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Sample records for iguana iguana iguana

  1. Energetics of the green iguana (Iguana iguana) in a semi-arid environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter David

    1991-01-01

    Energy budgets in the herbivorous green iguana (Iguana Iguana) were studied from April 1985-October 1988 in a strongly seasonal environment on the semi-arid island Curacao (Netherlands Antilles) under the auspices of the CARMABI Foundation in cooperation with the State University of Groningen (The N

  2. PRE AND POSTPRANDIAL THERMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA

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    Simona Rusu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body temperature of 10 clinically healthy green iguanas (Iguana iguana was measured using a thermographic camera (FLIR E6, Flir Systems Sweden before and after the food was offered. For each animal there were performed a total of 6 measurements (3 before feeding and 3 after the food was offered. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the thermographic pattern of the body before and after the feeding, since herbivore reptiles tend to bask after the feeding to increase the body temperature that will help them afterwards digest the food. The animals were housed in individual vivariums with every animal having a basking spot available. The pictures were taken outside the vivarium in an adjacent room. The animals were handled with gloves and transported in a cardboard box in order to avoid heat transfer between the handler and the iguana that would have produced thermal artefacts. Each individual was placed on a table on a styrofoam slate, again, to avoid the heat transfer between the table and the animal`s body. For each animal a total of 4 pictures were taken (up, front, left and right. The pictures were analysed with the FLIR Tools program that is provided by the manufacturer and 3 temperatures were taken into consideration (the head temperature, body temperature on the right side and body temperature on the left side. The temperatures were compared between them and with the temperature of the vivariums that consisted of the average between the temperature in 3 different spots (basking spot, the feeding bowl site and the coldest spot measured with an infrared thermometer GM300 (Benetech, China. The temperature of the body was dependent on the vivarium temperature and it was a significant temperature difference between the measurements before the feeding and after the feeding. Also we discovered a significant difference between the head temperature and the body temperature on the left side before the feeding that disappeared

  3. Fecal glucocorticoid response to environmental stressors in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Timm, Jeanette; Ibsen, Ida

    2012-01-01

    study, fecal corticosterone metabolite (FCM) levels in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) were quantified during periods of rest and exposure to hypothesized stressors. FCM quantification was combined with behavioral analysis to further contextualize the measured increases. It was shown that both daily 5......-minute handling/restraint, as well as housing devoid of climbing opportunity, resulted in increased FCM excretion. Behavioral analysis suggested that the iguanas were chronically stressed by the lack of climbing opportunity, whereas handling may have induced only a transient stress response...

  4. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae Possess Functional Mitochondria.

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    Giuseppina Di Giacomo

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i widely occur in erythrocytes, ii are polarized, and iii seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  5. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF SPIROTOME® DEVICE FOR LIVER BIOPSY IN GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA): A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Giordano; Origgi, Francesco C; Leopardi, Stefania; Zaghini, Anna; Saunders, Jimmy H; Vignoli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a large-core manual biopsy device (Spirotome(®), Medinvents, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium) for liver sampling and histologic diagnosis in green iguanas (Iguana iguana). The study included eight green iguanas, and two ultrasound-guided biopsies were collected for each lizard, for 16 biopsies in total. The procedure was carried out under general anesthesia induced by intravenous injection of propofol (10 mg/kg) maintained with a mixture of 2.0% isoflurane and 0.8-1.2 L/min oxygen after tracheal intubation. Fourteen (87.5%) of the 16 biopsies were considered diagnostic. Liver biopsy quality was assessed according to sample size and tissue preservation. In particular, mean length (16.2 ± 4.5 mm), width (2.2 ± 0.5 mm), area (34.8 ± 6.9 mm(2)), and number of portal areas (9.4 ± 3.9) of each biopsy were recorded for all green iguanas. The total available surface of the sections obtained from the biopsies and their grade of preservation enabled a satisfactory evaluation of the parenchymal architecture. One of the green iguanas in the study died the day after the procedure due to severe hemocoeloma. Risk assessment evaluation suggested that small green iguanas may not be suitable for this biopsy procedure.

  6. Comparison of isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia after premedication with butorphanol in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Divers, Sonia M; Schumacher, Juergen; Stahl, Scott; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol followed by sevoflurane or isoflurane were compared in 23 male green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Heart and respiratory rates were recorded before administration of butorphanol (2 mg/kg i.m.) and at 30 min after premedication. Anesthesia was induced in 12 iguanas (group 1) with isoflurane (5%) and in 11 iguanas (group 2) with sevoflurane (7%). Heart rate, relative arterial oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2 concentrations (EtCO2) were measured every minute for the first 5 min and every 5 min thereafter. Arterial blood gas parameters were determined at 10 and 40 min after induction. Thirty minutes after butorphanol administration, no significant changes in heart and respiratory rate were seen as compared with baseline values. Quality and time to induction were superior with butorphanol-sevoflurane (6 +/- 3 min) than with butorphanol-isoflurane (9 +/- 4 min). Vaporizer settings during maintenance ranged between 1-3% and 2-4%, respectively. No significant differences in heart rate were noted between groups. In the sevoflurane group, SpO2 values were > 90% throughout. Although SpO2, values were isoflurane group, no significant differences in SpO2 values were seen over time and between groups. A significant decrease in EtCO2 with time was present in both groups, with no significant differences between the groups. At 10 and 40 min, arterial blood oxygen saturation values were > 90% in both groups and no significant differences were noted with time and between groups. Recovery time was significantly longer in the butorphanol-isoflurane group (35 +/- 27 min) than in the butorphanol-sevoflurane group (7 +/- 4 min). The cardiopulmonary effects of butorphanol-isoflurane and butorphanol-sevoflurane assessed in this study are similar, and both inhalants appear to be safe and effective for induction and maintenance in the green iguana.

  7. Helmintos oxiuridae parasitos de Iguana iguana (Squamata, Lacertilia, Iguanidae procedentes do Brasil

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    P. Breves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study on nematode fauna occurring in wild iguanas (Iguana iguana from Brazilian Northeast (Alagoas and Maranhão and Central-west (Goiás and Mato Grosso areas were presented. Six adult iguanas, three males and three females, were necropsied and the digestive system removed to examination. All the iguana specimens were heavily parasitized. The helminths diagnosed were: Ozolaimus cirratus in the cecum and colon of five iguanas; Ozolaimus megatyphlon in cecum, colon and rectum of three iguanas; and Alaeuris vogelsangi in the small intestine, cecum, colon and rectum of five animals. Two larvae of Ozolaimus sp. were recovered from the pyloric region of the stomach of one iguana. The three diagnosed species of nematodes were reported for the first time in the Brazilian Central-West region.

  8. Flap surgery in a green iguana (Iguana iguana) with a non-healing palmar wound – a case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Kocsis; Francisc P. Nagy; CRISTINA, Romeo T.

    2014-01-01

    In this clinical tutorial report for young vets, there is presented the clinical efficiency of a common surgery technique in a non-healing decubitus inflammatory crusted and pyogenic wound to a nine years male green iguana (Iguana iguana). The wound appeared two months before the reptile was presented to control and the bacteriologic culture made revealed a massive bacterial association where Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were dominant. Consequently, the antibiogram was...

  9. The mitochondrial genomes of the iguana (Iguana iguana) and the caiman (Caiman crocodylus): implications for amniote phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Janke, Axel; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Nilsson, Malin; Arnason, Ulfur

    2001-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two reptiles, the common iguana (Iguana iguana) and the caiman (Caiman crocodylus), were sequenced in order to investigate phylogenetic questions of tetrapod evolution. The addition of the two species allows analysis of reptilian relationships using data sets other than those including only fast-evolving species. The crocodilian mitochondrial genomes seem to have evolved generally at a higher rate than those of other vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of ...

  10. Genetic evidence of hybridization between the endangered native species Iguana delicatissima and the invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae) in the Lesser Antilles: management Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Vuillaume; Victorien Valette; Olivier Lepais; Frédéric Grandjean; Michel Breuil

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana) in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact ...

  11. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  12. Sleep and wakefulness in the green iguanid lizard (Iguana iguana).

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    Ayala-Guerrero, F; Mexicano, G

    2008-11-01

    The reptile Iguana iguana exhibits four states of vigilance: active wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness (QW), quiet sleep (QS) and active sleep (AS). Cerebral activity decreases in amplitude and frequency when passing from wakefulness to QS. Both parameters show a slight increase during AS. Heart rate is at a maximum during AW (43.8+/-7.9 beats/min), decreases to a minimum in QS (25.3+/-3.2 beats/min) and increases in AS (36.1+/-5.7 beats/min). Tonical and phasical muscular activity is present in wakefulness, decreases or disappears in QS and reappears in AS. Single or conjugate ocular movements are observed during wakefulness, then disappear in QS and abruptly reappear in AS. Although these reptiles are polyphasic, their sleep shows a tendency to concentrate between 20:00 and 8:00 h. Quiet sleep occupies the greater percentage of the total sleep time. Active sleep episodes are of very short duration, showing an average of 21.5+/-4.9 (mean+/-SD). Compensatory increment of sleep following its total deprivation was significant only for QS. Reaction to stimuli decreased significantly when passing from wakefulness to sleep. It is suggested that the lizard I. iguana displays two sleep phases behaviorally and somatovegetatively similar to slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep in birds and mammals.

  13. Energetic consequences of field body temperatures in the green iguana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, WDVM; Wesselingh, RA

    1997-01-01

    We investigated body temperatures of free-ranging green iguanas (Iguana iguana) on Curacao (Netherlands Antilles), and how metabolic costs and benefits of food processing affect body temperatures. Body temperatures of free-living iguanas were measured by radio telemetry. We also used a model, with a

  14. Energetic consequences of field body temperatures in the green iguana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, WDVM; Wesselingh, RA

    1997-01-01

    We investigated body temperatures of free-ranging green iguanas (Iguana iguana) on Curacao (Netherlands Antilles), and how metabolic costs and benefits of food processing affect body temperatures. Body temperatures of free-living iguanas were measured by radio telemetry. We also used a model, with a

  15. DIGESTION IN AN ECTOTHERMIC HERBIVORE, THE GREEN IGUANA (IGUANA-IGUANA) - EFFECT OF FOOD COMPOSITION AND BODY-TEMPERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LICHTENBELT, WDV

    1992-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the effect of food composition and body temperature on digestive efficiency was investigated in the lizard Iguana iguana on Curacao (Netherlands Antilles). In a series of experiments the animals were kept in cages with a temperature gradient and different foods were offere

  16. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

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    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor.

  17. [Displacements of the green iguana (Iguana iguana) (Squamata: Iguanidae) during the dry season in La Palma, Veracruz, Mexico].

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    Morales-Mávil, Jorge E; Vogt, Richard C; Gadsden-Esparza, Héctor

    2007-06-01

    The green iguana (Iguana iguana) is said to be primarily sedentary, although the females travel long distances to nest. Displacement patterns must be known to help predict the effects of environmental disturbance on iguanas' survival. We studied nesting season (February-July) movements in La Palma, Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico (18 degrees 33' N, 95 degrees 03' W). Individual movements and activity were monitored by radio tracking. The transmitters were implanted surgically in eight adult iguanas (four males and four females). Snout vent length (SVL) was used to determine the relationship between size of the body and size of home range. To estimate the size of home range, three or more points were used. Minimum convex polygons estimates of home range were calculated with McPAAL. The iguanas were radio-located between 23 and 30 occasions, mainly in trees (56% between 3-9 m); only 4% were localized under a height of 3 m (forest floor). The occupation area mean was larger for males (9,158.06+/-3,025.3 m2 vs. 6,591.24+/-4,001.1 m2) although the differences were not significant (t= 0.51, p>0.05). SVL was correlated with home range (r= 0.76; gl= 7; p<0.05). Breeding males defended their home range vigorously against other adult males. We observed one separate male home range and large portions of overlap between the sexes. The home range generally formed a conglomerate of polygons and only two had linear shapes along the river: apparently iguanas use the riparian vegetation for foraging. The females display two strategies for nesting: 1) moving to the sandy area near the sea or, 2) laying eggs near the river, in loam. Iguanas responded to habitat fragmentation and reduction by modifying their nesting strategy.

  18. Revisión sobre la Insuficiencia Renal en Iguana Verde (Iguana iguana)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Milena Lamprea-Maldonado

    2010-01-01

    La insuficiencia renal constituye una de las principales patologías que afecta a las iguanas cautivas. Se reportan dos formas clínicas: aguada y crónica. Las causas son múltiples, siendo las más comunes infecciones renales y tóxicos para la forma aguda y las relacionadas con malas condiciones nutricionales y ambientales para su presentación crónica. Los signos clínicos no son específicos e incluyen anorexia, debilidad, letargia y pérdida de peso. Dentro de las pruebas diagnósticas, la determi...

  19. Prevalence, serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. from wild and domestic green iguanas (Iguana iguana) in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, W R B; Amadi, V; Pinckney, R; Macpherson, C N L; McKibben, J S; Bruhl-Day, R; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2014-09-01

    Cloacal swabs from 62 green iguanas (Iguana iguana), including 47 wild and 15 domestic ones from five parishes of Grenada, were sampled during a 4-month period of January to April 2013 and examined by enrichment and selective culture for the presence of Salmonella spp. Fifty-five per cent of the animals were positive, and eight serovars of Salmonella were isolated. The most common serovar was Rubislaw (58.8%), a serovar found recently in many cane toads in Grenada, followed by Oranienburg (14.7%), a serovar that has been causing serious human disease outbreaks in Japan. Serovar IV:48:g,z51 :- (formerly, S. Marina) highly invasive and known for serious infections in children in the United States, constituted 11.8% of the isolates, all of them being from domestic green iguanas. Salmonella Newport, a serovar recently found in a blue land crab in Grenada, comprised 11.8% of the isolates from the green iguanas. The remaining four less frequent serovars included S. Javiana and S. Glostrup. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests conducted by a disc diffusion method against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal, with intermediate susceptibility, mainly to streptomycin, tetracycline and cefotaxime. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars from wild and domestic green iguanas in Grenada, West Indies.

  20. REPRODUCTIVE ADAPTATIONS OF THE GREEN IGUANA ON A SEMIARID ISLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LICHTENBELT, WDV; ALBERS, KB

    1993-01-01

    Reproductive cycle and clutch size were studied in the green iguana (Iguana iguana) on the semiarid Caribbean island of Curacao. The reproductive cycle is correlated with seasonality in rainfall. Mating is in the first half of the dry season, egg laying in the second part of the dry season, and hatc

  1. XROMM analysis of rib kinematics during lung ventilation in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Moritz, Sabine; Ritter, Dale A

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional rotations of ribs during breathing are typically described as bucket-handle rotation about a dorsoventrally oriented axis, pump-handle rotation about a mediolateral axis, and caliper rotation about a rostrocaudal axis. In amniotes with double-headed ribs, rib motion is constrained primarily to one degree-of-freedom (DOF) rotation about an axis connecting the two rib articulations. However, in Squamata, the ribs are single headed and the hemispherical costovertebral joints permit rotations with three DOF. In this study, we used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM ) to quantify rib rotation during deep breathing in four green iguanas. We found that rib rotation was strongly dominated by bucket-handle rotation, thus exhibiting nearly hinge-like motion, despite the potential for more complex motions. The vertebral and sternal segments of each rib did not deform measurably during breathing, but they did move relative to each other at a thin, cartilaginous intracostal joint. While standing still and breathing deeply, four individual iguanas showed variability in their rib postures, with two breathing around a highly inflated posture, and two breathing around a posture with the ribs folded halfway back. Bucket-handle rotations showed clear rostrocaudal gradients, with rotation increasing from the third cervical to the first or second dorsal rib, and then decreasing again caudally, a pattern that is consistent with the intercostal muscles in the rostral intercostal spaces being the primary drivers of inspiration. The constrained, primarily bucket-handle rotations observed here during breathing do not help to explain the evolution of permissive, hemispherical costovertebral joints in squamates from the more constrained, double-headed rib articulations of other amniotes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Flap surgery in a green iguana (Iguana iguana with a non-healing palmar wound – a case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kocsis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical tutorial report for young vets, there is presented the clinical efficiency of a common surgery technique in a non-healing decubitus inflammatory crusted and pyogenic wound to a nine years male green iguana (Iguana iguana. The wound appeared two months before the reptile was presented to control and the bacteriologic culture made revealed a massive bacterial association where Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were dominant. Consequently, the antibiogram was accomplished, the results indicating resistance to penicillin and chloramphenicol and respectively, efficacy to gentamicin, erythromycin and tetracycline. The initial treatment with gentamicin 5%, as topical application was started, but though the massive tissue destruction, the surgical way was chosen. Under anaesthesia, the area was scratched and the wound was debrided with scalpel until the bleeding occurred and skin was primarily closed with a surgical skin stapler, but this technique proven to be totally unsuited to green iguana, because of the skin’s tension developed consequently the intervention. Following, the “twisted flap” surgical technique was accomplished, we considering this way as a choice one in iguana’s case, and skin was sutured with no absorbable 2/0 nylon. After the local and general antibiotic treatment with enrofloxacin, animal was fully recovered, the suture points being removed after five weeks.

  3. [Demography and nesting ecology of green iguana, Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae), in 2 exploited populations in Depresión Momposina, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Eliana M; Ortega, Angela M; Bock, Brian C; Páez, Vivian P

    2003-03-01

    We studied the demography and nesting ecology of two populations of Iguana iguana that face heavy exploitation and habitat modification in the Momposina Depression, Colombia. Lineal transect data was analyzed using the Fourier model to provide estimates of social group densities, which was found to differ both within and among populations (1.05-6.0 groups/ha). Mean group size and overall iguana density estimates varied between populations as well (1.5-13.7 iguanas/ha). The density estimates were far lower than those reported from more protected areas in Panama and Venezuela. Iguana densities were consistently higher in sites located along rivers (2.5 iguanas/group) than in sites along the margin of marshes, probably due to vegetational differences (1.5 iguanas/group). There was no correlation between density estimates and estimates of relative abundance (number of iguanas seen/hour/person) due to differing detectabilities of iguana groups among sites. The adult sex ratio (1:2.5 males:females) agreed well with other reports in the literature based upon observation of adult social groups, and probably results from the polygynous mating system in this species rather than a real demographic skew. Nesting in this population occurs from the end of January through March and hatching occurs between April and May. We monitored 34 nests, which suffered little vertebrate predation, perhaps due to the lack of a complete vertebrate fauna in this densely inhabited area, but nests suffered from inundation, cattle trampling, and infestation by phorid fly larvae. Clutch sizes in these populations were lower than all other published reports except for the iguana population on the highly xeric island of Curaçao, implying that adult females in our area are unusually small. We argue that this is more likely the result of the exploitation of these populations rather than an adaptive response to environmentally extreme conditions.

  4. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Sapoznikov; Petr Cizek; Frantisek Tichy

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed...

  5. Characterization of a ribonuclease gene and encoded protein from the reptile, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Lin, Cynthia; Dyer, Kimberly D; Wagner, Robert A; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2005-06-06

    In this work we identify an intronless open reading frame encoding an RNase A ribonuclease from genomic DNA from the Iguana iguana IgH2 cell line. The iguana RNase is expressed primarily in pancreas, and represents the majority of the specific enzymatic activity in this tissue. The encoded sequence shares many features with its better-known mammalian counterparts including the crucial His12, Lys40 and His114 catalytic residues and efficient hydrolytic activity against yeast tRNA substrate (k(cat)/K(m)=6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), albeit at a reduced pH optimum (pH 6.0). Although the catalytic activity of the iguana RNase is not diminished by human placental RI, iguana RNase is not bactericidal nor is it cytotoxic even at micromolar concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates moderate (46%) amino acid sequence similarity to a pancreatic RNase isolated from Chelydra serpentina (snapping turtle) although no specific relationship could be determined between these RNases and the pancreatic ribonucleases characterized among mammalian species. Further analysis of ribonucleases from non-mammalian vertebrate species is needed in order to define relationships and lineages within the larger RNase A gene superfamily.

  6. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vuillaume

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact of interspecific hybridization on the decline of I. delicatissima. 59 I. delicatissima (5 localities, 47 I. iguana (12 localities and 27 hybrids (5 localities, who were all identified based on morphological characters, have been genotyped at 15 microsatellites markers. We also sequenced hybrids using ND4 mitochondrial loci to further investigate mitochondrial introgression. The genetic clustering of species and hybrid genetic assignment were performed using a comparative approach, through the implementation of a Discriminant Analysis of Principal Component (DAPC based on statistics, as well as genetic clustering approaches based on the genetic models of several populations (Structure, NewHybrids and HIest, in order to get full characterization of hybridization patterns and introgression dynamics across the islands. The iguanas identified as hybrids in the wild, thanks to morphological analysis, were all genetically F1, F2, or backcrosses. A high proportion of individuals were also the result of a longer-term admixture. The absence of reproductive barriers between species leads to hybridization when species are in contact. Yet morphological and behavioral differences between species could explain why males I. iguana may dominate I. delicatissima, thus resulting in short-term species displacement and extinction by hybridization and recurrent introgression from I. iguana toward I. delicatissima. As a consequence, I. delicatissima gets eliminated through

  7. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters for cefovecin in hens and green iguanas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Line Risager; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Brimer, Leon

    2009-01-01

    hens and green iguanas, following subcutaneous injections with 10 mg cefovecin / kg bodyweight. Preliminary studies in eight additional species of birds and reptiles were performed and results were compared with the parameters found in hens and green iguanas. The kinetics were characterized by rapid...

  8. Estudio químico analítico de la grasa de iguana verde (Iguana iguana)-efecto cicatrizante y antiinflamatorio sobre lesiones inducidas en ratas

    OpenAIRE

    Bell Cortez, Carlos Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Se evaluaron los efectos cicatrizante, antiinflamatorio y antimicrobiano de la grasa de Iguana Verde (Iguana iguana) de hembras grávidas procedentes del distrito de Castilla, provincia de Piura, departamento de Piura (Perú). La grasa demostró que a dosis de 0,55 mL/kg (vía tópica) tiene actividad cicatrizante y claras evidencias de atenuar y/o borrar cicatrices sobre lesiones inducidas en ratas; también mostró tener propiedad antiiflamatoria mediante edema inducido por xyleno en oreja de r...

