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Sample records for ignition tokamak design

  1. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Doggett, J.N.; Johnson, B.M.; Lee, J.D.; Hoard, R.W.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs. (WRF)

  2. Vacuum vessel system design for the compact ignition tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, W. (Ebasco Services Inc., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The compact ignition tokamak (CIT) is envisioned to be the test bed for the study of self- sustained, or ignited, fusion plasmas. The design basis for CIT is a 11-T toroidal field, 12-MA plasma current and peak fusion power of 500 MW. A major portion of this project is the vacuum vessel system, which includes the vacuum chamber, the divertor, first wall, and the robotics systems necessary to maintain the in-vessel components. The vacuum chamber is 2.1 m major radius torus with a D-shaped cross section. For hydrogenic species the base pressure is 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, with a total pumping speed of 5000 l/s. It is designed to withstand the forces resulting from plasma disruptions and be bakeable to approximately 350 {degree}C. A swept divertor and fixed limiters are provided. Both are carbon based structures designed to accommodate heat fluxes as large as 40 MW/m{sup 2} during the 5 s pulse. Articulated booms and manipulators will be deployed for in-vessel maintenance tasks, such as first wall removal/replacement and leak checking. This paper summarizes the engineering considerations and design status. In addition, the unique organization of the project's national design team, led by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the integration into this organization of the industrial consortium responsible for the design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel system is described.

  3. Options for an ignited tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon ..beta../sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed.

  4. Tokamak startup: problems and scenarios related to the transient phases of ignited tokamak operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    During recent years improvements have been made to tokamak startup procedures, which are important to the optimization of ignited tokamaks. The use of rf-assisted startup and noninductive current drive has led to substantial reduction and even complete elimination of the volt-seconds used during startup, relaxing constraints on poloidal coil, vacuum vessel, and structure design. This paper reviews these and other improvements and discusses the various bulk heating techniques that may be used to ignite a D-T plasma.

  5. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: status of FEDC studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program comprise the report. The technical areas discussed are the mechanical configuration status, magnet analysis, stress analysis, cooling between burns, TF coil joint, and facility/device layout options. (WRF)

  6. TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) disruption scenarios and CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) vacuum vessel force evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, R.O.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code and the TWIR postprocessor code have been used to develop credible plasma disruption scenarios for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) in order to predict the evolution of forces on CIT conducting structures and to provide results required for detailed structural design analysis. The extreme values of net radial and vertical vacuum vessel (VV) forces were found to be F{sub R}={minus}12.0 MN/rad and F{sub Z}={minus}3.0 MN/rad, respectively, for the CIT 2.1-m, 11-MA design. Net VV force evolution was found to be altered significantly by two mechanisms not noted previously. The first, due to poloidal VV currents arising from increased plasma paramagnetism during thermal quench, reduces the magnitude of the extreme F{sub R} by 15-50{percent} and modifies the distribution of forces substantially. The second effect is that slower plasma current decay rates give more severe net vertical VV loads because the current decay occurs when the plasma has moved farther from midplane than is the case for faster decay rates. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ex-vessel remote maintenance for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Macdonald, D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for operation of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist in removing and repairing such components as diagnostic modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the plasma chamber includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system for test cell operations, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid-radiation-waste-handling equipment. Wherever possible, the project will use commercially available equipment. Several areas of the maintenance system design were addressed in fiscal year (FY) 1987, including conceptual designs of manipulator systems, the start of a remote equipment research and development (RandD) program, and definition of the hot cell, decon, and equipment repair facility requirements. R and D work included preliminary demonstrations of remote handling operations on full-size, partial mock-ups of the CIT machine at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remote Operations and Maintenance Development (ROMD) Facility. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  8. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.

  9. Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Salmonson, J D; Callahan, D A; Town, R P

    2009-12-01

    The National Ignition Campaign, tasked with designing and fielding targets for fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), has carried forward three complementary target designs for the past several years: a beryllium ablator design, a plastic ablator design, and a high-density carbon or synthetic diamond design. This paper describes current simulations and design optimization to develop the plastic ablator capsule design as a candidate for the first ignition attempt on NIF. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve a comparable ignition probability to that with beryllium are emphasized. Large numbers of 1-D simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as 2-D simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are presented.

  10. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  11. Ignition curves for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in spherical tokamak reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motevalli S M; Fadaei F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, ignition curve for deuterium/helium-3 fusion reaction is studied. Four fusion reactions are considered. Zero-dimensional model for the power balance equation has been used. The closed ignition curves for $\\rho$ = constant (ratio of particle to energy confinement time) have been derived. The results of our calculations show that ignited equilibria for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in a spherical tokamak is only possible for $\\rho$ = 5.5 and 6. Then, by using the energy confinement scaling and parameters of the spherical tokamak reactor, the plasma stability limits have been obtained in $n_e, T$ plane and, to determine the thermal instability of plasma, the time dependent transport equations have been solved.

  12. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Aase, D.T.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb/sub 3/Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  13. Design method of divertor in tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Noriaki (Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Itoh, Sanae; Tanaka, Masaaki; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1991-03-01

    Computational method to design the efficient divertor configuration in tokamak reactor is presented. The two-dimensional code has been developed to analyze the distributions of the plasma and neutral particles for realistic configurations. Using this code, a method to design the efficient divertor configuration is developed. An example of new divertor, which consists of the baffle and fin plates, is analyzed. (author).

  14. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  15. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  16. Initial DEMO tokamak design configuration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.bachmann@efda.org [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aiello, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Boccaccini, L.; Carloni, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Federici, G. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Kovari, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Loving, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maione, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Mattei, M. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Meszaros, B. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Riccardo, V. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A definition of main DEMO requirements. • A description of the DEMO tokamak design configuration. • A description of issues yet to be solved. - Abstract: To prepare the DEMO conceptual design phase a number of physics and engineering assessments were carried out in recent years in the frame of EFDA concluding in an initial design configuration of a DEMO tokamak. This paper gives an insight into the identified engineering requirements and constraints and describes their impact on the selection of the technologies and design principles of the main tokamak components. The EU DEMO program aims at making best use of the technologies developed for ITER (e.g., magnets, vessel, cryostat, and to some degree also the divertor). However, other systems in particular the breeding blanket require design solutions and advanced technologies that will only partially be tested in ITER. The main differences from ITER include the requirement to breed, to extract, to process and to recycle the tritium needed for plasma operation, the two orders of magnitude larger lifetime neutron fluence, the consequent radiation dose levels, which limit remote maintenance options, and the requirement to use low-activation steel for in-vessel components that also must operate at high temperature for efficient energy conversion.

  17. Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R

    2012-04-05

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design

  18. National Ignition Facility design, performance, and cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, W.J.; Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H. [and others

    1994-09-16

    A conceptual design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and its cost has been estimated by a multilaboratory team. To maximize the performance/cost ratio a compact, segmented amplifier is used in a multipass architecture. Many recent optical and laser technology developments have been incorporated into the final design. The Beamlet project has successfully demonstrated the new concept. The mission of ICF Program using the NEF is to achieve ignition and gain in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects experiments, and for civilian applications such as inertial fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high energy density.

  19. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m/sup 2/ and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma.

  20. Socioeconomic information, Plainsboro area, New Jersey: Supplementary documentation for an environmental assessment for the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) at PPPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, L.K.; Bender, D.S.

    1987-07-01

    This report contains socioeconomic information on the Plainsboro, New Jersey, area, the proposed location of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) facility. It was prepared as supplemental information for an environmental assessment for the CIT at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The report contains descriptions of the demographic, economic, and community resource characteristics, and, based on information available in early 1987, considers the socioeconomic effect of the proposed facility. In all areas examined, the anticipated socioeconomic impacts of the proposed CIT facility at PPPL are negligible or minimal. 29 refs., 8 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. National Ignition Facility Target Design and Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R C; Kozioziemski, B J; Nikroo, A; Wilkens, H L; Bhandarkar, S; Forsman, A C; Haan, S W; Hoppe, M L; Huang, H; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Sater, J D; Seugling, R M; Stephens, R B; Takagi, M; Xu, H W

    2007-12-10

    The current capsule target design for the first ignition experiments at the NIF Facility beginning in 2009 will be a copper-doped beryllium capsule, roughly 2 mm in diameter with 160-{micro}m walls. The capsule will have a 75-{micro}m layer of solid DT on the inside surface, and the capsule will driven with x-rays generated from a gold/uranium cocktail hohlraum. The design specifications are extremely rigorous, particularly with respect to interfaces, which must be very smooth to inhibit Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. This paper outlines the current design, and focuses on the challenges and advances in capsule fabrication and characterization; hohlraum fabrication, and D-T layering and characterization.

  2. Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meglicki, Z

    1995-09-19

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs.

  3. Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meglicki, Z

    1995-09-19

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs.

  4. Design and Analysis of the Thermal Shield of EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Han; LIAO Ziying

    2008-01-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operated at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied on the surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system at a minimum, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This study employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a theoretical basis for an optimization design of the structure.

  5. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.Y., E-mail: xysun@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication.

  6. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing conceptual design and basic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotkov, V.A. E-mail: korotkov@sintez.niiefa.spb.su; Azizov, E.A.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Dokouka, V.N.; Ya.Dvorkin, N.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Krylov, V.A.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Leykin, I.N.; Mineev, A.B.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Shestakov, V.P.; Shapovalov, G.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Yagnov, V.A

    2001-10-01

    The construction of a special machine for plasma facing material testing under powerful and particle and heat flux deposition is necessary for progress of researches in the field of controlled fusion to industrial application. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing (KTM) is planned as spherical tokamak with moderate-to-low aspect ratio (A=2) and high plasma and vacuum vessel elongation, that allows to reach high plasma parameters, large power-intensity at a compact arrangement of design elements and low requirements to a toroidal magnetic field. KTM tokamak is planned in order to investigate the following issues: (1) Plasma confinement in tokamak with A=2, plasma parameters and configurations working window; (2) Differed kinds of divertor plates under power flux of plasma to divertor volume; (3) Plasma-wall interaction (different materials and coating) and plasma-limiter configurations. In the paper the basic parameters of the machine are given. The design of magnet system with poloidal field coils, vacuum vessel and divertor are submitted.

  7. Design and construction of Alborz tokamak vacuum vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardani, M., E-mail: mohsenmardani@gmail.com [Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrollahi, R.; Koohestani, S. [Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma-surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. - Abstract: The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. At the heart of the tokamak is the vacuum vessel and limiter which collectively are referred to as the vacuum vessel system. As one of the key components for the device, the vacuum vessel can provide ultra-high vacuum and clean environment for the plasma operation. The VV systems need upper and lower vertical ports, horizontal ports and oblique ports for diagnostics, vacuum pumping, gas puffing, and maintenance accesses. A limiter is a solid surface which defines the edge of the plasma and designed to protect the wall from the plasma, localizes the plasma-surface interaction and localizes the particle recycling. Basic structure analyses were confirmed by FEM model for dead weight, vacuum pressure and plasma disruptions loads. Stresses at general part of the VV body are lower than the structure material allowable stress (117 MPa) and this analysis show that the maximum stresses occur near the gravity support, and is about 98 MPa.

  8. Nondimensional transport experiments on DIII-D and projections to an ignition tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Balet, B.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1996-07-01

    The concept of nondimensional scaling of transport makes it possible to determine the required size for an ignition device based upon data from a single machine and illuminates the underlying physics of anomalous transport. The scaling of cross-field heat transport with the relative gyroradius {rho}*, the gyroradius normalized to the plasma minor radius, is of particular interest since {rho}* is the only nondimensional parameter which will vary significantly between present day machines and an ignition device. These nondimensional scaling experiments are based upon theoretical considerations which indicate that the thermal heat diffusivity can be written in the form {chi} = {chi}{sub B}{rho}*{sup x{sub {rho}}} F({beta}, v*, q, R/a, {kappa}, T{sub e}/T{sub i},...), where {chi}{sub B} = cT/eB. As explained elsewhere, x{sub {rho}} = 1 is called gyro-Bohm scaling, x{sub {rho}} is Bohm scaling, x{sub {rho}} = {minus}1/2 is Goldston scaling, and x{sub {rho}} = {minus}1 is stochastic scaling. The DIII-D results reported in this paper cover three important aspects of nondimensional scaling experiments: the testing of the underlying assumption of the nondimensional scaling approach, the determination of the {rho}* scaling of heat transport for various plasma regimes, and the extrapolation of the energy confinement time to future ignition devices.

  9. Design and modeling of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.; Powers, L.V.; Alley, W.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Futterman, J.A.; Levedahl, W.K.; Rosen, M.D.; Rowley, D.P.; Sacks, R.A.; Shestakov, A.I.; Strobel, G.L.; Tabak, M.; Weber, S.V.; Zimmerman, G.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Krauser, W.J.; Wilson, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Harris, D.B.; Hoffman, N.M.; Wilde, B.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several targets are described that in simulations give yields of 1--30 MJ when indirectly driven by 0.9--2 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m laser light. The article describes the targets, the modeling that was used to design them, and the modeling done to set specifications for the laser system in the proposed National Ignition Facility. Capsules with beryllium or polystyrene ablators are enclosed in gold hohlraums. All the designs utilize a cryogenic fuel layer; it is very difficult to achieve ignition at this scale with a noncryogenic capsule. It is necessary to use multiple bands of illumination in the hohlraum to achieve sufficiently uniform x-ray irradiation, and to use a low-{ital Z} gas fill in the hohlraum to reduce filling of the hohlraum with gold plasma. Critical issues are hohlraum design and optimization, Rayleigh--Taylor instability modeling, and laser--plasma interactions.

  10. Beryllium ignition target design for indirect drive NIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Beryllium (Be) ablator offers multiple advantages over carbon based ablators for indirectly driven NIF ICF ignition targets. These are higher mass ablation rate, ablation pressure and ablation velocity, lower capsule albedo, and higher thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. Such advantages can be used to improve the target robustness and performance. While previous NIF Be target designs exist, they were obtained a long time ago and do not incorporate the latest improved physical understanding and models based upon NIF experiments. Herein, we propose a new NIF Be ignition target design at 1.45 MJ, 430 TW that takes all this knowledge into account.

  11. Concept design on RH maintenance of CFETR Tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yuntao, E-mail: songyt@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Wu, Songtao; Wan, Yuanxi; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Ye, Minyou [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Zheng, Jinxing; Cheng, Yong; Zhao, Wenlong; Wei, Jianghua [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We discussed the concept design of the RH maintenance system based on the main design work of the key components for CFETR. •The main design work for RH maintenance in this paper was carried out including the divertor RH system, the blanket RH system and the transfer cask system. •The technical problems encountered in the design process were discussed. •The present concept design of remote maintenance system in this paper can meet the physical and engineering requirement of CFETR. -- Abstract: CFETR which stands for Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor is a superconducting Tokamak device. The concept design on RH maintenance of CFETR has been done in the past year. It is known that, the RH maintenance is one of the most important parts for Tokamak reactor. The fusion power was designed as 50–200 MW and its duty cycle time (or burning time) was estimated as 30–50%. The center magnetic field strength on the TF magnet is 5.0 T, the maximum capacity of the volt seconds provided by center solenoid winding will be about 160 VS. The plasma current will be 10 MA and its major radius and minor radius is 5.7 m and 1.6 m respectively. All the components of CFETR which provide their basic functions must be maintained and inspected during the reactor lifetime. Thus, the remote handling (RH) maintenance system should be a key component, which must be detailedly designed during the concept design processing of CFETR, for the operation of reactor. The main design work for RH maintenance in this paper was carried out including the divertor RH system, the blanket RH system and the transfer cask system. What is more, the technical problems encountered in the design process will also be discussed.

  12. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; Nuij, Pwjm; M.R. de Baar,; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron cyclot

  13. Surface erosion and tritium inventory analysis for CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.N. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Dylla, H.F. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Pontau, A.E.; Wilson, K.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The expected buildup of co-deposited tritium on the CIT carbon divertor and first wall surfaces and operational methods of minimizing the inventory have been examined. The analysis uses impurity transport computer codes, and associated plasma and tritium retention models, to compute the thickness of redeposited sputtered carbon and the resulting co-deposited tritium inventory on the divertor plates and first wall. Predicted erosion/growth rates are dominated by the effect of gaps between carbon tiles. The overall results appear favorable, showing stable operation (finite self-sputtering) and acceptably low ({approximately}25 Ci/pulse) co-deposited tritium rates, at high surface temperature (1700{degree}C) design conditions. These results, however, are highly speculative due to serious model inadequacies at the high sputtering rates predicted. If stable operation is obtainable, the prospects appear good for adequate tritium inventory control via helium-oxygen glow discharge cleaning. 25 refs.

  14. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  15. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  16. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor fueling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, K.D.; Donnert, H.J.; Yang, T.F.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design of a fuel injection system for CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor) is discussed. Initially, relative merits of the cold-fueling concept are compared with those of the hot-fueling concept; that is, fueling where the electron is below 1 eV is compared with fueling where the electron temperature exceeds 100 eV. It is concluded that cold fueling seems to be somewhat more free of drawbacks than hot fueling. Possible implementation of the cold-fueling concept is exploited via frozen-pellet injection. Several methods of achieving frozen-pellet injection are discussed and the light-gas-gun approach is chosen from these possibilities. A modified version of the ORNL Neutral Gas Shielding Model is used to simulate the pellet injection process. From this simulation, the penetration-depth dependent velocity requirement is determined. Finally, with the velocity requirement known, a gas-pressure requirement for the proposed conceptual design is established. The cryogenic fuel-injection and fuel-handling systems are discussed. A possible way to implement the conceptual device is examined along with the attendant effects on the total system.

  17. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor fueling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, K D; Donnert, H J; Yang, T F

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design of a fuel injection system for CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor) is discussed. Initially, relative merits of the cold-fueling concept are compared with those of the hot-fueling concept; that is, fueling where the electron temperature is below 1 eV is compared with fueling where the electron temperature exceeds 100 eV. It is concluded that cold fueling seems to be somewhat more free of drawbacks than hot fueling. Possible implementation of the cold-fueling concept is exploited via frozen-pellet injection. Several methods of achieving frozen-pellet injection are discussed and the light-gas-gun approach is chosen from these possibilities. A modified version of the ORNL Neutral Gas Shielding Model is used to simulate the pellet injection process. From this simulation, the penetration-depth dependent velocity requirement is determined. Finally, with the velocity requirement known, a gas-pressure requirement for the proposed conceptual design is established. The cryogenic fuel-injection and fuel-handling systems are discussed. A possible way to implement the conceptual device is examined along with the attendant effects on the total system.

  18. Optical Design of ECEI Diagnostic System for HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun(王俊); Wen Yizhi(闻一之); Yu Changxuan(俞昌旋); Wan Baonian(万宝年); N.C. Luhmann; Wang Jian; Xia Z. G.

