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Sample records for ii bonded amalgam

  1. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  2. Fracture resistance of premolars with bonded class II amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Souza, Grace Mendonça; Pereira, Gisele Damiana Silveira; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD cavity preparation and simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test in the Universal Testing Machine (Instron). The statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed that the fracture resistance of group 2 (G2=105.720 kgF) was superior to those of groups 1 (G1=72.433 kgF) and 3 (G3=80.505 kgF) that did not differ between them.

  3. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  4. Characterization of dentin-bonding-amalgam interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S B; Mazor, Y; Klein, E; Judes, H

    2001-01-01

    Applying a bonding agent and a resinous adhesive layer before amalgam condensation has become a common clinical procedure. However, interactions between the different interfaces formed, and the extent of sealing obtained, have not been extensively studied. This study characterized the interfaces formed in the bonded amalgam restoration. Specifically, the individual contributions of the bonding agent (One-Step) and the adhesive resin (Resinomer) were examined, along with their mode of application on the prevention of microleakage and the formation of a tight, continuous adhesion to amalgam. To this end, a dye penetration assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used, including high resolution elemental analysis, for the characterization of the sealing properties and the interface structure obtained following various procedures of applying amalgam adhesives. Results indicated that placing bonding material under the amalgam restoration is essential to preventing microleakage. When condensed against uncured or cured adhesive material, the adhesive resinous glass layer creates a thick interface with protrusions and inclusions in the amalgam, though microleakage studies indicate that condensation over the uncured adhesive results in a better seal than that of the cured adhesive. SEM combined with elemental analysis indicates that the adhesion between amalgam and adhesive material is mainly of mechanical character and is formed by interdigitations of the adhesive material protruding into the amalgam. Gaps formed at the various interfaces in the different modalities could be localized. In addition, resinous glass composite alone, without bonding, was found to provide an unacceptable degree of sealing between the tooth and amalgam. The clinical significance of these findings is further discussed.

  5. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Vanishree

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Bonded amalgam appears to be comparable to amalgam when microleakage is considered and to composite resin when fracture resistance is considered; hence, bonded amalgam can also be an alternative material to amalgam in primary molars.

  6. Improving orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam.

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    Zachrisson, B U; Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, Y O

    1995-01-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 84) prepared from lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting or roughening with a diamond bur. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs using: Concise (Bis-GMA resin); one of three metal-bonding adhesives, viz., Superbond C&B (4-META resin), Panavia Ex (10-MDP Bis-GMA resin) or Geristore (composite base); and Concise after application of the intermediate resins All-Bond 2 Primers A+B, or the Scotch-Bond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) system. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before tensile bond strength testing. Alignment and uniform loading during testing were secured by engaging a hook in a circular ring soldered onto the bracket slot before bonding. Similar control brackets (n = 12) were bonded with Concise to extracted caries-free mandibular incisors. Bond failure sites were classified by a modified ARI system. Mean tensile bond strengths in the experimental group ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (13.2 MPa). Bond failure generally occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. Superbond C&B created the strongest bonds to amalgam; according to ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple-Range test, they were significantly stronger than the bonds with Panavia Ex and Concise, with Geristore in between. However, the bond strength of Concise to sandblasted amalgam was comparable to the Superbond C&B bonds when coupled with an intermediate application of All-Bond 2 Primers A+B. The SBMP, on the other hand, was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  8. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  9. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  10. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  11. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  12. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  13. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with the bonded amalgam technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Souza, G M; Pereira, G D; Dias, C T; Paulillo, L A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD Class II cavity preparations restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After the restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test. Statistical analysis of the data (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed no significant differences among the three groups that were studied.

  14. Evaluation of various concentrations of alkaline surface treatment on interfacial bond strengths of amalgam bonded to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Asaad Javaid; Ahmad, Asif; Mohammad, Taqi; Khan, Zahid Akhter

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to assess the influence of alkaline surface modification on interfacial bond strength of existing fractured (old) amalgam restoration bonded to fresh amalgam. Old and Fresh amalgam interfaced samples were prepared by applying a 4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride (4-META) containing adhesive. The adhesive used was Amalgabond (Parkell, Farmingdale, NY 11735, USA). Four concentrations of calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 solutions were used as a surface modifiers for old amalgam to increase the pH of the amalgam surfaces. The concentrations used were 2.5, 5, 10 and 15%. Direct measurement of the interfacial bond strength was carried out using an electromechanical universal tensile testing machine at crosshead speed of 10mm per minute. Results show that all the calcium hydroxide modified samples produced the increased tensile bond strength (TBS) as compared to their control group. The highest values of bond strength were achieved using 15% Ca(OH)2 solution as surface modifier. Pretreatment of fractured amalgam with calcium hydroxide improves the bond strength of 4-META adhesives. Its use in repair of amalgam may therefore be considered.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi S; Bahman S; Arghavan A; Fatemeh M

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior te...

  16. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumelin-Chemla, F; Degrange, M

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E = +300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 microA cm(-2)) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 microA cm(-2)). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10(6).

  17. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumelin-Chemla, Florence; Degrange, Michel [Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Paris V, Montrouge (France)

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E=+300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 deg. C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 {mu}A cm{sup -2}) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 {mu}A cm{sup -2}). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10{sup 6}. (author)

  18. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    OpenAIRE

    H S Vanishree; B M Shanthala; W Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Background : The intense development of adhesive restorative materials and parents′ preferences for esthetic restorations prompt clinicians to use alternative restorative materials for primary molars. Amalgam, however, is the choice of material when it comes to occlusal stress bearing areas, either in primary or permanent molars. To overcome the drawbacks of amalgam and restorative adhesive materials, the bonded amalgam technique is employed. Aims: To evaluate microleakage and fracture re...

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, S; Bahman, S; Arghavan, A B; Fatemeh, M

    2008-06-01

    Amalgam's non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05) Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  20. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations using different adhesive agents with dye under vacuum: An in vitro study

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    Abhishek Parolia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Significance: Bonded amalgam restorations prevent over-preparation and reduce the tooth flexure. GIC type I under amalgam provides chemical bonding in between amalgam and tooth structure and thus reduces the microleakage.

  1. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05 Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  2. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  3. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  4. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  5. Radial multipliers on amalgamated free products of II-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Let ℳi be a family of II1-factors, containing a common II1-subfactor 풩, such that [ℳi : 풩] ∈ ℕ0 for all i. Furthermore, let ϕ: ℕ0 → ℂ. We show that if a Hankel matrix related to ϕ is trace-class, then there exists a unique completely bounded map Mϕ on the amalgamated free product of the ℳi...... with amalgamation over 풩, which acts as a radial multiplier. Hereby, we extend a result of Haagerup and the author for radial multipliers on reduced free products of unital C*- and von Neumann algebras....

  6. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheela K; Sudeep P; Hegde V; Francis R; Bhat K

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer ...

  7. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime.

  8. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheela, K; Sudeep, P T; Hegde, V; Francis, R F; Bhat, K S; Sundeep, P T

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer of glass ionomer cement. The shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement mediated bond is significant and may be adequate for clinical application.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restoration associated with dentin adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA Fabiana Sodré de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restorations (Dispersalloy associated with copal varnish (Copalite and with two dentin bonding agents (Scotchbond Multi-uso Plus and Multi Bond Alpha was evaluated in vitro and compared by two methods: scores and linear measurements. Forty-five sound premolars were used, on which two separated class II cavities were prepared on the M and D surfaces. After the restoration, the specimens were thermocycled and stored in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin during 24 hours. The analysis allowed to conclude that none of the three restorative systems were able to eliminate the marginal microleakage. Nevertheless, the leakage was significantly smaller on the restorations associated with dentin bonding agents when compared to copal varnish. The linear measurement method was more sensitive than the score criteria.

  10. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  11. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  12. Resistance of composite and amalgam core foundations retained with and without pins and bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Swigert, Ryan; Richman, Brian; Sawicki, Vincent; Pace, Lauren; Moon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resistance of different amalgam and composite core foundations retained by pins, bonding agents, or both, 100 molars were mounted in acrylic resin and their occlusal surfaces were reduced to expose dentin. Pins were inserted at the four line angles of the teeth and matrices were placed. Bonding agents were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Amalgam was handcondensed and composite was incrementally added and photocured. Restorations were adjusted to produce specimens (n = 10) 5 mm in height with a 1 mm bevel at the axial-occlusal surface. After immersion in deionized water for 24 hours, specimens were loaded at a 45 degree angle on their beveled surfaces in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 in./minute. ANOVA and Tukey's tests indicated that FluoroCore 2 (with or without pins) was statistically stronger than all other combinations (p < 0.05).

  13. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage of class II bonded amalgam restorations using a dentin adhesive and a glass ionomer cement Avaliação in vitro da microinfiltração marginal em restaurações de amálgama tipo classe II usando adesivo dentinário e cimento de ionômero de vidro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmêr Silvestre PEREIRA JÚNIOR

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effectiveness of the dentin bonding system All Bond 2 associated with Resinomer (Bisco, and of Vitrebond (3M glass ionomer cement fresh-mixed, both used in the bonded amalgam technique, to prevent short-term microleakage in class II cavities restored with Dispersalloy (Dentsply, an admixed alloy. The control group utilized the Copalite (Cooley & Cooley varnish. Forty five sound human extracted premolars were used. Class II cavity preparations were made on the mesial and distal surfaces of non-carious teeth, with the gingival margins wall established 1mm under the cementum enamel junction. The specimens were divided randomly into three groups with thirty cavities in each group. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and were thermocyled through 500 cycles in distilled water between 5°C and 55°C with a dwell time of 15 seconds. The apices and roots of the teeth were sealed. They were placed in a 37°C bath of 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours. The teeth were washed in tap water for 24 hours and cut. The microleakage scores per restoration were averaged and three values of various test groups were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test at a significance level of p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar in vitro a efetividade na prevenção da microinfiltração do sistema adesivo All Bond 2 associado ao Resinomer (Bisco, e do cimento de ionômero de vidro Vitrebond (3M, sem polimerização, em amálgama adesivo classe II, restauradas com Dispersalloy (Dentsply. No grupo controle utilizou-se o verniz cavitário Copalite (Cooley & Cooley. Para tanto, 45 pré-molares humanos íntegros e extraídos, com finalidade ortodôntica, receberam cavidades classe II, sendo uma na face mesial e outra na face distal de cada dente, com a parede cervical localizada a 1mm além da junção cemento-esmalte, sendo 30 cavidades em cada grupo. Após as restaurações os dentes foram estocados

  14. Effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of composite resin to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Koolman, C; Aladag, A; Dündar, M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing amalgam restorations with composite resins using surface conditioning methods is a conservative treatment approach. This study investigated the effects of different conditioning methods that could be used for repair of amalgam fractures. Amalgam (N=96) was condensed into cavities within autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and the exposed surface of each specimen (diameter, 6 mm; thickness, 2 mm) was ground finished. The specimens were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n=12 per group), depending on the conditioning method used. The control group had natural central incisors with amalgam (n=12). The combination of the following conditioning methods was tested: silicacoating (Sc), sandblasting (Sb), metal primers, coupling agents, fiber (Fb) application, and opaquers (O). Five types of silanes, metal primers, or adhesives (Visiobond [V], Porcelain Photobond [PP], Alloy Primer [AP], Unibond sealer [Us], ESPE-Sil [ES]), and four opaquers, namely, Clearfil St Opaquer (CstO), Sinfony (S), Miris (M), and an experimental Opaquer (EO-Cavex), were used. The groups were as follows: group 1, Sc+ES+S+V; group 2, Sc+ES+CstO+V; group 3, Sc+ES+M+V; group 4, Sc+ES+EO+V; group 5, Sb+AP+S; group 6, Sb+AP+PP+CstO; group 7, Sc+ES+S+Fb+V+Fb; group 8-control, SC+ES+V; and group 9, Etch+Sc+ES+S+Us. One repair composite was used for all groups (Clearfil Photo Bond Posterior, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Shear bond strengths (SBSs) (MPa ± SD) were evaluated after 5 weeks of water storage (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Tukey honestly significant differences [HSD], α=0.05). Group 1 exhibited significantly higher values (35.5 ± 4.1) than were seen in group 4 (19.4 ± 8.9), group 6 (19.1 ± 7.8), and group 8 (20.1 ± 4.1) (pcomposite adhesion to amalgam. Experimental opaquer exhibited lower values. Leaving a small border of enamel around the restoration decreased the bond strength.

  15. Current Teaching of Proximal Retention Grooves for Class II Amalgam Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey gathered information on methods of class II amalgam preparation taught in 59 dental schools. Focus was on the teaching and testing of proximal retention groove use, stated rationale for placing retention grooves, and the relationship of the instruction to board criteria for cavity preparation. (MSE)

  16. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  17. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh Ghavamnasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times.

  18. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  19. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at Pamalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars.

  20. Bad metal behaviour in the new Hg-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} with polar metallic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambornino, Frank; Hoch, Constantin, E-mail: constantin.hoch@cup.uni-muenchen.de

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The novel Hg-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} was synthesised by electrocrystallisation. • The structure was investigated by single crystal and powder diffraction. • Thermal decomposition, electric resistance and magnetic susceptibiliy were examined. • Band structure, total and partial density of states and Bader charges were calculated. • Bad metal behaviour results from ionic, metallic and covalent bonding contributions. - Abstract: The new mercury-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} crystallises with the BaHg{sub 6} structure type (orthorhombic, space group Pnma (No. 62), a = 13.394(9) Å, b = 5.270(3) Å, c = 10.463 Å). It was prepared by electrolysis of a solution of KI in N,N′-Dimethylformamide at 343 K at a reactive Hg cathode. The structure of KHg{sub 6} shows motifs of ionic packing, covalent Hg cluster formation and metallic properties. KHg{sub 6} decomposes peritectically at 443 K. The combination of alkali metals with a noble metal with moderate electron affinity results in the formation of polar metal–metal bonding with considerable but incomplete electron transfer from the electropositive to the electronegative sublattice, resulting in typical “bad metal behaviour”, illustrated by resistance and susceptibility measurements and quantum theoretical calculations.

  1. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  2. Microleakage in primary teeth restored by conventional or bonded amalgam technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myaki, S I; Rodrigues, C R; Raggio, D P; Flores, T A; Matson, M R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate marginal leakage in class V restorations in primary teeth restored with amalgam, using three different techniques. Thirty maxillary anterior primary teeth, clinically sound and naturally exfoliated, were used. In group 1 (n = 10), two thin layers of a copal varnish (Cavitine) were applied. In group 2 (n = 10), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, a dual adhesive system, was used according to manufacturer instructions. In group 3 (n = 10), One-Step adhesive system in combination with a low-viscosity resin (Resinomer) were used according to manufacturer instructions. All samples were restored with a high-copper dental amalgam alloy (GS 80, SDI). After restoration, the samples were stored in normal saline at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The specimens were polished, thermocycled (500 cycles, 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, 30-s dwell time) and impermeabilized with fingernail polish to within 1.0 mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were then placed in 0.5% methylene blue for 4 h. Finally, the samples were sectioned and evaluated for marginal leakage. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the filled adhesive resin (group 3) had the least microleakage. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2.

  3. Management of Class I and Class II Amalgam Restorations with Localized Defects: Five-Year Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of dental restorations has been the traditional treatment for defective restorations. This five-year prospective clinical trial evaluated amalgam restorations with localized defects that were treated by means of repair or refurbishing. Fifty-two patients (50% female and 50% male, mean age 28.3±18.1 years, range 18–80 with 160 class I and class II defective restorations were included. The study focused on the application of two minimally invasive treatments for localized restoration defects and compared these with no treatment and total replacement as negative and positive controls, respectively. Restorations were assessed by two calibrated examiners according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria, including marginal adaptation, anatomic form, secondary caries, and roughness. At five years, recall was examined in 45 patients with 108 restorations (67.5%. The results suggest that repair treatment is as effective as total replacement of restorations with localized defects, reducing biological costs to the patient and providing new tools to the clinician. Refinishing restoration is a useful treatment for localized anatomic form defects.

  4. An In Vitro Evaluation of the Use of Resin Liners to Reduce Microleakage and Improve Bond Strength of Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    of amalgam, gutta percha, and zinc oxide- eugenol , found that the dyes possessed many of the advantages noted by other researchers. The ability of...Clin North Am 1985;29:341-58. 4. Glassman MD, Miller IJ. Antibacterial properties of one conventional and three high-copper dental amalgams. J Prosthet

  5. Fracture Resistance of Pulpotomized Primary Molar Restored with Extensive Class II Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mazhari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate fracture resistance of pulpoto-mized primary molar teeth restored with extensive multisurface amalgam restorations.Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted carious human primary molar teeth were se-lected forpresent study. Teeth were divided in to eight groups of ten. Mesio- or disto-occlusal and Mesio-occluso-distal cavities with different cavity wall thickness (1.5 or 2.5mm were prepared in both first and second primary molar teeth. After restoring teeth with amalgam, all specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Then samples were thermocycled for 1000 cycles from 5°C to 55°C. The specimens then were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min-1. ANOVA and t-test were used for statistical analysis.Results: Mean fracture resistance of first and second molar teeth were 975.5 N (SD=368.8 and 1049.2 N (SD=540.1 respectively. In the first molar group, fracture resis-tance of two-surface cavities was significantly more than three-surface cavities (P<0.001, however this difference was not statistically significant in the second molar group. In both first and second molar group, fracture resistance incavities with 2.5 mm wall thickness, was significantly more than the group with 1.5 mm wall thickness.Conclusion: The mean fracture resistance in pulpotomized primary molar restored with amalgam restorations was higher than reported maximum bite force in primary teeth even in extensive multi-surface restorations. Therefore, the teeth with large proximal carious lesions in schoolchildren could be restored with amalgam.

  6. Amalgam tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hien T; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Soldano, Anthony C

    2008-05-15

    A 53-year-old woman with a history of melanoma status-post excision two years prior presented with a 4-month history of 4, dark-brown macules on the inferior surface of her tongue. A biopsy specimen showed a squamous mucosa with chronic submucosal inflammation and brown pigment. The clinical and histopathologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of amalgam tattoo. Amalgam tattoos are common, oral pigmented lesions that clinically present as isolated, blue, grey, or black macules on the gingivae, the buccal and alveolar mucosae, the palate, and/or the tongue. They are due to deposition of a mixture of silver, tin, mercury, copper, and zinc, which are components of an amalgam filling, into the oral soft tissues. Amalgam tattoos can either be treated surgically or with a Q-switched ruby laser. In the case of our patient with the history of melanoma, her oral lesions proved not to be the more dire diagnosis of malignant melanoma.

  7. Comprehension of amalgamation for future digital society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Uk

    2010-08-15

    This book deals with understanding of amalgamation for future digital society, which describes outline of amalgamation, ubiquitous environment, cognitive science I such as psychology and neurology, cognitive science II like philosophy, linguistics and anthropology, an automatic machine, evolution theory and amalgamation, brain science and consciousness, mind and software and creativity and art. Each chapter has introduction, composition, related science, function and models.

  8. Comparison of microleakage in high copper spherical amalgam restorations using three different dentin bondin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Amalgam is one of the mostly used restorative materials, but has some disadvantages. Microleakage is one of the short comings of amalgam which may lead to sensitivity and recurrent caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three dentin bonding systems on reduction of microleakage in amalgam restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: Class II amalgam restorations were made in 40 noncarious molar and premolar teeth. Then the specimens were divided into four equal groups. Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Single bond, "niBond, were used as liner in groups one to three respectively and in group four no liner was used. The teeth were restored with high copper spherical amalgam. After thermocycling for 500 cycles at 50C and 550C, the specimens were immersed in basic fuchsin for 24 hours, bisectioned mesiodistally and evaluated under stereomicroscope at X25 for dye penetration. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-wallis and Scheffe. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: The groups showed significant difference (p=0.003. The group four had significantly less microleakage than the first and second groups (p<0.05. The second and third groups showed significantly different microleakage (p=0.038. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this investigation applying dentin bonding agents has no effect on reducing microleakage in amalgam restorations, however more studies are recommended.

  9. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  10. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  11. Dentalni amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Galić, Nada; Šutalo, Jozo; Prpić-Mehičić, Goranka; Anić, Ivica

    1994-01-01

    Dentalni amalgam je bio materijal izbora za ispune na stražnjim zubima tijekom proteklih 150 godina. U radu je prikazan p o vijesni razvoj amalgama, njegov obvezni sastav, te podjela dentalnih amalgama prema količinskom udjelu bakra i prema obliku čestica. Navedena su svojstva amalgama s posebnim osvrtom na njegovu toksičnost. Poznato je da se posljednjih godina pojačao napad na amalgam i u znanstvenoj i u popularnoj literaturi, a u svezi s njegovim navodnim patološkim djelovanjem ...

  12. Phase down of amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Rabab’ah, Mohammad A.; Bustani, Mohammad A.; Khraisat, Ameen S.; Sawair, Faleh A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the knowledge of Jordanian dentists toward phase down of dental amalgam as recommended by the Minamata Convention, and their training and competency in placing posterior composites. Methods This study was conducted through structured questionnaire interviews with randomly selected cohort of dentists in Jordan between March 2015 and June 2015. Out of 230 dentists who were invited, 196 (85.2%) agreed to participate. Dentists were asked if they know about the Minamata Convention. They were also asked about their training in placement of posterior composite. Results Out of the 196 interviewed, only 13.8% know about Minamata Convention and 17% had an undergraduate training in favor of placing composites in posterior teeth. Approximately 50% of those dentists were not trained in using rubber dam when placing posterior composites, while only 38.3% had training in sectional matrix placement. Undergraduate training did not influence (p=0.00) the dentists’ decision to remove old amalgam based on patient’s demands. Only 28.1% were of the opinion of discontinuing the use of amalgam due to its alleged health and environmental hazards. There was no general agreement on the type of composite, liner, and bonding strategy when placing posterior composites. Conclusion Dentists are not well informed on the Minamata Convention and the phase down of amalgam. Training in posterior composite placement should be given more room in undergraduate curriculum and continuous dental education. PMID:27874155

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Silver-amalgam Alloy Post-core Technique for Restoration Residual Molar Crown%黏结银汞桩核磨牙残冠修复临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察和评价黏结银汞桩核修复磨牙残冠的临床效果.方法:对50例磨牙残冠进行黏结银汞桩核修复,观察疗效,随访时间12个月.结果:随访检查束发现修复体松动、折裂、脱落,X线牙片显示银汞桩与根管壁之间结合紧密.结论:黏结银汞桩核用于磨牙残冠修复具有明显技术优势,临床应用效果良好.%Objective:To evaluate the clinical effect of bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique in restoration of molar crown.Methods: 50 teeth in 50 cases, apply with bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique.The patients were followed up for 12 months.Results: The effect of bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique for restoration residual molar crown was satisfied Conclusion:Bonding silver-amalgam alloy post-core technique could effectively in restoration residual molar crown.

  14. The Microfloral Analysis of Secondary Caries Biofilm around Class I and Class II Composite and Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Si-su

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. The diversity of the bacterial sources and the different types of filling materials could play a role in secondary caries. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the microbial spectrum of secondary caries biofilms around amalgam and composite resin restorations. Methods Clinical samples were collected from freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with clinical secondary caries. Samples were categorized into four groups according to the types of restoration materials and the classification of the cavity. Biofilms were harvested from the tooth-restoration interface using a dental explorer and after dilution were incubated on special agars. The bacteria were identified using the biochemical appraisal system. Statistical calculations were carried out using SPSS11.5 software to analyze the prevalence of the bacteria involved in secondary caries. Results Samples from a total of four groups were collected: two groups were collected from amalgam restorations, each had 21 samples from both Class I and Class II caries; and the other two groups were from composite resin restorations, each had 13 samples from both class I and class II caries. Our results showed: (1 Anaerobic species were dominant in both restoration materials. (2 In terms of the types of individual bacteria, no significant differences were found among the four groups according to the geometric mean of the detected bacteria (P > 0.05. However, there were significant differences among the detected bacteria within each group (P 0.05, but showed significant differences among the detected bacteria in each group (P 0.05, however, the detection rate of each bacterium within each group was statistically different among the detected bacteria (P Conclusions The proportion of obligatory anaerobic species was much greater than the facultative anaerobic species in the

  15. Irregular amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Stewart

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The amalgam of Lp and ℓq consists of those functions for which the sequence of Lp-norms over the intervals [n,n+1 is in ℓq. These spaces (Lp,ℓq have been studied in several recent papers. Here we replace the intervals [n,n+1 by a cover α={In;n∈Z} of the real line consisting of disjoint half-open intervals In each of the form [a,b, and investigate which properties of (Lp,ℓq carry over to these irregular amalgams (Lp,ℓqα. In particular, we study how (Lp,ℓqα varies as p, q, and α vary and determine conditions under which translation is continuous.

  16. Kondensasi Pada Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Batubara, Runi Syahriani

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam merupakan campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalah merkuri. Kata amalgam juga didefenisikan untuk menggambarkan kombinasi atau campuran dari beberapa bahan seperti merkuri, perak, timah, tembaga, dan lainnya. Dental amalgam sendiri adalah kombinasi alloy dengan merkuri melalui suatu proses yang disebut amalgamasi. Pemanipulasian amalgam meliputi triturasi, kondensasi, carving, dan polishing. Kondensasi merupakan penekanan amalgam setelah triturasi p...

  17. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Parts Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Calvin; VanHoose, James R.; Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Sound amalgams can be fabricated by substituting Ga-In liquid for mercury; Cu-coated steel fibers bond well with the amalgam components. Inclusion of steel fibers significantly improved mechanical properties. An application scenario utilizing amalgams for in-space parts fabrication and repair was suggested. Procedure and materials need to be optimized

  18. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  19. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  20. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  1. Effect of surface roughness on amalgam repair using adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Marcelo; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments and two adhesive systems on the shear bond strength of old and freshly placed amalgam. The results suggested that the intact amalgam showed a significantly higher strength than repaired groups and the strongest repaired specimens were made when the amalgam surfaces were roughened with a diamond bur or microetcher. The adhesive systems showed no significant differences on bond strength with the same superficial texture.

  2. Indicators of the risk mechanics for Class-I and Class-II amalgam and composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Eduardo; Arroyo, Erik Dreyer; Pardo, Claudia Letelier; OLIVEIRA JUNIOR,Osmir Batista de; Cortés, Gustavo Moncada [UNESP; Casielles,Javier Martín

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine indicators of prognosis for mechanical risks of amalgam and composite resin restorations in permanent teeth. METHODS: Thirty-nine adult patients with direct clinical, photographic, radiographic and model examinations. A total of 256 restorations were classified as "not satisfactory," with Bravo or Charlie values according to the modified Ryge /USPHS criteria. The total "n" was divided into Bravo and Charlie groups according to the value obtained in the "marginal adaptation" ...

  3. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  4. Silver nanoparticles deposited on amine-functionalized silica spheres and their amalgamation-based spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rameshkumar, Perumal; Manivannan, Shanmugam; Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com [Madurai Kamaraj University, Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry (India)

    2013-05-15

    A facile synthetic method to decorate amine-functionalized silica spheres (SiO{sub 2}) by silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is reported. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images showed that spherical Ag NPs with an average particle size of 14 nm were deposited on 250 nm-sized SiO{sub 2} spheres (SiO{sub 2}/Ag NPs). The spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions were carried out using the synthesized SiO{sub 2}/Ag NPs with an experimental detection limit of 5 {mu}M. It was found that the addition of Hg(II) ions (150 {mu}M) into the solution of SiO{sub 2}/Ag NPs completely quenched the SPR band of the Ag NPs due to the formation of anisotropic Ag amalgam crystals (AgHg). The selective detection of Hg(II) ions by SiO{sub 2}/Ag NPs in the presence of other environmentally relevant metal ions was also demonstrated using spectral and colorimetric methods.Graphical abstractAmine-functionalized silica spheres are decorated by in situ formation of silver nanoparticles and their spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions is reported.

  5. Strength Pada Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Handayani

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam didefinisikan sebagai campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalali merkuri. Dental amalgam sendiri merupakan campuran dari merkuri (Hg), perak (Ag), timah (Sn), tembaga (Cu) dan bahan-bahan lain yang memiliki fungsinya masing-masing, dimana sebagian diantaranya akan saling mengatasi kekurangan yang ditimbulkan logam lain, jika logam tersebut dikombinasikan dengan perbandingan yang tepat. Amalgam mempunyai strength (kekuatan) yang cukup besar sehingga dap...

  6. Silver nanoparticles deposited on amine-functionalized silica spheres and their amalgamation-based spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshkumar, Perumal; Manivannan, Shanmugam; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2013-05-01

    A facile synthetic method to decorate amine-functionalized silica spheres (SiO2) by silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is reported. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images showed that spherical Ag NPs with an average particle size of 14 nm were deposited on 250 nm-sized SiO2 spheres (SiO2/Ag NPs). The spectral and colorimetric detection of Hg(II) ions were carried out using the synthesized SiO2/Ag NPs with an experimental detection limit of 5 μM. It was found that the addition of Hg(II) ions (150 μM) into the solution of SiO2/Ag NPs completely quenched the SPR band of the Ag NPs due to the formation of anisotropic Ag amalgam crystals (AgHg). The selective detection of Hg(II) ions by SiO2/Ag NPs in the presence of other environmentally relevant metal ions was also demonstrated using spectral and colorimetric methods.

  7. A technical report on repair of amalgam-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Salihoğlu-Yener, E

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes a repair protocol for cusp fracture of a failed amalgam-dentin complex. A maxillary right first premolar with an amalgam restoration presented a buccal cusp fracture. Chairside repair has been undertaken by conditioning the existing amalgam restoration with silica coating (30 μm CoJet®-Sand), phosphoric acid etching the beveled enamel surface, priming dentin, and application of a bonding agent on both enamel and dentin. Thereafter, the amalgam was silanized (ESPE®-Sil), and opaque resin was applied and polymerized to mask the amalgam. The fractured buccal cusp was modeled using resin composite (Clearfil Photo Posterior) and photo-polymerized. Finally, the amalgam was refinished and refurbished and the composite was finished and polished.

  8. Comparison of the composition of Cinalux amalgam with ADA standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi Nasab M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam is one of the oldest restorative materials, used in dentistry, which has undergone a lot of quality changes since its advent. Copper is one of the major elements in dental amalgam. Dental amalgam is classified as low and high cooper group based on the percentage of this element. Cinaluy is an Iranian product, a product of Shahid Faghihi's factory and its particles are spherical with high copper and it does not contain any zinc and gama II phase. The goal of this study was to identify the type and percentage of its ingredients and to analyze this dental amalgam by muclear reactor. The products of the factory, at two different times, were compared with each other and also with the percentages presented by the factory, regarding their ingredients. They were also compared with two standardized amalgams called: Sybralloy and Tytin. Three typical Cinalux amalgam capsules, produced on different dates, were selected. The contents of capsules were enveloped in plastic bags and then sealed and placed in a miniature reactor to undergo nuclear radiation for 10 days. After this period, the elements in amalgam became activated and converted into radioisotopes of the same elements, and began to radiate. Then gama spectrometer system accumulated these radiations and transferred them to Span software. This software, aided by reference standards, shows the intensity and the wave length of the received radiation, and consequently identifies the type and percentage of the elements in amalgam. The results demonstrated that the Cinalux amalgam samples, regarding the type and percentage of their elements, were identical and also met the factory standards. The differences were not significant. There was also no significant difference between Cinalux amalgam and the standardized amalgam Sybralloy, regarding the percentage of their elements, but comparing this amalgam with the standardized amalgam Tytin, a significant difference was not observed.

  9. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  10. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  11. [Microleakage of four different amalgam binding systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, T G; Grobler, S R; Rossouw, R J; van Wyk Kotze, T J; Grobler-Rabie, A

    2001-02-01

    This-study was undertaken to evaluate and compare microleakage in class V cavities in human teeth which were lined with Amalgambond Plus with HPA (Parkell, USA), Optibond Solo (Kerr, U.S.A.), Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, Japan) and Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply, Switzerland), and then restored with Logic amalgam (SDI Australia). The restored teeth were thermocycled in basic fuchsin dye, sectioned, and evaluated for dye penetration. The interdiffusion zones were viewed in a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results showed that no bonding system could totally eliminate microleakage. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between Amalgambond Plus with HPA and Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus as well as Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. No significant differences were found between Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus and Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. Amalgambond Plus showed significantly more leakage at dentine sides while Prime & Bond 2.1 showed significantly more leakage at enamel sides. The CLSM revealed hybrid layers of different thicknesses, resin penetration into tubules, as well as resin incorporation within the spherical particles of the amalgam. Optibond Solo, Fuji Plus and Prime & Bond 2.1 can serve to improve the marginal seal of amalgam restorations.

  12. Dental amalgam: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  13. Repair of amalgam restorations with conventional and bonded amalgam: an in vitro study = Reparo de restaurações de amálgama com amálgama adesivo e convencional: estudo in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar a microinfiltração em restaurações de amálgama com reparo em amálgama ou amálgama adesivo. Métodos: Trinta pré-molares humanos extraídos foram restaurados com amálgama. Simu- lou-se um defeito nas restaurações reparado com: G1 - amálgama (n=15) (Permite C-SDI); G2 - amálgama adesivo (n=15) (Caulk 34% Condicionador dentário Gel Dentsply + Prime & Bond 2. 1 Dentsply + Permite C-SDI). Os dentes foram imersos em solução de nitrato de prata a 50%, termociclados e então, seciona...

  14. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  15. 2种粘接剂应用于银汞合金粘接修复的临床应用评价%Clinical Evaluation of Bonded Amalgam Restorations Using Two Adhesive Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 王文梅; 江卫民

    2013-01-01

    目的:比较2种粘接剂粘接银汞合金修复的粘接效果.方法:选择80颗有后牙龋坏者,其近中及远中均有邻牙存在,充填物在1年内有脱落史者,随机分为A、B组(A组:树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀组;B组:树脂型银汞粘接剂组)进行充填,随访1年,观察其临床效果.结果:卡方检验2组疗效无显著差异.结论:用2种粘接剂粘接银汞合金修复在1年内达到了同样的效果,而树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀组较树脂粘接剂组操作简单,为临床治疗提供了新的思路.%Objective: To compare the clinical efficacy of two adhesive materials used for bonding amalgam restorations.Methods: 80 molars with caries that had been treated but the filling sheded off in one year were selected.Then the control and experiment groups were both randomly divided into A, B groups.Glass - ionomer cement bonding and composite resin bonding were used respectively.Clinical efficacy were compared after one year.Results: The clinical efficacy in two groups showed no significantly different.Conclusion: The manipulation and placement of glass-ionomer cement were easy and it was benefit for clinical application.

  16. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p amalgam restorations.

  17. Estudo comparativo da resistência à fratura de pré-molares superiores íntegros e restaurados com amálgama aderido Comparative study of the fracture resistance of sound upper premolars and upper premolars restored with bonded amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Marcelo Peruchi Minto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo avaliou-se, in vitro, a resistência à fratura de pré-molares superiores preparados com cavidades de classe II compostas (conservadoras e extensas restauradas com amálgama aderido a dois tipos diferentes de sistemas adesivos. Setenta dentes foram divididos em 4 grupos: grupo 1 ou controle com 10 dentes íntegros; grupo 2 com 20 dentes, sendo 10 cavidades conservadoras e 10 extensas restauradas com amálgama sem qualquer tipo de forramento. O grupo 3 e o grupo 4 foram compostos da mesma forma que o grupo 2, sendo que o primeiro recebeu cimento de ionômero de vidro (Vitrebond - 3M e o segundo, adesivo dental (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M, antes de serem restaurados. Os dentes haviam sido incluídos anteriormente em cilindros de PVC e fixados com resina acrílica. Após serem restaurados e termociclados, foram submetidos à fratura por força de compressão em uma máquina universal de testes EMIC-MEM 2000. Após análise de variância e aplicação do teste complementar de Tukey, concluiu-se que os sistemas adesivos utilizados condicionaram o aumento da resistência à fratura da estrutura dental nas cavidades convencionais, sendo os dentes com cavidades conservadoras mais resistentes em qualquer condição experimental.The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the fracture resistance of upper premolars which had received class II preparations (conservative and extensive and were restored with bonded amalgam, with two different adhesive systems. Seventy teeth were divided in four groups: group 1 (control, with ten sound teeth; group 2, with twenty prepared teeth (10 teeth received conservative cavities and 10, extensive cavities restored with amalgam without any kind of liner; groups 3 and 4, similar to group 2, though with linings of glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond - 3M (group 3 and dental adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M (group 4. The teeth were previously fixed in PVC cylinders with acrylic

  18. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Swati A; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M; Nivedita, C K V S

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing.

  19. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Swati A.; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M.; Nivedita, C.K.V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing. PMID:27217645

  20. Pengaruh Penambahan Paladium Terhadap Perilaku Thermal Amalgam Tembaga Tinggi Tipe Lathe Cut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellyza Herda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of additing 1 percent (w/o palladium (Pd on the thermal behavior of a lathe cut type high copper amalgam (13 w/o copper were studied. The identical alloys, with and without 1% Pd were fabricated. X-ray diffraction studies of the amalgams revealed the elimination of the γ2-phase by Pd addition DSC thermogram of non-Pd containing amalgam indicated the existence of two γ1-phaseone with the transition temperature (endothermic peak at 88◦C and the other at 109◦C. The thermogram data of the Pd containing amalgam showed an endothermic peak at 110.7◦C. The transition temperature of the n phase of the palladium containing amalgam is 4.9◦C lower than the transition temperature of the n phase of the non Pd containing amalgam. This result indicates that the n phase of the Pd containing amalgam includes more of Tin (Sn than the non-Pd containing amalgam. The thermogravimetri diagram showed that the phase decomposition occurred at about 390◦C for the non-Pd containing amalgam and at about 410◦C for the Pd containing amalgam. It is concluded that the addition of 1% Pd into a lathe cut type of high copper amalgam (13% could eliminate the formation of γ2 phase as well as an unstable γ1 phase, promoting strong mercury bonding to Silver.

  1. Dentin Pre-Treatment to Suppress Microleakage of Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosi Kusuma Eriwati Arianto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diminished microleakage of amalgam-to-dentin preparations would benefit large populations in public health facilities. Prior studies demonstrated less microleakage for bonded amalgams than similarly bonded advanced composites among 30 different composite/bonding agent/storage conditions, Haller et al. showed that a combination of formaldehyde pre-treatment and glutaraldehyde-containing Syntac adhesive minimized microleakage. In the current study, CLass V restorations (groups of 10 formaldehyde-treated non carious human molars were filled with Valiant (Ivoclar NA amalgam after application of one of three liners: Copalite varnish; Amalagambond Plus with microfiber; and Syntac/Variolink. The control group used no liner material. After 24 hours at 37°C/100% RH, samples were thermocycled (1000 eyeles in water at 5°C and 60°C (15 second dwell time in each. Samples were immersed in 5% methylene blue solution (4 hrs and observed under a stereomicroscope; interfaces also were examined by SEM. Krsukal Wallis ANOVA by ranks (P<0.01 and Mann Whitney U Tests (P<0.05 of the data indicate improvements (equivalent among the 3 different liners tested here over unlined amalgam preparations. Liner/aldehyde-crosslinked dentin interphases, without technique-sensitive composites, may minimize microleakage by improving amalgam contact (physical bonding.

  2. Reactivity of mononuclear alkylperoxo copper(II) complex. O-O bond cleavage and C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishita, Atsushi; Ishimaru, Hirohito; Nakashima, Satoru; Ogura, Takashi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2008-04-02

    A detailed reactivity study has been carried out for the first time on a new mononuclear alkylperoxo copper(II) complex, which is generated by the reaction of copper(II) complex supported by the bis(pyridylmethyl)amine tridentate ligand containing a phenyl group at the 6-position of the pyridine donor groups and cumene hydroperoxide (CmOOH) in CH3CN. The cumylperoxo copper(II) complex thus obtained has been found to undergo homolytic cleavage of the O-O bond and induce C-H bond activation of exogenous substrates, providing important insights into the catalytic mechanism of copper monooxygenases.

  3. Investigations of the Nature of Zn(II) -Si(II) Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Köppe, Ralf; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-05-17

    A series of zinc(II) silylenes was prepared by using the silylene {PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )Si. Whereas reaction of the silylene with ZnX2 (X=Cl, I) gave the halide-bridged dimers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnX(μ-X)]2 , with ZnR2 (R=Ph, Et, C6 F5 ) as reagent the monomers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnR2 ] were obtained. The stability of the complexes and the Zn-Si bond lengths clearly depend on the substitution pattern of the zinc atom. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize these adducts, whereas electron-donating groups destabilize them. This could be rationalized by quantum chemical calculations. Two different bonding modes in these molecules were identified, which are responsible for the differences in reactivity: 1) strong polar Zn-Si single bonds with short Zn-Si distances, Zn-Si force constants close to that of a classical single bond, and strong binding energy (ca. 2.39 Å, 1.33 mdyn Å(-1) , and 200 kJ mol(-1) ), which suggest an ion pair consisting of a silyl cation with a Zn-Si single bond; 2) relatively weak donor-acceptor Zn-Si bonds with long Zn-Si distances, low Zn-Si force constants, and weak binding energy (ca. 2.49 Å, 0.89 mdyn Å(-1) , and 115 kJ mol(-1) ), which can be interpreted as a silylene-zinc adduct.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amalgamator is a device, usually AC-powered, intended to mix, by shaking, amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  5. In vitro shear bond strength of the Amalgambond Plus system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Dearlove, W R

    1995-06-01

    The bonding of composite resins to dentine by means of dentine bonding agents is common practice. Although amalgam has been used for many years, no attempt had been made to bond it chemically to tooth structure. Amalgambond Plus (ABP) was developed to bond amalgam (as well as composite) to various substrates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ABP system for its ability to bond amalgam, as well as composite, to dentine, and also to assess the strength of the product when bonding composite to set amalgam. The following values (MPa) were obtained for the different ABP variations: Amalgam to Dentine (with HPA): 5.20; Amalgam to Dentine (without HPA): 3.26; Composite to Dentine (without HPA): 17.57; Composite to Amalgam (without HPA): 12.00. It can be concluded that Amalgambond Plus gives varying bond strengths to different substrates, with the highest value obtained when used to bond Composite to Dentine.

  6. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  7. Amalgams and χ-Boundedness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penev, Irena

    2017-01-01

    , clique-cutsets, and amalgams together preserve χ-boundedness. More precisely, we show that if G and G∗ are hereditary classes of graphs such that G is χ-bounded, and such that every graph in G∗ either belongs to G or admits a proper homogeneous set, a clique-cutset, or an amalgam, then the class G∗ is χ...

  8. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  9. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination...

  10. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication of Replacement Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Calvin T.; Van Hoose, James R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Being able to fabricate replacement parts during extended space flight missions precludes the weight, storage volume, and speculation necessary to accommodate spares. Amalgams, widely used in dentistry, are potential candidates for fabricating parts in microgravity environments as they are moldable, do not require energy for melting, and do not pose fluid handling problems. Unfortunately, amalgams have poor tensile strength and the room temperature liquid component is mercury. To possibly resolve these issues a gallium-indium alloy was substituted for mercury and small steel fibers were mixed in with the commercial alloy powder. Subsequent microscopic examination of the novel amalgam revealed complete bonding of the components, and mechanical testing of comparable samples showed those containing steel fibers to have a significant improvement in strength. Experimental procedures, microstructures, and test results are presented and discussed in view of further improving properties.

  11. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Longitudinal Modulus of Cu3Sn Phase of Ag-Sn-Cu Amalgam Alloy (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Rusli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of cooling rate (at the time of solidification on the elastic constants of Cu3Sn phase of Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalgam alloy were studied. In this study, three types of alloys were made, with the composition Cu-38-37 wt% Sn by means of casting, where each alloy was subjected to different cooling rate, such as cooling on the air (AC, air blown (AB, and quenched in the water (WQ. X-ray diffraction, metallography, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy studies of three alloys indicated the existence of Cu3Sn phase. Determination of the modulus of elasticity of Cu3Sn (ε phase was carried out by the measurement of longitudinal and transversal waves velocity using ultrasonic technique. The result shows that Cu3Sn (ε phase on AC gives higher modulus of elasticity values than those of Cu3Sn (ε on AB and WQ. The high modulus of elasticity value will produce a strong Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalagam alloy.