  9. Desplazamientos de la iguana verde, Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae durante la estación seca en La Palma, Veracruz, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Morales-Mávil

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Usamos radiotransmisores para determinar los desplazamientos de la iguana verde (Iguana iguana en el periodo de anidación (febrero-julio en La Palma, Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, México (18°33’ N, 95°03’ W. Las iguanas fueron radiolocalizadas entre 23 y 30 ocasiones, principalmente en árboles (56 % entre 3-9 m; sólo 4 % fueron localizadas en el suelo. El tamaño del ámbito hogareño de machos y de hembras fue similar (9 158.06±3 025.3 m² vs. 6 591.24±4 001.1 m², respectivamente; t= 0.51, p>0.05. Se encontró una correlación significativa entre la LHC y el ámbito hogareño (r= 0.76, gl= 7, pDisplacements of the green iguana (Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae during the dry season in La Palma, Veracruz, Mexico. The green iguana (Iguana iguana is said to be primarily sedentary, although the females travel long distances to nest. Displacement patterns must be known to help predict the effects of environmental disturbance on iguanas’ survival. We studied nesting season (February-July movements in La Palma, Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico (18°33’ N, 95°03’ W. Individual movements and activity were monitored by radio tracking. The transmitters were implanted surgically in eight adult iguanas (four males and four females. Snout vent length (SVL was used to determine the relationship between size of the body and size of home range. To estimate the size of home range, three or more points were used. Minimum convex polygons estimates of home range were calculated with McPAAL. The iguanas were radio-located between 23 and 30 occasions, mainly in trees (56 % between 3-9 m; only 4 % were localized under a height of 3 m (forest floor. The occupation area mean was larger for males (9 158.06±3 025.3m² vs. 6 591.24±4 001.1 m² although the differences were not significant (t= 0.51, p>0.05. SVL was correlated with home range (r= 0.76; gl= 7; p<0.05. Breeding males defended their home range vigorously against other adult males. We observed one

  10. Duplicación de miembro anterior en Iguana iguana (Linnaeus, 1758): registro de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Cupul Magaña, Fabio Germán; García de Quevedo-Machain, Rafael; Tovar-Ramos, Jorge Alfredo; Curiel-Beltrán, Jesús Aarón

    2014-01-01

    Esta nota registra el caso de polimelia en una hembra juvenil de Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae) o iguana verde de entre cinco y seis meses de edad (camada del 2012), con talla (punta del hocico a punta de la cola) de 43 cm y peso de 60 g. El ejemplar fue capturado por el tercer autor durante la última semana de septiembre del 2012 sobre la rama de un árbol de guamuchilillo, Pithecellobium lanceolatum (Willd.) Benth., en las inmediaciones de la zona centro de la mancha urbana de Puerto Va...

  11. [Evaluation of a number of commercial diets for iguana (Iguana iguana), bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps), and land and marsh tortoises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, M J; Beynen, A C

    2003-09-15

    Fifteen commercially available, complete diets for iguanas, bearded dragons, and chelonians were analysed and compared with the ideal composition of a diet formulated by the authors. The clinical risks of feeding with a too high or a too low content of specific nutrients are described. Nutrient deficiencies are not expected if these diets are the sole source of nutrients. However, one diet had only a marginally adequate protein content, five diets for herbivorous reptiles contained a too low percentage of crude fibre, three diets contained an undesirably high percentage of calcium, and three diets had an extremely high iron content. As a rule, the calcium and iron contents of diets are not declared on the food label, which complicates evaluation of the diets.

  12. OPTIMAL FORAGING OF A HERBIVOROUS LIZARD, THE GREEN IGUANA IN A SEASONAL ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LICHTENBELT, WDV

    1993-01-01

    Food selection was studied in free living green iguanas (Iguana iguana) throughout the year in a semiarid environment, Curacao (Netherlands Antilles). Food intake was determined by direct observations and converted into biomass intake. Comparison between intake and biomass availability of the variou

  13. The Lesser Antillean Iguana on St. Eustatius: 2012 status update and review of limiting factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Boman, E.

    2013-01-01

    The endangered Lesser Antillean Iguana, Iguana delicatissima, is an emblematic species for the island of St. Eustatius and in Caribbean Netherlands it is only found on St. Eustatius. In this study we conducted an extensive population survey for the iguana and compared densities in different areas to

  14. OPTIMAL FORAGING OF A HERBIVOROUS LIZARD, THE GREEN IGUANA IN A SEASONAL ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LICHTENBELT, WDV

    Food selection was studied in free living green iguanas (Iguana iguana) throughout the year in a semiarid environment, Curacao (Netherlands Antilles). Food intake was determined by direct observations and converted into biomass intake. Comparison between intake and biomass availability of the

  15. ENERGY BUDGETS IN FREE-LIVING GREEN IGUANAS IN A SEASONAL ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LICHTENBELT, WDV; WESSELINGH, RA; VOGEL, JT; ALBERS, KBM

    1993-01-01

    Using a variety of techniques we estimated energy expenditure and allocation of energy in free-living green iguanas (Iguana iguana) in a seasonal environment on Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. 1) Daily energy expenditure (DEE) was measured by means of the doubly labeled water (DLW) technique, using O

  16. The biogeography of threatened insular iguanas and opportunities for invasive vertebrate management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tershy, Bernie R.; Newton, Kelly M.; Spatz, Dena R.; Swinnerton, Kirsty; Iverson, John B.; Fisher, Robert N.; Harlow, Peter S.; Holmes, Nick D.; Croll, Donald A.; Iverson, J.B.; Grant, T. D.; Knapp, C. R.; Pasachnik, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Iguanas are a particularly threatened group of reptiles, with 61% of species at risk of extinction. Primary threats to iguanas include habitat loss, direct and indirect impacts by invasive vertebrates, overexploitation, and human disturbance. As conspicuous, charismatic vertebrates, iguanas also represent excellent flagships for biodiversity conservation. To assist planning for invasive vertebrate management and thus benefit threatened iguana recovery, we identified all islands with known extant or extirpated populations of Critically Endangered and Endangered insular iguana taxa as recognized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. For each island, we determined total area, sovereignty, the presence of invasive alien vertebrates, and human population. For the 23 taxa of threatened insular iguanas we identified 230 populations, of which iguanas were extant on 185 islands and extirpated from 45 islands. Twenty-one iguana taxa (91% of all threatened insular iguana taxa) occurred on at least one island with invasive vertebrates present; 16 taxa had 100% of their population(s) on islands with invasive vertebrates present. Rodents, cats, ungulates, and dogs were the most common invasive vertebrates. We discuss biosecurity, eradication, and control of invasive vertebrates to benefit iguana recovery: (1) on islands already free of invasive vertebrates; (2) on islands with high iguana endemicity; and (3) for species and subspecies with small total populations occurring across multiple small islands. Our analyses provide an important first step toward understanding how invasive vertebrate management can be planned effectively to benefit threatened insular iguanas.

  17. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sapoznikov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana. Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  18. Estudio embriológico de Iguana iguana (Linnaeus, 1758 bajo condiciones de incubación controladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossa Velásquez Jaime de la

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Se realiza un estudio de Iguana iguana para establecer los estadios embrionarios que caracterizan la especie, bajo condiciones de incubaci6n artificial controladas de 32.5°C y humedad relativa promedio de 90% ± 2, colectándose y fijándose 5 huevos diarios a partir de la postura y durante 67 días. El peso promedio de los huevos fue de 15.4001 g, largo 3.84 mm, ancho 2.7 mm, notándose que estos son independientes del tiempo transcurrido de incubación. El peso de los embriones no presenció diferencias significativas durante los primeros 6 estadios (periodo embrionario, a partir del estadio 7 (periódo fetal existen valores que van de 1.5834 g a 7.2323 g. 14 dimensiones fueron evaluadas en cada embrión, encontrándose que todas están directamente relacionadas con el tiempo de incubación. Se establecieron 12 estadios embrionarios para Iguana iguana teniendo en cuenta una tipificación rnorfométrica y morfológica, lepidosis, organización de órganos, proceso mandibular, grade de diferenciación de bulbos en extremidades y presencia de lengua, entre otros. Los embriones de Iguana iguana continúan su desarrollo postovipuestos con la presencia de esbozo cardíaco y hepático. Al final del estadio 8 la porción distal de la lengua se observa dividida en dos. Solo en el estadio 12 se evidencian los dientes y e! ovirruptor o diente embrionario. Los hemipenes en embriones machos, se mantienen externos durante todo el proceso embrionario.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic anatomy of the heads of green iguana (Iguana iguana , common tegu ( Tupinambis merianae and bearded dragon ( Pogona vitticeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banzato Tommaso

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiology and computed tomography are the most commonly available diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of pathologies affecting the head and skull in veterinary practice. Nevertheless, accurate interpretation of radiographic and CT studies requires a thorough knowledge of the gross and the cross-sectional anatomy. Despite the increasing success of reptiles as pets, only a few reports over their normal imaging features are currently available. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of the green iguana, tegu and bearded dragon. Results 6 adult green iguanas, 4 tegus, 3 bearded dragons, and, the adult cadavers of : 4 green iguana, 4 tegu, 4 bearded dragon were included in the study. 2 cadavers were dissected following a stratigraphic approach and 2 cadavers were cross-sectioned for each species. These latter specimens were stored in a freezer (−20°C until completely frozen. Transversal sections at 5 mm intervals were obtained by means of an electric band-saw. Each section was cleaned and photographed on both sides. Radiographs of the head of each subject were obtained. Pre- and post- contrast computed tomographic studies of the head were performed on all the live animals. CT images were displayed in both bone and soft tissue windows. Individual anatomic structures were first recognised and labelled on the anatomic images and then matched on radiographs and CT images. Radiographic and CT images of the skull provided good detail of the bony structures in all species. In CT contrast medium injection enabled good detail of the soft tissues to be obtained in the iguana whereas only the eye was clearly distinguishable from the remaining soft tissues in both the tegu and the bearded dragon. Conclusions The results provide an atlas of the normal anatomical and in vivo radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of lizards, and this may be

  20. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic anatomy of the heads of green iguana (Iguana iguana), common tegu (Tupinambis merianae) and bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzato, Tommaso; Selleri, Paolo; Veladiano, Irene A; Martin, Andrea; Zanetti, Emanuele; Zotti, Alessandro

    2012-05-11

    Radiology and computed tomography are the most commonly available diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of pathologies affecting the head and skull in veterinary practice. Nevertheless, accurate interpretation of radiographic and CT studies requires a thorough knowledge of the gross and the cross-sectional anatomy. Despite the increasing success of reptiles as pets, only a few reports over their normal imaging features are currently available. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of the green iguana, tegu and bearded dragon. 6 adult green iguanas, 4 tegus, 3 bearded dragons, and, the adult cadavers of: 4 green iguana, 4 tegu, 4 bearded dragon were included in the study. 2 cadavers were dissected following a stratigraphic approach and 2 cadavers were cross-sectioned for each species. These latter specimens were stored in a freezer (-20°C) until completely frozen. Transversal sections at 5 mm intervals were obtained by means of an electric band-saw. Each section was cleaned and photographed on both sides. Radiographs of the head of each subject were obtained. Pre- and post- contrast computed tomographic studies of the head were performed on all the live animals. CT images were displayed in both bone and soft tissue windows. Individual anatomic structures were first recognised and labelled on the anatomic images and then matched on radiographs and CT images. Radiographic and CT images of the skull provided good detail of the bony structures in all species. In CT contrast medium injection enabled good detail of the soft tissues to be obtained in the iguana whereas only the eye was clearly distinguishable from the remaining soft tissues in both the tegu and the bearded dragon. The results provide an atlas of the normal anatomical and in vivo radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of lizards, and this may be useful in interpreting any imaging modality involving these

  1. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (fH), heart mass (Mh) and body mass (Mb) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean fH and VO2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while fH was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while fH was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean fH and VO2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO2 from measurements of fH is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (COi) derived from the product of fH and Mh. However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Zn finger protein Iguana impacts Hedgehog signaling by promoting ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Andrew M; Wilkinson, Alex W; Backer, Chelsea B; Lapan, Sylvain W; Gutzman, Jennifer H; Cheeseman, Iain M; Reddien, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for metazoan development and requires cilia for pathway activity. The gene iguana was discovered in zebrafish as required for Hedgehog signaling, and encodes a novel Zn finger protein. Planarians are flatworms with robust regenerative capacities and utilize epidermal cilia for locomotion. RNA interference of Smed-iguana in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea caused cilia loss and failure to regenerate new cilia, but did not cause defects similar to those observed in hedgehog(RNAi) animals. Smed-iguana gene expression was also similar in pattern to the expression of multiple other ciliogenesis genes, but was not required for expression of these ciliogenesis genes. iguana-defective zebrafish had too few motile cilia in pronephric ducts and in Kupffer's vesicle. Kupffer's vesicle promotes left-right asymmetry and iguana mutant embryos had left-right asymmetry defects. Finally, human Iguana proteins (dZIP1 and dZIP1L) localize to the basal bodies of primary cilia and, together, are required for primary cilia formation. Our results indicate that a critical and broadly conserved function for Iguana is in ciliogenesis and that this function has come to be required for Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates.

  3. Seasonal shifts in body temperature and use of microhabitats by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.; Tracy, C.R.; Porter, W.P.

    1983-06-01

    Seasonal differences in the body temperatures (T/sub b/) of free-ranging Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus) were detected by temperature sensitive telemetry transmitters. Midday T/sub b/'s of iguanas average 4.4/sup 0/C lower in the Garua (cool) season than in the Hot season. Measured T/sub b/'s and those predicted from biophysical models permitted the following conclusions: (1) lower T/sub b/'s during the Garua season represent an active shift in thermoregulation by the iguanas rather than a passive result of a cooler season; (2) the average midday T/sub b/ selected by the iguanas in either season is the T/sub b/ that allows maintenance of a constant T/sub b/ for the longest possible portion of the day; (3) by exploiting the warmer microclimate created by a cliff face, the iguanas are able to maintain a constant T/sub b/ for a full hour longer than they could elsewhere in their home range. Census data demonstrated that the iguanas exploited the warmer microclimate created by the cliff extensively during the Garua season, and the cliff face was visited by the iguanas relatively infrequently during the Hot season. Thus, the exploitation of the microclimate created by the cliff results in seasonal differences in the pattern of space utilization within the home ranges of the iguanas. Within the Garua season the iguanas moved away from the cliff more often on sunny days than during cloudy days. It is concluded that the physical environment is an important determinant of patterns of space utilization both within and between seasons.

  4. Análisis bromatológico de la carne de la iguana verde (Iguana iguana de los sectores de Minca, Bonda y Mamatoco (Santa Marta D.T.C.H. y Fonseca (La Guajira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Macías Villamizar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ResumenSe determinó el contenido bromatológico parcial (proteínas, grasas, carbohidratos y minerales en veinte animales de los sectores de Minca, Bonda y Mamatoco (Santa Marta y Fonseca (Guajira.Se encontró que las iguanas capturadas en Mamatoco presentaron un relativo mayor porcentaje de proteína, calcio, hierro y potasio; en Bonda, mayor cantidad de humedad, cenizas y sodio; en Minca, mayor contenido de grasa, cloruro y calorías; mientras las de Fonseca mayor contenido de magnesio, manganeso, sulfatos y carbohidratos. Lo que convierte a la Iguana Verde en una fuente económica de nutrientes, siempre que se utilice en forma racional. (Duazary 2007; 1: 30 - 37AbstractThe contained partial bromathologic was determined (proteins, fats, carbohydrates and minerals in twenty animals of the sectors of Minca, Bonda and Mamatoco (Santa Marta and Fonseca (Guajira. It was found that the iguanas captured in Mamatoco presented a relative bigger protein percentage, calcium, iron and potassium; those captured in Bonda, bigger quantity of humidity, ashy and sodium; those captured in Minca, bigger content of fat, chloride and calories; while those of contained bigger Fonseca of magnesium, manganese, sulphates and carbohydrates. What transforms the Green Iguana into a source of nutritious economic whenever it is used in rationally.Key word: Green iguana; food habits; reptiles; proximate analysis; meat.

  5. The IGUANA Interactive Graphics TOolkit with Examples from CMS and D0

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GeorgeAlverson; IannaOsborne; 等

    2001-01-01

    IGUANA(Interactive Graphics for User ANAlysis)is a C++ toolkit for developing graphical user interfaces and high performance 2-D and 3-D graphics applications,such as data browsers and detector and event visualisation programs.The IGUANA strategy is to use freely available software(e.g.Qt,SoQt,OpenInventor,OpenGL,HEPVis)and package and extend it to provide a general-purpose and experiment-independent toolkit.We describe the evaluation and choices of publicly available GUI/graphics software and the additional functionality currently provided by IGUANA.We demonstrate the use of IGUANA with several applications built for CMS and D0.

  6. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric and computed tomographic features of the coelomic cavity in the green iguana (Iguana iguana), black and white tegu (Tupinambis merianae) and bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzato, T; Selleri, P; Veladiano, I A; Zotti, A

    2013-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies of the coelomic cavity in four green iguanas, four black and white tegus and four bearded dragons were performed using a conventional CT scanner. Anatomical reference cross sections were obtained from four green iguana, four black and white tegu and six bearded dragon cadavers; the specimens were stored in a -20°C freezer for 24 h then sliced into 5-mm intervals. The frozen sections were cleaned with water and photographed on both sides. The individual anatomical structures were identified by means of the available literature; these were labelled first on the anatomical images and then matched to the corresponding computed tomography images. The results provide an atlas of the normal cross-sectional and computed tomographic anatomy of the coelomic cavity in the green iguana, the black and white tegu and the bearded dragon, which is useful in the interpretation of any imaging modality. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Physiological effects of tourism and associated food provisioning in an endangered iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Charles R; Hines, Kirsten N; Zachariah, Trevor T; Perez-Heydrich, Caro; Iverson, John B; Buckner, Sandra D; Halach, Shelley C; Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deliberately feeding wildlife is an increasingly popular tourism-related activity despite a limited understanding of long-term impacts on the species being fed. As a result, tourist behaviours that may have adverse impacts on imperiled species have often been encouraged without the necessary evaluation or oversight. Here, we report the responses of Northern Bahamian Rock Iguanas (Cyclura cychlura) to human-visitation pressure and associated food provisioning. We compared a variety of blood chemistry parameters of iguanas subjected to supplemental feeding at popular tourist destinations with iguanas occurring on islands where supplemental feeding does not take place. We demonstrate that male and female iguanas inhabiting tourist-visited islands where supplemental feeding occurs do not differ in body condition or baseline stress and stress response (determined by corticosterone levels) compared with iguanas from non-visited islands. Both males and females from tourist-visited sites experienced a greater incidence of endoparasitic infection and atypical loose faeces. Indicators of dietary nutrition, including glucose, potassium, and uric acid values, also differed for both sexes from tourist-visited and unvisited islands. Male iguanas from visited islands differed significantly from those on non-visited islands in calcium, cholesterol, cobalt, copper, magnesium, packed cell volume, selenium, and triglyceride concentrations, whereas female iguanas from visited islands differed significantly in ionized calcium. Although the interpretation of these differences is challenging, chronic biochemical stressors could compromise individual health over time or decrease survivorship during periods of environmental stress. We suggest protocols that can be adopted throughout the region to ensure that supplemental feeding has fewer impacts on these long-lived iguanas.

  8. Physiological effects of tourism and associated food provisioning in an endangered iguana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Charles R.; Hines, Kirsten N.; Zachariah, Trevor T.; Perez-Heydrich, Caro; Iverson, John B.; Buckner, Sandra D.; Halach, Shelley C.; Lattin, Christine R.; Romero, L. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deliberately feeding wildlife is an increasingly popular tourism-related activity despite a limited understanding of long-term impacts on the species being fed. As a result, tourist behaviours that may have adverse impacts on imperiled species have often been encouraged without the necessary evaluation or oversight. Here, we report the responses of Northern Bahamian Rock Iguanas (Cyclura cychlura) to human-visitation pressure and associated food provisioning. We compared a variety of blood chemistry parameters of iguanas subjected to supplemental feeding at popular tourist destinations with iguanas occurring on islands where supplemental feeding does not take place. We demonstrate that male and female iguanas inhabiting tourist-visited islands where supplemental feeding occurs do not differ in body condition or baseline stress and stress response (determined by corticosterone levels) compared with iguanas from non-visited islands. Both males and females from tourist-visited sites experienced a greater incidence of endoparasitic infection and atypical loose faeces. Indicators of dietary nutrition, including glucose, potassium, and uric acid values, also differed for both sexes from tourist-visited and unvisited islands. Male iguanas from visited islands differed significantly from those on non-visited islands in calcium, cholesterol, cobalt, copper, magnesium, packed cell volume, selenium, and triglyceride concentrations, whereas female iguanas from visited islands differed significantly in ionized calcium. Although the interpretation of these differences is challenging, chronic biochemical stressors could compromise individual health over time or decrease survivorship during periods of environmental stress. We suggest protocols that can be adopted throughout the region to ensure that supplemental feeding has fewer impacts on these long-lived iguanas. PMID:27293616

  9. Physiological and ecological consequences of sleeping-site selection by the Galapagos land iguana (Conolophus pallidus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Field observations and biophysical models were combined to analyze sleeping-site selection by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus). Iguanas slept in different kinds of sleeping sites during different seasons. In the coolest season (garua), adult land iguanas were found in sleeping sites that were warmer than the coolest sites available. This may be because the garua season (cool, overcast, and foggy) is a time when environmental conditions mitigate against rapid warm-up in the mornings, so lizards may regulate nighttime body temperatures so that it is easier to warm up to preferred daytime body temperatures. In the warmest season, adult iguanas were found in the coolest sleeping sites available. This observation is consistent with hypotheses of voluntary hypothermia, which can be advantageous in energy conservation and in avoiding detrimental effects associated with maintenance of constant body temperatures throughout the day and night. Juvenile iguanas were found sleeping in rock crevices regardless of the ambient thermal environments. Such sites are likely to be important as refugia for this life stage, which, unlike the adult stage, is vulnerable to predation. It was concluded that selection of sleeping sites is a process that may help in avoidance of predation, optimization of body temperature at the end of the sleeping period, and reduction of metabolic costs during sleeping. The importance of some of these factors may change with the thermal milieu (e.g., season).

  10. Phylogeography of the endangered Lesser Antillean iguana, Iguana delicatissima: a recent diaspora in an archipelago known for ancient herpetological endemism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica L; Knapp, Charles R; Gerber, Glenn P; Thorpe, Roger S; Welch, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Iguana delicatissima is an endangered endemic of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. Phylogeographic analyses for many terrestrial vertebrate species in the Caribbean, particularly lizards, suggest ancient divergence times. Often, the closest relatives of species are found on the same island, indicating that colonization rates are so low that speciation on islands is often more likely to generate biodiversity than subsequent colonization events. Mitochondrial sequence analysis of the region spanning ND4 was performed on I. delicatissima individuals from islands across the species' range to estimate genetic divergence among geographically isolated populations. Five unique haplotypes were recovered from 46 individuals. The majority of animals carry a single common haplotype. Two of the haplotypes were only present in individuals classified as hybrids from Îles des Saintes. The final 2 haplotypes, single nucleotide substitutions, were present in animals from Îlet Chancel of Martinique and Saint Barthélemy, respectively. Despite the great distances between islands and habitat heterogeneity within islands, this species is characterized by low haplotype diversity. The low mtDNA variation of I. delicatissima suggests a single colonization coupled with rapid range expansion, potentially hastened by human-mediated dispersal.

  11. The Exploration of Green Iguana Behavior Training%绿鬣蜥行为训练研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐华; 左智力; 毛杰; 谢毅; 陈建; 刘选珍

    2012-01-01

    From January to December of 2011, 3 Green iguanas (Iguana iguana) reared in Chengdu Zoo were trained by positive reinforcement procedures. Green iguanas learned to follow the trainers instructions to touch a target stick after four to nine days of training. Green iguanas learned to follow the target stick to climb an electronic platform balance after about 20 ad- ditional days of training. The body weight of green iguanas could be measured in this way. Green iguanas learned follow target sticks of different colors after training. Behavior training is helpful to measure head and body length. tail length and weight of young Green iguanas.%2011年1~12月,对成都动物园两爬馆饲养展出的3只幼年绿鬣蜥,采用正面强化法进行了训练。结果表明:3只绿鬣蜥经过4~9d的训练都可以按照训练员的指令触碰目标棒;再经过20d左右的训练,它们就可以跟随目标棒移动并开始爬上秤台,从而可以称量它们的体重。同时经过训练的绿鬣蜥,在木棒的颜色发生变化后,会很快地接受新颜色的目标棒。行为训练有助于对幼年绿鬣蜥头体长、尾长和体重顺利进行测量。

  12. A new species of iguana Brachylophus Cuvier 1829 (Sauria: Iguania: Iguanidae) from Gau Island, Fiji Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert N.; Niukula, Jone; Watling, Dick; Harlow, Peter S.