    2004-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging system in the frequency range of 95 GHz ~125 GHz is going to be constructed for a two-dimensional diagnosis of the electron temperature profiles and fluctuations on the HT-7 Tokamak. The optical design for the ECEI diagnostic system is completed. Because of the superconducting technology used in HT-7, the vacuum chamber is rather thick (630 mm), the height of the horizontal windows is limited (maximum 450 mm), which constrains greatly the ECE imaging Gaussian beam that passing through the windows. We here comes to make a design compromise between the number of the beams that can pass through the windows and the spatial resolution (around 1.1 cm). We also find that due to the field curvature of the optical system, the gaussian beams of edge channels are always overlapped. To flatten the field curvature, it is needed to insert a concave made of a material with a low refractive index (compared with the one used in the convex). But the suitable material has not been available so far, therefore the deterioration of the resolution in some channels (e.g. the edge channels) is acceptable.

  19. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraga, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Nagatomo, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Theobald, W. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Solodov, A. A. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Tabak, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-17

    Here, integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ~kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analyzed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  20. Design for environment for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, E.; Gobor, K.; Celeste, J.; Cerruti, S.

    1998-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national center for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other research into the physics of high temperatures and high densities, and a vital element of the DOE`s nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. It will be used by scientists from a numerous different institutions and disciplines to support research advancements in national security, energy, basic science, and economic development. Multiple powerful laser beams will `ignite` small fusion targets, helping liberate more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. This paper discusses the Design for Environment process for NIF, some of the subsequent activities resulting from the initial study, and a few of the lessons learned from this process. Subsequent activities include the development of a Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization Plan (P2/WMin) for the facility, which includes Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAS) on predicted waste streams from NIF, development of construction phase recycling plans, analysis of some of the specialized materials of construction to minimize future demolition and decommissioning (D&D) costs and development of cost assessments for more benign cleaning procedures that meet the stringent cleaning specifications for this facility.

  1. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H/sub 2/O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters.

  2. Design of the Cryostat for HT—7U superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郁杰; 武松涛; 等

    2002-01-01

    The cryostat of HT-7U tokamak is a large vacuum vessel surrounding the entire basic machine with a cylindrical shell,a dished top and a flat bottom.The main function of HT-7U cryostat is to provide a thermal barrier between an ambient temperature test hall and a liquid helium-cooled superconducting magnet.The loads applied to the cryostat are from sources of vacuum pressure,dead weight,seismic events and electromagnetic forces originated by eddy currents.It also provides feed-through penetrations for all the conecting elements inside and outside the cryostat.The main material selected for the cryostat is stainless steel 304L.The structural analyses including buckling for the cryostat vessel under the plasma operation condition have been carried out by using a finite element code.Stress analysis results show that the maximum stress intensity was below the allowable value.In this paper,the structural analyses and design of HT-7U cryostat are emphasized.

  3. Review Committee report on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment: Role and mission of TPX; overview of design; physics design assessment; engineering design assessment; evaluation of cost, schedule, and management plans; and, environment safety and health.

  4. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  5. Design of geometric phase measurement in EAST Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, T; Liu, J; Jie, Y X; Wang, Y L; Gao, X; Qin, H

    2016-01-01

    The optimum scheme for geometric phase measurement in EAST Tokamak is proposed in this paper. The theoretical values of geometric phase for the probe beams of EAST Polarimeter-Interferometer (POINT) system are calculated by path integration in parameter space. Meanwhile, the influences of some controllable parameters on geometric phase are evaluated. The feasibility and challenge of distinguishing geometric effect in the POINT signal are also assessed in detail.

  6. Preliminary Design of Control Network for HT-7U Tokamak Cryogenic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yibin(金毅彬); Zhuang Ming(庄明); Bai Hongyu(白宏宇)

    2003-01-01

    In the course of the cryoplant modernization, a control network will be set up in order to facilitate the control, the supervision, the centralized data acquisition and the alarm handling of the cryogenic system for HT-7U tokamak. The paper introduces the preliminary design of control network based on the Controller Link Network for HT-7U tokamak cryogenic system. The multi-layer structure mentioned in the paper is the mainstream of automatic control.The control philosophy, the structure of the network and the components for control are also presented.

  7. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, D.C., E-mail: pacedc@fusion.gat.com; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  8. Update to Rev6 ignition designs NIF, with details about support tent in particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, S. W.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Ho, D.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A.; Lafortune, K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Simakov, A. N.; Yi, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.; Hoover, D.

    2013-10-01

    Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility will use an indirectly driven spherical implosion to assemble and ignite a mass of DT fuel. Requirements describing the specifics of the experiment and the corresponding expected performance were established several years prior. These requirements include laser features, target fabrication and characterization, and data obtained from pre-ignition experiments. Since those requirements were originally set, various NIF experiments using surrogate targets have motivated updates to the target designs and requirements. A summary of these updates will be presented. Rev6 designs for CH(Si), C(W), and Be(Cu) will be summarized. One particularly significant change regards the thickness of the tent films supporting the capsule, and the presentation will include updated thickness goals and the experimental motivation for the change. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Conceptual design of a camera system for neutron imaging in low fusion power tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Nocente, M.; Chen, Z.; Peng, X.; Cui, Z.; Du, T.; Hu, Z.; Li, T.; Fan, T.; Chen, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, G.; Yuan, G.; Yang, J.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The basic principles for designing a camera system for neutron imaging in low fusion power tokamaks are illustrated for the case of the HL-2A tokamak device. HL-2A has an approximately circular cross section, with total neutron yields of about 1012 n/s under 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. The accuracy in determining the width of the neutron emission profile and the plasma vertical position are chosen as relevant parameters for design optimization. Typical neutron emission profiles and neutron energy spectra are calculated by Monte Carlo method. A reference design is assumed, for which the direct and scattered neutron fluences are assessed and the neutron count profile of the neutron camera is obtained. Three other designs are presented for comparison. The reference design is found to have the best performance for assessing the width of peaked to broadened neutron emission profiles. It also performs well for the assessment of the vertical position.

  10. A divertor plasma configuration design method for tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Xiao, Bing-Jia; Liu, Lei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yuehang; Qiu, Qinglai

    2016-11-01

    The efficient and safe operation of large fusion devices strongly relies on the plasma configuration inside the vacuum chamber. It is important to construct the proper plasma equilibrium with a desired plasma configuration. In order to construct the target configuration, a shape constraint module has been developed in the tokamak simulation code (TSC), which controls the poloidal flux and the magnetic field at several defined control points. It is used to construct the double null, lower single null, and quasi-snowflake configurations for the required target shape and calculate the required PF coils current. The flexibility and practicability of this method have been verified by the simulated results. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB103000 and 2014GB110003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305216, 11305209, and 11375191), and External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. GJHZ201303).

  11. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  12. Conceptual design study of the moderate size superconducting spherical tokamak power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Keii; Ono, Yasushi; Nakamura, Makoto; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Ono, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    A new conceptual design of the superconducting spherical tokamak (ST) power plant was proposed as an attractive choice for tokamak fusion reactors. We reassessed a possibility of the ST as a power plant using the conservative reactor engineering constraints often used for the conventional tokamak reactor design. An extensive parameters scan which covers all ranges of feasible superconducting ST reactors was completed, and five constraints which include already achieved plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and confinement parameters in ST experiments were established for the purpose of choosing the optimum operation point. Based on comparison with the estimated future energy costs of electricity (COEs) in Japan, cost-effective ST reactors can be designed if their COEs are smaller than 120 mills kW-1 h-1 (2013). We selected the optimized design point: A = 2.0 and Rp = 5.4 m after considering the maintenance scheme and TF ripple. A self-consistent free-boundary MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration of the ST reactor were designed by modifying the neutral beam injection system and plasma profiles. The MHD stability of the equilibrium was analysed and a ramp-up scenario was considered for ensuring the new ST design. The optimized moderate-size ST power plant conceptual design realizes realistic plasma and fusion engineering parameters keeping its economic competitiveness against existing energy sources in Japan.

  13. Proto-CIRCUS Tilted-Coil Tokamak-Torsatron Hybrid: Design and Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A W; Hammond, K C; Kornbluth, Y; Spong, D A; Sweeney, R; Volpe, F A

    2014-01-01

    We present the field-line modeling, design and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak-torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six "toroidal field" coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping me...

  14. Status of design and experimental activity on module of lithium divertor for KTM tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyublinski, Igor E., E-mail: lyublinski@yandex.ru [JSC “Red Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vertkov, Alexey V.; Zharkov, Mikhail Yu.; Semenov, Vladimir V. [JSC “Red Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mirnov, Sergey V.; Lazarev, Vladimir B. [GSC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tazhibayeva, Irina L.; Shapovalov, Gennadiy V.; Kulsartov, Timur V.; D’yachenko, Alexandr V. [IAE of National Nuclear Center, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mazzitelli, Giuseppe [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Rome (Italy); Agostini, Pietro [ENEA Brasimone, Camugnano, BO (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Lithium divertor module based on capillary-porous system is created for KTM tokamak. • The hydraulic tests of lithium divertor module were conducted. • The results were compared with the calculation data. • The analysis of results’ discrepancies was conducted. • The lithium divertor module is ready for tests on KTM tokamak. -- Abstract: The projects of ITER and DEMO reactors showed that there are serious difficulties with solving the issues of plasma facing elements (PFE) based on the solid materials. Problems of PFE can be overcome by the use of liquid lithium. Application of lithium will allow to create a self-renewal and MHD stable liquid metal surface of the in-vessel devices possessing practically unlimited service life. Realization of these advantages is based on use of so-called lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) – new material, in which liquid lithium fills a solid matrix from porous material. The progress in development of lithium technology and also lithium experiments in the tokamaks TFTR, T-11M, T-10, FTU, NSTX, LTX, HT-7 and stellarator TJ II is a good basis for development of the project of steady-state operating lithium divertor module for Kazakhstan tokamak. At present the lithium divertor module for KTM tokamak is development and manufacturing. The paper describes main design features of the module of lithium divertor (MLD). The first step of the hydraulic tests of MLD with fully assembled external thermo-stabilization system, which was connected to in-vessel lithium unit, were performed using ethanol as a model heat transfer media. Test results of MLD have shown that operating parameters of designed and manufactured system for thermo-stabilization are sufficient for proper operation; basic hydraulic characteristics of the system are close to expected values.

  15. Status of tokamak research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, J.M. (ed.)

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design. (MOW)

  16. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

  17. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  18. Internal combustion engines a detailed introduction to the thermodynamics of spark and compression ignition engines, their design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Rowland S

    1979-01-01

    Internal Combustion of Engines: A Detailed Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Spark and Compression Ignition Engines, Their Design and Development focuses on the design, development, and operations of spark and compression ignition engines. The book first describes internal combustion engines, including rotary, compression, and indirect or spark ignition engines. The publication then discusses basic thermodynamics and gas dynamics. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics; internal energy and enthalpy diagrams; gas mixtures and homocentric flow; and state equation. The text ta

  19. The ignition design space of magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemuth, Irvin R. [2490 North Grannen Road, Tucson, Arizona 85745 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The simple magnetized target implosion model of Lindemuth and Kirkpatrick [Nucl. Fusion 23, 263 (1983)] has been extended to survey the potential parameter space in which three types of magnetized targets—cylindrical with axial magnetic field, cylindrical with azimuthal magnetic field, and spherical with azimuthal magnetic field—might achieve ignition and produce large gain at achievable radial convergence ratios. The model has been used to compute the dynamic, time-dependent behavior of many initial parameter sets that have been based upon projected ignition conditions using the quasi-adiabatic and quasi-flux-conserving properties of magnetized target implosions. The time-dependent calculations have shown that energy gains greater than 30 can potentially be achieved for each type of target. By example, it is shown that high gain may be obtained at extremely low convergence ratios, e.g., less than 15, for appropriate initial conditions. It is also shown that reaching the ignition condition, i.e., when fusion deposition rates equal total loss rates, does not necessarily lead to high gain and high fuel burn-up. At the lower densities whereby fusion temperatures can be reached in magnetized targets, the fusion burn rate may be only comparable with the hydrodynamic heating/cooling rates. On the other hand, when the fusion burn rates significantly exceed the hydrodynamic rates, the calculations show a characteristic rapid increase in temperature due to alpha particle deposition with a subsequent increased burn rate and high gain. A major result of this paper is that each type of target operates in a different initial density-energy-velocity range. The results of this paper provide initial target plasma parameters and driver parameters that can be used to guide plasma formation and driver development for magnetized targets. The results indicate that plasmas for spherical, cylindrical with azimuthal field, and cylindrical with axial field targets must have an initial

  20. A flexible software design to determine the plasma boundary in Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Rasoul; Sadeghi, Yahya; Esteki, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-06-01

    A plasma boundary reconstruction code has been designed by using current filament method to calculate the magnetic flux and consequently plasma boundary in Damavand tokamak. Hence, a computer-based code "The Plasma Boundary Reconstruction Code in Tokamak (PBRCT)" was developed to make a graphical user interface and to speed up the plasma boundary estimation algorithm. All required tools as the plasma boundary and magnetic surface display (MSD), error display, primary conditions and modeling panel as well as a search motor to determine a good position and number of the current filaments to find a precise model have been considered. The core is a 3000 lines Matlab code and the graphical user interface is 10,000 lines in C# language.

  1. Low Convergence path to Fusion I: Ignition physics and high margin design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, M. J.; McCall, G. H.; Betti, R.; Foula, D. H.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multi-shell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (280 TW/cm2) to achieve robust ignition. These Revolver targets consist of three concentric metal shells, enclosing a volume of 10s of µg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. The inner shell pusher, nominally of gold, is compressed to over 2000 g/cc, effectively trapping the radiation and enabling ignition at low temperature (2.5 keV) and relatively low implosion velocity (20 cm/micro-sec) at a fuel convergence of 9. Ignition is designed to occur well ``upstream'' from stagnation, with implosion velocity at 90% of maximum, so that any deceleration phase mix will occur only after ignition. Mix, in all its non-predictable manifestations, will effect net yield in a Revolver target - but not the achievement of ignition and robust burn. Simplicity of the physics is the dominant principle. There is no high gain requirement. These basic physics elements can be combined into a simple analytic model that generates a complete target design specification given the fuel mass and the kinetic energy needed in the middle (drive) shell (of order 80 kJ). This research supported by the US DOE/NNSA, performed in part at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  3. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  4. Mechanical design and thermo-hydraulic simulation of the infrared thermography diagnostic of the WEST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micolon, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.micolon@cea.fr; Courtois, Xavier; Aumeunier, Marie-Hélène; Chenevois, Jean-Pierre; Larroque, Sébastien

    2015-10-15

    The WEST (Tungsten (W) Environment in Steady state Tokamak) project is a partial rebuild of the Tore Supra tokamak to make it an X-point metallic environment machine aimed at testing ITER technologies in relevant plasma environment. For the safe operation of the WEST tokamak, infra-red (IR) thermography is a crucial diagnostic as it is a sound and reliable way to detect hotspots or abnormal heating patterns on the plasma facing components (PFCs). Thus WEST will be fitted with middle/short-IR (1.5–2 μm or 3–5 μm) cameras in the upper port plugs to get a full view of the critical PFCs (in particular the new lower divertor) and radio-frequency (RF) heating antennas and one camera at the equatorial level to monitor the new upper divertor and the first wall. This paper describes the design of the up-to-date optical system along with the hydraulic analysis and the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis conducted to ensure adequate heat extraction capabilities. Boundary conditions and simulation results will be presented and discussed as well as technological solutions retained.

  5. Safety and environmental process for the design and construction of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-05-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laser fusion experimental facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This paper describes the safety and environmental processes followed by NIF during the design and construction activities.

  6. Design of a cone target for fast ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunahara Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new type of target for the fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion. Pre-formed plasma inside a cone target can significantly reduce the energy coupling efficiency from the ultra-high intense short-pulse laser to the imploded core plasma. Also, in order to protect the tip of the cone and reduce generation of pre-formed plasma, we propose pointed shaped cone target. In our estimation, the shock traveling time can be delayed 20–30 ps by lower-Z material with larger areal density compared to the conventional gold flat tip. Also, the jet flow can sweep the blow-off plasma from the tip of the cone, and the implosion performance is not drastically affected by the existence of pointed tip. In addition, the self-generated magnetic field is generated along the boundary of cone tip and surrounding CD or DT plasma. This magnetic field can confine fast electrons and focus to the implosion core plasma. Resultant heating efficiency is improved by 30% compared to that with conventional gold flat tip.

  7. Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) blanket design study, December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This work represents only the second iteration of the conceptual design of a DTHR blanket; consequently, a number of issues important to a detailed blanket design have not yet been evaluated. The most critical issues identified are those of two-phase flow maldistribution, flow instabilities, flow stratification for horizontal radial inflow of boiling water, fuel rod vibrations, corrosion of clad and structural materials by high quality steam, fretting and cyclic loads. Approaches to minimizing these problems are discussed and experimental testing with flow mock-ups is recommended. These implications on a commercial blanket design are discussed and critical data needs are identified.

  8. Systematic analysis of direct-drive baseline designs for shock ignition with the Laser MégaJoule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, V.; Canaud, B.; Laffite, S.; Temporal, M.; Ramis, R.

    2013-11-01

    We present direct-drive target design studies for the laser mégajoule using two distinct initial aspect ratios (A = 34 and A = 5). Laser pulse shapes are optimized by a random walk method and drive power variations are used to cover a wide variety of implosion velocities between 260 km/s and 365 km/s. For selected implosion velocities and for each initial aspect ratio, scaled-target families are built in order to find self-ignition threshold. High-gain shock ignition is also investigated in the context of Laser MégaJoule for marginally igniting targets below their own self-ignition threshold.

  9. Conceptual design of superconducting magnet systems for the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Mills, F.E.; DeMichele, D.W.; Smelser, P.; Kim, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    As an integral effort in the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor Conceptual Design, the conceptual design of a 10-tesla, pure-tension superconducting toroidal-field (TF) coil system has been developed in sufficient detail to define a realistic design for the TF coil system that could be built based upon the current state of technology with minimum technological extrapolations. A conceptual design study on the superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coils and the superconducting equilibrium-field (EF) coils were also completed. These conceptual designs are developed in sufficient detail with clear information on high current ac conductor design, cooling, venting provision, coil structural support and zero loss poloidal coil cryostat design. Also investigated is the EF penetration into the blanket and shield.

  10. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations. (MOW)

  11. An overview of the Tokamak Physics Experiment vacuum vessel preliminary design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocco, R.E. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The mission of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) Project is to develop the scientific basis for a compact and continuously operating tokamak fusion reactor. The vacuum vessel, which consists of a double walled torus, ports and supports, is a major element of the TPX machine. This paper provides an overview of the vacuum vessel preliminary design work. The design of the vacuum vessel is being carried out by an industrial team under subcontract to the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The respective work scopes of this team are discussed. The role of concurrent engineering is presented in the context of this design-build subcontract. A discussion of the engineering requirements, material selection rationale and vacuum vessel configuration is provided. Titanium 6Al-4V will be used to fabricate the vacuum vessel. Significant material concerns were identified with the use of titanium; hydrogen embrittlement and the effects of borated water were the major issues. A research and development (R and D) program was established to resolve these material issues as well as to develop the vessel weld details. A comprehensive analytical effort was established to perform the structural and thermal analysis of the vessel. Design details of the vessel, supports, ports, and flanges are presented.