  12. Selective loss of cysteine residues and disulphide bonds in a potato proteinase inhibitor II family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Qing Li

    Full Text Available Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C, and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution.

  13. Mode initialization when simulating switched bond graphs, version II

    OpenAIRE

    Edström, Krister

    1998-01-01

    When simulating hybrid systems using switched bond graphs, the initialization of new modes is made by using a generalization of the principle of momentum conservation. Here it is shown how to use causality propagation to get an efficient initialization algorithm. By looking at causal paths, set of variables that have to be initialized simultaneously are found. Furthermore, it is shown how impulses due to structural changes in the system can be found with a correct initialization and with a co...

  14. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  15. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  16. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen E. Kopperud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%, followed by restoration fractures (25.1%. Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01, employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS (p < 0.01 and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03. There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01. Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  17. Trace Operators on Wiener Amalgam Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jayson Cunanan; Yohei Tsutsui

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with trace operators of Wiener amalgam spaces using frequency-uniform decomposition operators and maximal inequalities, obtaining sharp results. Additionally, we provide the embeddings between standard and anisotropic Wiener amalgam spaces.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF MERCURY RELEASE FROM DENTAL AMALGAM: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Aditya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mercury from dental amalgam restoration, with possible negative health effects, has generally been considered to occur via either erosion or evaporation directly from the surface of fillings, followed by ingestion. This study aims to assess the mercury release from dental amalgam and provide a basis for comparison between mercury release in oral cavities with single and multiple amalgam restorations at different time intervals. This study was conducted in A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, and included three groups I , II and III containing one, four and eight teeth respectively. The level of mercury vapors released from dental amalgam restorations was calculated from artificial saliva and measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The obtained results concluded that the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations decreases as the restoration ages, after 30 days there was no significant difference between the amount of mercury released from multiple and single tooth restorations.

  19. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. it is questioned whet

  20. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Ozcan, M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. It is questioned whet

  1. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Caries is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. For (direct restaurations of carious lesions, tooth-coloured composite materials are increasingly used. The compulsory health insurance pays for composite fillings in front teeth; in posterior teeth, patients have to bear the extra cost. Scientific background: Amalgam is an alloy of mercury and other metals and has been used in dentistry for more than one hundred and fifty years. Composites consist of a resin matrix and chemically bonded fillers. They have been used for about fifty years in front teeth. Amalgam has a long longevity; the further development of composites has also shown improvements regarding their longevity. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the longevity (failure rate, median survival time (MST, median age of direct amalgam fillings in comparison to direct composite fillings in permanent teeth from a medical and economical perspective and discusses the ethical, legal and social aspects of using these filling materials. Methods: The systematic literature search yielded a total of 1,149 abstracts. After a two-step selection process based on defined criteria 25 publications remained to be assessed. Results: The medical studies report a longer longevity for amalgam fillings than for composite fillings. However, the results of these studies show a large heterogeneity. No publication on the costs or the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings exists for Germany. The economic analyses (NL, SWE, GB report higher costs for composite fillings when longevity is assumed equal (for an observation period of five years or longer for amalgam compared to composite fillings. These higher costs are due to the higher complexity of placing composite fillings. Discussion: Due to different study designs and insufficient documentation of study details, a comparison of different studies on longevity of direct amalgam and composite

  2. Effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of class II restorations with different composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Silva, Flávia; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of Class II restorations using different composite materials. Class II preparations with gingival margins located in dentin were performed on the mesial surface of 80 bovine incisors. The teeth were randomly allocated to eight groups (n=10) according to resin composite (Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, Tetric Ceram HB and Esthet-X) and use of cyclic loading. The restorations were bonded with the Single Bond adhesive system. Simulated aging groups were cyclic loaded for 200,000 cycles with 80N load (2Hz). The specimens were vertically sectioned (two slabs per restoration) and further trimmed into an hour-glass shape at the adhesive interface to obtain a final bonded area 1 mm2. Samples were placed in an apparatus and tested under tension using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test with a 95% confidence level. Aged groups presented significantly lower means when compared to the groups that were not aged (p=0.03). However, significant differences among composite materials were not observed (p=0.17). Regardless of the restorative composite material used, it could be concluded that the bond strength of Class II restorations at the gingival wall was affected by simulated cyclic loading.

  3. The use of amalgam in pediatric dentistry: new insights and reappraising the tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Anna B

    2015-01-01

    The debate on amalgam led to its being phased out in some countries. Results of clinical trials report failure rates of amalgams ranging from 12 percent to over 70 percent. Treatment of caries should meet the needs of each particular patient, based on his/her caries risk. In general, for small occlusal lesions, a conservative preventive resin restoration would be more appropriate than the classic Class I amalgam preparation. For proximal lesions, amalgam would be indicated for two-surface Class II preparations that do not extend beyond the line angles of primary teeth. This recommendation might not be appropriate for high-risk patients or restoring primary first molars in children four years old and younger where stainless steel crowns have demonstrated better longevity. Currently, amalgam demonstrates the best clinical success for Class II restorations that extend beyond the proximal line angles of permanent molars. The need to reduce the use of amalgam as a mercury-containing material is inevitable when aiming to reduce environmental contamination. It is important always to praise prevention and constantly search for biologically safe materials regarding health, clinical work, and environment. The purpose of this report was to summarize several factors that affect the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of using dental amalgam in primary teeth.

  4. Influence of cavity depth on marginal degradation of amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, A

    1991-04-01

    In a 5-year clinical trial it was observed that the marginal degradation of class-II amalgam restorations could be related to the bulk of the restoration. The association between the occlusal cavity depth and the marginal degradation was observed after 6 months and varied for the different types of alloy. Ridit scores of the marginal degradation were correlated to various indices of the cavity sizes, to assess the possible reason for this association. The possibilities of the relationship being an indirect effect caused by longer condensation times or by poorer condensation due to the use of larger condenser sizes were rejected. Furthermore, the possibility that the association was the result of potential buildup of stresses on the restoration margins caused by flexible cusps and axial walls was not apparent. A possible mechanism may be that marginal degradation is the result of short-term or long-term expansion, or even extrusion of amalgam. Expansion may theoretically be caused over short periods by temperature changes or over long periods by corrosion or phase shifts in the amalgam. The theory does not exclude the role of creep or corrosion and may furthermore explain the lack of correlation between in-vitro tests and in-vivo performance of amalgam restorations.

  5. Resistência à tração entre amálgama e resina composta em diferentes condições de oxidação - estudo in vitro In vitro tensile bond strength between composite resin and amalgam - effects of oxidation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Nicolau YOUSSEF

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho estuda in vitro a resistência à tração de corpos-de-prova de amálgama-resina composta unidos pelo adesivo dental Scotchbond Multi-Uso Plus. Os corpos-de-prova foram divididos em três grupos de dez, sendo que cada corpo era o resultado da união de dois discos, um de amálgama e outro de resina composta. Esses discos foram obtidos dentro de cilindros de baquelite e sofreram acabamento superficial com lixa de grana 600. Pretendeu-se simular a técnica do amalcomp e verificar a resistência à tração entre o amálgama e a resina composta em diferentes condições de oxidação do amálgama. Dos resultados obtidos e mediante análise de variância e teste de Tukey a 5%, pôde-se concluir que: o Grupo 3, que ficou na saliva artificial por trinta dias e portanto sofreu maior oxidação, apresenta resistência à tração superior e estatisticamente significante em relação aos grupos 1 e 2; o Grupo 2, que ficou na saliva por sete dias e sofreu menor oxidação, não apresenta resistência à tração estatisticamente superior ao Grupo 1 de amálgama recém-condensado.Our in vitro research investigated the effects of three different corrosion periods on the tensile bond strength between amalgam and composite resin discs bonded with Scotchbond Multi Purpose adhesive. The discs were fabricated using a baquelite cilinder matrix. The exposed surface was treated with a 600 grit jig paper. The amalgam discs were bonded to composite resin discs at three different periods of storage: Group 1, immediately after condensation; Group 2, after one week of storage in artificial saliva; Group 3, after one month of storage in artificial saliva. The results were examined by ANOVA and Tukey test in 5%. There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2. Group 3 showed statistically significant greater bond strength than the other groups.

  6. Determination of light elements in amalgam restorations. [Dental amalgam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Osborne, J.W.; Nelson, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering has been used to measure the major elemental compositions in the near-surface regions of freshly prepared and used samples of dental amalgam. A depletion from bulk stoichiometry of the major elements, which indicates an accumulation of lighter elements on the surface of the materials, has been observed. Increases in the F, Na, Cl, P, O, C, and N concentrations between freshly prepared samples and used samples were measured by observation of gamma rays produced by proton and deuteron induced reactions.

  7. Study of gluing and wire bonding for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.H. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hara, K. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa no ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa city, Chiba 277 8583 (Japan); Hyun, H.J.; Jeon, H.B. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, C.W. [Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kah, D.H. [CBRN Directorate, Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mibe, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Park, H., E-mail: sunshine@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, K.K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Experimental High Energy Physics Group, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400-005 (India); Sato, N. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, N. [Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanida, K. [Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Tsuboyama, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Uozumi, S. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes an investigation into gluing and wire bonding for assembling the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) for the Belle II experiment at KEK in Japan. Optimizing the gluing of the silicon microstrip sensors, the support frame, and the readout flex cables is important for achieving the required mechanical precision. The wire bonding between the sensors and the readout electronic chips also needs special care to maximize the physics capability of the SVD. The silicon sensors and signal fan out flex circuits (pitch adapters) are glued and connected using wire bonding. We determine that gluing quality is important for achieving good bonding efficiency. The standard deviation in the glue thickness for the best result is measured to be 3.11 μm. Optimal machine parameters for wire bonding are determined to be 70 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the pitch adapter and 60 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the silicon strip sensors; these parameters provide a pull force of (10.92±0.72) gf. With these settings, 75% of the pitch adapters and 25% of the strip sensors experience the neck-broken type of break.

  8. Extraction and PerconcentrationLead (II Using Octadecyl Bonded Silica Cartridge and Determination by FAAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghimi A. Shaabanzadeh M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been developed for the preconcentration of Lead (II based on the adsorption of its 1-(2-Pyridyl Azo2-Naphtol (PAN complex on aOctadecyl bonded silica cartridges. The influence of acidity, eluting agents, stability of the column, sample volume and interfering ions has been investigated in detail. The adsorbed complex could be eluted using environmentally benign HNO34M and the concentration of Lead (II was determined flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A detection limit of 50 µgL−1 could be achieved and the developed procedure was successfully applied for the determination of Lead (II in tap water and waste water samples. 

  9. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of iron(II), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) ortho-dihalophenolate complexes: insights into metal-halogen secondary bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Boshart, Monica D; Schofield, Jeremy A; Rodriguez, Meghan M; Grubel, Katarzyna; Rokhsana, Dalia; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-09-15

    Metal complexes incorporating the tris(3,5-diphenylpyrazolyl)borate ligand (Tp(Ph2)) and ortho-dihalophenolates were synthesized and characterized in order to explore metal-halogen secondary bonding in biorelevant model complexes. The complexes Tp(Ph2)ML were synthesized and structurally characterized, where M was Fe(II), Co(II), or Ni(II) and L was either 2,6-dichloro- or 2,6-dibromophenolate. All six complexes exhibited metal-halogen secondary bonds in the solid state, with distances ranging from 2.56 Å for the Tp(Ph2)Ni(2,6-dichlorophenolate) complex to 2.88 Å for the Tp(Ph2)Fe(2,6-dibromophenolate) complex. Variable temperature NMR spectra of the Tp(Ph2)Co(2,6-dichlorophenolate) and Tp(Ph2)Ni(2,6-dichlorophenolate) complexes showed that rotation of the phenolate, which requires loss of the secondary bond, has an activation barrier of ~30 and ~37 kJ/mol, respectively. Density functional theory calculations support the presence of a barrier for disruption of the metal-halogen interaction during rotation of the phenolate. On the other hand, calculations using the spectroscopically calibrated angular overlap method suggest essentially no contribution of the halogen to the ligand-field splitting. Overall, these results provide the first quantitative measure of the strength of a metal-halogen secondary bond and demonstrate that it is a weak noncovalent interaction comparable in strength to a hydrogen bond. These results provide insight into the origin of the specificity of the enzyme 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase (PcpA), which is specific for ortho-dihalohydroquinone substrates and phenol inhibitors.

  10. C [bond] H activation by cationic platinum(II) complexes: ligand electronic and steric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H Annita; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2002-02-20

    A series of bis(aryl)diimine-ligated methyl complexes of Pt(II) with various substituted aryl groups has been prepared. The cationic complexes [(ArN=CR [bond] CR=NAr)PtMe(L)](+)[BF(4)](-) (Ar = aryl; R = H, CH(3); L = water, trifluoroethanol) react smoothly with benzene at approximately room temperature in trifluoroethanol solvent to yield methane and the corresponding phenyl Pt(II) cations, via Pt(IV)-methyl-phenyl-hydrido intermediates. The reaction products of methyl-substituted benzenes suggest an inherent reactivity preference for aromatic over benzylic C [bond] H activation, which can however be overridden by steric effects. For the reaction of benzene with cationic Pt(II) complexes bearing 3,5-disubstituted aryl diimine ligands, the rate-determining step is C [bond] H activation, whereas for the more sterically crowded analogues with 2,6-dimethyl-substituted aryl groups, benzene coordination becomes rate-determining. This switch is manifested in distinctly different isotope scrambling and kinetic deuterium isotope effect patterns. The more electron-rich the ligand is, as assayed by the CO stretching frequency of the corresponding carbonyl cationic complex, the faster the rate of C [bond] H activation. Although at first sight this trend appears to be at odds with the common description of this class of reaction as electrophilic, the fact that the same trend is observed for the two different series of complexes, which have different rate-determining steps, suggests that this finding does not reflect the actual C [bond] H activation process, but rather reflects only the relative ease of benzene displacing a ligand to initiate the reaction; that is, the change in rates is mostly due to a ground-state effect. The stability of the aquo complex ground state in equilibrium with the solvento complex increases as the diimine ligand is made more electron-withdrawing. Several lines of evidence, including the mechanism of degenerate acetonitrile exchange for the methyl

  11. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H., E-mail: sunshine@knu.ac.kr [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uozumi, S. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); and others

    2016-09-21

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  12. High Copper Amalgam Alloys in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam Restoration is an example of the material giving its name to the process. Amalgam fillings are made up of mercury, powdered silver and tin. They are mixed and packed into cavities in teeth where it hardens slowly and replaces the missing tooth substance. The high copper have become material of choice as compared to low copper alloys nowadays because of their improved mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, better marginal integrity and improved performance in clinical trial. The high copper amalgam was used as a restorative material. The application of high copper amalgam was found to be much more useful than low copper amalgam. High copper had much more strength, corrosion resistance, durability and resistance to tarnish as compared to low copper amalgams. No marked expansion or condensation was noted in the amalgam restoration after its setting after 24 hrs. By using the high copper alloy, the chances of creep were also minimized in the restored tooth. No discomfort or any kind of odd sensation in the tooth was noted after few days of amalgam restoration in the tooth.

  13. Fourier transforms on an amalgam type space

    CERN Document Server

    Liflyand, E

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an amalgam type space, a subspace of $L^1(\\mathbb R_+).$ Integrability results for the Fourier transform of a function with the derivative from such an amalgam space are proved. As an application we obtain estimates for the integrability of trigonometric series.

  14. Elimination of mercury from amalgam in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, N. [Dept. of Dental Pathology, School of Dentistry, Zagreb (Croatia); Prpic-Mehicic, G.; Prester, Lj.; Blanusa, M. [Inst. for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia); Krnic, Z.; Erceg, D. [Pliva Pharmaceutical Co., Biomedicine Research Inst. ' ' Pliva' ' , Zagreb (Croatia)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the urinary mercury excretion in rats exposed to amalgam over a two months period. Animals were either exposed to mercury from 4 dental amalgams or fed the diet containing powdered amalgams. The results showed significantly higher mercury amount in urine of both exposed groups than in control. Even two months after the amalgam had been placed in rats teeth, the amount of mercury in the urine remained 4-5 times higher than in control, and 4 times higher than in rats exposed to diet containing powdered amalgam. The elevated urinary Hg amount was accompanied by an increased level of total protein in urine. In the same exposure period the excretion of total protein in urine of rats with amalgam fillings was 2 times higher than in control and 1.5 times higher than in rats exposed to amalgam through diet. Concentrations of mercury in the sera of all groups were below the detection limit of the method. The results show that amount of mercury and protein in the urine of rats were related to the mercury release from dental amalgam. (orig.)

  15. Dental Amalgam Exposure and Urinary Mercury Levels in Children: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Assmann, Susan F.; Barregard, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary mercury (U-Hg) excretion is a commonly used biomarker for mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Objectives Our goal was to determine the most efficient measure of dental amalgam exposure for use in analyses concerning U-Hg in children. Methods We analyzed time-sensitive longitudinal amalgam exposure data in children randomized to amalgam restorations (n = 267) during the 5-year New England Children’s Amalgam Trial. We calculated 8 measures of amalgam, evaluatin...

  16. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  17. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K. H.; Jeon, H. B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaia, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor "Origami" method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force.

  18. Metallothionein in human gingival amalgam tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, J C; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Wysocki, G P; Cherian, M G

    2001-11-01

    Amalgam tattoos occur when small particles of dental amalgam, composed largely of silver (Ag) and mercury (Hg), are inadvertently implanted into oral soft tissues during dental procedures. Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous, low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that are inducible by many agents including metals and may be involved in the detoxification of toxic metals such as Hg. In this study, the correlation between MT expression and amalgam tattoos in human gingiva was investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and immunohistochemical techniques. Light microscopically, amalgam tattoos presented as either fine granular particles or larger discrete opaque globular particles in connective tissues. EDX revealed the smaller particles to be silver sulphide (Ag(2)S), while the larger particles exhibited a shell of Ag(2)S that contained irregularly distributed masses of Ag and Hg. Particles of tin (Sn) were also found. No MT staining was observed in collagen, fibroblasts or blood vessels in areas exhibiting abundant amounts of embedded fine granular Ag(2)S particles. Blood vessels exhibiting relatively few amalgam particles stained positively for MT. Cells with the morphological features of histiocytes located directly adjacent to larger pieces of amalgam showed intense MT staining. These results indicate that amalgam tattoos contain no Hg or free Ag except in large globular pieces of amalgam, which still contain Hg and which induce MT expression in adjacent histiocytes. This suggests that Hg leaching from impacted dental amalgam particles induces MT, while residual Ag(2)S and Sn particles do not. MT may therefore act to reduce Hg exposure in patients with amalgam tattoos.

  19. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  20. [Dental amalgams and mercury polemic in Abidjan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoaka-Boni, M-C; Adou-Assoumou, N M; Sinan, A A; Abouattier-Mansilla, E C

    2007-12-01

    Dental amalgam is metallic biomaterials which has raised a number of controversies in the past few years, because of mercury potential toxicity. Considering the significance of theses controversies, this study was carried out with a view to evaluating the behaviour of Abidjan-based practitioners with respect to dental amalgam. The contemplated objective is to determine the frequency in the use of dental amalgam, to identify the problems encountered using dental amalgam and to propose solutions for fighting mercury contamination. The results show that dental amalgam is used in 81.8% for posterior teeth restoration. The side effects mentioned are metallic taste, gingival tattoo, galvanic corrosion and tooth pain. This is why 21.8 % of practitioners believe that the controversy over dental amalgam has merits while 45.5% hold the contrary opinion because of lack of scientific arguments. However, considering the absence of means to treat amalgam waste, dentist practitioners and authorities have to get involved to fight against mercury contamination.

  1. Mercury release during autoclave sterilization of amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsell, D E; Karns, L; Buchanan, W T; Johnson, R B

    1996-05-01

    Natural teeth are an invaluable teaching tool for preclinical instruction in operative dentistry and endodontic techniques. Cavity preparation in teeth containing amalgam restorations is a realistic simulation of an often experienced clinical situation. As various pathogens are contained in saliva, teeth must be disinfected before use by students. The purpose of this study is to indirectly evaluate whether mercury vapor is released from amalgam restorations in such teeth during steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor detection, sample mass changes and x-ray fluorescence data were collected from experimental steam autoclave sterilization of amalgam samples sealed in autoclave bags. All of the data showed evidence of mercury vapor generation coincident to steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor levels within the room where amalgam was exposed to steam autoclave sterilization reached levels that constitute an unnecessary health risk to dental personnel. The volume of amalgam tested simulated that contained in 175 amalgam restored teeth. Initial venting of the autoclave chamber produced mercury vapor concentrations significantly in excess of OSHA vapor concentration ceiling levels. Thus, the use of a steam autoclave for sterilization of amalgam containing teeth for use in preclinical laboratory exercises may be harmful to personnel involved.

  2. Madumycin II inhibits peptide bond formation by forcing the peptidyl transferase center into an inactive state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Kasatsky, Pavel; Kartsev, Victor G.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Polikanov, Yury S. (InterBioScreen); (UIC); (MSU-Russia); (Kurchatov)

    2017-05-13

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, which spurs a renewed interest in revisiting older and poorly studied drugs. Streptogramins A is a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that target the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the large subunit of the ribosome. In this work, we have revealed the mode of action of the PTC inhibitor madumycin II, an alanine-containing streptogramin A antibiotic, in the context of a functional 70S ribosome containing tRNA substrates. Madumycin II inhibits the ribosome prior to the first cycle of peptide bond formation. It allows binding of the tRNAs to the ribosomal A and P sites, but prevents correct positioning of their CCA-ends into the PTC thus making peptide bond formation impossible. We also revealed a previously unseen drug-induced rearrangement of nucleotides U2506 and U2585 of the 23S rRNA resulting in the formation of the U2506•G2583 wobble pair that was attributed to a catalytically inactive state of the PTC. The structural and biochemical data reported here expand our knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms by which peptidyl transferase inhibitors modulate the catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  3. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis.

  4. Amalgam Contact Hypersensitivity Lesion: An Unusual Presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contact allergic reactions due to hypersensitivity to dental materials in professionals and .... it, incisional biopsy was done under local anesthesia and the specimen was sent ... minimal technique sensitivity, amalgam for long has been used for ...

  5. The thickness of amalgamations of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The thickness $\\theta(G)$ of a graph $G$ is the minimum number of planar spanning subgraphs into which the graph $G$ can be decomposed. As a topological invariant of a graph, it is a measurement of the closeness to planarity of a graph, and it also has important applications to VLSI design. In this paper, the thickness of graphs that are obtained by vertex-amalgamation and bar-amalgamation of any two graphs whose thicknesses are known are obtained, respectively. And the lower and upper bounds for the thickness of graphs that are obtained by edge-amalgamation and 2-vertex-amalgamation of any two graphs whose thicknesses are known are also derived, respectively.

  6. Marginal microfiltration in amalgam restorations. Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoud Salem, Víctor; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima. Perú.

    2014-01-01

    The present articule is review references from phenomenon of microfiltration in restorations with amalgam and yours consecuents in changes of color in the interface tooth-restorations, margin deterioted , sensitivity dentinarea postoperate, caries secondary and pulp inflamation. Besides naming the mechanicals for to reduce microfiltration, and yours effects for use of sealers dentinaries representation for the varnish cavitys and adhesive systens Conclusive indicate wath the amalgam is the ma...

  7. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  8. The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

    2002-01-01

    Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (presin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam.

  9. Cross-coupling of C(sp)-H Bonds with Organometallic Reagents via Pd(II)/Pd(0) Catalysis**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasa, Masayuki; Engle, Keary M; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2010-12-01

    Palladium-catalyzed C-H activation/C-C bond-forming reactions have emerged as a promising class of synthetic tools in organic chemistry. Among the many different means of forging C-C bonds using Pd-mediated C-H activation, a new horizon in this field is Pd(II)-catalyzed cross-coupling of C-H bonds with organometallic reagents via a Pd(II)/Pd(0) catalytic cycle. While this type of reaction has proven to be effective for the selective functionalization of aryl C(sp(2))-H bonds, the focus of this review is on Pd(II)-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H activation/C-C cross-coupling, a topic of particular importance because reactions of this type enable fundamentally new methods for bond construction. Since our laboratory's initial report on cross-coupling of C-H bonds in 2006, this area has expanded rapidly, and the unique ability of Pd(II) catalysts to cleave and functionalize alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds has been exploited to develop protocols for forming an array of C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) and C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) bonds. Furthermore, enantioselective C(sp(3))-H activation/C-C cross-coupling has been achieved through the use of chiral amino acid-derived ligands, offering a novel technique for producing enantioenriched molecules. Although this nascent field remains at an early stage of development, further investigations hold the potential to revolutionalize the way in which chiral molecules are synthesized in industrial and academic laboratories.

  10. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Moosavi, Horieh; Moddaber, Maryam; Parvizi, Reza; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima; Meharry, Michael; B Kazemi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs). Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR)/ liner/ None (No), on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No). In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB), Clearfil S3 (S3), Single Bond (SB) and Varnish (V). Each main group (n=6) was divided into two subgroups (n=3) according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA) or spherical Tytin (Tyt). The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP), and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate) and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates). Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. PMID:27942548

  11. Hybridization vs. Bond Stretching Isomerism in Ru(II Cyclometalated Complexes of 2-Phenylpyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Salcedo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of formation of two isomers, yellow and orange, of the cyclometalated Ru(II complex, [Ru(o-C6H4-py(MeCN4]+, was investigated by EELS spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Both forms show very similar structures and spectroscopic properties, but slight differences in X-ray data and absorption between them were noted. No double minimum on the potential energy surface was found and thus these two forms cannot be considered as bond stretching isomers. However, the DFT study revealed the change in the hybridization of the carbon in trans-position of one of acetonitrile ligands. This effect can be responsible for the difference in colour. The results of the theoretical modelling coincide well with the experimental EELS data.

  12. The effect of surface treatment and position of the dental restoration on amalgam corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, V. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Materials Engineering Dept., Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment, clinical operations and the condition and position of the dental restoration on amalgam corrosion behavior. Commercial amalgam alloy namely Oralloy was selected. Twenty-one amalgam samples were prepared. After triturating and condensation, the samples were divided into three groups and each group was finished by using one of three surface clinical procedures; carving, carving-burnishing, carving-burnishing-polishing. A special cylindrical mold was used in order to simulation of the interproximal areas and proximal surfaces of the dental restorations. Stainless steel matrix band was laid on the internal mold surfaces and amalgam paste was compacted in the mold. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed at a temperature of 37{+-}1 {sup o}C in physiological solution in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of dental amalgam samples, as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed statistically significant differences between the mean corrosion current density values of three different groups of dental amalgam (P<0.05). The polished group possesses the lowest and the carved group shows the highest corrosion current density. The carved group shows more corrosion resistance in compare with the sample near the matrix band as an index of the proximal surfaces of restorations. It was concluded that even a simple clinical operation could effect on dental amalgam corrosion resistance. The proximal surfaces of the class II restorations are not only susceptible to concentration cell corrosion but also possess less corrosion resistance because dentist could perform no clinical surface treatment. (author)

  13. Low-distortion, high-strength bonding of thermoplastic microfluidic devices employing case-II diffusion-mediated permeant activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallow, Thomas I; Morales, Alfredo M; Simmons, Blake A; Hunter, Marion C; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Domeier, Linda A; Sickafoose, Shane M; Patel, Kamlesh D; Gardea, Andy

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate a new method for joining thermoplastic surfaces to produce microfluidic devices. The method takes advantage of the sharply defined permeation boundary of case-II diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. The technique is capable of producing bonds that exhibit cohesive failure, while preserving the fidelity of fine features in the bonding interface. This approach is uniquely suited to production of layered microfluidic structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometre length scales. Distortions in microfluidic device channels are limited to the size scale of the permeant-swollen layer; 6 microm deep channels are routinely produced with no detectable cross-sectional distortions. Conventional thermal diffusion bonding of identical parts yields less strongly bonded microfluidic structures with increasingly severe dimensional compressions as bonding temperatures approach the thermoplastic glass-transition temperature: a preliminary rheological analysis is consistent with the observed compressions. The bond-enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows, uses inexpensive reagents, and requires no specialized equipment.

  14. A retrospective clinical study on longevity of posterior composite and amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the longevity of class I and II amalgam and composite resin restorations placed in a general practice. METHODS: Patient records of a general practice were used for collecting the data for this study. From the files longevity and r

  15. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek;

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  16. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  17. Proximal Contact Repair of Complex Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zguri, M N; Casey, J A; Jessup, J P; Vandewalle, K S

    2017-01-12

    The carving of a complex amalgam restoration may occasionally result in light proximal contact with the adjacent tooth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of complex amalgam restorations repaired with a proximal slot amalgam preparation. Extracted human third molars of similar coronal size were sectioned 1 mm apical to the height of the contour using a saw and were randomly distributed into 9 groups of 10 teeth each. One pin was placed at each line angle of the flattened dentinal tooth surface. A metal matrix band was placed and an admixed alloy was condensed and carved to create a full crown contour but with a flat occlusal surface. A proximal slot was prepared with or without a retention groove and repaired using a single-composition spherical amalgam 15 minutes, 24 hours, one week, or six months after the initial crown condensation. The specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C water before fracture at the marginal ridge using a round-ended blade in a universal testing machine. The control group was not repaired. The mean maximum force in newtons and standard deviation were determined per group. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance as well as Tukey and Dunnett tests (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between groups based on type of slot preparation (p=0.017) but not on time (p=0.327), with no significant interaction (p=0.152). No significant difference in the strength of the marginal ridge was found between any repair group and the unrepaired control group (p>0.076). The proximal repair strength of a complex amalgam restoration was not significantly different from an unrepaired amalgam crown. Placing a retention groove in the proximal slot preparation resulted in significantly greater fracture strength than a slot with no retention grooves. Time of repair had no significant effect on the strength of the repair.

  18. FREE FISHER INFORMATION AND AMALGAMATED FREENESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟彬; 郭懋正; 曹小红

    2004-01-01

    The notion of operator-valued free Fisher information was introduced.It is a generalization of free Fisher information which was defined by D.Voiculescu on tracial von Neumann algebras.It is proved that the operator-valued free Fisher information is closely related to amalgamated freeness,i.e.,the operator-valued free Fisher information of some random variables is additive if and only if these random variables are a free family with amalgamation over a subalgebra.Cramer-Rao inequality in operator-valued settings is also obtained.

  19. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen bonding between water and platinum(II): an atom in molecule (AIM) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Guiqiu; Chen, Dezhan

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] [1] reported a hydrogen-bonding-like interaction between a water molecule and a d8 metal ion (PtII) based on neutron diffraction, and provided the first crystallographic evidence for this interaction. We studied the hydrogen bonding of the O-H ... Pt interaction theoretically using atoms in molecule (AIM) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) in the crystallographic geometries. The method used density functional theory (DFT) with the hybrid B3LYP function. For platinum atoms, we used the Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-Double-Zeta (LANL2DZ) basis set, and for the other atoms we used 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of interactions in the complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: Why can a filled d orbital of square-planar d8 metal ions such as platinum(II) also act as hydrogen-bond acceptors? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. The interaction is mainly closed-shell and there is some charge transfer in this system.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  1. Evidence summary: which dental liners under amalgam restorations are more effective in reducing postoperative sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mona

    2011-06-10

    Since August 2009, members of the Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (www.dentistryresearch.org) have taken part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question that receives the most votes each month forms the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting takes place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website. The paper below details a summary of the findings of the ninth critical appraisal. In order to address the question raised by dentistry research forum, first a search was conducted for systematic reviews on the topic. There was one systematic review retrieved comparing bonded amalgam restorations versus non-bonded amalgam restorations. However, there was no other systematic review identified assessing the effectiveness of dental liners under amalgam restorations in general. Therefore, a search was conducted for any randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of a lining under amalgam restorations versus no lining or RCTs comparing differing lining materials under amalgam against each other. There were eight relevant RCTs identified. Due to the low quality, small sample sizes or lack of adequate reporting of the outcome data, the evidence is inadequate to claim or refute a difference in postoperative sensitivity between different dental liners. Further well-conducted RCTs are needed to answer this question. These RCTs would be preferably included and synthesised in a systematic review.

  2. Direct functionalization of M-C (M = Pt(II), Pd(II)) bonds using environmentally benign oxidants, O2 and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedernikov, Andrei N

    2012-06-19

    Atom economy and the use of "green" reagents in organic oxidation, including oxidation of hydrocarbons, remain challenges for organic synthesis. Solutions to this problem would lead to a more sustainable economy because of improved access to energy resources such as natural gas. Although natural gas is still abundant, about a third of methane extracted in distant oil fields currently cannot be used as a chemical feedstock because of a dearth of economically and ecologically viable methodologies for partial methane oxidation. Two readily available "atom-economical" "green" oxidants are dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide, but few methodologies have utilized these oxidants effectively in selective organic transformations. Hydrocarbon oxidation and C-H functionalization reactions rely on Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes. These reagents have practical advantages because they can tolerate moisture and atmospheric oxygen. But this tolerance for atmospheric oxygen also makes it challenging to develop novel organometallic palladium and platinum-catalyzed C-H oxidation reactions utilizing O(2) or H(2)O(2). This Account focuses on these challenges: the development of M-C bond (M = Pt(II), Pd(II)) functionalization and related selective hydrocarbon C-H oxidations with O(2) or H(2)O(2). Reactions discussed in this Account do not involve mediators, since the latter can impart low reaction selectivity and catalyst instability. As an efficient solution to the problem of direct M-C oxidation and functionalization with O(2) and H(2)O(2), this Account introduces the use of facially chelating semilabile ligands such as di(2-pyridyl)methanesulfonate and the hydrated form of di(2-pyridyl)ketone that enable selective and facile M(II)-C(sp(n)) bond functionalization with O(2) (M = Pt, n = 3; M = Pd, n = 3 (benzylic)) or H(2)O(2) (M = Pd, n = 2). The reactions proceed efficiently in protic solvents such as water, methanol, or acetic acid. With the exception of benzylic Pd(II) complexes, the

  3. Evaluation of the Role of Water in the H2 Bond Formation by Ni(II)-Based Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R Morris

    2013-08-13

    We investigate the role of water in the H-H bond formation by a family of nickel molecular catalysts that exhibit high rates for H2 production in acetonitrile solvent. A key feature leading to the high reactivity is the Lewis acidity of the Ni(II) center and pendant amines in the diphosphine ligand that function as Lewis bases, facilitating H-H bond formation or cleavage. Significant increases in the rate of H2 production have been reported in the presence of added water. Our calculations show that molecular water can displace an acetonitrile solvent molecule in the first solvation shell of the metal. One or two water molecules can also participate in shuttling a proton that can combine with a metal hydride to form the H-H bond. However the participation of the water molecules does not lower the barrier to H-H bond formation. Thus these calculations suggest that the rate increase due to water in these electrocatalysts is not associated with the elementary step of H-H bond formation or cleavage but rather with the proton delivery steps. We attribute the higher barrier in the H-H bond formation in the presence of water to a decrease in direct interaction between the protic and hydridic hydrogen atoms forced by the water molecules.

  4. Amalgam tattoo (amalgam pigmentation) of the oral mucosa: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, A

    2004-07-01

    Amalgam tattoo is an iatrogenic lesion caused by traumatic implantation of dental amalgam into soft tissue. Amalgam tattoo is the most common localized pigmented lesion in the mouth. In a study of a mass screening oral examination in the United States, it was found in about 0.4-0.9% of the adult population and in Sweden in about 8%. Clinically, amalgam tattoo presents as a dark gray or blue, flat macule located adjacent to a restored tooth. Most are located on the gingiva and alveolar mucosa followed by the buccal mucosa and the floor of the mouth. Microscopic examination reveals that amalgam is present in the tissues in two forms: as irregular dark, solid fragments of metal or as numerous, discrete fine, brown or black granules dispersed along collagen bundles and around small blood vessels and nerves. In most lesions, it is presented in both forms. The biologic response to the amalgam is related to particle size, quantity and elemental composition of the amalgam. Large fragments often become surrounded by dense fibrous connective tissue. Smaller particles are associated with mild to moderate chronic inflammatory response with individual macrophages engulfing small amalgam particles. Occasionally, the reaction takes the form of foreign body granuloma in which macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are present. Some of the multinucleated giant cells also contain amalgam particles. Diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is usually obvious from the location and clinical appearance. A radiograph is recommended to confirm the presence of metallic particles, but absence of radiographic evidence does not rule out the possibility, since particles are often too fine or widely dispersed to be visible on radiographs. When there is no radiographic evidence or an adjacent restored tooth, biopsy is recommended to rule out an early melanoma. Once the diagnosis of amalgam tattoo has been established, no additional treatment is necessary except for cosmetic reasons. If the pigmentation

  5. Evaluating the Reasons of Amalgam Restoration Replacement in Esthetic and Restorative Department of Babol Dental School in 2013-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Abolghasemzade

    2015-08-01

    Results: Within 263 patients, there were 81(30.8% men and 182(69.2% women. Most patients aged 30-40(42.2%, and were reported to suffer from class Ι dental occlusion(92.4%.The mean DMF was 9.7±2.4 . Lower molars were demonstrated as the most frequent teeth group for replacing amalgam restorations as well as causing secondary caries. Furthermore, secondary caries involved the major causes of amalgam restoration replacement. The most prevalent class for amalgam restoration replacement was class II restorations. It should be noted that secondary caries were most prevalent within class II MO / DO(25 cases(44.6%. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that the most common cause of the restoration replacement involved the secondary caries which was most observed in the Class II restorations.

  6. Boundedness of positive operators on weighted amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar Cañestro María Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we characterize the pairs (u, v of positive measurable functions such that T maps the weighted amalgam in (Lp (u, ℓ q for all , where T belongs to a class of positive operators which includes Hardy operators, maximal operators, and fractional integrals. 2000 Mathematics Subject Classification 26D10, 26D15 (42B35

  7. Dental amalgam: is this the end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Cristina

    Dental amalgam is a reliable and effective restorative material with a well-established role in modern dentistry. Throughout the years its mercury content and the risks posed to human health were main topics of interest for many scientists. This paper offers a review of the scientific literature on the health and environmental impact of mercury in dentistry published over the last decade. A variety of peer-reviewed, epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies on dental amalgam, as well as published reports of professional and governmental bodies, were organised thematically and analysed. The most relevant findings of the aforementioned literature are reported. No reliance has been placed on unpublished work or publicly available opinions that are not scientifically based. In order to offer an appropriate view on the topic the toxicology, health impacts and possible environmental threats are briefly presented in relation to the relevant literature published in the last ten years. It is almost unanimously accepted that dental amalgam is a safe material, with little or insignificant adverse effect on general health. However, current and mostly unfounded environmental concerns may result in the implementation of new across the board legislation that could lead to a global dental amalgam "phase out".

  8. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizi, José Luiz Santos; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression.

  9. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Santos Parizi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR tissue expression.

  10. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pamalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Key words:Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration. PMID:27398176

  11. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Mostafa Moazzami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs. Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR/ liner/ None (No, on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No. In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB, Clearfil S3 (S3, Single Bond (SB and Varnish (V. Each main group (n=6 was divided into two subgroups (n=3 according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA or spherical Tytin (Tyt. The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP, and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates. Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. Keywords ● Electrochemical Test ● Dental Amalgam ● Corrosion ● Self-etch adhesive;

  12. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  13. A RhIII-N-heterocyclic carbene complex from metal-metal singly bonded [RhII−RhII] precursor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Sinha; Abir Sarbajna; Shrabani dinda; Jitendra K Bera

    2011-11-01

    Metal-metal singly bonded [Rh2(CO)4(acac)2][OTf]2 (1) has been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. A density functional theory (DFT) optimized structure has been computed for the unbridged centro-symmetric structure. Reaction of 1 with PIN.HBr results in the [Rh(PIN)2(H2O)Br][OTf]2 (2) in high yield. The reaction involves metal-oxidation from RhII to RhIII accompanied by the metal-metal bond cleavage. The X-ray structure of 2 has been determined which reveals the incorporation of two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands to each rhodium. This work demonstrates the general utility of the metal-metal bonded compounds for the easy synthesis of metal-NHC compounds.

  14. A Review on Dental Amalgam Corrosion and Its Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fathi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam is still the most useful restorative material for posterior teeth and has been successfully used for over a century. Dental amalgam has been widely used as a direct filling material due to its favorable mechanical properties as well as low cost and easy placement. However, the mercury it contains raises concerns about its biological toxicity and environmental hazard. Although in use for more than 150 years, dental amalgam has always been suspected more or less vigorously due to its alleged health hazard. Amalgam restorations often tarnish and corrode in oral environment. Corrosion of dental amalgam can cause galvanic action. Ion release as a result of corrosion is most important. Humans are exposed to mercury and other main dental metals via vapor or corrosion products in swallowed saliva and also direct absorption into blood from oral mucosa. During recent decades the use of dental amalgam has been discussed with respect to potential toxic effects of mercury components. In this article, the mechanisms of dental amalgam corrosion are described and results of researches are reviewed. It finally covers the corrosion of amalgams since this is the means by which metals, including mercury, can be released within oral cavity. Keywords: Dental amalgam, Amalgam corrosion, Biocompatibility, Mercury release, Amalgam restoration

  15. The effects of filling techniques and a low-viscosity composite liner on bond strength to class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo Reis, André; Giannini, Marcelo; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Chan, Daniel C N

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the effects of filling technique, cavity configuration and use of a low-viscosity composite liner influence resin bond strength to the dentin of class II cavities gingival floor; and analyze the failure modes of fractured specimens. Standardized class II cavities were prepared in the proximal surfaces of freshly extracted third molars, which were randomly assigned to 10 experimental groups. All prepared surfaces were acid-etched, bonded with Single Bond adhesive system and restored with TPH composite, according to each technique: G1 and G2-horizontal layering, G3 and G4-faciolingual layering, G5 and G6-oblique layering, G7 and G8-bulk filling, G9 and G10-control (flat dentin surfaces). Groups were tested, with or without a low-viscosity composite liner (Tetric Flow Chroma). After storage in water for 24h, teeth were vertically serially sectioned to yield a series of 0.8mm thick slabs. Each slab was trimmed into an hourglass shape of approximately 0.8mm(2) area at the gingival resin-dentin interface. Specimens were tested in tension at 0.5mm/min until failure. Fractured specimens were analyzed in an SEM to determine the failure modes. No significant difference was found between groups restored with and without a low-viscosity composite liner (p>0.05). Among filling techniques, the bulk filling groups presented the lowest bond strength values (pcomposite liner. Bond strengths were not improved when a low-viscosity composite liner was applied, but it remarkably influenced the failure modes. Incremental techniques improved bond strength.

  16. Validity of bond strength tests: A critical review-Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantheti Sirisha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macro-bond strength tests resulted in cohesive failures and overestimation of bond strengths. To reduce the flaws, micro-bond strength tests were introduced. They are the most commonly used bond-strength tests. Objective: Thus the objective of this review is to critically review the reliability of micro-bond strength tests used to evaluate resin-tooth interface. Data Collection: Relevant articles published between January 1994 and July 2013 were collected from Pubmed database, Google scholar and hand searched journals of Conservative Dentistry, Endodontics and Dental materials. Data Synthesis: Variables that influence the test outcome are categorized into substrate related factors, factors related to specimen properties, specimen preparation and test methodology. Impact of these variables on the test outcome is critically analyzed. Conclusion: Micro-bond tests are more reliable than macro-bond tests. However, no standard format exists for reporting the bond strength tests which could lead to misinterpretation of the data and bonding abilities of adhesives.

  17. Hydrogen bonding interactions and supramolecular networks of pyridine-aryl based thiosemicarbazides and their Zn(II) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    GUNNLAUGSSON, THORFINNUR; PANDURANGAN, KOMALA; MC CABE, THOMAS; KITCHEN, JOANNE

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED The synthesis of five pyridyl derived thiosemicarbazides, 1-5, is presented. All five were formed in a single step from 2-hydrazinopyridine with commercially available isothiocyanates using microwave assisted synthesis. Compounds 1-4 were structurally characterised by single crystal diffraction analysis, and showed extended supramolecular hydrogen bonding arrays. Furthermore, the Zn(ii) complexes 6 and 7 have been prepared using ligands 1 and 5, and structurally characterised, ag...