    2017-01-01

    The south Pacific iguanas (Brachylophus) currently have three recognized living species in Fiji.  Recent surveys have uncovered more specific variation (morphological and genetic) within the genus and have better defined the geographic ranges of the named species.  One of these recent discoveries is a strikingly different iguana from all other island populations in Fiji which is restricted to Gau Island of the Lomaiviti Province.  Gau is the fifth largest island in Fiji and maintains excellent upland forests in the higher elevations.  We describe this population from Gau Island as a new species, Brachylophus gau sp. nov., in recognition of its type locality.

  13. Development and characterization of 11 microsatellite loci for the Mona Island iguana (Cyclura cornuta stejnegeri)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Buitrago, Néstor; Rosas G., Keysa; Acevedo-Rodríguez,Pedro; Funk, S. M.; McMillan, Owen

    2008-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 11 microsatellite loci in the Mona Island iguana (Cyclura cornuta stejnegeri). Eleven loci exhibit moderate to high allelic diversity (two to 12 alleles, mean = 4.5) and polymorphism (mean observed heterozygosity, 0.56; range, 0.26 to 0.78) in 41 adults. This marker set has low probability of identity and high parentage exclusion power and will be suitable for studies of paternity, social organization and relatedness in this species.

  14. Chemical properties of femoral gland secretions in the desert iguana,Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, A C

    1990-01-01

    This study investigates the chemistry of femoral gland secretions in the desert iguana,Dipsosaurus dorsalis (Lacertilia: Iguanidae), and discusses their possible functional significance. Electrophoretic and proton NMR studies indicated that the secretions are composed of approximately 80 % protein and 20% lipid material. Individual differences in polyacrylamide gel banding patterns of femoral gland proteins were found. Reflectance spectroscopy revealed that the secretions strongly absorb longwave ultraviolet light, a feature that may be important in the localization of secretion deposits in the environment.

  15. IGUANA A high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    CERN Document Server

    Alverson, G; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L A

    2004-01-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high- performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, sl...

  16. Natural history and morphometry of the Cuban iguana (Cyclura nubila Gray, 1831 in Cayo Sijú, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beovides-Casas, K.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The report presents data about the Cuban iguana population (Cyclura nubila nubila inhabiting Cayo Sijú, an 88 ha island off the southwest coast of Cuba. Population densities estimated using strip transects were higher in xerophytic coastal scrub (6.72 ± 6.25 iguanas/ha than in typical sand vegetation (3.63 ± 2.71 iguanas/ha and mangrove forests (2.9 ± 2.9 iguanas/ha. The total population for the cay was estimated at 350 individuals with an adult biomass of approximately 11.67 kg/ha. Densities varied minimally between three habitat types and between the wet and dry seasons. No significant density fluctuations were found one month after Hurricane Ivan affected the cay. Iguana burrows were encountered most frequently in beach dunes. Analysis of 30 scat samples revealed eight species of plants, with the fruits of Chrysobalanum icaco and the leaves of Batis maritima being the most frequently identified items. The remains of crab (Cardisoma guandhumi and insects of the order Hemiptera were also present in scat samples. Sexual dimorphism was evident in this population, with males being significantly larger in eight morphological variables. The snout-vent length measurements were larger in this population than in those reported in two cays off the south coast of Cuba.

  17. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ruger Porter

    Full Text Available Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange. Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT. Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory

  18. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body) as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange). Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI) technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory tissue temperature

  19. Diversity of compounds in femoral secretions of Galápagos iguanas (genera: Amblyrhynchus and Conolophus, and their potential role in sexual communication in lek-mating marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ibáñez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Chemical signals are widely used in the animal kingdom, enabling communication in various social contexts, including mate selection and the establishment of dominance. Femoral glands, which produce and release waxy secretions into the environment, are organs of central importance in lizard chemical communication. The Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus is a squamate reptile with a lek-mating system. Although the lekking behaviour of marine iguanas has been well-studied, their potential for sexual communication via chemical cues has not yet been investigated. Here we describe the diversity of the lipophilic fraction of males’ femoral gland secretions among 11 island populations of marine iguanas, and compare it with the composition of its sister species, the Galápagos land iguana (Conolophus subcristatus. We also conducted behavioural observations in marine iguana territorial males in order to explore the possible function of these substances in the context of male dominance in leks. Methods Femoral secretions were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS, and chromatography with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID in order to characterise the lipophilic composition. To understand the potential role of femoral secretions in marine iguana intraspecific communication, territorial males were sampled for their femoral glands and monitored to record their head bob rate—a territorial display behaviour in males—as well as the number of females present in their leks. Results We found that the gland secretions were composed of ten saturated and unsaturated carboxylic acids ranging in chain length between C16 and C24, as well as three sterols. Cholesterol was the main compound found. Intriguingly, land iguanas have a higher diversity of lipophilic compounds, with structural group of lipids (i.e. aldehydes entirely absent in marine iguanas; overall the chemical signals of both species were strongly

  20. Reduced foraging in the presence of predator cues by the Black Spiny-tailed Iguana, Ctenosaura similis (Sauria: Iguanidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent R. Farallo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a predator may have direct and indirect effects on the behavior of the prey. Although altered behavior may help prey avoid predators, it also can have a potential impact on critical activities such as foraging. Predator-prey interactions are routinely studied in laboratory-based experiments owing to theperceived difficulties of conducting such experiments in natural settings. We conducted an experimental study under field conditions in Palo Verde National Park in northwestern Costa Rica to assess behavioral responses of Black Spiny-tailed Iguanas (Ctenosaurasimilis to the presence of predators and predator cues. Free-roaming iguanas were offered mango in designated areas in the presence of a predator (Boa constrictor, a predator cue (B. constrictor feces, and a control (no predator or predator cue. Results indicate that iguanas reduced their foraging efforts in the presence of both a predator and its cue.

  1. Characterization of Salmonella Occurring at High Prevalence in a Population of the Land Iguana Conolophus subcristatus in Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Alessia; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Lorenzetti, Serena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the association between the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella and a population of land iguana, Colonophus subcristatus, endemic to Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. We assessed the presence of Salmonella subspecies and serovars and estimated the prevalence of the path...

  2. Ecological and evolutionary influences on body size and shape in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Ylenia; Glaberman, Scott; Tarroso, Pedro; Caccone, Adalgisa; Claude, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Oceanic islands are often inhabited by endemic species that have undergone substantial morphological evolutionary change due to processes of multiple colonizations from various source populations, dispersal, and local adaptation. Galápagos marine iguanas are an example of an island endemic exhibiting high morphological diversity, including substantial body size variation among populations and sexes, but the causes and magnitude of this variation are not well understood. We obtained morphological measurements from marine iguanas throughout their distribution range. These data were combined with genetic and local environmental data from each population to investigate the effects of evolutionary history and environmental conditions on body size and shape variation and sexual dimorphism. Our results indicate that body size and shape are highly variable among populations. Sea surface temperature and island perimeter, but not evolutionary history as depicted by phylogeographic patterns in this species, explain variation in body size among populations. Conversely, evolutionary history, but not environmental parameters or island size, was found to influence variation in body shape among populations. Finally, in all populations except one, we found strong sexual dimorphism in body size and shape in which males are larger, with higher heads than females, while females have longer heads than males. Differences among populations suggest that plasticity and/or genetic adaptation may shape body size and shape variation in marine iguanas. This study will help target future investigations to address the contribution of plasticity versus genetic adaptation on size and shape variation in marine iguanas.

  3. Phylogenetic evidence for lateral gene transfer in the intestine of marine iguanas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lateral gene transfer (LGT appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The inserts harbored 16S rRNA genes that place the organism from which they originated within Clostridium cluster IV, a well documented group that habitats the mammalian intestinal tract. However, sequence analysis indicates that 52% of the protein-coding genes on the fosmids have top BLASTX hits to bacterial species that are not members of Clostridium cluster IV, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that at least 10 of 44 coding genes on the fosmids may have been transferred from Clostridium cluster XIVa to cluster IV. The fosmids encoded four transposase-encoding genes and an integrase-encoding gene, suggesting their involvement in LGT. In addition, several coding genes likely involved in sugar transport were probably acquired through LGT. CONCLUSION: Our phylogenetic evidence suggests that LGT may be common among phylogenetically distinct members of the phylum Firmicutes inhabiting the intestinal tract of marine iguanas.

  4. Spatial Ecology of the Critically Endangered Fijian Crested Iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an Extremely Dense Population: Implications for Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne F.; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S.; Keogh, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs. PMID:24019902

  5. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne F; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S; Keogh, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  6. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F Morrison

    Full Text Available The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  7. Metagenomic-Based Study of the Phylogenetic and Functional Gene Diversity in Galápagos Land and Marine Iguanas

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-12-19

    In this study, a metagenome-based analysis of the fecal samples from the macrophytic algae-consuming marine iguana (MI; Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and terrestrial biomass-consuming land iguanas (LI; Conolophus spp.) was conducted. Phylogenetic affiliations of the fecal microbiome were more similar between both iguanas than to other mammalian herbivorous hosts. However, functional gene diversities in both MI and LI iguana hosts differed in relation to the diet, where the MI fecal microbiota had a functional diversity that clustered apart from the other terrestrial-biomass consuming reptilian and mammalian hosts. A further examination of the carbohydrate-degrading genes revealed that several of the prevalent glycosyl hydrolases (GH), glycosyl transferases (GT), carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), and carbohydrate esterases (CE) gene classes were conserved among all examined herbivorous hosts, reiterating the important roles these genes play in the breakdown and metabolism of herbivorous diets. Genes encoding some classes of carbohydrate-degrading families, including GH2, GH13, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM48, CE4, and CE11, as well as genes associated with sulfur metabolism and dehalogenation, were highly enriched or unique to the MI. In contrast, gene sequences that relate to archaeal methanogenesis were detected only in LI fecal microbiome, and genes coding for GH13, GH66, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM13, CE4, and CE8 carbohydrate active enzymes were highly abundant in the LI. Bacterial populations were enriched on various carbohydrates substrates (e.g., glucose, arabinose, xylose). The majority of the enriched bacterial populations belong to genera Clostridium spp. and Enterococcus spp. that likely accounted for the high prevalence of GH13 and GH2, as well as the GT families (e.g., GT2, GT4, GT28, GT35, and GT51) that were ubiquitously present in the fecal microbiota of all herbivorous hosts.

  8. Are hotshots always hot? A longitudinal study of hormones, behavior, and reproductive success in male marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Maren N; Rubenstein, Dustin R; Nelson, Karin N; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Polygynous lek-mating systems are characterized by high reproductive skew, with a small number of males gaining a disproportionate share of copulations. In lekking species, where female choice drives male mating success and patterns of reproductive skew, female preferences for 'good genes' should lead to preferred males having high reproductive success in all years. Here we investigate whether these 'hotshot' males have steroid hormone patterns that are consistent over time (between two mating seasons), and whether hormone levels consistently predict display behavior. We test these questions in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), a lekking vertebrate with high male reproductive skew. We found that male mating success and testosterone levels were not consistent across years. The most successful males showed an inverse relationship in copulation success between years. Similarly, territorial males that had high testosterone in one year had low levels in the next. Across years, testosterone was strongly associated with head-bob display, suggesting that this steroid plays a key role in mate attraction. These results suggest that female marine iguanas are not choosing the same 'hotshot' males in every year, but instead base their reproductive decisions on male behavioral traits that are hormonally mediated and variable across years. By using testosterone to regulate their costly display behaviors male marine iguanas appear to have a mechanism that allows them to adjust their reproductive effort depending on extrinsic and/or intrinsic factors.

  9. Basic ecology of the Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana (Squamata: Iguanidae, in Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Rioja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana is a restricted species to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Southern Oaxaca, Mexico. This reptile is one of the less known iguanid species. We censustracked a population in the South of Niltepec, Oaxaca, Mexico from May 2010 to April 2011. Throughout one year, a total of 10 line transects were situated and recorded in the study area to determine relative abundance and density, and habitat type use (dry forest, Nanchal, grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangrove by the species. This study reports a new C. oaxacana population on the Southeastern limit of species range. Although this species has a very restricted distribution and is in danger of extinction, C. oaxacana has a high population density when compared to other Ctenosaura species. A total of 108 individuals were recorded throughout the study. Dry forest (33.75ind/ha and Nanchal (18.75ind/ha were the habitats with higher densities. Comparisons between habitat types showed no significant differences between dry forest and Nanchal (W=15, p=0.0808. Results between seasons were similar. The Oaxacan Spiny tailed Iguana preferred first the dry forest, and then Nanchal, while avoided grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangroves. There was no difference in habitat use between males and females. Mean perch heights were 1.23±0.32 (n=30 in Nanchal, 2.11±0.30 (n=9 in grassland, 1.90±0.56 (n=54 in dry forest, 1.91±0.28 (n=9 in mangrove and 2.30±0.37 (n=6 in riparian vegetation. Species observed as refuge and perch were B. crassifolia (Nanchal; C. alata (grassland; Tabebuia sp., Genipa americana, G. sepium, Acacia sp., Ficus sp. and Haematoxylon sp. (dry forest; G. sepium, Acacia sp. and Guazuma ulmifolia (riparian vegetation; and C. erecta (mangrove. Live trees hollows and branches were used by species. Main threats to the species are excessive hunting and habitat loss. Furthermore, grassland fires are still common in the study area during the

  10. Genetic impact of a severe El Nino event on Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Steinfartz

    Full Text Available The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO is a major source of climatic disturbance, impacting the dynamics of ecosystems worldwide. Recent models predict that human-generated rises in green-house gas levels will cause an increase in the strength and frequency of El Niño warming events in the next several decades, highlighting the need to understand the potential biological consequences of increased ENSO activity. Studies have focused on the ecological and demographic implications of El Niño in a range of organisms, but there have been few systematic attempts to measure the impact of these processes on genetic diversity in populations. Here, we evaluate whether the 1997-1998 El Niño altered the genetic composition of Galápagos marine iguana populations from eleven islands, some of which experienced mortality rates of up to 90% as a result of El Niño warming. Specifically, we measured the temporal variation in microsatellite allele frequencies and mitochondrial DNA diversity (mtDNA in samples collected before (1991/1993 and after (2004 the El Niño event. Based on microsatellite data, only one island (Marchena showed signatures of a genetic bottleneck, where the harmonic mean of the effective population size (N(e was estimated to be less than 50 individuals during the period between samplings. Substantial decreases in mtDNA variation between time points were observed in populations from just two islands (Marchena and Genovesa. Our results suggests that, for the majority of islands, a single, intense El Niño event did not reduce marine iguana populations to the point where substantial neutral genetic diversity was lost. In the case of Marchena, simultaneous changes to both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation may also be the result of a volcanic eruption on the island in 1991. Therefore, studies that seek to evaluate the genetic impact of El Niño must also consider the confounding or potentially synergistic effect of other environmental

  11. Basic ecology of the Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana (Squamata: Iguanidae), in Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioja, Tamara; Carrillo-Reyes, Arturo; Espinoza-Medinilla, Eduardo; López-Mendoza, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana is a restricted species to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Southern Oaxaca, Mexico. This reptile is one of the less known iguanid species. We census-tracked a population in the South ofNiltepec, Oaxaca, Mexico from May 2010 to April 2011. Throughout one year, a total of 10 line transects were situated and recorded in the study area to determine relative abundance and density, and habitat type use (dry forest, Nanchal, grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangrove) by the species. This study reports a new C. oaxacana population on the Southeastern limit of species range. Although this species has a very restricted distribution and is in danger of extinction, C. oaxacana has a high population density when compared to other Ctenosaura species. A total of 108 individuals were recorded throughout the study. Dry forest (33.75ind/ha) and Nanchal (18.75ind/ha) were the habitats with higher densities. Comparisons between habitat types showed no significant differences between dry forest and Nanchal (W=15, p=0.0808). Results between seasons were similar. The Oaxacan Spiny tailed Iguana preferred first the dry forest, and then Nanchal, while avoided grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangroves. There was no difference in habitat use between males and females. Mean perch heights were 1.23 +/- 0.32 (n=30) in Nanchal, 2.11 +/- 0.30 (n=9) in grassland, 1.90 +/- 0.56 (n=54) in dry forest, 1.91 +/- 0.28 (n=9) in mangrove and 2.30 +/- 0.37 (n=6) in riparian vegetation. Species observed as refuge and perch were B. crassifolia (Nanchal); C. alata (grassland); Tabebuia sp., Genipa americana, G. sepium, Acacia sp., Ficus sp. and Haematoxylon sp. (dry forest); G. sepium, Acacia sp. and Guazuma ulmifolia (riparian vegetation); and C. erecta (mangrove). Live trees hollows and branches were used by species. Main threats to the species are excessive hunting and habitat loss. Furthermore, grassland fires are still common in the study area

  12. Basic ecology of the Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana (Squamata: Iguanidae, in Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Rioja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oaxacan Spiny-tailed Iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana is a restricted species to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Southern Oaxaca, Mexico. This reptile is one of the less known iguanid species. We censustracked a population in the South of Niltepec, Oaxaca, Mexico from May 2010 to April 2011. Throughout one year, a total of 10 line transects were situated and recorded in the study area to determine relative abundance and density, and habitat type use (dry forest, Nanchal, grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangrove by the species. This study reports a new C. oaxacana population on the Southeastern limit of species range. Although this species has a very restricted distribution and is in danger of extinction, C. oaxacana has a high population density when compared to other Ctenosaura species. A total of 108 individuals were recorded throughout the study. Dry forest (33.75ind/ha and Nanchal (18.75ind/ha were the habitats with higher densities. Comparisons between habitat types showed no significant differences between dry forest and Nanchal (W=15, p=0.0808. Results between seasons were similar. The Oaxacan Spiny tailed Iguana preferred first the dry forest, and then Nanchal, while avoided grassland, riparian vegetation, and mangroves. There was no difference in habitat use between males and females. Mean perch heights were 1.23±0.32 (n=30 in Nanchal, 2.11±0.30 (n=9 in grassland, 1.90±0.56 (n=54 in dry forest, 1.91±0.28 (n=9 in mangrove and 2.30±0.37 (n=6 in riparian vegetation. Species observed as refuge and perch were B. crassifolia (Nanchal; C. alata (grassland; Tabebuia sp., Genipa americana, G. sepium, Acacia sp., Ficus sp. and Haematoxylon sp. (dry forest; G. sepium, Acacia sp. and Guazuma ulmifolia (riparian vegetation; and C. erecta (mangrove. Live trees hollows and branches were used by species. Main threats to the species are excessive hunting and habitat loss. Furthermore, grassland fires are still common in the study area during the

  13. Salmonella strains isolated from Galapagos iguanas show spatial structuring of serovar and genomic diversity.

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    Emily W Lankau

    Full Text Available It is thought that dispersal limitation primarily structures host-associated bacterial populations because host distributions inherently limit transmission opportunities. However, enteric bacteria may disperse great distances during food-borne outbreaks. It is unclear if such rapid long-distance dispersal events happen regularly in natural systems or if these events represent an anthropogenic exception. We characterized Salmonella enterica isolates from the feces of free-living Galápagos land and marine iguanas from five sites on four islands using serotyping and genomic fingerprinting. Each site hosted unique and nearly exclusive serovar assemblages. Genomic fingerprint analysis offered a more complex model of S. enterica biogeography, with evidence of both unique strain pools and of spatial population structuring along a geographic gradient. These findings suggest that even relatively generalist enteric bacteria may be strongly dispersal limited in a natural system with strong barriers, such as oceanic divides. Yet, these differing results seen on two typing methods also suggests that genomic variation is less dispersal limited, allowing for different ecological processes to shape biogeographical patterns of the core and flexible portions of this bacterial species' genome.

  14. Genetic diversity and structure in the Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura inornata

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    Andrea C. Aplasca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana (Cyclura cychlura inornata is endemic to the Allen Cays, a tiny cluster of islands in the Bahamas. Naturally occurring populations exist on only two cays (<4 ha each. However, populations of unknown origin were recently discovered on four additional cays. To investigate patterns of genetic variation among these populations, we analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial markers for 268 individuals. Analysis of three mitochondrial gene regions (2,328 bp and data for eight nuclear microsatellite loci indicated low genetic diversity overall. Estimates of effective population sizes based on multilocus genotypes were also extremely low. Despite low diversity, significant population structuring and variation in genetic diversity measures were detected among cays. Genetic data confirm the source population for an experimentally translocated population while raising concerns regarding other, unauthorized, translocations. Reduced heterozygosity is consistent with a documented historical population decline due to overharvest. This study provides the first range-wide genetic analysis of this subspecies. We suggest strategies to maximize genetic diversity during ongoing recovery including additional translocations to establish assurance populations and additional protective measures for the two remaining natural populations.

  15. From a thriving past to an uncertain future: Zooarchaeological evidence of two millennia of human impact on a large emblematic lizard (Iguana delicatissima) on the Guadeloupe Islands (French West Indies)

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    Bochaton, C.; Bailon, S.; Ineich, I.; Breuil, M.; Tresset, A.; Grouard, S.

    2016-10-01

    Among the lizards in the Lesser Antillean Islands, iguanas are undoubtedly the most emblematic, especially the endemic species, Iguana delicatissima. However, although much effort is currently made for the conservation of this species as a result of the present biodiversity crisis, nearly nothing is known of the history of this animal on these islands during the last millennia. Here we present the first data relating to the distribution, morphology, and interaction of past iguanas with human populations in the Lesser Antilles. To do so, we review the archaeological Iguana remains collected over the past 15 years on the Guadeloupe Islands. Our results show that the only Iguana species occurring in pre-Columbian archaeological deposits is Iguana delicatissima. Moreover, we demonstrate that this species occurred on all the islands of Guadeloupe during pre-Columbian times and then suddenly became extinct between 1960 and 1990 on most of these islands. We also confirm the modern introduction of I. iguana to the Guadeloupe Islands. In addition, zooarchaeological research demonstrates that pre-Columbian human populations occasionally used iguanas as a source of food, but with no apparent impact on the native population. However, the first data relating to past size variations of I. delicatissima on the Guadeloupe Islands indicate that archaeological iguanas were much larger than the largest remnant modern specimens and that a marked decrease in body length (more than 20%) occurred in these lizards after contact with European populations. This evidence of widespread extinction and morphological change during modern times is another demonstration of the extensive effects of disturbance and selection induced by modern human societies on endemic insular faunas.

  16. Variation in the thermal ecology of an endemic iguana from Mexico reduces its vulnerability to global warming.

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    Valenzuela-Ceballos, Sara; Castañeda, Gamaliel; Rioja-Paradela, Tamara; Carrillo-Reyes, Arturo; Bastiaans, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    The persistence of reptile populations in a specific location is influenced by individuals' capacity to regulate their body temperatures, among other factors. Anthropogenic climate change may pose a risk to the survival of ectothermic animals due to their dependence on external heat sources to thermoregulate. In this study, we calculated indices of thermal habitat quality, thermoregulatory precision, and thermoregulatory effectiveness for the endemic spiny-tailed iguana Ctenosaura oaxacana. We evaluated these indices and the thermoregulatory behavior of the iguanas in the four types of vegetation that provide the most favorable conditions for thermoregulation. We also performed our experiments during both the wet and dry seasons to capture the full range of thermal conditions available to C. oaxacana over the course of a year. Finally, we evaluated the potential niche for the iguana in the years 2020, 2050, and 2080. Thermoregulation depends on both seasonal and environmental factors in this species. We found that thermoregulation effectiveness in both wet and dry seasons depends not only on the thermal conditions of the immediate environment, but also on the cover vegetation and habitat structure available across the range of habitats the species uses. Thus, heterogeneous habitats with dispersed vegetation may be most suitable for this species' thermoregulatory strategy. Likewise, niche modeling results suggested that suitable habitat for our study species may continue to be available for the next few decades, despite global warming tendencies, as long as cover vegetation remains unaltered. Our results suggest that thermoregulation is a complex process that cannot be generalized for all ectothermic species inhabiting a given region. We also found that temperature changes are not the only factor one must consider when estimating the risk of species loss. To understand the necessary thermal conditions and extinction risk for any ectothermic species, it is necessary

  17. Inferred vs realized patterns of gene flow: an analysis of population structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana.