  12. The Design of the Polychromator for Thomson Scattering Measurements on HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨利; 赵君煜; 方自深

    2004-01-01

    A five-channel polychromator, utilizing high performance interference filters, has been completed for Thomson scattering measurements on HT-7 tokamak. For our instrument, the range of electron temperature varies from 50 eV to 1.5 keV. According to this, the bandpass of the different interference filters are chosen. Unique features of the polychromator are high throughput,easy alignment, flexibility and compact size when compared with other alternatives. In this article,both the method of designing and the measured transmission curves for the polychromator are given.

  13. DESIGN OF A HIGH COMPRESSION, DIRECT INJECTION, SPARK-IGNITION, METHANOL FUELED RESEARCH ENGINE WITH AN INTEGRAL INJECTOR-IGNITION SOURCE INSERT, SAE PAPER 2001-01-3651

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stratified charge research engine and test stand were designed and built for this work. The primary goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using a removal integral injector ignition source insert which allows a convenient method of charging the relative locat...

  14. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  15. A self-description data framework for Tokamak control system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zheng, Wei, E-mail: zhengwei@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hu, Feiran; Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The SDD framework can be applied to different Tokamak devices. • We explain how configuration settings of control systems are described in SDD models, namely components and connections. • Evolving SDD models are stored in a dynamic schema database. • The SDD editor supports plug-and-play SDD models. - Abstract: A Tokamak device consists of numerous control systems, which need to be integrated. CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication) system requires the configuration settings of these control systems to carry out the integration smoothly. SDD (Self-description data) is designed to describe the static configuration of control systems. ITER CODAC group has released an SDD software package for control system designers to manage the static configuration, but it is specific for ITER plant control systems. Following the idea of ITER SDD, we developed a flexible and scalable SDD framework to develop SDD software for J-TEXT and other sophisticated devices. The SDD framework describes the configuration settings of various control systems, including physical and logical elements and their relation information, in SDD models which are classified into Components and Connections. The framework is composed of three layers: the MongoDB database, an open-source, dynamic schema, NoSQL (Not Only SQL) database; the SDD service, which maps SDD models to MongoDB and handles the transaction and business logic; the SDD applications, which can be used to create and maintain SDD information, and generate various kinds of output using the stored SDD information.

  16. Design of octahedral spherical hohlraum for CH Rev5 ignition capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zhai, Chuanlei; Zheng, Chunyang; Lan, Ke

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we design an octahedral spherical Au hohlraum for CH Rev5 ignition capsule [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] by using the initial design method and two-dimensional (2D) simulations, and we investigate its laser entrance hole (LEH) closure and laser-plasma instabilities (LPI) by using a spherical hohlraum with two different-size LEHs via 2D simulations. The designed spherical hohlraum with RH=5 RC, RL=1.2 mm , and RL*=2 RL requires an ignition laser pulse of 1.92 MJ in energy and 670 TW in peak power, where RH, RC, RL, and RL* are radii of the spherical hohlraum, capsule, LEH, and the cylindrical LEH outer ring, respectively. From 2D simulations, the closure and opening up of LEH are clearly obtained. The LEH closure and its rate are strongly connected to the radiation pulse, while the LEH opening-up and its rate are strongly connected to the laser pulse. The smallest radius of LEH during closure is 0.6 mm before opening up, which leaves enough room for arranging the laser beams with a radius of 0.5 mm in our design. By using a post-process code for LPI, a relatively high stimulated Brillouin scattering fraction and a very low stimulated Raman scattering fraction are predicted, which may be due to the neglection of three-dimensional density gradients of the ablative flow along the laser transportation in 2D simulations. This work provides the energy and power references for the future ignition laser facility which uses octahedral spherical hohlraums as ignition targets.

  17. Compact tokamak reactors. Part 1 (analytic results)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-09-13

    We discuss the possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First we review and summarize the existing literature. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamak power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field, and considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. The analytic results will be augmented by a numerical calculation which permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency; the results of which will be presented in Part II. Third, a scaling from any given reference reactor design to a copper toroidal field coil device is discussed. Throughout the paper the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculating electric power. We conclude that the latest published reactor studies, which show little advantage in using low aspect ratio unless remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, can be reproduced with the analytic model.

  18. Design of Initial Opacity Platform at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Ayers, S. L.; Emig, J. A.; Iglesias, C. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Wilson, B. G.; Huffman, E. J.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; McKenty, P. W.; Zhang, R.; Cardenas, T.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Kline, J. L.; Sherrill, M. E.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    The absorption and re-emission of x-rays by partly stripped ions plays a critical role in stars and in many laboratory plasmas. A NIF Opacity Platform has been designed to resolve a persistent disagreement between theory and experiments on the Sandia Z facility, studying iron in conditions closely related to the solar radiation-convection transition boundary. A laser heated hohlraum ``oven'' will produce iron plasmas at temperatures >150 eV and electron densities >=7x1021/cm3, and be probed with continuum X-rays from a capsule implosion backlighter source. The resulting X-ray transmission spectra will be recorded on a specially designed Opacity Spectrometer. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Shock ignition: a brief overview and progress in the design of robust targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.; Schiavi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Shock ignition is a laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) scheme in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The fuel is first imploded at a lower velocity than in conventional ICF, reducing the threats due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Close to stagnation, an intense laser spike drives a strong converging shock, which contributes to hot spot formation. This paper starts with a brief overview of the theoretical studies, target design and experimental results on shock ignition. The second part of the paper illustrates original work aiming at the design of robust targets and computation of the relevant gain curves. Following Chang et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 135002) a safety factor for high gain, ITF* (analogous to the ignition threshold factor ITF introduced by Clark et al (2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 056305)), is evaluated by means of parametric 1D simulations with artificially reduced reactivity. SI designs scaled as in Atzeni et al (2013 New J. Phys. 15 045004) are found to have nearly the same ITF*. For a given target, such ITF* increases with implosion velocity and laser spike power. A gain curve with a prescribed ITF* can then be simply generated by upscaling a reference target with that value of ITF*. An interesting option is scaling in size by reducing the implosion velocity to keep the ratio of implosion velocity to self-ignition velocity constant. At a given total laser energy, targets with higher ITF* are driven to higher implosion velocity and achieve a somewhat lower gain. However, a 1D gain higher than 100 is achieved at an (incident) energy below 1 MJ, an implosion velocity below 300 km s-1 and a peak incident power below 400 TW. 2D simulations of mispositioned targets show that targets with a higher ITF* indeed tolerate larger displacements.

  20. One-megajoule, wetted-foam target-design performance for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Betti, R.; Harding, D. R.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Skupsky, S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.

    2007-05-01

    Wetted-foam, direct-drive target designs are a path to high-gain experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. Wetted-foam designs [S. Skupsky et al., in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001, edited by K. Tanaka, D. D. Meyerhofer, and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn (Elsevier, Paris, 2002)] take advantage of the increased laser absorption provided by the higher-atomic-number elements in a target ablator composed of plastic foam saturated with deuterium-tritium (DT). The increased laser coupling allows more fuel to be driven with the same incident laser energy, resulting in increased hydrodynamic stability and target gain. A stability analysis of a 1-MJ design was performed using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)]. Simulations examining the effect of the expected levels of laser nonuniformities (single-beam and multiple-beam) and target nonuniformities (surface and ice roughness) have been performed. A nonuniformity-budget analysis has been constructed and suggests that two-dimensional (2D) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) [S. Skupsky et al., J. Appl. Phys. 66, 3456 (1989)] is needed to reduce single-beam nonuniformities to levels sufficient for ignition to proceed. Two integrated 2D simulations with 0.75-μm initial ice roughness, multiple-beam nonuniformity, surface roughness, and imprint were completed, one with 2D SSD smoothing and one with 1D SSD. The former ignited and produced a gain of 32, while the latter failed to ignite. A third integrated 2D simulation with 1-μm initial ice roughness and an ice power-law spectral index of 1 was also completed and produced a gain of 27.

  1. Design of the power supply system for the plasma current modulation on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.; Shao, J.; Ma, S.X., E-mail: mashaoxiang@hust.edu.cn; Liang, X.; Yu, K.X.; Pan, Y.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A modification scheme of heating field power supply system for plasma current modulation. • High-power fast control power supply with multilevel cascade circuit. • Restraining circulating current with coupled inductors in cyclic symmetric structure. - Abstract: In order to further study the influence of current modulation parameters on suppressing tearing instability, the plasma current should be modulated in a wider range. So a modification scheme is designed to improve the performance of ohmic heating power supply system on J-TEXT tokamak. A multilevel cascade circuit with carrier phase-shifted PWM technique has been proposed. Coupled inductors are connected in the form of cyclic symmetry to restrain the circulating current caused by multiple paralleled branches. The simulation proves this proposed current modulation power supply system matches output requirement and achieves good current sharing effect. Finally, a prototype is designed, and the experiment results can verify the correctness of the simulation model well.

  2. Status report on the conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor (CTHR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    A preliminary conceptual design is presented for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants. The study has been made in sufficient depth to indicate no insurmountable technical problems exist and has provided a basis for valid cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources.

  3. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  4. Spatial filter lens design for the main laser of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korniski, R. J., Optics 1 Inc, Westlake Village, CA

    1998-06-05

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1{omega}) of 1 053{micro}m Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) will produce 1 8 megajoules of the third harmonic light (3{omega} or {lambda}=351{micro}m) at the target The purpose of this paper is to provide the lens design community with the current lens design details of the large optics in the Main Laser This paper describes the lens design configuration and design considerations of the Main Laser The Main Laser is 123 meters long and includes two spatial filters one 13 5 meters and one 60 meters These spatial filters perform crucial beam filtering and relaying functions We shall describe the significant lens design aspects of these spatial filter lenses which allow them to successfully deliver the appropriate beam characteristic onto the target For an overview of NIF please see ``Optical system design of the National Ignition Facility,`` by R Edward English. et al also found in this volume.

  5. Design of a tangential Phase Contrast Imaging diagnostic for the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Stefano; Marinoni, Alessandro; Chavan, Rene; Magnin, Jean Claude; Pochon, Guy

    2008-11-01

    A PCI diagnostic has been designed, built and installed in the TCV tokamak, employing a 7-cm wide CO2 laser beam in a near-toroidal launch direction. The system can resolve wavelengths in the range 0.1 to 7 cm, sampling 32 chords at 12.5 Msamples/sec, thus appraising microinstabilities ranging from ion to electron spatial scale lengths. Being an imaging technique it does not face difficulties in investigating highly inhomogeneous regions, such as transport barriers. The tangential configuration, combined with appropriate spatial filtering techniques, provides an excellent spatial resolution, of the order of 1% of the minor radius. The spatial filtering also allows the selection of different spatial regions (e.g. deep core or edge). Wavelengths and correlation properties can be recovered from the spatial mapping. First data will be presented along with preliminary interpretation and comparisons with linear gyrokinetic simulations.

  6. Target Area design basis and system performance for the National Ignition Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M.; Karpenko, V.; Hagans, K.; Anderson, A.; Latkowski, J.; Warren, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wavrik, R.; Garcia, R.; Boyes, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The NIF Target Area is designed to confine the ICF target experiments leading up to and including fusion ignition and gain. The Target Area will provide appropriate in-chamber conditions before, during, and after each shot. The repeated introduction of large amounts of laser energy into the chamber and emission of fusion energy from targets represents a new challenge in ICF facility design. Prior to a shot, the facility provides proper illumination geometry, target chamber vacuum, and a stable platform for the target and its diagnostics. During a shot, the impact of the energy introduced into the chamber is minimized, and workers and the public are protected from excessive prompt radiation doses. After the shot, the residual radioactivation is managed to allow required accessibility. Tritium and other radioactive wastes are confined and disposed of. Diagnostic data is also retrieved, and the facility is readied for the next shot. The Target Area will accommodate yields up to 20 MJ, and its design lifetime is 30 years. The Target Area provides the personnel access needed to support the use precision diagnostics. The annual shot mix for design purposes is shown. Designing to this experimental envelope ensures the ability and flexibility to move through the experimental campaign to ignition efficiently.

  7. Plasma facing components: a conceptual design strategy for the first wall in FAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, C.; Di Gironimo, G.; Renno, F.

    2015-09-01

    Satellite tokamaks are conceived with the main purpose of developing new or alternative ITER- and DEMO-relevant technologies, able to contribute in resolving the pending issues about plasma operation. In particular, a high criticality needs to be associated to the design of plasma facing components, i.e. first wall (FW) and divertor, due to physical, topological and thermo-structural reasons. In such a context, the design of the FW in FAST fusion plant, whose operational range is close to ITER’s one, takes place. According to the mission of experimental satellites, the FW design strategy, which is presented in this paper relies on a series of innovative design choices and proposals with a particular attention to the typical key points of plasma facing components design. Such an approach, taking into account a series of involved physical constraints and functional requirements to be fulfilled, marks a clear borderline with the FW solution adopted in ITER, in terms of basic ideas, manufacturing aspects, remote maintenance procedure, manifolds management, cooling cycle and support system configuration.

  8. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Dodd, E.; Huffman, E. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  9. Systematic analysis of direct-drive baseline designs for shock ignition with the Laser MégaJoule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon V.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present direct-drive target design studies for the laser mégajoule using two distinct initial aspect ratios (A = 34 and A = 5. Laser pulse shapes are optimized by a random walk method and drive power variations are used to cover a wide variety of implosion velocities between 260 km/s and 365 km/s. For selected implosion velocities and for each initial aspect ratio, scaled-target families are built in order to find self-ignition threshold. High-gain shock ignition is also investigated in the context of Laser MégaJoule for marginally igniting targets below their own self-ignition threshold.

  10. A novel design of feedback control system for plasma horizontal position in IR-T1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghidokht, A.; Khodabakhsh, R. [Department of physics, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Determination of accurate plasma horizontal position during plasma discharge is essential to transport it to a control system based on feedback. By using the plasma-circuits linearized model, Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) based controllers and a first order transfer function representing the power supply (PS) dynamics of vertical coil system for IR-T1 tokamak, we analyzed step feedback response of the overall system of IR-T1 tokamak and corresponding Bode diagrams for two cases with and without the plasma resistance and the eddy currents distribution. Also we did experiments for determination of plasma horizontal displacement in this tokamak. This work is done by four magnetic probes that are installed on the circular contour of the tokamak. This data used as input to the feedback controller to validate the performance of it. Results of feedback response analysis show that the controller has good performance. Due to approximations in the controller design, construction, installation and implementation of the controller is necessary and this is the purpose of our future works.

  11. Improving concept design of divertor support system for FAST tokamak using TRIZ theory and AHP approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gironimo, G., E-mail: giuseppe.digironimo@unina.it [Association Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Carfora, D.; Esposito, G.; Labate, C.; Mozzillo, R.; Renno, F.; Lanzotti, A. [Association Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Siuko, M. [VTT Systems Engineering, Tekniikankatu 1, 33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Optimization of the RH system for the FAST divertor using TRIZ. • Participative design approach using virtual reality. • Comparison of product alternatives in an immersive virtual reality environment. • Prioritization of concept alternatives based on AHP. -- Abstract: The paper focuses on the application of the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ) to divertor Remote Handling (RH) issues in Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST), a satellite tokamak acting as a test bed for the study and the development of innovative technologies oriented to ITER and DEMO programs. The objective of this study consists in generating concepts or solutions able to overcome design and technical weak points in the current maintenance procedure. Two different concepts are designed with the help of a parametric CAD software, CATIA V5, using a top-down modeling approach; kinematic simulations of the remote handling system are performed using Digital Mock-Up (DMU) capabilities of the software. The evaluation of the concepts is carried out involving a group of experts in a participative design approach using virtual reality, classifying the concepts with the help of the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP)

  12. Design and implementation of visual inspection system handed in tokamak flexible in-vessel robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng; Xu, Lifei [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China (China)

    2016-05-15

    In-vessel viewing system (IVVS) is a fundamental tool among the remote handling systems for ITER, which is used to providing information on the status of the in-vessel components. The basic functional requirement of in-vessel visual inspection system is to perform a fast intervention with adequate optical resolution. In this paper, we present the software and hardware solution, which is designed and implemented for tokamak in-vessel viewing system that installed on end-effector of flexible in-vessel robot working under vacuum and high temperature. The characteristic of our in-vessel viewing system consists of two parts: binocular heterogeneous vision inspection tool and first wall scene emersion based augment virtuality. The former protected with water-cooled shield is designed to satisfy the basic functional requirement of visual inspection system, which has the capacity of large field of view and high-resolution for detection precision. The latter, achieved by overlaying first wall tiles images onto virtual first wall scene model in 3D virtual reality simulation system, is designed for convenient, intuitive and realistic-looking visual inspection instead of viewing the status of first wall only by real-time monitoring or off-line images sequences. We present the modular division of system, each of them in smaller detail, and go through some of the design choices according to requirements of in-vessel visual inspection task.

  13. A modularized operator interface framework for Tokamak based on MVC design pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xuan; Zheng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Ming, E-mail: zhangming@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Jing; Zhuang, G.; Ding, T. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Our framework is based on MVC design pattern. • XML is used to cope with minor difference between different applications. • Functions dealing with EPICS and MDSplus have been modularized into reusable modules. • The modularized framework will shorten J-TEXT's software development cycle. - Abstract: Facing various and continually changing experimental needs, the J-TEXT Tokamak experiment requires home-made software applications developed for different sub-systems. Though dealing with different specific problems, these software applications usually share a lot of functionalities in common. With the goal of improving the productivity of research groups, J-TEXT has designed a C# desktop application framework which is mainly focused on operator interface development. Following the Model–View–Controller (MVC) design pattern, the main functionality dealing with Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) or MDSplus has been modularized into reusable modules. Minor difference among applications can be coped with XML configuration files. In this case, developers are able to implement various kinds of operator interface without knowing the implementation details of the bottom functions in Models, mainly focusing on Views and Controllers. This paper presents J-TEXT C# desktop application framework, introducing the technology of fast development of the modularized operator interface. Some experimental applications designed in this framework have been already deployed in J-TEXT, and will be introduced in this paper.

  14. TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A. (eds.)

    1986-09-01

    Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

  15. Preliminary conceptual design of a Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR). Status report, January 1978--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.L. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The DTHR preliminary conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined fusion reactor fitted with a fertile thorium blanket. The fusion driver concept is based on a beam driven plasma, but at sufficiently high plasma densities that neutrons originating from the interactions of bulk plasma ions contribute significantly to the wall loading. The tokamak has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.2 m, and the elongation is 1.6. All of the magnetic coil systems are superconducting Nb/sub 3/Sn based on the Large Coil Project (LCP) technology. The toroidal field (TF) coils employ an innovative concept, the ''compact D'' configuration. An engineered bundle divertor concept has been developed based on the bundle divertor design techniques developed for TNS and ISX-B. A thermal power of 150MW of 200 keV deuterium is injected into the plasma through six ducts of a positive ion, neutral beam injection system (NBIS). A water cooled, 316 stainless steel vacuum vessel concept was developed and initial scoping analyses look encouraging. The fusile fuel handling system was evaluated and defined. Details of the tritium injection system remain to be developed. Tritium breeding will be assessed in subsequent phases of the DTHR operation. The fusion driver provides a neutron first wall loading of 2MW/m/sup 2/ for fissile production in the blanket.