  18. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  19. Innovations in bonding to zirconia-based materials. Part II: focusing on chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; H. Mirmohamadi; J.P. Matinlinna; E. Kukk; H.F. Ounsi; Z. Salameh

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The zirconia-resin bond strength was enhanced using novel engineered zirconia primers in combination with selective infiltration etching as a surface pre-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial aging on the chemical stability of the established bond and

  20. Halogen-bonded network of trinuclear copper(II 4-iodopyrazolate complexes formed by mutual breakdown of chloroform and nanojars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart A. Surmann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of bis(tetrabutylammonium di-μ3-chlorido-tris(μ2-4-iodopyrazolato-κ2N:N′tris[chloridocuprate(II] 1,4-dioxane hemisolvate, (C16H36N2[Cu3(C3H2IN23Cl5]·0.5C4H8O or (Bu4N2[CuII3(μ3-Cl2(μ-4-I-pz3Cl3]·0.5C4H8O, were obtained by evaporating a solution of (Bu4N2[{CuII(μ-OH(μ-4-I-pz}nCO3] (n = 27–31 nanojars in chloroform/1,4-dioxane. The decomposition of chloroform in the presence of oxygen and moisture provides HCl, which leads to the breakdown of nanojars to the title trinuclear copper(II pyrazolate complex, and possibly CuII ions and free 4-iodopyrazole. CuII ions, in turn, act as catalyst for the accelerated decomposition of chloroform, ultimately leading to the complete breakdown of nanojars. The crystal structure presented here provides the first structural description of a trinuclear copper(II pyrazolate complex with iodine-substituted pyrazoles. In contrast to related trinuclear complexes based on differently substituted 4-R-pyrazoles (R = H, Cl, Br, Me, the [Cu3(μ-4-I-pz3Cl3] core in the title complex is nearly planar. This difference is likely a result of the presence of the iodine substituent, which provides a unique, novel feature in copper pyrazolate chemistry. Thus, the iodine atoms form halogen bonds with the terminal chlorido ligands of the surrounding complexes [mean length of I...Cl contacts = 3.48 (1 Å], leading to an extended two-dimensional, halogen-bonded network along (-110. The cavities within this framework are filled by centrosymmetric 1,4-dioxane solvent molecules, which create further bridges via C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds with terminal chlorido ligands of the trinuclear complex not involved in halogen bonding.

  1. The effect of rebonding and liner type on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi H.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Application of varnish and dentin bonding agents can effectively reduce microleakage under amalgam restorations. Also rebonding may show some effects on microleakage and its complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liner/ adhesives on microleakage of Class V amalgam restoration with or without rebonding. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study Class V cavities were prepared on sixty sound human maxillary premolars with the gingival floor 1mm below the CEJ. Cases were divided into six groups of ten teeth each. Specimens in group 1 and 2 were lined with Copalite and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP respectively. In the third group (control no liner was applied. The teeth were then restored with spherical amalgam. Specimens in group 4 to 6 received the same treatments but after filling, the interfaces of restorations and teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed and dried. Adhesive resin of SBMP was applied over amalgam and tooth margins and polymerized (rebonding. Specimens were thermocycled, exposed to dye and sectioned. Microleakage was graded (0-3 using a stereomicroscope at X40 magnification. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon pair wise statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: The groups lined with SBMP showed the lowest and the groups without liner the highest microleakage (p= 0.001. Significant difference was observed in microleakage mean rank of enamel and dentin margins (p=0.048. Rebonding with resin did not improve the seal (p> 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, total etch adhesive system had significant effect on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations especially in cervical margin. Rebonding did not show a significant effect on microleakage.

  2. Human brain mercury levels related to exposure to amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertaş, E; Aksoy, A; Turla, A; Karaarslan, E S; Karaarslan, B; Aydın, A; Eken, A

    2014-08-01

    The safety of dental amalgam as the primary material in dental restoration treatments has been debated since its introduction. It is widely accepted that amalgam restorations continuously release elemental mercury (Hg) vapor, which is inhaled and absorbed by the body and distributed to tissues, including the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the presence of amalgam fillings is correlated with brain Hg level. The Hg levels in the parietal lobes of the brains of 32 cadavers were analyzed with an atomic absorption spectrometer with the mercury hydride system. A total of 32 brain samples were tested; of these, 10 were from cadavers with amalgam fillings, while 22 of them were amalgam free. Hg was detected in 60.0% (6 of 10) of the samples in the amalgam group and in 36.3% (8 of 22) in the amalgam-free group. The average Hg level of the amalgam group was 0.97 ± 0.83 µg/g (minimum: 0.3 µg/g and maximum: 2.34 µg/g), and in the amalgam-free group, it was 1.06 ± 0.57 µg/g (minimum: 0.17 µg/g and maximum: 1.76 µg/g). The results of the present study showed no correlation between the presence of amalgam fillings and brain Hg level.

  3. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of class II restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purk, John H.; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Methods Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P .05). Conclusions PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Clinical Implications Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested. PMID:17012721

  4. Micro-PIXE study of metal loss from dental amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Guibert, Edouard; Wang, Liping; Chappuis, Thibault; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2017-08-01

    Mercury amalgams have been a topic of controversy ever since their introduction over 150 years ago as a dental material. An interesting question is if metals are released from the amalgam into the enamel and dentine tissue. To elucidate this PIXE mapping was used to investigate metal redistribution in an extracted molar tooth with a ∼30 year old high-Cu content amalgam filling. The tooth was sectioned and polished, and elemental mapping carried out on the amalgam/enamel, bulk amalgam and the wear surface of the amalgam. As expected, the amalgam was multiphase amalgam comprising of Cu-rich and Ag-rich grains with non-uniform distribution of Hg. The amalgam/dentine interface was clearly defined with amalgam elements on one side and C and P from hydroxyapatite on the other side with evidence of only slight interface corrosion. The peaks for Cu Hg and Zn were isolated from interfering signals with concentrations in the enamel tissue, observed to be at, or below the method detection limit. The proximity in energy of the Sn L α and Ca K α , peaks and the background on the Hg M α gave signal overlap which increased the MDL for these elements. Remarkably, a course grain texture in the amalgam was observed just below the biting surface of the amalgam which might be associated with tribochemical processes from mastication. This coupled with the clear absence of the amalgam metals from tooth tissue, even in close proximity to the interface, suggests that for this sample, release of Hg occurred via erosion or dissolution in saliva.

  5. Critical Heegaard surfaces obtained by amalgamation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Critical surfaces are defined by Bachman as topological index 2 surfaces, generalizing incompressible surfaces and strongly irreducible surfaces. In this paper we give a condition to obtain critical Heegaard surfaces by amalgamation. As a special case, we obtain critical Heegaard surfaces by boundary stabilization. It gives critical Heegaard surfaces of non-minimal genus, for 3-manifolds which do not admit distinct Heegaard splittings (up to isotopy).

  6. DIRECT PERMANENT RESTORATIVES - AMALGAM VS COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashree

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dental restoration is the most commonly administered dental treatment. These restorations are subjected to dynamic conditions in oral cavity, are likely to fail and need replacement. Ideal restorative material should pass two tests - Longitivity and Esthetics. Longitivity of the restorative material depends on three major factors - first is Patient’s factors, second is Operator`s skills and last is the Restorative material itself. Dentists today have a plethora of materials to choose from. Materials like Silver Amalgam being tested over a century, other nubile but promising materials, developed recently and yet to be tested in long run. This puts a dentist in dilemma so as which material to select to ensure durable clinical p erformance after placement. Amalgam has been tested over 165 years and has fulfilled almost all desired qualities of a restorative material except esthetics. On the other hand composites have advantage in cases where esthetics is of prime importance; howev er Recent studies conclude them at par with amalgam 1 . Performance of these two materials is assessed on following criterions - Longevity, wear resistance, cost effectiveness, marginal leakage and predisposal to secondary decay, biocompatibility, pulp irri tation, tooth preparation, technique sensitivity and esthetics

  7. Recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva Pereira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam residues are probably the most important chemical residues generated from clinical dental practice because of the presence of heavy metals among its constituents, mainly mercury and silver. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative method for the recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The residue generated after vacuum distillation of dental amalgam for the separation of mercury was initially diluted with 32.5% HNO3, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. Sequentially, under constant heating and agitation with NaOH and sucrose, the sample was reduced to metallic silver. However, the processing time was too long, which turned this procedure not viable. In another sequence of experiments, the dilution was accomplished with concentrated HNO3 at 90ºC, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. After washing, the pellet was diluted with concentrated NH4OH, water and more NaCl in order to facilitate the reaction with the reducer. RESULTS: Ascorbic acid was efficiently used as reducer, allowing a fast reduction, thus making the procedure viable. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed methodology is of easy application and does not require sophisticated equipment or expensive reagents.

  8. Electron density characteristics and charge transfer effect of hydrogen bond O-H···Pt(II): atoms in molecules study and natural bond orbital analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiqiu; Li, Xiwen; Li, Yan; Chen, Dezhan

    2013-11-01

    In this report, we extended the works of Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] on the nature of O-H...Pt hydrogen bond in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex, by computational study of O-H...Pt interaction in [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)], with emphasis on charge transfer effect in this interaction of platinum(II) and hydrogen atom. According to the crystallographic geometry reported by José María Casas et al., [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)] possesses one O-H...Pt hydrogen bridging interaction, similar to the case in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex. On the basis of topological criteria of electron density, we characterised this O-H...Pt interaction. Charge transferred between platinum(II) and σ*O-H orbital in this complex was calculated by using NBO method. The stabilised energy associated to charge transfer was estimated using a direct proportionality, that is 2-3 eV per electron transferred. Charge transfer effects in O-H...Pt hydrogen bonds were studied for these two complexes. Our results indicate that the interaction of O-H...Pt is closed-shell in nature with significant charge transfer, and that charge transfer effect is not negligible in the interaction of O-H...Pt. The second conclusion is different from the result of Rizzato et al.

  9. Halogen bond preferences of thiocyanate ligand coordinated to Ru(II) via sulphur atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Tuikka, Matti; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2017-09-01

    Halogen bonding between [Ru(bpy)(CO)2(S-SCN)2] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), I2 was studied by co-crystallising the metal compound and diiodine from dichloromethane. The only observed crystalline product was found to be [Ru(bpy)(CO)2(S-SCN)2]ṡI2 with only one NCSṡṡṡI2 halogen bond between I2 and the metal coordinated S atom of one of the thiocyanate ligand. The dangling nitrogen atoms were not involved in halogen bonding. However, computational analysis suggests that there are no major energetic differences between the NCSṡṡṡI2 and SCNṡṡṡI2 bonding modes. The reason for the observed NCSṡṡṡI2 mode lies most probably in the more favourable packing effects rather than energetic preferences between NCSṡṡṡI2 and SCNṡṡṡI2 contacts.

  10. Disposition of Unirradiated Sodium Bonded EBR-II Driver Fuel Elements and HEU Scrap: Work Performed for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen A Moore

    2007-04-01

    Specific surplus high enriched uranium (HEU) materials at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) will be transferred to a designated off-site receiving facility. The DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO) will determine which materials, if any, will be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for nuclear reactors. These surplus HEU materials include approximately 7200 kg unirradiated sodium-bonded EBR-II driver fuel elements, and nearly 800 kg of HEU casting scrap from the process which formed various sodium-bonded fuels (including the EBR-II driver elements). Before the driver fuel can be packaged for shipment, the fuel elements will require removal of the sodium bond. The HEU scrap will also require repackaging in preparation for off-site transport. Preliminary work on this task was authorized by BWXT Y-12 on Nov 6, 2006 and performed in three areas: • Facility Modifications • Safety Documentation • Project Management

  11. Regular Semigroups Which Are Amalgamation Bases for Finite Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kunitaka Shoji

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove that a completely O-simple (or completely simple) semigroup is an amalgamation base for finite semigroups if and only if it is an amalgamation base for semigroups.By adopting the same method as used in a previous paper, we prove that a finite regular semigroup is an amalgamation base for finite semigroups if its Jclasses are linearly ordered and all of its principal factor semigroups are amalgamation bases for finite semigroups.Finally, we give an example of a finite semigroup U which is an amalgamation base for semigroups, but not all of its principal factor semigroups are amalgamation bases either for semigroups or for finite semigroups.

  12. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  13. Effect of amalgam cuspal coverage on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Mohammdi Basir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Endodontically treated teeth are prone to fracture because they loose a big amount of their structure. The treatment plan of those teeth is completed when they are rehabilitated with a strong and functional restoration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam cuspal coverage in comparison with other restorative techniques.   Materials and Methods: 40 human healthy maxillary premolars were divided into 4 groups: group1 (S: sound teeth, group 2(Co: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with bonding and composite, group 3(Am-B: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with bonding and amalgam and group 4 (Am-CC: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with amalgam cuspal coverage. Then the restorations were stored in water and room temperature for 100 days at then thermocycled for 500 cycles between water baths at (5.5 ± 1 and (55 ± 1 0 C. The fracture resistance was evaluated by universal testing machine (Instron, 1195 UK with the compressive force of about 2000 N in 0.5 mm/min. The fracture modes were evaluated in four groups by a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis (Scheffe test was done for all groups (P0.05. The lowest fracture resistance was found in group 2 (Co (384 ± 137.4 N that had no significant difference with group 3 (Am-B (P>0.05. The fracture resistance in group 4 was significantly higher than group 2 (Co and 3 (Am-B. The fracture mode in group 1 was cohesive within tooth and in group 2 (Co and 3 (Am-B was mixed cohesive and adhesive, and in group 4 was cohesive within in restorative material.   Conclusion: The highest fracture resistance was found in teeth that received amalgam cuspal coverage.

  14. Effect of pellicle on galvanic corrosion of amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, R I

    1984-02-01

    Galvanic corrosion of amalgam, induced by contact with a type IV dental casting gold alloy, was determined under simulated oral conditions in an electrochemical cell. The effect of a pellicle layer formed by 1 h exposure to saliva in the oral cavity was determined. Pellicle on the amalgam had no effect on the maximum corrosion rate or the 2 h corrosion charge, whereas pellicle on the gold alloy substantially reduced both these parameters of the conventional low-copper amalgam; the corrosion of the high-copper amalgam was less and was not influenced by pellicle formation.

  15. BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations in giant H II regions using strong and semi-strong lines

    CERN Document Server

    Asari, N Vale; Morisset, C; Fernandes, R Cid

    2016-01-01

    We present BOND, a Bayesian code to simultaneously derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions. It compares observed emission lines to a grid of photoionization models without assuming any relation between O/H and N/O. Our grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Varying starburst ages accounts for variations in the ionizing radiation field hardness, which arise due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastic sampling of the initial mass function. All previous approaches assume a strict relation between the ionizing field and metallicity. The other novelty is extracting information on the nebular physics from semi-strong emission lines. While strong lines ratios alone ([O III]/Hbeta, [O II]/Hbeta and [N II]/Hbeta) lead to multiple O/H solutions, the simultaneous use of [Ar III]/[Ne III] allows one to decide whether an H II region is of high or low metallicity. Adding He I/Hbeta pins down the hardness of the ...

  16. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  17. Hydrogen bonds as structural directive towards unusual polynuclear complexes: synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes with a 2-aminoglucose ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Anja; Spielberg, Eike T; Simon, Sascha; Görls, Helmar; Buchholz, Axel; Plass, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of benzyl 2-amino-4,6-O-benzylidene-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (HL) with the metal salts Cu(ClO(4))(2)6 H(2)O and Ni(NO(3))(2)6 H(2)O affords via self-assembly a tetranuclear mu(4)-hydroxido bridged copper(II) complex [(mu(4)-OH)Cu(4)(L)(4)(MeOH)(3)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(3) (1) and a trinuclear alcoholate bridged nickel(II) complex [Ni(3)(L)(5)(HL)]NO(3) (2), respectively. Both complexes crystallize in the acentric space group P2(1). The X-ray crystal structure reveals the rare (mu(4)-OH)Cu(4)O(4) core for complex 1 which is mu(2)-alcoholate bridged. The copper(II) ions possess a distorted square-pyramidal geometry with an [NO(4)] donor set. The core is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between the coordinating amino group of the glucose backbone and the benzylidene protected oxygen atom O4 of a neighboring {Cu(L)} fragment as hydrogen-bond acceptor. For complex 2 an [N(4)O(2)] donor set is observed at the nickel(II) ions with a distorted octahedral geometry. The trinuclear isosceles Ni(3) core is bridged by mu(3)-alcoholate O3 oxygen atoms of two glucose ligands. The two short edges are capped by mu(2)-alcoholate O3 oxygen atoms of the two ligands coordinated at the nickel(II) ion at the vertex of these two edges. Along the elongated edge of the triangle a strong hydrogen bond (244 pm) between the O3 oxygen atoms of ligands coordinating at the two relevant nickel(II) ions is observed. The coordinating amino groups of the these two glucose ligands are involved in additional hydrogen bonds with O4 oxygen atoms of adjacent ligands further stabilizing the trinuclear core. The carbohydrate backbones in all cases adopt the stable (4)C(1) chair conformation and exhibit the rare chitosan-like trans-2,3-chelation. Temperature dependent magnetic measurements indicate an overall antiferromagnetic behavior for complex 1 with J(1)=-260 and J(2)=-205 cm(-1) (g=2.122). Compound 2 is the first ferromagnetically coupled trinuclear nickel(II) complex with J(A)=16.4 and J

  18. Bonding and Emotional Reeducation of Couples in the PAIRS Training: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durana, Carlos

    1996-01-01

    Uses quantitative and qualitative research methods to evaluate the impact of the bonding and catharsis segment of a measure of intimate relationship skills. Results suggest that the segment can lead to significant improvements in marital adjustment, cohesion, self-esteem, and anxiety levels. Explores differences in changes for males and females.…

  19. Synthesis of Stable Diarylpalladium(II) Complexes: Detailed Study of the Aryl-Aryl Bond-Forming Reductive Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Tobias; Richter, Nils; Theumer, Gabriele; Kataeva, Olga; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of diarylpalladium(II) complexes by twofold aryl C-H bond activation was developed. These intermediates of oxidative cyclization reactions are stabilized by chelation with acetyl groups while still maintaining sufficient reactivity to study their reductive elimination. Four distinct triggers were found for the reductive elimination of these complexes to dibenzofurans and carbazoles. Thermal elimination occurs at very high temperatures, whereas ligand-promoted and oxidatively induced reductive eliminations proceed readily at room temperature. Under these conditions, no isomerization occurs. In contrast, weak Brønsted acids, such as acetic acid, lead to a sequence of proto-demetalation, isomerization to a κ(3) -diarylpalladium(II) complex, and reductive elimination to non-symmetrical cyclization products.

  20. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CBond' name='Single-Bond' value='Single-Bond'/>N bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shardin, Rosidah; Pui, Law Kung; Yamin, Bohari M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kassim, Mohammad B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato) and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the C{sub benzoyl}Bond' name='Single-Bond' value='Single-Bond'/>N bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the (3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato)(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole)Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ε = 116 dm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} cm{sup −1}) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres.

  1. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana G. Colson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body.

  2. Studies of EXAFSSpectra using Copper (II) Schiff Base complexes and Determination of Bond lengths Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A.; Vibhute, V.; Ninama, S.; Parsai, N.; Jha, S. N.; Sharma, P.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) at the K-edge of copper has been studied in some copper (II) complexes with substituted anilines like (2Cl, 4Br, 2NO2, 4NO2 and pure aniline) with o-PDA (orthophenylenediamine) as ligand. The X-ray absorption measurements have been performed at the recently developed BL-8 dispersive EXAFS beam line at 2.5 GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Source at RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using EXAFS data analysis program Athena.The graphical method gives the useful information about bond length and also the environment of the absorbing atom. The theoretical bond lengths of the complexes were calculated by using interactive fitting of EXAFS using fast Fourier inverse transformation (IFEFFIT) method. This method is also called as Fourier transform method. The Lytle, Sayers and Stern method and Levy's method have been used for determination of bond lengths experimentally of the studied complexes. The results of both methods have been compared with theoretical IFEFFIT method.

  3. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practi

  4. Solid-state Photochemical [2+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of Hydrogen-Bonded Zn(II) Metal Complex Containing Several Parallel C=C Bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABDUL MALIK P PEEDIKAKKAL

    2017-02-01

    A 2D hydrogen-bonded dinuclear Zn(II) complex, [{Zn(H₂O) ₃ (bpe) ₂} ₂ (bpe)](NO₃) ₄・3bpe・14H₂O,1 (bpe = 4,4_-bipyridylethylene) containing coordination complex cations, [{Zn(H₂O) ₃ (bpe) ₂} ₂ (μ-bpe)] ⁴⁺and free bpe and lattice water molecules shows face-to-face, π ・ ・ ・ π stacking of two of the four free bpemolecules with coordinated bpe ligands. Out of eight bpe molecules, six are aligned in parallel fashion withshort C・ ・ ・ C distances of 3.663–3.814Å and they undergo photochemical [2+2] cycloaddition reaction. The photoreaction conducted on ground sample of 1 in the solid-state affords rctt-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)cyclobutane (rctt-tpcb) product in 75% yield. The molecular movement of free bpe molecules was tested by conducting thephotoreaction in ground sample and heated sample of single crystals. The photoreactivity study of 1 indicates that the free bpe molecules are locked between the cationic [{Zn(H₂O) ₃ (bpe) ₂} ₂ (bpe)] ⁴⁺ layers.

  5. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  6. A valence bond model for aqueous Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in the AMOEBA polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2013-04-05

    A general molecular mechanics (MM) model for treating aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions was developed based on valence bond (VB) theory and incorporated into the atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) polarizable force field. Parameters were obtained by fitting MM energies to that computed by ab initio methods for gas-phase tetra- and hexa-aqua metal complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the proposed AMOEBA-VB model were performed for each transition metal ion in aqueous solution, and solvent coordination was evaluated. Results show that the AMOEBA-VB model generates the correct square-planar geometry for gas-phase tetra-aqua Cu(2+) complex and improves the accuracy of MM model energetics for a number of ligation geometries when compared to quantum mechanical (QM) computations. On the other hand, both AMOEBA and AMOEBA-VB generate results for Zn(2+)-water complexes in good agreement with QM calculations. Analyses of the MD trajectories revealed a six-coordination first solvation shell for both Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions in aqueous solution, with ligation geometries falling in the range reported by previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Acylmethyl(aryl)tellurium(IV,II) derivatives: intramolecular secondary bonding and steric rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ashok K S; Singh, Puspendra; Srivastava, Ramesh C; Duthie, Andrew; Voda, Andreea

    2008-08-14

    Electrophilic substitution of acylmethanes (methyl ketones), RCOCH3 (R = i-Pr, 1; Et, 2; Me, 3) with aryltellurium trichlorides, ArTeCl3 (Ar = 1-C10H7, Np, A; 2,4,6-Me3C6H2, Mes, B; 4-MeOC6H4, Anisyl, C) under mild conditions affords the corresponding acylmethyl(aryl)tellurium dichlorides (RCOCH2)ArTeCl2. Reduction of the dichlorides, gives tellurides, (i-PrCOCH2)ArTe, 1A-1C, which give the corresponding dihalides, (i-PrCOCH2)ArTeX2 (X = Cl, 1Aa-1Ca; Br, 1Ab-1Cb; I, 1Ac-1Cc) when reacted in situ with SO2Cl2, Br2 or I2. The unsymmetric tellurides are labile towards disproportionation and attempts to obtain them lead to the isolation of Ar2Te2 except in the case of (i-PrCOCH2)MesTe (1B), which represents an interesting example of a kinetically stable aryl(alkyl)telluride. All the dihalomesityltellurium(IV) derivatives show separate 1H and 13C NMR signals for the ortho methyls irrespective of the sizes of R and X ligands. The telluride, 1B with free rotation about Te-C(mesityl) bond shows, like the unsymmetric diorganotellurium(IV) dihalides, only one 125Te NMR signal. The 1,4-chelating behavior of the acyl ligand among diorganotellurium(IV) compounds is inferred from the X-ray diffraction data for 1Aa, 1Ac, 1Ba, 1Bb, 1cA and 1Cc which are indicative of the presence of intramolecular Te...O secondary bonding interactions (SBIs) at least in the solid state. As a consequence, steric repulsion in case of the mesityltellurium(IV) derivatives, 1Ba and 1Bb, reaches the threshold so as to cause loss of two-fold rotational symmetry of the mesityl group about the Te-C(mesityl) bond axis. Intermolecular C-HO...O H-bonding interactions appears to stabilize such an orientation of the aryl ligand at least in the solid state.

  8. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of A_aD_d type(II):Properties of hydrogen bonding networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Making use of the invariant property of the equilibrium size distribution of the hydrogen bonding clus- ters formed in hydrogen bonding system of AaDd type,the analytical expressions of the free energy in pregel and postgel regimes are obtained.Then the gel free energy and the scaling behavior of the number of hydrogen bonds in gel phase near the critical point are investigated to give the corre- sponding scaling exponents and scaling law.Meanwhile,some properties of intermolecular and in- tramolecular hydrogen bonds in the system,sol and gel phases are discussed.As a result,the explicit relationship between the number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hydrogen bonding degree is obtained.

  9. Hydrogen-bond vibrational and energetic dynamical properties in sI and sII clathrate hydrates and in ice Ih: Molecular dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Somendra Nath; English, Niall J

    2015-10-21

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on cubic (sI and sII) polymorphs of methane hydrate, and hexagonal ice (ice Ih), to study the dynamical properties of hydrogen-bond vibrations and hydrogen-bond self-energy. It was found that hydrogen-bond energies are greatest in magnitude in sI hydrates, followed by sII, and their energies are least in magnitude in ice Ih. This is consistent with recent MD-based findings on thermal conductivities for these various materials [N. J. English and J. S. Tse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 015901 (2009)], in which the lower thermal conductivity of sI methane hydrate was rationalised in terms of more strained hydrogen-bond arrangements. Further, modes for vibration and energy-transfer via hydrogen bonds in sI hydrate were found to occur at higher frequencies vis-à-vis ice Ih and sII hydrate in both the water-librational and OH⋯H regions because of the more strained nature of hydrogen bonds therein.

  10. The dental amalgam toxicity fear: a myth or actuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A

    2012-05-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity.

  11. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed synthesis of pyrrole- and indole-fused isocoumarins by C-H bond activation in DMF and water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, K.S.; Sawant, S.G.; Dixneuf, P.H.

    -C-H bond activation offer efficient routes for a fast access to various functional molecules.[12] Initially palladium catalysts were used for the direct C-H functionalization of heterocycles,[13,14] however tremendous progress has been made..., in terms of synthesis efficiency,atom economy and process cost, with the less expensive ruthenium(0)[15] and especially the more stable, even in water, ruthenium(II)catalysts[16--17]for cross C- C bond formation fromsp2C-H bonds.A wide range of N...

  12. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen.

  13. Anaerobic DNA cleavage in red light by dicopper(II) complexes on disulphide bond activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debojyoti Lahiri; Ritankar Majumdar; Ashis K Patra; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2010-05-01

    Binuclear complexes [Cu(-RSSR)]2 (1) and [M2(-PDS)(H2O)]2 (M = Cu(II), 2; Fe(II), 3), where H2RSSR is a reduced Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine having a disulphide moiety and H2PDS is derived from dimerization of D-penicillamine, have been prepared, structurally characterized, and their photo-induced DNA cleavage activity studied. The crystal structure of 1 shows the complex as a discrete binuclear species with each metal in a CuN2O2 square-planar geometry (Cu…Cu, 6.420 Å). The tetradentate RSSR2- acts as a bridging ligand. The sulphur atoms in the disulphide unit do not interact with the metal ions. Complexes 1-3 do not show any DNA cleavage activity in darkness. The copper(II) complexes exhibit chemical nuclease activity in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Cleavage of supercoiled DNA has been observed in UV-A light of 365 nm for 1 and red light of 647.1 nm for both 1 and 2 in air. Mechanistic data reveal the involvement of the disulphide unit as photosensitizer generating hydroxyl radicals ($^{\\bullet}$OH) as the reactive species. Photo-induced DNA cleavage in red light seems to involve sulphide radicals in a type-I process and hydroxyl radicals. The dicopper(II) complexes show significant anaerobic photo-induced DNA cleavage activity in red light under argon following type-I pathway without involving any reactive oxygen species.

  14. Activation volume measurement for C[bond]H activation. Evidence for associative benzene substitution at a platinum(II) center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procelewska, Joanna; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi; Zhong, H Annita; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2002-06-03

    The reaction of the platinum(II) methyl cation [(N-N)Pt(CH(3))(solv)](+) (N-N = ArN[double bond]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond]NAr, Ar = 2,6-(CH(3))(2)C(6)H(3), solv = H(2)O (1a) or TFE = CF(3)CH(2)OH (1b)) with benzene in TFE/H(2)O solutions cleanly affords the platinum(II) phenyl cation [(N-N)Pt(C(6)H(5))(solv)](+) (2). High-pressure kinetic studies were performed to resolve the mechanism for the entrance of benzene into the coordination sphere. The pressure dependence of the overall second-order rate constant for the reaction resulted in Delta V(++) = -(14.3 +/- 0.6) cm(3) mol(-1). Since the overall second order rate constant k = K(eq)k(2), Delta V(++) = Delta V degrees (K(eq)) + Delta V(++)(k(2)). The thermodynamic parameters for the equilibrium constant between 1a and 1b, K(eq) = [1b][H(2)O]/[1a][TFE] = 8.4 x 10(-4) at 25 degrees C, were found to be Delta H degrees = 13.6 +/- 0.5 kJ mol(-1), Delta S degrees = -10.4 +/- 1.4 J K(-1) mol(-1), and Delta V degrees = -4.8 +/- 0.7 cm(3) mol(-1). Thus DeltaV(++)(k(2)) for the activation of benzene by the TFE solvento complex equals -9.5 +/- 1.3 cm(3) mol(-1). This significantly negative activation volume, along with the negative activation entropy for the coordination of benzene, clearly supports the operation of an associative mechanism.

  15. Progression of radiopacities and radiolucencies under amalgam restorations on bite-wing radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphy, M P; Gorter, Y; van Loveren, C; Poorterman, J H; van Amerongen, J P

    1997-01-01

    Radiolucent and radiopaque areas in the dentine under amalgam fillings represent demineralized tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caries progresses in radiolucent and radiopaque areas under amalgam fillings, by assessing their enlargement longitudinally on bite-wing radiographs. Bite-wings from dentitions of persons aged 17, 20 and 23 years were compared. For a 3-year evaluation, 365 teeth with class I and class II amalgam restorations were available on bite-wings; 16 radiopacities, 46 radiolucencies and 28 combinations could be followed longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 14 radiolucencies enlarged and 8 combinations enlarged. For a 6-year evaluation, 236 filled teeth were available; 10 radiopacities, 30 radiolucencies and 11 combinations could be compared longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 12 radiolucencies enlarged and 6 combinations enlarged. Because the radiopaque areas had not enlarged visibly on bite-wing radiographs over 3 or even 6 years, it was concluded that radiopacities may be non-progressing caries. A substantial number of radiolucent areas, with or without concomitant radiopacities, did not enlarge while radiolucent areas are considered as progressing caries.

  16. Nitric oxide as a non-innocent ligand in (bio-)inorganic complexes: spin and electron transfer in Fe(II)-NO bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broclawik, Ewa; Stępniewski, Adam; Radoń, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    The nature of electron density transfer upon bond formation between NO ligand and Fe(II) center is analyzed on the basis of DFT calculation for two {Fe-NO}(7) complexes with entirely diverse geometric and electronic structures: Fe(II)P(NH3)NO (with bent Fe-N-O unit) and [Fe(II)(H2O)5(NO)](2+) (with linear Fe-N-O structure). Proper identification of an electronic status of the fragments, "prepared" to make a bond, was found necessary to get meaningful resolution of charge and spin transfer processes from a spin-resolved analysis of natural orbitals for chemical valence. The Fe(II)P(NH3)NO adduct (built of NO(0) (S=1/2) and Fe(II)P(NH3) (S=0) fragments) showed a strong π*-backdonation competing with spin transfer via a σ-donation, yielding significant red-shift of the NO stretching frequency. [Fe(II)(H2O)5(NO)](2+) (built of NO(0) (S=1/2) antiferromagnetically coupled to Fe(II)(H2O)5 (S=2) fragment) gave no noticeable charge or spin transfer between fragments; a slight blue-shift of the NO stretching frequency could be related to a residual π-donation due to weak π-bonding.

  17. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  18. Mercury (Hg) burden in children: the impact of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al Anoud

    2011-07-15

    The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5-15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine (μg/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter (μg/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N=106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N=76), with means of 3.763 μg/g creatinine versus 3.457 μg/g creatinine, respectively (P=0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P=0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 μg/g (N=97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 μg/g (N=74) for those without amalgam fillings (P=0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 μg/g, N=61) versus those with (0.163 μg/g, N=101), the relationship was not significant (P=0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (Pdental amalgam fillings (P=0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and/or nephrotoxic effects of such an increased Hg on children should be a cause of concern, and further investigation is warranted. Our

  19. Evaluation of the Rh(II)-Rh(II) bond dissociation enthalpy for [(TMTAA)Rh]2 by 1H NMR T2 measurements: application in determining the Rh-C(O)- BDE in [(TMTAA)Rh]2C═O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imler, Gregory H; Zdilla, Michael J; Wayland, Bradford B

    2013-10-07

    Toluene solutions of the rhodium(II) dimer of dibenzotetramethylaza[14]annulene ([(TMTAA)Rh]2; (1)) manifest an increase in the line widths for the singlet methine and methyl (1)H NMR resonances with increasing temperature that result from the rate of dissociation of the diamagnetic Rh(II)-Rh(II) bonded dimer (1) dissociating into paramagnetic Rh(II) monomers (TMTAA) Rh (2). Temperature dependence of the rates of Rh(II)-Rh(II) dissociation give the activation parameters for bond homolysis ΔH(‡)(app) = 24(1) kcal mol(-1) and ΔS(‡)(app) = 10 (1) cal K(-1) mol(-1) and an estimate for the Rh(II)-Rh(II) bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of 22 kcal mol(-1). Thermodynamic values for reaction of 1 with CO to form (TMTAA)Rh-C(O)-Rh(TMTAA) (3) ΔH1° = -14 (1) kcal mol(-1), ΔS1°= -30(3) cal K(-1) mol(-1)) were used in deriving a (TMTAA)Rh-C(O)- BDE of 53 kcal mol(-1).

  20. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Sardenberg; Clarissa Calil Bonifácio; Mariana Minatel Braga; José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato; Fausto Medeiros Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group -...

  1. Mercury (Hg) burden in children: The impact of dental amalgam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, PO Box: 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Sedairi, Al anoud [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, PO Box: 24452, Riyadh 11495 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-15

    The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5-15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine ({mu}g/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter ({mu}g/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N = 106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N = 76), with means of 3.763 {mu}g/g creatinine versus 3.457 {mu}g/g creatinine, respectively (P = 0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P = 0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 {mu}g/g (N = 97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 {mu}g/g (N = 74) for those without amalgam fillings (P = 0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 {mu}g/g, N = 61) versus those with (0.163 {mu}g/g, N = 101), the relationship was not significant (P = 0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (P < 0.01). In contrast, a significant inverse relationship was seen between NHg levels and dental amalgam fillings (P = 0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and

  2. Improving the strength of amalgams by including steel fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Calvin T. [Hendrix College, Conway, AR 72032 (United States); Van Hoose, James R. [Siemens, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); McGill, Preston B. [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM20, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Grugel, Richard N., E-mail: richard.n.grugel@nasa.gov [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM30, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A room temperature liquid Ga-In alloy was successfully substituted for mercury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physically sound amalgams with included steel fibers can be made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small volume fraction inclusion of fibers increased strength by {approx}20%. - Abstract: Mercury amalgams, due to their material properties, are widely and successfully used in dental practice. They are, however, also well recognized as having poor tensile strength. With the possibility of expanding amalgam applications it is demonstrated that tensile strength can be increased some 20% by including a small amount of steel fibers. Furthermore, it is shown that mercury can be replaced with a room temperature liquid gallium-indium alloy. Processing, microstructures, and mechanical test results of these novel amalgams are presented and discussed in view of means to further improve their properties.

  3. [Experience with amalgams manufactured by Southern Dental Industries (Australia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarján, I; Gábris, K; Balaton, P; Dénes, J

    1990-09-01

    The gamma 2 phaseless amalgam of the firm Southern Dental Industries (SDI) was tested. None of the 205 fillings showed level deviations, unevenness, secondary caries and breakage. A minimum size gap was found in 2 cases.

  4. Aggravated neuromuscular symptoms of mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Ayla; Yılmaz, Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Köş, Durdu Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Dental amalgam fillings are widely used all over the world. However, their mercury content can lead to various side effects and clinical problems. Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause several side effects on the central nerve system, renal and hepatic functions, immune system, fetal development and it can play a role on exacerbation of neuromuscular diseases. In this case, we will present a patient with vacuolar myopathy whose symptoms were started and aggravated with her dental amalgam fillings.

  5. Mercury from dental amalgam: exposure and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, Stephen M

    2013-02-01

    There has long been an undercurrent within the dental profession of anti-amalgam sentiment, a "mercury-free" movement. To assess whether anything is or is not scientifically wrong with amalgam, one must look to the vast literature on exposure, toxicology, and risk assessment of mercury. The subject of risk assessment goes straight to the heart of the debate over whether a malgam is safe, or not, for unrestricted use in dentistry in the population at large.

  6. Enhancing lives together: reviewing the process of an organizational amalgamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Emily; Cripps, Donna; Badzioch, Lillian; Sersen, Mary Anne; Flaherty, Brenda; Martin, Murray T

    2010-01-01

    The amalgamation between two hospitals creates a transition period of significant change, uncertainty and complexity. It is a challenging time within an organization that needs to be managed effectively. This article outlines the integration process and eight-step framework used during an amalgamation of an acute hospital organization and a post-acute hospital. The initial process evaluation and lessons learned are also presented.

  7. Tuning of coordination geometry via cooperation of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in bis(benzoylacetonato)manganese(II) adducts with pyridine derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cvrtila, Ivica; Stilinovic, Vladimir; Kaitner, Branko

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effects of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on coordination geometry of a relatively rigid octahedral system, eight coordination compounds derived from bis(benzoylacetonato)manganese(II) and seven pyridine derivatives (three of them o-aminopyridines) were prepared. Four compound

  8. Theoretical studies on N-O or N-N bond formation from aryl azide catalyzed by iron(II) bromide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Lixin

    2012-03-02

    DFT calculations have been carried out to study the reaction mechanism on N-O or N-N bond formation from aryl azide catalyzed by iron(II) bromide complex. A favorable reaction pathway is proposed to account for the construction of the core structure of 2H-indazoles or 2,1-benzisoxazoles.

  9. Tuning of coordination geometry via cooperation of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in bis(benzoylacetonato)manganese(II) adducts with pyridine derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cvrtila, Ivica; Stilinovic, Vladimir; Kaitner, Branko

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effects of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on coordination geometry of a relatively rigid octahedral system, eight coordination compounds derived from bis(benzoylacetonato)manganese(II) and seven pyridine derivatives (three of them o-aminopyridines) were prepared. Four

  10. Palladium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation/C-C and C-O Bond Formation Reaction Cascade: Direct Synthesis of Coumestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neog, Kashmiri; Borah, Ashwini; Gogoi, Pranjal

    2016-12-02

    A palladium catalyzed cascade reaction of 4-hydroxycoumarins and in situ generated arynes has been developed for the direct synthesis of coumestans. This cascade strategy proceeds via C-H bond activation/C-O and C-C bond formations in a single reaction vessel. This methodology affords moderate to good yields of coumestans and is tolerant of a variety of functional groups including halide. The methodology was applied to the synthesis of natural product flemichapparin C.

  11. Fatigue crack analysis of EBR-II Ni-bonded duplex tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. H.; Porter, D. L.; Lloyd, W. R.; Kisohara, N.

    2011-03-01

    Small, notched three-point bend specimens machined from duplex tubes, which were extracted from an EBR-II superheater, were fatigued through the nickel interlayer to determine propensity for crack arrest within this interlayer. Several of these specimens were fatigued in the near threshold, and steady state regimes of Paris Law behavior. Additionally, two specimens were fatigued to the edge of the nickel interlayer and then monotonically loaded. Micro-hardness profiles of the nickel interlayer were also measured. Fatigue behavior was found to be similar to previous studies in that arrest was only noted in the near threshold Paris regime (attributed to the presence of voids) and in the steady state regime exhibited an acceleration of crack growth rate through the nickel interlayer followed by a slight retardation. Monotonic loading resulted in crack branching or delamination along the interlayer. Although archival material was not available for this study, the hardness of the nickel interlayer was determined to have been lowered slightly during service by comparison to the expected hardness of a similar nickel braze prepared as specified for fabrication of these tubes.

  12. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Simen E. Kopperud; Frode Staxrud; Ivar Espelid; Anne Bjørg Tveit

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the de...

  13. Oxidation of Half-Lantern Pt2(II,II) Compounds by Halocarbons. Evidence of Dioxygen Insertion into a Pt(III)-CH3 Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, V; Baya, M; Borja, P; Martín, A

    2015-08-01

    The half-lantern compound [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)}2] (1) [bzq = benzo[h]quinoline, HN^S = 2-mercaptopyrimidine (C4H3N2HS)] reacts with CH3I and haloforms CHX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) to give the corresponding oxidized diplatinum(III) derivatives [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)X}2] (X = Cl 2a, Br 2b, I 2c). These compounds exhibit half-lantern structures with short intermetallic distances (∼2.6 Å) due to Pt-Pt bond formation. The halogen abstraction mechanisms from the halocarbon molecules by the Pt2(II,II) compound 1 were investigated. NMR spectroscopic evidence using labeled reagents support that in the case of (13)CH3I the reaction initiates with an oxidative addition through an SN2 mechanism giving rise to the intermediate species [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}]. However, with haloforms the reactions proceed through a radical-like mechanism, thermally (CHBr3, CHI3) or photochemically (CHCl3) activated, giving rise to mixtures of species [X(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)R] (3a-c) and [X(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)X] (2a-c). In these cases the presence of O2 favors the formation of species 2 over 3. Transformation of 3 into 2 was possible upon irradiation with UV light. In the case of [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}] (3d), in the presence of O2 the formation of the unusual methylperoxo derivative [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)(O-O(13)CH3)}] (4d) was detected, which in the presence of (13)CH3I rendered the final product [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)I}2] (2c) and (13)CH3OH.

  14. An Extended Chain and Trinuclear Complexes Based on Pt(II)-M (M = Tl(I), Pb(II)) Bonds: Contrasting Photophysical Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forniés, Juan; Giménez, Nora; Ibáñez, Susana; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa

    2015-05-04

    The syntheses and structural characterizations of a Pt-Tl chain [{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}Tl(Me2CO)]n 1 and two trinuclear Pt2M clusters (NBu4)[{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}2Tl] 2 and [{Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2}2Pb] 3 (bzq = 7,8-benzoquinolinyl), stabilized by donor-acceptor Pt → M bonds, are reported. The one-dimensional heterometallic chain 1 is formed by alternate "Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2" and "Tl(Me2CO)" fragments, with Pt-Tl bond separations in the range of 2.961(1)-3.067(1) Å. The isoelectronic trinuclear complexes 2 (which crystallizes in three forms, namely, 2a, 2b, and 2c) and 3 present a sandwich structure in which the Tl(I) or Pb(II) is located between two "Pt(bzq)(C6F5)2" subunits. NMR studies suggest equilibria in solution implying cleavage and reformation of Pt-M bonds. The lowest-lying absorption band in the UV-vis spectra in CH2Cl2 and tetrahydrofuran (THF) of 1, associated with (1)MLCT/(1)L'LCT (1)[5dπ(Pt) → π*(bzq)]/(1)[(C6F5) → bzq], displays a blue shift in relation to the precursor, suggesting the cleavage of the chain maintaining bimetallic Pt-Tl fragments in solution, also supported by NMR spectroscopy. In 2 and 3, it shows a blue shift in THF and a red shift in CH2Cl2, supporting a more extensive cleavage of the Pt-M bonds in THF solutions than in CH2Cl2, where the trinuclear entities are predominant. The Pt-Tl chain 1 displays in solid state a bright orange-red emission ascribed to (3)MM'CT (M' = Tl). It exhibits remarkable and fast reversible vapochromic and vapoluminescent response to donor vapors (THF and Et2O), related to the coordination/decoordination of the guest molecule to the Tl(I) ion, and mechanochromic behavior, associated with the shortening of the intermetallic Pt-Tl separations in the chain induced by grinding. In frozen solutions (THF, acetone, and CH2Cl2) 1 shows interesting luminescence thermochromism with emissions strongly dependent on the solvent, concentration, and excitation wavelengths. The Pt2Tl complex 2 shows an emission close to 1, ascribed to

  15. One-Dimensional Hydrogen-bonded Double Chain Composed of a Copper(II) Complex with Chelidamic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guo-Wei; GUO Guo-Cong; CAI Li-Zhen; LIU Bing; HUANG Jin-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Complex [Cu(C7H3NO5)(DMF)(H2O)] was crystallized from the reaction of Cu(CH3COO)2·H2O with 2,6-dicarboxy-4-hydroxypyridine (chelidamic acid) in DMF solution and its structure was characterized by X-ray crystallography. The crystal is of triclinic, space group (P1)with a = 7.835(2), b = 8.594(2), c = 10.309(2)(A),α = 84.16(3), β= 77.94(3), γ= 69.22(3)°, V = 634.4(2) (A)3, Mr = 335.76, Z = 2, Dc = 1.758 g/cm3, λ = 0.71073(A), μ(MoKα) = 1.756 mm-1 and F(000) = 342. The structure was refined to R = 0.0367 and wR = 0.0805 for 2191 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). The crystal structure shows a distorted square pyramidal geometry around the copper(II) ion, which is chelated by one nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms of the chelidamic acid, one water molecule and one DMF molecule. The title complex displays 1-D hydrogen-bonded double chains.