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    Giuliano Colosimo

    Full Text Available Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p<<0.01. These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes.

  18. Expression of UV-sensitive parapinopsin in the iguana parietal eyes and its implication in UV-sensitivity in vertebrate pineal-related organs.

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    Seiji Wada

    Full Text Available The pineal-related organs of lower vertebrates have the ability to discriminate different wavelengths of light. This wavelength discrimination is achieved through antagonistic light responses to UV or blue and visible light. Previously, we demonstrated that parapinopsin underlies the UV reception in the lamprey pineal organ and identified parapinopsin genes in teleosts and frogs of which the pineal-related organs were reported to discriminate light. In this study, we report the first identification of parapinopsin in the reptile lineage and show its expression in the parietal eye of the green iguana. Spectroscopic analysis revealed that iguana parapinopsin is a UV-sensitive pigment, similar to lamprey parapinopsin. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analyses using antibodies specific to parapinopsin and parietopsin, a parietal eye green-sensitive pigment, revealed that parapinopsin and parietopsin are colocalized in the outer segments of the parietal eye photoreceptor cells in iguanas. These results strongly suggest that parapinopsin underlies the wavelength discrimination involving UV reception in the iguana parietal eye. The current findings support the idea that parapinopsin is a common photopigment underlying the UV-sensitivity in wavelength discrimination of the pineal-related organs found from lampreys to reptiles.

  19. Expression of UV-sensitive parapinopsin in the iguana parietal eyes and its implication in UV-sensitivity in vertebrate pineal-related organs.

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    Wada, Seiji; Kawano-Yamashita, Emi; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2012-01-01

    The pineal-related organs of lower vertebrates have the ability to discriminate different wavelengths of light. This wavelength discrimination is achieved through antagonistic light responses to UV or blue and visible light. Previously, we demonstrated that parapinopsin underlies the UV reception in the lamprey pineal organ and identified parapinopsin genes in teleosts and frogs of which the pineal-related organs were reported to discriminate light. In this study, we report the first identification of parapinopsin in the reptile lineage and show its expression in the parietal eye of the green iguana. Spectroscopic analysis revealed that iguana parapinopsin is a UV-sensitive pigment, similar to lamprey parapinopsin. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analyses using antibodies specific to parapinopsin and parietopsin, a parietal eye green-sensitive pigment, revealed that parapinopsin and parietopsin are colocalized in the outer segments of the parietal eye photoreceptor cells in iguanas. These results strongly suggest that parapinopsin underlies the wavelength discrimination involving UV reception in the iguana parietal eye. The current findings support the idea that parapinopsin is a common photopigment underlying the UV-sensitivity in wavelength discrimination of the pineal-related organs found from lampreys to reptiles.

  20. Tracking acquired antibiotic resistance in commensal bacteria of Galapagos land iguanas: no man, no resistance.

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    Maria Cristina Thaller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance, evolving and spreading among bacterial pathogens, poses a serious threat to human health. Antibiotic use for clinical, veterinary and agricultural practices provides the major selective pressure for emergence and persistence of acquired resistance determinants. However, resistance has also been found in the absence of antibiotic exposure, such as in bacteria from wildlife, raising a question about the mechanisms of emergence and persistence of resistant strains under similar conditions, and the implications for resistance control strategies. Since previous studies yielded some contrasting results, possibly due to differences in the ecological landscapes of the studied wildlife, we further investigated this issue in wildlife from a remote setting of the Galapagos archipelago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Screening for acquired antibiotic resistance was carried out in commensal enterobacteria from Conolophus pallidus, the terrestrial iguana of Isla Santa Fe, where: i the abiotic conditions ensure to microbes good survival possibilities in the environment; ii the animal density and their habits favour microbial circulation between individuals; and iii there is no history of antibiotic exposure and the impact of humans and introduced animal species is minimal except for restricted areas. Results revealed that acquired antibiotic resistance traits were exceedingly rare among bacteria, occurring only as non-dominant strains from an area of minor human impact. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Where both the exposure to antibiotics and the anthropic pressure are minimal, acquired antibiotic resistance traits are not normally found in bacteria from wildlife, even if the ecological landscape is highly favourable to bacterial circulation among animals. Monitoring antibiotic resistance in wildlife from remote areas could also be a useful tool to evaluate the impact of anthropic pressure.

  1. Characterization of Salmonella occurring at high prevalence in a population of the land iguana Conolophus subcristatus in Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

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    Alessia Franco

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to elucidate the association between the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella and a population of land iguana, Colonophus subcristatus, endemic to Galápagos Islands in Ecuador. We assessed the presence of Salmonella subspecies and serovars and estimated the prevalence of the pathogen in that population. Additionally, we investigated the genetic relatedness among isolates and serovars utilising pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE on XbaI-digested DNA and determined the antimicrobial susceptibility to a panel of antimicrobials. The study was carried out by sampling cloacal swabs from animals (n = 63 in their natural environment on in the island of Santa Cruz. A high prevalence (62/63, 98.4% was observed with heterogeneity of Salmonella subspecies and serovars, all known to be associated with reptiles and with reptile-associated salomonellosis in humans. Serotyping revealed 14 different serovars among four Salmonella enterica subspecies: S. enterica subsp. enterica (n = 48, S. enterica subsp. salamae (n = 2, S. enterica subsp. diarizonae (n = 1, and S. enterica subsp. houtenae (n = 7. Four serovars were predominant: S. Poona (n = 18, S. Pomona (n = 10, S. Abaetetuba (n = 8, and S. Newport (n = 5. The S. Poona isolates revealed nine unique XbaI PFGE patterns, with 15 isolates showing a similarity of 70%. Nine S. Pomona isolates had a similarity of 84%. One main cluster with seven (88% indistinguishable isolates of S. Abaetetuba was observed. All the Salmonella isolates were pan-susceptible to antimicrobials representative of the most relevant therapeutic classes. The high prevalence and absence of clinical signs suggest a natural interaction of the different Salmonella serovars with the host species. The interaction may have been established before any possible exposure of the iguanas and the biocenosis to direct or indirect environmental factors influenced by the use of antimicrobials in

  2. The relationship between heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption in Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) at two different temperatures.

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    Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Wang, Tobias; Wikelski, Martin

    2002-07-01

    To enable the use of heart rate (fH) for estimating field metabolic rate (FMR) in free-ranging Galapagos marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, we determined the relationships between fH and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) in seven iguanas before and during exercise on a treadmill and during the post-exercise period. The experiments were conducted at 27 and 35 degrees C, which are the temperatures that represent the lowest and highest average body temperatures of these animals in the field during summer. There were linear and significant relationships between fH and sVO2 at both temperatures (r(2)=0.86 and 0.91 at 27 degrees C and 36 degrees C, respectively). The slopes of the two regression lines did not differ, but there were significant differences in their intercepts. Thus, while heart rate can be used to predict FMR, the effects of temperature on the intercept of the regression must be taken into account when converting fH to sVO2. On the basis of our data, this can be achieved by applying the following formula: sVO2=0.0113fH-0.2983Q(10)((T(b)-27)/10). The increase in sVO2 with elevated body temperature results from an increase in fH, with no significant change in mass-specific oxygen pulse (sO(2) pulse; cardiac stroke volume times the difference in oxygen content between arterial and mixed venous blood). However, during exercise at both temperatures, increases in fH are insufficient to provide all of the additional O(2) required and there are also significant increases in the sO(2) pulses. This creates the situation whereby the same fH at the two temperatures can represent different values of sVO2.

  3. Characterization and evolution of MHC class II B genes in Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

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    Glaberman, Scott; Moreno, Maria A; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2009-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules play a key role in the adaptive immune system of vertebrates. Class II B genes appear to evolve in a very different manner in mammals and birds. Orthology is commonly observed among mammal loci, while genes tend to cluster phylogenetically within bird species. Here we present class II B data from a representative of another major group of amniotes, the squamates (i.e. lizards, snakes, amphisbaenians), with the ultimate goal of placing mammalian and avian MHC evolution into a broader context. In this study, eight class II B cDNA sequences were obtained from the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) which were divided into five locus groups, Amcr-DAB1 through -DAB5, based on similarities along most of the coding and noncoding portions of the transcribed gene. All marine iguana sequences were monophyletic with respect to class II genes from other vertebrates indicating that they originated from a common ancestral locus after squamates split from other reptiles. The beta-1 domain, which is involved in antigen binding, exhibited signatures of positive selection as well as interlocus gene conversion in both long and short tracts-a pattern also observed in birds and fish, but not in mammals. On the other hand, the beta-2 domain was divergent between gene groups, which is characteristic of mammals. Based on these results, we preliminarily show that squamate class II B genes have been shaped by a unique blend of evolutionary forces that have been observed in differing degrees in other vertebrates.

  4. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history

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    Keogh, J.S.; Edwards, D.L.; Fisher, R.N.; Harlow, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  5. Soft tissue influence on ex vivo mobility in the hip of Iguana: comparison with in vivo movement and its bearing on joint motion of fossil sprawling tetrapods.

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    Arnold, Patrick; Fischer, Martin S; Nyakatura, John A

    2014-07-01

    The reconstruction of a joint's maximum range of mobility (ROM) often is a first step when trying to understand the locomotion of fossil tetrapods. But previous studies suggest that the ROM of a joint is restricted by soft tissues surrounding the joint. To expand the limited informative value of ROM studies for the reconstruction of a fossil species' locomotor characteristics, it is moreover necessary to better understand the relationship of ex vivo ROM with the actual in vivo joint movement. To gain insight into the relationship between ex vivo mobility and in vivo movement, we systematically tested for the influence of soft tissues on joint ROM in the hip of the modern lizard Iguana iguana. Then, we compared the ex vivo mobility to in vivo kinematics of the hip joint in the same specimens using X-ray sequences of steady-state treadmill locomotion previously recorded. With stepwise removal of soft tissues and a repeated-measurement protocol, we show that soft tissues surrounding the hip joint considerably limit ROM, highlighting the problems when joint ROM is deduced from bare bones only. We found the integument to have the largest effect on the range of long-axis rotation, pro- and retraction. Importantly, during locomotion the iguana used only a fragment of the ROM that was measured in our least restrictive dissection situation (i.e. pelvis and femur only conjoined by ligaments), demonstrating the discrepancy between hip joint ROM and actual in vivo movement. Our study emphasizes the necessity for caution when attempting to reconstruct joint ROM or even locomotor kinematics from fossil bones only, as actual in vivo movement cannot be deduced directly from any condition of cadaver mobility in Iguana and likely in other tetrapods.

  6. Two new species of Nyctotherus (Heterotrichidae: Protozoa) from the cecum of the iguana Ctenosaura pectinata from Islas Marias, Nayarit, México

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    Tijerina Garza, María de la Paz, 1943-; Mercado Hernández, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Two new Heterotrichidae species from the caecum of the iguana Ctenosaura pectinata are reported. Nyctotherus earlensis n. sp. is smaller than N. hardwickii, its macronucleus is peripherical and presents cyclosis, the citostome is in the posterior third of the cell. N. jimenezis n. sp. presents a macronudeus that varies from oval to triangular, is in the anterior third of the cell and presents cariophore. It differs from N. sokoloffi in the form of the citopharinx. Se describe dos especies ...

  7. Contributions to elevated metabolism during recovery: dissecting the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis).

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    Hancock, Thomas V; Gleeson, Todd T

    2008-01-01

    The excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), a measure of recovery costs, is known to be large in ectothermic vertebrates such as the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), especially after vigorous activity. To analyze the cause of these large recovery costs in a terrestrial ectotherm, Dipsosaurus were run for 15 s at maximal-intensity (distance 35.0+/-1.9 m; 2.33+/-0.13 m s(-1)) while O(2) uptake was monitored via open-flow respirometry. Muscle metabolites (adenylates, phosphocreatine, and lactate) were measured at rest and after 0, 3, 10, and 60 min of recovery. Cardiac and ventilatory activity during rest and recovery were measured, as were whole-body lactate and blood lactate, which were used to estimate total muscle activity. This vigorous activity was supported primarily by glycolysis (65%) and phosphocreatine hydrolysis (29%), with only a small contribution from aerobic metabolism (2.5%). Aerobic recovery lasted 43.8+/-4.6 min, and EPOC measured 0.166+/-0.025 mL O(2) g(-1). This was a large proportion (98%) of the total suprabasal metabolic cost of the activity to the animal. The various contributions to EPOC after this short but vigorous activity were quantified, and a majority of EPOC was accounted for. The two primary causes of EPOC were phosphocreatine repletion (32%-50%) and lactate glycogenesis (30%-47%). Four other components played smaller roles: ATP repletion (8%-13%), elevated ventilatory activity (2%), elevated cardiac activity (2%), and oxygen store resaturation (1%).

  8. Progressive colonization and restricted gene flow shape island-dependent population structure in Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus

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    Snell Howard L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus inhabit the coastlines of large and small islands throughout the Galápagos archipelago, providing a rich system to study the spatial and temporal factors influencing the phylogeographic distribution and population structure of a species. Here, we analyze the microevolution of marine iguanas using the complete mitochondrial control region (CR as well as 13 microsatellite loci representing more than 1200 individuals from 13 islands. Results CR data show that marine iguanas occupy three general clades: one that is widely distributed across the northern archipelago, and likely spread from east to west by way of the South Equatorial current, a second that is found mostly on the older eastern and central islands, and a third that is limited to the younger northern and western islands. Generally, the CR haplotype distribution pattern supports the colonization of the archipelago from the older, eastern islands to the younger, western islands. However, there are also signatures of recurrent, historical gene flow between islands after population establishment. Bayesian cluster analysis of microsatellite genotypes indicates the existence of twenty distinct genetic clusters generally following a one-cluster-per-island pattern. However, two well-differentiated clusters were found on the easternmost island of San Cristóbal, while nine distinct and highly intermixed clusters were found on youngest, westernmost islands of Isabela and Fernandina. High mtDNA and microsatellite genetic diversity were observed for populations on Isabela and Fernandina that may be the result of a recent population expansion and founder events from multiple sources. Conclusions While a past genetic study based on pure FST analysis suggested that marine iguana populations display high levels of nuclear (but not mitochondrial gene flow due to male-biased dispersal, the results of our sex-biased dispersal tests and the

  9. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

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    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  10. Genetic differentiation between marine iguanas from different breeding sites on the island of Santa Fe (Galapagos Archipelago).

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    Lanterbecq, Deborah; Glaberman, Scott; Vitousek, Maren Noelani; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Benavides, Edgar; Wikelski, Martin; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2010-01-01

    We studied patterns of genetic diversity within and among 5 populations (318 individuals) of Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) from the island Santa Fé. Populations were separated by distances of 0.2 to 9.9 km. We sequenced 1182 base pairs of the mitochondrial control region and screened 13 microsatellite loci for variability. We also added data from 5 populations (397 individuals) sampled on 4 neighboring islands (Santa Cruz, Floreana, Espanola, and San Cristobal). The 5 Santa Fé populations, revealed as genetically distinct from populations on other islands, present relatively low levels of genetic diversity, which are similar for both microsatellite (average observed heterozygosity from 0.7686 to 0.7773) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers (haplotypic and nucleotide diversity from 0.587 to 0.728 and from 0.00079 to 0.00293, respectively), and comparable with those observed in similar-sized sampling sites on other islands. There was frequency-based evidence of genetic structure between northern and southern sites on Santa Fé (F(st) of 0.0027-0.0115 for microsatellite and 0.0447-0.2391 for mtDNA), but the 4 southern sites showed little differentiation. Most of the intra-island genetic variation was allocated within rather than between sites. There was no evidence of sex-biased dispersal or population substructuring due to lek-mating behavior, suggesting that these 2 observed behaviors are not strong enough to leave an evolutionary signal on genetic patterns in this species.

  11. Iguana iguana (Linnaeus 1758) (Squamata: Iguanidae)

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    Aguilar-Kirigin, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Tres ejemplares fueron colectados en la República de Bolivia, y depositados en la Colección Boliviana de Fauna (CBF), La Paz, Bolivia. Los registros se realizaron en el Departamento de La Paz, Provincia Abel Iturralde, Sección Primera, Municipio Ixiamas. Localidad El Tigre, 11º58'15.7"S, 68º00'22.5"W; 162 msnm. Fecha de colecta: 11 julio 2010. Hora: 9:27 AM. Colectores: Alvaro J. Aguilar Kirigin y Wilson Bani Rivero. Colectado en bajíos herbáceos inundables, a orillas del río Madre ...

  12. Variation in parental investment and relative clutch mass of the spiny-tail iguana, Ctenosaura pectinata (Squamata: Iguanidae in central México Variación en la inversión parental y masa relativa de la nidada en la iguana de cola espinosa Ctenosaura pectinata (Squamata: Iguanidae en el centro de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Castro-Franco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured the length, width, volume, and weight of 871 freshly laid eggs of 28 clutches of Ctenosaura pectinata. The iguanas were obtained from a tropical dry forest area in central Mexico. The relative clutch mass was related positively to the average egg weight but not to average egg volume. Unlike what usually occurs in lizards, where the body length strongly predicts egg production, in C. pectinata clutch size and egg size were not correlated with female weight or snout-vent length. Observed differences revealed variation in the weight-size of the egg within an individual clutch. Therefore, there is not an optimization of the egg in the studied population of Ctenosaura, as usually occurs in small lizards. This variation associated with reproduction takes place in the middle of the dry season, and may be interpreted as an adaptation to facilitate the adjustment of different phenotypes in environments with extreme drought.Medimos la longitud, amplitud, volumen, y peso de 871 huevos recién puestos de 28 nidadas de Ctenosaura pectinata. Las iguanas fueron obtenidas en un área de bosque tropical seco en el centro de México. La masa relativa de la nidada estuvo relacionada positivamente con el peso promedio de los huevos pero no con el volumen promedio del huevo. A diferencia de lo que ocurre usualmente en lagartijas, donde la longitud del cuerpo determina la producción de huevos, en C. pectinata el tamaño de la puesta y el tamaño del huevo no se correlacionan con el peso y tamaño de las hembras. Las diferencias observadas revelan variación en el tamaño y peso de los huevos dentro de las puestas individuales. En consecuencia, no hay una optimización del huevo en la población estudiada de Ctenosaura, como usualmente ocurre en lagartijas de tamaño pequeño. Esta variación asociada con la reproducción tiene lugar a mitad de la estación seca, y puede ser interpretada como una adaptación para facilitar el ajuste de diferentes

  13. Elektrokardiographische Untersuchungen beim Grünen Leguan (Iguana iguana)

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, neue Erkenntnisse über den bisher wenig beachteten Bereich der elektrokardiographischen Untersuchung in der Reptilienmedizin zu erlangen. Dabei wurden 39 gesunde Grüne Leguane ohne Narkose und 15 gesunde Grüne Leguane in Narkose mit einem Elektrokardiographen für Kleintiere (PC-EKG 2000 der Firma Eickemeyer, Tuttlingen, Bundesrepublik Deutschland) untersucht. Die Tiere wurden zunächst fixiert, dann fand eine Aufzeichnung in Brustlage statt. Die Elektroden wurden ...

  14. Fecal glucocorticoid response to environmental stressors in green iguanas (Iguana iguana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Timm, Jeanette; Ibsen, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces has been shown to be a powerful tool in evaluating well-being in vertebrates. Little is known however about the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response to stressors, and consequent glucocorticoid excretion, in reptiles. In a longitudinal...

  15. THE AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCE OF IGUANA (IGUANA-IGUANA) PANCREATIC RIBONUCLEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHAO, W; BEINTEMA, JJ; HOFSTEENGE, J

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine-specific ribonuclease superfamily constitutes a group of homologous proteins so far found only in higher vertebrates. Four separate families are found in mammals, which have resulted from gene duplications in mammalian ancestors. To learn more about the evolutionary history of this su

  16. Contenido de alimento y metabolismo ceco-cólico en el tracto digestivo de poblaciones silvestres de iguana negra (Ctenosaura pectinata) en Morelos, México Cecum-colic content of food and metabolism in the digestive tract of wild population black lizard (Ctenosaura pectinata) in Morelos, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    L Vélez-Hernández; MA Cobos-Peralta; JL Arcos-García

    2012-01-01

    Se colectaron cinco tractos digestivos de iguana negra (Ctenosaura pectinata) en estado silvestre en el estado de Morelos, México, para conocer la composición botánica de la dieta y el metabolismo ceco-cólico. Se observaron frotis realizados del contenido ceco-cólico para registrar la presencia de protozoarios, bacterias y parásitos intestinales existentes. Se obtuvo la media y desviación estándar de las características evaluadas. En el contenido ceco-cólico se identificaron las especies vege...

  17. The Heterogeneous Space in The Night of the Iguana%救赎与欲望——《蜥蜴的夜晚》中的异质空间探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎林

    2012-01-01

    从空间批评的视角出发,分析了田纳西·威廉斯(Tennessee Williams)的《蜥蜴的夜晚》(The Night of the Iguana)中呈现的异质空间,及其和人物的互为建构关系。正是这种有别于现代西方社会常规空间的异质空间的存在,为主人公逃脱主流社会桎梏、寻求救赎提供了可能,使作品中表现的在生存和毁灭、光亮与阴影的较量中,生的信念、光的力量占据了上风。但是,作为西方主流规训性社会空间的他者,这种异质空间也具有双重性,既因其开放、生机勃勃而被赋予包容、繁衍、重生和救赎功能,具有批判性和颠覆性,又被蒙上了神秘、肉欲的原始色彩,因此揭示了作者本人既边缘又中心的双重身份、视野和灵肉冲突的双重人格。%The Night of the Iguana, put on in 1961, is one of Tennessee Williams's most celebrated plays, which has yet been largely ignored by critics in China. Adopting the perspective of spatial criticism, the paper analyzes the heterogeneous space in the play and how such a space interacts with characters in it. It is right such a kind of space deviating from disci- plinary space in modern society that affords possibility for the protagonist's seeking refuge and salvation. It enables the be-lief in life and the power of light to gain the upper hand in the battle between survival and destruction, light and shadow. But the heterogeneous space as "the other" has its duality: it is endowed with the all-embracing, generating and revitali- zing capacity for its primeval vitality, while on the other hand it is identified with mystery and lust. Such duality reveals the author's both marginalized and central positions in his society and the resulting double visions as well as his conflicting per- sonalities split between spiritual aspiration and sexual pursuit.