  16. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  17. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J., E-mail: yangzj@hust.edu.cn; Ma, X. D.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Zhu, Y. L. [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W. [Davis Millimeter Wave Research Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  18. A new ignition hohlraum design for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Li; Zhensheng, Dai; Wudi, Zheng; Jianfa, Gu; Peijun, Gu; Shiyang, Zou; Jie, Liu; Shaoping, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a six-cylinder-port hohlraum is proposed to provide high symmetry flux on capsule. It is designed to ignite a capsule with 1.2 mm radius in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) . Flux symmetry and laser energy are calculated by using three dimensional view factor method and laser energy balance in hohlraums. Plasma conditions are analyzed based on the two dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. There is no Ylm (l<=4) asymmetry in the six-cylinder-port hohlraum when the influences of laser entrance holes (LEHs) and laser spots cancel each other out with suitable target parameters. A radiation drive with 300 eV and good flux symmetry can be achieved with use of laser energy of 2.3 MJ and 500 TW peak power. According to the simulations, the electron temperature and the electron density on the wall of laser cone are high and low, respectively, which are similar to those of outer cones in the hohlraums on National Ignition Facility (NIF). And the laser intensity is also as low...

  19. Design and Analysis of Steerable ECRH Launcher for SST-1 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hardik; Shukla, B. K.

    2017-07-01

    In the tokamaks ECRH system is used for pre-ionization, start up, heating, current drive and suppression of NTMs (Neo Classical Tearing Modes). A Standard ECRH system consists of high power microwave source Gyrotron, circular corrugated waveguide based transmission line and launcher. The Focused ECH power is launched into plasma through launcher. The microwave beam emerges out from circular corrugated waveguide and propagates freely in air with finite divergence. So focusing and plane mirror combination is used to launch focused beam in plasma. Thus an ECRH launcher consists of metallic profiled and plane mirror, UHV compatible vacuum barrier window and a UHV gate valve. One 42 GHz gyrotron capable of delivering 500 kW of power for 500 ms and other 82 GHz gyrotron capable of delivering 200 kW of power for 1000s are used for SST-1 ECRH system. The launcher design consists of mirror design, design of supports and design of steering mechanism to provide suitable movements with minimum backless error. The whole assembly is UHV compatible. The launcher is capable of steering the beams by ±20° in both toroidal and poloidal directions. Mirrors are given motion by means of one rotary and one linear feedthrough. For 82 GHz launcher active cooling is provided, whereas for 42 GHz launcher no active cooling is provided. A detailed analysis is carried out for the mirrors of the high power launcher. The heat load for the 82 GHz launcher is 2 kW ( 1% absorption) and for 42 GHz launcher it is 5 kW. For 82 GHz launcher, the maximum steady state surface temperatures of focusing and reflecting mirrors are 315K and 323K and von-mises stresses are within 10 MPa. Similarly for 42 GHz launcher maximum temperatures observed during 500 ms pulse are 301K and 303K for focusing and reflecting mirrors respectively. This paper explains the mechanical and thermal design and analysis of the launcher for the ECRH system.

  20. A conceptual design of a low resistance vacuum vessel for the Steady State Tokamak Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamada, Masao; Tomita, Mitsuru (Mitsubishi Fusion Center, Tokyo (Japan)); Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nishio, Satoshi; Seki, Yasushi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    A design study on the vacuum vessel of the Steady State Tokamak Reactor has been performed in order to provide a realistic structural concept for a fusion reactor. The vacuum vessel and shield are integrated to form a double-thin-wall structure filled with stainless steel and water resulting in a low one-turn electric resistance of {proportional to}4 {mu}{Omega} without insulating breaks or bellows. The reinforcement plates are welded between the inner and outer skins of the double-thin-wall structure, and shielding units are installed in every chamber with electrical insulation from these skins and plates. As a result, the requirements for the vacuum vessel can be realized by this simple structure alone. Transient electromagnetic and structural analysis has been performed for a three-dimensional shell model in the plasma disruption condition of plasma current 12 MA and current decay time 20 ms. An eddy current, about 95% of plasma current, is induced on the vacuum vessel, and a maximum magnetic pressure {proportional to}5.8 MPa is caused by the coupling with the toroidal field. The maximum stress intensity for the magnetic pressure is about 216 MPa. This low resistance vacuum vessel is extremely effective in shielding the change of the magnetic field in the superconducting toroidal and poloidal field coils during a plasma disruption. In summary, the feasibility and features of this new type of vacuum vessel concept have been shown in this study. (orig.).

  1. Design and implementation of new control room system in Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, H.; Zamanian, H.; Gheidi, M.; Kheiri-Fard, M.; Kouhi, A.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is design and implementation of an up-to-date control room. The previous control room had a lot of constraints and it was not apposite to the sophisticated diagnostic systems as well as to the modern control and multivariable systems. Although it provided the best output for the considered experiments and implementing offline algorithms among all similar plants, it needed to be developed to provide more capability for complex algorithm mechanisms and this work introduces our efforts in this area. Accordingly, four leading systems were designed and implemented, including real-time control system, online Data Acquisition System (DAS), offline DAS, monitoring and data transmission system. In the control system, three real-time control modules were established based on Digital Signal Processor (DSP). Thanks to them, implementation of the classic and linear and nonlinear intelligent controllers was possible to control the plasma position and its elongation. Also, online DAS was constructed in two modules. Using them, voltages and currents of charge for the capacitor banks and pressure of different parts in vacuum vessel were measured and monitored. Likewise, by real-time processing of the online data, the safety protocol of plant performance was accomplished. In addition, the offline DAS was organized in 13 modules based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This system can be used for gathering all diagnostic, control, and performance data in 156 channels. Data transmission system and storing mechanism in the server was provided by data transmitting network and MDSplus standard protocol. Moreover, monitoring software was designed so that it could display the required plots for physical analyses. Taking everything into account, this new platform can improve the quality and quantity of research activities in plasma physics for Damavand tokamak.

  2. The design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P. S.; Ross, J. S.; Froula, D. H.; Daub, K. D.; Galbraith, J.; Glenzer, S.; Hatch, B.; Katz, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.; Manha, D.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Montgomery, D.; Moody, J.; Swadling, G. F.; Weaver, J.

    2016-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs. We report on the design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beam splitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ0-210 nm) will be used to optimize the scattered signal for plasma densities of 5 × 1020 electrons/cm3 while a 3ω probe will be used for experiments investigating lower density plasmas of 1 × 1019 electrons/cm3. We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS telescope, spectrometer, and streak camera; these will be used to assess the background levels at NIF. Phase II will include the design and installation of a probe laser.

  3. Design of the neutron imaging pinhole for use at the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, Valerie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Felix P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilde, Carl H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilke, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic is designed to be used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This instrument will be used to image both primary (14MeV neutrons) and down scattered (6-8MeV neutrons). The pinhole body sits 225mm from the target, while the scintillator and recording systems are located 28m from the target. The diagnostic uses port 90, 315 and the recording system is located in a specifically built room located outside of switchyard I. The location of the pinhole and the recording system combine to give a magnification of 104. The recording of both the primary and downscattered image is done by recording the image from both the front and back side of the scintillator.

  4. The preliminary design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P.; Ross, J. S.; Froula, D.; Galbraith, J.; Glenzer, S.; Hatch, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Montgomery, D.; Moody, J.; Swadling, G.; Weaver, J.; Vergel de Dios, G.; Vitalich, M.

    2016-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion programs. We report on the preliminary design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beamsplitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ0 between 185-215 nm) will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 5 x 1020 electrons/cm3 while a 3ω probe will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 1 x 1019 electrons/cm3. We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS recording system to measure background levels at NIF and phase II will include the integration of a probe laser.

  5. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatherley, V. E.; Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-11-01

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  6. High-Performance Cryogenic Designs for OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; McCrory, R. L.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvydky, A.

    2016-10-01

    The main advantage of laser symmetric direct drive (SDD) is a significantly higher coupled drive laser energy to the hot-spot internal energy at stagnation compared to that of laser indirect drive. Because of coupling losses resulting from cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), however, reaching ignition conditions on the NIF with SDD requires designs with excessively large in-flight aspect ratios ( 30). Results of cryogenic implosions performed on OMEGA show that such designs are unstable to short-scale nonuniformity growth during shell implosion. Several CBET reduction strategies have been proposed in the past. This talk will discuss high-performing designs using several CBET-mitigation techniques, including using drive laser beams smaller than the target size and wavelength detuning. Designs that are predicted to reach alpha burning regimes as well as a gain of 10 to 40 at the NIF-scale will be presented. Hydrodynamically scaled OMEGA designs with similar CBET-reduction techniques will also be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, V. E., E-mail: vef@lanl.gov; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  8. Design of the high-resolution soft X-ray imaging system on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianchao; Ding, Yonghua, E-mail: yhding@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xiao, Zhengyu; Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A new soft X-ray diagnostic system has been designed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) aiming to observe and survey the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities. The system consists of five cameras located at the same toroidal position. Each camera has 16 photodiode elements. Three imaging cameras view the internal plasma region (r/a < 0.7) with a spatial resolution about 2 cm. By tomographic method, heat transport outside from the 1/1 mode X-point during the sawtooth collapse is found. The other two cameras with a higher spatial resolution 1 cm are designed for monitoring local MHD activities respectively in plasma core and boundary.

  9. Simulated performance of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic designed for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. S., E-mail: ross36@llnl.gov; Datte, P.; Divol, L.; Galbraith, J.; Hatch, B.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Moody, J. D.; Swadling, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Froula, D. H.; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Weaver, J. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An optical Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed for the National Ignition Facility to characterize under-dense plasmas. We report on the design of the system and the expected performance for different target configurations. The diagnostic is designed to spatially and temporally resolve the Thomson scattered light from laser driven targets. The diagnostic will collect scattered light from a 50 × 50 × 200 μm volume. The optical design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths. A deep-UV probe beam (λ{sub 0} = 210 nm) will be used to Thomson scatter from electron plasma densities of ∼5 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} while a 3ω probe will be used for plasma densities of ∼1 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The diagnostic package contains two spectrometers: the first to resolve Thomson scattering from ion acoustic wave fluctuations and the second to resolve scattering from electron plasma wave fluctuations. Expected signal levels relative to background will be presented for typical target configurations (hohlraums and a planar foil).

  10. A new ignition hohlraum design for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wu, Chang-Shu; Dai, Zhen-Sheng; Zheng, Wu-Di; Gu, Jian-Fa; Gu, Pei-Jun; Zou, Shi-Yang; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Shao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a six-cylinder-port hohlraum is proposed to provide high symmetry flux on capsule. It is designed to ignite a capsule with 1.2-mm radius in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Flux symmetry and laser energy are calculated by using three-dimensional view factor method and laser energy balance in hohlraum. Plasma conditions are analyzed based on the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. There is no Y lm (l ⩽ 4) asymmetry in the six-cylinder-port hohlraum when the influences of laser entrance holes (LEHs) and laser spots cancel each other out with suitable target parameters. A radiation drive with 300 eV and good flux symmetry can be achieved by using a laser energy of 2.3 MJ and peak power of 500 TW. According to the simulations, the electron temperature and the electron density on the wall of laser cone are high and low, respectively, which are similar to those of outer cones in the hohlraums on National Ignition Facility (NIF). And the laser intensity is also as low as those of NIF outer cones. So the backscattering due to laser plasma interaction (LPI) is considered to be negligible. The six-cyliner-port hohlraum could be superior to the traditional cylindrical hohlraum and the octahedral hohlraum in both higher symmetry and lower backscattering without supplementary technology at an acceptable laser energy level. It is undoubted that the hohlraum will add to the diversity of ICF approaches. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11435011 and 11575034).

  11. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Boege, Steven J.; Boyd, Robert D.; Davis, Donald T.; Demaret, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark; Gates, Alan J.; Holdener, Fred R.; Knopp, Carl F.; Kyker, R. D.; Lauman, C. W.; McCarville, Tom J.; Miller, John L.; Miller-Kamm, Victoria J.; Rivera, W. E.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Severyn, J. R.; Sheem, Sang K.; Thomas, Stan W.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Wang, David Y.; Yoeman, M. F.; Zacharias, Richard A.; Chocol, Clifford J.; Hollis, J.; Whitaker, Daniel E.; Brucker, J.; Bronisz, L.; Sheridan, T.

    1999-07-01

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro- E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensor are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams.

  12. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  13. A novel three-axis cylindrical hohlraum designed for inertial confinement fusion ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kuang, Longyu; Jing, Longfei; Lin, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lu; Li, Lilin; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A novel ignition hohlraum for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion is proposed, which is named as three-axis cylindrical hohlraum (TACH). TACH is a kind of 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) hohlraum, which is made of three cylindrical hohlraums orthogonally jointed. Laser beams are injected through every entrance hole with the same incident angle of 55{\\deg}. The view-factor simulation result shows that the time-varying drive asymmetry of TACH is no more than 1.0% in the whole drive pulse period without any supplementary technology such as beam phasing etc. Its coupling efficiency of TACH is close to that of 6 LEHs spherical hohlraum with corresponding size. Its plasma-filling time is close to typical cylindrical ignition hohlraum. Its laser plasma interaction has as low backscattering as the outer cone of the cylindrical ignition hohlraum. Therefore, the proposed hohlraum provides a competitive candidate for ignition hohlraum.

  14. A novel three-axis cylindrical hohlraum designed for inertial confinement fusion ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Longyu; Li, Hang; Jing, Longfei; Lin, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lu; Li, Liling; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A novel ignition hohlraum for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion is proposed, which is named three-axis cylindrical hohlraum (TACH). TACH is a kind of 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) hohlraum, which is orthogonally jointed of three cylindrical hohlraums. Laser beams are injected through every entrance hole with the same incident angle of 55°. A view-factor simulation result shows that the time-varying drive asymmetry of TACH is less than 1.0% in the whole drive pulse period without any supplementary technology. Coupling efficiency of TACH is close to that of 6 LEHs spherical hohlraum with corresponding size. Its plasma-filling time is close to that of typical cylindrical ignition hohlraum. Its laser plasma interaction has as low backscattering as the outer cone of the cylindrical ignition hohlraum. Therefore, TACH combines most advantages of various hohlraums and has little predictable risk, providing an important competitive candidate for ignition hohlraum. PMID:27703250

  15. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  16. Design of a collective scattering system for small scale turbulence study in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Lee, D. J.; Nam, Y. U.; Leem, J.; Kim, T. K.

    2016-04-01

    The design characteristics of a multi-channel collective (or coherent) scattering system for small scale turbulence study in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), which is planned to be installed in 2017, are given in this paper. A few critical issues are discussed in depth such as the Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects on the beam polarization, radial spatial resolution, probe beam frequency, polarization, and power. A proper and feasible optics with the 300 GHz probe beam, which was designed based on these issues, provides a simultaneous measurement of electron density fluctuations at four discrete poloidal wavenumbers up to 24 cm-1. The upper limit corresponds to the normalized wavenumber kθρe of ˜0.15 in nominal KSTAR plasmas. To detect the scattered beam power and extract phase information, a quadrature detection system consisting of four-channel antenna/detector array and electronics will be employed.

  17. A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation code for design of position and shape control on tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Senda, Ikuo

    1999-04-01

    A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation (TSPS) code has been developed for investigating the position and shape control on tokamak plasmas. The analyses of three-dimensional eddy currents on the conducting components around the plasma and the two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium are taken into account in this code. The code can analyze the plasma position and shape control during the minor disruption in which the deformation of plasma is not negligible. Using the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) parameters, some examples of calculations are shown in this paper. (author)

  18. Conceptual Design of a Small Aspect Ratio Tokamak of Variable Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Velazquez, Julio; Arroyo-Diaz, Ismael; Corona-Rivera, Domenica; Chavez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    We show the preliminary work being done in order to propose a mid-term project for a Mexican nuclear fusion programme, with the necessary flexibility to produce original results. The purpose is to study the feasibility of a medium size, low aspect ratio tokamak, with the capability of actively controlling the shape and position of the plasma column. Its objective would be to explore the necessary operational conditions for high β and high bootstrap currents. The 3D-MAPTOR code is used in order to estimate the magnetic field surfaces behaviour. The TEMEX tokamak would consist in a stainless-steel toroidal vacuum chamber with semi-rectangular cross section, with external toroidal and poloidail field coils. The central post would include the central solenoid, as well as inner control coils. The toroidal magnetic field is produced by 10 rectangular coils, made out of 40 turns of water cooled copper conductor. Six poloidal field coils have been included, distributed in two groups of three, one on the upper, and another one on the lower side of the torus.

  19. Fast-ignition design transport studies: realistic electron source, integrated PIC-hydrodynamics, imposed magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Larson, D J; Divol, L; Kemp, A J; Bellei, C; Marinak, M M; Key, M H

    2012-01-01

    Transport modeling of idealized, cone-guided fast ignition targets indicates the severe challenge posed by fast-electron source divergence. The hybrid particle-in-cell [PIC] code Zuma is run in tandem with the radiation-hydrodynamics code Hydra to model fast-electron propagation, fuel heating, and thermonuclear burn. The fast electron source is based on a 3D explicit-PIC laser-plasma simulation with the PSC code. This shows a quasi two-temperature energy spectrum, and a divergent angle spectrum (average velocity-space polar angle of 52 degrees). Transport simulations with the PIC-based divergence do not ignite for > 1 MJ of fast-electron energy, for a modest 70 micron standoff distance from fast-electron injection to the dense fuel. However, artificially collimating the source gives an ignition energy of 132 kJ. To mitigate the divergence, we consider imposed axial magnetic fields. Uniform fields ~50 MG are sufficient to recover the artificially collimated ignition energy. Experiments at the Omega laser facil...

  20. Advanced tokamak concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  1. Advanced tokamak concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1996-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  2. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X. [Institution of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  3. Update on design simulations for NIF ignition targets, and the rollup of all specifications into an error budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, S. W.; Herrmann, M. C.; Salmonson, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Pollaine, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Suter, L. J.

    2007-08-01

    Targets intended to produce ignition on NIF are being simulated and the simulations are used to set specifications for target fabrication and other program elements. Recent design work has focused on designs that assume only 1.0 MJ of laser energy instead of the previous 1.6 MJ. To perform with less laser energy, the hohlraum has been redesigned to be more efficient than previously, and the capsules are slightly smaller. Three hohlraum designs are being examined: gas fill, SiO2 foam fill, and SiO2 lined. All have a cocktail wall, and shields mounted between the capsule and the laser entrance holes. Two capsule designs are being considered. One has a graded doped Be(Cu) ablator, and the other graded doped CH(Ge). Both can perform acceptably with recently demonstrated ice layer quality, and with recently demonstrated outer surface roughness. Complete tables of specifications are being prepared for both targets, to be completed this fiscal year. All the specifications are being rolled together into an error budget indicating adequate margin for ignition with the new designs. The dominant source of error is hohlraum asymmetry at intermediate modes 4 8, indicating the importance of experimental techniques to measure and control this asymmetry.