  16. Evaluation of hydrogen bond networks in cellulose Iβ and II crystals using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Mazeau, Karim; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-09-08

    Crystal models of cellulose Iβ and II, which contain various hydrogen bonding (HB) networks, were analyzed using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. From the CPMD trajectories, the power spectra of the velocity correlation functions of hydroxyl groups involved in hydrogen bonds were calculated. For the Iβ allomorph, HB network A, which is dominant according to the neutron diffraction data, was stable, and the power spectrum represented the essential features of the experimental IR spectra. In contrast, network B, which is a minor structure, was unstable because its hydroxymethyl groups reoriented during the CPMD simulation, yielding a different crystal structure to that determined by experiments. For the II allomorph, a HB network A is proposed based on diffraction data, whereas molecular modeling identifies an alternative network B. Our simulations showed that the interaction energies of the cellulose II (B) model are slightly more favorable than model II(A). However, the evaluation of the free energy should be waited for the accurate determination from the energy point of view. For the IR calculation, cellulose II (B) model reproduces the spectra better than model II (A). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Godoy Iano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, as any other heavy metal, may cause environmental damages due to its accumulation and biotransformation. Dental offices, whether private or institutional, use dental amalgam as a restorative material on a daily basis. Dental amalgam is composed of mercury (50%, silver (30% and other metals. Approximately 30% of the amalgam prepared in dental offices (0.6 g per capsule are wasted and inadequately discarded without any treatment. Methods for mercury recovery have been proposed previously, using high temperatures through exposure to direct flame (650°C, long processing time, and hazardous reagents as potassium cyanide. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to replace the direct flame by an electrical mantle in the process of mercury recovery. Results showed an average mercury recovery of 90% from 2 kg of amalgam after 30 minutes of processing time, thus optimizing the procedure. The proposed modifications allowed a significant reduction in processing time and a mercury recovery with high purity. The modified process also provided minimization of operator exposure to physical, chemical and ergonomic hazards, representing a technological advance compared to the risks inherent to the original method. It also provided environmental health and economy of energy resources by replacing a finite energy source (fossil and organic by a more environmentally appropriate electric source, resulting in significant improvement of the procedure for mercury recovery from dental amalgam.

  18. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  19. Dental amalgam: few proven harmful effects but many ongoing concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    (1) Dental amalgam is one of the main sources of exposure to mercury in industrialised countries; (2) At high doses, mercury is both neurotoxic and nephrotoxic. A suspected link exists between chronic exposure to low doses of mercury derived from dental amalgam and renal, neurodegenerative or neurobehavioural disorders, but it has not been established; (3) Some individual cases are troubling, but epidemiological studies show no major effects in the general population. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain why some people may be more sensitive than others to the effects of low-dose mercury; (4) More and more countries, especially Sweden, recommend that the use of amalgam should be restricted, particularly in pregnant women and children; (5) As part of a global strategy to eliminate mercury, the European Parliament has asked the Commission to draft legislation limiting the use of mercury in dental amalgam; (6) Evaluation of the risk-benefit balances of alternatives to dental amalgam does not provide sufficient data on which to base an informed choice between available options.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations in oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennoju Sai Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mercury a popular heavy metal used in dentistry in the form of amalgam is a known clastogen. The assessment of micronuclei in cells is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of mercury on them. Hence, a study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells of subjects with amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (age and gender-matched sample of 30 study group and 30 control group were included in this study. Smears were obtained with moistened wooden spatula from buccal mucosa in close contact with amalgam restoration and fixed with 100% ethyl alcohol. After staining with Papanicolaou stain, all the slides were examined under ×40 and 1,000 cells were counted for the presence of micronuclei. The data were entered into a spread sheet and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant increase in the number of micronuclei containing cells was observed in the study group when compared to control group (P < 0.05. A positive correlation was observed between the duration of restoration and frequency of micronuclei (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed a definite genotoxic effect of amalgam restorations on the oral cavity which can be attributed to the clastogenic action of mercury in amalgam restorations.

  1. Comparison of release of mercury from three dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C L; Soh, G; Lee, A S; Yeoh, T S

    1989-07-01

    Mercury release from dental amalgams has generated considerable concern in recent years and is the subject of this study. Specimens of one admixed high-copper amalgam (Contour), one lathe-cut low-copper amalgam (SDI), and a new tin- and copper-free amalgam claimed to be non-mercury-releasing (Composil) were evaluated for release of mercury when incubated in purified water at 37 degrees C. Measurement of mercury was done by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and the amount released was expressed as micrograms/cm2/24 hr. Study was conducted over a four-week period. Results show that Contour and SDI released similar insignificant amounts (mean release of less than 0.1 microgram/cm2/24 hr) compared with Composil (mean release of 41.0 micrograms/cm2/24 hr). The difference in release by Composil compared with that by Contour and SDI is highly significant (P less than 0.001). The implications of chronic release of mercury from dental amalgams are discussed. Long-term release studies are in progress.

  2. Monte carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zahri Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  3. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Neelakantan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II, polyantibiotic paste (Group III, a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V. In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. RESULTS: Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05. Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials.

  4. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEELAKANTAN, Prasanna; RAO, Chandragiri Venkata Subba; INDRAMOHAN, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. Material and Methods This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. Results Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials. PMID:22666827

  5. Plasmonic detection of mercury via amalgam formation on surface-immobilized single Au nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, Carola; Martín, Alfonso; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Au nanorods were used as plasmonic transducers for investigation of mercury detection through a mechanism of amalgam formation at the nanorod surfaces. Marked scattering color transitions and associated blue shifts of the surface plasmon resonance peak wavelengths (λ max) were measured in individual nanorods by darkfield microscopy upon chemical reduction of Hg(II). Such changes were related to compositional changes occurring as a result of Hg–Au amalgam formation as well as morphological changes in the nanorods’ aspect ratios. The plot of λ max shifts vs. Hg(II) concentration showed a linear response in the 10–100 nM concentration range. The sensitivity of the system was ascribed to the narrow width of single nanorod scattering spectra, which allowed accurate determination of peak shifts. The system displayed good selectivity as the optical response obtained for mercury was one order of magnitude higher than the response obtained with competitor ions. Analysis of mercury content in river and tap water were also performed and highlighted both the potential and limitation of the developed method for real sensing applications. PMID:28179959

  6. Effects of three restorative techniques in the bond strength and nanoleakage at gingival wall of Class II restorations subjected to simulated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos Pimenta Vidal, Cristina; Pavan, Sabrina; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of simulated aging in bond strength and nanoleakage of class II restorations using three different restorative techniques. Class II preparations (n = 12) were restored using: FS - composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus (3M/ESPE); RMGIC + FS - resin-modified glass ionomer cement Vitrebond Plus (3M/ESPE) + FS; and FFS + FS - flowable composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus Flowable (3M ESPE) + FS. The teeth were assigned into two groups: Control and Simulated Aging - Thermal/Mechanical cycling (3,000 cycles, 20-80 °C/500,000 cycles, 50 N). From each tooth, two slabs were assessed to microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) (MPa), and two slabs were prepared for nanoleakage assessment, calculated as penetration along the restoration margin considering the penetration length (%) and as the area of silver nitrate particle deposition (μm(2)). Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test (p < 0.05). FS presented the highest μTBS to dentin (22.39 ± 7.55 MPa) after simulated aging, while the presence of flowable resin significantly decreased μTBS (14.53 ± 11.65 MPa) when compared to no aging condition. Both control and aging groups of RMGIC + FS presented the highest values of silver nitrate penetration (89.90 ± 16.31 % and 97.14 ± 5.76 %) and deposition area (33.05 ± 12.49 and 28.08 ± 9.76 μm(2)). Nanoleakage was not affected by simulated aging. FS presented higher bond strength and lower nanoleakage and was not affected by simulated aging. Use of flowable resin compromised the bond strength after simulated aging. The use of an intermediate layer did not improve the dentin bond strength neither reduced nanoleakage at the gingival margins of class II restorations under simulated aging conditions.

  7. Amalgamated Products of Ore and Quadratic Extensions of Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Garrett

    2012-01-01

    We study the ideal theory of amalgamated products of Ore and quadratic extensions over a base ring R. We prove an analogue of the Hilbert Basis theorem for an amalgamated product Q of quadratic extensions and determine conditions for when the one-sided ideals of Q are principal or doubly-generated. We also determine conditions that make Q a principal ideal ring. Finally, we show that the double affine Hecke algebra $H_{q,t}$ associated to the general linear group GL_2(k) (here, k is a field with characteristic not 2) is an amalgamated product of quadratic extensions over a three-dimensional quantum torus and give an explicit isomorphism. In this case, it follows that $H_{q,t}$ is a noetherian ring.

  8. Amalgam buildups: shear strength and dentin sealing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, E L; Comer, R W; Parry, E E; Pashley, D H

    1991-01-01

    The retentive strength and sealing properties of amalgam buildups were compared in vitro in three groups of specimens. All teeth were prepared with flat, nonretentive surfaces. In the first group, the amalgam buildups were retained by four self-threading Minim pins. In the second group, retention was provided by a circumferential slot prepared in the dentin just inside the DEJ. The third group utilized an adhesive resin for retention. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance before and after placement of the amalgam buildups and before and after thermocycling. All methods of retention sealed dentin very well even in the absence of cavity varnish. The 90 degree retentive strength was: pins, 10.3 +/- 0.9 MPa; slots, 4.1 +/- 0.5 MPa; resin, 3.1 +/- 0.8 MPa (mean +/- SEM).

  9. The amalgam-free dental school.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, F.J.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the change in teaching of Restorative Dentistry at Nijmegen dental school over the period 1986 to the present. KEY POINTS: In 1986, class I and II resin composite restorations were included in the pre-clinical program. However, these courses still started with class I and II am

  10. Preparation and corrosion behavior evaluation of amalgam/titania nano composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Bahremandi Tolou

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: By adding nano particles of titania and preparing amalgam/titania nano composite as a dental amalgam, corrosion behavior and mercury release during the 2 st h after preparation could be improved.

  11. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  12. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or lingual surfaces of primary molar and canine teeth. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (25 samples each. No liner was used for the first group and the second group restorations were lined with copalite varnish. Two dentin adhesives, called Syntac C and Single Bond, were used for the third and fourth groups, respectively. At the next stage, the samples were immersed in 5% fuschin solution for 24 hours, then sectioned buccolingually, and examined under a stereomicroscope for microleakage evaluation."nResults: There was a significant difference between four groups statistically (PO.000I, Comparing"nfour groups, the first and fourth ones, demonstrated the most and the least microleakage, respectively."nConclusion: The present study showed that new dentinal adhesive systems caused microleakage"nreduction in amalgam restorations of primary teeth.

  13. Amalgam tattoo mimicking mucosal melanoma: a diagnostic dilemma revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schmidt, G; Bonde, C

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare but highly aggressive neoplasm. However, the clinicians need to be aware of the other and more frequent etiologies of intraoral pigmentation, such as amalgam tattoos. As amalgam has been extensively used for dental restorations and can cause pigmentations in the oral mucosa, this is a differential diagnosis not to be forgotten. We describe the characteristics of these two phenomena and present a case vignette illustrating the differential diagnostic issues. Other causes of intraoral pigmentation are summarized.

  14. Demonstration of the heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of putative nonheme iron(II)-OOH(R) complexes for Fenton and enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Suhee; Park, Sora; Lee, Yong-Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-07-21

    One-electron reduction of mononuclear nonheme iron(III) hydroperoxo (Fe(III)-OOH) and iron(III) alkylperoxo (Fe(III)-OOR) complexes by ferrocene (Fc) derivatives resulted in the formation of the corresponding iron(IV) oxo complexes. The conversion rates were dependent on the concentration and oxidation potentials of the electron donors, thus indicating that the reduction of the iron(III) (hydro/alkyl)peroxo complexes to their one-electron reduced iron(II) (hydro/alkyl)peroxo species is the rate-determining step, followed by the heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of the putative iron(II) (hydro/alkyl)peroxo species to give the iron(IV) oxo complexes. Product analysis supported the heterolytic O-O bond-cleavage mechanism. The present results provide the first example showing the one-electron reduction of iron(III) (hydro/alkyl)peroxo complexes and the heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of iron(II) (hydro/alkyl)peroxo species to form iron(IV) oxo intermediates which occur in nonheme iron enzymatic and Fenton reactions.

  15. Comparison of Sarns 3M heparin bonded to Duraflo II and control circuits in a porcine model: macro- and microanalysis of thrombi accumulation in circuit arterial filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D F; Arzouman, D; Kleinert, L; Patula, V; Williams, S

    2000-01-01

    Heparin-bonded perfusion circuits have been reported to reduce the thrombus formation during various levels of systemic heparinization. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of thrombo-resistance of the Sarns 3M heparin-bonded circuit to Baxter Duraflo II and untreated control in a porcine model. Fifteen Yorkshire pigs (60-65 kg) were anesthetized, heparinized with 3000 IU, intravenously (i.v.) and surgically cannulated with an internal jugular outflow and a femoral vein inflow. All circuits consisted of a 22-Fr venous cannula, centrifugal pump, arterial filter, an 18-Fr cannula for return and connected with equal lengths of 3/8" polyvinyl chloride tubing. The flows were maintained at 2.0 l/min for 4 h. Thrombus formation in filter samples were morphometrically analyzed through macro-densitometry, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our findings revealed that the 3M circuit had significantly less gross thrombus (p < 0.001), 66% and 84% less microscopic thrombi and fivefold less SEM-measured aggregates (p = 0.03) compared to the Duraflo II and uncoated groups. This study demonstrated that the 3M heparin-bonded circuit had significantly reduced the formation of micro- and macro-thrombi in the minimally heparinized pig model compared to the Duraflo II and untreated control circuits.

  16. A dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and urinary mercury levels: a further assessment of the Casa Pia Children's Dental Amalgam Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material, and amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg). In our study, urinary Hg levels was examined in children of age 8-18 years, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study) that was designed to evaluate the potential health consequences of prolonged exposure to Hg from dental amalgam fillings. Our study was designed to determine whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels. Hg exposure depends on the size and number of teeth with dental amalgams. Overall, consistent with the results observed in the parent study, there was a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels, after covariate adjustment. Further, it was observed that urinary Hg levels increased by 18% to 52% among 8 to 18 year old individuals, respectively, with an average exposure to amalgams, in comparison to study subjects with no exposure to amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing Hg exposure in a dose-dependent fashion.

  17. Preparation and corrosion behavior evaluation of amalgam/titania nano composite

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Bahremandi Tolou; Mohammadhossein Fathi; Ahmad Monshi; Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Farzaneh Shirani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many attempts have been performed and continued for improvement of dental amalgam properties during last decades. The aim of present research was fabrication and characterization of amalgam/titania nano composite and evaluation of its corrosion behavior. Materials and Methods: In this experimental research, nano particles of titania were added to initial amalgam alloy powder and then, dental amalgam was prepared. In order to investigate the effect of nano particle amounts on p...

  18. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  19. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  20. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  1. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  2. Test of Picture-Text Amalgams in Procedural Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David Edey

    Designed to assess how people read and comprehend information presented in picture-text amalgams in procedural texts, this instrument presents various combinations of text information and illustrative information on slides. Subjects are assigned to one of four conditions and directed to follow the instructions presented on the slides. Videotapes…

  3. Amalgam and ART restorations in children: a controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorim, R.G. de; Leal, S.C.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to compare 2-year cumulative survival rates of amalgam and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations in primary molars and to investigate the determinants of the survival rate of restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A controlled clinical trial using

  4. Amalgams of Rank 2 and Characteristic 3 Involving M11

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建华; 李慧陵

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the amalgams (M11,X) of rank 2 and characteristic 3,where X is a group of Lie type of rank 1 or permutation group of low rank,and give a characterization of the 3 local subgroups of the finite sporadic groups Co3 of Ly and Suz.

  5. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; van der Hoorn, W.; Özcan, M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Roeters, J.F.M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. METHODS: Sound human molars (n = 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n

  6. Mercury Amalgam Diffusion in Human Teeth Probed Using Femtosecond LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Liciane Toledo; da Ana, Patricia Aparecida; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Zezell, Denise Maria; Vieira, Nilson Dias; Samad, Ricardo Elgul

    2017-01-01

    In this work the diffusion of mercury and other elements from amalgam tooth restorations through the surrounding dental tissue (dentin) was evaluated using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS). To achieve this, seven deciduous and eight permanent extracted human molar teeth with occlusal amalgam restorations were half-sectioned and analyzed using pulses from a femtosecond laser. The measurements were performed from the amalgam restoration along the amalgam/dentin interface to the apical direction. It was possible to observe the presence of metallic elements (silver, mercury, copper and tin) emission lines, as well as dental constituent ones, providing fingerprints of each material and comparable data for checking the consistence of the results. It was also shown that the elements penetration depth values in each tooth are usually similar and consistent, for both deciduous and permanent teeth, indicating that all the metals diffuse into the dentin by the same mechanism. We propose that this diffusion mechanism is mainly through liquid dragging inside the dentin tubules. The mercury diffused further in permanent teeth than in deciduous teeth, probably due to the longer diffusion times due to the age of the restorations. It was possible to conclude that the proposed femtosecond-LIBS system can detect the presence of metals in the dental tissue, among the tooth constituent elements, and map the distribution of endogenous and exogenous chemical elements, with a spatial resolution that can be brought under 100 µm.

  7. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  8. The problem of motivating teaching staff in a complex amalgamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrick, M A

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses some of the problems brought about by the merger of a number of schools of nursing into a new complex amalgamation. A very real concern in the new colleges of nursing and midwifery in the United Kingdom is the effect of amalgamation on management systems and staff morale. The main focus of this paper is the motivation of staff during this time of change. There is currently a lack of security amongst staff and in many instances the personal job satisfaction of nurse teachers and managers of nurse education has been reduced, which has made the task of motivating staff difficult. Hence, two major theories of motivation and the implications of these theories for managers of nurse education are discussed. The criteria used for the selection of managers within the new colleges, leadership styles and organizational structures are reviewed. The amalgamations have brought about affiliation with higher-education institutions. Some problems associated with these mergers and the effects on the motivation of staff both within the higher-education institutions and the nursing colleges are outlined. Strategies for overcoming some of the problems are proposed including job enlargement, job enrichment, potential achievement rewards and the use of individual performance reviews which may be useful for assessing the ability of all staff, including managers, in the new amalgamations.

  9. Staining of dentin from amalgam corrosion is induced by demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; van der Hoorn, Wietske; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.; Roeters, Joost F. M.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of artificial demineralization upon color change of dentin in contact with dental amalgam. Methods: Sound human molars (n= 34) were embedded in resin and coronal enamel was removed. Dentin was exposed to artificial caries gel (pH 5.5) at 37 degrees C for 12 weeks (n=

  10. The copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination mode of HExxH and HxxEH motif in small peptides: the role of carboxylate location and hydrogen bonding network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Magrì, Antonio; Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with two hexapeptides encompassing HExxH and HxxEH motif were characterized by means of a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Parallel tempering and density functional theory (DFT) investigations show the presence of different hydrogen bonding networks between the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with the two peptides, suggesting a significant contribution of these non-covalent interactions to the stability constant values. The glutamate carboxylate group has a direct role in metal ion binding. The location of this amino acid along the sequence of the investigated peptides is critical to determine thermodynamic and spectroscopic features of the copper(II) complex species, whereas is less relevant in the zinc(II) complexes formation. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) characterization of the zinc(II) complex species show that in the [ZnH-2L] two deprotonated amide nitrogen atoms are involved in the metal coordination environment, an uncommon behavior in zinc(II) complexes for multi-histidine ligands.

  11. Electron-correlation effects on the static longitudinal polarizability of polymeric chains. II. Bond-length-alternation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Benoît; Mosley, David H.; Vračko, Marjan; André, Jean-Marie

    1995-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of the static longitudinal polarizability of different molecular hydrogen model chains have been carried out at different levels of approximation to investigate the effects of including electron correlation as well as the variation of these effects as a function of the bond-length alternation of the systems. First, the coupled and uncoupled Hartree-Fock schemes have been employed. To assess the electron-correlation effects, the size-consistent Mo/ller-Plesset treatments limited to second (MP2), third (MP3), and fourth (MP4) order in electron-electron interactions, as well as the coupled-cluster techniques including all double substitutions (CCD), all single and double substitutions (CCSD), and all single and double substitutions with a perturbational estimate of the connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] have been used. Within the MP4 treatment, a decomposition of the electron-correlation corrections according to the different classes of substitutions and different order highlights the relatively greater importance of the double substitutions at second and third orders. The main findings are that (i) the coupled Hartree-Fock (CHF) technique overestimates the asymptotic static longitudinal polarizability per unit cell for the three types of H2 chains under investigation; (ii) larger basis sets have to be employed when including electron correlation effects, otherwise, the correction is overestimated; (iii) these basis-set effects on the electron-correlation correction are enhanced in the case of the less alternating chains; (iv) using a sufficiently large atomic basis set, at the Mo/ller-Plesset or CCSD(T) levels, the more conjugated the chains, the less the relative magnitude of the electron-correlation correction to the CHF value, whereas using the CCD and CCSD techniques, these relative electron-correlation corrections slightly increase in the case of the less alternating molecular hydrogen chains; and (v) the more conjugated the systems

  12. Repair or replacement of amalgam restorations: decisions at a USA and a UK dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setcos, James C; Khosravi, Reza; Wilson, Nairn H F; Shen, Chiayi; Yang, Mark; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    Whereas replacement of failed restorations is the major treatment for adults in dental practice, repair is an important alternative with the potential to save tooth structure and increase the longevity of restorations at a lower cost. This in vitro study recorded the choices of treatment for the same set of teeth with defective Class II amalgam restorations by students and faculty at two dental schools (University of Manchester, UK and University of Florida, USA). Treatment options (monitor, refurbish, repair and replace) and reason(s) for the choice of treatment for 24 marked amalgam restorations were selected. Overall, participants more frequently chose replacement of restorations; whereas, repair was the least favored option. The reasons cited the most to replace restorations were secondary caries including unsightly appearance, partially lost restoration and tooth fracture; for repair, the major reasons included loss of part of the restoration and marginal ditching; and for refurbishment, the major reasons included poor anatomic form and marginal ditching. There was a significant difference between the students and faculties at the two sites in their choice of treatment (p<0.0001; Chi-square test). The treatment decision to "monitor" the restorations was more frequent for the Manchester site than the Florida site. Conversely, the combined treatment decisions to "refurbish, repair and replace" were more frequently chosen in Florida than in Manchester.

  13. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p<1.1×10-5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  14. Spectral and gravimetric analysis of completely oxidized amalgam systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H J

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of the soluble solution species, insoluble solution precipitate, adherent corrosion products, and microstructural changes of the substrate amalgam after selected polarization to -0.2v and +0.5v in a chloride solution is reported. Results indicate only small concentrations of soluble species, high concentrations of a Sn insoluble solution precipitate at -0.2v, and high concentrations of a Cu precipitate at +0.5v, related to CuCl2 . 3 Cu (OH)2. The completely oxidized amalgam microstructure indicates a thin outermost layer of predominantly Sn--Cl, a thick corroded layer of Ag-Sn-Hg-Cl, and the remaining substrate amalgam. The compound of (SnO) 160 is also associated with the thick corroded layer. The microstructure of the substrate amalgam exhibits, besides the normally occurring phases and products, four new phases or alterations due to the redistribution of Sn, Cl and 0 from the gamma-2 corrosion products, (1) the reappearance of voids, (2) a grey Ag-Sn-Cl phase with and without Cu localized at specific sites in the gamma-1 matrix, (3) dark areas or partially filled voids containing the same elements as in (2) and formerly occupied by the gamma-2 products, and (4) a Cu-rich phase from the deterioration of the Cu6Sn5 phase and also included within the matrix. These changes, particularly (1), (2) and (3) occur with the onset of the gamma-1 deterioration. Unreacted Ag3Sn including the additions of the Cu3Sn component is the last phase to be attacked in the composite amalgam.

  15. Geometry and bond-length alternation in nonlinear optical materials. II. Effects of donor strength in two push-pull molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsford, Graeme J; Bhuiyan, M Delower H; Kay, Andrew J

    2008-04-01

    The compounds N-[2-(4-cyano-5-dicyanomethylene-2,2-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-3-yl)vinyl]-N-phenylacetamide, C(20)H(16)N(4)O(2), (I), and 2-{3-cyano-5,5-dimethyl-4-[2-(piperidin-1-yl)vinyl]-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}malononitrile 0.376-hydrate, C(17)H(18)N(4)O x 0.376 H(2)O, (II), are novel push-pull molecules. The significant bonding changes in the polyene chain compared with the parent molecule 2-dicyanomethylene-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihyrofuran-3-carbonitrile are consistent with the relative electron-donating properties of the acetanilido and piperidine groups. The packing of (I) utilizes one phenyl-cyano C-H...N and two phenyl-carbonyl C-H...O hydrogen bonds. Compound (II) crystallizes with a partial water molecule (0.376H(2)O), consistent with cell packing that is dominated by attractive C-H...N(cyano) interactions. These compounds are precursors to novel nonlinear optical chromophores, studied to assess the impact of donor strength and the extent of conjugation on bond-length alternation, crystal packing and aggregation.

  16. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  18. A prospective study of prenatal mercury exposure from maternal dental amalgams and autism severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, David A; Kern, Janet K; Geier, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Dental amalgams containing 50% mercury (Hg) have been used in dentistry for the last 150 years, and Hg exposure during key developmental periods was associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study examined increased Hg exposure from maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy among 100 qualifying participants born between 1990-1999 and diagnosed with DSM-IV autism (severe) or ASD (mild). Logistic regression analysis (age, gender, race, and region of residency adjusted) by quintile of maternal dental amalgams during pregnancy revealed the ratio of autism:ASD (severe:mild) were about 1 (no effect) for or =6 amalgams. Subjects with > or =6 amalgams were 3.2-fold significantly more likely to be diagnosed with autism (severe) in comparison to ASD (mild) than subjects with < or =5 amalgams. Dental amalgam policies should consider Hg exposure in women before and during the child-bearing age and the possibility of subsequent fetal exposure and adverse outcomes.

  19. Seal, replacement or monitoring amalgam restorations with occlusal marginal defects? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, G; Fernández, E; Mena, K; Martin, J; Vildósola, P; De Oliveira Junior, O B; Estay, J; Mjör, I A; Gordan, V V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this prospective and blind clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of sealing localized marginal defects of amalgam restoration that were initially scheduled to be replaced. A cohort of twenty six patients with 60 amalgam restorations (n=44Class I and n=16Class II), that presented marginal defects deviating from ideal (Bravo) according to USPHS criteria, were assigned to either sealing or replacement groups: A: sealing n=20, Replacement n=20, and no treatment (n=20). Two blind examiners evaluated the restorations at baseline (K=0.74) and after ten years (K=0.84) according with USPHS criteria, in four parameters: marginal adaptation (MA), secondary caries (SC), marginal staining (MS) and teeth sensitivity (TS). Multiple comparison of restorations degradation/upgrade was analyzed by Friedman test and the comparisons within groups were performed by Wilcoxon test. After 10 years, 44 restorations were assessed (73.3%), Group A: n=14 and Group B: n=16; and Group C: n=14 sealing and replacement amalgam restorations presented similar level of quality in MA (p=0.76), SC (p=0.25) and TS (p=0.52), while in MS (p=0.007) presented better performance in replacement group after 10-years. Most of the occlusal amalgam restorations with marginal gaps showed similar long term outcomes than the restorations were sealed, replaced, or not treated over a 10-year period. Most of the restorations of the three groups were clinically acceptable, under the studied parameters. All restorations had the tendency to present downgrade/deterioration over time.

  20. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CN bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardin, Rosidah; Pui, Law Kung; Yamin, Bohari M.; Kassim, Mohammad B.

    2014-09-01

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-{3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato} and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the CbenzoylN bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the {3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato}{3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole}Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ɛ = 116 dm3 mol-1 cm-1) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres.

  1. Effect of copper-sulphur bond on the DNA photo-cleavage activity of 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine copper(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarkeshwar Gupta; Ashis K Patra; Shanta Dhar; Munirathinam Nethaji; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2005-03-01

    The binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of a binary complex [CuL2](ClO4)2 (1) and the in situ generated ternary complexes [CuLB](ClO4)2 from 1 (B: 1,10-phenanthroline, phen, 2; dipyrido[3,2-: 2',3'-]quinoxaline, dpq, 3) are studied, where L is a N2S-donor tridentate Schiff base 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine. Complex 1, structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction study, has six-coordinate meridional geometry showing CuN4S2 coordination. The Cu-N bond lengths are in the range of 1.968(3) to 2.158(4) Å. The Cu-S bond lengths of 2.599(2) and 2.705(2) Å are significantly long indicating weak covalent interaction between copper and sulphur atoms. The thiomethyl groups are cis to each other giving S-Cu-S angle of 75.82(5)°. The Cu-N(pyridyl) bond distances are longer than the Cu-N(imine) bonds. The complexes are redox active and display a quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric response assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple near 0.0 V vs SCE in DMF-Tris buffer (1 : 4 /) using 0.1 M KCl as supporting electrolyte. Electronic spectra of the complexes show a - band in the range 630 to 700 nm in DMF along with higher energy charge transfer bands. While complex 1 is a poor binder to DNA, the ternary complexes show good DNA binding propensity. The photo-nuclease activity of 1-3 is studied using UV and visible wavelengths. The DNA cleavage activity at 365 nm follows the order: 3 > 2 > 1. The cleavage reaction involves the formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species in a type-II process.

  2. Ceramic (Feldspathic & IPS Empress II) vs. laboratory composite (Gradia) veneers; a comparison between their shear bond strength to enamel; an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, S; Azari, Abbas; Dehgan, S

    2010-07-01

    Patient demand for aesthetic dentistry is steadily growing. Laminates and free metal restorations have evolved in an attempt to overcome the invasiveness nature of full veneer restorations. Although many different materials have been used for making these restorations, there is no single material that fits best for all purposes. Two groups of ceramic material (Feldspathic and IPS Empress II) and one group of laboratory composite (Gradia) discs (10 discs in each group; 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared according to the manufacturer's instruction. The surface of ceramic discs were etched and silanized. In Gradia group, liquid primer was applied on composite surfaces. Thirty freshly extracted sound human molars and premolars were randomly divided into three groups. The enamel surface of each tooth was slightly flattened (0.3 mm) on the buccal or lingual side and then primed and cemented to the prepared discs with the aid of a dental surveyor. The finishing specimens were thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 2500 cycles and then prepared for shear bond strength testing. The resulting data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD test. The fractured surfaces of each specimen were inspected by means of stereomicroscope and SEM. There is significant difference between the bond strength of materials tested. The mean bond strengths obtained with Feldspathic ceramic, IPS Empress II and Gradia were 33.10 +/- 4.31 MPa, 26.04 +/- 7.61 MPa and 14.42 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. The fracture pattern was mainly mixed for ceramic groups. More scientific evidence needed for standardization of bonding protocols.

  3. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1 catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−, and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an Rcryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along with only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity (Ki for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 nM. The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.

  4. Schiff base ligand derived from (±trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine and its Cu(II, Co(II, Zn(II and Mn(II complexes: Synthesis, characterization, styrene oxidation and hydrolysis study of the imine bond in Cu(II Schiff base complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkheil Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Schiff base ligand (H2L derived from 2´-hydroxypropiophenone and (±trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine was synthesized. The reactions of MCl2.xH2O (M =Cu(II, Co(II, Zn(II and Mn(IIwith the di-Schiff base ligand (H2L were studied. This ligand when stirred with 1 equivalent of CuCl2.2H2O in the solution of ethanol and chloroform undergoes partial hydrolysis of the imino bond and the resultant tridentate ligand (HL′immediately forms complex[CuL´Cl]∙3/2CHCl3(1with N2O coordination sphere. Under the same condition, the reaction of H2L with MCl2.xH2O (M = Co(II (3, Zn(II (4 and Mn(II (5 gave complexes[ML]•1/2CHCl3∙3/2H2O (3-5with N2O2 coordination sphere and no hydrolytic cleavage was occurred. Also, the reaction of H2L with CuCl2.2H2O in THF gave the complex CuL (2with N2O2 coordination sphere. The ligand and complexes were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H NMRand elemental analysis. The homogeneous catalytic activity of the complexes1, 3 and 5wasevaluated for the oxidation of styrene using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP as oxidant. Finally, the copper(II complex(1encapsulated in the nanopores of zeolite-Y by flexible ligand method (CuL´-Yand its encapsulation was ensured by different studies. The catalytic performance of heterogeneous catalyst in the styrene oxidation with TBHP was investigated. The catalytic tests showed that the homogenous and heterogeneous catalysts were active in the oxidation of styrene.

  5. Mor-Dalphos-Pd (II) oxidative addition complexes and related NH3 adducts: Insights into bonding and nonbonding interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Batista, Ana P.; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The stabilizing effects and bonding properties of the Pd metallic center in [(κ2 -P,N-Mor-Dalphos)Pd(Ar)Cl] complexes and related NH3 adducts were investigated by density functional theory (DFT), the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach and the Su-Li energy decomposition method (Su-Li EDA). The IBO analysis showed that the P atom from the P,N-Mor-Dalphos structure has stabilizing contributions in all Pd-Cl and Pd-NH3 bonds in the complexes. According to the Su-Li energy decomposition analysis, the main energy that drives the interaction between the [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)] moiety and Cl- is the electrostatic term, therefore, the electrostatic energy interaction between them might be an important factor for taking into account when designing other [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)]-Cl precatalysts.

  6. Cu(II) salen complex with propylene linkage: An efficient catalyst in the formation of Csbnd X bonds (X = N, O, S) and biological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohammad; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Adil, S. F.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2017-02-01

    The catalytic property of a mononuclear Cu(II) salen complex in Chan-Lam coupling reaction with phenyl boronic acid at room temperature is reported. The studied complex is found to be potential catalyst in the preparation of carbon-heteroatom bonds with excellent yields. The studied Cu(II) salen complex is monoclinic with cell parameters, a = 9.6807(5) (α 90°), (b = 17.2504(8) (β 112.429 (2), c = 11.1403 (6) (γ = 90°), and has distorted square planar environment around Cu(II) ion. Furthermore, there is no π⋯π interactions in the reported complex due to large distance between the centroid of aromatic rings. In addition, DNA binding study of Cu(II) salen complex by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy is also reported. Moreover, the reported Cu(II) salen complex exhibits significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and displays potential antimicrobial biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa, suggesting antimicrobial biofilm an important tool for suppression of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  7. Microanalysis of oligodeoxynucleotides by cathodic stripping voltammetry at amalgam-alloy surfaces in the presence of copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hason, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2006-05-15

    The application of gold amalgam-alloy electrode (AuAE) for a sensitive voltammetric detection of different oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing the purine units within the ODN-chains in the presence of copper is described. The detection of ODNs is based on the following procedure: (i) the first step includes an acidic hydrolysis of the ODN (ahODN) samples performing the release of the purine bases from ODN-chain; (ii) the second step includes an electrochemical accumulation of the complex of the purine base residues released from ODN-chain with copper ions Cu(I) (ahODN-Cu(I) complex) at the potential of reduction of copper ions Cu(II) on the amalgam-alloy electrode surfaces; (iii) finally followed the cathodic stripping of the electrochemically accumulated ahODN-Cu(I) complex from the electrode surface. The proposed electrochemical method was used for: (a) detection of different ODN lengths containing only adenine units (the number of adenine units within the ODN-chains was changed from 10 to 80), and (b) determination of the number of purine units within the 30-mer ODNs containing a random sequence segments involving both the purine and pyrimidine units. The intensity of the cathodic stripping current density peak (j(CSP)) of the electrochemically accumulated ahODN-Cu(I) complex increased linearly with the increasing number of purine units within the ODN-chains. We observed a good correlation between the percentage content of purine units to the whole length of different 30-mer ODNs and the percentage content of the intensity of the j(CSP) of the electrochemically accumulated 30-mer ahODN-Cu(I) complexes. The detection of acid hydrolysed 80-mer (A(80)) in the bulk solution and in a 20-mul volume is possible down to 200pM and 2nM at the AuAE, respectively. For the shortest 10-mer (A(10)) a detectable value of 5nM in the bulk solution on the AuAE was observed. The sensitive detection of different ODNs containing the purine units in their chains in the presence of

  8. Cu(II) complex of pyridine-based polydentate as a novel, efficient, and highly reusable catalyst in C-N bond-forming reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharghi, Hashem; Sepehri, Saeideh; Aberi, Mahdi

    2017-06-26

    In this paper, a highly reusable copper(II) complex of pyridine-based polydentate is able to efficiently catalyze a C-N bond-forming reaction under mild conditions. A variety of N-heterocyclic and amine compounds arylated with different aryl iodides, bromides, and chlorides produced N-substituted compounds in good to excellent yields. This methodology can be also used for the arylation of N-unsubstituted compounds using arylboronic acids under solvent-free conditions. All reactions are performed in short times under air, and the catalyst can be reused up to seven times.

  9. A complex containing three different kinds of Ru-N bonds: ethoxydinitronitrosyl(N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine-kappa2N,N')ruthenium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albores, Pablo; Chaia, Zulema D; Baraldo, Luis; Castellano, Eduardo E; Piro, Oscar E

    2002-04-01

    The octahedral title compound, [Ru(C(2)H(5)O)(NO)(NO(2))(2)(C(6)H(16)N(2))], crystallizes in the rhombohedral space group P3(1) with an ethoxy ligand axially coordinated trans to the nitrosyl ligand. The RuII ion is equatorially coordinated by a tetramethylethylenediamine group acting as a bidentate ligand, and to two nitro moieties whose planes are tilted with respect to the mean equatorial plane. Each nitrogen ligand bonded to the metallic centre has a different hybridization state.

  10. Flow electrochemical biosensors based on enzymatic porous reactor and tubular detector of silver solid amalgam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josypčuk, Bohdan, E-mail: josypcuk@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of AS CR, v.v.i., Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Dolejskova 3, Prague (Czech Republic); Barek, Jiří [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, University Center of Excellence UNCE “Supramolecular Chemistry”, Department of Analytical Chemistry, UNESCO Laboratory of Environmental Electrochemistry, Albertov 6, CZ-128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Josypčuk, Oksana [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of AS CR, v.v.i., Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Dolejskova 3, Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, University Center of Excellence UNCE “Supramolecular Chemistry”, Department of Analytical Chemistry, UNESCO Laboratory of Environmental Electrochemistry, Albertov 6, CZ-128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Flow amperometric enzymatic biosensor was constructed. •The biosensor is based on a reactor of a novel material – porous silver solid amalgam. •Tubular amalgam detector was used for determination of decrease of O{sub 2} concentration. •Covalent bonds amalgam−thiol−enzyme contributed to the sensor long-term stability. •LOD of glucose was 0.01 mmol L{sup −1} with RSD = 1.3% (n = 11). -- Abstract: A flow amperometric enzymatic biosensor for the determination of glucose was constructed. The biosensor consists of a flow reactor based on porous silver solid amalgam (AgSA) and a flow tubular detector based on compact AgSA. The preparation of the sensor and the determination of glucose occurred in three steps. First, a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) was formed at the porous surface of the reactor. Second, enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was covalently immobilized at MUA-layer using N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. Finally, a decrease of oxygen concentration (directly proportional to the concentration of glucose) during enzymatic reaction was amperometrically measured on the tubular detector under flow injection conditions. The following parameters of glucose determination were optimized with respect to amperometric response: composition of the mobile phase, its concentration, the potential of detection and the flow rate. The calibration curve of glucose was linear in the concentration range of 0.02–0.80 mmol L{sup −1} with detection limit of 0.01 mmol L{sup −1}. The content of glucose in the sample of honey was determined as 35.5 ± 1.0 mass % (number of the repeated measurements n = 7; standard deviation SD = 1.2%; relative standard deviation RSD = 3.2%) which corresponds well with the declared values. The tested biosensor proved good long-term stability (77% of the current response of glucose was retained after 35 days)

  11. The Unstabilized Amalgamation of Heegaard Splittings along Disconnected Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xutao GAO; Qilong GUO

    2013-01-01

    Let M be a 3-manifold,F={F1,F2,…,Fn} be a collection of essential closed surfaces in M (for any i,j ∈ {1,…,n},ifi≠ j,Fi is not parallel to Fj and Fi∩Fj =(O)) and (O)0M be a collection of components of (O)M.Suppose M-∪Fi∈F Fi × (-1,1) contains k components M1,M2,…,Mk.If each Mi has a Heegaard splitting Vi∪si Wi with d(Si) > 4(g(M1) +… + g(Mk)),then any minimal Heegaard splitting of M relative to (O)0M is obtained by doing amalgamations and self-amalgamations from minimal Heegaard splittings or (O)-stabilization of minimal Heegaard splittings of M1,M2,…,Mk.

  12. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of oral amalgam pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Risueño-Mata, Presentación; Ricart-Vayá, José M; Baquero Ruíz de la Hermosa, Carmen; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Amalgam tattoo, the most common exogenous oral pigmentation, can sometimes be confused with melanotic lesions, being then biopsied. We present the clinicopathological characteristics of 6 biopsied cases (5 females and 1 male) of oral amalgam pigmentation. The most common location was the gingival mucosa, followed by the buccal and palatal mucosa. Morphology and distribution (stromal, perivascular, perineural, endomysial) of pigmentation was variable; there was only 1 case with fibrous capsular reaction and likewise only a single case of granulomatous foreign body reaction. Morphological variability is conditioned by the timing and amount of the pigment deposit, which is often associated with infiltration by mast cells (CD117+), as well as overexpression of metallothionein and HLA-DR at different tissue levels.

  13. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988).

  14. Mercury and Amalgam Dental: Implications for Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution and occupational exposures by Mercury have been associated with many health problems since the fetal life. Since amalgam is widely used in dentistry due to its ease use and lower cost, the objective of this work was to elaborate a review regarding Mercury pollution and environmental, occupational and health aspects. A review covering 2010 to 2014 period using Medline, ISI, and LILACS databases were done. Mercury is associated with reduction of physical growth and cogni...