  18. Contenido de alimento y metabolismo ceco-cólico en el tracto digestivo de poblaciones silvestres de iguana negra (Ctenosaura pectinata en Morelos, México Cecum-colic content of food and metabolism in the digestive tract of wild population black lizard (Ctenosaura pectinata in Morelos, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Vélez-Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se colectaron cinco tractos digestivos de iguana negra (Ctenosaura pectinata en estado silvestre en el estado de Morelos, México, para conocer la composición botánica de la dieta y el metabolismo ceco-cólico. Se observaron frotis realizados del contenido ceco-cólico para registrar la presencia de protozoarios, bacterias y parásitos intestinales existentes. Se obtuvo la media y desviación estándar de las características evaluadas. En el contenido ceco-cólico se identificaron las especies vegetales guamúchil (Phitecellobium dulce y huizache (Acacia farnesiana. Se estimó en base a materia seca la porción vegetal que conforma la dieta, la cual se distribuyó en frutos (62,9%, hojas (30,6%, rebrotes (2,9% y flores (3,5%. La región ceco-cólica se caracterizó por la concentración (mmol de los ácidos grasos acético (68,9 ± 10,6, butírico (11,98 ± 5,7, propiónico (9,04 ± 1,5 y total (89,9 ± 15, con pH de 7,45 y concentración de nitrógeno amoniacal (7,4 ± 2,8 mg/dl. La microbiota que se observó fue el protozoario Nyctotherus spp. Las bacterias totales oscilaron en concentraciones 7 x 10 a 9 x 10/g, siendo las celulolíticas de 9,2 x 10 hasta 3,5 x 10/g de contenido cecal. Los parásitos encontrados son nematodos identificados como miembros de la superfamilia Oxyuroidea con 655 ± 265/g huevos y 6,300 ± 329 adultos/iguana. Se concluye que la fermentación de la región ceco-cólica de la iguana negra en estado adulto se comporta de manera similar como en las especies herbívoras, en las cuales la fermentación se manifiesta de acuerdo con el alimento consumido. La concentración dietaria de proteína cruda fue de 14,5% y energía de 2,193 Mcal/kg y son animales parasitados con oxiuros.Five digestive tracts of black lizards (Ctenosaura pectinata from a wild population were collected in Morelos State, México, in order to identify the plant composition in the diet and the cecum-colic metabolism. Smears obtained from cecum

  19. Iguana: A management support tool using Haskell and LDAP

    OpenAIRE

    Ryder, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Haskell is widely used within research and academia but is less well used for `real world' projects. This paper describes a real world project using Haskell in a larger scale data processing application. The project was undertaken jointly by British Airways and the Computing Laboratory, University of Kent.

  20. The Energetics of Non-Sustainable, Burst Locomotion in the Desert Iguana, Dipsosaurus Dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption ( EPOC ), once known as ’oxygen debt,’ has been well documented in a wide variety of organisms. There are many...factors implicated as responsible for EPOC . These include elevated lactate and hormone levels, depressed glycogen concentrations, increased body...myoglobin. Both the intensity and duration of exercise have been found to influence the length and magnitude of EPOC . Most of the previous research done on

  1. Correlated amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in six lizard species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P; Manley, GA; Gallo, L

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were recorded from 17 lizard ears (six species: Gerrhosaurus major, Iguana iguana, Basiliscus vittatus, Tupinambis teguixin, Varanus exanthematicus, and Cordylus tropidosternum), The spectrum of each recording contained multiple spectral peaks. For each peak, the

  2. Correlated amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in six lizard species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P; Manley, GA; Gallo, L

    1998-01-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were recorded from 17 lizard ears (six species: Gerrhosaurus major, Iguana iguana, Basiliscus vittatus, Tupinambis teguixin, Varanus exanthematicus, and Cordylus tropidosternum), The spectrum of each recording contained multiple spectral peaks. For each peak, the en

  3. Expression of UV-Sensitive Parapinopsin in the Iguana Parietal Eyes and Its Implication in UV-Sensitivity in Vertebrate Pineal-Related Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Seiji Wada; Emi Kawano-Yamashita; Mitsumasa Koyanagi; Akihisa Terakita

    2012-01-01

    The pineal-related organs of lower vertebrates have the ability to discriminate different wavelengths of light. This wavelength discrimination is achieved through antagonistic light responses to UV or blue and visible light. Previously, we demonstrated that parapinopsin underlies the UV reception in the lamprey pineal organ and identified parapinopsin genes in teleosts and frogs of which the pineal-related organs were reported to discriminate light. In this study, we report the first identifi...

  4. Rediscovery of the 220-year-old holotype of the Banded Iguana, Brachylophus fasciatus (Brongniart, 1800) in the Paris Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineich, Ivan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Natural History Museum herpetological collection (MNHN-RA) has seven historical specimens of Brachylophus spp. collected late in the 18th and early in the 19th centuries. Brachylophus fasciatus was described in 1800 by Brongniart but its type was subsequently considered as lost and never present in MNHN-RA collections. We found that 220 year old holotype among existing collections, registered without any data, and we show that it was donated to MNHN-RA from Brongniart’s private collection after his death in 1847. It was registered in the catalogue of 1851 but without any data or reference to its type status. According to the coloration (uncommon midbody saddle-like dorsal banding pattern) and morphometric data given in its original description and in the subsequent examination of the type in 1802 by Daudin and in 1805 by Brongniart we found that lost holotype in the collections. Another MNHN-RA specimen has Horn Islands (Wallis and Futuna) as the collection location but we show that most of the collections given to MNHN-RA by its collector, Louis Arnoux, have mixed localities in the MNHN-RA catalogues. We thus conclude that the locality is wrong and that the species never inhabited those islands located west of Western Samoa and north-east of Fiji.

  5. A review of the nutritional content and technological parameters of indigenous sources of meat in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, A; Cabrera, M C

    2008-11-01

    Meat yields, proximate compositions, fatty acids compositions and technological parameters are reviewed for species which might be further developed as indigenous sources of meat in South America. These include the alpaca (Lama pacos), capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), guanaco (Lama guanicoe), llama (Lama glama), nutria (Myocastor coypus), collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu), greater rhea (Rhea americana), lesser rhea (Rhea pennata), yacare (Caiman crocodilus yacare), tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae) and green iguana (Iguana iguana).

  6. Reptile-associated ticks from Dominica and the Bahamas with notes on hyperparasitic erythraeid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Lance A; Knapp, Charles R; Beati, Lorenza; Dold, Stephanie

    2015-02-01

    Ticks were collected or recorded from 522 individual reptiles on Dominica and from 658 reptiles from the Bahamas. Two species of ticks were collected on Dominica: Amblyomma antillorum and Amblyomma rotundatum. Similarly, 2 species were collected in the Bahamas: Amblyomma albopictum and Amblyomma torrei. On Dominica, A. antillorum was recorded from 517 Lesser Antillean iguanas (Iguana delicatissima), 2 boa constrictors (Boa nebulosa), 1 Antilles snake (Alsophis sibonius), and 1 Dominican ground lizard (Ameiva fuscata), whereas A. rotundatum was recorded from 1 Lesser Antillean skink (Mabuya mabouya). In the Bahamas, A. albopictum was recorded from 131 Andros iguanas (Cyclura cychlura cychlura), 271 Exuma Island iguanas (Cyclura cychlura figginsi), and 1 Andros curlytail lizard (Leiocephalus carinatus coryi), whereas A. torrei was recorded from 255 Exuma Island iguanas. In the Bahamas, A. albopictum parasitized iguanas on Andros Island and the central Exuma Islands, and A. torrei parasitized iguanas in the southern Exumas. An exception to this trend was that A. torrei was collected from iguanas on Pasture Cay in the central Exumas, an anomaly that is explained by the fact that iguanas (with attached ticks) on Pasture Cay were introduced by humans in the past from islands further south. External hyperparasitic larval erythraeid mites ( Leptus sp.) were recorded from A. torrei in the Bahamas.

  7. Gli2a protein localization reveals a role for Iguana/DZIP1 in primary ciliogenesis and a dependence of Hedgehog signal transduction on primary cilia in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eeden Freek

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammalian cells, the integrity of the primary cilium is critical for proper regulation of the Hedgehog (Hh signal transduction pathway. Whether or not this dependence on the primary cilium is a universal feature of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling has remained contentious due, in part, to the apparent divergence of the intracellular transduction pathway between mammals and teleost fish. Results Here, using a functional Gli2-GFP fusion protein, we show that, as in mammals, the Gli2 transcription factor localizes to the primary cilia of cells in the zebrafish embryo and that this localization is modulated by the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, we show that the Igu/DZIP1protein, previously implicated in the modulation of Gli activity in zebrafish, also localizes to the primary cilium and is required for its proper formation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a conserved role of the primary cilium in mediating Hedgehog signalling activity across the vertebrate phylum and validate the use of the zebrafish as a representative model for the in vivo analysis of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling.

  8. Experimental infestation with the immatures of Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae on Tropidurus torquatus (Lacertilia: Iguanidae and Oryctolagus cuniculus Infestação experimental com as fases imaturas de Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae em Tropidurus torquatus (Lacertilia: Iguanidae e Oryctolagus cuniculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H.T. Freitas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Larvas provenientes de duas fêmeas de Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae, naturalmente ingurgitadas em uma iguana (Iguana iguana e provenientes do Estado do Mato Grosso, foram utilizadas na infestação experimental de lagartos da espécie Tropidurus torquatus e coelhos domésticos. As larvas alimentadas em ambos os hospedeiros realizaram ecdise para ninfas. As ninfas apenas ingurgitaram no lagarto e mudaram para machos e fêmeas. Este é o primeiro registro do parasitismo de larvas e ninfas de A. dissimile em T. torquatus e de larvas em coelhos.

  9. Nuevos registros de nemátodes parásitos de animales de vida silvestre en el Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tantaleán

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registran, por primera vez para el Perú, 4 especies de nemátodes: Dipetalonema graciliformis Freitas, 1964 parásito de Saguinus labiatus; Evaginuris branickii (McCiure, 1932 Quentín, 1973 de Dinomys branickii; Alaeuris caudatus (Lent & Freitas, 1948 de Iguana iguana y Serpinema amazonicus de Podocnemis expansa. También, se considera a Saguinus labiatus como un nuevo huésped para Dipetalonema graciliformis.

  10. Emotion and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanac, M

    1999-02-01

    Gentle handling of mammals (rats, mice) and lizards (Iguana), but not of frogs (Rana) and fish (Carassius), elevated the set-point for body temperature (i.e., produced an emotional fever) achieved only behaviorally in lizards. Heart rate, another detector of emotion in mammals, was also accelerated by gentle handling, from ca. 70 beats/min to ca. 110 beats/min in lizards. This tachycardia faded in about 10 min. The same handling did not significantly modify the frogs' heart rates. The absence of emotional tachycardia in frogs and its presence in lizards (as well as in mammals), together with the emotional fever exhibited by mammals and reptiles, but not by frogs or fish, would suggest that emotion emerged in the evolutionary lineage between amphibians and reptiles. Such a conclusion would imply that reptiles possess consciousness with its characteristic affective dimension, pleasure. The role of sensory pleasure in decision making was therefore verified in iguanas placed in a motivational conflict. To be able to reach a bait (lettuce), the iguanas had to leave a warm refuge, provided with standard food, and venture into a cold environment. The results showed that lettuce was not necessary to the iguanas and that they traded off the palatability of the bait against the disadvantage of the cold. Thus, the behavior of the iguanas was likely to be produced, as it is in humans, through the maximization of sensory pleasure. Altogether, these results may indicate that the first elements of mental experience emerged between amphibians and reptiles.

  11. Análisis de los deslizamiento en la cuenca de la Quebrada La Iguana de la ciudad de Medellín a partir de la integración lluvia _pendiente_ formación geológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Echeverri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En el lapso comprendido entre 1980 y 2001 se han registrado un total de 40 deslizamientos sobre las laderas de la cuenca de la quebrada La Iguaná al occidente de la ciudad de Medellín. En esta investigación se han analizado las relaciones de la ocurrencia de deslizamientos con los registros de precipitación precedente, la pendiente de la ladera y las distintas formaciones geológicas superficiales locales, estableciendo comparaciones con cada una de las mencionadas y con la interacción conjunta de las tres variables de análisis. El trabajo desarrollado ha permitido proponer un umbral de amenaza para precipitaciones antecedentes de 3 días y precedentes de 15 días, reconocer la susceptibilidad al deslizamiento de cada formación superficial y las pendientes más propensas a los movimientos en masa. La conjugación de las tres variables (precipitación, pendiente y formación superficial ha facilitado la elaboración de un mapa de amenaza por deslizamiento que se estima puede ser empleado como elemento en la ejecución de programas de prevención de desastres. La metodología propuesta permite, mediante la actualización de la información pluviométrica, que se detecten con antelación las áreas dentro de la cuenca en las cuales se puede presentar un deslizamiento, y puedan tomarse las acciones preventivas del caso. La concepción metodológica planteada permite en cualquier momento conocer la amenaza por deslizamiento con solo disponer de los registros de lluvia, lo que la constituye en una herramienta innovadora y de fácil manejo.

  12. Ticks parasitizing reptiles in the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, L A; Knapp, C R

    2005-09-01

    Two species of reptile ticks, Amblyomma dissimile Koch and Amblyomma torrei Pérez Vigueras (Acari: Ixodidae), are reported from the Bahama Islands for the first time. The widespread neotropical (including the Caribbean and southern Florida) A. dissimile was recovered on Andros Island from three species of reptiles all for the first time: the Andros iguana Cyclura cychlura cychlura Cuvier, the Andros curly tail lizard Leiocephalus carinatus coryi Schmidt, and the Andros boa Epicrates striatus fowleri Sheplan and Schwartz. The iguana tick A. torrei, previously known only from Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Cayman Islands, was recovered in the Exuma Islands from the Exuma iguana Cyclura cychlura figginsi Barbour. Mean numbers of ticks per host were as high as 36.6 on Mangrove Cay, Andros Island, and 25.8 on Pasture Cay in the Exuma Islands.

  13. WILDLIFE USE BY RURAL COMMUNITIES IN THE CATAZAJÁ - LA LIBERTAD WETLANDS, CHIAPAS, MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasminda García-Del Valle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of wild vertebrates was analyzed for rural communities in Catazajá and La Libertad municipalities, Chiapas state. From interviews (n=190 and two workshops (January 2007-December 2008 applied to four communities (Playas, Punta Arena, Morelos and La Libertad, species, uses, sites and hunting seasons were recorder. A total of 24 species were recognized by local people as resources for food, sale, pet, craft and traditional medicine. Jicotea tortoise (Trachemys scripta, nine banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcintus, Morelet´s crocodile (Crocodylus moreletti, green iguana (Iguana iguana and white front parrot (Amazona albifrons were recognized as species with high use value. We analyzed the problematic and the communities propose some strategies that would favor the population increment and the diversity maintenance of wildlife in this region.

  14. Dermatomycosis in a pet inland bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) caused by a Chrysosporium species related to Nannizziopsis vriesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, M L; Martorell, J; Castellá, G; Ramis, A; Cabañes, F J

    2009-08-01

    A Chrysosporium sp. related to Nannizziopsis vriesii was isolated in pure culture from squames and biopsies of facial lesions in a pet inland bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) in Spain. The presence in histological sections of morphologically consistent fungal elements strongly incriminates this fungus as the aetiological agent of infection. Lesions regressed following treatment with oral ketoconazole and topical chlorhexidine and terbinafine until the lizard was lost to follow up 1 month later. The ITS-5.8S rRNA gene of the isolate was sequenced and a search on the GenBank database revealed a high match with the sequences of two Chrysosporium sp. strains recently isolated from green iguanas (Iguana iguana) with dermatomycosis, also in Spain. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed that all these strains are related to N. vriesii. This is the first report of dermatomycoses caused by a Chrysosporium species related to N. vriesii in a bearded dragon outside North America.

  15. Nematofauna de tres especies de lagartijas (Sauria: Tropiduridae y Gekkonidae de la Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Ica, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pérez Z.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Los nemátodos Thubunaea iguanae y Spauligodon viracochai son reportados para tres especies Spauligodon viracochai son reportados para tres especies Spauligodon viracochai de lagartijas en la Reserva Nacional de Paracas, Ica, Perú. El primer nematodo fue registrado para Microlophus peruvianus y Microlophus peruvianus y Microlophus peruvianus Microlophus thoracicus thoracicus, mientras que el segundo fue registrado para Phyllodactylus angustidigitus. Estos reportes representan dos nuevos hospederos y una nueva localidad para T. iguanae, nematodo reportado por primera vez para Sudamérica, además del registro de un nuevo hospedero para S. viracochai .

  16. Plasma lipid concentrations for some Brazilian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, M P; Lima, V L; Costa, J C; Sibrian, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides were determined for ten species of Brazilian lizards, Iguana iguana, Tropidurus torquatos and T. semitaeniatus (Iguanidae), Tupinambis teguixin, Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae), Mabuya maculata (Scincidae), Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae), Amphisbaenia vermicularis and Leposternon polystegum (Amphisbaenidae). 2. Considerable inter- and intra-species variations in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. 3. The percentage of total cholesterol esterified and the individual phospholipid composition of plasma were relatively constant for each species. 4. Over 60% of the cholesteryl esters present in plasma from three species each of iguanid and teiid lizards were polyenoic.

  17. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  18. Self-Assessing of the Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Intelligence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagiene, Valentina; Juškeviciene, Anita; Carneiro, Roberto; Child, Camilla; Cullen, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Organisational Intelligence (OI) competences self-assessment tools developed and applied by the IGUANA project. In the paper Emotional Intelligence and Organisational Intelligence competences are discussed, their use in action research experiments to assess and…

  19. News from Academy Bay

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Galapagos National Park. Fire at the Darwin Research Station. The control of introduced mammals. Good news about the Hood tortoises. The endangered land iguanas. Penguins, cormorants and flamingos in 1984. A workshop on national parks. International conservation award to Secretary Ripley. Visits and events at the Charles Darwin Research Station.

  20. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. March 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    contaminated and polluted water than from all forms of violence , including wars, notes the UNEP report, Sick Water? Some two million tons of waste...list—some species of iguanas, an entire genus of tree frogs from Central America, and Kaiser’s newt salamander from Iran. In the meantime, the EU

  1. Acquisition of Resort Property Located in Indian Springs, Nevada, Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Indian Springs (Nellis AFB 1997). A diverse herpetofauna is present that includes desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), zebra-tailed lizard...Received on December 26, 2010 from: http://gisgate.co.clark.nv.us/ gisplot_ pdfs /cp/nwindianspringsplu.pdf Myhrer, Keith. 2011. Indian Springs

  2. The Role of Habituation and Sensitization in Understanding the Annoyance of Community Exposures to Impulsive Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-15

    tell tale sign of the OR) for all five stimuli, the hearts of green iguanas and Sudan plated lizards did not respond to any of those stimuli. One...ratings. Available at http://www.ssas.de/wiki/images/4/42/TechManual2005. pdf Lukas, J.S., and K.D. Kryter. 1970a. A preliminary study of the

  3. Work-Related Issues Facing Nurse Anesthetists During Deployment on Military Operation Other Than War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    sites. There were mosquitoes, banana rats, iguanas , and sand crabs in Cuba; camel spiders, mice, scorpions, snakes, and "attack" flies in Saudi Arabia...doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jplO2. pdf NURSE ANESTHETIST DEPLOYMENT ISSUES 62 Kincheloe, J.L., & McLaren, P.L. (1994). Rethinking critical theory and qualitative

  4. Work-Related Issues Facing Nurse Anesthetists During Deployment on a Military Operation Other Than War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    an every day occurrence at the majority of sites. There were mosquitoes, banana rats, iguanas , and sand crabs in Cuba; camel spiders, mice, scorpions...www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jpl_02. pdf NURSE ANESTHETIST DEPLOYMENT ISSUES 62 Kincheloe, J.L

  5. [Eumycetic mycetoma due to Madurella mycetomatis. Report of six cases.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, G; Arenas, R; Pérez-Polito, A; Torres, B; Estrada, R

    1998-06-01

    We report six cases of mycetoma due to Madurella mycetomatis. Five men and a woman from 28 to 70 years of age, and a history of one to ten years. In four of them the foot was affected, in another the wrist, and one exceptional case with neck involvement after an iguana bite. The response to treatment was irregular and not satisfactory.

  6. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  7. Percepción y patronos de uso de la fauna silvestre o comunidades indigenas Embera - Katíos en la cuenca del río San Jorge, zona amortiguadora del PNN - Paramillo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alfonso Racero - Casarrubia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In workshops with four indigenous communities in the Embera-Katíos communal lands (resguardo , located in the upper San Jorge River Valley (Tres Playitas, Las Piedras, Boca San Cipriano, San Juan Medio, information about the wild fauna that they recognized inside their hunting grounds was collected. Mammals, reptiles, and birds, especially the Psittacidae family, are the vertebrates most used by the indigenous communities. No kind of use was found for amphibians. The consumption of reptiles such as Iguana iguana, Tupinambis teguixin, Caiman crocodylus fuscus, and Crocodylus acutus show them to be an important part of their culture. The indigenous communities associate environmental problems with habitat destruction due to the cultivation of illicit crops and forest clearing in the buffer zone around Paramillo National Park.

  8. Snakes in the wrong places: Gordon Rodda’s career in invasive species research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    When USGS research zoologist Gordon G. Rodda was a graduate student at Cornell University studying behavioral biology of alligators —or later, completing a post-doc at the Smithsonian Institute studying the social behavior of green iguanas in Venezuela or following that, as a statistics and sociobiology instructor at the University of Tennessee—he did not foresee that his professional future was in snakes. Lots of snakes, and in places they don’t belong.

  9. Detsibill : Rock'n'roll Arnie. White label : Kreatiivmootor. Kuula / DJ Pickney Tiger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    DJ Pickney Tiger, pseud., 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: "Kreatiivmootor", Method Man "4:21...the day after", OutKast "Idlewood", R.E.M. "The best of the I.R.S. years 1982-1987", t.A.T.u. "The Best", Mrs. Etta Baker, Family and Frends "Instrumental music of the Southern Appalachians", Louie Austen "Iguana", Hatebreed "Supermacy", "Jazz-Travels Compiled By Casbah 73", 36 Crazyfists "Rest inside the flames", "Toatuur", Robb Scott "Afro Odyssey"

  10. Detsibill : Rock'n'roll Arnie. White label : Kreatiivmootor. Kuula / DJ Pickney Tiger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    DJ Pickney Tiger, pseud., 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: "Kreatiivmootor", Method Man "4:21...the day after", OutKast "Idlewood", R.E.M. "The best of the I.R.S. years 1982-1987", t.A.T.u. "The Best", Mrs. Etta Baker, Family and Frends "Instrumental music of the Southern Appalachians", Louie Austen "Iguana", Hatebreed "Supermacy", "Jazz-Travels Compiled By Casbah 73", 36 Crazyfists "Rest inside the flames", "Toatuur", Robb Scott "Afro Odyssey"

  11. Treatment of ’Battlefield Detainees’ in the War on Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-23

    news/Aug2006/d20060814comm3. pdf ] (last visited Nov. 7, 2006). 15 See Department of Defense, Press Release, Transfer of Juvenile Detainees Completed...housed in special facilities apart from the general prison population, known as Camp Iguana , where they received schooling and were allowed to watch...2006), available at [http://www.ohchr.org/english/ bodies/chr/docs/62chr/E.CN.4.2006.120_. pdf ] (last visited March 23, 2006). The United States

  12. Mobile Sensors Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-26

    marine iguana . Marine reptiles are again limited in their range due to the inability to regulate their own body temperature. Fish are located...Item (B)(2)(b) available at: http://www.deq.virginia.gov/ air/ pdf /airregs/806. pdf Form 7 available at: ftp://ftp.deq.virginia.gov/pub /air...http://www.hawaii.gov/healt h/about/rules/11-60-1. pdf Hawaii State Department of Health Clean Air Branch Alaska All diesel generators are

  13. Treatment of "Battlefield Detainees" in the War on Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-14

    www.defenselink.mil/news/Aug2006/d20060814comm3. pdf ] (last visited Nov. 7, 2006). 15 See Department of Defense, Press Release, Transfer of Juvenile...detainees had been housed in special facilities apart from the general prison population, known as Camp Iguana , where they received schooling and were...www.ohchr.org/english/ bodies/chr/docs/62chr/E.CN.4.2006.120_. pdf ] (last visited March 23, 2006). The United States objected to the legal conclusions

  14. When top-down becomes bottom up: behaviour of hyperdense howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) trapped on a 0.6 ha island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela, Gabriela; Terborgh, John; Ceballos, Natalia; Glander, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Predators are a ubiquitous presence in most natural environments. Opportunities to contrast the behaviour of a species in the presence and absence of predators are thus rare. Here we report on the behaviour of howler monkey groups living under radically different conditions on two land-bridge islands in Lago Guri, Venezuela. One group of 6 adults inhabited a 190-ha island (Danto) where they were exposed to multiple potential predators. This group, the control, occupied a home range of 23 ha and contested access to food resources with neighbouring groups in typical fashion. The second group, containing 6 adults, was isolated on a remote, predator-free 0.6 ha islet (Iguana) offering limited food resources. Howlers living on the large island moved, fed and rested in a coherent group, frequently engaged in affiliative activities, rarely displayed agonistic behaviour and maintained intergroup spacing through howling. In contrast, the howlers on Iguana showed repulsion, as individuals spent most of their time spaced widely around the perimeter of the island. Iguana howlers rarely engaged in affiliative behaviour, often chased or fought with one another and were not observed to howl. These behaviors are interpreted as adjustments to the unrelenting deprivation associated with bottom-up limitation in a predator-free environment.