  4. Lower hybrid heating and current drive design for ITER and application for present tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froissard, P.; Rey, G.; Bibet, P.; Goniche, M.; Kazarian, F.; Portafaix, C.; Tonon, G. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Bosia, G.; Bruno, L. [ITER Joint Work Site, Garching (Germany); Kuzikov, S. [Inst. of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Wasastjerna, F. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    The lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive (LHH and CD) System shall provide on ITER off-axis current profile control during burn, main contribution to the non-inductive current generation in the advanced Tokamak scenario, current profile tailoring during ramp up phase, heating and current drive during plasma shut-down, extension of the pulse duration during commissioning phase. The LHH and CD system operates at 5 GHz, this frequency being a trade-off between power absorption by alpha particles and klystron technology and couples a minimum of 50 MW using two ITER ports. This article describes the launcher plug and the transmission lines. Specific converters, such as the mode converters, RF windows and the hyper-guide have now been successfully tested at high power and long pulse duration.

  5. 一种高可靠点火执行级电路的设计%Design of high-reliability ignition execution circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高先锋

    2012-01-01

    火工品点火技术是一种对安全性和可靠性要求极高的技术,一般是一个系统中最关键的执行环节,如果出现问题,轻则导致系统试验失败,重则导致人员伤亡.为了可靠的实现火工品的点火,提出了一种高可靠点火执行级电路的设计方案,通过对点火准备指令、点火指令等信号的可靠接收和滤波,基于点火准备指令的两级延时保护,点火的执行部分多重安全保护等方法,安全准确地实现了对火工品的点火控制,并在某型空空导弹点火装置中得到应用,取得了良好的效果.%The ignition technology of initiators is the one that requires high safety and reliability. It is a critical excutive link for systems. If problem occurs, it will lead to failure of system test, even the personnel injury and death. In order to realize the ignition of initiating devices reliably, a design scheme of high-reliability ignition execution circuit is proposed. By reliably receiving and filtering of instruction signals, like ignition preparation, ignition and so on, the circuit realizes precise ignition control of initiating devices based on a two-stage delay protection of the ignition preparation instruction and multi-protection methods of ignition execution section. It has been applied to some air-to-air missile ignition devices, and achieved good results.

  6. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-01

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  7. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jianfa, E-mail: gu-jianfa@iapcm.ac.cn; Dai, Zhensheng, E-mail: dai-zhensheng@iapcm.ac.cn; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  8. Design and performance of main vacuum pumping system of SST-1 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Ziauddin, E-mail: ziauddin@ipr.res.in; Pathan, Firozkhan; George, Siju; Dhanani, Kalpesh; Paravastu, Yuvakiran; Semwal, Pratibha; Pradhan, Subrata

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •SST-1 Tokamak was successfully commissioned. •Vacuum vessel and cryostat were pumped down to 6.3 × 10{sup −7} mbar and 1.3 × 10{sup −5} mbar. •Leaks developed during baking were detected in-situ by RGA and confirmed later on. •Cryo-pumping effect was observed when LN2 thermal shields reached below 273 K. •Non-standard aluminum wire-seals have shown leak tightness < 1.0 × 10{sup −9} mbar l/s. -- Abstract: Steady-state Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) was installed and it is commissioning for overall vacuum integrity, magnet systems functionality in terms of successful cool down to 4.5 K and charging up to 10 kA current was started from August 2012. Plasma operation of 100 kA current for more than 100 ms was also envisaged. It is comprised of vacuum vessel (VV) and cryostat (CST). Vacuum vessel, an ultra-high (UHV) vacuum chamber with net volume of 23 m{sup 3} was maintained at the base pressure of 6.3 × 10{sup −7} mbar for plasma confinement. Cryostat, a high-vacuum (HV) chamber with empty volume 39 m{sup 3} housing superconducting magnet system, bubble thermal shields and hydraulics for these circuits, maintained at 1.3 × 10{sup −5} mbar in order to provide suitable environment for these components. In order to achieve these ultimate vacuums, two numbers of turbo-molecular pumps (TMP) are installed in vacuum vessel while three numbers of turbo-molecular pumps are installed in cryostat. Initial pumping of both the chambers was carried out by using suitable Roots pumps. PXI based real time controlled system is used for remote operation of the complete pumping operation. In order to achieve UHV inside the vacuum vessel, it was baked at 150 °C for longer duration. Aluminum wire-seals were used for all non-circular demountable ports and a leak tightness < 1.0 × 10{sup −9} mbar l/s were achieved.

  9. Scoping and sensitivity analyses for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sink, D.A.; Gibson, G.

    1979-03-01

    The results of an extensive set of parametric studies are presented which provide analytical data of the effects of various tokamak parameters on the performance and cost of the DTHR (Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor). The studies were centered on a point design which is described in detail. Variations in the device size, neutron wall loading, and plasma aspect ratio are presented, and the effects on direct hardware costs, fissile fuel production (breeding), fusion power production, electrical power consumption, and thermal power production are shown graphically. The studies considered both ignition and beam-driven operations of DTHR and yielded results based on two empirical scaling laws presently used in reactor studies. Sensitivity studies were also made for variations in the following key parameters: the plasma elongation, the minor radius, the TF coil peak field, the neutral beam injection power, and the Z/sub eff/ of the plasma.

  10. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  11. ZTI: Preliminary characterization of an ignition class reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Werley, K. A.

    A preliminary cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class reverse-field pinch (RFP) device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics in a deuterium (DT) plasma is reported. The ZTI design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. Reductions in both device costs and number of steps to commercialization portend a significantly reduced development cost for fusion. The methodology and result and coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for ZTI, which is a device that would follow the 2 to 4 MAzth on an approximately greater than 1996 to 98 timescale.

  12. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Holder, J. P.; Kalantar, D. K.; MacPhee, A. G.; Telford, S.

    2010-10-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  13. Low initial aspect-ratio direct-drive target designs for shock- or self-ignition in the context of the laser Megajoule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, V.; Canaud, B.; Temporal, M.; Ramis, R.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of low initial aspect ratio direct-drive target designs is carried out by varying the implosion velocity and the fuel mass. Starting from two different spherical targets with a given 300 µg-DT mass, optimization of laser pulse and drive power allows to obtain a set of target seeds referenced by their peak implosion velocities and initial aspect ratio (A = 3 and A = 5). Self-ignition is achieved with higher implosion velocity for A = 5-design than for A = 3-design. Then, rescaling is done to extend the set of designs to a huge amount of mass, peak kinetic energies and peak areal densities. Self-ignition kinetic energy threshold Ek is characterized by a dependance of Ek ˜ vβ with β-values which depart from self-ignition models. Nevertheless, self-ignition energy is seen lower for smaller initial aspect ratio. An analysis of Two-Plasmons Decay threshold and Rayleigh-Taylor instability e-folding is carried out and it is shown that two-plasmon decay threshold is always overpassed for all designs. The hydrodynamic stability analysis is performed by embedded models to deal with linear and non-linear regime. It is found that the A = 5-designs are always at the limit of disruption of the shell.

  14. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L., E-mail: laura.savoldi@polito.it; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-15

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study

  15. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-01

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study has been

  16. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K.E. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Finn, P.A.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.

    1980-11-01

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated.

  17. Bridge Wire Electric Ignition Drive Circuits Design%桥丝电点火器的驱动电路设计∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宪国; 曹红松; 赵捍东; 白松

    2015-01-01

    Pulse jet engines are often ignited by gunpowder wrapped bridge wire electric igniter and widely used in aircraft attitude control. The electric igniter needs short-pulse current driving for rapid initiation. In this paper,opto-isolated constant current source and capacitor discharge mode driving circuits are designed for the demand of micro-bridge wire electric igniter. Two kinds of detonating circuit designs implemente the ignition driving of brige wire e-lectric igniter wtih resistance fluctuations. The constant current source mode is capable of long storage life,compact spatial structure and high safety, and the reservoir capacitor mode demonstrates high energy efficiency and fast-acting for quick initiation. Two methods provide reference designs for the pulse jet engines of different engineering requirements.%用于飞行器姿态控制的脉喷发动机常采用火药包裹的桥丝电点火器进行点火,电点火器需要短时脉冲电流驱动。本文针对微小型桥丝电点火器驱动需求,设计了光耦隔离恒流源方式及电容储能脉冲放电驱动电路,均实现了对阻值波动桥丝电点火器的点火驱动。试验证明,光耦隔离恒流源方式可靠性高,安全稳定,电容储能放电方式效率高、作用迅速。该两种设计方法可为脉喷发动机的工程实践提供参考。

  18. Frequency converter design and manufacturing considerations for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbard, R.L.; English, R.E., Jr.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Montesanti, R.C.

    1998-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams, Figure 1. The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1{omega}) of 1.053 {micro}m. Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) produces 1.8 Mj of the third harmonic light (3{omega} or {lambda}=0.35). On NIF the frequency conversion crystals are part of the Final Optics Assembly (FOA), whose two principal functions are to convert the laser light to 3{omega} and focus it on target. In addition, the FOA provides a vacuum window to the target chamber, smoothes the on- target irradiance profile, moves the unconverted light away from the target, and provides signals for alignment and diagnostics. The FOA has four Integrated Optics Modules (IOM), Figure 4, each of which contains two 41 cm square crystals are mounted with the full edge support to micro radian angular and micron flatness tolerances. This paper is intended to be an overview of the important factors that affect frequency conversion on NIF. Chief among these are angular errors arising from crystal growth, finishing, and mounting. The general nature of these errors and how they affect frequency conversion, and finally the importance of a frequency conversion metrology tool in assessing converter performance before opto-mechanical assemblies are installed on NIF will be discussed.

  19. Design and implementation of a 150 GHz single-channel millimeter wave interferometer on Joint TEXT tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X D; Zhuang, G; Yang, Z J; Gao, L; Hu, X W

    2013-04-01

    A simple, single-channel millimeter-wave interferometer system has been designed, fabricated, and installed on the J-TEXT tokamak. For the plasma density anticipated on J-TEXT, a solid-state source operating at 150 GHz has been chosen to minimize errors due to both vibration along the beam path and refraction in the plasma. The new aspect of the interferometer design is to use a subharmonic mixer for detection with a frequency doubled 150 GHz source. It employs a single source which is bias-tuned and modulated with a sawtooth wave form up to 100 kHz in order to generate the intermediate frequency. The 12.5 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator is multiplied to 75 GHz before a final doubler raises it to 150 GHz. A portion of the 75 GHZ power is used for the local oscillator (LO) and is directly connected to the LO input of the subharmonic mixer. The phase is evaluated by a digital phase comparator using a software-based algorithm. Detection noise limits the minimum resolvable phase change with the interferometer to ±0.05 fringe, which corresponds to an averaged electron density change along the chord of ±1.1 × 10(17) m(-2). The maximum measurable electron density is expected to be ∼9 × 10(19) m(-3). A comparison of preliminary results from the millimeter wave interferometer with that from the far-infrared hydrogen cyanide laser (wavelength of 337 μm) interferometer shows good agreement during the pulse flat-top period. The millimeter wave interferometer system will be used as a part of the density feedback control system in the future.

  20. Design and implementation of a 150 GHz single-channel millimeter wave interferometer on Joint TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X. D.; Zhuang, G.; Yang, Z. J.; Gao, L.; Hu, X. W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-04-15

    A simple, single-channel millimeter-wave interferometer system has been designed, fabricated, and installed on the J-TEXT tokamak. For the plasma density anticipated on J-TEXT, a solid-state source operating at 150 GHz has been chosen to minimize errors due to both vibration along the beam path and refraction in the plasma. The new aspect of the interferometer design is to use a subharmonic mixer for detection with a frequency doubled 150 GHz source. It employs a single source which is bias-tuned and modulated with a sawtooth wave form up to 100 kHz in order to generate the intermediate frequency. The 12.5 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator is multiplied to 75 GHz before a final doubler raises it to 150 GHz. A portion of the 75 GHZ power is used for the local oscillator (LO) and is directly connected to the LO input of the subharmonic mixer. The phase is evaluated by a digital phase comparator using a software-based algorithm. Detection noise limits the minimum resolvable phase change with the interferometer to {+-}0.05 fringe, which corresponds to an averaged electron density change along the chord of {+-}1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -2}. The maximum measurable electron density is expected to be {approx}9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. A comparison of preliminary results from the millimeter wave interferometer with that from the far-infrared hydrogen cyanide laser (wavelength of 337 {mu}m) interferometer shows good agreement during the pulse flat-top period. The millimeter wave interferometer system will be used as a part of the density feedback control system in the future.

  1. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements ancillary systems SSDR 1.5.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, J.; Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Ancillary Systems, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  2. Design and installation of the electron cyclotron wave system for the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, T.P.; Alberti, S.; Henderson, M.A.; Pochelon, A.; Tran, M.Q. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-10-01

    The design of a combined 82.7 GHz and 118 GHz, 4.5 MW, 2.0 s electron cyclotron wave (ECW) system for heating and current drive on TCV is described. Low and high power test results of the RF source, transmission line and launching antenna are presented. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs.

  3. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements automatic alignment system SSDR 1.5.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Automatic Alignment System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  4. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated safety systems SSDR 1.5.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, R.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Safety System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  5. Innovative Comparison of Transient Ignition Temperature at the Booster Interface, New Stainless Steel Pyrovalve Primer Chamber Assembly "V" (PCA) Design Versus the Current Aluminum "Y" PCA Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; McDougle, Stephen H.; Garcia,Roberto; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Sipes, William; Rickman, Steven; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of four spacecraft pyrovalve anomalies that occurred during ground testing was conducted by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) in 2008. In all four cases, a common aluminum (Al) primer chamber assembly (PCA) was used with dual NASA Standard Initiators (NSIs) and the nearly simultaneous (separated by less than 80 microseconds) firing of both initiators failed to ignite the booster charge. The results of the assessment and associated test program were reported in AIAA Paper AIAA-2008-4798, NESC Independent Assessment of Pyrovalve Ground Test Anomalies. As a result of the four Al PCA anomalies, and the test results and findings of the NESC assessment, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project team decided to make changes to the PCA. The material for the PCA body was changed from aluminum (Al) to stainless steel (SS) to avoid melting, distortion, and potential leakage of the NSI flow passages when the device functioned. The flow passages, which were interconnected in a Y-shaped configuration (Y-PCA) in the original design, were changed to a V-shaped configuration (V-PCA). The V-shape was used to more efficiently transfer energy from the NSIs to the booster. Development and qualification testing of the new design clearly demonstrated faster booster ignition times compared to the legacy AL Y-PCA design. However, the final NESC assessment report recommended that the SS V-PCA be experimentally characterized and quantitatively compared to the Al Y-PCA design. This data was deemed important for properly evaluating the design options for future NASA projects. This test program has successfully quantified the improvement of the SS V-PCA over the Al Y-PCA. A phase B of the project was also conducted and evaluated the effect of firing command skew and enlargement of flame channels to further assist spacecraft applications.

  6. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs.

  7. Design and Analysis of Steerable ECRH Launcher for SST-1 Tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mistry Hardik

    2017-01-01

    A detailed analysis is carried out for the mirrors of the high power launcher. The heat load for the 82 GHz launcher is 2 kW (~1% absorption and for 42 GHz launcher it is 5 kW. For 82 GHz launcher, the maximum steady state surface temperatures of focusing and reflecting mirrors are 315K and 323K and von-mises stresses are within 10 MPa. Similarly for 42 GHz launcher maximum temperatures observed during 500 ms pulse are 301K and 303K for focusing and reflecting mirrors respectively. This paper explains the mechanical and thermal design and analysis of the launcher for the ECRH system.

  8. Ignitable solids having an arrayed structure and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, David P.; Reeves, Robert V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Henry, Michael David

    2017-08-08

    The present invention relates to the design and manufacture of an ignitable solid, where the solid is composed of an array of ignitable regions. In some examples, the array provides a three-dimensional periodic arrangement of such ignitable regions. The ignitable region can have any useful geometry and geometric arrangement within the solid, and methods of making such regions are also described herein.

  9. Designs of LiMIT as a Limiter in the EAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) provide a constantly refreshing, self-healing surface that can reduce erosion and thermal stress damage to prolong device lifetime, and additionally decrease edge recycling, reduce impurities, and enhance plasma performance. The Liquid Metal Infused Trench (LiMIT) system, developed at UIUC, has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) driven flow of liquid lithium through series of solid trenches. This TEMHD effect drives liquid lithium in fusion systems using the plasma heat flux and the toroidal magnetic field, and the surface tension of the liquid lithium maintains a fresh surface on top of the solid trenches. LiMIT has been successfully tested at UIUC as well as HT-7 and Magnum PSI at heat fluxes up to 3 MW/m2. The next step is demonstrating system viability in full-scale fusion-relevant conditions. In collaboration with a team in Hefei, design and testing has begun for a large scale LiMIT system that will act as a limiter in EAST. The designs improve upon previous versions of LiMIT tested at Illinois and incorporate lessons learned from earlier tests of liquid metal PFCs at EAST. Existing infrastructure is used to load and supply lithium to the system, and the LiMIT trenches will help maintain a smooth, fresh surface as well as aid in propelling the lithium out of direct plasma flux to improve heat transfer. Supported by DOE/ALPS DE-FG02-99ER54515.

  10. A practical globalization of one-shot optimization for optimal design of tokamak divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blommaert, Maarten; Dekeyser, Wouter; Baelmans, Martine; Gauger, Nicolas R.; Reiter, Detlev

    2017-01-01

    In past studies, nested optimization methods were successfully applied to design of the magnetic divertor configuration in nuclear fusion reactors. In this paper, so-called one-shot optimization methods are pursued. Due to convergence issues, a globalization strategy for the one-shot solver is sought. Whereas Griewank introduced a globalization strategy using a doubly augmented Lagrangian function that includes primal and adjoint residuals, its practical usability is limited by the necessity of second order derivatives and expensive line search iterations. In this paper, a practical alternative is offered that avoids these drawbacks by using a regular augmented Lagrangian merit function that penalizes only state residuals. Additionally, robust rank-two Hessian estimation is achieved by adaptation of Powell's damped BFGS update rule. The application of the novel one-shot approach to magnetic divertor design is considered in detail. For this purpose, the approach is adapted to be complementary with practical in parts adjoint sensitivities. Using the globalization strategy, stable convergence of the one-shot approach is achieved.

  11. A practical globalization of one-shot optimization for optimal design of tokamak divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blommaert, Maarten, E-mail: maarten.blommaert@kuleuven.be [Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-4), FZ Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dekeyser, Wouter; Baelmans, Martine [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Gauger, Nicolas R. [TU Kaiserslautern, Chair for Scientific Computing, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Reiter, Detlev [Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-4), FZ Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    In past studies, nested optimization methods were successfully applied to design of the magnetic divertor configuration in nuclear fusion reactors. In this paper, so-called one-shot optimization methods are pursued. Due to convergence issues, a globalization strategy for the one-shot solver is sought. Whereas Griewank introduced a globalization strategy using a doubly augmented Lagrangian function that includes primal and adjoint residuals, its practical usability is limited by the necessity of second order derivatives and expensive line search iterations. In this paper, a practical alternative is offered that avoids these drawbacks by using a regular augmented Lagrangian merit function that penalizes only state residuals. Additionally, robust rank-two Hessian estimation is achieved by adaptation of Powell's damped BFGS update rule. The application of the novel one-shot approach to magnetic divertor design is considered in detail. For this purpose, the approach is adapted to be complementary with practical in parts adjoint sensitivities. Using the globalization strategy, stable convergence of the one-shot approach is achieved.