  15. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic and redox properties of the mononuclear NiII, NiII(BPh2)2 containing (B-C) bond and trinuclear CuII-NiII-CuII type-metal complexes of ,'-(4-amino-1-benzyl piperidine)-glyoxime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmet Kilic; Esref Tas; Ismail Yilmaz

    2009-01-01

    The novel vic-dioxime ligand containing the 4-amino-1-benzyl piperidine group, ,'-(4-amino-1-benzyl piperidine)-glyoxime, (LH2) has been prepared from 4-amino-1-benzyl piperidine with anti-dichloroglyoxime at -15°C in absolute THF. Mononuclear NiII metal complex has been obtained with 1 : 2 metal/ligand ratio. The NiII complex of this ligand is proposed to be square planar geometry. IR spectra show that the ligand acts in a tetradentate manner and coordinates N4 donor groups of LH2 to NiII ion. The detection of H-bonding (O-H$\\cdots$O) in the [Ni(LH))2] (${\\rm 1}$) metal complex by IR spectra supported the square-planar MN4 coordination of mononuclear complex. The disappereance of H-bonding (O-H$\\cdots$O) in the [Ni(L)2(BPh2)2] (2) complex shows that the BPh$^{+}_{2}$-capped groups (BPh$^{+}_{2}$ cation formed BPh4 anion) attaches to the main oxime core. MN4 coordination of the [Ni(LH)2] (1) and [Ni(L)2(BPh2)2] (2) metal complexes were also determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. In the trinuclear CuII-NiII-CuII metal complexes, the NiII ion centered into the main oxime core by the coordination of the imino groups while the two CuII ions coordinate dianionic oxygen donors of the oxime groups and linked to the ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipyridine, and 4,4'-bipyridine. The ligand and their mono and trinuclear metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C-NMR spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements, molar conductivity, cyclic voltammetry, mass spectra and X-ray powder techniques. The cyclic voltammetric results show that the cathodic peak potential of [Ni(L)2(BPh2)2] shifted toward more negative value compared to that of [Ni(LH)2], probably due to a decreasing effect of back donation of metal-oxime moieties as a result of the BPh$^{+}_{2}$-bridged complex formation. Also, the formation of the trinuclear CuII-NiII-CuII metal complexes caused considerable changes on the CV behaviour of mononuclear [Ni(LH)2] (1

  17. Effect of rubber dam on mercury exposure during amalgam removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, L; Halbach, S; Willruth, H; Mehl, A; Welzl, G; Wack, F X; Hickel, R; Greim, H

    1999-06-01

    It was the aim of this investigation to treat 20 volunteers with maximally 5 amalgam fillings by the same comprehensive protocol in which all removals with (n = 8) and without (n = 12) rubber dam had been performed within a few months. Nine amalgam-related parameters indicated a close matching of both groups before removal. In the group without rubber dam, mercury (Hg) levels in plasma increased significantly above preremoval values at days 1 and 3 after removal; they decreased significantly below preremoval values at day 30 in the rubber-dam group and at day 100 in both groups. Excretion rates did not increase significantly in either group, but decreased significantly at day 100 in the protected group. Peak plasma-Hg was 0.6 ng/mL on average at day one and decreased with halftimes of 3 and 43 d in subjects protected by rubber dam. The results indicated that concentrations of total mercury in plasma responded rapidly to changes in the amalgam status and reflected the actual absorption most reliably. Notably, plasma-Hg levels were sensitive enough to detect a transient attenuation of the additional exposure by using rubber dam during the removal of only a few fillings. However, being small in magnitude and lasting 100 d at best, the rubber-dam effect had minor toxicological relevance.

  18. Structural and spectropscopic studies of a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded copper(II) complex: aqua[bis(pyridin-2-ylcarbonyl)amidato]cyanidocopper(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-Yun

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and X-ray and spectroscopic studies of the title copper(II) complex, [Cu(C12H8N3O2)(CN)(H2O)], are reported. The Cu(II) cation is five-coordinated, forming a distorted square-planar pyramid with an Addison τ parameter of 0.14. The UV-vis spectrum shows a d-d transition of the Cu(II) centre at 638 nm, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum confirms that the Cu(II) cation has an axial symmetry coordination and that the unpaired electrons occupy the d(x(2)-y(2)) orbital. Cyclic voltammetric studies show two irreversible oxidation and reduction peaks.

  19. Estanilenos: organometálicos de estanho (II σ - ligados a grupos orgânicos Stannylenes: organometallic compounds of tin (II σ-bonded to organic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo M. de Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a short review of the chemistry of stannylenes and their derivatives, including the preparation, spectroscopic properties, molecular structure and reactivity of the various species. The organometallic chemistry of Sn(II is far less explored than that of its much more common Sn(IV counterpart. Organometallics of main group metals have become increasingly important in recent years, which prompted us to present an overview of the situation regarding the case of Sn(II.

  20. The remarkable efficiency of a Pin-II proteinase inhibitor sans two conserved disulfide bonds is due to enhanced flexibility and hydrogen bond density in the reactive site loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Suresh, C G; Joshi, Rajendra; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Capsicum annuum (L.) expresses diverse potato type II family proteinase inhibitors comprising of inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) as basic functional unit. Most IRDs contain eight conserved cysteines forming four disulfide bonds, which are indispensible for their stability and activity. We investigated the functional significance of evolutionary variations in IRDs and their role in mediating interaction between the inhibitor and cognate proteinase. Among the 18 IRDs encoded by C. annuum, IRD-7, -9, and -12 were selected for further characterization on the basis of variation in their reactive site loop, number of conserved cysteine residues, and higher theoretical ΔGbind for interaction with Helicoverpa armigera trypsin. Moreover, inhibition kinetics showed that IRD-9, despite loss of some of the disulfide bonds, was a more potent proteinase inhibitor among the three selected IRDs. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that serine residues in the place of cysteines at seventh and eighth positions of IRD-9 resulted in an increase in the density of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and reactive site loop flexibility. Results of the serine residues chemical modification also supported this observation and provided a possible explanation for the remarkable inhibitory potential of IRD-9. Furthermore, this natural variant among IRDs showed special attributes like stability to proteolysis and synergistic inhibitory effect on other IRDs. It is likely that IRDs have coevolved selective specialization of their structure and function as a response towards specific insect proteases they encountered. Understanding the molecular mechanism of pest protease-plant proteinaceous inhibitor interaction will help in developing effective pest control strategies. An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:39.

  1. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in six-coordinated zinc(ii)-quinoxaline complexes with ligand hydrogen bonds: their fluorescent properties sensitive to axial positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Ken-Ichi; Takahashi, Sami; Kobayashi, Ataru; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Dosen, Masaaki; Kato, Masako; Nagashima, Umpei

    2010-02-28

    Zinc(ii)-quinoxaline complexes, [Zn(hqxc)(2)(py)(2)] and [Zn(hqxc)(2)(DMSO)(2)] (hqxc = 3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinecarboxylate, py = pyridine, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both complexes, the zinc ion is six-coordinated by two equatorial bidentate hqxc ligands with an intramolecular hydrogen bond and two axial monodentate ligands such as pyridine or DMSO. In spite of similar coordination geometries, there is a remarkable difference between their solid-state fluorescent properties. The pyridine complex is strongly fluorescent (fluorescence quantum yield Phi = 0.22), giving rise to a significantly Stokes-shifted spectrum. From its thin film photopumped by a nitrogen gas laser, amplified spontaneous emission was observed. These results suggest that the fluorescence occurs by way of excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) in the hydrogen bond of hqxc. On the other hand, the DMSO complex shows fluorescent intensity (Phi = 0.08) lower than that of the pyridine complex, and shows normal emission in addition to ESIPT emission. From IR measurements for these complexes, it is concluded that axial ligands influence the hydrogen bond strength of the equatorial hqxc ligand via zinc and thus the ESIPT efficiency.

  2. Monofunctional platinum(II) complexes with potent tumor cell growth inhibitory activity: the effect of a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor N-heterocyclic ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiotta, Nicola; Savino, Salvatore; Gandin, Valentina; Marzano, Christine; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of further increase the role of the N-donor aromatic base in antitumor Hollis-type compounds by conferring the possibility to act as a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor. Therefore, we synthesized the Pt(II) complex cis-[PtCl(NH3 )2 (naph)]NO3 (1) containing the 1,8-naphthyridine (naph) ligand. The naphthyridine ligand is generally monodentate, and the second nitrogen atom can act as H-bond donor/acceptor depending upon its protonation state. The possibility of forming such an H-bond could be crucial in the interaction of the drug with DNA or proteins. Apart from the synthesis of the compound, in this study we evaluated its in vitro antitumor activity in a wide panel of tumor cell lines, also including cells selected for their sensitivity/resistance to oxaliplatin, which was compared with that of previously reported complex 2 ([PtI(2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(1-methyl-cytosine)]I) and oxaliplatin and cisplatin as reference compounds. The cytotoxicity data were correlated with the cellular uptake and the DNA platination levels. Finally, the reactivity of 1 towards guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and glutathione was investigated to provide insights into its mechanism of action.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Costa, A. C.; Versiane, O.; Lemma, T.; Machado, N. C. F.; Mondragón, M. A.; Martin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained.

  4. Feynman perturbation expansion for the price of coupon bond options and swaptions in quantum finance. II. Empirical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E; Liang, Cui

    2007-01-01

    The quantum finance pricing formulas for coupon bond options and swaptions derived by Baaquie [Phys. Rev. E 75, 016703 (2006)] are reviewed. We empirically study the swaption market and propose an efficient computational procedure for analyzing the data. Empirical results of the swaption price, volatility, and swaption correlation are compared with the predictions of quantum finance. The quantum finance model generates the market swaption price to over 90% accuracy.

  5. New seven membered palladacycles: C-Br bond activation of 2-bromo-pyridine derivative by Pd(II)

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    C-Br bond activation followed by a C-C coupling reaction of the 2-bromo-pyridyl unit of [1-phenyl-2-(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-benzoimidazole] was performed by Pd(CH2CMe2-o-C6H 4)(η4-COD). Two new seven membered palladacycles were obtained. A combined experimental and theoretical DFT study elucidates the mechanism for this reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Selective cleavage of an azaGly peptide bond by copper(II). Long-range effect of histidine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhidia, Reda; Melnyk, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    Several reports have highlighted the interest of replacing Gly, a frequent amino acid within bioactive peptides, by azaGly (Agly) to improve their stability, activity or for the design of prodrugs. Because metal catalysis is increasingly used for tailoring peptide molecules, we have studied the stability of Agly peptides in the presence of metal ions. In this study, we show that Cu(II), unlike other metal ions such as Fe(II), Fe(III), Pd(II), or Pt(II), induces the cleavage of Agly peptides at room temperature and pH 7.3. The cleavage occurred in the absence of an anchoring His residue within the peptide but it was accelerated when this amino acid was present in the sequence. The influence of His residue on the cleavage rate was minimal when His and Agly were adjacent, whereas large effects were observed for distant His residues. The reaction between Cu(II) and Agly peptides induced the formation of Cu(I) species, which could be detected using bicinchoninic acid as a probe. The nature of products formed in this reaction allowed suggesting a mechanism for the Cu(II)-induced cleavage of Agly peptides.

  7. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) II: Assignment of bonded parameters and partial atomic charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug candidates interacting with biological systems. In these simulations, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters and partial atomic charges is required. In the present article, algorithms for the assignment of parameters and charges for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) are presented. These algorithms rely on the existing parameters and charges that were determined as part of the parametrization of the force field. Bonded parameters are assigned based on the similarity between the atom types that define said parameters, while charges are determined using an extended bond-charge increment scheme. Charge increments were optimized to reproduce the charges on model compounds that were part of the parametrization of the force field. A “penalty score” is returned for every bonded parameter and charge, allowing the user to quickly and conveniently assess the quality of the force field representation of different parts of the compound of interest. Case studies are presented to clarify the functioning of the algorithms and the significance of their output data. PMID:23145473

  8. Patients' experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjursen, Therese T; Binder, Per-Einar; Lygre, Gunvor B; Helland, Vigdis; Dalen, Knut; Björkman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients' assigning meaning to illness experiences.

  9. Patients’ experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese T. Sjursen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients’ assigning meaning to illness experiences.

  10. Oral lichenoid contact lesions to mercury and dental amalgam--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, Helen; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patch testing to identify those susceptible from OLL is explored, and recommendations for removing amalgam fillings, when indicated are outlined. We conclude that evidence does not show that exposure to mercury from amalgam restorations poses a serious health risk in humans, except for an exceedingly small number of hypersensitivity reactions that are discussed.

  11. Tuning through-bond Fe(III)/Fe(II) coupling by solvent manipulation of a central ruthenium redox couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Tin; Tai, Joe; Su, Denny; Huang, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Ingrid; Lin, Ju-Ling; Lee, Mandy M; Chiou, Mong Feng; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Kwan, Ken-Shin; Chen, Yuan-Jang; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2009-03-02

    The relationships between the intervalence energy (E(IT)) and the free energy difference (DeltaG) that exists between the minima of redox isomers (Fe(II)-Ru(III)/Fe(III)-Ru(II)) for various heterobimetallic complexes [(R-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(5)](2+/3+) (R = H, ethyl, Br, actyl; Fcpy = (4-pyridyl)ferrocenyl; Ru(NH(3))(5) = pentaam(m)ineruthenium) were examined. The changes in DeltaG for the complexes in various solvents were due to the effects of both solvent donicity and the substituents. The intervalence energy versus DeltaG, DeltaG approximately FDeltaE(1/2) (DeltaE(1/2) = E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) - E(1/2)(Ru(III/II))), plots for the complexes in various solvents suggest a nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) of approximately 6000 cm(-1) (Chen et al. Inorg. Chem. 2000, 39, 189). For [(R-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(5)](2+) and [(et-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(4)(py)](2+) (Ru(NH(3))(4) = trans-tetraam(m)ineruthenium; py = pyridine) in various solvents, the E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) of rutheniumam(m)ine typically was less than the E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) of the ferrocenyl moiety. However, the low-donicity solvents resulted in relatively large values of E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) for [(et-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(4)(py)](2+/3+/4+). Under our unique solvent conditions, a dramatic end-to-end interaction was observed for the trimetal cation, [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](4+), in which the [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](4+) included a central trans-tetraam(m)ineruthenium(III) and a terminal Fe(II)/Fe(III) pair. In general, results of electrochemical studies of [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](2+) indicated both solvent-tunable E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) (1 e(-)) and solvent-insensitive E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) (2 e(-)) redox centers. However, in nitriles, two E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) peaks were found with DeltaE(1/2)(Fe(III/II) - Fe(III/II)) ranging between 83 and 108 mV at a terminal metal-to-metal distance of up to 15.6 A. Furthermore, the bridging dpi orbital of the ruthenium center mediated efficient end-to-end interaction between the combinations of the terminal

  12. Contact hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam restorations may mimic oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisa, C; Taylor, J S; Bernat, J R; Helm, T N

    1999-03-01

    Oral lichenoid lesions caused by hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam fillings may mimic oral lichen planus on clinical and histologic examination. A positive patch test reaction to more than one mercurial allergen increases confidence in the diagnosis and justifies the removal and replacement of all amalgam fillings with those made of other materials. A complete remission may be expected about 3 months after the last amalgam filling is removed.

  13. 'n Ondersoek na die amalgamering van skole in die RSA / André Johann Nel

    OpenAIRE

    Nel, André Johann

    1999-01-01

    Rationalisation, because of a lack of governmental funds, has become part of the education system of the RSA. In schools it implies that teaching posts are being reduced and that more emphasis is placed on the optimum use of physical facilities. For many smaller and rural schools, amalgamation became a possible solution to the problem. The amalgamation of schools however, implies a drastic change in the status quo. The main aim of the study is to investigate amalgamation as ...

  14. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of cysteine using silver and copper solid amalgam electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosypchuk, B; Novotný, L

    2002-04-01

    Silver and copper solid amalgam electrodes (modified with mercury meniscus and based on amalgamation of fine metallic powder) have been successfully tested for cathodic stripping voltammetry of cysteine. In the case of the silver solid amalgam electrode AgSAE the relative standard deviation (RSD) and the detection limit (3 SD) reached +/-2.3% and 3x10(-9) mol l(-1) cysteine, respectively.

  15. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sardenberg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11 were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p < 0.05. The cavities in all the groups presented significantly greater areas after the procedures. However, the amalgam group showed more substantial dental loss. The other three groups presented no statistically significant difference in dental structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  16. Molecular orbital study of coordinated dioxygen. I. Structure and bonding of model monomeric Co(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boča, R.

    1980-08-01

    The CNDO—UHF type of MO—LCAO—SCP calculation is carried out for model systems of dioxygen fixation: O 2 CoCl 4L 2- complexes in which L = none and L = NH 3. A geometry variation is performed with respect to 5 internal coordinates describing the degrees of freedom of the Co—O 2 group. The calculated geometry, spin densities and atomic charges agree with available data based on X-ray and ESR measurements of real dioxygen carriers. Structure and bonding of complexes are discussed in more detail.

  17. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bollini, C G; Giambiagi, M

    2001-01-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I sub r sub i sub n sub g values.

  18. Synthesis of diorganoplatinum(IV) complexes by the Ssbnd S bond cleavage with platinum(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroomand Hosseini, Fatemeh; Rashidi, Mehdi; Nabavizadeh, S. Masoud

    2016-12-01

    Reaction of [PtR2(NN)] (R = Me, p-MeC6H4 or p-MeOC6H4; NN = 2,2‧-bipyridine, 4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) with MeSSMe gives the platinum(IV) complexes cis,trans-[PtR2(SMe)2(NN)]. They are characterized by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The geometries and the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals of Pt(IV) complexes containing Ptsbnd S bonds are studied by means of the density functional theory.

  19. A significant dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and kidney integrity biomarkers: a further assessment of the Casa Pia children's dental amalgam trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, M R

    2013-04-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material. Amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg), and Hg is known to significantly accumulate in the kidney. It was hypothesized that because Hg accumulates in the proximal tubules (PTs), glutathione-S-transferases (GST)-α (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of PT) would be expected to be more related to Hg exposure than GST-π (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of the distal tubules). Urinary biomarkers of kidney integrity were examined in children of 8-18 years old, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study). Our study determined whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and GST-α and GST-π as biomarkers of kidney integrity. Overall, the present study, using a different and more sensitive statistical model than the parent study, revealed a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary levels of GST-α, after covariate adjustment; where as, a nonsignificant relationship was observed with urinary levels of GST-π. Furthermore, it was observed that urinary GST-α levels increased by about 10% over the 8-year course of the study among individuals with an average exposure to amalgams among the study subjects from the amalgam group, in comparison with study subjects with no exposure to dental amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing kidney damage at the level of the PTs in a dose-dependent fashion.

  20. Rhodium(II)-Alkynyl Carbenoids Insertion into Si-H bonds: An Entry to Propargylic Geminal Bis(silanes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Thibaut; Kumar, Rahul; Turcaud, Serge; Micouin, Laurent

    2016-10-07

    α-Alkynyl-α'-trimethylsilylhydrazones are used as novel Rh(II)-carbenoids precursors. These new carbenoids have shown very good reactivity in Si-H insertion reactions, leading to original propargylic geminal-bis(silanes) in a two-step sequential process.

  1. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression.

  2. Association of topoisomerase II with the hepatoma cell nuclear matrix: the role of intermolecular disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S H; Shaper, J H

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies have resulted in conflicting data regarding the recovery of the nuclear enzymes topoisomerase (topo) II and topo I in the nuclear matrix fraction. In the present study we have assessed the effect of systematically altering a single extraction procedure on the distribution of these enzymes during the subfractionation of nuclei from HTC hepatoma tissue culture cells. When nuclear monolayers (prepared by treating attached cells in situ with the neutral detergent Nonidet-P40 at 4 degrees C) were isolated in the presence of the irreversible sulfhydryl blocking reagent iodoacetamide, subsequent treatment with DNase I and RNase A followed by 1.6 M NaCl resulted in structures which were extensively depleted of intranuclear components as assessed by phase contrast microscopy and conventional transmission electron microscopy. These structures contained 12 +/- 4% of the total protein present in the original nuclear monolayers. The lamins and polypeptides with molecular weights comparable to those of actin and vimentin were the predominant polypeptides present on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Western blotting revealed that less than 5% of the total nuclear topo II molecules were present in these structures. In contrast, when the sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent sodium tetrathionate (NaTT) was substituted for iodoacetamide, the same extraction procedure yielded structures containing components of the nucleolus and an extensive intranuclear network. These structures contained a wide variety of nonlamin, nonhistone nuclear polypeptides including 23 +/- 4% of the total nuclear topo II. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed under nonreducing conditions revealed that topo II in these nuclear matrices was present as part of a large disulfide cross-linked complex. Treatment of these structures with reducing agents in 1.6 M NaCl released the topo II. In contrast, topo I did not form disulfide cross-linked oligomers and was not detectable in any of these nuclease

  3. Rondeau Seminars amalgamated mid-sagittal (lateral) cephalometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    The author presents a comprehensive International Association for Orthodontics--Rondeau Seminars Amalgamated Mid-sagittal (Lateral) Cephalometric Analysis. Norms on the Cephalometric Data Sheet are age and gender specific for the Caucasian population and the postings are color coded for visual attraction. If the patient is ofa different ethnic group, the Norms should be adjusted accordingly. This Cephalometric Analysis is comprised often Sections, in alphabetical order and twenty nine Factors. The author expanded Rondeau Seminars Cephalometric Analysis by only six Factors, thus fulfilling the requirement for the case presentation for the Fellow of the IAO and the Diplomate ofthe IBO.

  4. From Strong Amalgamability to Modularity of Quantifier-Free Interpolation

    CERN Document Server

    Bruttomesso, Roberto; Ranise, Silvio

    2012-01-01

    The use of interpolants in verification is gaining more and more importance. Since theories used in applications are usually obtained as (disjoint) combinations of simpler theories, it is important to modularly re-use interpolation algorithms for the component theories. We show that a sufficient and necessary condition to do this for quantifier-free interpolation is that the component theories have the 'strong (sub-)amalgamation' property. Then, we provide an equivalent syntactic characterization, identify a sufficient condition, and design a combined quantifier-free interpolation algorithm capable of handling both convex and non-convex theories, that subsumes and extends most existing work on combined interpolation.

  5. Self-assembly of a Co(II) dimer through H-bonding of water molecules to a 3D open-framework structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sujit K Ghosh; Parimal K Bharadwaj

    2005-01-01

    Reaction of pyridine-2,4,6-tricarboxylic acid (ptcH3) with Co(NO3)2.6H2O in presence of 4,4'-bipyridine (4,4'-bpy) in water at room temperature results in the formation of {[Co2(ptcH)2(4,4'-bpy)(H2O)4].2H2O}, (1). The solid-state structure reveals that the compound is a dimeric Co(II) complex assembled to a 3D architecture via an intricate intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen-bonding interactions involving water molecules and carboxylate oxygens of the ligand ptcH2-. Crystal data: monoclinic, space group 21/, = 11.441(5) Å, = 20.212(2) Å, = 7.020(5) Å, = 103.77(5)°, = 1576.7(1) Å3, = 2, 1 = 0.0363, 2 = 0.0856, = 1.000.

  6. [Black or white--is amalgam 'out'? Part 1. Amalgam or composite: which of these 2 materials is the most deleterious?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    Dental amalgam containing mercury has been condemned because of its toxicity and hence to be damaging of harmful to the general health. It must be clear that many sensational, confusing and misleading reports have been published. Today there is evidence that dental amalgam in the oral cavity does not harm anyone's health. For those who are condemning amalgam there an abundant number of alarming reports taking into consideration the biologic effects of resin composites: methacrylate allergy for dentists and dental technicians, the three-finger-syndrome due to contact with liquid resin, allergic reactions at the level of the airways and breathing problems caused by dust particles (esp. composite particles after polishing procedures) have been described. It can be concluded that dental amalgam is not more toxic than resin composite in light of both patients' and dental care providers' health. Recent investigations demonstrated higher than expected health risks with resin composites.

  7. Gastrointestinal and in vitro release of copper, cadmium, indium, mercury and zinc from conventional and copper-rich amalgams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D. (NIOM, Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials, Oslo, Norway); Gjerdet, N. (Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Bergen, Norway); Paulsen, G. (Denatal Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway)

    1983-01-01

    Particles of a conventional lathe-cut, a spherical non-gamma 2 and a copper amalgam have been gastrointestinally administered to rats for the purpose of evaluation of the dissolution resistance. The animals were sacrificed after 20 hrs. The contents of copper, cadmium, indium, mercury and zinc in kidney, liver, lung or blood were measured using nuclear tracer techniques. From a copper amalgam an extreme release of copper was demonstrated. This study simulates the clinical conditions of elemental release from swallowed amalgam particles after amalgam insertion or after removal of old amalgam fillings. Specimens of the same types of amalgams were also exposed to artificial saliva for a period of 10 days. The amounts of copper and mercury released were measured with flame and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry respectively. The levels of copper and mercury released from the copper amalgam were approximately 50 times those of the two other amalgam types studied.

  8. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardenberg, Fernanda; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  9. On Reduced Amalgamated Free Products of C*-algebras and the MF-Property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seebach, Jonas A.

    We establish an isomorphism of the group von Neumann algebra of an amalgamated free product of countable Abelian discrete groups. This result is then used to give some new examples of reduced group $ C^* $-algebras which are MF. Finally, we give a characterization of the amalgamated free products...

  10. EDS and μ-XRF mapping of amalgam degradation products in ancient mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizio, E; Orsega, E F; Falcone, R; Vallotto, M

    2014-12-01

    An amalgam mirror is a mirror type, used from the fifteenth century until the end of the nineteenth century, where the reflective layer is constituted by a tin amalgam layer adhered to a glass sheet. In this work, two amalgam mirrors samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer and by micro-X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping to go deeply into the understanding of the degradation mechanism of the amalgam layer of ancient mirrors. The investigation has been focused for the first time on the reflective surface of the amalgam layer adherent to the glass sheet to better understand the processes of amalgam corrosion. The two amalgam degradation compounds, romarchite and cassiterite, has been spatially differentiated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) maps. SEM images and micro-X-ray fluorescence and EDS maps showed that the amalgam degradation products grow up to form hemispherical stratified calottes. This structure is probably due to a mechanism involves cyclic phases and oxygen radial diffusion from a superficial oxidation nucleus.

  11. Tin amalgam mirrors: investigation by XRF, SEM-EDS, XRD and EPMA-WDS mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizio, E.; Orsega, E. F.; Sommariva, G.; Falcone, R.

    2013-06-01

    Ancient mirrors were constituted by a tin-mercury amalgam layer superimposed to a glass sheet. This was the only one method used until the nineteenth century, when the wet silvering process was invented. The tin amalgam is a binary alloy of tin and mercury constituted by two different phases: a mercury-rich liquid phase and a tin-rich solid phase. The amalgam alteration produces mercury loss and a general growth of the solid crystalline phase. In addition, tin dioxide and monoxide are formed with a consequent decrease of the amalgam adhesion to the glass. These degradation phenomena led to reduction or disappearance of the mirror reflective power. The aim of this study was the characterization of the amalgam layers of eight mirror samples dating during the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and by a Scanning Electron Microscope with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and for the first time on this type of alloy by X-ray Fluorescence and EPMA-WDS (Electron Probe Micro Analysis with Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry) elemental mapping. The contents of tin, mercury, and some trace elements in the amalgam layers have been determined. The investigation of the superficial patterns of the amalgam by SEM, EPMA-WDS mapping, and SEM-EDS allowed a first understanding of some morphologies and processes of the degradation of the amalgam layer.

  12. An elementary study of deformation of molar teeth during amalgam restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J G

    1977-06-01

    A technique using an optical comparator was employed to examine the dimensional changes resulting from cavity preparation, application of the matrix and packing with amalgam in three extracted molar teeth. The changes have been reported and the nature of the change discussed. A modification in the use of the matrix and amalgam packing technique is suggested.

  13. Synthesis, structure determination, and spectroscopic/computational characterization of a series of Fe(II)-thiolate model complexes: implications for Fe-S bonding in superoxide reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Adam T; Halfen, Heather L; Halfen, Jason A; Brunold, Thomas C

    2005-02-16

    A combined synthetic/spectroscopic/computational approach has been employed to prepare and characterize a series of Fe(II)-thiolate complexes that model the square-pyramidal [Fe(II)(N(His))(4)(S(Cys))] structure of the reduced active site of superoxide reductases (SORs), a class of enzymes that detoxify superoxide in air-sensitive organisms. The high-spin (S = 2) Fe(II) complexes [(Me(4)cyclam)Fe(SC(6)H(4)-p-OMe)]OTf (2) and [FeL]PF(6) (3) (where Me(4)cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetramethylcyclam and L is the pentadentate monoanion of 1-thioethyl-4,8,11-trimethylcyclam) were synthesized and subjected to structural, magnetic, and electrochemical characterization. X-ray crystallographic studies confirm that 2 and 3 possess an N(4)S donor set similar to that found for the SOR active site and reveal molecular geometries intermediate between square pyramidal and trigonal bipyramidal for both complexes. Electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies were utilized, in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) and semiemperical INDO/S-CI calculations, to probe the ground and excited states of complexes 2 and 3, as well as the previously reported Fe(II) SOR model [(L(8)py(2))Fe(SC(6)H(4)-p-Me)]BF(4) (1) (where L(8)py(2) is a tetradentate pyridyl-appended diazacyclooctane macrocycle). These studies allow for a detailed interpretation of the S-->Fe(II) charge transfer transitions observed in the absorption and MCD spectra of complexes 1-3 and provide significant insights into the nature of Fe(II)-S bonding in complexes with axial thiolate ligation. Of the three models investigated, complex 3 exhibits an absorption spectrum that is particularly similar to the one reported for the reduced SOR enzyme (SOR(red)), suggesting that this model accurately mimics key elements of the electronic structure of the enzyme active site; namely, highly covalent Fe-S pi- and sigma-interactions. These spectral

  14. Interplay of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in making of inclusion/pseudo-inclusion complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of a salophen type ligand: Crystal structures and spectral aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambili, K. U.; Sithambaresan, M.; Kurup, M. R. Prathapachandra

    2017-04-01

    Three novel photoluminescent materials were synthesized by treating Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) acetate salts with a Schiff base prepared from 3-ethoxysalicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzylamine. Among the prepared complexes, Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are inclusion compounds while Zn(II) complex is a pseudo-inclusion compound. They were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible and EPR spectra. Single crystal XRD studies of these complexes suggest that Ni(II) and Cu(II) are in a distorted square planar environment while the spatial arrangement of donor atoms in Zn(II) complex is best described as distorted square based pyramid although significant distortion towards trigonal bipyramid is noticed. Stabilized crystal packing of the complexes is established via supramolecular interactions. The metal chelate rings as the π system for C-H···π interactions found in Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes explicit the concept of metalloaromaticity. TG-DTG studies reveal that all the complexes are thermally stable. Both ligand and complexes exhibit intense photoluminescence in near UV region. However, Zn(II) complex giving an intense blue-green emission spectrum at maximum wavelength of 518 nm with shoulder peaks, could be used for optoelectronic applications.

  15. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) < Cd(II) < Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  16. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  17. A variety of amalgamated allusion in Saeb’s sonnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Haghjoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poetic figures of speech are among the factors which their prominence in a poet’s poetry makes up his/her specific style. One of the figures of speech and poetic techniques is allusive figures of speech or amalgamated allusions. As the name entails, these are types of figures in which allusion is located at the center and amalgamates with other figures. Such amalgamation brings about a novel complicated figure of speech.  One special type of allusive figures of speech is an allusion which is occasionally amalgamated with metaphor and ambiguity, and at times in addition to metaphor and ambiguity with simile. The origin of this figure, which is recently referred to as “metaphoric ambiguous allusion, is traced back to Hakim baz in Persian literature. Although, poetry of Hafez is replete with metaphoric ambiguous allusion, it is considerably ubiquitous in Indian style in a way that its ignorance especially in Saeb’s poetry implies the denial of one of its foremost stylistic qualities. The mixed nature of this figure and the presence of several robust figures besides each other which are the basis of poetic fantasy and a fantastic presentation is created by combination of these figures. These figures invite readers into a mode of reflection and thinking and opens corridors of fantasy towards him replete with unsurpassable satisfaction. Such amalgamated figure is formed when a poet grants an allusion to a phenomenon which in reality the phenomenon owns such quality but in a different conceptualization. Supposedly, the given figure was Saeb’s major artifact which helped him to fulfill his distinct poetic quality i.e. unsurpassed power of creating vivacious contents. The present article intended to conduct a supplementary reanalysis of “metaphoric ambiguous allusion and its different varieties and examined it in Saeb’s Poetry. Metaphoric ambiguous allusion refers to a metaphor which alludes to something. The characteristics of the

  18. Combined analysis of chemical bonding in a Cu(II) dimer using QTAIM, Voronoi tessellation and Hirshfeld surface approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologzhanina, Anna V; Kats, Svitlana V; Penkova, Larisa V; Pavlenko, Vadim A; Efimov, Nikolay N; Minin, Vadim V; Eremenko, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    Interaction of 1-(1H-pyrazol-5-yl)ethanone oxime (H2PzOx) with copper(II) chloride in the presence of pyridine afforded a binuclear discrete [Cu2(HPzOx)2Cl2py2] complex, which was characterized by Fourier transform-IR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, magnetochemistry and high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments. Multipole refinement of X-ray diffraction data and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations of an isolated molecule allowed charge and spin distributions to be obtained for this compound. Magnetochemistry data, EPR spectra and DFT calculations of an isolated molecule show antiferromagnetic coupling between copper(II) ions. The spin distribution suggests an exchange pathway via the bridging pyrazole ring in the equatorial plane of the CuN4Cl coordination polyhedron, thus providing support for the classical superexchange mechanism; the calculated value of the magnetic coupling constant -2J is equal to 220 cm(-1), which compares well with the experimental value of 203 ± 2 cm(-1). Chemical connectivity was derived by Bader's 'quantum theory of atoms in molecules' and compared with Voronoi tessellation and Hirshfeld surface representations of crystal space. All methodologies gave a similar qualitative and semi-quantitative description of intra- and intermolecular connectivity.

  19. One-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bonded Infinite Chain from Nickel(II Tetraaza Macrocyclic Complex and 1,2-Cyclopentanedicarboxylate Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Choi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of [Ni(L]Cl2·2H2O (L = 3,14-dimethyl-2,6,13,17-tetraazatricyclo [14,4,01.18,07.12]docosane with trans-1,2-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (H2-cpdc yields a 1D hydrogen-bonded infinite chain with formula [Ni(L(H-cpdc-2] (1. This complex has been characterized by X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The crystal structure of 1 exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry about Ni atom with four nitrogen atoms of the macrocycle and two oxygen atoms of the H-cpdc- ligand at the axial position. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system P21/c with a = 8.7429(17, b = 10.488(2, c = 18.929(4 Å, β = 91.82(2, V = 1734.8(6 Å3, Z = 2. Electronic spectrum of 1 reveals a high-spin octahedral environment. Cyclic voltammetry of 1 undergoes two waves of a one-electron transfer corresponding to NiII/NiIII and NiII/NiI processes.

  20. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, electronic spectrum, natural bond orbital, and Mulliken charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate copper (II) complex, [Cu(DDTC)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez Soto, C A; Costa, A C; Ramos, J M; Vieira, L S; Rost, N C V; Versiane, O; Rangel, J L; Mondragón, M A; Raniero, L; Martin, A A

    2013-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to study the interactions of the normal modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate copper (II) complex, [Cu(DDTC)2] on nano-structured mixture silver-gold surfaces and on silver surfaces. The electronic spectrum of this complex was measured and the charge transfer bands were assigned through the TD-PBE1PBE procedure. Natural bond orbital (NBO) were also carried out to study the Cu(II) hybridation leading to the square planar geometry of the framework of the [Cu(DDTC)2] complex, and to study which are the donor NBO and the acceptor NBO in meaningful charge transfer through the Second Order Perturbation Theory Analysis of the Fox Matrix in NBO basis. To see the electronic dispersion, the Mulliken electronic charges (MAC) were calculated for each normal mode and correlated with the SERS effect. Full assignment of the SERS spectra was also supported by carefully analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes.

  1. Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G M; Wilson, R; Allard, D; Purtill, C; Douma, S; Gravière, J

    2011-09-15

    Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk. Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam. Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population. Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m(3) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m(3) established by the California Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors.

  2. Galvanic corrosion and cytotoxic effects of amalgam and gallium alloys coupled to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, J D; Johansson, B I

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare the galvanic corrosion of a conventional, a dispersed high-copper, and a palladium-enriched spherical high-copper amalgam and a gallium alloy coupled to titanium in saline and cell culture solutions, and to evaluate the effects of the couples on cultured cells. The potentials and charge transfers between amalgams and titanium were measured by electrochemical corrosion methods. Cytotoxicity of the couples, as indicated by the uptake of neutral red vital stain, was determined in 24-h direct contact human gingival fibroblast cell cultures. Results of this study indicated that before connecting the high-copper amalgams to titanium, the amalgams exhibited more positive potentials which resulted in initial negative charge transfers, i.e. corrosion of titanium. However, this initial corrosion appeared to cause titanium to passivate, and a shift in galvanic currents to positive charge transfers, i.e. corrosion of the amalgam samples. Lower galvanic currents were measured for the amalgam-titanium couples as compared to the gallium alloy-titanium couple. Coupling the conventional or the palladium-enriched high-copper amalgams to titanium did not significantly affect the uptake of neutral red as compared to cells not exposed to any test alloy. However, significant cytotoxic effects were observed when the dispersed-type high-copper amalgam and the gallium alloy were coupled to titanium. Even though the corrosion currents measured for these couples were less than gold alloys coupled to amalgam, these results suggest there is the potential for released galvanic corrosion products to become cytotoxic. These data warrant further investigations into the effects of coupling amalgam and gallium alloys to titanium in the oral environment.

  3. Osmium(II)–bis(dihydrogen) complexes containing caryl,CNHC–chelate ligands: Preparation, bonding situation, and acidity

    OpenAIRE

    Bolaño, Tamara; Esteruelas, Miguel A.; Fernández, Israel; Oñate, Enrique; Palacios, Adrián; Tsai, Jui-Yi; Xia, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    The hexahydride complex OsH6(PiPr3)2 (1) reacts with the BF4-salts of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-1-H-benzimidazolium, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-1-H-5,6-dimethyl-benzimidazolium, and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-1-H-imidazolium to give the respective trihydride-osmium(IV) derivatives OsH3(κ2-Caryl,CNHC)(PiPr3)2 (2–4). The protonation of these compounds with HBF4·OEt2 produces the reduction of the metal center and the formation of the bis(dihydrogen)-osmium(II) complexes [Os(κ2-Caryl,CNHC)(η2-H2)2(PiPr3)2]BF4 (5–7). DFT c...

  4. TLC of alkaloids on cyanopropyl bonded stationary phases. Part II. Connection with RP18 and silica plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruczynik, Anna; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika; Plech, Tomasz; Tuzimski, Tomasz; Hajnos, Michał Ł; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Gadzikowska, Maria; Rompała, Anna

    2008-04-01

    Some standards of the alkaloids and synthetic or natural mixtures are separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on different adsorbent layers. Normal- and reversed-phase systems are used to obtain significant differences in the separation selectivity. Optimization of the one-dimensional TLC separation of the alkaloids' standards is performed on cyanopropyl-silica, RP18W, and silica layers in various eluents containing (besides diluent and modifier) silanol blockers, such as diethyl amine or ammonia. The most selective systems are used for the separation of the alkaloids' mixtures by two-dimensional TLC with an adsorbent gradient method. The mixtures of alkaloids or plant extracts (Chelidonium majus, Fumaria officinalis, or Glaucium flavum) are chromatographed in system I; the plates are connected with the plate pre-coated with various adsorbent, and partly separated fractions are transferred to the second layer and developed in system II. CN-silica-RP18W and CN-silica-silica are used as the connected layers. The alkaloids are identified by R(F) values of standards, and the components of plant extracts are identified in both systems, and by the comparison of UV spectra obtained in diode array detector densitometry.

  5. Process Optimization for Valuable Metal Recovery from Dental Amalgam Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Parra–Mesa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the methodology used for optimizing leaching in a semi pilot plant is presented. This leaching process was applied to recover value metals from dental amalgam residues. 23 factorial design was used to characterize the process during the first stage and in the second one, a central compound rotational design was used for modeling copper percentage dissolved, a function of the nitric acid concentration, leaching time and temperature. This model explained the 81% of the response variability, which is considered satisfactory given the complexity of the process kinetics and, furthermore, it allowed the definition of the operation conditions for better copper recovery, which this was of 99.15%, at a temperature of 55°C, a concentration of 30% by weight and a time of 26 hours.

  6. "A Future Amalgamation Between the Scientist and the Clinician?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood-Small, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine is gaining momentum and analytical methods such as MS are ideally situated to provide coherent imaging of human disease. The cancer research field is already starting to benefit from the MS imaging applications; non-cancerous diseases will hopefully enjoy the same success. Often, the way forward is to embrace several techniques, which can complement and verify each other. This approach can be seen as less confrontational as everyone can play a part in the development of a new working practice. Stakeholders, professional bodies, and instrument manufacturers will be open to maximizing the patient benefit; investment is more likely given the past performance and reputation of the collaborative highly skilled team.With this in mind, how close are we to a future amalgamation between the scientist and the clinician? Can we accelerate the integration of innovative bench technologies into the clinical setting and bring state-of-the-art imaging diagnostics to the patient bedside or General Practitioners treatment room?

  7. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Pulpotomized Primary Molars Restored with Stainless Steel Crown and Amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghgoo R.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Pulpotomy is the most common pulp treatment in primary teeth. Final restoration of the pulpotomized primary molar can affect the success rate of treatment. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the success rate of formocresol pulpotomy in primary molars restored with stainless steel crowns as compared to those restored with amalgam.Materials and Method: In this randomized clinical trial study, 110 primary molars to be treated with pulpotomy were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. Then these teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: amalgam and crown. 55 teeth were restored by stainless steel crown and 55 by amalgam. The clinical and radiographic evaluation was done at 6-12-24 months. The data were analyzed by Exact Fisher test.Results: During the 6 months of evaluation, no clinical and radiographic failure was seen. In the 12 months of follow up in the amalgam group, 1 case showed swelling and furcal radiolucency. During the 24 months of evaluation, mobility was seen in 2 teeth in the crown group, and in the amalgam group radiolucency was seen in 1 case, mobility in 1 case, and internal resorption in 1 tooth. Exact Fisher test showed that there was no significant difference in the success rate of pulpotomized molars restored by stainless steel crown and amalgam.Conclusion: If the tooth is selected correctly for pulpotomy, SSC and amalgam restoration can be used as the final restoration.

  8. Secondary Caries Development in in situ Gaps next to Composite and Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Nicolien K; Montagner, Anelise F; van de Sande, Françoise H; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Opdam, Niek J M; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D J N M

    2015-01-01

    This in situ study investigated the secondary caries development in dentin in gaps next to composite and amalgam. For 21 days, 14 volunteers wore a modified occlusal splint containing human dentin samples with an average gap of 215 µm (SD=55 µm) restored with three different materials: Filtek Supreme composite, Clearfil AP-X composite and Tytin amalgam. Eight times a day, the splint with samples was dipped in a 20% sucrose solution for 10 min. Before and after caries development, specimens were imaged with transversal wavelength independent microradiography, and lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) were calculated. The LD and ML of the three restoration materials were compared within patients using paired t tests (α=5%). In total 38 composite samples (Filtek n=19 and AP-X n=19) and 19 amalgam samples could be used for data analysis. AP-X composite presented the highest mean values of LD and ML of the three restorative materials. Amalgam showed statistically significantly less ML (Δ=452 µm×vol%) than the combined composite materials (p=0.036). When comparing amalgam to the separate composite materials, only AP-X composite showed higher ML (Δ=515 µm×vol%) than amalgam (p=0.034). Analysis of LD showed the same trends, but these were not statistically significant. In conclusion, amalgam showed reduced secondary caries progression in dentin in gaps compared to composite materials tested in this in situ model.

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. Influence of dental biofilm on release of mercury from amalgam exposed to carbamide peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Doron; Blank, Ori; Rotstein, Ilan

    2003-10-15

    Tooth bleaching is a popular procedure in modern aesthetic dentistry. Bleaching agents may affect amalgam restorations by altering the release of mercury. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of biofilm-coated amalgam restorations on the release of mercury in the presence of carbamide peroxide. Samples of SDI and Valliant amalgams were submerged for either 14 days or 7 months in buffered KCl after which they were coated with saliva, bacteria, and polysaccharides. The samples were exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) for 24 h. The amount of mercury released was examined for 120 h. Results showed that most of mercury release occurred within the first 24 h, after which the release rate decreased sharply. After 120 h the release of mercury from the tested samples was minimal and similar to the control group. The presence of biofilm coating on the amalgam samples did not induce the release of mercury but tended to reduce mercury release into the surrounding environment. CP induces the release of mercury from amalgam samples. However, the presence of biofilm did not prevent large amounts of mercury release from amalgam coated with biofilms and exposed to CP. This study indicates that dental biofilm may retard the release of mercury from amalgam restorations.