  15. When top-down becomes bottom up: behaviour of hyperdense howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus trapped on a 0.6 ha island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Orihuela

    Full Text Available Predators are a ubiquitous presence in most natural environments. Opportunities to contrast the behaviour of a species in the presence and absence of predators are thus rare. Here we report on the behaviour of howler monkey groups living under radically different conditions on two land-bridge islands in Lago Guri, Venezuela. One group of 6 adults inhabited a 190-ha island (Danto where they were exposed to multiple potential predators. This group, the control, occupied a home range of 23 ha and contested access to food resources with neighbouring groups in typical fashion. The second group, containing 6 adults, was isolated on a remote, predator-free 0.6 ha islet (Iguana offering limited food resources. Howlers living on the large island moved, fed and rested in a coherent group, frequently engaged in affiliative activities, rarely displayed agonistic behaviour and maintained intergroup spacing through howling. In contrast, the howlers on Iguana showed repulsion, as individuals spent most of their time spaced widely around the perimeter of the island. Iguana howlers rarely engaged in affiliative behaviour, often chased or fought with one another and were not observed to howl. These behaviors are interpreted as adjustments to the unrelenting deprivation associated with bottom-up limitation in a predator-free environment.

  16. Population genetic structure of a three-host tick, Amblyomma dissimile, in eastern Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampo, M; Rangel, Y; Mata, A

    1998-12-01

    Patterns of genetic variation for the tick Amblyomma dissimile were analyzed from a total of 200 ticks collected on 12 toads (Bufo marinus), 14 snakes (Boa constrictor), and 8 lizards (Iguana iguana) at 11 localities. The analyses were performed on electrophoretic data from 8 isozyme loci. Mean heterozygosity per locus was 6% (+/-3.1) per population. Differences in allelic frequencies among ticks from different individual hosts were the major source of genetic variability in this study. Host species was a smaller source of genetic variation. Genetic distances between localities varied according to which host species was present in each locality, and these appeared to be related to the extent of habitat overlap between host species. The smallest genetic distances between samples from different host species were recorded for I. iguana and B. constrictor. In contrast, the genetic distances between tick samples from B. marinus and either of the reptile species were significantly larger than between tick samples from this amphibian species. Ecological variables or the geographic distance did not explain the local patterns of differentiation observed in A. dissimile. Major genetic differences between island and mainland sites (0.03702) suggested an association between genetic distances and geographic isolation. The consistency between patterns of genetic variation and those of host home range overlap suggests that host dispersion is the main force structuring the genetic variation within this tick species.

  17. Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Anke C; Blahak, Silvia; Heckers, Kim O; Wiechert, Jutta; Behncke, Helge; Mathes, Karina; Günther, Pascale; Zwart, Peer; Ball, Inna; Rüschoff, Birgit; Marschang, Rachel E

    2013-09-27

    Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards.

  18. A Coherent and Non—Invasive Open Analysis Architecture and Framework with Applications in CMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GeorgeAlverson; IannaOsborne; 等

    2001-01-01

    The CMS IGUANA project has implemented an open analysis architecture that enables the creation of an integrated analysis environment.In this "analysis desktop" environment a physicist is able to perform most analysis-related tasks,not just the presentation and visualisation steps usually associated with analysis tools.The motivation behind IGUANA's approach is that phsics analysis includes much more than just the visualisation and data presentation.Many factors contribute to the increasing importance of making analysis and visualisation software an integral part of the experiment's software:object oriented and ever more advanced data models,GRID,and automated hierarchical storage management systems to name just a few.At the same time the analysis toolkits should be modular and non-invasive to be usable in different contexts within one experiment and generally across experiments.Ideally the analysis environment would appear to be perfectly customised to the experiment and the context,but would mostly consist of generic components.We describe how the IGUANA project is addressing these issues and present both the architecture and examples of how different aspects of analysis appear to the users and the developers.

  19. Disease patterns in the Detroit Zoo: a study of reptilian and amphibian populations from 1973 through 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneene, J B; Taylor, R F; Sikarskie, J G; Meyer, T J; Richter, N A

    1985-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine disease patterns in reptilian and amphibian populations at the Detroit Zoo from 1973 through 1983. In the reptilian population (mean +/- SD = 285.2 +/- 28), overall annual mortality rates were 1% to 40%. Mortality rates were highest in the fall months (20%) and lowest in the winter months (6%). The most frequently affected reptiles were iguana (Iguana iguana), reticulated python (Python reticulatus), rattlesnakes (Crotalus spp), common boa (Constrictor constrictor), and lizards (various genera of suborder Lacertilia). Of the 1,300 reptilian deaths from 1973 through 1983, 36.6% were caused by microbial agents, 12% by parasites, 11.6% by trauma, and 9.3% by nutritional deficiencies. The main microbial organisms that caused death were Aeromonas spp, Salmonella spp, Pseudomonas spp, Proteus spp, and Edwardsiella spp. The main parasites that caused death were Entamoeba spp and lungworms. Among amphibians, frogs and toads were the most frequently affected, and starvation and trauma were the most frequent causes of death.

  20. Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards. PMID:24073785

  1. COMERCIO DE FAUNA SILVESTRE EN COLOMBIA WILDLIFE TRADE IN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Javier Mancera Rodríguez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo ofrece un panorama sobre las actividades relacionadas con el comercio de bienes derivados de las especies de fauna silvestre en Colombia, abordando el tema desde el desarrollo que ha tenido su actividad productiva, el aprovechamiento extractivo, así como la dinámica de su comercio legal e ilegal en el país y el desarrollo y promoción de alternativas productivas sustentadas en su aprovechamiento. Se analizó la información secundaria de entidades como el Ministerio de Ambiente, Vivienda y Desarrollo Territorial, las Corporaciones Autónomas Regionales y Autoridades Ambientales Urbanas, el Instituto Colombiano de Desarrollo Rural-INCODER, las Autoridades Policiales, los Institutos de Investigación, el Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística, la Dirección de Impuestos y Aduanas Nacionales-DIAN, el Ministerio de Comercio, Industria y Turismo, y PROEXPORT. entre otras. En Colombia, el comercio de especies de fauna silvestre está centrado principalmente en la extracción de ejemplares de forma ilegal, lo cual ha generado desequilibrios en las poblaciones naturales y ha repercutido en el deterioro de la dinámica de los ecosistemas. El comercio legal de fauna silvestre se basa en la producción de unas pocas especies entre las que se destacan la babilla (Caiman crocodilus, el chigüiro (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, cerca de 200 especies de peces ornamentales y en menor medida el lobo pollero (Tupinambis nigropunctatus, la iguana (Iguana iguana, la boa (Boa constrictor, escarabajos (Dynastes hercules y mariposas. En el país no se tiene información exacta sobre el número de incautaciones realizadas en los operativos de control al tráfico ilegal de fauna, y no existe un conocimiento de la dinámica de este comercio ilegal.This work offers a current view on the activities related to the trade of derived from the wildlife species in Colombia, approaching the topic from the development that has had its productive activity

  2. Roadkills of vertebrates in Venezuela Vertebrados mortos em estradas na Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pinowski

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of vertebrate roadkills in five different habitats of tropical South America. Observations of vertebrate roadkills were conducted in 1978, on a 572 km road between Caracas and Mantecal/Apure in Venezuela, during the rainy season (June-October. During five passages on this route, which includes five distinct habitats, 79 vertebrate carcasses - mammals and reptiles - were found. If we assume that the carcasses remain for two days on the road, vehicles can be expected to strike 350 spectacled caimans Caiman crocodilus Linnaeus, 1758 (Alligatoridae during the rainy season alone. Similar calculations for other species yield 313 snakes and lizards, 294 opossums Didelphis marsupialis Linnaeus, 1758 (Didelphidae, 220 crab-eating foxes Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1776 (Canidae, 129 tamanduas Tamandua tetradactyla (Linnaeus, 1758 (Myrmecophagidae, 55 capybaras Hydrochaerus hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766 (Hydrochaeridae and 37 eastern cottontails Sylvilagus floridanus Allen, 1890 (Leporidae. Numerous papers have been published on vertebrates killed by vehicles on roads in Europe, North America, and Australia, and several papers are available regarding vertebrate roadkills in Africa and Asia. From South America there are several papers on vertebrates, birds, and mammals, whereas from Venezuela only one and it deals with iguanas (Iguana iguana Linnaeus, 1758, Iguanidae.Este trabalho apresenta uma análise de vertebrados mortos em estrada em cinco habitats tropicais diferentes na América do Sul. As observações dos vertebrados mortos em estrada foram feitas em 1978, a 572 km da rodovia entre Caracas e Mantecal/Apure na Venezuela, durante a estação das chuvas (junho-outubro. Durante cinco passagens nesta rota, a qual inclui cinco habitats diferentes, foram encontradas 79 carcaças de vertebrados - répteis e mamíferos. Assumindo que as carcaças permaneçam por dois dias na estrada, é esperado que veículos matem 350

  3. Identification of a novel splicing form of amelogenin gene in a reptile, Ctenosaura similis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinping Wang

    Full Text Available Amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein in tooth development, has been demonstrated to play a significant role in tooth enamel formation. Previous studies have identified the alternative splicing of amelogenin in many mammalian vertebrates as one mechanism for amelogenin heterogeneous expression in teeth. While amelogenin and its splicing forms in mammalian vertebrates have been cloned and sequenced, the amelogenin gene, especially its splicing forms in non-mammalian species, remains largely unknown. To better understand the mechanism underlying amelogenin evolution, we previously cloned and characterized an amelogenin gene sequence from a squamate, the green iguana. In this study, we employed RT-PCR to amplify the amelogenin gene from the black spiny-tailed iguana Ctenosaura similis teeth, and discovered a novel splicing form of the amelogenin gene. The transcript of the newly identified iguana amelogenin gene (named C. Similis-T2L is 873 nucleotides long encoding an expected polypeptide of 206 amino acids. The C. Similis-T2L contains a unique exon denominated exon X, which is located between exon 5 and exon 6. The C. Similis-T2L contains 7 exons including exon 1, 2, 3, 5, X, 6, and 7. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structures of T2L amelogenin protein demonstrated that exon X has a dramatic effect on the amelogenin structures. This is the first report to provide definitive evidence for the amelogenin alternative splicing in non-mammalian vertebrates, revealing a unique exon X and the splicing form of the amelogenin gene transcript in Ctenosaura similis.

  4. Atlas de Tupinambis rufescens (Squamata: teiidae) : Anatomía externa, osteología y bibliografía

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Ricardo; Abdala de Aredez, Virginia; Moro, Silvia Alejandra

    2004-01-01

    Los lagartos que en Argentina se conocen como «iguana roja» o «caraguay» pertenecen al género Tupinambis, uno de los saurios de mayor talla del continente; tienen importancia económica, tanto por su cuero como por su carne. Se reconocen seis especies actuales, que se distribuyen en América del Sur desde Colombia hasta el norte de la Patagonia, Argentina (Cei, 1993). Por su amplia distribución y abundancia son utilizados como animales de laboratorio por lo que es importante el conocimiento det...

  5. Atlas de Tupinambis rufescens (Squamata: Teiidae). Anatomía externa, osteología y bibliografía

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Ricardo; Abdala,Virginia; Moro,Silvia; Gallardo, Gabriela

    2004-01-01

    Los lagartos que en Argentina se conocen como "iguana roja" o "caraguay" pertenecen al género Tupinambis, uno de los saurios de mayor talla del continente; tienen importancia económica, tanto por su cuero como por su carne. Se reconocen seis especies actuales, que se distribuyen en América del Sur desde Colombia hasta el norte de la Patagonia, Argentina (Cei, 1993). Por su amplia distribución y abundancia son utilizados como animales de laboratorio por lo que es importante el conocimiento det...

  6. An Outline of Biological Hazards to Swimmers in Tropical and Subtropical Waters,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-08-01

    wounds. A threat of awe-inspiring but uncertain importance is the killer whale , Gra ’npus orca , which is found in all oceans and seas. Facetiously it has...been said that no one has reported being bitten by a killer whale ; authenticated cases of attacks on humans are unknow n to this author , though the...seen fording a stream; the only ones regularly entering the ocean are the harmless marine iguanas of the Galapagos Islands. It is assumed tha t

  7. Atlas de Tupinambis rufescens (Squamata: Teiidae). Anatomía externa, osteología y bibliografía

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Ricardo; Abdala, Virginia; Moro,Silvia; Gallardo, Gabriela

    2004-01-01

    Los lagartos que en Argentina se conocen como "iguana roja" o "caraguay" pertenecen al género Tupinambis, uno de los saurios de mayor talla del continente; tienen importancia económica, tanto por su cuero como por su carne. Se reconocen seis especies actuales, que se distribuyen en América del Sur desde Colombia hasta el norte de la Patagonia, Argentina (Cei, 1993). Por su amplia distribución y abundancia son utilizados como animales de laboratorio por lo que es importante el conocimiento det...

  8. Atlas de Tupinambis rufescens (Squamata: teiidae) : Anatomía externa, osteología y bibliografía

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Ricardo; Abdala de Aredez, Virginia; Moro, Silvia Alejandra

    2004-01-01

    Los lagartos que en Argentina se conocen como «iguana roja» o «caraguay» pertenecen al género Tupinambis, uno de los saurios de mayor talla del continente; tienen importancia económica, tanto por su cuero como por su carne. Se reconocen seis especies actuales, que se distribuyen en América del Sur desde Colombia hasta el norte de la Patagonia, Argentina (Cei, 1993). Por su amplia distribución y abundancia son utilizados como animales de laboratorio por lo que es importante el conocimiento det...

  9. 8 Pets That Pose Maior Health Threats to Kids%8种威胁孩子健康的宠物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nancy Shute

    2008-01-01

    @@ That iguana in your son's bedroom isn't just a reptile.It's also a deadly-germ machine. So says the American Academy of Pediatrics,which warns parents that many of the"easy"pets-the ones that don't shed,don't need to be walked,and don't throw up on the sofa-pose serious health threats to young children.And here I was so ready to convince my daughter that lizards are almost as cuddly as a Beverly Hills Chihuahua.

  10. Acetaminophen and zinc phosphide for lethal management of invasive lizards Ctenosaura similis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael L. AVERY; John D. EISEMANN; Kandy L. KEACHER; Peter J. SAVARIE

    2011-01-01

    Reducing populations of invasive lizards through trapping and shooting is feasible in many cases but effective integrated management relies on a variety of tools,including toxicants.In Florida,using wild-caught non-native black spiny-tailed iguanas Ctenosaura similis,we screened acetaminophen and zinc phosphide to determine their suitability for effective population management of this prolific invasive species.Of the animals that received acetaminophen,none died except at the highest test dose,240 mg per lizard,which is not practical for field use.Zinc phosphide produced 100% mortality at dose levels as little as 25 mg per lizard,equivalent to about 0.5% in bait which is lower than currently used in commercial baits for eommensal rodent control.We conclude that zinc phosphide has potential as a useful tool for reducing populations of invasive lizards such as the black spiny-tailed iguana provided target-selective delivery methods are developed [Current Zoology 57 (5):625-629,2011].

  11. A new species of Neosilba (Diptera, Lonchaeidae from Brazil Uma nova espécie de Neosilba (Diptera, Lonchaeidae do Brasil

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    Pedro C. Strikis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Neosilba McAlpine, 1962, N. pradoi sp. nov., is described and illustrated. This new species was found in the south of Brazil (Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, in the southeast (State of São Paulo and center west (State of Mato Grosso do Sul. It has been reared from fruits of guava (Psidium guajava, Myrtaceae, "araçá" (Psidium cattleyanum, Myrtaceae, "guabiroba" (Campomanesia xanthocarpa, Myrtaceae, Surinam cherry (Malpighia emarginata, Malpighiaceae, cherry (Prunus avium, Rosaceae, orange (Citrus sinensis, Rutaceae, "ingá" (Inga laurina, Fabaceae, "esporão-de-galo" (Celtis iguanae, Ulmaceae and passion fruit (Passiflora edulis, Passifloraceae.Uma nova espécie de Neosilba McAlpine, 1962, N. pradoi sp. nov., é descrita e ilustrada. Esta nova espécie foi encontrada no sul do Brasil (Rio Grande do Sul e Santa Catarina, no sudeste (Estado de São Paulo e na região centro-oeste (Estado do Mato Grosso do Sul. Foi obtida de frutos de goiaba (Psidium guajava, Myrtaceae, araçá (Psidium cattleyanum, Myrtaceae, guabiroba (Campomanesia xanthocarpa, Myrtaceae, acerola (Malpighia emarginata, Malpighiaceae, cereja (Prunus avium, Rosaceae, laranja (Citrus sinensis, Rutaceae, ingá (Inga laurina, Fabaceae, esporão-de-galo (Celtis iguanae, Ulmaceae e maracujá (Passiflora edulis, Passifloraceae.

  12. Conserved sex chromosomes across adaptively radiated Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-07-01

    Vertebrates possess diverse sex-determining systems, which differ in evolutionary stability among particular groups. It has been suggested that poikilotherms possess more frequent turnovers of sex chromosomes than homoiotherms, whose effective thermoregulation can prevent the emergence of the sex reversals induced by environmental temperature. Squamate reptiles used to be regarded as a group with an extensive variability in sex determination; however, we document how the rather old radiation of lizards from the genus Anolis, known for exceptional ecomorphological variability, was connected with stability in sex chromosomes. We found that 18 tested species, representing most of the phylogenetic diversity of the genus, share the gene content of their X chromosomes. Furthermore, we discovered homologous sex chromosomes in species of two genera (Sceloporus and Petrosaurus) from the family Phrynosomatidae, serving here as an outgroup to Anolis. We can conclude that the origin of sex chromosomes within iguanas largely predates the Anolis radiation and that the sex chromosomes of iguanas remained conserved for a significant part of their evolutionary history. Next to therian mammals and birds, Anolis lizards therefore represent another adaptively radiated amniote clade with conserved sex chromosomes. We argue that the evolutionary stability of sex-determining systems may reflect an advanced stage of differentiation of sex chromosomes rather than thermoregulation strategy.

  13. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. PMID:26702042

  14. Ticks infesting amphibians and reptiles in Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil Carrapatos infestando anfíbios e répteis em Pernambuco, Nordeste do Brasil

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    Filipe Dantas-Torres

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ticks infesting amphibians and reptiles in the State of Pernambuco are reviewed, based on the current literature and new collections recently carried out by the authors. To date, three tick species have been found on amphibians and reptiles in Pernambuco. Amblyomma fuscum appears to be exclusively associated with Boa constrictor, its type host. Amblyomma rotundatum has a relatively low host-specificity, being found on toads, snakes, and iguana. Amblyomma dissimile has been found on a lizard and also small mammals (i.e., rodents and marsupials. New tick-host associations and locality records are given.Os carrapatos encontrados infestando anfíbios e répteis no Estado de Pernambuco são revisados com base na literatura atual e em novas coletas realizadas recentemente pelos autores. Até o momento, três espécies de carrapatos foram encontradas sobre anfíbios e répteis em Pernambuco. Amblyomma fuscum parece estar exclusivamente associado à Boa constrictor, seu hospedeiro-tipo. Amblyomma rotundatum tem uma especificidade parasitária relativamente baixa, sendo encontrado em sapos, serpentes e iguana. Amblyomma dissimile já foi encontrado sobre um lagarto e também sobre pequenos mamíferos (isto é, roedores e marsupiais. Novas associações carrapato-hospedeiro e novos registros de localidades são apresentados.

  15. A taxonomic revision of small neotropical saurian Malarias allied to Plasmodium minasense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, S R

    1979-01-01

    Saurian malaria species which produce schizonts smaller than normal erythrocyte nuclei, with 4-8 merozoietes and gametocytes equal to or smaller than erythrocyte nuclei in size, parasitizing hosts of the lizard families Scincidae, Iguanidae and Teiidae in the Neotropics are considered to be Plasmodium minasense Carini and Rudolph, 1912. Subspecific designations are given to distinctive populations parasitizing different host species: P. minasense minasense is recognized from the type host, Mabuya mabouya of Brasil; P. minasense carinii Leger and Mouzels, 1917 from Iguana iguana of coastal South America; P. minasense anolisi subsp. nov. from Anolis limifrons of Panama; P. minasense capitoi subsp. nov. from Anolis capito of Panama; P. minasense plicae subsp. nov. from Plica umbra of Guyana; P. minasense tegui subsp. nov. from Tupinambis teguixin of Venezuela; and P. minasense diminutivum Telford, 1973, new combination, from Ameiva ameiva of Panama. Plasmodium rhadinurum Thompson and Huff, 1944 is recognized as a distinct species at present on the basis of possessing schizonts of different shape, asexual stages with filamentous projections in most portions of its range, and larger gametocytes, as well as apparent sympatry with P. minasense carinii in some areas.

  16. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms.