  12. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements computer system SSDR 1.5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, J.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-05

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Computer System, WBS 1.5.1 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in ICCS (WBS 1.5) which is the document directly above.

  13. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated timing system SSDR 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedwald, J.; Van Aersau, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-08-26

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Timing System, WBS 1.5.3 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The Integrated Timing System provides all temporally-critical hardware triggers to components and equipment in other NIF systems.

  14. Design and Analysis of the Poloidal Field Grid Power Supply System for the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a new project - the poloidal field (PF) grid power supply system to replace the ac flywheel generator power supply system on the basis of the present running parameters of the HT-7 poloidal field and the short-circuit capacity of our transformer substation.The designed parameters of the PF grid power supply system have been verified to meet the requirements of the heating field (HF) and the vertical field (VF). In the meantime, in order to reduce the disturbance to the local power grid, the device of reactive power and harmonic current compensation has been added. Experimental results have confirmed the feasibility of the PF grid power supply system. Compared with the ac flywheel generator, the PF grid power supply system has the advantages of lower noise, precise control, convenient maintenance, simple operation and cost savings.

  15. ZTI: An ignition class reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Werley, K. A.

    A cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class RFP device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics and burn control in a DT plasma is reported. With major and minor plasma radii R(sub T) = 2.4m and tau(sub p) = 0.4 m, respectively, and for conservative extrapolations of experimental energy-confinement times, ion-density profiles, and impurity levels, the ZTI operating conditions during a 5-s period of constant fusion power are: toroidal plasma current I(sub phi) is approximately equal to 9 MA, plasma temperature T is approximately equal to 11 keV, plasma density n(sub i) is approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 20)/cu m, fusion power P(sub F) is approximately equal to 100 MW, and physics Q-value Q(sub p) is approximately equal to 5 for a total machine size that corresponds to P(sub F)/M(sub FPC) is approximately equal to 590 kW/tonne. This physics design point was adopted as a strawman with which to examine the requirements of ohmic heating to DT ignition and to perform a cost-optimized magnetics design. The ZTl design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. The methodology and results of coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for this device that would follow the 2 to 4 MA ZTH presently under construction.

  16. Design of a tokamak fusion reactor first wall armor against neutral beam impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    The maximum temperatures and thermal stresses are calculated for various first wall design proposals, using both analytical solutions and the TRUMP and SAP IV Computer Codes. Beam parameters, such as pulse time, cycle time, and beam power, are varied. It is found that uncooled plates should be adequate for near-term devices, while cooled protection will be necessary for fusion power reactors. Graphite and tungsten are selected for analysis because of their desirable characteristics. Graphite allows for higher heat fluxes compared to tungsten for similar pulse times. Anticipated erosion (due to surface effects) and plasma impurity fraction are estimated. Neutron irradiation damage is also discussed. Neutron irradiation damage (rather than erosion, fatigue, or creep) is estimated to be the lifetime-limiting factor on the lifetime of the component in fusion power reactors. It is found that the use of tungsten in fusion power reactors, when directly exposed to the plasma, will cause serious plasma impurity problems; graphite should not present such an impurity problem.

  17. Impact of fuel molecular structure on auto-ignition behavior – Design rules for future high performance gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Boot, Michael D.

    2016-12-29

    At a first glance, ethanol, toluene and methyl tert-butyl ether look nothing alike with respect to their molecular structures. Nevertheless, all share a similarly high octane number. A comprehensive review of the inner workings of such octane boosters has been long overdue, particularly at a time when feedstocks for transport fuels other than crude oil, such as natural gas and biomass, are enjoying a rapidly growing market share. As high octane fuels sell at a considerable premium over gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, new entrants into the refining business should take note and gear their processes towards knock resistant compounds if they are to maximize their respective bottom lines. Starting from crude oil, the route towards this goal is well established. Starting from biomass or natural gas, however, it is less clear what dots on the horizon to aim for. The goal of this paper is to offer insight into the chemistry behind octane boosters and to subsequently distill from this knowledge, taking into account recent advances in engine technology, multiple generic design rules that guarantee good anti-knock performance. Careful analysis of the literature suggests that highly unsaturated (cyclic) compounds are the preferred octane boosters for modern spark-ignition engines. Additional side chains of any variety will dilute this strong performance. Multi-branched paraffins come in distant second place, owing to their negligible sensitivity. Depending on the type and location of functional oxygen groups, oxygenates can have a beneficial, neutral or detrimental impact on anti-knock quality.

  18. The use of beam propagation modeling of Beamlet and Nova to ensure a ``safe`` National Ignition Facility laser system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henesian, M.A.; Renard, P.; Auerbach, J. [and others

    1997-03-17

    An exhaustive set of Beamlet and Nova laser system simulations were performed over a wide range of power levels in order to gain understanding about the statistical trends in Nova and Beamlet`s experimental data sets, and to provide critical validation of propagation tools and design ``rules`` applied to the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The experiments considered for modeling were at 220-ps FWHM duration with unpumped booster slabs on Beamlet, and 100-ps FWHM with pumped 31.5-cm and 46-cm disk amplifiers on Nova. Simulations indicated that on Beamlet, the AB (the intensity pendent phase shift parameter characterizing the tendency towards beam filamentation) for the booster amplifier stage without pumping, would be nearly identical to the AB expected on NIF at the peak of a typical 20-ns long shaped pulse intended for ICF target irradiation. Therefore, with energies less than I kJ in short-pulses, we examined on Beamlet the comparable AB-driven filamentation conditions predicted for long ICF pulseshapes in the 18 kJ regime on the NIF, while avoiding fluence dependent surface damage. Various spatial filter pinhole configurations were examined on Nova and Beamlet. Open transport spatial filter pinholes were used in some experiments to allow the direct measurement of the onset of beam filamentation. Schlieren images on Beamlet of the far field irradiance measuring the scattered light fraction outside of 33-{micro}radians were also obtained and compared to modeled results.

  19. Design and analysis of x-ray driven shock wave equation-of-state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Lazicki, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Erskine, D. J.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Meezan, N. B.; Peterson, J. L.; NIF EOS Team

    2016-10-01

    The equation-of-state (EOS) is important for describing and predicting material properties in the field of high energy density physics. Especially important is the EOS of materials compressed and heated from ambient conditions by shockwaves. For most materials, experimental data at high pressures, much above 10 Mbar, is sparse. The large energy and power of the National Ignition Facility readily enable EOS experiments in a new regime, at pressures on order of 100 Mbar. We describe a platform for EOS measurements using planar shockwaves driven by x rays within a hohlraum target. The EOS is determined by an impedance matching method, using a reference material of known EOS. For transparent materials, the shock velocity is measured directly by optical interferometry, while for opaque materials, the measurement is done by timing the entrance and exit of the shock and correcting for time variations with an adjacent transparent reference. We describe the computational design and analysis of experiments. Predicted shock velocities and transit times are used to set the target layer thicknesses and interferometer timing. Data from several NIF shots are compared to post-shot calculations. New, high pressure EOS data is presented for several materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target diagnostics subsystem SSDR 1.8.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.

    1996-10-28

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Target Experimental System`s Diagnostic, WBS 1.8. 3. This includes the individual diagnostic components, the Target Diagnostic Data Acquisition System (Target DAS), the diagnostic vacuum system, the timing/fiducial system, and the EMI protection system.

  2. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Huffman, E. J.; Iglesias, C. A.; King, J. A.; Kline, J. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Opachich, Y. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Ross, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Sherrill, M. E.; Wilson, B. G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative-convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures eV and electron densities 21~\\text{cm}-3$ . The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a ps, diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design, of the NIF beams deliver 500 kJ to the mm diameter hohlraum, and the remaining directly drive the CH capsule with 200 kJ. Calculations indicate this capsule backlighter should outshine the iron sample, delivering a point-projection transmission opacity measurement to a time-integrated X-ray spectrometer viewing down the hohlraum axis. Preliminary experiments to develop the backlighter and hohlraum are underway, informing simulated measurements to guide the final design.

  3. Tokamak Systems Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  4. Low initial aspect-ratio direct-drive target designs for shock- or self-ignition in the context of the laser Megajoule

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of low initial aspect ratio direct-drive target designs is carried out by varying the implosion velocity and the fuel mass. Starting from two different spherical targets with a given 300?g-DT mass, optimization of laser pulse and drive power allows to obtain a set of target seeds referenced by their peak implosion velocities and initial aspect ratio (A = 3 and A = 5). Self-ignition is achieved with higher implosion velocity for A = 5-design than for A = 3-design. Then, rescaling is d...

  5. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R.  F.; Bailey, J.  E.; Craxton, R.  S.; DeVolder, B.  G.; Dodd, E.  S.; Garcia, E.  M.; Huffman, E.  J.; Iglesias, C.  A.; King, J.  A.; Kline, J.  L.; Liedahl, D.  A.; McKenty, P.  W.; Opachich, Y.  P.; Rochau, G.  A.; Ross, P.  W.; Schneider, M.  B.; Sherrill, M.  E.; Wilson, B.  G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T.  S.

    2017-01-09

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative–convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures${\\geqslant}150$ eV and electron densities${\\geqslant}7\\times 10^{21}~\\text{cm}^{-3}$. The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a${\\sim}200$ ps,${\\sim}200~\\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\\text{m}$diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design

  6. Sensitivity of combustion and ignition characteristics of the solid-fuel charge of the microelectromechanical system of a microthruster to macrokinetic and design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Ermolaeva, E. M.; Dobrego, K. V.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Dolgii, L. N.

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a sensitivity analysis permitting effective estimation of the change in the impulse responses of a microthrusters and in the ignition characteristics of the solid-fuel charge caused by the variation of the basic macrokinetic parameters of the mixed fuel and the design parameters of the microthruster's combustion chamber. On the basis of the proposed sensitivity analysis, we have estimated the spread of both the propulsive force and impulse and the induction period and self-ignition temperature depending on the macrokinetic parameters of combustion (pre-exponential factor, activation energy, density, and heat content) of the solid-fuel charge of the microthruster. The obtained results can be used for rapid and effective estimation of the spread of goal functions to provide stable physicochemical characteristics and impulse responses of solid-fuel mixtures in making and using microthrusters.

  7. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  8. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part I: performance estimation and design considerations unique to small dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Research and development activities pertaining to the development of a 10 W, homogeneous charge compression ignition free-piston engine-compressor are presented. Emphasis is place upon the miniature engine concept and design rationale. Also, a crankcase-scavenged, two-stroke engine performance estimation method (slider-crank piston motion) is developed and used to explore the influence of engine operating conditions and geometric parameters on power density and establish plausible design conditions. The minimization of small-scale effects such as enhanced heat transfer, is also explored. (author)

  9. The Flame Photometric Ignition Circuit Research and Design%火焰光度计点火控制电路设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋婷玉; 徐小力; 许宝杰; 谷玉海; 宋丹丹

    2012-01-01

    In order to design the flame photometric ignition circuit,through to the method of decomposing the circuit working different effects in the ignition system, then reduction in its whole process, producing the delay and high-pressure discharge ignition with NE555 and mutual inductance coil, finally, with the basic functions anti-interference and self-protection, ruled out the influence of external environment to the flame, and ensure the reliability of practical application of the circuit.%通过将点火系统中不同作用的电路分解,然后还原其整个工作过程的方法,用NE555产生延时,线圈互感产生高压放电点火,设计了火焰光度计点火控制电路,具备了点火电路抗干扰和自保护的功能,排除了外部环境对火焰的影响,保证了电路的可靠性。

  10. Cryogenic needs for future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheder, H.

    The ITER tokamak is a machine using superconducting magnets. The windings of these magnets will be subjected to high heat loads resulting from a combination of nuclear energy absorption and AC-losses. It is estimated that about 100 kW at 4.5 K are needed. The total cooling mass flow rate will be around 10 - 15 kg/s. In addition to the large cryogenic power required for the superconducting magnets cryogenic power is also needed for refrigerated radiation shield, various cryopumps, fuel processing and test beds. A general description of the overall layout and the envisaged refrigerator cycle, necessary cold pumps and ancillary equipment is given. The basic cryogenic layout for the ITER tokakmak design, as developed during the conceptual design phase and a short overview about existing tokamak designs using superconducting magnets is given.

  11. Low Energy Electronic Ignition System for NOFBX Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a miniature, low RF noise ignition module for NOFBX propulsion systems. This ignition module is designed utilizing unique properties of the...

  12. Design of Q-band FMCW reflectometry for electron density profile measurement on the Joint TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linghan, Wan; Zhoujun, Yang; Ruobing, Zhou; Xiaoming, Pan; Chi, Zhang; Xianli, Xie; Bowen, Ruan

    2017-02-01

    The Q-band (33-50 GHz) fast sweep frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry has been recently developed for electron density profile measurement on the Joint TEXT tokamak. It operates in ordinary mode (O-mode) with a 20 μs sweeping period, covering the density range from 1 × 1019 m-3 to 3 × 1019 m-3. On the bench test, a Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) filter is used for the dynamic calibration of the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to obtain a linear frequency sweep. Besides, the use of a power combiner helps to improve the side-band suppression level of the single side-band modulator (SSBM). The reconstructed density profiles are presented, which demonstrate the capability of the reflectometry.

  13. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  14. A compact Tokamak transmutation reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuLi-Jian; XiaoBing-Jia

    1997-01-01

    The low aspect ration tokamak is proposed for the driver of a transmutation reactor.The main parameters of the reactor core,neutronic analysis of the blanket are given>the neutron wall loading can be lowered from the magnitude order of 1 MW/m2 to 0.5MW/m2 which is much easier to reach in the near future,and the transmutation efficiency (fission/absorption ratio)is raised further.The blanket power density is about 200MW/m3 which is not difficult to deal with.The key components such as diverter and center conductor post are also designed and compared with conventional TOkamak,Finally,by comparison with the other drivers such as FBR,PWR and accelerator,it can be anticipated that the low aspect ratio transmutation reactor would be one way of fusion energy applications in the near future.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma rotation, primarily

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Haverkort (Willem)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractOne of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma rotation

  17. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles

  18. Design of the 3.7 GHz, 500 kW CW circulator for the LHCD system of the SST-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Harish V., E-mail: hvdixit48@yahoo.com [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Jadhav, Aviraj R. [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Jain, Yogesh M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Cheeran, Alice N. [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Gupta, Vikas [Vidyavardhini' s College of Engineering and Technology, Vasai, Maharashtra 401202 (India); Sharma, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design of a 500 kW CW circulator for LHCD system at 3.7 GHz. • Mechanism for thermal management of ferrite tile. • Scheme for uniform magnetisation of the ferrite tiles. • Design of high CW power CW quadrature and 180 ° hybrid coupler. - Abstract: Circulators are used in high power microwave systems to protect the vacuum source against reflection. The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system of SST-1 tokamak commissioned at IPR, Gandhinagar in India comprises of four high power circulators to protect klystrons (supplying 500 kW CW each at 3.7 GHz) which power the system. This paper presents the design of a Differential Phase Shift Circulator (DPSC) capable of handling 500 kW CW power at 3.7 GHz so that four circulators can be used to protect the four available klystrons. As the DPSC is composed by three main components, viz., magic tee, ferrite phase shifter and 3 dB hybrid coupler, the designing of each of the proposed components is described. The design of these components is carried out factoring various multiphysics aspects of RF, heating due to high CW power and magnetic field requirement of the ferrite phase shifter. The primary objective of this paper is to present the complete RF, magnetic and thermal design of a high CW power circulator. All the simulations have been carried out in COMSOL Multiphysics. The designed circulator exhibits an insertion loss of 0.13 dB with a worst case VSWR of 1.08:1. The total length of the circulator is 3 m.

  19. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

  20. Flexible design of fuel injection and ignition systems for gasoline direct injection engines; Flexibles Design der Einspritzduese und Effektivitaet von Zuendanlagen fuer Benzin-Direkt-Einspritzung-Motoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, H.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nakashima, T.; Sugiura, S. [DENSO Corp. (Japan); Saitoh, K.; Okabe, S. [NIPPON SOKEN, Inc. (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    First generation ''wall-guided'' DISI engines had stratified lean combustion with a wide spacing between the injector and spark plug. In these engines, however, the combustion timing tended to be too early, leading to the inability to achieve ideal efficiency from the thermodynamic process. One proposal to overcome the disadvantages of ''wall-guided'' DISI engines is second-generation ''spray-guided'' DISI engines. It has stratified lean combustion with a close spacing between the injector and spark plug. In ''spray-guided'' DISI engines, the air-fuel mixture formation is independent of gas flow and piston movement. This enables the most significant possibilities for decreasing fuel consumption. Nevertheless, stratified lean combustion has been criticized for the costs and complexity of the aftertreatment required to achieve particulate and NOx emissions compliance. As one response to this problem, there has been a shift toward DISI development specific to stoichiometric homogeneous combustion. In this report, we will describe DENSO's current status and the future of two critical technologies for DISI fuel spray and ignition. Specifically, we will describe a nozzle concept and a high-performance ignition concept. The first concerns a ''multi-hole nozzle with highly flexible spray formation,'' and the second concerns a ''multi-spark ignition system with a high degree of energy flexibility.'' In addition, we will describe advanced ignition methods involving a plasma and a laser ignition. (orig.)

  1. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M J; De Esch, H P L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H(-) accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  2. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H- accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  3. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  4. Power Deposition on Tokamak Plasma-Facing Components

    CERN Document Server

    Arter, Wayne; Fishpool, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The SMARDDA software library is used to model plasma interaction with complex engineered surfaces. A simple flux-tube model of power deposition necessitates the following of magnetic fieldlines until they meet geometry taken from a CAD (Computer Aided Design) database. Application is made to 1) models of ITER tokamak limiter geometry and 2) MASTU tokamak divertor designs, illustrating the accuracy and effectiveness of SMARDDA, even in the presence of significant nonaxisymmetric ripple field. SMARDDA's ability to exchange data with CAD databases and its speed of execution also give it the potential for use directly in the design of tokamak plasma facing components.

  5. Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Lafortune, Kai; Divol, Laurent; Betti, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Shock-ignition is being studied as a future option for achieving high target gains on NIF, offering the potential for testing high yield (200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy and targets with appreciable gains at drive energies much less than 1MJ. In contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, the assembly and ignition phases are separated by imploding a high mass shell at low velocity. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherical shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating. Because the implosion velocity is significantly less than that required for hotspot ignition, considerably more fuel mass can be assembled and burned for the same kinetic energy in the shell. Like fast ignition, shock ignition could achieve high gains at low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. We will discuss gain curves for shock-ignited NIF targets in both UV and green light and examine the feasibility of designs that employ indirect drive fuel assembly with direct drive shock ignition

  6. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  7. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 46, CPDR review package. Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This preliminary design reviews the overall design package for the magnet system. It is mostly presented in viewgraphs. The lengthy presentation took up two full days. Sections are given on TF SDD, TF magnet specifications, TF interface definition, drawing tree and design control, winding pack design, manufacturing, coil setup for VPI, TPX TF magnet assembly, TF materials and processes, quality assurance and test requirements, coil verification testing, TPX acceptance tools, and planning tools.