  11. The Copper concentration variation to physical properties of high copper amalgam alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminatun Aminatun

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The function of copper (Cu inside amalgam is to increase hardness and impact force and to decrease thermal expansion coefficient. In general, amalgam which is used in dentistry and available in the market is contain Cu 22%, while the maximum Cu concentration is 30%. It is necessary to determine the concentration Cu does generate the best physical properties to be used as dental restorative agent. Amalgam is made by mixing blended-metal Ag-Sn-Cu (with Cu concentration of 13%, 21%, 22%, and 29% and Hg, stirred manually in a bowl for 15 minutes,leave it in temperature 27°C for 24 hours to become hardened. The result of X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, analyzed by Rietveld method and Rietica program, shows amalgam with Cu 29% concentration for Cu3Sn compound density is 31.790 sma/Å3, for Ag2Hg3 compound is 41.733 sma/ Å3, a Cu3Sn relative weight percentage of 43.23%, Ag2Hg3 of 54.54%, Cu 7Hg6 of 2.23% and hardness of Cu 29% is 90.700 ± 0.005 kgf/mm2. These numbers are the highest values on Cu 29% concentrations compared to other copper concentration variants. Whereas amalgam thermal expansion coefficient on Cu 29% is (2.17 ± 0.9110-3 mm/°C is the lowest value compared to other Cu concentration. The conclution is that adding Cu concentration into amalgam will increase density value, Cu3Sn relative weight percentage, hardness level and will decrease amalgam thermal expansion coefficient. Amalgam 29% Cu concentration has better physical properties compared to amalgam Cu 22% concentration.

  12. Functionally generated amalgam stops for single complete denture: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar G Patil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Single complete denture opposing natural dentition is a common occurrence in clinical practice. This article reports a case of a single complete denture with a technique of occlusal refinement by func-tionally generated amalgam stops condensed in prepared resin teeth after initial balancing of the den-ture with semi-adjustable articulator. This technique provides intimacy of contact in all excursions by carving the amalgam in plastic stage. Amalgam stops improve the efficiency of the resin teeth. Den-tures fabricated using this technique require fewer and simpler post-insertion adjustments.

  13. Investigation of the mechanism of mercury removal from a silver dental amalgam alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. DJURDJEVIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of silver dental amalgam decomposition and the mercury removal mechanism was performed. The decomposition process was analysed during thermal treatment in the temperature interval from 400 °C to 850 °C and for times from 0.5 to 7.5 h. The chemical compositions of the silver dental amalgam alloy and the treated alloy were tested and microstructure analysis using optical and scanning electron microscopy was carried out. The phases were identified using energy disperse electron probe microanalysis. A mechanism for the mercury removal process from silver dental amalgam alloy is suggested.

  14. Comparison of halogen bonding networks with Ru(ii) complexes and analysis of the influence of the XB interactions on their reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Marta E G; Egido, Irene; Hortelano, Carlos; López-López, María; Gómez-Sal, Pilar

    2017-07-20

    Coordination compounds of formula [Ru(Cl)2(CNR)4] are interesting building blocks for the preparation of halogen bonding supramolecular networks, since the chloride ligand is a good XB acceptor. When using I2 as the XB donor, an unexpected reaction on the ruthenium coordination sphere happens where the chloride ligands are substituted by iodides. The isolation of several intermediates with different substitution degrees and showing XB interactions in a solid state network evidenced the clear influence of the XB species in this unusual reaction process. The extension of the studies to bromine gave the analogous result, i.e. the substitution of the chloride ligands by bromides. Furthermore, changing the organic substituent in the isocyanide ligands from alkyl to aryl does not affect the outcome of the reaction; however the process is faster when the alkyl substituents are present. In the course of the study of these reactions we have isolated a whole range of XB-based networks were interactions such as ClI-I, BrBr-Br, II-I and IBr-Br are present, a systematic comparison of the XB structural features for the different networks isolated and the influence in their reactivity has been performed.

  15. Self-Assembly of a 1D Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer from a Hexamethyltetraaza Macrocyclic Nickel(II Complex and Isophthalic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Taek Lim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The compound [Ni(L(isoph2][Ni(L]·8H2O (1; L = C-meso-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane; H2-isoph = isophthalic acid has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 exhibits a geometrically symmetric core with a {4/6} coordination number set. The coordination environment around the Ni(1 ion is a distorted octahedron, while the geometry around the four-coordinate Ni(2 is depicted as square planar in 1D hydrogen-bonded infinite chain. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic system P-1 with a = 8.602(2, b = 10.684(7, c = 16.550(3 Å, a = 91.04(4, b = 94.09(2, g = 111.09(4°, V = 1413.9(10 Å3, Z = 1. The cyclic voltammogram of 1 undergoes one-electron wave corresponding to NiII/NiI process. The electronic spectra, electrochemical and TGA behavior of the complex are significantly affected by the nature of the hexamethyltetraaza macrocycle and the axial isoph2− ligand.

  16. Luminescent pincer platinum(II) complexes with emission quantum yields up to almost unity: photophysics, photoreductive C-C bond formation, and materials applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Pui-Keong; Cheng, Gang; Tong, Glenna So Ming; To, Wai-Pong; Kwong, Wai-Lun; Low, Kam-Hung; Kwok, Chi-Chung; Ma, Chensheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2015-02-09

    Luminescent pincer-type Pt(II)  complexes supported by C-deprotonated π-extended tridentate RC^N^NR' ligands and pentafluorophenylacetylide ligands show emission quantum yields up to almost unity. Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements and time-dependent DFT calculations together reveal the dependence of excited-state structural distortions of [Pt(RC^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] on the positional isomers of the tridentate ligand. Pt complexes [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-Ar)] are efficient photocatalysts for visible-light-induced reductive CC bond formation. The [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] complexes perform strongly as phosphorescent dopants for green- and red-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with external quantum efficiency values over 22.1 %. These complexes are also applied in two-photon cellular imaging when incorporated into mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

  17. Transition metal chemistry of cyclodiphosphanes containing phosphine and amide-phosphine functionalities: formation of a stable dipalladium(II) complex containing a Pd-P σ-bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, Maravanji S; Venkateswaran, Ramalingam; Mague, Joel T

    2010-12-14

    Cyclodiphosphazanes containing phosphine or phosphine plus amide functionalities {((t)BuNP(OC(6)H(4)PPh(2)-o)}(2) (3), {(t)BuNP(OCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2))}(2) (4), {(t)BuHN((t)BuNP)(2)OC(6)H(4)PPh(2)-o} (5), and {(t)BuHN((t)BuNP)(2)OCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)} (6) were synthesized by reacting cis-{(t)BuNPCl}(2) (1) and cis-[(t)BuHN((t)BuNP)(2)Cl] (2) with corresponding phosphine substituted nucleophiles. The reactions of 3 and 5 with excess of elemental sulfur or selenium produce the corresponding tetra and trichalcogenides, {((t)BuNP(E)(OC(6)H(4)P(E)Ph(2)-o)}(2) (7, E = S; 8, E = Se) and {(t)BuHN((t)BuNP)(2)OC(6)H(4)P(E)Ph(2)-o} (9, E = S; 10, E = Se), respectively, in quantitative yields. The reactions between 3 and [Rh(COD)Cl](2) or [M(COD)Cl](2) (M = Pd or Pt) afford bischelated complexes [Rh(CO)Cl{(t)BuNP(OC(6)H(4)PPh(2)-o)}](2) (11), and [MCl(2){(t)BuNP(OC(6)H(4)PPh(2)-o)}](2) (12, M = Pd; 13, M = Pt) in good yield. The 1 : 2 reaction between 3 and [PdCl(η(3)-C(3)H(5))](2) in dichloromethane resulted initially in the formation of a tripalladium complex of the type [Pd(3)Cl(4)(η(3)-C(3)H(5))(2){(t)BuNPOC(6)H(4)PPh(2)}(2)] (14a) which readily reacts with moisture to form an interesting binuclear complex, [Cl(2)Pd{μ-(PPh(2)C(6)H(4)OP(μ-(t)BuN)(2)P(O)}(μ-Cl)Pd(OC(6)H(4)PPh(2))] (14b). One of the palladium(II) atoms forms a simple six-membered chelate ring, whereas the other palladium(II) atom facilitates the moisture assisted cleavage of one of the endocyclic P-O bonds followed by the oxidation of P(III) to P(V) thus forming a Pd-P σ-bond. The broken ortho-phosphine substituted phenoxide ion forms a five-membered palladacycle with the same palladium(II) atom. Similar reaction of 5 with [PdCl(η(3)-C(3)H(5))](2) also affords a binuclear complex [{PdCl(η(3)-C(3)H(5))}(t)BuNH{(t)BuNP}(2)OC(6)H(4)PPh(2){PdCl(2)}] (15) containing a PdCl(2) moiety which forms a six-membered chelate ring via ring-phosphorus and PPh(2) moieties on one side and a PdCl(η(3)-C(3)H(5)) fragment

  18. Field evaluation of mercury vapor analytical methods: comparison of the "double amalgam method" and ISO 17733.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Mitsutoshi; Joeng, Jee Yeon; Ishihara, Nobuo; Serita, Fumio; Kohyama, Norihiko

    2006-04-01

    In this study, a gold amalgam method called the "Double amalgam method" was compared with the ISO 17733 method for mercury vapor analysis method. In terms of sensitivity and ease of operation, the amalgamation method is superior to the oxidation method. Two parallel samplings were carried out in this research at a button battery factory, where the mercury vapor level in the air was about 0.001 mg/m3 and at a fluorescent lamp factory, where the mercury vapor level was about 0.015 mg/m3. In the both cases, the measured values of the two showed good agreement with each other. As these two workplaces represent typical mercury levels in industries today, the double amalgam method is applicable to working environment measurement.

  19. Managing the phase-down of amalgam: Part I. Educational and training issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2013-08-01

    Following the recently agreed Minamata Convention, a phase-down in the use of dental amalgam will become a priority for the profession. With a lead-in period of a number of years, important changes in the mind-set of the profession are required to ensure that patient safety is not compromised. Posterior composites have been a viable, and in many cases preferable, alternative to amalgam for many years. However, notwithstanding considerable developments in dental school teaching on the application and placement of posterior composites, growing evidence to support the use of composites in the restoration of posterior teeth and advances in composite systems, many practitioners remain reluctant to place composite rather than amalgam. This paper considers the present and future use of posterior composites and highlights ways in which dental school teaching and continuing professional development (CPD) may contribute to the successful phase-down, and now inevitable discontinuation, in the use of dental amalgam.

  20. Amalgam contact hypersensitivity lesion: an unusual presentation-report of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarayan, Bk; Maligi, Pm; Smitha, T; Patil, Us

    2014-09-01

    Amalgam or its components may cause Type IV hypersensitivity reactions on the oral mucosa. These amalgam contact hypersensitivity lesions (ACHL) present as white striae and plaques, erythematous, erosive, atrophic, or ulcerative lesions. Postinflammatory pigmentation in such lesions and pigmentation due to amalgam incorporation in the soft tissue have been reported in the literature. However, ACHL presenting primarily as a black pigmented lesion is extremely rare if not reported. The clinician should be aware of one such presentation of ACHL; we report a unique case of ACHL in a 30-year-old female with such a pigmented lesion in close contact with amalgam restorations. The lesion regressed considerably in a year after replacement of the restoration with posterior composites.

  1. ON THE WEIGHTED VARIABLE EXPONENT AMALGAM SPACE W (Lp(x), Lqm)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Turan GURKANLI; Ismail AYDIN

    2014-01-01

    In [4] , a new family W (Lp(x), Lqm) of Wiener amalgam spaces was defined and investigated some properties of these spaces, where local component is a variable exponent Lebesgue space Lp(x) (R) and the global component is a weighted Lebesgue space Lqm (R). This present paper is a sequel to our work [4]. In Section 2, we discuss necessary and sufficient conditions for the equality W Lp(x), Lqm=Lq (R) . Later we give some characterization of Wiener amalgam space WLp(x), Lqm. In Section 3 we define the Wiener amalgam space W FLp(x),Lq m and investigate some properties of this space, where F Lp(x) is the image of Lp(x) under the Fourier transform. In Section 4, we discuss boundedness of the Hardy-Littlewood maximal operator between some Wiener amalgam spaces.

  2. Daya Antibakteri Bahan Tumpat Amalgam dan Resin Komposit Berfluor Terhadap Bakteri Streptococcus Mutans Serotipe KPSK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Ayu Nyoman Putri Artiningsih

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to study the difference in the antibacterial capacity of two kinds of filling materials, namely amalgam and composite resin, on S. mutans KPSK2 bacteria with different times of treatment. In total, 48 amalgam and composite resin samples each were prepared and then divided into four groups of treatment. Of each group, 6 samples were used to count the number of bacterial colonies and 6 samples to count the right obstacle zone. The results show that the best antibacterial capacity of composite resin occurred within one week, while for amalgam the best performance appears within one day. The antibacterial capacity of fluorine containing composites is stronger than that of amalgam for a time of 1 to 2 weeks.

  3. New science challenges old notion that mercury dental amalgam is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, Kristin G; Kern, Janet K; Haley, Boyd E; Geier, David A; King, Paul G; Sykes, Lisa K; Geier, Mark R

    2014-02-01

    Mercury dental amalgam has a long history of ostensibly safe use despite its continuous release of mercury vapor. Two key studies known as the Children's Amalgam Trials are widely cited as evidence of safety. However, four recent reanalyses of one of these trials now suggest harm, particularly to boys with common genetic variants. These and other studies suggest that susceptibility to mercury toxicity differs among individuals based on multiple genes, not all of which have been identified. These studies further suggest that the levels of exposure to mercury vapor from dental amalgams may be unsafe for certain subpopulations. Moreover, a simple comparison of typical exposures versus regulatory safety standards suggests that many people receive unsafe exposures. Chronic mercury toxicity is especially insidious because symptoms are variable and nonspecific, diagnostic tests are often misunderstood, and treatments are speculative at best. Throughout the world, efforts are underway to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury dental amalgam.

  4. [Management of wastes from dental amalgam by dentists in Burkina Faso and Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, S; Sawadogo, A; Sakout, M; Abdallaoui, F

    2012-12-01

    Dental amalgam is a metallic restorative material that is used for direct filling of carious lesions since many years. The use of this material generates solid and particulate wastes that present potential challenges to the environment. This study was carried out to assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practiced by Moroccan and Burkinabe dentists. A cross-sectional study was made of 79 in Rabat, Sale and Temara in Morocco and 56 in Ouagadougou, Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina-Faso. The results showed that 69.5% of dental amalgam waste in Morocco vs 49.9% in Burkina-Faso was disposed with household waste which is a problem for both the environment and a risk to human being. Proper methods of dental amalgam waste disposal should be carried out to prevent indirect mercury poisoning for human.

  5. Cracked mercury dental amalgam as a possible cause of fever of unknown origin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamonti Fabrizia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sudden fever of unknown origin is quite a common emergency and may lead to hospitalization. A rise in body temperature can be caused by infectious diseases and by other types of medical condition. This case report is of a woman who had fever at night for several days and other clinical signs which were likely related to cracked dental mercury amalgam. Case presentation A healthy women developed fever many days after had cracked a mercury dental amalgam filling. Blood tests evidenced increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anemia and elevated white cell count; symptoms were headache and palpitations. Blood tests and symptoms normalized within three weeks of removal of the dental amalgam. Conclusion This case highlights the possible link between mercury vapor exposure from cracked dental amalgam and early activation of the immune system leading to fever of unknown origin.

  6. Treatment of amalgam tattoo with a subepithelial connective tissue graft and acellular dermal matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumbigere-Math, Vivek; Johnson, Deborah K

    2014-04-01

    A 54-year-old female was referred for management of a large amalgam tattoo involving the alveolar mucosa between teeth #6 and #9. The lesion had been present for over 20 years following endodontic treatment of teeth #7 and #8. A two-stage surgical approach was used to remove the pigmentation, beginning with removal of amalgam fragments from the underlying bone and placement of a subepithelial connective tissue graft and acellular dermal matrix to increase soft tissue thickness subadjacent to the amalgam. Following 7 weeks of healing, gingivoplasty was performed to remove the overlying pigmented tissue. At the 21-month follow-up appointment, the patient exhibited naturally appearing soft tissue with no evidence of amalgam tattoo.

  7. The amalgam of faith and reason: Euclid’s Elements and the scientific thinker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade-Molina, Melissa; Valero, Paola; Ravn, Ole

    2017-01-01

    child intertwines with what was ought to be the ‘scientific thinker’ to Christianity. We focus on how Euclidean geometry, taken as a proper method of inquiry amalgamated with the Christian worldview to provide explanations about the natural world. In modern education, the core of this amalgamation...... continues connecting reason with faith, and science with Platonic views of mathematics. The effect of power is the making of the Modern scientific thinker....

  8. Minor changes in serum levels of cytokines after removal of amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Lars; Brokstad, Karl A; Moen, Ketil; Jonsson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    Dental amalgam restorations release mercury and silver which is absorbed and distributed in the body. Animal studies have shown that both elements may interfere with the host by activation of the immune system in genetically susceptible strains at exposure levels relevant to those from dental amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of no change over time in concentrations of a number of immune mediators in serum after removal of all dental amalgam restorations in patients with health complaints attributed to their amalgam restorations and compare with a healthy reference group. Twenty patients previously examined at a specialty unit for health complaints attributed to dental materials were included in a clinical trial and had all amalgam restorations replaced with other dental restorative materials. Serum samples were collected before amalgam removal and 3 and 12 months after the removal was finished. Twenty blood donors matched for age and gender were used as comparison group. A fluorescent bead-based (Luminex) immunoassay kit was used to measure cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in serum. At baseline, the patient group had slightly higher values for GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-2R, IFN-alpha, IL-7, and IL-12p40/p70 compared with the reference group. After amalgam removal a decrease towards the median value of the reference group was found for GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-7. In conclusion, removal of all dental amalgam restorations and replacement with other dental restorative materials was associated with decreased concentrations of Th1-type proinflammatory markers in serum.

  9. 2-Local Amalgams for the Simple Groups GL(5, 2), M24 and He, Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Lempken

    2003-01-01

    We elaborate on a method of G. Michler [6] to construct finite groups with a prescribed involution centralizer H using compatible pairs and amalgamation of H and another naturally arising 2-local subgroup. Modifying this approach we deal with the particular set-up leading to the simple groups GL(5, 2), M24 and He and characterize these groups as the universal completions of certain 2-local amalgams of rank 3.

  10. Characterisation of baroque tin amalgam mirrors of the historical Green Vault in Dresden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywitzki, O.; Nedon, W.; Kopte, T.; Modes, T.

    2008-07-01

    The historical Green Vault, one of Europe’s most sumptuous treasure chambers, has reopened in September 2006 in the Dresden Royal Palace. For the baroque presentation of the artworks the special properties of tin amalgam mirrors are of great importance. A comprehensive analytic characterisation was necessary for restoration and reconstruction. The different original casting glasses were analysed in respect of chemical composition, roughness, waviness and optical properties like chromaticity coordinates and transmittance. The microstructure of the tin amalgam layers were investigated on metallographic cross-sections and by X-ray diffraction. The investigations reveal that the tin amalgam layers are composed of γ-HgSn6-10 phase with a grain size between 5 and 50 μm surrounded by a thin mercury phase with about 2 wt. % tin. However the most important property of the baroque tin amalgam mirrors is a relative low reflectivity of about 59% which is drastically lower than for silver mirrors with a reflectivity of about 96%. According to the characterisation results a suitable glass for reconstruction was selected. The mirror layers were produced by historical tin amalgam technology for the rooms not destroyed by bombarding of Dresden in February 1945. For the completely destroyed Jewel Room pure tin layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The results show that this new technology enables an adequate substitute for the original tin amalgam layers.

  11. Crystal packing and hydrogen bonding in platinum(II) nucleotide complexes: X-ray crystal structure of [Pt(MeSCH(2)CH(2)SMe)(5'-GMP-N7)(2)].6H(2)O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuran, Milos I; Milinkovic, Snezana U; Habtemariam, Abraha; Parsons, Simon; Sadler, Peter J

    2002-02-01

    We have synthesised the complex [Pt(CH(3)SCH(2)CH(2)SCH(3))(5'-GMP-N7)(2)].6H(2)O (1), where 5'-GMP is 5'-guanosine monophosphate, and determined its X-ray crystal structure. Pt(II) adopts a square-planar geometry in which the bases are coordinated head-to-tail (HT) in the Delta configuration. The nucleotide conformation in this complex is almost identical to that in the previously reported complex [Pt(en)(5'-GMP-N7)(2)].9H(2)O (2), in which there is outer sphere macrochelation via intramolecular H-bonding between the monoanionic phosphate groups and the coordinated ethylenediamine (en) NH. It is therefore apparent that intermolecular interactions rather than intramolecular H-bonding determines the orientation of the sugar-phosphate side-chain in these Pt(II) bisnucleotide complexes in the solid state.

  12. Easy oxidative addition of the carbon-halogen bond by dimethylplatinum(II) complexes containing a related series of diimine ligands: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Badri Z.; Fathi, Nastaran; Mohagheghi, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylplatinum(II) complexes [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = 4,4‧-Me2bpy (4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 5,5‧-Me2bpy (5,5‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine)} were reacted with alkyl halides (RX = EtI, EtBr) to yield the organoplatinum(IV) complexes [PtMe2RX(NN)]. On the basis of NMR data, the platinum(IV) product of each reaction contains almost exclusively the trans isomer but small traces of the cis isomers are also observed. On the other hand, the reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bu2bpy (4,4‧-di-tert-butyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 4,4‧-Me2bpy; 5,5‧-Me2bpy} with CH2Br2 gave a mixture of cis and trans-[PtMe2(CH2Br)Br(NN)] formed by the oxidative addition of one of the C-Br bonds. The formation of the cis isomer increases in the order of 5,5‧-Me2bpy > bu2bpy > 4,4‧-Me2bpy. The reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bpy (2,2‧-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline)} with 1,8-dibromooctane or 1,9-dibromononane afforded the mononuclear complexes [PtMe2{(CH2)nBr}Br(NN)] (n = 8-9). The products were fully characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, HH COSY, HMQC, DEPT and DEPTQ-135 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of [PtMe2EtI(4,4‧-Me2bpy)] reveals that Pt(IV) atom is six-coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with the ethyl group trans to iodide.

  13. Stabilization of the Low-Spin State in a Mononuclear Iron(II) Complex and High-Temperature Cooperative Spin Crossover Mediated by Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sipeng; Reintjens, Niels R M; Siegler, Maxime A; Roubeau, Olivier; Bouwman, Elisabeth; Rudavskyi, Andrii; Havenith, Remco W A; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-01-04

    The tetrapyridyl ligand bbpya (bbpya=N,N-bis(2,2'-bipyrid-6-yl)amine) and its mononuclear coordination compound [Fe(bbpya)(NCS)2 ] (1) were prepared. According to magnetic susceptibility, differential scanning calorimetry fitted to Sorai's domain model, and powder X-ray diffraction measurements, 1 is low-spin at room temperature, and it exhibits spin crossover (SCO) at an exceptionally high transition temperature of T1/2 =418 K. Although the SCO of compound 1 spans a temperature range of more than 150 K, it is characterized by a wide (21 K) and dissymmetric hysteresis cycle, which suggests cooperativity. The crystal structure of the LS phase of compound 1 shows strong NH⋅⋅⋅S intermolecular H-bonding interactions that explain, at least in part, the cooperative SCO behavior observed for complex 1. DFT and CASPT2 calculations under vacuum demonstrate that the bbpya ligand generates a stronger ligand field around the iron(II) core than its analogue bapbpy (N,N'-di(pyrid-2-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-diamine); this stabilizes the LS state and destabilizes the HS state in 1 compared with [Fe(bapbpy)(NCS)2 ] (2). Periodic DFT calculations suggest that crystal-packing effects are significant for compound 2, in which they destabilize the HS state by about 1500 cm(-1) . The much lower transition temperature found for the SCO of 2 compared to 1 appears to be due to the combined effects of the different ligand field strengths and crystal packing.

  14. An intrinsically disordered photosystem II subunit, PsbO, provides a structural template and a sensor of the hydrogen-bonding network in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Polander, Brandon C; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-10-04

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound enzyme that utilizes solar energy to catalyze the photooxidation of water. Molecular oxygen is evolved after four sequential light-driven oxidation reactions at the Mn4CaO5 oxygen-evolving complex, producing five sequentially oxidized states, Sn. PSII is composed of 17 membrane-spanning subunits and three extrinsic subunits, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO. PsbO is intrinsically disordered and plays a role in facilitation of the water oxidizing cycle. Native PsbO can be removed and substituted with recombinant PsbO, thereby restoring steady-state activity. In this report, we used reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information concerning the role of PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO during the S state cycle. Light-minus-dark difference spectra were acquired, monitoring structural changes associated with each accessible flash-induced S state transition in a highly purified plant PSII preparation (Triton X-100, octylthioglucoside). A comparison of S2 minus S1 spectra revealed that removal of PsbP and PsbQ had no significant effect on the data, whereas amide frequency and intensity changes were associated with PsbO removal. These data suggest that PsbO acts as an organizational template for the PSII reaction center. To identify any coupled conformational changes arising directly from PsbO, global (13)C-PsbO isotope editing was employed. The reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectra of accessible S states provide evidence that PsbO spectral contributions are temperature (263 and 277 K) and S state dependent. These experiments show that PsbO undergoes catalytically relevant structural dynamics, which are coupled over long distance to hydrogen-bonding changes at the Mn4CaO5 cluster.

  15. MOBILITY OF MERCURY OF THE DENTAL AMALGAM IN REDUCTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Dalla Costa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The dental wastewater can contribute to the total daily mercury load on environment. Factorial design of experiments is useful to analysis of factors that influence in this mobility. The aim of the present study was to design experiments to examine the effects of operational variables – temperature, pH and contact time - which may affect the mobility of mercury in form of dental amalgam residue in reduction process in the sediments of the Pirapó River. Based on the factorial design of experiments and the analysis of variance, the temperature was the most significant factor in this process, followed by the pH and contact time. The parameters affecting the mobility of total mercury showed that when the temperature and contact time increases and pH decreases there is an important increase of mercury concentration in process. For the tested conditions, the high total mercury concentration was obtained using the temperature = 35oC, pH = 4.0 and contact time = 10 days.

  16. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia amalgamated with alopecia areata: immunologic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both scarring and non-scarring alopecias exist; however, rare cases demonstrate features of both classes. Case Report: We describe an interesting alopecia case with amalgamated clinical, histologic and immunopathologic features of scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Specifically, the case displays combined features of alopecia areata (AA and of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA. A 36 year old female presented with symmetric, round, patchy hair loss on her scalp. Methods: Biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E examination, as well as for special stains, direct immunofluorescence (DIF and immunohistochemistry (IHC were performed. Results: The H&E biopsy revealed focally diminished hair follicular units, and sebaceous gland damage. Perifollicular concentric fibrosis was confirmed by Verhoeff elastin special staining. Antibodies to micelles were noted. Positive IHC staining for CD4, CD8, CD45 and multiple proteases and protease inhibitors was noted around selected follicular unit remnants. Conclusion: We present a rare alopecia, combining histologic features of CCCA with additional, selected immunologic features of AA.

  17. Reduction in operatory mercury levels after contamination or amalgam removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Engle, J H; Okabe, T; Mitchem, J C

    1994-04-01

    The threshold limit value (TLV) for occupational exposure to mercury can be exceeded in the dental operatory after a contamination event or during certain dental procedures. The objective of this study was to determine the time required for the mercury vapor levels to return to baseline in both non-ventilated and ventilated operatories after they had been contaminated with mercury to the TLV of 0.050 mg/m3; and to evaluate the efficiency of an activated charcoal filtering device for removing mercury vapor. The results showed that even in a poorly ventilated operatory, the mercury vapor level returned to background within 20-30 minutes after a contamination, and within 10-20 minutes when the operatory was ventilated. The filtering device reduced the level of mercury vapor by approximately 25% during a continuous contamination event, but did not clear the operatory faster than normal settling after a limited source contamination. The filter caused a significant reduction in mercury in the breathing zones of the patient and dentist during and after amalgam removal, but did not eliminate the exposure. This study demonstrated the difficulty in contaminating an operatory with mercury vapor and confirmed the limited time mercury remains airborne, presumably due to its density and affinity for surfaces.

  18. Analysis of an unusual hetero-halogen bonded trimer using charge density analysis: A case of concerted type I Br· · · Br and type II Br· · · Cl interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MYSORE S PAVAN; TAYUR N GURU ROW

    2016-10-01

    The crystal structure of 4−bromo−2−chlorobenzoic acid generates an unusual triangular motif consisting of a hitherto uncharacterized Type I Br· · · Br contact along with two Type II Br· · · Cl interactions as edges of the triangle. The nature of such bonding is analyzed based on both experimental and theoretical chargedensity followed by topological analysis.

  19. Supramolecular hydrogen-bonding patterns in the organic-inorganic hybrid compound bis(4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidinium) tetrathiocyanatozinc(II)-4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine-water (1/2/2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Ammasai; Zeller, Matthias; Thomas Muthiah, Packianathan

    2016-04-01

    Zinc thiocyanate complexes have been found to be biologically active compounds. Zinc is also an essential element for the normal function of most organisms and is the main constituent in a number of metalloenzyme proteins. Pyrimidine and aminopyrimidine derivatives are biologically very important as they are components of nucleic acids. Thiocyanate ions can bridge metal ions by employing both their N and S atoms for coordination. They can play an important role in assembling different coordination structures and yield an interesting variety of one-, two- and three-dimensional polymeric metal-thiocyanate supramolecular frameworks. The structure of a new zinc thiocyanate-aminopyrimidine organic-inorganic compound, (C6H9ClN3)2[Zn(NCS)4]·2C6H8ClN3·2H2O, is reported. The asymmetric unit consist of half a tetrathiocyanatozinc(II) dianion, an uncoordinated 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidinium cation, a 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine molecule and a water molecule. The Zn(II) atom adopts a distorted tetrahedral coordination geometry and is coordinated by four N atoms from the thiocyanate anions. The Zn(II) atom is located on a special position (twofold axis of symmetry). The pyrimidinium cation and the pyrimidine molecule are not coordinated to the Zn(II) atom, but are hydrogen bonded to the uncoordinated water molecules and the metal-coordinated thiocyanate ligands. The pyrimidine molecules and pyrimidinium cations also form base-pair-like structures with an R2(2)(8) ring motif via N-H...N hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure is further stabilized by intermolecular N-H...O, O-H...S, N-H...S and O-H...N hydrogen bonds, by intramolecular N-H...Cl and C-H...Cl hydrogen bonds, and also by π-π stacking interactions.

  20. 1D and 2D assembly structures by imidazole···chloride hydrogen bonds of iron(II) complexes [Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))3]Cl·Y (HL(n-Pr) = 2-methylimidazol-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl; Y = AsF6, BF4) and their spin states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinami, Takeshi; Nishi, Koshiro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Iijima, Seiichiro; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Kojima, Masaaki

    2011-12-07

    Two Fe(II) complexes fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)]Cl·Y (Y = AsF(6) (1) and BF(4) (2)) were synthesized, where HL(n-Pr) is 2-methylimidazole-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl. Each complex-cation has the same octahedral N(6) geometry coordinated by three bidentate ligands and assumes facial-isomerism, fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) with Δ- and Λ-enantiomorphs. Three imidazole groups per Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) are hydrogen-bonded to three Cl(-) ions or, from the viewpoint of the Cl(-) ion, one Cl(-) ion is hydrogen-bonded to three neighbouring fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) cations. The 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds between Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) and Cl(-) generate two kinds of assembly structures. The directions of the 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds and hence the resulting assembly structures are determined by the size of the anion Y, though Y is not involved into the network structure and just accommodated in the cavity. Compound 1 has a 1D ladder structure giving a larger cavity, in which the Δ- and Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) enantiomorphs are bridged by two NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 has a 2D network structure with a net unit of a cyclic trimer of {fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+)···Cl(-)}(3) giving a smaller cavity, in which Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) species with the same chirality are linked by NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds to give a homochiral 2D network structure. Magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectral measurements demonstrated that compound 1 showed an abrupt one-step spin crossover with 4.0 K thermal hysteresis of T(c↓) = 125.5 K and T(c↑) = 129.5 K and compound 2 showed no spin transition and stayed in the high-spin state over the 5-300 K temperature range.

  1. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  2. Does intermunicipal cooperation create inefficiency? A comparison of interest rates paid by intermunicipal organizations, amalgamated municipalities and not recently amalgamated municipalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allers, Maarten; van Ommeren, Bernard; Geertsema, Bieuwe

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, local governments operating on a small scale face a choice between amalgamation and cooperation. This paper applies a novel methodology to investigate the implications of this choice for operating efficiency. Using a unique micro-level dataset of over 11,000 loans made to both mun

  3. Cleavage of an RNA model catalyzed by dinuclear Zn(II) complexes containing rate-accelerating pendants. Comparison of the catalytic benefits of H-bonding and hydrophobic substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mark F; Brown, R Stan

    2010-12-17

    The transesterification of a simple RNA model, 2-hydroxypropyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (2, HpNPP) promoted by seven dinuclear Zn(II) catalysts (3,4,5,6,7,8,9:Zn(II)2:(-OCH3)) based on the bis[bis(2-substituted-pyridinyl-6-methyl)]amine ligand system was investigated in methanol under sspH-controlled conditions at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C. The two metal complexing ligands were joined together via the amino N connected to a m-xylyl linker (3, 4, 5, 6, 7) where the 2-pyridinyl substituent = H, CH3, (CH)4, NH2, and NH(C═O)CH3, respectively, and a propyl linker (8, 9) where the ring substituent = H and CH3. All of the dinuclear complexes except 8:Zn(II)2 exhibit saturation kinetics for the kobs versus [catalyst] plots from which one can determine catalyst:substrate binding constants (KM), the catalytic rate constants for their decomposition (kcat), and the second order catalytic rate constants (k2cat = kcat/KM). In the case of 8:Zn(II)2, the plots of kobs versus [catalyst] as a function of sspH are linear, and the catalytic rate constants (k2cat) are defined as the gradients of the plots. Analysis of all of the data at the sspH optimum for each reaction indicates that the presence of the amino and acetamido H-bonding groups and the CH3 group provides similar increases of the kcat terms of 25−50 times that exhibited by the parent complex 3:Zn(II)2. However, in terms of substrate catalyst binding (KM), there is no clear trend that H-bonding groups or the CH3 group provides stronger binding than the parent complex. In terms of the overall second order catalytic rate constant, the CH3, amino, and NH(C═O)CH3 groups provide 20, 10, and 68 times the k2cat observed for the parent complex. In the case of 9:Zn(II)2, the presence of the methyl groups provides a 1000-fold increase in activity (judged by k2cat) over the parent complex 8:Zn(II)2. The results are interpreted to indicate that H-bonding effects may be important for catalysis and less so for substrate binding, but the

  4. Effect of Surface Polishing on Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam After Treatment 16% Carbamide Peroxide Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khamverdi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of surface polishing on mercury release from dental amalgam after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide gel.Materials and Methods: Ninety-six samples from two different amalgam brands were prepared in truncated cone-shaped PVC polymer molds with an external surface area of 195 mm². Half of the specimens were polished with green and red rubber, a brush and tin oxide paste at low speed. Samples were treated with 16% carbamide peroxide gel intubes containing 3 mL of carbamide peroxide gel and 0.1 mL of distilled water for 14 and 28 hours. Subsequently, carbamide peroxide gel on the sample surfaces was rinsed away with 7.0 mL of distilled water until the volume of each tube increased to 10 mL. Themercury level of each solution was measured using the VAV–440 mercury analyzer system.Considering the surface area of each amalgam disc, mercury amounts were calculated in μg ⁄mm². Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.Results: There were significant differences between the mean levels of mercury release from polished vs. unpolished amalgam surfaces after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide.Increasing the storage time from 14 to 28 hours did not result in significant changes in the amount of mercury release. There was no significant interaction effect between amalgam surface polish and storage time statistically.Conclusion: Polished amalgam restorations release less mercury after treatment with carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in comparison with unpolished amalgam restorations.

  5. Uptake and accumulation of mercury from dental amalgam in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.J

    2003-03-01

    Exposure of fish to concentrations of dental amalgam typically found in waste discharge leads to mercury accumulation in tissues. - In this study, the bioavailability and accumulation of mercury from external environmental exposure to mixed, cured, milled, sieved and proportioned dental amalgam was examined in the common goldfish, Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to dental amalgam (particle size range from <0.10 to 3.15 mm) in order to represent the particle size and distribution of that found within the typical dental office wastewater discharge stream. Experimental amalgam water loadings were 0 g/l, 0.5 g/l and 1 g/l in glass aquaria at 15 deg. C for 28 days. Fish tissues were sampled at 5 min and 28 days of exposure, and the liver, brain, muscle and whole body analyzed for total mercury using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Mercury was found in several tissues examined and generally increased with exposure to higher amounts of dental amalgam. The highest levels were found in the whole body (17.68{+-}5.73 {mu}g/g) followed by the liver (0.80{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g) and muscle (0.47{+-}0.16 {mu}g/g). The lowest concentrations were seen in the brain (0.28{+-}0.19 {mu}g/g). Compared to controls, concentrations in the whole body, muscle and liver in fish exposed for 28 days to the highest concentration of amalgam were 200-, 233-, and 40-fold higher, respectively. This study shows that mercury from an environmental exposure to representative samples of dental amalgam typically found within the dental wastewater discharge stream is bioavailable to fish and may accumulate in internal tissues.

  6. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  7. Periapical status of non-root-filled teeth with resin composite, amalgam, or full crown restorations: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Victoria; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Akerman, Sigvard

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies show that dental pulp cells respond unfavorably to contact with resin composite restorative material. Hypothetically, in a random population, the frequency of apical periodontitis should be higher for teeth restored with resin composite than with amalgam. Therefore, the aim was to compare the periapical status of non-root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, amalgam, or laboratory-fabricated crowns in an adult Swedish population. The subjects comprised 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1,000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all non-root-filled teeth by clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status was evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed using the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite or amalgam (1.3% and 1.1%, respectively). The frequency of AP for teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns was significantly higher (6.3%). Regression analysis showed no association between AP and resin composite restorations but a significant association with laboratory-fabricated crowns. The results indicate that the risk of damage to the pulp-dentin complex from exposure to resin composite material and dentin bonding agents shown in experimental studies is not reflected in the clinical setting. However, in the study sample, AP was diagnosed in a significantly higher proportion of teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rh(III)/Cu(II)-cocatalyzed synthesis of 1H-indazoles through C-H amidation and N-N bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da-Gang; Suri, Mamta; Glorius, Frank

    2013-06-19

    Substituted 1H-indazoles can be formed from readily available arylimidates and organo azides by Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/C-N bond formation and Cu-catalyzed N-N bond formation. For the first time the N-H-imidates are demonstrated to be good directing groups in C-H activation, also capable of undergoing intramolecular N-N bond formation. The process is scalable and green, with O2 as the terminal oxidant and N2 and H2O formed as byproducts. Moreover, the products could be transformed to diverse important derivatives.

  9. Applications of total-etch adhesive bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassler, Howard E

    2003-06-01

    The concept of total-etch adhesion for enamel and dentin is well accepted. Although new techniques with self-etching adhesives have been introduced, there needs to be more reported clinical trials before making a complete switch to these systems. Currently, the only adhesive systems with long-term data to support confidence and success with their clinical use are total-etch systems. Applications for using a total-etch adhesive bonding technique include sealants, orthodontic brackets, anterior composite resins, posterior composite resins, bonded dental silver amalgam, resin cementation with posts, all-metal, porcelain-metal, composite resin, and ceramic restorations, splinting, core foundations, and conservative treatment of the worn dentition. This article will review the concepts for clinical success with total-etch adhesion for a wide range of clinical applications.

  10. On the Importance of Noncovalent Carbon-Bonding Interactions in the Stabilization of a 1D Co(II) Polymeric Chain as a Precursor of a Novel 2D Coordination Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pampi; Konar, Saugata; Lama, Prem; Das, Kinsuk; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-07-14

    A new cobalt(II) coordination polymer 2 with μ1,5 dicyanamide (dca) and a bidentate ligand 3,5-dimethyl-1-(2'-pyridyl)pyrazole (pypz) is prepared in a stepwise manner using the newly synthesized one-dimensional linear Co(II) coordination polymer 1 as a precursor. The structural and thermal characterizations elucidate that the more stable complex 2 shows a two-dimensional layer structural feature. Here, Co(II) atoms with μ1,5 dicyanamido bridges are linked by the ligand pypz forming a macrocyclic chain that runs along the crystallographic 'c' axis having 'sql' (Shubnikov notation) net topology with a 4-connected uninodal node having point symbol {4(4).6(2)}. The remarkable noncovalent carbon-bonding contacts detected in the X-ray structure of compound 1 are analyzed and characterized by density functional theory calculations and the analysis of electron charge density (atoms in molecules).

  11. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  12. Un cas d'extragrammaticalité particulier : les amalgames lexicaux fantaisistes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Léturgie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available L'amalgamation lexicale est un procédé d'innovation lexicale assez peu décrit en français et dont la morphologie ressort de l'extragrammatical. Partant du constat que les différentes classifications des amalgames lexicaux sont établies sur des corpus restreints, nous proposons de dresser un état des lieux de ces classifications en confrontant plusieurs modèles théoriques avec deux corpus complémentaires pour fournir une description morpho-phonologique de ces unités lexicales afin de faire émerger un prototype pour le français. Nous avons procédé, dans un premier temps, au recensement de 7 052 amalgames lexicaux tirés de 17 dictionnaires fantaisistes. Puis, un second corpus d'amalgames attestés en discours a été constitué afin d'être comparé au premier. À l'aide des données récoltées, il est possible de voir apparaître un schéma prototypique de l'amalgamation lexicale en français.

  13. Variations in survival time for amalgam and resin composite restorations: a population based cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S; Price, R; Andreou, P; Jones, G; Portolesi, A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the association between the restorative material used and time to further treatment across population cohorts with universal coverage for dental treatment. Cohort study of variation in survival time for tooth restorations over time and by restoration material used based on an Accelerated Failure Time model. Primary dental care clinics. Members of Canada's First Nations and Inuit population covered by the Non-Insured Health Benefits program of Health Canada for the period April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2012. Tooth restorations using resin composite or amalgam material. Survival time of restoration to further treatment. Median survival time for resin composite was 51 days longer than amalgam, for restorations placed in 1999-2000. This difference was not statistically significant (p⟩0.05). Median survival times were lower for females, older subjects. Those visiting the dentist annually, and decreased monotonically over time from 11.2 and 11.3 years for resin composite and amalgam restorations respectively placed in 1999-2000 to 6.9 and 7.0 years for those placed in 2009-10. Resin composite restorations performed no better than amalgams over the study period, but cost considerably more. With the combination of the overall decrease in survival times for both resin composite and amalgam restorations and the increase in use of resin composite, the costs of serving Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits population will rise considerably, even without any increase in the incidence of caries.

  14. Studies suggest alternatives to amalgam as a retrograde filling material for apicectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Sources were Medline and the Cochrane Library. Studies included were in vivo with human subjects, had experimental and control groups, and gave quantitative results in English, German or French. Success and failure rates were derived from randomised controlled trials (RCT), clinical controlled trials (CCT), cohort studies (CS) and case-controlled studies (CCS). Qualitative synthesis of results was performed. Two RCT, six CCT and 14 CCS were identified. The two RCT suggest that glass ionomer may be more effective than amalgam, conversely one CCT showed amalgam to be more effective. CCTs also suggest that EBA (reinforced zinc oxide eugenol) cement, composite with GLUMA (Bayer AG., Leverkusen, Germany) and gold leaf retrograde filling may be more effective than amalgam. A further CCT suggested that gutta-percha used as a retrograde filing is less effective than when used following an orthograde approach. Based on the outcome of two RCT, glass ionomer appears as effective as amalgam. EBA cement, composite with GLUMA and gold leaf and orthograde gutta-percha may also be as effective as amalgam. Evidence is limited, however, and further research is needed.