  17. Animal-based medicines used in ethnoveterinary practices in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil

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    Wedson M.S. Souto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work documents the zootherapeutic practices in Ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM of Pedra Lavrada (6°45'S, 36°28'W, Northeastern Brazil. We interviewed 23 people (22 men and 1 woman, who provided information on animal species used as remedies, body parts used to prepare the remedies, and illnesses for which the remedies were prescribed. We calculated the use-value to determine the most important species. Interviewees cited 11 animal taxa. The main species mentioned were ram - Ovis aries (UV=0.89, crab-eating fox - Cerdocyon thous (UV=0.79, common green iguana - Iguana iguana (UV=0.79, and South American rattlesnake - Caudisona durissa (Linnaeus, 1758 (UV=0.74. The most frequently cited treatments concerned to inflammatory and dermatological ailments or conditions, as well as to obstetric disorders. Similar to other studies, local ethnoveterinary establishes connections with human ethnomedicine. The results suggest that similarities in the repertoire of medicinal resources chosen by local residents reflect the local accessibility/availability of the resources. Our results help to preserve ethnoveterinary knowledge, which is important in enhancing our understanding on the relationship among humans, society and nature, and also to elaborate more effective strategies for conserving natural resources. Other studies for scientific validation of the effects and side effects of these zootherapeutic products are needed before they can be recommended or not for use.Este trabalho registra as práticas zooterapêuticas na medicina etnoveterinária no município de Pedra Lavrada, Nordeste do Brasil. Entrevistaram-se 23 pessoas (22 homens e uma mulher os quais forneceram informações sobre as espécies usadas como remédios, as partes do corpo usadas para preparar os remédios e as doenças tratadas. Calculou-se o Valor de Uso a fim de determinar quais espécies eram mais importantes. Os entrevistados reportaram 11 animais usados medicinalmente. As

  18. Salmonella serotypes in reptiles and humans, French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Noellie; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; de Thoisy, Benoit; Berger, Franck

    2014-05-14

    In French Guiana, a French overseas territory located in the South American northern coast, nearly 50% of Salmonella serotypes isolated from human infections belong to serotypes rarely encountered in metropolitan France. A reptilian source of contamination has been investigated. Between April and June 2011, in the area around Cayenne, 151 reptiles were collected: 38 lizards, 37 snakes, 32 turtles, 23 green iguanas and 21 caimans. Cloacal swab samples were collected and cultured. Isolated Salmonella strains were identified biochemically and serotyped. The overall carriage frequency of carriage was 23.2% (95% confidence interval: 16.7-30.4) with 23 serotyped strains. The frequency of Salmonella carriage was significantly higher for wild reptiles. Near two-thirds of the Salmonella serotypes isolated from reptiles were also isolated from patients in French Guiana. Our results highlight the risk associated with the handling and consumption of reptiles and their role in the spread of Salmonella in the environment.

  19. Selection and implementation of a flagship fleet in a locally undervalued region of high endemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Meredith; Armesto, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Flagships are one conservation education tool. We present a proposed flagship species fleet for environmental education in central Chile. Our methods followed recent flagship guidelines. We present our selection process and a detailed justification for the fleet of flagship species that we selected. Our results are a list of eight flagship species forming a flagship fleet, including two small- and medium-sized mammals, the degu (Octodon degus) and the culpeo fox (Lycalopex culpeaus), two birds, the turca (Pteroptochos megapoidius) and the burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia), the Chilean iguana (Calopistes palluma), the tarantula (Grammostola mollicoma), and two trees, the litre (Lithrea caustica) and the espino (Acacia caven). We then describe how these flagships can be deployed most effectively, describing their audience, effective narrative frames, and modes of presentation. We conclude that general selection rules paired with social science background data allow for an efficient selection process.

  20. “Getting Past the Stereotypes: Women and Motorcycles in Recent Lesbian Novels”

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    Sarah Boslaugh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Although many American women ride motorcycles, their stories seldom appear in cultural references to motorcycling. The two dominant motorcycling images in popular American culture are that of biker gangs, and that of individuals or close friends on road trips. In both cases, women are primarily excluded or relegated to marginal roles. However, in lesbian culture richer stories about women and motorcycling are common. This article looks at how five recent lesbian novels (Shy Girl, with child, Midas Touch, Flaming Iguanas and Hoochie Mama draw on conventions of male-dominated motorcycle stories, but reinterpret and and subvert them in order to tell stories about women and motorcycling in which the female characters are the central concern.

  1. A new Psammogammarus (Amphipoda: Eriopisidae) from anchialine pools on the Exuma Cays, Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume, Damià; Iliffe, Thomas M; Van Der Ham, Joris L

    2013-01-01

    Psammogammarus lucayensis sp. nov. is described from anchialine pools on Little Iguana Cay (Exuma Cays, Great Bahama Bank). It can be easily distinguished from the other 14 members of the genus by the combination of: 1) carpus of G2 longer than broad; 2) male G2 palm margin non-excavated, evenly convex and devoid of strong mid-palmar robust setae; 3) basis of P7 with subparallel margins; 4) armature arrangement of ventral margin of epimeral plates as 0-2-3; 5) posteroventral angle of epimeral plate III strongly produced; 6) protopod of U2 with distomedial angle armed with comb of 3-4 robust setae; 7) U3 endopod as long as exp1; and 8) telson with robust setae on tip. The generic diagnosis is amended in order to allow the precise characterization of members of Psammogammarus compared to other eriopisids.

  2. Atlas de Tupinambis rufescens (Squamata: Teiidae. Anatomía externa, osteología y bibliografía

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    Montero, Ricardo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Los lagartos que en Argentina se conocen como "iguana roja" o "caraguay" pertenecen al género Tupinambis, uno de los saurios de mayor talla del continente; tienen importancia económica, tanto por su cuero como por su carne. Se reconocen seis especies actuales, que se distribuyen en América del Sur desde Colombia hasta el norte de la Patagonia, Argentina (Cei, 1993. Por su amplia distribución y abundancia son utilizados como animales de laboratorio por lo que es importante el conocimiento detallado de su anatomía. Es por ello que aquí presentamos en un Atlas fotográfico la morfología externa y osteología de Tupinambis rufescens.

  3. Osteomyelitis due to Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae: the price of exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, S; Itsekzon, T; Yinnon, A M; Lachish, T

    2012-02-01

    We describe a 31-year-old immunocompromised patient who developed sepsis and osteomyelitis due to Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae secondary to exposure to iguana and snakes kept as pets at her home, and review all 23 previously published cases of bone and joint infections due to this organism, for a total of nine children and 15 adults. Eleven of the adults were female (73%), compared with three (33%) of the children (p child only (17%) (p child only (11%, p <0.01). Antibiotic therapy was prolonged in both adults and children, and in most cases consisted of 4-6 weeks of parenteral treatment. Complete cure and survival was attained in 11 of 15 adults (73%) and all nine children (NS). Optimal antibiotic treatment probably consists of ceftriaxone or a fluoroquinolone, if the organism is susceptible.

  4. New Entamoeba group in howler monkeys (Alouatta spp.) associated with parasites of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-García, Claudia; Gordillo-Chávez, Elías José; Baños-Ojeda, Carlos; Rendón-Franco, Emilio; Muñoz-García, Claudia Irais; Carrero, Julio César; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex; Maravilla, Pablo; Galian, José; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando; Villalobos, Guiehdani

    2017-08-01

    Our knowledge of the parasite species present in wildlife hosts is incomplete. Protozoans such as amoebae of the genus Entamoeba infect a large variety of vertebrate species, including NHPs. However, traditionally, their identification has been accomplished through microscopic evaluation; therefore, amoeba species have not always been identified correctly. We searched for Entamoeba spp. using a fragment of the small subunit rDNA in free-ranging howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata and A. pigra) from southeast Mexico. One hundred fifty five samples were collected, with 46 from A. palliata and 109 from A. pigra and 8 of the total samples were positive. We detected a new clade of Entamoeba, which was separated from other described species but closer to E. insolita, as well as an unnamed sequence typically found in iguana species with low shared identity values (<90%). We designated this new clade as conditional lineage 8 (CL8) and we have shown that members of this group are not exclusive to reptiles.

  5. The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem of the Galapagos Marine Reserve: Energy flow structure and role of keystone groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Diego J.; Wolff, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    The Bolivar Channel Ecosystem (BCE) is among the most productive zones in the Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR). It is exposed to relatively cool, nutrient-rich waters of the Cromwell current, which are brought to the photic zone through topographic upwelling. The BCE is characterized by a heterogeneous rocky reef habitat covered by dense algae beds and inhabited by numerous invertebrate and fish species, which represent the food for higher predators including seals and sharks and exploited fish species. In addition, plankton and detritus based food chains channel large amounts of energy through the complex food web. Important emblematic species of the Galapagos archipelagos reside in this area such as the flightless cormorant, the Galapagos penguin and the marine iguanas. A trophic model of BCE was constructed for the habitats barracudas should be emphasized for their great contribution to the trophic flows and biomass of the system.

  6. Carriage of antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria varies among sites in Galapagos reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Emily; Hong, Pei-Ying; Bedon, Lenin Cruz; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-01-01

    Increased overlap between humans and wildlife populations has increased the risk for novel disease emergence. Detecting contacts with a high risk for transmission of pathogens requires the identification of dependable measures of microbial exchange. We evaluated antibiotic resistance as a molecular marker for the intensity of human-wildlife microbial connectivity in the Galápagos Islands. We isolated Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from the feces of land iguanas (Conolophus sp.), marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), giant tortoises (Geochelone nigra), and seawater, and tested these bacteria with the use of the disk diffusion method for resistance to 10 antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were found in reptile feces from two tourism sites (Isla Plaza Sur and La Galapaguera on Isla San Cristóbal) and from seawater close to a public use beach near Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on Isla San Cristóbal. No resistance was detected at two protected beaches on more isolated islands (El Miedo on Isla Santa Fe and Cape Douglas on Isla Fernandina) and at a coastal tourism site (La Lobería on Isla San Cristóbal). Eighteen E. coli isolates from three locations, all sites relatively proximate to a port town, were resistant to ampicillin, doxycycline, tetracycline, and trimethoprin/sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, only five S. enterica isolates showed a mild decrease in susceptibility to doxycycline and tetracycline from these same sites (i.e., an intermediate resistance phenotype), but no clinical resistance was detected in this bacterial species. These findings suggest that reptiles living in closer proximity to humans potentially have higher exposure to bacteria of human origin; however, it is not clear from this study to what extent this potential exposure translates to ongoing exchange of bacterial strains or genetic traits. Resistance patterns and bacterial exchange in this system warrant further investigation to understand better how human associations

  7. Estudo evolutivo da anatomia das artérias coronárias em espécies de vertebrados com técnica de moldagem em acetato de vinil (vinilite

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    RODRIGUES Tânia Maria de Andrade

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho foram produzidos 30 moldes anatômicos de corações de vertebrados, visando contribuir para o estudo das artérias coronárias direita e esquerda de diferentes espécies: peixes, anfíbios, répteis, aves e mamíferos. Os corações foram injetados com acetato de vinil, submetidos a corrosão e semicorrosão pelo ácido clorídrico, a fim de evidenciar o padrão anatômico apresentado pelas artérias coronárias no tocante à evolução das espécies e adaptações morfológicas (estrutura e arquitetura. Com base na morfologia das peças estudadas foram obtidas as seguintes conclusões: a técnica utilizando acetato de vinil, associada à corrosão, mostrou-se eficaz na produção de modelos de coração de diferentes espécies, apresentando detalhamento capaz de permitir visibilização dos ramos colaterais, quando existentes; o número de estruturas e a complexidade vascular cardíaca aumenta na medida em que os seres evoluem na escala zoológica. No réptil iguana iguana foi encontrado ventrículo duplo com tríplice via de saída, como único padrão evolutivo da anatomia dos ventrículos e grandes vasos da base ainda não descrito como cardiopatia congênita em humanos.

  8. Salmonella in Brazilian and imported pet reptiles Salmonella em répteis de estimação nacionais e importados

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    Isabel Valéria Abalem de Sá

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of salmonellae in fecal samples or cloacal swabs of 97 pet reptiles (15 snakes, 24 lizards and 58 chelonians was investigated. Thirty seven animals had national origin and 60 were imported. Salmonella spp was detected in 39.1% of the reptiles, being 62.5% in lizards, 53.3% in snakes and 25.8% in chelonians. Strains belonged to subspecies I (44.7%, II (10.5%, IIIa (5.2%, IIIb (21.0% and IV (18.5% of the enterica species, with predominance (55.3% of subspecies usually found in cold-blooded animals (II to IV. In the subspecies I, the serovars Albany, Enteritidis and Typhimurium predominated. The Trachemys scripta elegans imported turtles corresponded to 93.3% (14/15 of the salmonellae-positive chelonians. The national iguanas presented a high rate of colonization (77.7% - 7/9. These animals pose a potencial risk to the human health, demanding sanitary control and more information to the public.A presença de salmonelas em amostras de fezes ou swabs cloacais de 97 répteis de estimação (15 cobras, 24 lagartos e 58 quelônios, dos quais 37 eram de origem nacional e 60 importados, foi investigada. Salmonella spp foi detectada em 39,1% dos répteis estudados, sendo 62,5% em lagartos, 53,3% em cobras e 25,8% em quelônios. Foram caracterizadas as subespécies I (44,7%, II (10,5%, IIIa (5,2%, IIIb (21,0% e IV (18,5% da espécie enterica, com predominância (55,3% das subespécies habitualmente encontradas em animais de sangue frio (II a IV. Na subespécie I, houve maior freqüência dos sorovares Albany, Enteritidis e Typhimurium. As tartarugas importadas Trachemys scripta elegans corresponderam a 93,3% dos quelônios portadores de salmonelas. Os iguanas nacionais apresentaram elevado índice de colonização (77,7% - 7/9. Conclui-se que esses animais apresentam risco potencial à saúde humana, havendo necessidade de controle sanitário e maior esclarecimento ao público.

  9. Corrección de "labio ondulado" en el síndrome de Melkersson-Rosenthal Upper lip "ruffle deformity" correction in Melkerson- Rosenthal's syndrome

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    C. Gutiérrez Gómez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome de Melkersson-Rosenthal es una entidad rara caracterizada por edema granulomatoso orofacial, episodios de parálisis facial y lengua plegada. La presentación monosintomática de labios se denomina queilitis granulomatosa de Miescher. Clásicamente se ha tratado con múltiples medicamentos con respuesta parcial o insatisfactoria, por lo que el tratamiento ideal es el quirúrgico, que obtiene resultados permanentes y permite al paciente relaciones interpersonales satisfactorias. Sin embargo la corrección propuesta por los diferentes autores disminuye el grosor del labio a expensas de dejar un estigma de deformidad de labio "ondulado" ya que no se acorta el labio en sentido transverso y únicamente se adelgaza. El presente artículo describe el tratamiento propuesto para corregir esta deformidad mediante la resección en bloque del tercio medio del labio superior. Además hace referencia a la afectación del cuello en el caso que presentamos, no descrita en la bibliografía actual al respecto, que daba al paciente un aspecto de cuello de "iguana", y que fue corregida mediante resección en huso y liposucción.Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome is a rare entity characterized by granulomatous orofacial swelling, recurrent facial palsy and lingua plicata. It's monosyntomatic form affecting only lips is known as Miescher granulomatous cheilitis. Many conservative treatments have been proposed to resolve the swelling; however many times they present recurrence or fail to respond. The surgical correction permit permanent improvement and better appearance. The surgical posterior reduction cheiloplastry removing mucosa and submucosa all along the lip proposed by several authors, gives the lips an stigma of the " ruffle" aspect; this is because there is no shortening of the total length of the previously enlarged lip because of the granulomatous swelling. We report the correction of this deformity by total thickness resection of the middle third

  10. The international trade in reptiles (Reptilia)--the cause of the transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) to Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena

    2010-05-11

    The problem of the unnatural transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland is presented. In the period from 2003 to 2007, 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The reptiles most infested with ticks are imported to Poland from Ghana in Africa, and are the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius. As a result of the investigations, the transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland was confirmed. There were 2104 specimens of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Donitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum (Schulze, 1941), Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma sp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Amblyomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed in the ticks A. flavomaculatum, A. latum and H. aegyptium. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological considerations, and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland.

  11. USE OF REPTILES BETWEEN YOREMES AND YORIS IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF EL FUERTE, SINALOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pascual-Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an ethnozoological study about the use of wild vertebrate in 11 indigenous communities of the municipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa, México, the reptiles were the third group the of local wildlife most used after birds and mammals. The purpose of this study was to characterize and describe the use of wild reptiles that are hunted both indigenous (called Yoremes and mestizo people (called Yoris. 58% of hunters belonged to the May-Yoreme ethnicity, and the rest were mestizos. Nine species of reptiles, of which 44% are in a risk category, were recorded. The hunters said they hunted between one and three species, which were recorded for up to five uses, of which the most common were food, medicinal and handcrafts. The most important species were the rattlesnake, green and black iguanas, although evidence for food use Turtle River, and to a lesser extent, the olive ridley turtle is endangered found. Knowledge of the hunted species of reptiles and their uses will take another step towards managing cultural and subsistence harvesting in indigenous communities in northern Sinaloa.

  12. Diet of the grass lizard Microlophus thoracicus icae in the Ica river valley, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pérez Z.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The diet of grass lizard, Microlophus thoracicus icae, was evaluated in three localities of the Ica River Valley, Peru. The dietary pattern was characterized by high consumption of vegetable material, mainly Prosopis spp. leaves, and invertebrates as ants and insect larvae. No significant relationships were found between body size, number of prey eaten or volume consumed. The juvenile, male and female M. t. icae not showed significant differences regarding number of ants or insect larvae consumed, neither on the proportion consumed of plant material. However, total volume of plant material was different between males and females, compared to juveniles. Multivariate analysis showed no evident difference in the diets of juveniles, males and females. Trophic niche amplitude for M. t. icae was Bij = 6.97. The consumption of plant material and invertebrates is important for both juvenile and adult iguanas, therefore; no clear age difference in diet was observed in the individuals studied. This species would present great diet plasticity (omnivory influenced by the local variation of food resources. Possible consequences of a varied diet may include particular characteristics of its parasites, foraging strategies and efficiency, thermoregulation, morphology, among others.

  13. Ignominy:a Tool for Software Dependency and Metric Analysis with Examples from Large HEP Packages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LassiA.Tuura; LucasTaylor

    2001-01-01

    Ignominy is a tool developed in the CMS IGUANA project to analyse the structure of software systems.Its primary component is a dependency scanner that distills information into human-usable forms.It also includes several tools to visualise the collected data in the form of graphical views and numerical metrics.Ignominy was designed to adapt to almost any reasonable structure,and it has been used to analyse several large projects. The original purpose of Ignominy was to help us better ensure the quality of our own software,and in particular warn us about possible structureal problems early on .As a part of this activity it is now used as a standard part of our release procedure,we also use it to evaluate and study the quality of external packages we plan to make use of .We describe what Ignominy can find out,and how if can be used to ivsualise and assess a software structure.We also discuss the inherent problems of the analysis as well as the different approaches to modularity the tool makes quite evident.The focus is the illustration of these issues through the analysis results for several sizable HEP softwre projects.

  14. Prototype for a Generic Thin—Client Remote Analysis Environment for CMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.D.Steenberg; J.J.Bunn; 等

    2001-01-01

    The multi-tiered architecture of the highly-distributed CMS computing systems necessitates a flexible data distribution and analysis environment.We describe a prototype analysis environment which functions efficiently over wide area networks using a server installed at the Caltech/UCSD Tier 2 prototype to analyze CMS data stored at various locations using a thin client.The analysis environnment is based on existing HEP(Anaphe) and CMOS(CARF,ORCA,IGUANA)software thchnology on the server acessed from a variety of clients.A Java Analysis Studio (JAS,from SLAC)plug-in is being developed as a reference client.The server is operated as "Black box"on the proto-Tier2 system.ORCA Objectivity databases(e.g.an existing large CMS Muon sample)are hosted on the master and slave nodes,and remote clients can request processing of queries across the server nodes ,and get the histogram results returned and rendered in the client.The server is implemented using pure C++,and use XML-RPC as a language-neutral transport.This has several benefits,including much better scalability,better integration with CARF/ORCA,and importanly,Makes the work directly useful to other non-java general-purpose analysis and presentation tools such as Hippodraw,Lizard.or ROOT.

  15. HL7标准下的医疗信息系统融合%The Fusion for Health Care Information System Based on HL7 Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡晓白

    2012-01-01

    简要介绍HL7标准,分析HL7的消息结构、消息构造与解析、HL7引擎的服务器与客户端体系模块,并从中间件的角度研究HL7应用的实现技术及其可以利用的资源,包括TinyXML,Chameleon,SOCKET套接字接口,Iguana。为分布式的异构医疗信息系统整合提出一个基于中间件技术的解决方案。%The paper briefly introduces HL7 standard,analyzes the message structure,message construction and analysis,server and client system of HL7 engine,studies the realization technologies of HL7 application from the aspect of middleware,as well as available resources, including TinyXML,Chameleon,SOCKET interface,Iguana.It provides a middleware technology bated solution for distributed and different structured health care information system integration.

  16. Savremeno naoružanje i vojna oprema za broj 2-2007 / Modern weapons and military equipment for issue 2-2007 / Современное вооружение и военное оборудование за но. 2-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Krbavac

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Poboljšani karabin HK 417; Laki automatski lanseri granata L134A1; Bacač granata M100 GREM; Automatski minobacački sistem za upravljanje vatrom Scorpion; Laki PA raketni lanseri MST; Novi kineski prenosni PA raketni sistemi; Troslojni protivraketni odbrambeni sistem; Brodski PA raketni sistem Štilj-1; Izvozni helikopteri kompanije Kamov; Bespilotna letelica za lociranje radarskih signala; Nove varijante bespilotnih letelica Predator; Oklopni transporteri BTR-80UP za iračku armiju; Poboljšana varijanta oklopnog transportera Iguana; Novi inžinjerijski tenkovski sistem Velike Britanije; Inžinjerijsko borbeno vozilo Terrier; Kamioni i tegljači KAMAZ; Osmatračka vozila Fennek za holandsku armiju; Dansko sanitetsko vozilo DURO III P 6×6; Podvodne mine M2004; Radio-uređaj jurišne pešadije Eagle; Uređaj za noćno osmatranje Pathfinder; Sredstva za zaštitu vazduhoplova i zemaljskih borbenih sistema; Provera sintetičkih goriva na bombarderu B-52 H.

  17. Galapagos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Zebrafish mutations in Gli-mediated hedgehog signaling lead to lens transdifferentiation from the adenohypophysis anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, H; Uchikawa, M; Yoda, H; Takeda, H; Furutani-Seiki, M; Karlstrom, R O

    2000-09-01

    It is known that the earliest lens marker delta-crystallin is expressed abundantly in Rathke's pouch of the chicken, suggesting a close relationship between the cell states of the adenohypophysis (pituitary) anlage and the early lens. We show here that the zebrafish midline mutants you-too (yot) and iguana (igu) develop lenses from the adenohypophysis anlage. The early adenohypophysis anlage of normal zebrafish expresses lim3 and six3 but in yot(ty119) mutants the anterior part of the anlage lacks lim3 expression, and instead produces a crystallin-expressing cell population which develops into a large lens structure expressing beta and gamma-crystallins, but is not associated with retina tissues. Among the zebrafish mutants with midline defects, midline lenses were observed in two mutant alleles of yot and an allele of igu, but not in other mutants (syu, con, smh, dtr, uml, spi and lok). Two yot mutant alleles with midline lenses likely encode dominant negative forms of the Gli2 protein which will interfere with transcriptional activation by other Gli proteins. The observation argues that overall inhibition of Shh-Gli signaling leads the adenohypophysis anlage to transdifferentiate into lens.