  8. Combustion characteristics of spark-ignition and pilot flame ignition systems in a model Wankel stratified charge engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroki, T. [Kanagawa Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kanagawa (Japan); Moriyoshi, Y. [Chiba Univ., Dept. of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    In a stratified charge engine, a glow plug pilot flame ignition system has been compared with a spark-ignition system for a model stratified charge Wankel combustion chamber. A motored two-stroke diesel engine was operated as a rapid compression and expansion machine with the cylinder head replaced by a model Wankel combustion chamber designed to simulate the temporal changes of air flow and pressure fields inside the chamber of an actual engine. It was found that the pilot flame ignition system had better ignitability and improved combustion characteristics, especially in the lean mixture range, relative to the spark-ignition system. (Author)

  9. Stability of Ignition Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey of published data on experimental and theoretical studies on ignition stability is offered. The comparison between theory and experiment is shown to prove qualitatively the efficiency of the phenomenological approach in the theory. However, the methods of mathematical simulation as well as those of experimental studying of ignition phenomenon, especially at high fluxes, need to be improved.

  10. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  11. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  12. Comprehensive study of ignition and combustion of single wooden particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    How quickly large biomass particles can ignite and burn out when transported into a pulverized-fuel (pf) furnace and suddenly exposed to a hot gas flow containing oxygen is very important in biomass co-firing design and optimization. In this paper, the ignition and burnout of the largest possible...... for all the test conditions. As the particle is further heated up and the volume-weighted average temperature reaches the onset of rapid decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose, a secondary homogeneous ignition occurs. The model-predicted ignition delays and burnout times show a good agreement...... with the experimental results. Homogeneous ignition delays are found to scale with specific surface areas while heterogeneous ignition delays show less dependency on the areas. The ignition and burnout are also affected by the process conditions, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced...

  13. Digital controlled pulsed electric system of the ETE tokamak. First report; Sistema eletrico pulsado com controle digital do Tokamak ETE (experimento Tokamak esferico). Primeiro relatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Felipe de F.P.W.; Del Bosco, Edson

    1997-12-31

    This reports presents a summary on the thermonuclear fusion and application for energy supply purposes. The tokamak device operation and the magnetic field production systems are described. The ETE tokamak is a small aspect ratio device designed for plasma physics and thermonuclear fusion studies, which presently is under construction at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) - S.J. dos Campos - S. Paulo. (author) 55 refs., 40 figs.

  14. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  15. Robustness studies of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility in two dimensionsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Haan, Steven W.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2008-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of 2000 two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code LASNEX, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ignition cliff is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of Levedahl and Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and Kishony and Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  16. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H.S., E-mail: hbar@mit.edu [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B{sub 0} = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma-material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m{sup -2} so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through {approx}1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and

  17. Tokamak Plasmas : Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; N R Ray

    2000-11-01

    Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly the top-bottom floating potential differences are quite noticeable, which in turn produces a vertical electric field (v). This v remains throughout the discharge but changes its direction at certain point of time which seems to depend on applied vertical magnetic field v).

  18. Characterization of the Tokamak Novillo in cleaning regime; Caracterizacion del Tokamak Novillo en regimen de limpieza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Valencia A, R.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-02-15

    In this work the obtained results of the investigation about the experimental characterization of those low energy pulsed discharges of the Tokamak Novillo are reported. With this it is possible to fix the one operation point but appropriate of the Tokamak to condition the chamber in the smallest possible time for the cleaning discharges regime before beginning the main discharge. The characterization of the cleaning discharges in those Tokamaks is an unique process and characteristic of each device, since the good points of operation are consequence of those particularities of the design of the machine. In the case of the Tokamak Novillo, besides characterizing it a contribution is made to the cleaning discharges regime which consists on the one product of the current peak to peak of plasma by the duration of the discharge Ip{sub t} like reference parameter for the optimization of the operation of the device in the cleaning discharge regime. The maximum value of the parameter I{sub (p)}t, under different work conditions, allowed to find the good operation point to condition the discharges chamber of the Tokamak Novillo in short time and to arrive to a regime in which is not necessary the preionization for the obtaining of the cleaning discharges. (Author)

  19. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: `Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented.

  20. Transport in gyrokinetic tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynick, H.E.; Parker, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transport in full-volume gyrokinetic (gk) simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in core tokamak plasmas is presented. Though this ``gyrokinetic tokamak`` is much simpler than experimental tokamaks, such simplicity is an asset, because a dependable nonlinear transport theory for such systems should be more attainable. Toward this end, we pursue two related lines of inquiry. (1) We study the scalings of gk tokamaks with respect to important system parameters. In contrast to real machines, the scalings of larger gk systems (a/{rho}{sub s} {approx_gt} 64) with minor radius, with current, and with a/{rho}{sub s} are roughly consistent with the approximate theoretical expectations for electrostatic turbulent transport which exist as yet. Smaller systems manifest quite different scalings, which aids in interpreting differing mass-scaling results in other work. (2) With the goal of developing a first-principles theory of gk transport, we use the gk data to infer the underlying transport physics. The data indicate that, of the many modes k present in the simulation, only a modest number (N{sub k} {approximately} 10) of k dominate the transport, and for each, only a handful (N{sub p} {approximately} 5) of couplings to other modes p appear to be significant, implying that the essential transport physics may be described by a far simpler system than would have been expected on the basis of earlier nonlinear theory alone. Part of this analysis is the inference of the coupling coefficients M{sub kpq} governing the nonlinear mode interactions, whose measurement from tokamak simulation data is presented here for the first time.

  1. The Measurable Effects of Germanium Loaded into the Pusher of a Pushered Single Shell Capsule Designed for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Robert; Baker, Kevin; Casey, Daniel; Dewald, Eduard; Graziani, Frank; MacLaren, Steve; Nikroo, Abass; Pino, Jesse; Ralph, Joe; Remington, Bruce; Sacks, Ryan; Salmonson, Jay; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Germanium loaded pushered single shells (PSS) have been designed as a vehicle to study the effects of turbulent mixing between the DT fuel and a pusher which is not fully ionized. This is intended as a surrogate for the high-Z mixing expected in future double-shell ignition capsules. These PSS experiments will be diagnosed by loading deuterium along with the germanium into the GDP pusher and filling the capsule with a mixture of tritium and hydrogen. In such CD mix experiments, the measured number of DT neutrons along with the inferred ion temperature from the time-of-flight thermal broadening provides detailed information about the annular mixing of the fuel and the pusher. This paper will compare the expected DT mix signals from capsules loaded with germanium to control capsules fired without any germanium. Leading turbulent mix models predict the germanium loaded capsules and no-germanium control capsules will produce significantly different results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344,LLNS, LLC.

  2. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  3. Spark ignition engines and diesel engines. Design, function and calculation of two-stroke and four-stroke engines; 11. ed.; Otto- und Dieselmotoren. Arbeitsweise, Aufbau und Berechnung von Zweitakt- und Viertakt-Verbrennungsmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grohe, H.

    1995-12-31

    The book presents an outline of the design and function of internal combustion engines. It comprises the following chapters: Historical review; fundamentals in mechanics and thermodynamics; calculation methods; ignition; knocking; mixing; load cycles; supercharging; components. (HW) [Deutsch] Das Buch liefert einen Ueberblick ueber Aufbau und Arbeitsweise des Verbrennungsmotors. Aufgliederung in folgende Kapitel: - Historisches Rueckblick; - Mechanische und waermetechnische Grundlagen; - Berechungsverfahren; - Zuendung; - Klopfen; - Gemischbildung; - Ladungswechsel; - Aufladung; - Bauteile. (HW)

  4. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoo Sun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang Heui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heui Dong [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Koo [Pohang Inst. of Science and Technology, Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the `advanced tokamak` physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Development of a Novel Non-Equilibrium Pulsed Plasma Ignition Module for High Altitude Turbojets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An experimental research program focusing on design, development, and testing of a novel nonequilibrium plasma ignition module is proposed. The ignition module will...

  6. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  7. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  8. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherfils-Clerouin, C; Boniface, C; Bonnefille, M; Fremerye, P; Galmiche, D; Gauthier, P; Giorla, J; Lambert, F; Laffite, S; Liberatore, S; Loiseau, P; Malinie, G; Masse, L; Masson-Laborde, P E; Monteil, M C; Poggi, F; Seytor, P; Wagon, F; Willien, J L, E-mail: catherine.cherfils@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2010-08-01

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser MegaJoule are presented. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4MJ and 380TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-shaped cocktail hohlraum. 1D and 2D robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, that can be traded off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  9. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherfils-Clerouin, C; Boniface, C; Bonnefille, M; Dattolo, E; Galmiche, D; Gauthier, P; Giorla, J; Laffite, S; Liberatore, S; Loiseau, P; Malinie, G; Masse, L; Masson-Laborde, P E; Monteil, M C; Poggi, F; Seytor, P; Wagon, F; Willien, J L, E-mail: catherine.cherfils@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-12-15

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) are being simulated in order to set specifications for target fabrication. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4 MJ and 380 TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-ball shaped cocktail hohlraum; with these improvements, a target based on the 240-beam A1040 capsule can be included in the 160-beam laser energy-power space. Robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, which can trade off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  10. Fusion ignition via a magnetically-assisted fast ignition approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W -M; Sheng, Z -M; Li, Y T; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards laser-driven fusion ignition via different schemes, including direct and indirect central ignition, fast ignition, shock ignition, and impact ignition schemes. However, to reach ignition conditions, there are still various technical and physical challenges to be solved for all these schemes. Here, our multi-dimensional integrated simulation shows that the fast-ignition conditions could be achieved when two 2.8 petawatt heating laser pulses counter-propagate along a 3.5 kilotesla external magnetic field. Within a period of 5 picoseconds, the laser pulses heat a nuclear fuel to reach the ignition conditions. Furthermore, we present the parameter windows of lasers and magnetic fields required for ignition for experimental test.

  11. Hydrodynamic modeling and simulations of shock ignition thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafon M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Shock Ignition (SI scheme [1] offers to reduce the laser requirements by relaxing the implosion phase to sub-ignition velocities and later adding an intense laser spike. Depending on laser energy, target characteristics and implosion velocity, high gains are expected [2,3]. Relevant intensities for scaled targets imploded in the velocity range from 150 to 400 km/s are defined at ignition thresholds. A range of moderate implosion velocities is specified to match safe implosions. These conditions for target design are then inferred for relevant NIF and LMJ shock-ignited targets.

  12. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  13. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines. S

  15. Trajectory planning of tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Lai, Yinping; He, Tao [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. • Two trajectory planning methods are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. • The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot. • Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. - Abstract: Tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is mainly designed to carry a camera for close observation of the first wall of the vacuum vessel, which is essential for the maintenance of the future tokamak reactor without breaking the working condition of the vacuum vessel. A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. In order to improve efficiency of the remote maintenance, it is necessary to design a corresponding trajectory planning algorithm to complete the automatic full coverage scanning of the complex tokamak cavity. Two different trajectory planning methods, RS (rough scanning) and FS (fine scanning), according to different demands of the task, are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. To quickly locate the damage position, the first trajectory planning method is targeted for quick and wide-ranging scan of the tokamak D-shaped section, and the second one is for careful observation. Furthermore, both of the two different trajectory planning methods can ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning with an optimal end posture. The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot, and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization.

  17. Review of the National Ignition Campaign 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindl, John; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John; Moses, Ed

    2014-02-01

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) was a multi-institution effort established under the National Nuclear Security Administration of DOE in 2005, prior to the completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in 2009. The scope of the NIC was the planning and preparation for and the execution of the first 3 yr of ignition experiments (through the end of September 2012) as well as the development, fielding, qualification, and integration of the wide range of capabilities required for ignition. Besides the operation and optimization of the use of NIF, these capabilities included over 50 optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems, target fabrication facilities, experimental platforms, and a wide range of NIF facility infrastructure. The goal of ignition experiments on the NIF is to achieve, for the first time, ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory via inertial confinement fusion and to develop a platform for ignition and high energy density applications on the NIF. The goal of the NIC was to develop and integrate all of the capabilities required for a precision ignition campaign and, if possible, to demonstrate ignition and gain by the end of FY12. The goal of achieving ignition can be divided into three main challenges. The first challenge is defining specifications for the target, laser, and diagnostics with the understanding that not all ignition physics is fully understood and not all material properties are known. The second challenge is designing experiments to systematically remove these uncertainties. The third challenge is translating these experimental results into metrics designed to determine how well the experimental implosions have performed relative to expectations and requirements and to advance those metrics toward the conditions required for ignition. This paper summarizes the approach taken to address these challenges, along with the progress achieved to date and the challenges that remain. At project completion in 2009, NIF lacked

  18. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  19. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  20. Plasma Shape and Current Control Simulation of HT-7U Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴斌; 张澄

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the discharge simulation of HT-7U tokamak plasma equilibriumand plasma current by solving MHD equations and surface average transport equations using anequilibrium evolution code. The simulated result shows the evolution of plasma parameter versustime .The simulated result can play an important role in the design of the plasma equilibrium andcontrol system of a tokamak.

  1. Operation of a tokamak reactor in the radiative improved mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Mavrin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a nuclear fusion reactor has been simulated within a model based on experimental results obtained at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and other facilities in which quasistationary regimes were achieved with long confinement times, high densities, and absence of the edge-localized mode. The radiative improved mode of confinement studied in detail at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak is the most interesting such regime. One of the most important problems of modern tokamaks is the problem of a very high thermal load on a divertor (or a limiter). This problem is quite easily solved in the radiative improved mode. Since a significant fraction of the thermal energy is reemitted by an impurity, the thermal loading is significantly reduced. As the energy confinement time τ E at high densities in the indicated mode is significantly larger than the time predicted by the scaling of ITERH-98P(y, 2), ignition can be achieved in a facility much smaller than the ITER facility at plasma temperatures below 20 keV. The revealed decrease in the degradation of the confinement time τ E with an increase in the introduced power has been analyzed.

  2. Indirect drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meezan, N. B.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Patel, P. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Town, R. P. J.; Albert, F.; Amendt, P. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hall, G. N.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Masse, L.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific results from the pursuit of indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and describes the program’s forward looking research directions. In indirect drive on the NIF, laser beams heat an x-ray enclosure called a hohlraum that surrounds a spherical pellet. X-ray radiation ablates the surface of the pellet, imploding a thin shell of deuterium/tritium (DT) that must accelerate to high velocity (v  >  350 km s-1) and compress by a factor of several thousand. Since 2009, substantial progress has been made in understanding the major challenges to ignition: Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability seeded by target imperfections; and low-mode asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray drive, exacerbated by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI). Requirements on velocity, symmetry, and compression have been demonstrated separately on the NIF but have not been achieved simultaneously. We now know that the RT instability, seeded mainly by the capsule support tent, severely degraded DT implosions from 2009-2012. Experiments using a ‘high-foot’ drive with demonstrated lower RT growth improved the thermonuclear yield by a factor of 10, resulting in yield amplification due to alpha particle heating by more than a factor of 2. However, large time dependent drive asymmetry in the LPI-dominated hohlraums remains unchanged, preventing further improvements. High fidelity 3D hydrodynamic calculations explain these results. Future research efforts focus on improved capsule mounting techniques and on hohlraums with little LPI and controllable symmetry. In parallel, we are pursuing improvements to the basic physics models used in the design codes through focused physics experiments.

  3. Fusion ignition research experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  4. Ignition Studies on Aluminised Propellant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Bhaskaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on the ignition of metallised propellants (APIHTPB/AI has been carried out 10 determine the ignition delay, minimum ignition energy and corresponding heat flux,threshold heat flux for ignition and minimum ignition temperature, Ignition experiments were conductedusing a shock tube under convectiveheating conditions similar to those prevailingin a rocket motor. Heat flux at propellant location was measured by thin film heat flux gauge and also calculated from a ribbon thermocouple output under similar test conditions. The igntion delay was measured as the time lag between the arrival of hot gas at the propellant and the light emission due to actual ignition of the propellant. The experimental results indicate that the ignition delay characteristics are independent of pressure. The minimum energy for ignition obtained for the propellant is 1100J/m2 corresponding to the heat flux range of 80·120 WIcm2 for a gas velocity of 110 mls. The threshold heat flux required to ignite the propellant was 40 W/cm2 at a velocity of 110 mls. Heat flux corresponding to minimum ignition energy and the threshold heat flux increase with gas velocity. The threshold ignition temperature of the propellant was found to be 600 ± 20 K.

  5. The National Ignition Facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  6. Deep Dive Topic: Approach to ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The current high-foot and related implosions have adequate CR and implosion velocity to ignite, but require improved finesse particularly in, but not limited to, implosion symmetry. This is being pursued. The challenge of controlling drive symmetry is also motivating lower convergence ratio designs. These require higher velocity implosions and are also being pursued.

  7. Ignition and Thermonuclear Burn on the National Ignition Facility with Imposed Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. G.; Rhodes, M. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Ho, D. D.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We are studying the impact of highly compressed magnetic fields on enhancing the prospects for ignition and burn on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Both magnetized room-temperature DT gas targets and cryo-ignition capsules are under study. Applied seed fields of 20-70T that compress to greater than 10000T (100MG) under implosion can reduce hotspot conditions required for ignition and propagating burn through range reduction and magnetic mirror trapping of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and potential stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. The applied field may also reduce hohlraum laser-plasma instabilities and suppress the transport of hot electron preheat to the capsule. These combined B-field attributes may permit recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in capsules that are otherwise submarginal through adverse hydrodynamic or hohlraum-drive conditions. Simulations indicate that optimum initial fields of 50T may produce multi-MJ-yields when applied to our present best experimental capsules. Proof-of-principle experiments for magnetized ignition capsules and hohlraum physics on NIF are now being designed. This work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  9. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  10. Minimization of the external heating power by long fusion power rise-up time for self-ignition access in the helical reactor FFHR2m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, O.; Sagara, A.; Chikaraishi, H.; Imagawa, S.; Watanabe, K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Motojima, O.

    2007-11-01

    Minimization of the external heating power to access self-ignition is advantageous to increase the reactor design flexibility and to reduce the capital and operating costs of the plasma heating device in a helical reactor. In this work we have discovered that a larger density limit leads to a smaller value of the required confinement enhancement factor, a lower density limit margin reduces the external heating power and over 300 s of the fusion power rise-up time makes it possible to reach a minimized heating power. While the fusion power rise-up time in a tokamak is limited by the OH transformer flux or the current drive capability, any fusion power rise-up time can be employed in a helical reactor for reducing the thermal stresses of the blanket and shields, because the confinement field is generated by the external helical coils.