  15. Chemical characterization of selected high copper dental amalgams using XPS and XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, E. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: talik@us.edu.pl; Babiarz-Zdyb, R. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Dziedzic, A. [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, Akademicki 17 Sqr., 41-209 Bytom (Poland)

    2005-08-02

    The study was carried out to analyze some dependencies between the composition of seven high copper dental amalgams and mercury release behavior, as well as oxygen reactivity of metallic elements. Chemical comparative analysis of selected dental amalgams was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The X-ray powder diffraction measurements revealed two main phases for measured amalgams: {gamma}{sub 1}-(Ag{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}) and {eta}'-(Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}). The amount of mercury obtained by the XPS method was lower than the value quoted in the manufacturer's literature, which suggested evaporation of mercury under the UHV conditions. A linear decrease of oxygen and carbon contamination with the growing amount of Cu and Ag was observed. The XPS analysis showed that a high Sn concentration caused less resistance to oxidation. Some of the amalgams contained some extra elements, such as Bi, In, and Zn. All samples contained lead in metallic state and oxides. The amount of Ag, Cu, Sn ingredients determines the main properties of high copper amalgams and plays an important role in mercury evaporation. High tin concentration combined with the presence of smaller amounts of silver and copper (high Sn/Ag ratio) may influence the increase of mercury vaporization.

  16. Problems in assessments of amalgam electrodes for standardising or certifying the corresponding ion selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falciola, Luigi; Fusi, Patrizia; Mussini, Patrizia R; Mussini, Torquato

    2003-03-01

    The primary method for standardizing or certifying an Mz+-ISE (Ion Selective Electrode for Mz+ where Mz+ = alkali or alkaline-earth cation) implies comparing the latter with the corresponding M-Amalgam electrode in the cell Pt/M-Amalgam/Mz+ Solution/Mz+ ISE/Pt, whose potential difference is obviously independent of Mz+ concentration. Assessment of the potential of the M-Amalgam electrode requires the precise determination of the mole fraction x of the M metal in amalgam, which is customarily performed by decomposing an M-Amalgam sample in excess HCl and titrating the HCl excess with standard NaOH solution. There arises the problem of choosing the correct end-point in pH-metric titrations of strong acids with carbonate-contaminated NaOH standard solutions, which is of frequent occurrence both in research and routine laboratory practice. This topic is either overlooked or insufficiently treated in textbooks: thus the interpretation of the above experimental pH-metric titration curves is often misled and the results may be affected by significant errors. Some recent misleading suggestions are here re-analyzed critically in order to focus correct, recommended methodological schemes.

  17. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  18. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  19. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Rangarao Pawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  20. Taguchi optimization: Case study of gold recovery from amalgamation tailing by using froth flotation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudibyo, Aji, B. B.; Sumardi, S.; Mufakir, F. R.; Junaidi, A.; Nurjaman, F.; Karna, Aziza, Aulia

    2017-01-01

    Gold amalgamation process was widely used to treat gold ore. This process produces the tailing or amalgamation solid waste, which still contains gold at 8-9 ppm. Froth flotation is one of the promising methods to beneficiate gold from this tailing. However, this process requires optimal conditions which depends on the type of raw material. In this study, Taguchi method was used to optimize the optimum conditions of the froth flotation process. The Taguchi optimization shows that the gold recovery was strongly influenced by the particle size which is the best particle size at 150 mesh followed by the Potassium amyl xanthate concentration, pH and pine oil concentration at 1133.98, 4535.92 and 68.04 gr/ton amalgamation tailing, respectively.

  1. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment.

  2. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S.; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R.; Kamble, Amit P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  3. Mercury content in amalgam tattoos of human oral mucosa and its relation to local tissue reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsell, M.; Larsson, B.; Ljungqvist, A.; Carlmark, B.; Johansson, O

    1998-02-01

    Mucosal biopsies from 48 patients with and 9 without amalgam tattoos were analysed with respect to their mercury content, distribution of mercury in the tissue, and histological tissue reactions. The distribution of mercury was assessed by auto-metallography (AMG), a silver amplification technique. The mercury content was determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), a multielemental analysis. Mercury was observed in connective tissue where it was confined to fibroblasts and macrophages, in vessel walls and in structures with the histological character of nerve fibres. A correlation was found between the histopathological tissue reaction, the type of mercury deposition, the intensity of the AMG reaction, and the mercury content. Mercury was also found in patients with amalgam dental fittings but without amalgam tattoos. (au) 24 refs.

  4. [Phase transition analysis of ancient bronze mirror surface tin amalgam in heating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-yun; Qin, Ying

    2010-10-01

    Taking advantage of theta-theta scanning (vertical goniometer) sealed and ceramic X-ray tube full-automatic diffractometer, which can be heated and detected at the same time when the temperature is between normal temperature and 1200 degrees C, and X-ray fluorescence, and combining surface feature with character, high tin bronze mirror which had been daubed "tin amalgam" was detected and analyzed. It can prove that phase with Hg will disappear gradually when the sample is heated to the temperature higher than the boiling point of Hg; It indicates that bronze surface cannot be as a proof of "tin amalgam" used whether it contains Hg, moreover, it is not necessary that bronze mirror is covered with "tin amalgam" in terms of application.

  5. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  6. Facilitating organizational mergers: amalgamation of community care access centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The development of 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in Ontario necessitated the re-organization of Community Care Access Centres (CCACs). The achievement of LHIN objectives was contingent upon the organizations responsible for home and long-term care placement being aligned within the LHIN geographic boundaries. This re-alignment required 42 provincial organizations to re-structure, integrate and reduce to 14. This project was focused on the amalgamation of two CCACs in the Waterloo Wellington LHIN. Both were distinctly different due to their organizational evolution, the composition of the region and leadership approach. The different organizational cultures, if not managed properly, could result in a derailing of several current projects that were underway and were also key to the overall health system transformation agenda. A literature search provided a plethora of critiques of organizational change approaches and practical suggestions. Of particular relevance was a report to the Royal Commission on Health Care in 2002 that authenticates the dismal success in health care to meet change objectives. The project included a joint planning day for the leadership teams of the two organizations followed by an Organizational Readiness Assessment conducted by the Canadian Council on Health Services Accreditation (CCHSA). Both activities brought the leadership and staff of Waterloo and Wellington together, started the integration process and solicited staff participation. A follow-up survey of the leadership teams revealed the effectiveness of the project in advancing integration between the two organizations and recognizing organizational cultural differences. The CCHSA Organizational Readiness Assessment process was viewed as an effective means for advancing the integration of the two organizations, particularly as it relates to allowing the staff groups to define for themselves the benefits of the merger. The lack of hard evidence on the benefits of a

  7. High-Field MRI and Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0 and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices, 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration,was significant (p=0.046. These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic fieldand release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  8. Benchmarking parameter-free AMaLGaM on functions with and without noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Peter A N; Grahl, Jörn; Thierens, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We describe a parameter-free estimation-of-distribution algorithm (EDA) called the adapted maximum-likelihood Gaussian model iterated density-estimation evolutionary algorithm (AMaLGaM-ID[Formula: see text]A, or AMaLGaM for short) for numerical optimization. AMaLGaM is benchmarked within the 2009 black box optimization benchmarking (BBOB) framework and compared to a variant with incremental model building (iAMaLGaM). We study the implications of factorizing the covariance matrix in the Gaussian distribution, to use only a few or no covariances. Further, AMaLGaM and iAMaLGaM are also evaluated on the noisy BBOB problems and we assess how well multiple evaluations per solution can average out noise. Experimental evidence suggests that parameter-free AMaLGaM can solve a wide range of problems efficiently with perceived polynomial scalability, including multimodal problems, obtaining the best or near-best results among all algorithms tested in 2009 on functions such as the step-ellipsoid and Katsuuras, but failing to locate the optimum within the time limit on skew Rastrigin-Bueche separable and Lunacek bi-Rastrigin in higher dimensions. AMaLGaM is found to be more robust to noise than iAMaLGaM due to the larger required population size. Using few or no covariances hinders the EDA from dealing with rotations of the search space. Finally, the use of noise averaging is found to be less efficient than the direct application of the EDA unless the noise is uniformly distributed. AMaLGaM was among the best performing algorithms submitted to the BBOB workshop in 2009.

  9. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  10. Factors of Influencing Bond Characteristics at II Interface of a Single Chamber Dual Thrust Solid Rocket Motor Grains%一种单室双推力发动机装药Ⅱ界面粘接性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何德伟; 刘戎; 侯少锋

    2012-01-01

    Based on the properties of single chamber dual thrust solid rocket motor grain,the effects of the thickness of thermal insulation,liner pre-curing and the vertical storage of pre-cured liner in vacuum on the bond characteristics at II interface were discussed in this paper.Some technical methods were proposed for improving the bond properties at interface.%根据单室双推力发动机装药的特点,对厚度绝热层、衬层的预反应及预固化衬层在真空状态下垂直存放等绝热衬层加工工艺条件对装药Ⅱ界面粘接性能的影响进行了研究,并提出了改善界面性能的技术途径。

  11. Clinical longevity of extensive direct composite restorations in amalgam replacement : Up to 3.5 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective clinical trial evaluated the longevity of direct resin composite (DRC) restorations made on stained dentin that is exposed upon removal of existing amalgam restorations in extensive cavities with severely reduced macro-mechanical retention for amalgam replacement. Method

  12. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; Yeates, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, J J; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M W; Myers, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg⁰)) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children's neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0-28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0-40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg⁰ from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age.

  13. Computational Study of Metal-Dinitrogen Keggin-Type Polyoxometalate Complexes [PW11O39M(II)N2)](5-) (M = Ru, Os, Re, Ir): Bonding Nature and Dinitrogen Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Guang; Liu, Shuang; Zheng, Ting

    2015-08-17

    Molecular geometry, electronic structure, and metal-dinitrogen bonding nature of a series of metal-dinitrogen derivatives of Keggin-type polyoxometalates (POMs) [PW11O39M(II)N2)](5-) (M = Ru, Os, Re, Ir) have been studied by using a density functional theory (DFT) method with the M06L functional. Among these Keggin-type POM complexes, Os- and Re-substituted POM complexes are the most active for N2 adsorption with considerable adsorption energy. The electronic structure analysis shows that Os(II) and Re(II) centers in their metal-dinitrogen POM complexes possess π(2)xzπ(2)yzπ(2)xy and π(2)xzπ(2)yzπ(1)xy configurations, respectively. DFT-M06L calculations show that the possible synthesis routes proposed in this work for the Ru-, Os-, and Re-dinitrogen POM complexes are thermodynamically feasible under various solvent environments. Meanwhile, the Re-dinitrogen POM complex was assessed for the direct cleavage of dinitrogen molecule. In the reaction mechanism, a dimeric Keggin-type POM derivative of rhenium could represent the intermediate which undergoes N-N bond scission. The calculated free energy barrier (ΔG(⧧)) for a transition state with a zigzag conformation is 16.05 kcal mol(-1) in tetrahydrofuran, which is a moderate barrier for the cleavage of the N-N bond when compared with the literature values. In conclusion, regarding the direct cleavage of the dinitrogen molecule, the findings would be very useful to guide the search for a potential N2 cleavage compound into totally inorganic POM fields.

  14. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nan......Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  15. A chromatographic estimate of the degree of surface heterogeneity of reversed-phase liquid chromatography packing materials II-Endcapped monomeric C18-bonded stationary phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    In a previous report, the heterogeneity of a non-endcapped C{sub 30}-bonded stationary phase was investigated, based on the results of the measurements of the adsorption isotherms of two neutral compounds (phenol and caffeine) and two ionizable compounds (sodium naphthalene sulfonate and propranololium chloride) by frontal analysis (FA). The same method is applied here for the characterization of the surface heterogeneity of two new brands of endcapped C{sub 18}-bonded stationary phases (Gemini and Sunfire). The adsorption isotherms of the same four chemicals were measured by FA and the results confirmed by the independent calculation of the adsorption energy distribution (AED), using the expectation-maximization (EM) method. The effect of the length of the bonded alkyl chain was investigated. Shorter alkyl-bonded-chains (C{sub 18} versus C{sub 30}) and the end-capping of the silica surface contribute to decrease the surface heterogeneity under the same experimental conditions (30% methanol, 25 mM NaCl). The AEDs of phenol and caffeine are bimodal with the C{sub 18}-bonded columns while they are trimodal and quadrimodal, respectively, with a non-endcapped C{sub 30}-bonded column. The 'supersites' (adsorption energy >20 kJ/mol) found on the C{sub 30}-Prontosil column and attributed to a cation exchange mechanism completely disappear on the C{sub 18}-Gemini and C{sub 18}-Sunfire, probably because the end-capping of the silica surface eliminates most if not all the ionic interactions.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism for reversible chloride transfer between mercury(II) and square-planar platinum(II) chloro ammine, aqua, and sulfoxide complexes. Stabilities, spectra, and reactivities of transient metal-metal bonded platinum-mercury adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, O; Sargeson, A M; Deeth, R J; Elding, L I

    2000-09-18

    The Hg2+aq- and HgCl+aq-assisted aquations of [PtCl4]2- (1), [PtCl3(H2O)]- (2), cis-[PtCl2(H2O)2] (3), trans-[PtCl2(H2O)2] (4), [PtCl(H2O)3]+ (5), [PtCl3Me2SO]- (6), trans-[PtCl2(H2O)Me2SO] (7), cis-[PtCl(H2O)2Me2SO]+ (8), trans-[PtCl(H2O)2M32SO]+ (9), trans-[PtCl2(NH3)2] (10), and cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2] (11) have been studied at 25.0 degrees C in a 1.00 M HClO4 medium buffered with chloride, using stopped-flow and conventional spectrophotometry. Saturation kinetics and instantaneous, large UV/vis spectral changes on mixing solutions of platinum complex and mercury are ascribed to formation of transient adducts between Hg2+ and several of the platinum complexes. Depending on the limiting rate constants, these adducts are observed for a few milliseconds to a few minutes. Thermodynamic and kinetics data together with the UV/vis spectral changes and DFT calculations indicate that their structures are characterized by axial coordination of Hg to Pt with remarkably short metal-metal bonds. Stability constants for the Hg2+ adducts with complexes 1-6, 10, and 11 are (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(4), (8 +/- 1) x 10(2), 94 +/- 6, 13 +/- 2, 5 +/- 2, 60 +/- 6, 387 +/- 2, and 190 +/- 3 M-1, respectively, whereas adduct formation with the sulfoxide complexes 7-9 is too weak to be observed. For analogous platinum(II) complexes, the stabilities of the Pt-Hg adducts increase in the order sulfoxide < aqua < ammine complex, reflecting a sensitivity to the pi-acid strength of the Pt ligands. Rate constants for chloride transfer from HgCl+ and HgCl2 to complexes 1-11 have been determined. Second-order rate constants for activation by Hg2+ are practically the same as those for activation by HgCl+ for each of the platinum complexes studied, yet resolved contributions for Hg2+ and HgCl+ reveal that the latter does not form dinuclear adducts of any significant stability. The overall experimental evidence is consistent with a mechanism in which the accumulated Pt(II)-Hg2+ adducts are not reactive

  17. Character of the hard tooth tissue-polymer bond. II. Study of the interaction of human tooth enamel and dentin with N-phenylglycine-glycidyl methacrylate adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, C

    1979-09-01

    The interaction of powdered human tooth enamel and dentin with NPG-GMA was studied in alcoholic and alcoholic-aqueous solutions. The reaction produces ionized carboxylic groups capable of forming ionic bonds between the calcium ions in the tooth enamel or dentin and NPG-GMA.

  18. Treatment of amalgam tattoo with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hasan Guney; Bayindir, Hakan; Kusakci-Seker, Basak; Tasar, Simge; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan

    2010-08-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common, asymptomatic, pigmented oral lesions that clinically exist as isolated, blue, gray, or black macules on the gingival, buccal, and alveolar mucosae, the palate, and/or the tongue. In this case report, the successful use of an erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser for the removal of an amalgam tattoo is explained. A 46-year-old man is presented with a half decade history of an amalgam tattoo on his left maxillary premolar-molar gingiva. Depigmentation procedure was performed under topical anesthesia with the use of an erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser at 2 W in the soft tissue pulsed mode for 10 min. The pigmented tissue was completely removed. The de-epithelialization area healed completely on the 10th day after treatment. The period of healing was uneventful. The amalgam tattoo was completely removed with erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser, and the treated area healed without any adverse effect.

  19. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  20. An Empirical Consideration of a Balanced Amalgamation of Learning Strategies in Graduate Introductory Statistics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    This study considers the effectiveness of a "balanced amalgamated" approach to teaching graduate level introductory statistics. Although some research stresses replacing traditional lectures with more active learning methods, the approach of this study is to combine effective lecturing with active learning and team projects. The results of this…

  1. THE EFFECTS OF HOME BLEACHING ON THE HARDNESS OF AMALGAM FILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Soufyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental bleaching has been considered as a feasible approach for dental esthetic, and many dental bleaching products can be seen in the market. Therefore, the side effect of such dental product should be studied. This study was aimed to determine the effect of carbamide peroxide-containing home bleaching agent on the hardness of dental amalgam surface structure. Forty amalgam filling specimens were divided into 4 groups, which consist of 3 treatment groups and 1 controu group. Each group was exposed to the bleaching agent daily for 2, 4 and 8 hours within 7 days. The Vickers Microhardness Tester, with loads 98.07 mN for 20 seconds, was used to measure the hardness of amalgam surface. It was revealed that, there was a significant difference between the treatment and the control group on 8 hours period. It was concluded that there was a decrease in hardness of dental amalgam surface after having a contact with carbamide peroxide bleaching agent.

  2. A Prospective Clinical Study on Blood Mercury Levels Following Endodontic Root-end Surgery with Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Shadmehr, Elham; Talebi, Seyed Morteza; Nazeri, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the blood mercury levels before and after endodontic surgery using amalgam as a root-end filling material. Fourteen patients requiring periradicular surgery participated in this prospective clinical study. A zinc-free amalgam was employed as root-end filling material. Blood samples were collected at three intervals: immediately before, immediately after and one week postoperatively. Mercury content of the blood was determined using gold amalgamation cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Obtained data were analyzed using analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired t-test. The mean (SD) of blood mercury levels was 2.20 (0.24) ng/mL immediately before surgery, 2.24 (0.28) ng/mL immediately after surgery and 2.44 (0.17) ng/mL one week after the periradicular surgery. The blood mercury level one week post-operative was significantly higher than both blood mercury levels immediately before (P<0.001) and immediately after (P=0.005) the surgery. Placement of an amalgam retroseal during endodontic surgery can increase blood mercury levels after one week. The mercury levels however, are still lower than the toxic mercury levels. We suggest using more suitable and biocompatible root-end filling materials.

  3. When Old and New Regionalism Collide: Deinstitutionalization of Regions and Resistance Identity in Municipality Amalgamations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerbauer, Kaj; Paasi, Anssi

    2013-01-01

    Regions as well as their identities and borders are social and discursive constructs that are produced and removed in contested, historically contingent and context-bound processes of institutionalization and deinstitutionalization. This article studies the deinstitutionalization of regions in the context of municipality amalgamations and the…

  4. A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCracken, Michael S; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations....

  5. Saturated vapor pressure above the amalgam of alkali metals in discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical and numerical analysis of the evaporation process of two-component compounds in vapors of alkali metals in discharge lamps is presented. Based on the developed mathematical model of calculation of saturated vapor pressure of the metal above the amalgam, dependences of mass fractions of the components in the discharge volume on design parameters and thermophysical characteristics of the lamp are obtained.

  6. Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Krikorian, Oscar H.; Homsy, Robert V.

    1979-01-01

    A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

  7. Teaching as an Amalgam of Discourses and the Consequent Need for Appropriate Modes of Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldron, John; Smith, Robin

    This paper explores the concept of reflection and reflective practice in teacher education. Teaching is a complex achievement that brings together a number of conceptual, practical, and physical resources in an individual's professional practice. Achievement in teaching is an amalgam of at least four different discourses--science, craft, art, and…

  8. Real-Time Plasmonic Monitoring of Single Gold Amalgam Nanoalloy Electrochemical Formation and Stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Gang; Fossey, John S; Li, Meng; Xie, Tao; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Direct electrodeposition of mercury onto gold nanorods on an ITO substrate, without reducing agents, is reported. The growth of single gold amalgam nanoalloy particles and subsequent stripping was monitored in real-time monitoring by plasmonic effects and single-nanoparticle dark-field spectroelectrochemistry techniques. Time-dependent scattering spectral information conferred insight into the growth and stripping mechanism of a single nanoalloy particle. Four critical stages were observed: First, rapid deposition of Hg atoms onto Au nanorods; second, slow diffusion of Hg atoms into Au nanorods; third, prompt stripping of Hg atoms from Au nanorods; fourth, moderate diffusion from the inner core of Au nanorods. Under high Hg(2+) concentrations, homogeneous spherical gold amalgam nanoalloys were obtained. These results demonstrate that the morphology and composition of individual gold amalgam nanoalloys can be precisely regulated electrochemically. Moreover, gold amalgam nanoalloys with intriguing optical properties, such as modulated plasmonic lifetimes and quality factor Q, could be obtained. This may offer opportunities to extend applications in photovoltaic energy conversion and chemical sensing.

  9. Colorimetric Signal Amplification Assay for Mercury Ions Based on the Catalysis of Gold Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengbo; Zhang, Chenmeng; Gao, Qinggang; Wang, Guo; Tan, Lulu; Liao, Qing

    2015-11-03

    Mercury is a major threat to the environment and to human health. It is highly desirable to develop a user-friendly kit for on-site mercury detection. Such a method must be able to detect mercury below the threshold levels (10 nM) for drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Herein, we for the first time reported catalytically active gold amalgam-based reaction between 4-nitrophenol and NaBH4 with colorimetric sensing function. We take advantage of the correlation between the catalytic properties and the surface area of gold amalgam, which is proportional to the amount of the gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-bound Hg(2+). As the concentration of Hg(2+) increases until the saturation of Hg onto the AuNPs, the catalytic performance of the gold amalgam is much stronger due to the formation of gold amalgam and the increase of the nanoparticle surface area, leading to the decrease of the reduction time of 4-nitrophenol for the color change. This sensing system exhibits excellent selectivity and ultrahigh sensitivity up to the 1.45 nM detection limit. The practical use of this system for Hg(2+) determination in tap water samples is also demonstrated successfully.

  10. Hardness Enhancement of Amalgam Teeth Fillings Using Diode Laser (675 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafie Almuslet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to enhance the hardness of human teeth filler material (Amalgam, in a short possible time via irradiation by low level laser. Hardening tests were carried out on different amalgam mixtures subjected to irradiation for two minutes by diode laser with wavelength of 675 nm and power of 15 mW. The samples were left for different time intervals and for each time interval hardening test was carried out using Brinell hardness test. Other samples were prepared for the same test with the same procedure but without irradiation, i.e. control group. The irradiated samples showed a considerable increasing in their hardness compared with samples without irradiation. The samples irradiated by laser need only 6 hours to reach the same value of hardness that the control group reached after 30 hours. In Conclusion, the irradiation of amalgam by this type of laser with the above parameters believed to be recrystalizing the material so it become harder with shorter time compared with the amalgam without irradiation.

  11. Survival of ART and amalgam restorations in permanent teeth of children after 6.3 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Taifour, D.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2006-01-01

    The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in the survival percentages of all restorations placed through the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach, with high-viscosity glass ionomer, and those produced through the traditional approach, with amalgam (TA), in the permanent d

  12. Is high-viscosity glass-ionomer-cement a successor to amalgam for treating primary molars?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgert, L.A.; Amorim, R.G. de; Leal, S.C.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.; Frencken, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare the cumulative survival rate of amalgam and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations in primary molars over 3 years. METHODS: 280 children aged 6-7 years old were enrolled in a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial using a parallel group design cov

  13. Secondary Caries Development in in situ Gaps next to Composite and Amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, N.K.; Montagner, A.F.; Sande, F.H. van de; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in situ study investigated the secondary caries development in dentin in gaps next to composite and amalgam. For 21 days, 14 volunteers wore a modified occlusal splint containing human dentin samples with an average gap of 215 microm (SD = 55 microm) restored with three different materials: Fil

  14. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen,and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time.How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the Shanghai Securities Journal.Edited excerpts follow.

  15. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen, and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time. How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the ShanghaiSecuritiesJournal. Edited excerpts follow:

  16. Aggregation of capped hexaglycine strands into hydrogen-bonding motifs representative of pleated and rippled β-sheets, collagen, and polyglycine I and II crystal structures. A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, Joshua A; Tsai, Midas I-Hsien; Dannenberg, J J

    2011-02-17

    We compare the energies and enthalpies of inter-action of three- and seven-stranded capped polyglycine aggregates in both the pleated and rippled antiparallel and parallel β-sheet structures as well as the collagenic (three-strand) or polyglycine II-like (seven-strand) forms using density functional theory at the B3LYP/D95(d,p) level. We present the overall interaction energies as broken down into pure H-bonding between the strands at the geometries they assume in the aggregates and the distortion energies required to achieve those geometries starting from the fully relaxed single strands. While the antiparallel sheets represent the most stable structures for both the three- and seven-strand structures, the pure H-bonding interactions are the smallest for these structures. The overall interaction energies are dominated by the energy required to distort the relaxed polyglycine strands rather than the H-bonding energies. The antiparallel β-sheet constrained to C(s) symmetry has a lower enthalpy, but higher energy, of interaction than the fully optimized structure.

  17. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nan......Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years....... Results: One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3 %) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group...

  18. A REFLECTION ON THE WAVE OF AMALGAMATIONS IN THE ROMANIAN HEALTH SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina MITU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of New Public Management (NPM and good governance, in the last decade the Romanian public health system has undergone a reform process. One of its consequences is the wave of public hospitals amalgamations that have occurred especially since the adoption of the new health law. Thus, in 2011 the Ministry of Health has made public a list of proposed amalgamations of hospitals (around 25% from total hospitals with beds that existed in that period. The aim of this research is to examine the wave of hospital mergers that occurred in Romania between 2011 and 2012. In particular, the study focuses on the drivers, social impact, typology and purpose of the analysed amalgamations. The study uses primary resources documents and it is based on a content analysis of 25 Government Decisions and Substantiation Notes from 2011 to 2012. An important generalization of the paper is that all the amalgamations from the analysed period are involuntary and are selected on territorial criteria and depending on the distance, the specific health services for the purpose of efficient use of human and material resources in order to enhance public health services. Additionally, the expected social impact of these events is materialized mainly in improving the quality of medical services provided to the population and providing unconditional access to medical services for policyholders. The expected changes include: reduction of staff costs; efficient use of public services; classifying the amalgamated hospitals in a higher category; reduction of management positions; optimizing medical activity in terms of economic efficiency; and achieving a management capable of the best use of existing financial resources.

  19. Surgical Reconstruction of Metatarsal Type Preaxial Polydactyly Using an Amalgamating Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Matthew J; Hogue, Grant D; Kasser, James R

    2016-09-01

    Polydactyly of the foot is a relatively common condition. Approximately 15% of cases are preaxial, with one third of these cases involving duplication of the metatarsal [metatarsal type preaxial polydactyly (MTPP)].Surgical reconstruction of polydactyly is indicated to improve shoe tolerance. Reconstruction of MTPP has traditionally involved resection of the hypoplastic lateral ray in addition to soft tissue reconstruction to correct hallux varus. Poor postoperative results have frequently been reported, primarily due to residual hallux varus. We present a novel surgical technique for the treatment of children with MTPP presenting with a cosmetic lateral hallux, involving an amalgamating osteotomy that permits retention of the stable medial metatarsotarsal joint while avoiding the complication of residual hallux varus. This was a retrospective case series describing the surgical technique of an amalgamating osteotomy in the treatment of patients with MTPP and a cosmetic lateral hallux. The surgical technique involves corresponding metatarsal osteotomies of the medial and lateral halluces, with amalgamation of the metatarsals and ablation of the residual medial hallux, without the need for extensive soft tissue reconstruction. Clinical and radiologic outcomes were evaluated at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively in 2 patients who underwent this technique. Two children, 1 female and 1 male, underwent an amalgamating osteotomy at the age of 31 and 18 months, respectively. At latest follow-up, 7.3 and 2.8 years after osteotomy, respectively, both patients displayed an excellent functional result according to the Phelps and Grogan clinical outcome scale. Plain radiographs in both cases demonstrated a well-aligned first ray with no growth abnormality and no hallux varus. We have presented a novel surgical technique for the reconstruction of MTPP presenting with a cosmetic lateral hallux, involving an amalgamating osteotomy without extensive soft tissue reconstruction

  20. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S M J; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam is composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non-carious extracted human premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10). The control group was stored in non-environment. The specimens in the experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 m away from the router. The concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva in the groups was evaluated by using a cold-vapor atomic absorption Mercury Analyzer System. The independent t test was used to evaluate any significant differences in mercury release between the two groups. The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009). Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.

  1. Tunable crossover between one- and three-dimensional magnetic dynamics in C oII single-chain magnets organized by halogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, A.; Clemente-Juan, J. M.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.; Evangelisti, M.; Espallargas, G. Mínguez; del Barco, E.

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature magnetometry, ac susceptibility, and calorimetry have been employed to study Co-based single-chain magnets (SCMs) organized through halogen bonding. Magnetic hysteresis and maxima in the dc and ac susceptibilities, respectively, confirm the SCM behavior of the system. Several characteristic magnetic relaxation regimes are observed at different temperatures, which can be associated with both intra- and interchain exchange interactions. Remarkably, tweaking the rate at which an external magnetic field is swept along the axis of the chains enables a controlled transition between the one- and three-dimensional dynamics. Experiments on an isostructural Co-based SCM system crystallized with different halogens do not show three-dimensional dynamics, illustrating the importance of halogen bonding on the control of interchain interactions.

  2. Non-innocent additives in a palladium(II)-catalyzed C-H bond activation reaction: insights into multimetallic active catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Megha; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-04-16

    The role of a widely employed additive (AgOAc) in a palladium acetate-catalyzed ortho-C-H bond activation reaction has been examined using the M06 density functional theory. A new hetero-bimetallic Pd-(μ-OAc)3-Ag is identified as the most likely active species. This finding could have far-reaching implications with respect to the notion of the active species in palladium catalysis in the presence of other metal salt additives.

  3. Reinforcement of Unsupported Enamel by Restorative Materials and Dentin Bonding Agents: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rostamzadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Preservation of unsupported occlusal enamel after removal of underlying carious dentin may result in maintenance of aesthetics as well as wear resistance against the opposing enamel. This study investigates the influence of different restorative materialsand bonding agents on reinforcement of unsupported enamel in molars and compares it with sound dentin.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty- five extracted human molars were selected and randomly divided into five groups of nine. All lingual cusps were cut off. The dentin underlying the buccal cusps was removed in all groups except the positive control.The negative control group received no restorations. After application of varnish and Panavia F, spherical amalgam (Sina and after application of Single-Bond (3M, composite resin (Tetric Ceram was used to replace missing dentin.All specimens were thermocycled, then mounted in acrylic resin using a surveyor. Lingual inclination of facial cusps was positioned horizontally. Load was applied by an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min until fracture.Data were subjected to ANOVA (one way and Post hoc Test (Duncan.Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the five groups (P<0.001; however, no significant difference was revealed between bonded amalgam and the positive control groups (P=0.762. Composite and amalgam had the same effect (P=0.642, while the composite and negative group had no significant difference(P=0.056.Conclusion: Bonded amalgam systems (Panavia F could reinforce the undermined occlusal enamel effectively.

  4. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  5. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Mickenautsch

    Full Text Available A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i similar effect direction and (ii similar effect magnitude.7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph.Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected.Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials.

  6. Comparison of chlorine and chloramine in the release of mercury from dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mark E; Scott, John W; Schultz, Stephen T; Berry, Denise L; Wilcoxon, Monte; Piwoni, Marv; Panno, Brent; Bordson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the ability of chlorine (HOCl/OCl(-)) and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) to mobilize mercury from dental amalgam. Two types of amalgam were used in this investigation: laboratory-prepared amalgam and samples obtained from dental-unit wastewater. For disinfectant exposure simulations, 0.5 g of either the laboratory-generated or clinically obtained amalgam waste was added to 250 mL amber bottles. The amalgam samples were agitated by end-over-end rotation at 30 rpm in the presence of 1 mg/L chlorine, 10 mg/L chlorine, 1 mg/L monochloramine, 10 mg/L monochloramine, or deionized water for intervals of 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h for the clinically obtained amalgam waste samples and 4 h and 24 h for the laboratory-prepared samples. Chlorine and monochloramine concentrations were measured with a spectrophotometer. Samples were filtered through a 0.45 microm membrane filter and analyzed for mercury with USEPA standard method 245.7. When the two sample types were combined, the mean mercury level in the 1 mg/L chlorine group was 0.020 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.008). The 10 mg/L chlorine group had a mean mercury concentration of 0.59 mg/L (n=25, SD=1.06). The 1 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.023 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.010). The 10 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.024 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.011). Independent samples t-tests showed that there was a significant difference between the natural log mercury measurements of 10 mg/L chlorine compared to those of 1 mg/L and 10 mg/L chloramine. Changing from chlorine to chloramine disinfection at water treatment plants would not be expected to produce substantial increases in dissolved mercury levels in dental-unit wastewater.

  7. Tatuaje por amalgama: un peculiar caso clínico Amalgam tattoo: a curious case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El tatuaje por amalgama también conocido como pigmentación por amalgama, es el producto del depósito en el tejido conectivo subepitelialde residuos de amalgama resultado de procedimientos iatrogénicos por parte del odontólogo. La presentación clínica varía dependiendo de la profundidad a laque se alberguen las partículas en el tejido, radiográficamente se puede identificar la radiopacidad correspondiente al fragmento de amalgama, en los estudios histopatológicos se pueden observar las partículas de amalgama como gránulos oscuros, sólidos e irregulares dispuesto entre los haces de colágeno y vasos sanguíneo. El presente artículo refiere un peculiar caso de tatuaje por amalgama de tonalidades azules y negras que se extendió difusa e irregularmente en toda la mucosa vestibular desde el órgano dentario 21 hasta región premolar izquierda. Al realizar una cirugía periodontal exploratoria se detectó una gran porción de amalgama utilizada como material obturador y restaurador radicular del 21. Durante el procedimiento quirúrgico se cureteó y adelgazó la cara interna del colgajo mucoperióstico para tratar de disminuir el grado de pigmentación.Amalgam pigmentation or amalgam tattoo is the product of the deposit in the subepithelial connective tissue of amalgam was the iatrogenic result of procedures by the dentist. The clinical presentation varies depending on the depth at which the particles are housed in the tissue can be identified radiographically radiopacity fragment corresponding to the amalgam, histopathological studies particles can be observed as dark granules amalgam, provided solid, irregular between collagen bundles and blood vessels. The present article describes an unusual case of focal argyrosis shades of blue andblack fuzzy and unevenly spread across the buccal mucosa from 21 to left premolar region. When performing exploratory periodontal surgery revealed alarge portion of amalgam used as a restorative filling

  8. A review of recent method for surface preparation of metal in resin- bonded bridges.Part II: Biomcchamica! and technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azari A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available After approximately 40 years of experience in the field of resin - bonded restorations (R.B.R,"nthese restorations arc one of the most controversial. During these years, many suggestions have been"nmade for better performance and increasing durability of these restorations. The aims of this paper are:"n1 - Reviewing the literature for the so many factors involving the success or failure of R.B.R."n2 - Introducing a new and simplified method for increasing the durability and /or relention of R.B.R.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the microtensile bond strength of bulk fill and low shrinkage composite for different depths of Class II cavities with the cervical margin in cementum: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Sonali; Kumar, Pragya; Kumar, Avnish

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of bulk fill and low shrinkage composite for different depths of Class II cavities with the cervical margin in cementum. Materials and Methods: Standardized conservative box-shaped Class II cavities were prepared on sixty sound-impacted human third molars. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: Group I (n = 30) - horizontal incremental technique and Group II (n = 30) - bulk fill technique (SonicFill). They were further subdivided into three subgroups of (n = 10) samples each according to the different occluso-gingival height: subgroup (A - 4 mm, B - 5 mm, and C - 6 mm). The gingival margins for all the samples were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The restored samples were subjected to thermocycling (500 cycles) followed by μTBS testing. The scores were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc test using SPSS software version 16. Results: Subgroups IA and IB showed lower μTBS than subgroups IIA and IIB (P < 0.05) whereas subgroup IC showed higher μTBS than subgroup IIC (P < 0.05). SonicFill showed a significant reduction in μTBS as the depth increased. Conclusion: SonicFill should be used in two increments for cavities with a depth of more than 5 mm. PMID:27994314

  10. Bis(morpholine) hydrogen bond pincer - a novel series of heteroleptic Cu(II) coordination compounds as receptors for electron rich guests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stilinovic, Vladimir; Uzarevic, Krunoslav; Cvrtila, Ivica; Kaitner, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Crystallisation from morpholine (morph) solutions of copper(II) salts with monovalent anions (A) and 1,3-diketones (Hdkt) yielded nine heteroleptic coordination compounds [Cu(dkt)(morph)(2)A]. The coordination polyhedron of the copper ion in these compounds is a square pyramid with a monovalent

  11. Bis(morpholine) hydrogen bond pincer - a novel series of heteroleptic Cu(II) coordination compounds as receptors for electron rich guests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stilinovic, Vladimir; Uzarevic, Krunoslav; Cvrtila, Ivica; Kaitner, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Crystallisation from morpholine (morph) solutions of copper(II) salts with monovalent anions (A) and 1,3-diketones (Hdkt) yielded nine heteroleptic coordination compounds [Cu(dkt)(morph)(2)A]. The coordination polyhedron of the copper ion in these compounds is a square pyramid with a monovalent anio

  12. Amalgam Separators and Standards%银汞合金分离器介绍及标准要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李仕宁; 李伟

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, combined with YY 0835-2011 “Dentistry-Amalgam separators” standard introduced what is Amalgam separators and its effects and signiifcance of mounting.%本文结合YY 0835-2011《牙科学银汞合金分离器》标准介绍了银汞合金分离器及其安装的作用和意义。

  13. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation) and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor; Bahrololoomi Z. Assistant Professor

    2003-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or li...

  14. Enhancement in resistivity resolution based on the data sets amalgamation technique at Bukit Bunuh, Perak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson Bery, Andy; Saad, Rosli; Hidayah, I. N. E.; Azwin, I. N.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have carried out a study with the main objective to enhance the resolution of the electrical resistivity inversion model by introducing the data sets amalgamation technique to be used in the data processing stage. Based on the model resistivity with topography results, the data sets amalgamation technique for pole-dipole and wenner- schlumberger arrays are successful in identifying the boundary or interface of the overburden and weathered granite. Although the electrical resistivity method is well known, the proper selection of an array and appropriate inversion parameters setting such as damping factors are important in order to achieve the study objective and to image the target at the Earth's subsurface characterizations.

  15. PreGarside monoids and groups, parabolicity, amalgamation, and FC property

    CERN Document Server

    Godelle, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    We define the notion of preGarside group slightly lightening the definition of Garside group so that all Artin-Tits groups are preGarside groups. This paper intends to give a first basic study on these groups. Firstly, we introduce the notion of parabolic subgroup, we prove that any preGarside group has a (partial) complemented presentation, and we characterize the parbolic subgroups in terms of these presentations. Afterwards we prove that the amalgamated product of two preGarside groups along a common parabolic subgroup is again a preGarside group. This enables us to define the family of preGarside groups of FC type as the smallest family of preGarside groups that contains the Garside groups and that is closed by amalgamation along parabolic subgroups. Finally, we make an algebraic and combinatorial study on FC type preGarside groups and their parabolic subgroups.

  16. Effect of mercury (Hg) dental amalgam fillings on renal and oxidative stress biomarkers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al anoud; Elkhatib, Rola

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of mercury (Hg) associated with dental amalgam fillings on biomarkers of renal and oxidative stress in children between the ages of 5-15.5 years. Urine samples were analyzed for N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), α(1)-microglobulin (α(1)-MG), β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)-MG), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin (ALB), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). The level of urinary Hg (UHg-C) was calculated as μg/g creatinine. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the excretion of urinary NAG was significantly associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=0.149, P=0.03) and the levels of UHg-C (β=0.531, P=0), with an interaction between the two (P=0). The increase in urinary NAG in relation to UHg-C levels had a dose-effect pattern. The lowest observed effect was seen at UHg-C levels above 1.452 μg/g creatinine, which is lower than previously reported. In contrast, α(1)-MG was negatively associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=-0.270, P=0), but positively with UHg-C levels (β=0.393, P=0). There were 7 children without, and one child with, dental amalgam fillings with urinary α(1)-MG levels above the reference limit of >7 mg/g creatinine. Even though α(1)-MG seems to be a reliable biomarker for early changes in renal functions, it might exert its effect only at a higher level of exposure. An inverse relationship was also observed between urinary 8-OHdG levels and the presence of dental amalgam fillings. This might suggest that the dental amalgam does not increase DNA damage but reduces the capacity to repair DNA, leading to lower urinary excretion of 8-OHdG. On the other hand, we found that Hg affected the excretion of urinary 8-OHdG in a dose-related pattern that was mostly associated with long-term exposure to low Hg levels. Urinary NAG levels were positively associated with urinary MDA levels (β=0.516, P=0) but not with 8-OHdG (β=0.134, P=0.078) after adjustment for

  17. Long-term results of amalgam versus glass ionomer cement as apical sealant after apicectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesslén, P; Zetterqvist, L; Heimdahl, A

    1995-01-01

    A total of 67 teeth in 64 patients were treated with apicectomy and retrograde fillings. They were randomized to receive fillings of amalgam or glass ionomer cement in a comparative clinical study. Healing was evaluated clinically and radiographically after 1 and 5 years. Evaluation showed no difference in healing capacity between the two materials. Overall success rates in both groups were registered as 90% at 1 year and 85% at 5 years. Contamination with blood or saliva during insertion of the filling material did not affect healing adversely. The study shows that the 5-year follow-up result can be predicted in more than 95% of the cases at the 1-year follow-up. It can be concluded that glass ionomer cement is a valid alternative to amalgam as an apical sealant after apicectomy with equally good long-term clinical results.

  18. The quantum and mechanical justification of intensification by magnetic field of amalgam isotope separation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myshkin V. F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The steady increase in demand for isotopes requires the development of methods to increase the efficiency of isotope separation technologies. Methods of isotope separation based on thermodynamic differences of isotopic forms of the molecules don't require significant investment, but characterized by a low rate of exchange. It's known that the magnetic effect leads to a change the vibrational frequency of the molecules, and therefore their thermodynamic parameters. The change increases the thermodynamic parameters, including the exchange rate. The results of the experimental determination of the thermal effect of dissolving the salts of NaCl, KCl, CuSO4, sodium amalgam decomposition by distillate in a magnetic field and without field were shown. Magnetic interference can have a significant effect on the amalgam exchange method which was shown by quantum and mechanical analysis of the results

  19. Development and Validation of a Prototype Vacuum Sensing Unit for the DD2011 Chairside Amalgam Separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    pressure values onto the SD card. The addition of free and open-source Arduino libraries allowed for the seamless integration of the shield into the...permanent or adult posterior teeth,” in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Collaboration, Ed. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd...Feb-2015. [ Online ]. Available: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/DentalProducts/Denta lAmalgam/ucm171094.htm

  20. Formation of a ruthenium(IV)-oxo complex by electron-transfer oxidation of a coordinatively saturated ruthenium(II) complex and detection of oxygen-rebound intermediates in C-H bond oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takahiko; Nakayama, Kazuya; Ikemura, Kenichiro; Ogura, Takashi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-08-03

    A coordinatively saturated ruthenium(II) complex having tetradentate tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) and bidentate 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), [Ru(TPA)(bpy)](2+) (1), was oxidized by a Ce(IV) ion in H(2)O to afford a Ru(IV)-oxo complex, [Ru(O)(H(+)TPA)(bpy)](3+) (2). The crystal structure of the Ru(IV)-oxo complex 2 was determined by X-ray crystallography. In 2, the TPA ligand partially dissociates to be in a facial tridentate fashion and the uncoordinated pyridine moiety is protonated. The spin state of 2, which showed paramagnetically shifted NMR signals in the range of 60 to -20 ppm, was determined to be an intermediate spin (S = 1) by the Evans' method with (1)H NMR spectroscopy in acetone-d(6). The reaction of 2 with various oraganic substrates in acetonitrile at room temperature afforded oxidized and oxygenated products and a solvent-bound complex, [Ru(H(+)TPA)(bpy)(CH(3)CN)], which is intact in the presence of alcohols. The oxygenation reaction of saturated C-H bonds with 2 proceeds by two-step processes: the hydrogen abstraction with 2, followed by the dissociation of the alcohol products from the oxygen-rebound complexes, Ru(III)-alkoxo complexes, which were successfully detected by ESI-MS spectrometry. The kinetic isotope effects in the first step for the reaction of dihydroanthrathene (DHA) and cumene with 2 were determined to be 49 and 12, respectively. The second-order rate constants of C-H oxygenation in the first step exhibited a linear correlation with bond dissociation energies of the C-H bond cleavage.