  19. VICHADA: LA HOSPITALIDAD DEL ORINOCO. Pag. 150-157

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmer Velandia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Donde el cielo y la sabana se unen en el infinito, se vislumbra una sola montaña en la lejanía, parece un gigante, antiguo y oscuro al final de la inmensidad un “Tepuye”, después de unas cuantas horas de camino se acerca este gran anciano que data del precámbrico, pero no está solo. Se observan algunos compañeros iguales a él, se podrían considerar como los guardianes del imponente y hermoso Orinoko, considerado en lengua Sikuani como la gran serpiente enroscada acompañada de una gran riqueza paisajística cultural y biodiversa; bosques de galería, diferentes tipos de sabana, esteros, lagunas, morichales, bosques inundables, las que recorren aguas blancas, negras y mixtas, rodeadas por diferentes etnias y grupos indígenas como Piaroas, Sikuanis – Guahibos, Cuibas y Amoruas, que viven en forma pacífica con llaneros y colonos, orgullosos de estas tierras, amables y hospitalarios que desde hace muchos años comparten este paraíso con: bagres, pirañas, anguilas, rayas, arawanas, anacondas, ranas, sapos, caimanes, babos, iguanas, tortugas, loros, búhos, guacamayas, azucareros, pavones, paujiles, águilas, zamuros, aulladores, armadillos, ocarros, chigüiros, osos hormigueros, ocelotes, jaguares, nutrias, murciélagos, cuerpo espines, zorros, venados y delfines, que pasan sus días entre; cedros, moriches, saladillos, caraños, yarumos, laureles, caimos, guaduas, guamos, alcornoques, chaparros, arepillos, palmiches y gualtes.

  20. Quantification of layered patterns with structural anisotropy: a comparison of biological and geological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Smolyar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns evident from satellite images of aeolian landforms on Earth and other planets; those of intermediate scale in marine and terrestrial sand ripples and sediment profiles; and small-scale patterns such as lamellae in the bones of vertebrates and annuli in fish scales are each represented by layers of different thicknesses and lengths. Layered patterns are important because they form a record of the state of internal and external factors that regulate pattern formation in these geological and biological systems. It is therefore potentially possible to recognize trends, periodicities, and events in the history of the formation of these systems among the incremental sequences. Though the structures and sizes of these 2-D patterns are typically scale-free, they are also characteristically anisotropic; that is, the number of layers and their absolute thicknesses vary significantly during formation. The aim of the present work is to quantify the structure of layered patterns and to reveal similarities and differences in the processing and interpretation of layered landforms and biological systems. To reach this goal we used N-partite graph and Boolean functions to quantify the structure of layers and plot charts for “layer thickness vs. layer number” and “layer area vs. layer number”. These charts serve as a source of information about events in the history of formation of layered systems. The concept of synchronization of layer formation across a 2-D plane is introduced to develop the procedure for plotting “layer thickness vs. layer number” and “layer area vs. layer number”, which takes into account the structural anisotropy of layered patterns and increase signal-to-noise ratio in charts. Examples include landforms on Mars and Earth and incremental layers in human and iguana bones.

  1. Hedgehog signaling pathway and gastrointestinal stem cell signaling network (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-12-01

    Hedgehog, BMP/TGFbeta, FGF, WNT and Notch signaling pathways constitute the stem cell signaling network, which plays a key role in a variety of processes, such as embryogenesis, maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis, tissue repair during chronic persistent inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH), Indian hedgehog (IHH) and Desert hedgehog (DHH) bind to PTCH1/PTCH or PTCH2 receptor to release Smoothened (SMO) signal transducer from Patched-dependent suppression. SMO then activates STK36 serine/threonine kinase to stabilize GLI family members and to phosphorylate SUFU for nuclear accumulation of GLI. Hedgehog signaling activation leads to GLI-dependent transcriptional activation of target genes, such as GLI1, PTCH1, CCND2, FOXL1, JAG2 and SFRP1. GLI1-dependent positive feedback loop combined with PTCH1-dependent negative feedback loop gives rise to transient proliferation of Hedgehog target cells. Iguana homologs (DZIP1 and DZIP1L) and Costal-2 homologs (KIF7 and KIF27) are identified by comparative integromics. SHH-dependent parietal cell proliferation is implicated in gastric mucosal repair during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. BMP-RUNX3 signaling induces IHH expression in surface differentiated epithelial cells of stomach and intestine. Hedgehog signals from epithelial cells then induces FOXL1-mediated BMP4 upregulation in mesenchymal cells. Hedgehog signaling is frequently activated in esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer due to transcriptional upregulation of Hedgehog ligands and epigenetic silencing of HHIP1/HHIP gene, encoding the Hedgehog inhibitor. However, Hedgehog signaling is rarely activated in colorectal cancer due to negative regulation by the canonical WNT signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling molecules or targets, such as SHH, IHH, HHIP1, PTCH1 and GLI1, are applied as biomarkers for cancer diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics. Small-molecule inhibitors for SMO or STK36 are suitable to be used for

  2. Molecular characterization of trichomonads isolated from animal hosts in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B; Rivera, Windell L

    2013-09-23

    Trichomonads are amitochondrial anaerobic flagellated protists that are either parasites or commensals, generally living in the digestive or genitourinary tract of humans and animals. It has been reported that these protozoa can migrate to other sites in their target host, can adapt to new hosts, and are capable of zoonotic transmission. In this study, 59 trichomonad isolates from different animal hosts in the Philippines were identified and characterized. Primer sets were designed and were successful in amplifying the 18S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using neighbor-joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP), maximum-likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses. Results showed that BLAST analysis of the isolates corresponded to the clustering of the isolates together with reference sequences in the constructed ML tree. Cattle and pig isolates were most likely Tetratrichomonas buttreyi, which were observed to be commensal in both animals. All duck and rooster isolates were similar with Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. All dog isolates together with single isolates from boa, goat, and owl were identical to Pentatrichomonas hominis. Occurrence of P. hominis in Boa constrictor imperator (boa) and Otus megalotis (Philippine scops owl) suggested the adaptation of the trichomonad to new hosts. Reptile hosts were observed to harbor Trichomitus batrachorum or Hypotrichomonas acosta. Three reptile isolates (Igu2, Igu4, and Liz7) suggest novel species belonging to Class Hypotrichomonadea. Furthermore, iguanas were infected with T. batrachorum or H. acosta. Trichomonads in animal hosts are commensal and the mode of transmission is via fecal-oral route. They are capable of adaptation to new hosts and therefore, zoonotic transmission is possible as well as pathogenesis in host. Thus, trichomonads can pose threats to the health of humans and animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Colecta de frutales tropicales en El Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cruz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available El estudio tuvo como objetivo recolectar, caracterizar y establecer colecciones de frutales de: Pouteria sapota (zapote, Manilkara zapota (níspero, Psidium sp. (guayaba, Spondia sp. (jocote, Mammea americana (mamey. Se realizaron giras de exploración y recolección a las diferentes zonas del país, con mayor potencial para el cultivo de los frutales. Las características evaluadas fueron: peso, longitud, diámetro, porcentaje de germinación, número de semillas, sabor y color de pulpa, forma del fruto, color de cáscara, presencia de plagas y enfermedades, y análisis bromatológico. Los datos fueron analizados por estadística descriptiva para mínimo, máximo y media. Se distribuyeron árboles frutales para el establecimiento de las colecciones en los Centros de Innovación Tecnológica San Andrés, Izalco y Morazán. El zapote Magaña presentó frutos de mayor peso, longitud y diámetro, textura de pulpa bastante fibrosa. El Zapote Valiente presentó frutos con mayor contenido proteína y grasa de 2,65% y 0,77%. El Zapote Rivera presentó frutos con mayor contenido de carbohidratos, 32,15%. La Guayaba Miami roja, presentó mayor fibra cruda 3,72%. En jocote, las principales plagas y enfermedades fueron trips, mosca de la fruta y antracnosis. Se estableció una colección de jocote del tipo azucarón, verano, pitarrillo, chapín, invierno, iguana y tronador; el Centro Innovación Tecnológica de San Andrés, La Libertad

  4. Glycogen synthesis from lactate in skeletal muscle of the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T T

    1985-01-01

    The capacity of skeletal muscle to synthesize glycogen from lactate was tested in the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Like other reptiles, Dipsosaurus accumulates significant lactic acid concentrations following vigorous exercise. After 5 min of progressively faster treadmill running at 35 degrees C (final speed = 2.2 km/h), blood lactate concentration increased over 14 mM, which decreased 11 mM after 2 h of recovery. Blood glucose concentration remained unchanged throughout at 8.6 +/- 0.46 mM. The role that muscle gluconeogenesis might play in the removal of post-exercise lactate was evaluated. Animals were run to exhaustion at 1.5 km/h on a treadmill thermostatted at 35 degrees C. Animals (n = 43) ran 6.9 +/- 0.75 min prior to exhaustion. Animals were sacrificed and iliofibularis muscles of both hindlimbs removed and stimulated at 2 Hz for 5 min, reducing twitch tension to 6% of prestimulus tension. Fatigued muscles were then split into red and white fiber bundles and incubated 2 h or 5 h at 35 degrees C in Ringer solution or in Ringer plus 20 mM lactate. In muscles tested in August, red fiber bundles incubated in lactate demonstrated a rate of glycogen synthesis of approximately 1 mg/(g muscle . h). In muscles tested in December, red fiber bundles synthesized glycogen at a reduced rate that was not statistically different than in fiber bundles incubated in Ringer solution without lactate. Glycogen synthesis from lactate was not evident in white fiber bundles in either August or December. The period of peak gluconeogenic capacity coincides with the field active season of Dipsosaurus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Reptilian skeletal muscle: contractile properties of identified, single fast-twitch and slow fibers from the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T T; Johnston, I A

    1987-06-01

    Contractile properties and innervation patterns were determined in identified single fibers from the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Single fibers from both the red and white regions of the iliofibularis muscle were dissected along their length under oil and a portion was mounted on transducers for determination of maximum isometric tension (Po) and unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax) using the slack test method. Fibers were chemically skinned and activated by high Ca++. The remaining portion of the muscle fiber was mounted on a glass slide and histochemically treated to demonstrate myosin ATPase activity. Fibers studied functionally could therefore be classified as fast or slow according to their myosin ATPase activity, and they could also be classified metabolically according to the region of the muscle from which they were dissected. Fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers from the white region and fast-twitch oxidative, glycolytic (FOG) and slow fibers from the red region had shortening velocities at 25 degrees C of 7.5, 4.4, and 1.5 l X s-1, respectively. Po did not differ in the three fiber types, averaging 279 kN X m-2. In a second experiment, 10 microns sections were examined every 30 microns through the proximal-most 7.5 mm of the iliofibularis muscle for motor endplates. Sections were stained to demonstrate regions of acetylcholinesterase activity. Fibers with visible endplates were classified in serial sections by histochemical treatment for myosin ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. All slow fibers examined (n = 22) exhibited multiple endplates, averaging one every 725 microns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Quantification of layered patterns with structural anisotropy: a comparison of biological and geological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyar, I; Bromage, T; Wikelski, M

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale patterns evident from satellite images of aeolian landforms on Earth and other planets; those of intermediate scale in marine and terrestrial sand ripples and sediment profiles; and small-scale patterns such as lamellae in the bones of vertebrates and annuli in fish scales are each represented by layers of different thicknesses and lengths. Layered patterns are important because they form a record of the state of internal and external factors that regulate pattern formation in these geological and biological systems. It is therefore potentially possible to recognize trends, periodicities, and events in the history of the formation of these systems among the incremental sequences. Though the structures and sizes of these 2-D patterns are typically scale-free, they are also characteristically anisotropic; that is, the number of layers and their absolute thicknesses vary significantly during formation. The aim of the present work is to quantify the structure of layered patterns and to reveal similarities and differences in the processing and interpretation of layered landforms and biological systems. To reach this goal we used N-partite graph and Boolean functions to quantify the structure of layers and plot charts for "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number". These charts serve as a source of information about events in the history of formation of layered systems. The concept of synchronization of layer formation across a 2-D plane is introduced to develop the procedure for plotting "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number", which takes into account the structural anisotropy of layered patterns and increase signal-to-noise ratio in charts. Examples include landforms on Mars and Earth and incremental layers in human and iguana bones.

  7. Diagnóstico del tráfico ilegal y del manejo post decomiso de fauna silvestre en nueve corporaciones autónomas regionales de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montenefgro Olga Lucía

    2007-12-01

    infraestructura que existe en los CAV de las corporaciones autónomas regionales de Colombia para definir el destino final de la fauna silvestre incautada, siendo tres las opciones de manejo: mantenimiento en cautiverio, retorno a la vida silvestre y eutanasia. Por tal razón esta investigación pretende realizar un diagnóstico de las especies decomisadas por algunas Corporaciones Autónomas Regionales, su uso, los procedimientos de liberaciones y reintroducciones que se llevan a cabo en los CAV centros de atención y valoración de fauna silvestre y la localización geográfica de las liberaciones. Esto con el fin de disminuir la presión que existe sobre las poblaciones de fauna silvestre y de esta forma realizar un uso sostenible de la biodiversidad de Colombia. En este trabajo se realiza un diagnóstico del tráfico ilegal de fauna silvestre en nueve corporaciones autónomas regionales de
    Colombia durante los años 2004 a 2006, así como también el manejo postdecomiso efectuado por cada
    corporación. La información fue suministrada por cada entidad mediante una encuesta y visitas a las corporaciones. Se registraron un total de 60.511 especímenes decomisados, dentro de los cuales 583 corresponden a pieles, 36.653 a huevos de iguana (Iguana iguana y tortuga y 23.178 a animales vivos. En cuanto
    a carne se tienen decomisos un total de 12.621 kg correspondientes a carne de chigüiro (Hydrochaerus
    hydrochaeris. Se observa que en la mayoría de corporaciones las especies con mayor número de decomisos fueron la Hicotea (Trachemys callirostris, el Perico real (Brotogeris jugularis y la ardilla (Sciurus sp.. El volumen de tráfico presentado en el periodo de 2004 a 2006 es alto con un total de 60.511 ejemplares decomisados. Si se compara con la información disponible para años anteriores (Procuraduría, 2006, en donde
    para el periodo abarcado entre los años 1996 y 2000 se decomisaron un total de 73.061 ejemplares correspondientes a 11 corporaciones aut

  8. Tennessee Williams’s post-pastoral Southern gardens in text and on the movie screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taïna Tuhkunen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the representation of the American South in the film adaptations of five plays by the Mississippi-born playwright, Tennessee Williams: A Streetcar Named Desire (Elia Kazan, 1951, Baby Doll (Elia Kazan, 1956, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Richard Brooks, 1958, Suddenly Last Summer (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1959 and The Night of the Iguana (John Huston, 1964. The article focuses on the disrespectful representations of the paradigmatic Southern garden which remains dynamic while maintaining some of its classic or biblical features. By relying on the conception of the pastoral garden as theorized by Leo Marx in The Machine in the Garden (1964, the author pays specific attention to the way mid-xxth century cinema kept recreating Williams’s Southern gardens as a corrupted and dehumanized space pierced through by disquieting shrieks.Cette étude se penche sur la représentation du Sud états-unien dans l’adaptation cinématographique de cinq pièces du dramaturge américain originaire du Mississippi, Tennessee Williams: Un tramway nommé désir (Elia Kazan, 1951, La poupée de chair (Elia Kazan, 1956, La chatte sur un toit brûlant (Richard Brooks, 1958, Soudain l’été dernier (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1959, et La nuit de l’iguane (John Huston, 1964. L’article met en évidence, chez Williams, la représentation irrévérencieuse du paradigmatique jardin sudiste qui, s’il conserve certains de ses attributs classiques et bibliques, ne s’avère pas moins dynamique. En s’appuyant sur la conception du jardin pastoral théorisé par Leo Marx dans The Machine in the Garden (1964, l’auteur s’attarde sur la façon dont le cinéma du milieu du xxe siècle cherchait à recréer le jardin williamsien comme un lieu corrompu et déshumanisé, traversé de cris inquiétants.

  9. How Should Genes and Taxa be Sampled for Phylogenomic Analyses with Missing Data? An Empirical Study in Iguanian Lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Jeffrey W; Schulte, James A; Wiens, John J

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is becoming a widespread tool for generating large phylogenomic data sets to address difficult phylogenetic problems. However, this methodology often generates data sets in which increasing the number of taxa and loci increases amounts of missing data. Thus, a fundamental (but still unresolved) question is whether sampling should be designed to maximize sampling of taxa or genes, or to minimize the inclusion of missing data cells. Here, we explore this question for an ancient, rapid radiation of lizards, the pleurodont iguanians. Pleurodonts include many well-known clades (e.g., anoles, basilisks, iguanas, and spiny lizards) but relationships among families have proven difficult to resolve strongly and consistently using traditional sequencing approaches. We generated up to 4921 ultraconserved elements with sampling strategies including 16, 29, and 44 taxa, from 1179 to approximately 2.4 million characters per matrix and approximately 30% to 60% total missing data. We then compared mean branch support for interfamilial relationships under these 15 different sampling strategies for both concatenated (maximum likelihood) and species tree (NJst) approaches (after showing that mean branch support appears to be related to accuracy). We found that both approaches had the highest support when including loci with up to 50% missing taxa (matrices with ~40-55% missing data overall). Thus, our results show that simply excluding all missing data may be highly problematic as the primary guiding principle for the inclusion or exclusion of taxa and genes. The optimal strategy was somewhat different for each approach, a pattern that has not been shown previously. For concatenated analyses, branch support was maximized when including many taxa (44) but fewer characters (1.1 million). For species-tree analyses, branch support was maximized with minimal taxon sampling (16) but many loci (4789 of 4921). We also show that the choice of these sampling

  10. Hedgehog signaling pathway and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2005-10-01

    Hedgehog, WNT, FGF and BMP signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway leads to pathological consequences in a variety of human tumors, such as gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), surgical gastrectomy and chemotherapy are therapeutic options for gastric cancer; however, prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patient is still poor. Here, Hedgehog signaling pathway in human gastric cancer and its clinical applications will be reviewed. Human SHH, IHH, DHH (Hedgehog homologs), HHAT (Hedgehog acyltransferase), HHIP (Hedgehog-interacting protein), DISP1, DISP2, DISP3 (Dispatched homologs), PTCH1, PTCH2 (Patched homologs), SMO (Smoothened homolog), KIF27, KIF7 (Costal-2 homologs), STK36 (Fused homolog), SUFU (SuFu homolog), DZIP1 (Iguana homolog), GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 (Cubitus interruptus homologs) are implicated in the Hedgehog signaling. PTCH1, FOXM1 and CCND2 are direct transcriptional targets of Hedgehog signaling. Hedgehog signaling activation leads to cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation. SHH regulates growth and differentiation within gastric mucosa through autocrine loop and FOXL1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. SHH is implicated in stem/progenitor cell restitution of damaged gastric mucosa during chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori. SHH up-regulation, IHH upregulation and HHIP down-regulation lead to aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling through PTCH1 to GLI1 in gastric cancer. Small molecule compounds targeted to SMO (KADD-cyclopamine, SANT1-4, Cur61414) as well as humanized anti-SHH antibodies are potent anti-cancer drugs for gastric cancer. Cocktail of Hedgehog inhibitors would be developed as novel therapeutics for gastric cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number polymorphism (CNP) of Hedgehog signaling genes would be utilized

  11. DECODIFICANDO MI FLORA Uso de dispositivos móviles y tablets en educación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulfo Estrada M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Los códigos QR (códigos de barras de rápida respuesta en la actualidad son una forma de compartir información de manera visual accediendo a ella por medio de dispositivos móviles y tablets tan solo con apuntar la cámara hacia el código;  muy utilizado por empresas, agencias de publicidad, supermercados etc. El uso de estas tecnologías que están en todos lados, permite, en este caso, que los estudiantes puedan acceder a contenidos digitales educativos que complementan su aprendizaje, que fuera de este contexto podrían parecer irrelevantes. Por tal razón el presente trabajo muestra ambientes de aprendizaje basados en tecnología móvil, mediante la codificación QR de la información más relevante de la flora encontrada en el Centro Ambiental las Iguanas de Montería, con el fin de darla a conocer accediendo a su información mediante el uso de dispositivos móviles, buscando así, su extrapolación a la Ronda del Sinú. Para ello se consultó la información de cada árbol escogido para luego ser incorporada como narración en los videos creados con fotos de cada planta; los videos editados se subieron a internet para obtener su URL respectiva y así generar los códigos QR correspondientes; estos códigos fueron impresos en acrílico y pegados a cada planta para así acceder a su información. Con este trabajo se ha logrado por parte delos estudiantes, la apropiación de las competencias científicas, comunicativas, ciudadanas y tecnológicas (MTICs, incentivación al Desarrollo Sostenible y recuperar información de la tradición oral que tienen nuestros abuelos acerca de estos árboles.

  12. [Transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In the of period 2003-2007, a total of 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The material for the present study was a collection of reptiles owned by the "Animals" Ltd from Swietochłowice (Upper Silesia, Poland), specialising in import of exotic animals to Poland, as well as the reptile collections of private breeders. The reptiles that turned out to be the most heavily infected with ticks were the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius and they were imported to Poland from Ghana, Africa. Exotic reptiles are also imported from Southern Europe, Asia and Central America. The presently reported study helped to confirm the fact of transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland. A total of 2104 tick specimens, representing all stages of development (males, females, nymphs, larvae), were collected. They represented species of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Dönitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum Schulze, 1941, Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma spp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Ambylomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. The overall prevalence of infection was 77.6%. The highest prevalence value (81.2%) was observed on pythons (Python regius) and (78.7%) on monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus). The highest number of ticks was collected from Python regius and Varanus exanthematicus. The mean infection intensity for V. exanthematicus was 7.6 ticks per host, while for P. regius the intensity reached 4.7 ticks. The most abundant tick transferred to Poland on a host was an African tick, Amblyomma latum. Fifty eight specimens of monitor lizards

  13. The development of the Middle Triassic tectonical controlled Germanic Basin of Central Europe and the palaeoenvironmental related distribution of marine and terrestrial reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    -Italy). Bolletino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 41 (1), 37-40. Bachmann, G.H. and Aref, M.A.M., 2005. A seismite in Triassic gypsum deposits (Grabfeld Formation, Ladinian), Southwest Germany. Sedimentary Geology 180, 75-89. De Zanche, V. and Farabegoli, E. 1988. Anisian paleogeographic evolution in the Central-Western Southern Alps. Memoirs Scientifique Geologique 40, 399-411. Demathieu, G.R. 1985. Trace fossil assemblages in Middle Triassic marginal marine deposits, eastern border of the Massif Central, France. Societe Economie Paléontologie et Mineralogie, Special Publications, 35, 53-66. Diedrich, C. 2005. Actuopalaeontological trackway experiments with Iguana on intertidal flat carbonates of the Arabian Gulf - a comparison to fossil Rhynchosauroides tracks of Triassic carbonate tidal flat megatracksites in the European Germanic Basin. Senckenbergiana maritime, 35 (2), 203-220. Diedrich, C. 2008a. Millions of reptile tracks - Early to Middle Triassic carbonate tidal flat migration bridges of Central Europe. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 259, 410-423. Diedrich, C. 2008b. Palaeogeographic evolution of the marine Middle Triassic marine Germanic Basin changements - with emphasis on the carbonate tidal flat and shallow marine habitats of reptiles in Central Pangaea. Global and Planetary Change, 65 (2009), 27-55. Diedrich, C. 2009a. The vertebrates of the Anisian/Ladinian boundary (Middle Triassic) from Bissendorf (NW Germany) and their contribution to the anatomy, palaeoecology, and palaeobiogeography of the Germanic Basin reptiles. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 273 (2009), 1-16. Diedrich, C. 2009b. Die Saurierspuren-Grabung im basalen Mittleren Muschelkalk (Anis, Mitteltrias) von Bernburg (Sachsen-Anhalt). Archäologie in Sachsen-Anhalt, Sonderband 2009, 1-62. Diedrich, 2010a. Palaeoecology of Placodus gigas (Reptilia) and other placodontids - macroalgae feeder of the Middle Triassic in the Germanic Basin of Central Europe and