  1. Extremely bulky amido first row transition metal(II) halide complexes: potential precursors to low coordinate metal-metal bonded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jamie; Jones, Cameron

    2013-04-01

    Reactions of the extremely bulky potassium amide complexes, [KL'(η(6)-toluene)] or [KL"] (L'/L" = N(Ar*)(SiR3), Ar* = C6H2{C(H)Ph2}2Me-2,6,4; R = Me (L') or Ph (L")), with a series of first row transition metal(II) halides have yielded 10 rare examples of monodentate amido first row transition metal(II) halide complexes, all of which were crystallographically characterized. They encompass the dimeric, square-planar chromium complexes, [{CrL'(THF)(μ-Cl)}2] and [{CrL"(μ-Cl)}2], the latter of which displays intramolecular η(2)-Ph···Cr interactions; the dimeric tetrahedral complexes, [{ML'(THF)(μ-Br)}2] (M = Mn or Fe), [{ML"(THF)(μ-X)}2] (M = Mn, Fe or Co; X = Cl or Br) and [{CoL"(μ-Cl)}2] (which displays intramolecular η(2)-Ph···Co interactions); and the monomeric zinc amides, [L'ZnBr(THF)] (three-coordinate) and [L"ZnBr] (two-coordinate). Solution state magnetic moment determinations on all but one of the paramagnetic compounds show them to be high-spin systems. Throughout, comparisons are made with related bulky terphenyl transition metal(II) halide complexes, and the potential for the use of the prepared complexes as precursors to low-valent transition metal systems is discussed.

  2. Different Supramolecular Coordination Polymers of [N,N'-di(pyrazin-2-yl-pyridine-2,6-diamine]Ni(II with Anions and Solvent Molecules as a Result of Hydrogen Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ta Wang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ni(II complexes of N,N'–di(pyrazin–2–ylpyridine–2,6–diamine (H2dpzpda with different anions were synthesized and their structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Hydrogen bonds between the amino groups and anions assembled the mononuclear molecules into different architectures. The perchlorate complex had a 1-D chain structure, whereas switching the anion from perchlorate to nitrate resulted in a corresponding change of the supramolecular structure from 1-D to 3-D. When the nitrate complex packed with the co-crystallized water, a double chain structure was formed through hydrogen bonding. The magnetic studies revealed values of g = 2.14 and D = 3.11 cm-1 for [Ni(H2dpzpda2](ClO42 (1 and g = 2.18 and D = 2.19 cm-1 for [Ni(H2dpzpda2](NO32 (2, respectively.

  3. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  4. [Amount of mercury from dental amalgam filling released into the atmosphere by cremation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M; Kishimoto, T; Yamamura, Y; Tabuse, M; Akama, Y; Satoh, H

    1994-07-01

    Mercury in dental amalgam filling is released into the atmosphere by cremation and is a suspected source of mercury pollution. The amount of mercury released was measured at three crematoriums. First, mercury levels in the atmosphere were measured. Mercury existed mainly in the gaseous form in ambient air. The concentration of atmospheric mercury at the three crematoriums (S, T and M) ranged from 4.3 to 19.7ng/m3, which was nearly identical to levels in our university surveyed as the control area and also to the levels of atmospheric mercury in general in Japan. Secondly, the amount of mercury release from T crematorium was estimated using official published statistical data in Japan and calculated as follows: sigma[(age specific number of dead that were cremated) x (the number of restored teeth by age category) x (mercury content per amalgam filling (0.6 g))] x (prevalence rate of restoration with amalgam). The amount of mercury released from this crematorium was estimated to be approximately 9.4 kg per year, or a daily release of 26 g into the ambient air. These results indicate that mercury release by cremation is similar to that from other man-made sources.

  5. Determination of the cathode and anode voltage drops in high power low-pressure amalgam lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, A. I., E-mail: vasiliev@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Startsev, A. Yu. [Joint Stock Company NPO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    For the first time, cathode and anode drops of powerful low-pressure amalgam lamps were measured. The lamp discharge current is 3.2 A, discharge current frequency is 43 kHz, linear electric power is 2.4 W/cm. The method of determination of a cathode drop is based on the change of a lamp operating voltage at variation of the electrode filament current at constant discharge current. The total (cathode plus anode) drop of voltage was measured by other, independent ways. The maximum cathode fall is 10.8 V; the anode fall corresponding to the maximal cathode fall is 2.4 V. It is shown that in powerful low pressure amalgam lamps the anode fall makes a considerable contribution (in certain cases, the basic one) to heating of electrodes. Therefore, the anode fall cannot be neglected, at design an electrode and ballast of amalgam lamps with operating discharge current frequency of tens of kHz.

  6. [Amalgam--a question of belief? A review and assessment of the current literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, H; Metzler, C

    1998-01-01

    Several hundred written sources have been researched regarding old and new findings. Forgotten and new facts are covered in four chapters. One of the authors is a retired industrial chemist, and the other a dental surgeon. In the first section the natural and synthetic sources of mercury are explained. In every scientific study the ubiquity of mercury for billions of years must be taken into consideration. The second chapter looks at the toxicology of mercury and its compounds. Well known catastrophies in Japan and Iraq are depicted. Individual intoxications are hardly mentioned in literature. The third chapter is devoted to the dental amalgam, a silver alloy with both physical-chemical properties, and corrosive and thermal behaviour. An attempt is made to define the mercury balance. The forth paragraph deals with the disposal and recycling of mercury. Many dental associations are currently discussing the possibility of recycling amalgam, which is rather a stable silver alloy than a volatile mercury compound. A controlled landfill disposal of dental amalgam will absorb a certain quantity of mercury during its life cycle, and is positive. Recycling is expensive, energy consuming and causes additional exposure. Unless silver and mercury become rare metals, recycling should not be considered. As yet no worldwide regulatory procedures exist.

  7. Generation, Characterization, and Reactivity of a Cu(II)-Alkylperoxide/Anilino Radical Complex: Insight into the O-O Bond Cleavage Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paria, Sayantan; Ohta, Takehiro; Morimoto, Yuma; Ogura, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Goto, Kei; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-09-02

    The reaction of [Cu(I)(TIPT3tren) (CH3CN)]ClO4 (1) and cumene hydroperoxide (C6H5C(CH3)2OOH, ROOH) at -60 °C in CH2Cl2 gave a Cu(II)-alkylperoxide/anilino radical complex 2, the formation of which was confirmed by UV-vis, resonance Raman, EPR, and CSI-mass spectroscopy. The mechanism of formation of 2, as well as its reactivity, has been explored.

  8. Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing Lutidine-Derived Pincer CNC Ligands: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Hydrogenation of C-N bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Juárez, Martín; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Lara, Patricia; Morales-Cerón, Judith P; Vaquero, Mónica; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Salazar, Verónica; Suárez, Andrés

    2015-05-11

    A series of Ru complexes containing lutidine-derived pincer CNC ligands have been prepared by transmetalation with the corresponding silver-carbene derivatives. Characterization of these derivatives shows both mer and fac coordination of the CNC ligands depending on the wingtips of the N-heterocyclic carbene fragments. In the presence of tBuOK, the Ru-CNC complexes are active in the hydrogenation of a series of imines. In addition, these complexes catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of phenantridine. Detailed NMR spectroscopic studies have shown the capability of the CNC ligand to be deprotonated and get involved in ligand-assisted activation of dihydrogen. More interestingly, upon deprotonation, the Ru-CNC complex 5 e(BF4 ) is able to add aldimines to the metal-ligand framework to yield an amido complex. Finally, investigation of the mechanism of the hydrogenation of imines has been carried out by means of DFT calculations. The calculated mechanism involves outer-sphere stepwise hydrogen transfer to the C-N bond assisted either by the pincer ligand or a second coordinated H2 molecule.

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigations of copper (I/II) complexes with triazine-pyrazole derivatives as ligands and their in situ C-N bond cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Xiao; Wang, Che; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xin-Yu; Xing, Yong-Heng; Sun, Qiao

    2015-05-01

    Two copper complexes, Cu(SCN)(Mpz∗T-(EtO)2) (1) (Mpz∗T-(EtO)2 = L3) and CuCl(H2O)(Mpz∗T-O2) (2) (Mpz∗T-O2 = L4) were synthesized by the reaction of 2,4,6-tri(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (L1) or 2,4,6-tri(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (L2) with CuCl2·2H2O in anhydrous ethanol and methanol, respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray powder diffraction. The structural characterizations and quantum mechanical calculations of the two complexes were analyzed in detail. It was found that an in site reaction occurred during the synthesis process of complexes 1 and 2, likely due to catalytic property of copper ions which leads to the C-N bond cleavage to generate new organic species, namely, Mpz∗T-(EtO)2 (L3) and Mpz∗T-O2 (L4).

  10. Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 °C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

  11. Mechanism of Me–Re Bond Addition to Platinum(II) and Dioxygen Activation by the Resulting Pt–Re Bimetallic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichaandi, Kothanda Rama; Kabalan, Lara; Amini, Hashem; Zhang, Guanghui; Zhu, Hanyu; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kais, Sabre; Nabavizadeh, S. Masoud; Rashdi, Mehdi; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M. (Shiraz); (Purdue); (Hamad Bin Khalifa)

    2017-02-06

    Unusual cis-oxidative addition of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) to [PtMe2(bpy)], (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) (1) is described. Addition of MTO to 1 first gives the Lewis acid–base adduct [(bpy)Me2Pt–Re(Me)(O)3] (2) and subsequently affords the oxidative addition product [(bpy)Me3PtReO3] (3). All complexes 1, MTO, 2, and 3 are in equilibrium in solution. The structure of 2 was confirmed by X-ray crystallography, and its dissociation constant in solution is 0.87 M. The structure of 3 was confirmed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray absorption near-edge structure in tandem with one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy augmented by deuterium and 13C isotope-labeling studies. Kinetics of formation of compound 3 revealed saturation kinetics dependence on [MTO] and first-order in [Pt], complying with prior equilibrium formation of 2 with oxidative addition of Me–Re being the rate-determining step. Exposure of 3 to molecular oxygen or air resulted in the insertion of an oxygen atom into the platinum–rhenium bond forming [(bpy)Me3PtOReO3] (4) as final product. In conclusion, density functional theory analysis on oxygen insertion pathways leading to complex 4, merited on the basis of Russell oxidation pathway, revealed the involvement of rhenium peroxo species.'

  12. Highly fluorescent platinum(II) organometallic complexes of perylene and perylene monoimide, with Pt σ-bonded directly to the perylene core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentijo, Sergio; Miguel, Jesús A; Espinet, Pablo

    2010-10-18

    3-Bromoperylene (BrPer) or N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-9-bromo-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide (BrPMI) react with [Pt(PEt(3))(4)] to yield trans-[PtR(PEt(3))(2)Br] (R = Per, 1a; R = PMI, 1b). Neutral and cationic perylenyl complexes containing a Pt(PEt(3))X group have been prepared from 1a,b by substitution of the Br ligand by a variety of other ligands (NCS, CN, NO(3), CN(t)Bu, PyMe). The X-ray structures of trans-[PtR(PEt(3))(2)X] (R = Per, X = NCS (2a); R = PMI, X = NO(3) (4b); R = Per, X = CN(t)Bu (5a)) show that the perylenyl fragment remains nearly planar and is arranged almost orthogonal to the coordination plane: The three molecules appear as individual entities in the solid state, with no π-π stacking of perylenyl rings. Each platinum complex exhibits fluorescence associated to the perylene or PMI fragments with emission quantum yields, in solution at room temperature, in the range 0.30-0.80 and emission lifetimes ∼4 ns, but with significantly different emission maxima, by influence of the X ligands on Pt. The similarity of the overall luminescence spectra of these metalated complexes with the perylene or PMI strongly suggests a perylene-dominated intraligand π-π*emissive state, metal-perturbed by interaction of the platinum fragment mostly via polarization of the Ar-Pt bond.

  13. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D. [Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  15. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  16. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, M.L. E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt; Marques, J.P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A.S

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 {mu}g g{sup -1} in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 {mu}g g{sup -1}, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 {mu}m of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  17. Geometry and bond-length alternation in nonlinear optical materials. III. Structural parameters of two chromophores containing aromatizable donorsPart II: Gainsford, Bhuiyan & Kay (2008a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsford, Graeme J; Bhuiyan, M Delower H; Kay, Andrew J

    2008-11-01

    The planar component of 2-{3-cyano-4-[3-(1-decyl-1,4-dihydroquinolin-4-ylidene)prop-1-enyl]-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}malononitrile, C(32)H(46)N(4)O, (I), forms into layers parallel to the (\\overline{1}01) plane. The larger of the two spaces between layers is filled by the alkyl chains, giving a ;sandwich stack' appearance. The packing of 2-{3-cyano-4-[5-(1-decyl-1,4-dihydroquinolin-4-ylidene)penta-1,3-dienyl]-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}malononitrile, C(34)H(38)N(4)O, (II), which has partial disorder in the 1-decyl group, utilizes weak C-H...N, C-H...O and C-N...pi interactions in a three-dimensional ;herring-bone' array with molecular segments parallel to the (111) and (\\overline{1}1\\overline{1}) planes. Different rotational isomers with respect to the polyene chain and the 5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene link are observed in the two structures. The significance of the study lies in the delocalization of charge along the polyene chain and the supramolecular aggregation present, which highlight the difficulty in obtaining the noncentrosymmetric alignment required for high nonlinear optical (NLO) responses in zwitterionic chromophores.

  18. Trans-dichlorotetrakis(1H-pyrazole-κN2)copper(II): Synthesis, crystal structure, hydrogen bonding graph-sets, vibrational and DFT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direm, Amani; Tursun, Mahir; Parlak, Cemal; Benali-Cherif, Nourredine

    2015-08-01

    The copper complex [Cu(HPrz)4]Cl2 (HPrz = Pyrazole) was synthesized and its structure was characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The structural conformers, optimized geometric parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of the compound were examined by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method, the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) functional, the 6-311+G(3df,p) and lanl2dz basis sets. Reliable vibrational assignments were investigated by the potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c with the unit cell parameters a = 13.5430 (10) Å, b = 9.1480 (10) Å, c = 14.6480 (10) Å and β = 116.7° (5). There is a good agreement between the theoretically predicted structural parameters and vibrational frequencies and those obtained experimentally. The findings of this work reveals further insight into molecular copper(II) pyrazole systems.

  19. Surgical endodontic therapy: retrofilling of apex with amalgam and SuperSeal. Retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pljevljak, N; Minasi, R; Brauner, E; Galli, M

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to make a retrospective analysis on teeth with apicectomized roots, closed off by retrograde with amalgam and SuperSeal-Ogna® (cement oxide of zinc and eugenol modified by acidity ethoxy-benzoic acid), in order to achieve clinical evaluation and radiographic evidence of treated dental elements and surrounding tissue SuperSeal (Ogna®). The study was conducted on 420 teeth, single and multi rooted, pertaining to 366 patients (189 women and 177 men) endodontically treated, in between 1998 and 2007. The teeth were treated with endodontic technique step-back and closed off with gutta-percha. Following the roots were apicectomyzed and then was prepared a retrograde cavity using retrotip steel mounted on the ultrasonic device. After carrying out the retrograde cavity all the samples were divided into two groups . The retrograde filling in Group A was made in Superseal, group B with amalgama. Both groups were divided in those teeths who was treated with use of optical microscope and in groups of teeths preformed without microscope. Nevertheless amalgam against the SuperSeal offers almost the same quality of the seal and the same prognosis. However SuperSeal as a material of choice, proved excellent, for carrying out the retrograde fillings free of some side effects, such as dimensional instability, mercury poisoning and pigmentation of tissues (tattoos from amalgam). In any case, whatever the type of material is, the operative microscope significantly affects the occurrence of failure. This demonstrates the importance of the microscope in order to obtain greater visibility and accuracy of the apex seal, more than minor sacrifice of healthy tissue.

  20. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  1. Mercury in dental amalgam: Are our health care workers at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, M; Sulaiman, N S; Tan, B S; Yahya, N A; Anual, Z F; Mahiyuddin, W R Wan; Khan, M F; Muttalib, K A

    2016-11-01

    Dental amalgam in fillings exposes workers to mercury. The exposure to mercury was investigated among 1871 dental health care workers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of mercury exposure among dental compared to nondental health care workers and to determine other risk factors for mercury exposure. Respondents answered questionnaires to obtain demographic, personal, professional, and workplace information and were examined for their own amalgam fillings. Chronic mercury exposure was assessed through urinary mercury levels. In total, 1409 dental and 462 nondental health care workers participated in the study. Median urine mercury levels for dental and nondental health care workers were 2.75 μg/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 3.0175) and 2.66 μg/L (IQR = 3.04) respectively. For mercury exposure, there were no significant risk factor found among the workers involved within the dental care. The Mann-Whitney test showed that urine mercury levels were significantly different between respondents who eat seafood more than 5 times per week compared to those who eat it less frequently or not at all (p = 0.003). The urinary mercury levels indicated significant difference between dental workers in their practice using squeeze cloths (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.03). Multiple logistic regression showed that only the usage of cosmetic products that might contain mercury was found to be significantly associated with the urinary mercury levels (odds ratio [OR] = 15.237; CI: 3.612-64.276). Therefore, mean urinary mercury levels of health care workers were low. Exposure to dental amalgam is not associated with high mercury exposure. However, usage of cosmetic products containing mercury and high seafood consumption may lead to the increase of exposure to mercury.

  2. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  3. A Readily Accessible Chiral NNN Pincer Ligand with a Pyrrole Backbone and Its Ni(II) Chemistry: Syntheses, Structural Chemistry, and Bond Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Jan; Kochan, Alexander; Wadepohl, Hubert; Gade, Lutz H

    2017-03-20

    A new class of chiral C2-symmetric N-donor pincer ligands, 2,5-bis(2-oxazolinyldimethylmethyl)pyrroles (PdmBox)H, was synthesized starting from the readily available ethyl 2,2-dimethyl-3-oxobutanoate (1). The synthesis of the ligand backbone was achieved by oxidative enole coupling with CuC12 followed by Paal-Knorr-type pyrrole synthesis. The corresponding protioligands ((R)PdmBox)H (R = iPr: 5a; Ph: 5b) were obtained by condensation with amino alcohols and subsequent zinc-catalyzed cyclization. Reaction of the lithiated ligands with [NiCl2(dme)] yielded the corresponding square-planar nickel(II) complexes [((R)PdmBox)NiCl] (6a/b). Salt metathesis of 6a with the corresponding alkali or cesium salts in acetone led to the formation of air- and moisture-stable [((iPr)PdmBox)NiX] (X = F (7), X = Br (8), X = I (9), X = N3 (10), X = OAc (11). Furthermore, the conversion of [((iPr)PdmBox)NiF] (7) with hydride transfer reagents such as PhSiH3 led to the stable hydrido species [((iPr)PdmBox)NiH] (27), the stoichiometric transformations of which were studied. Treatment of 6a with organometallic reagents such as ZnEt2, PhLi, PhC≡CLi, NsLi, or ((4F)Bn)2Mg(THF)2 gave the corresponding alkyl, alkynyl, or aryl complexes. The availability of the new nonisomerizable PdmBox pincer ligands allowed the comparative study of their ligation to square-planar complexes as helically twisted spectator ligands as opposed to the enforced planar rigidity of their iso-PmBox analogues and the way this influences the reactivity of the Ni complexes.

  4. Structural chemistry and number theory amalgamized: crystal structure of Na11Hg52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-12-01

    The recently elucidated crystal structure of the technologically important amalgam Na11Hg52 is described by means of a method employing some fundamental concept of number theory, namely modular arithmetical (congruence) relations observed between a slightly idealized set of atomic coordinates. In combination with well known ideas from group theory, regarding lattice-sublattice transformations, these allow for a deeper mutual understanding of both and provide the structural chemist with a slightly different kind of spectacles, thus enabling a distinct viw on complex crystal structures in general.

  5. The effect of bevel angle on apical microleakage following the use of amalgam and MTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian MR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Achieving appropriate seal in canal obturation is the main goal of endodontic therapy. However, in some cases, it can not be obtained by non-surgical procedures alone. Retrograde surgery is one of the most common procedures in endodontics. Apical seal improvement can be obtained by root end filling and decreasing the root end resection angle (bevel angle. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of bevel angle on apical microleakage following the use of amalgam and MTA as root end filling materials. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 128 extracted human teeth were instrumented and obturated by lateral condensation technique. The teeth were divided into two groups and the apical root resection was performed by high speed fissure bur (one group perpendicular to the long axis of the teeth and the other 45 to the long axis. The 3 mm root end cavity was prepared by ultrasonic device. Each group was divided into two subgroups: One filled with amalgam and the other with MTA. Teeth were incubated for 72 h, covered by two layers of nail polish (except for apical 3mm and submerged in methylene blue for 48 h. Teeth were washed under tap water and mesiodistally dissected by low speed disc. Dye penetration was evaluated by stereomicroscope. Data were analysed by two way ANOVA and Tukey tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The results showed that retrofill material type had a significant effect on microleakage and MTA was superior to amalgam in this respect. Bevel angle failed to show any significant effect on apical microleakage. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it seems that the use of MTA instead of amalgam in clinical practice can improve the success rate of endodontic surgery whereas the bevel angle can be determined based on the status of each individual case; However, increasing the bevel angle seems to increase microleakage due to exposure of more dentinal tubules.

  6. Enterococcus faecalis leakage in MTA silver amalgam and glass ionomer as root-end filling materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda Mejía, Martha Elena; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Salcedo Moncada, Doris; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Castro Rodríguez, Antonia; Departamento Académico Estomatología Biosocial. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Palacios Alva, Elmo; Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Moromi Nakata, Hilda; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Martínez Cadillo, Elba; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Ortiz Cárdenas, Ántero; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Watanabe Velásquez, Rómel; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Zambrano de la Peña, Livia; Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Ochoa Tataje, Julio; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Lara Téllez, Lourdes; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Ayala de la Vega, Gerardo; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.; Ventocilla Huasupoma, María; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad Odontología UNMSM. Lima Perú.

    2014-01-01

    One of the aims of a root-end filling material placed in an apicectomy treatment is to provide apical seal that can inhibits the coronary migration of antigens to perirradicular tissues. Many materials are used for this end; however, to date there has not been any material that satisfies all the requirements of an ideal material. With the purpose of making a comparative analysis of the apical sealing abilities of three root-end filling materials: silver amalgam, glass ionomer and MTA (mineral...

  7. On the Multilinear Singular Integrals and Commutators in the Weighted Amalgam Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the norm estimates for the multilinear singular integral operators and their commutators formed by BMO functions on the weighted amalgam spaces Lvw→q,Lpαℝn. Some criterions of boundedness for such operators in Lvw→q,Lpαℝn are given. As applications, the norm inequalities for the multilinear Calderón-Zygmund operators and multilinear singular integrals with nonsmooth kernels as well as the corresponding commutators on Lvw→q,Lpαℝn are obtained.

  8. 通过镍(II)-硫键和碘离子基元反应有理合成碘-二硫醇盐桥联的双核镍-镍配合物%Rational preparation of iodide-dithiolate-bridged binuclear Ni-Ni complex from the reaction between nickel(II)-sulfur bond and iodide moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强; 安德鲁·马; 朱文锋; 亚力山大·布雷克; 克莱尔·威尔森; 斯蒂芬·戴维斯; 马丁·施罗德

    2008-01-01

    The reaction between Fe(CO)412 and Ni(SR)2(dppe) affords NiI2(dppe) due to the necleophilic attack of iodide on the labile N-S(aryl thiolate) bonds.The iodide-dithiolate-bridged binuclear Ni-Ni complexes[(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-pdt)Ni(dppe)]I and[(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-edt)Ni(dppe)]I can be readily prepared by reaction between[NiI2(dppe)]and[Ni(pdt)(dppe)] or[Ni(edt)(dppe)][dppe=1,2-bis (diphenyl phosphino)-ethane;pdt=1,3-propane-dithiolate;edt=1,2-ethane-dithiolate]in CH2C12 as a result of the attack on the Ni-I bond by the lone pairs of electrons on thiolato sulfur donors.On the other hand,the reaction between[FeCp(CO)2I] and [Ni(pdt)(dppe)] or[Ni(edt)(dppe)]in CH2C12 processes extremely slow.However, upon the metathesis with NH4PF6 for these reaction,the iodide-thiolate-bridged binuclear Ni-Ni complexes [(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-pdt)Ni(dppe)]PF6 and [(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-edt)Ni(dppe)]PF6 have been prepared due to the reaction of iodide and the Ni(II)-S bonds.These results suggest that the reactivity of Ni-SR bonds in such Ni-thiolate-phosphine complexes is tuneable with regard to the second metal ion and the different reactivity of iodide moiety.%本文报道由于碘离子对不稳定的Ni(II)-S(芳基硫醇盐)键的亲核作用,使得Fe(CO)412和Ni(SR)2(dppe(SR=芳基硫醇盐)之间的反应生成NiI2(dppe).含碘和二芳基硫醇盐离子桥联的Ni-Ni双核配合物[(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-pdt)Ni(dppe)]I和[(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-edt)Ni(dppe)]I可方便地由[NiI2(dppe)]和[Ni(pdt)(dppe)]或[Ni(edt)(dppe)]在二氯甲烷的溶液中的反应制得;该类反应可认为是由于硫醇盐离子基团中S-供体上的孤对电子对Ni-I键的进攻所致.另一方面,我们观察到[FeCp(CO)2I]和[Ni(pdt)(dppe)]或[Ni(edt)(dppe)]在二氯甲烷中的反应极其缓慢;但当向上述反应体系中加入NH4PF6进行复分解置换后,源于碘离子和Ni(II)-S键的作用同样可得到含碘与二芳基硫醇盐离子桥联的Ni-Ni双核配合物[(dppe)Ni(μ-I)(μ-pdt)Ni(dppe)]PF6

  9. Dental amalgam - the effect of the technology of alloy powder preparation on the corrosion behaviour and the release of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joska, L.; Bystriansky, J.; Novak, P. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Institute of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2003-03-01

    Dental amalgams are based on a broad spectrum of materials differing in their chemical composition, metallurgical treatment, and in the way the initial alloys powders are prepared. In addition to their chemical composition, amalgams based on various powders differ in both their microstructure and the amount of mercury needed for preparation. All these facts may affect electrochemical processes occurring during their interaction with oral fluids, and also mercury release. While verifying the effect of the technology used for the preparation of the high-copper ternary alloy powder on the properties of resulting amalgams, this study aimed at the mechanism of their interaction with a model saliva solution as well as mercury release was included. Measurements were done in a model saliva solution using standard electrochemical methods and exposition measurements. The interaction of individual types of amalgams with artificial saliva did not reveal any significant differences. The free corrosion potential of all these amalgams in an aerated solution settled in the range of values in which tin oxidation, resulting in a layer of insoluble corrosion products, turned out to be the dominant anodic process. The rate of mercury release was the lowest for amalgams based on a gas-atomized alloy. The highest rate of mercury release, and also its dependence on time, was exhibited by lathe-cut powder based amalgam. In addition to different volume fraction of the Ag-Hg phase and the level of its tin alloying, this different behaviour may be explained by differences in the rate at which a layer of tin corrosion products acting as a barrier to mercury release is formed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Dentalamalgame basieren auf einem breitem Spektrum von Werkstoffen, die sich in ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung, der metallurgischen Behandlung und der Art, wie die Ausgangslegierungspulver hergestellt werden, unterscheiden. Zusaetzlich zu ihrer chemischen

  10. A self-designed instrument to evaluate cavosurface angle for class I amalgam cavity preparation: A learning aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankit; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Ballal, Vasudev; Sharma, Padmaja

    2012-07-01

    Fighting the controversies, amalgam, as a posterior restorative material has survived till date. The fate of amalgam restoration is determined by geometry of the cavity preparation and cavosurface angle is one integral part of the cavity, which decides the marginal characteristics of the restoration and health of the tooth. Low edge strength of amalgam highlights the importance of cavosurface angle. However, at the same time conservation of the tooth also should be considered. This article presents a self-designed instrument to evaluate and obtain a cavosurface angle close to 110°. The design of the instrument also helps in evaluating parameters, such as depth of the cavity, undercut angle, and allows finishing of the buccal or lingual walls.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of pstrength of the luting cements (pcore materials (pstrength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than traditional GIC luting cement for all core buildup materials except, for silver amalgam core buildup material. RMGIC core material showed highest shear bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI Silver Reinforced, GI and

  12. Valuing Euro rating-triggered step-up telecom bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  13. Valuing Euro Rating-Triggered Step-Up Telecom Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  14. Valuing Euro rating-triggered step-up telecom bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  15. Valuing Euro Rating-Triggered Step-Up Telecom Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  16. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  17. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  19. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  20. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  1. Satisfaction, Restriction and Amalgamation of Constraints in the Framework of M-Adhesive Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Schölzel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Application conditions for rules and constraints for graphs are well-known in the theory of graph transformation and have been extended already to M-adhesive transformation systems. According to the literature we distinguish between two kinds of satisfaction for constraints, called general and initial satisfaction of constraints, where initial satisfaction is defined for constraints over an initial object of the base category. Unfortunately, the standard definition of general satisfaction is not compatible with negation in contrast to initial satisfaction. Based on the well-known restriction of objects along type morphisms, we study in this paper restriction and amalgamation of application conditions and constraints together with their solutions. In our main result, we show compatibility of initial satisfaction for positive constraints with restriction and amalgamation, while general satisfaction fails in general. Our main result is based on the compatibility of composition via pushouts with restriction, which is ensured by the horizontal van Kampen property in addition to the vertical one that is generally satisfied in M-adhesive categories.

  2. Urinary mercury levels in females: influence of skin-lightening creams and dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Saleh, I; Shinwari, N

    1997-10-01

    The influence of application of skin-lightening creams and dental amalgam fillings on the urinary mercury (Hg) level was evaluated in 225 females (ages 17 to 58 years) living in Riyadh, capital of Saudi Arabia. The arithmetic mean of the urinary Hg level was 6.96 +/- 20.43 micrograms 1(-1), in the range 0 to 204.8 micrograms 1(-1). The mean urinary Hg level adjusted by creatinine (Cr) was 11.22 +/- 37.23 micrograms g-1 Cr, in the range 0 to 459.37 micrograms g-1. No significant difference in urinary Hg was noted between the females regarding the use of skin-lightening creams. On the other hand, results showed that urinary Hg concentration was influenced by the use and number of dental amalgam fillings. No women were identified with symptoms or signs that could be attributed to Hg intoxication. Urine analyses for creatinine, urea, uric acid, phosphorus, magnesium, glucose and calcium showed significant correlation with urinary Hg. This suggests that chronic exposure to Hg may be associated with a deterioration of renal function.

  3. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  4. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  5. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  6. Evaluation of the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide gel (Nite White on mercury release from Iranian and foreign spherical and admixed amalgams by cold vapor atomic absorption method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nowadays, esthetic dentistry has become an important part of modern dentistry. Bleaching is considered as a conservative, safe and effective way for treatment of discolored teeth. Although bleaching is commonly used on anterior teeth, the bleaching gel may come into contact with patient's former amalgam restorations and result in corrosive effects, dissolution of amalgam phases and increasing release of mercury. Mercury released from dental amalgam during mouthguard bleaching can be absorbed and increase the total mercury body burden. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign brands of amalgams with spherical and admixed particles, polished and unpolished, after 16%carbamide peroxide gel application.Materials and Methods: This experimental in vitro study was performed on 256 Iranian and foreign amalgam samples with spherical and admixed particles. The provided samples were put in distilled water and classified according to the type of amalgam, shape of particles and quality of surface polishing. The test samples were placed in Nite White 16% carbamid peroxide gel and control samples were put in phosphate buffer (Ph=6.5 for 14 and 28 hours. The amount of released mercury was calculated using AVA-440 Mercury Analysis System (Thermo Jarrell Ash model SH/229 with cold-vapor atomic absorption. Data were analyzed using t-test, four way and three way ANOVA tests with P<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: 16% Nite White carbamide peroxide gel caused a significant increase in amount of mercury released from amalgams in all groups (P<0.05. Mercury release from Iranian amalgam was higher than that from the foreign brands (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in mercury released from spherical and admixed amalgams (P>0.05. The amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign amalgams was time dependent (P<0.05. Furthermore, the amount of mercury released from

  7. Scalp hair and saliva as biomarkers in determination of mercury levels in Iranian women: Amalgam as a determinant of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakour, H., E-mail: fakour.h@gmail.com [Department of Environment, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaili-Sari, A. [Department of Environment, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zayeri, F. [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Paramedical Sciences and Proteomics Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between mercury concentrations in saliva and hair in women with amalgam fillings and its relation with age and number of amalgam fillings. Eighty-two hair and saliva samples were collected randomly from Iranian women who have the same fish consumption pattern and free from occupational exposures. The mean {+-} SD age of these women was 29.37 {+-} 8.12 (ranged from 20 to 56). The determination of Hg level in hair samples was carried out by the LECO, AMA 254, Advanced Mercury Analyzer according to ASTM, standard No. D-6722. Mercury concentration in saliva samples was analyzed by PERKIN-ELMER 3030 Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The mean {+-} SD mercury level in the women was 1.28 {+-} 1.38 {mu}g/g in hair and 4.14 {+-} 4.08 {mu}g/l in saliva; and there were positive correlation among them. A significant correlation was also observed between Hg level of saliva (Spearman's {rho} = 0.93, P < 0.001) and hair (Spearman's {rho} = 0.92, P < 0.001) with number of amalgam fillings. According to the results, we can conclude that amalgam fillings may be an effective source for high Hg concentration in hair and releasing the mercury to the saliva samples.

  8. The Minamata Convention on Mercury: attempting to address the global controversy of dental amalgam use and mercury waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Contreras, John T; Liang, Bryan A

    2014-02-15

    In October 2013, a new international binding treaty instrument called the Minamata Convention on Mercury opened for signature in Minamata City, Japan, the site of arguably the worst public health and environmental disaster involving mercury contamination. The treaty aims to curb the significant health and environmental impacts of mercury pollution and includes provisions addressing the mining, export and import, storage, and waste management of products containing mercury. Importantly, a provision heavily negotiated in the treaty addresses the use of dental fillings using mercury amalgam, an issue that has been subject to decades of global controversy. Though use of dental amalgam is widespread and has benefits, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for human health risk and environmental damage from emissions and improper waste management. While the Minamata Convention attempts to address these issues by calling for a voluntary phase-down of dental amalgam use and commitment to other measures, it falls short by failing to require binding and measurable targets to achieve these goals. In response, the international community should begin exploring ways to strengthen the implementation of the dental amalgam treaty provisions by establishing binding phase-down targets and milestones as well as exploring financing mechanisms to support treaty measures. Through strengthening of the Convention, stakeholders can ensure equitable access to global oral health treatment while also promoting responsible environmental stewardship.

  9. 49 CFR 244.15 - Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration Plan not involving an amalgamation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITIONS OF CONTROL Safety Integration Plans § 244.15 Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration Plan... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration Plan not involving an amalgamation of operations. 244.15 Section 244.15 Transportation...

  10. Biological mercury measurements before and after administration of a chelator (DMPS) and subjective symptoms allegedly due to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurs, A; Exterkate, R; ten Cate, J M; ten Cate, B

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore multivariately the relationship between subjective symptoms allegedly due to amalgam and mercury measurements before and after administration of a chelator. Of 120 participants, the mercury concentrations in urine (U-Hg) and plasma (P-Hg) before and after a chelating agent or placebo were determined as were the numbers of fillings and symptoms allegedly due to subjective symptoms. The dental status was charted. Blood was analysed on 13 parameters. The analysis revealed neither the parameters in blood nor the subjective symptoms to be associated with a dimension dominated by 'mercury indicators'. The final analysis was therefore performed with 'number of subjective symptoms' and enabled to distinguish two subsamples. One subsample was characterised by > 2 subjective "symptoms", highest scores for U-Hg, P-Hg and filled surfaces, and chewing gum for > 1 h a day. The other subsample comprised the subjects with few filled surfaces and low U-Hg and P-Hg, but was not characterised by "no subjective symptoms". The chelator was considered neither to invalidate nor to improve these findings and was concluded not to be helpful in diagnosing "symptoms". The chelator caused side effects in 42% of the subjects and the placebo in 27%. A relationship between amalgam fillings and subjective symptoms could not be shown. Therefore, the mere fact of knowing to have amalgam fillings was assumed to be the reason why subjective symptoms were attributed to amalgam and side effects were ascribed to the treatment.

  11. The use of amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide to recreate a radiopaque image of a lost dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2002-05-01

    Radiographs of dental restorations are highly reliable when used to identify postmortem dental remains. A problem exists if key dental restorations are missing or defective, which results in the loss of a comparative radiographic image. This article describes a simple method allowing the odontologist to quickly recreate a temporary radiopaque restoration. This article presents a method of using amalgam powder (radiopaque material) and calcium hydroxide (radiopaque material and transport medium for the amalgam powder) to recreate a radiopaque image on a tooth that has lost a dental restoration. Amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide is easily obtained (in any dental office), fairly clean, easy to manipulate, inexpensive, inert, stable, and able to be removed without damaging the dental remains. The amalgam powder/calcium hydroxide mixture can easily be re-shaped or modified to reflect the radiopaque image of the original restoration. Radiographic comparison of the "restored" dental remains to the antemortem radiographs is now possible. The use of this technique is presented in a case report.

  12. Molar apicectomy with amalgam root-end filling: results of a prospective study in two district general hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gale, T M; Wesson, C M

    2003-01-01

    ..., has seemed also to hold out the prospect of an advance. Whilst the data reported in this paper concerning the comparative success rates of apicectomy with amalgam REF associated with the different molars, the probable sites of failure and the risks of damage to the inferior dental nerve (IDN) in mandibular molar apicectomy continue to have relevance, our o...

  13. Mercury contamination - Amalgamate (contract with NFS and ADA). Stabilize Elemental Mercury Wastes. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 1675

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Through efforts led by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and its Mercury Working Group (HgWG), the inventory of bulk elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides stored at various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is thought to be approximately 16 m3 (Conley et al. 1998). At least 19 different DOE sites have this type of mixed low-level waste in their storage facilities. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) specifies amalgamation as the treatment method for radioactively contaminated elemental mercury. Although the chemistry of amalgamation is well known, the practical engineering of a sizable amalgamation process has not been tested (Tyson 1993). To eliminate the existing DOE inventory in a reasonable timeframe, scaleable equipment is needed that can: produce waste forms that meet the EPA definition of amalgamation, produce waste forms that pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) limit of 0.20 mg/L, limit mercury vapor concentrations during processing to below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) 8-hour worker exposure limit (50 mg/m3) for mercury, and perform the above economically.

  14. Mercury contamination - Amalgamate (contract with NFS and ADA). Stabilize Elemental Mercury Wastes. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 1675

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Through efforts led by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and its Mercury Working Group (HgWG), the inventory of bulk elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides stored at various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is thought to be approximately 16 m3 (Conley et al. 1998). At least 19 different DOE sites have this type of mixed low-level waste in their storage facilities. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) specifies amalgamation as the treatment method for radioactively contaminated elemental mercury. Although the chemistry of amalgamation is well known, the practical engineering of a sizable amalgamation process has not been tested (Tyson 1993). To eliminate the existing DOE inventory in a reasonable timeframe, scaleable equipment is needed that can: produce waste forms that meet the EPA definition of amalgamation, produce waste forms that pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) limit of 0.20 mg/L, limit mercury vapor concentrations during processing to below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) 8-hour worker exposure limit (50 mg/m3) for mercury, and perform the above economically.

  15. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  16. Characterizing ceramics and the interfacial adhesion to resin: II- the relationship of surface treatment, bond strength, interfacial toughness and fractography Caracterização de cerâmicas e adesão à resina: II- relação entre tratamento de superfície, resistência adesiva, tenacidade de fratura da interface e fractografia

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promote micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this review is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters ...

  17. Effect of various endodontic irrigants on the push-out bond strength of biodentine and conventional root perforation repair materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Akbulut, Makbule Bilge; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various endodontic irrigants on the push-out bond strength of Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France) in comparison with contemporary root perforation repair materials. Midroot dentin of canine teeth was horizontally sectioned into 1-mm-thick slices. The canal space of each dentin slice was enlarged with a diamond bur to 1.4 mm in diameter. The samples were divided into 5 groups (n = 40), and the following materials were placed, respectively: Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), amalgam, Dyract AP (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany), and intermediate restorative material (IRM, Dentsply DeTrey). The samples were wrapped in wet gauze for 10 minutes and divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) to be immersed into 3.5% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), or saline for 30 minutes. No irrigation was performed in the controls (n = 10), and a wet cotton pellet was placed over each test material. After incubation for 48 hours, the dislodgement resistance of the samples was measured using a universal testing machine. The samples were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine the nature of the bond failures. Biodentine showed significantly higher push-out bond strength than MTA (P amalgam ≥ IRM ≥ Biodentine > MTA. The push-out bond strength of Dyract AP, amalgam, IRM, and Biodentine was not significantly different when immersed in NaOCl, CHX, and saline solutions, whereas MTA lost strength when exposed to CHX. Biodentine showed considerable performance as a perforation repair material even after being exposed to various endodontic irrigants, whereas MTA had the lowest push-out bond strength to root dentin. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Mediterranean-style model for early Neoproterozoic amalgamation of South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Jun

    2017-04-01

    A Mediterranean-style model is proposed for early Neoproterozoic amalgamation of South China, based on recognition of the Guangxi promontory on the southeastern margin of the Yangtze craton through a synthesis of geologic, geophysical and chronological data. The model suggests that, while the Guangxi promontory collided with the overriding Cathaysia terrane along the Yunkai orogeny during the earliest Neoproterozoic, the convergence between the Yangtze craton and the Cathaysia terrane paused or slowed down, which triggered the upper Rhine Graben-style Kangdian impact rift along the western Yangtze margin and resulted in roll-back of the oceanic slab trapped in the embayments and sequential formation of backarc rifts in the Cathaysia margin during the early Neoproterozoic. This model predicts a complex diachronous Yangtze-Cathaysia collision history, first at the Guangxi promontory at ∼1000 Ma and finally at the Guizhou reentrant at ∼830 Ma.

  19. A Lower Bound of the Genus of a Self-amalgamated 3-manifolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XU; LEI FENG-CHUN

    2011-01-01

    Let M be a compact connected oriented 3-manifold with boundary,Q1, Q2 (C)(э)M be two disjoint homeomorphic subsurfaces of (э)M, and h: Q1 → Q2 be an orientation-reversing homeomorphism. Denote by Mh or MQ1=Q2 the 3-manifold obtained from M by gluing Q1 and Q2 together via h. Mh is called a self-amalgamation of M along Q1 and Q2. Suppose Q1 and Q2 lie on the same component F′ of (э)M′, and F′ - Q1 ∪ Q2 is connected. We give a lower bound to the Heegaard genus of M when M′ has a Heegaard splitting with sufficiently high distance.

  20. AunHgm Clusters: Mercury Aurides, Gold Amalgams, or van der Waals Aggregates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Pyykkö, Pekka

    2009-02-01

    The class of bimetallic clusters, AunMm (M = Zn, Cd, Hg), is calculated at the ab initio level using the DFT, RI-MP2, and CCSD(T) methods. For the triatomic Au2M (M = Zn, Cd), the auride-type linear Au-M-Au structures are preferred; for Au2Hg, the linear Au-Au-Hg "amalgam" is preferred. The mixed cation [HgAuHg]+, an analog of the known solid-state species Hg32+, is predicted. For larger AunHgm clusters, the results are similar to the isoelectronic AunM- anions. Several local minima and transition states are identified. All are found to be planar.