  11. Improvement of system code importing evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis of tokamak fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobori, Hikaru [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hiwatari, Ryoji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We incorporated the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code. • We calculated CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. • We found that the objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. • The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. • The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant. - Abstract: This study incorporate the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of tokamak type DEMO reactor and following commercial reactors as an extension of a system code to calculate CO{sub 2} emissions from reactor construction, operation and decommissioning that is considered as a major environmental cost. Competitiveness of tokamak fusion power reactors is expected to be evaluated by the cost and environmental impact represented by the CO{sub 2} emissions, compared with present and future power generating systems such as fossil, nuclear and renewables. Result indicated that (1) The objective of conceptual design of the tokamak fusion power reactor is moved by changing evaluation index. (2) The tokamak fusion reactor can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in the life cycle effectively by reduction of the amount involved in the replacement of internal components. (3) The tokamak fusion reactor achieves under 0.174$/kWh electricity cost, the tokamak fusion reactor is contestable with 1500 degrees-class LNG-fired combined cycle power plant.

  12. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  13. Nondiffusive plasma transport at tokamak edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    Recent findings show that cross field edge plasma transport at tokamak edge does not necessarily obey a simple diffusive law [1], the only type of a transport model applied so far in the macroscopic modeling of edge plasma transport. Cross field edge transport is more likely due to plasma filamentation with a ballistic motion of the filaments towards the first wall. Moreover, it so fast that plasma recycles on the main chamber first wall rather than to flow into divertor as conventional picture of edge plasma fluxes suggests. Crudely speaking particle recycling wise diverted tokamak operates in a limiter regime due to fast anomalous non-diffusive cross field plasma transport. Obviously that this newly found feature of edge plasma anomalous transport can significantly alter a design of any future reactor relevant tokamaks. Here we present a simple model describing the motion of the filaments in the scrape off layer and discuss it implications for experimental observations. [1] M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard, B. Lipschultz, and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 2791; M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 3373.

  14. TPX diagnostics for tokamak operation, plasma control and machine protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, P.H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The diagnostics for TPX are at an early design phase, with emphasis on the diagnostic access interface with the major tokamak components. Account has to be taken of the very severe environment for diagnostic components located inside the vacuum vessel. The placement of subcontracts for the design and fabrication of the diagnostic systems is in process.

  15. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E. M.; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55∘ are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55∘ are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28 .5∘ and 55∘, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28 .5∘ in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55∘ injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35 -μ m incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E M; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55^{∘} are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55^{∘} are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28.5^{∘} and 55^{∘}, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28.5^{∘} in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55^{∘} injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35-μm incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  17. Standard Molded Composite Rocket Pyrogen Igniter - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    The pyrogen igniter has the function to furnish a controlled, high temperature, high pressure gas to ignite solid propellant surfaces in a rocket motor. Present pyrogens consist of numerous inert components. The Standard Molded Pyrogen Igniter (SMPI) consists of three basic parts, a cap with several integrally molded features, an ignition pellet retainer plate, and a tube with additional integrally molded features. A description is presented of an investigation which indicates that the SMPI concept is a viable approach to the design and manufacture of pyrogen igniters for solid propellant rocket motors. For some applications, combining the structural and thermal properties of molded composites can result in the manufacture of lighter assemblies at considerable cost reduction. It is demonstrated that high strength, thin walled tubes with high length to diameter ratios can be fabricated from reinforced plastic molding compound using the displacement compression process.

  18. Tokamak Plasmas : Internal magnetic field measurement in tokamak plasmas using a Zeeman polarimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Jagadeeshwari; J Govindarajan

    2000-11-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the poloidal magnetic field profile closely depends on the current density profile. We can deduce the internal magnetic field from the analysis of circular polarization of the spectral lines emitted by the plasma. The theory of the measurement and a detailed design of the Zeeman polarimeter constructed to measure the poloidal field profile in the ADITYA tokamak are presented. The Fabry-Perot which we have employed in our design, with photodiode arrays followed by lock-in detection of the polarization signal, allows the measurement of the fractional circular polarization. In this system He-II line with wavelength 4686 Å is adopted as the monitoring spectral line. The line emission used in the present measurement is not well localized in the plasma, necessiating the use of a spatial inversion procedure to obtain the local values of the field.

  19. PETN ignition experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael L; Wente, William B; Kaneshige, Michael J

    2010-04-29

    Ignition experiments from various sources, including our own laboratory, have been used to develop a simple ignition model for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The experiments consist of differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, beaker tests, one-dimensional time to explosion tests, Sandia's instrumented thermal ignition tests (SITI), and thermal ignition of nonelectrical detonators. The model developed using this data consists of a one-step, first-order, pressure-independent mechanism used to predict pressure, temperature, and time to ignition for various configurations. The model was used to assess the state of the degraded PETN at the onset of ignition. We propose that cookoff violence for PETN can be correlated with the extent of reaction at the onset of ignition. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating metal deformation produced from detonators encased in copper as well as comparing postignition photos of the SITI experiments.

  20. A CONCEPT FOR NEXT STEP ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak,which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST,also well known by the name "spherical tokamak").The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter, the machine aspect ratio A=R0/a0=2.0,where the parameters a0 and R0 denote,respectively,the plasma (equatorial) minor radius and the plasma major radius.The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0≈2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0,R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database,between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs.Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently,the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter.In the present concept,a nominal plasma minor radius a0=1.2m is adopted to be the principal design value,and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes,to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks.Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments,for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii.The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs,and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region inside the envisioned tokamak torus,with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius,will be available for technological adjustments and maneuverings to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real time high

  1. Robustness studies of NIF ignition targets in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300 eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of two thousand two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code Lasnex, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ``ignition cliff'' is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of W. K. Levedahl and J. D. Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and R. Kishony and D. Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  2. Hot-wire ignition of AN-based emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Richard; Goldthorp, Sandra; Badeen, Christopher M. [Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G1 (Canada); Chan, Sek Kwan [Orica Canada Inc., Brownsburg-Chatham, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Emulsions based on ammonium nitrate (AN) and water locally ignited by a heat source do not undergo sustained combustion when the pressure is lower than some threshold value usually called the Minimum Burning Pressure (MBP). This concept is now being used by some manufacturers as a basis of safety. However, before a technique to reliably measure MBP values can be designed, one must have a better understanding of the ignition mechanism. Clearly, this is required to avoid under ignitions which could lead to the erroneous interpretation of failures to ignite as failures to propagate. In the present work, facilities to prepare and characterize emulsions were implemented at the Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory. A calibrated hot-wire ignition system operated in a high-pressure vessel was also built. The system was used to study the ignition characteristics of five emulsion formulations as a function of pressure and ignition source current. It was found that these mixtures exhibit complicated pre-ignition stages and that the appearance of endotherms when the pressure is lowered below some threshold value correlates with the MBP. Thermal conductivity measurements using this hot-wire system are also reported. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Study on the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Li, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Yao, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Direct current plasma torches have been applied to generate unique sources of thermal energy in many industrial applications. Nevertheless, the successful ignition of a plasma torch is the key process to generate the unique source (plasma jet). However, there has been little study on the underlying mechanism of this key process. A thorough understanding of the ignition process of a plasma torch will be helpful for optimizing the design of the plasma torch structure and selection of the ignition parameters to prolong the service life of the ignition module. Thus, in this paper, the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch (SPT) is theoretically and experimentally modeled and analyzed. Corresponding electrical models of different stages of the ignition process are set up and used to derive the electrical parameters, e.g. the variations of the arc voltage and arc current between the cathode and anode. In addition, the experiments with different ignition parameters on a home-made SPT have been conducted. At the same time, the variations of the arc voltage and arc current have been measured, and used to verify the ones derived in theory and to determine the optimal ignition parameters for a particular SPT.

  4. Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Alcator C-Mod at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is operated as a DOE national user facility. Alcator C-Mod is a unique, compact tokamak facility that uses...

  5. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  6. National Ignition Facility site requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Site Requirements (SR) provide bases for identification of candidate host sites for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for the generation of data regarding potential actual locations for the facilities. The SR supplements the NIF Functional Requirements (FR) with information needed for preparation of responses to queries for input to HQ DOE site evaluation. The queries are to include both documents and explicit requirements for the potential host site responses. The Sr includes information extracted from the NIF FR (for convenience), data based on design approaches, and needs for physical and organization infrastructure for a fully operational NIF. The FR and SR describe requirements that may require new construction or may be met by use or modification of existing facilities. The SR do not establish requirements for NIF design or construction project planning. The SR document does not constitute an element of the NIF technical baseline.

  7. The ETE spherical Tokamak project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Andrade, Maria Celia Ramos de; Barbosa, Luis Filipe Wiltgen [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] [and others]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, with a brief overview of work in the area of spherical torus already performed or in progress at several institutions. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and status of construction in September, 1998 at the Associated plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  8. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  9. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  10. Development and Testing of a Green Monopropellant Ignition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Judson, Michael I.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will detail the development and testing of a "green" monopropellant booster ignition system. The proposed booster ignition technology eliminates the need for a pre-heated catalyst bed, a high wattage power source, toxic pyrophoric ignition fluids, or a bi-propellant spark ignitor. The design offers the simplicity of a monopropellant feed system features non-hazardous gaseous oxygen (GOX) as the working fluid. The approach is fundamentally different from all other "green propellant" solutions in the aerospace in the industry. Although the proposed system is more correctly a "hybrid" rocket technology, since only a single propellant feed path is required, it retains all the simple features of a monopropellant system. The technology is based on the principle of seeding an oxidizing flow with a small amount of hydrocarbon.1 The ignition is initiated electrostatically with a low-wattage inductive spark. Combustion gas byproducts from the hydrocarbon-seeding ignition process can exceed 2400 C and the high exhaust temperature ensures reliable main propellant ignition. The system design is described in detail in the Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System Design subsection.

  11. Burner ignition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  12. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  13. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  14. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  15. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to

  16. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-09-17

    likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

  17. Neutron skyshine calculations for the PDX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Nigg, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) at Princeton will be the first operating tokamak to require a substantial radiation shield. The PDX shielding includes a water-filled roof shield over the machine to reduce air scattering skyshine dose in the PDX control room and at the site boundary. During the design of this roof shield a unique method was developed to compute the neutron source emerging from the top of the roof shield for use in Monte Carlo skyshine calculations. The method is based on simple, one-dimensional calculations rather than multidimensional calculations, resulting in considerable savings in computer time and input preparation effort. This method is described.

  18. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined α particles and tritons on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, S. S.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Fisher, R. K.; Duong, H. H.; McChesney, J. M.; Parks, P. B.; Petrov, M. P.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    1996-09-01

    Radially resolved energy and density distributions of the confined α particles in D-T experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are being measured with the pellet charge exchange (PCX) diagnostic. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons produced in D-D plasmas and H, He3, or tritium rf-driven minority ion tails. The ablation cloud formed by injected low-Z impurity pellets provides the neutralization target for this active charge exchange technique. Because the cloud neutralization efficiency is uncertain, the PCX diagnostic is not absolutely calibrated so only relative density profiles are obtained. A mass and energy resolving E∥B neutral particle analyzer (NPA) is used which has eight energy channels covering the energy range of 0.3-3.7 MeV for α particles with energy resolution ranging from 5.8% to 11.3% and a spatial resolution of ˜5 cm. The PCX diagnostic views deeply trapped ions in a narrow pitch angle range around a mean value of v∥/v=-0.048±10-3. For D-T operation, the NPA was shielded by a polyethylene-lead enclosure providing 100× attenuation of ambient γ radiation and 14 MeV neutrons. The PCX diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  19. 球形托卡马克聚变嬗变堆中子学设计%NEUTRONICS DESIGN FOR A SPHERICAL TOKAMAK FUSION-TRANSMUTATION REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯开明; 张国书; 郭增基

    2001-01-01

    Based on studies of spherical tokamak fusion reactors,a concept of fusion-transmutation reactor is put forward.A set of plasma parameters suitable for the transmutation blanket is selected.Using the transport and burn-up calculation code BISON3.0 and its associated database,transmutation rate of MA nuclear waste,energy multiplication,and tritium breeder rate in the transmutation blanket are calculated.%基于对球形托卡马克ST聚变堆的研究,提出了ST聚变嬗变堆的设计概念。对堆芯参数作了初步选择,确定了一组适合于嬗变包层的堆芯参数供中子学计算和结构设计参考,给出了旨在以嬗变次锕系元素(MA)核废物为目标的一维中子学计算结果。

  20. Shock Timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Robey, H. F.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G. F.; Jackson, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments are proceeding to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The results of these measurements will be used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak; Sistema de procesamiento de datos para espectroscopia en el Tokamak Novillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, G.; Gaytan G, E. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  2. PITR: a small-aspect-ratio, small-major-radius ignition test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.; Bolton, R.A.; Brown, D.I.

    1978-05-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in D-T, and to develop optimal start-up methods for tokamak power reactors. The design approach is based on minimizing dependence on a central transformer core, which thereby results in a machine of small aspect ratio (A approximately 2 to 2.5) and smaller major radius (R/sub 0/ approximately 2.8 m). Current induction is achieved by a combination of ''leaky OH'' coils, equilibrium-field flux swing, a small central solenoid, and compression. Impurity control is effected by a bundle divertor during the beam-heating phase, and by a cold plasma blanket during the burn. The vacuum vessel is constructed of thin-gauge, double-wall titanium alloy. Sixteen normal-copper TF coils of the compound constant-tension type enable low-stress operation at B/sub max/ = 12.5 T.

  3. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.

    2017-01-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range with...

  4. Ignition models and simulation of solid propellant of thermodynamic undersea vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-jun; QIAN Zhi-bo; YANG Jie; YAN Ping

    2007-01-01

    The starting characteristics of thermodynamic undersea vehicle systems are determined by the geometry, size and combustion area of solid propellants, which directly effect liquid propellant pipeline design. It is necessary to establish accurate burning models for solid propellants. Based on combustion models using powder tings and two different solid ignition grains, namely star-shaped ignition grains and stuffed ignition grains, a mathematic model of the ignition process of the propulsion system was built.With the help of Matlah, a series of calculations were made to determine the effects of different grains on ignition characteristics. The results show that stuffed ignition grain is best suited to be the ignition grain of a thermodynamic undersea vehicle system.

  5. Ignition characteristics of forest species in relation to thermal analysis data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liodakis, S.; Bakirtzis, D. [Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), 9 Iroon Polytecniou Street, 157 73 Athens (Greece); Dimitrakopoulos, A. [Laboratory of Forest Protection, Department of Forestry and Natural Environment, Aristotle University, P.O. Box 228, 540 06 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2002-07-15

    The ignitability of various forest species was measured with a specifically designed apparatus, under precisely controlled temperature and airflow conditions. The ignitability tests were based on ignition delay time versus temperature measurements using five different forest species: Pinus halepensis, Pistacia lentiscus, Cupressus sempervirens, Olea europaea, Cistus incanus. These species are common in the Mediterranean region and frequently devastated by forest fires. The ignition characteristics of the forest fuels examined were related to thermogravimetric analysis data. The DTG curves showed that the mass changes related to cellulose decomposition in the temperature range of 320-370C are greatly responsible for the ignition behavior of the species tested. In addition, the mass of volatiles evolving between 120-160C has a significant effect on the ignitability. On the contrary, the inorganic ash content of forest fuels, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, seems to play an insignificant role on the ignitability characteristics of the forest fuels examined.

  6. National Ignition Facility under fire over ignition failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The 3.5bn National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California is no nearer to igniting a sustainable nuclear fusion burn - four years after its initial target date - according to a report by the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  7. The National Ignition Facility Performance Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C; Auerbach, J; Nicola, J D; Dixit, S; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Jancaitis, K; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mehta, N; Nostrand, M; Orth, C; Sacks, R; Shaw, M; Sutton, S; Wegner, P; Williams, W; Widmayer, C; White, R; Yang, S; Van Wonterghem, B

    2005-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single ''quad'' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the Precision Diagnostics System (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements.

  8. The national ignition facility performance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C.; Auerbach, J.; Bowers, M.; Di-Nicola, J.M.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Jancaitis, K.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Mehta, N.; Nostrand, M.; Orth, C.; Sacks, R.; Shaw, M.; Sutton, S.; Wegner, P.; Williams, W.; Widmayer, C.; White, R.; Yang, S.; Van Wonterghem, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science, including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single 'quad' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the precision diagnostic system (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements. (authors)

  9. Ignition and burn of a small magnetized fuel target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The crucial step for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is ignition, which leads to sufficiently high gain to enable design of a power producing system. Thus far, this step has not been demonstrated. Magnetized targets may provide an alternative path to ignition. In addition, the 1-D calculations presented here suggest that this approach may provide the gain and other characteristics needed for a practical fusion reactor.

  10. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear bum in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm3-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIP's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY20l0 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  11. Study and Design of Automobile Ignition Coil Function Test System%汽车点火线圈功能测试系统的设计与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶楚; 王阳明

    2011-01-01

    为满足汽车点火线圈生产过程中的大批量生产和自动化功能测试的要求,对所采用的功能测试设备的控制系统进行了设计.在某公司给出的测试规范基础上,采用以三菱Q系列PLC、Agilent测量仪表以及基于LabVIEW的GPIB总线通讯为核心组建汽车点火线圈功能测试系统.文中详细介绍了系统的功能、硬件构成和软件设计,重点介绍了PLC程序设计中FB的使用方法、上位机与PLC数据交换方法以及对数据库访问方法等.该系统自动化程度高,可靠性好,测量准确并已作为点火线圈终检设备投入使用.%In order to satisfy the requirements of volume-produce and robeticized function test in the process of automobile ignition coil production, it is very important to design control system for the functional testing equipments. Based on specification of identification company, this paper presents a design of an automotive ignition coil function test system which is composed of Q series PLC, Agilent instrumentation and GPIB communication bus based on LabVIEW. In the paper, it gives detailed introduction on function of the system、hardware structure and software design, especially gives the using method of FB in PLC programme designing、data exchange methods between upper machine and PLC as well as the methods of access, etc. The system has a high degree of automation, good reliability and measurement accuracy and is put into use as an automotive ignition coil end inspection equipment.

  12. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  13. Development and testing of an ignition physics test facility and an oxygen/methane swirl torch igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jesus Roberto

    There are many advantages to LOX/methane propulsion, such as in-situ resource utilization from Mars and the Moon, and simplicity of ground operations due to its non-toxic nature. There exists a lack of fundamental understanding of the ignition physics, and flame characteristics of these propellants when related to rocket propulsion, which has created undesirably long design cycles and flight hardware that is not optimized. Motivated by these issues, a study of the ignition physics of a shear coaxial injector is proposed, in which the flow field dynamics and ignition transients will be observed through a visually accessible combustion chamber. The main goal of this work is to study the effects of geometric differences of the injector, such as recess in the liquid oxygen post and thickness of the LOX post, on the jet breakup downstream of the injector, and the flame anchoring mechanism and location. A facility was developed to support this endeavor in a safe and efficient way, including a cryogenic delivery system, a Multipurpose Optically Accessible Combustor (MOAC) with torch igniter, and a bunker with a Data Acquisition and Remote Controls system (DARCS). A swirl coflow premixed torch igniter was designed, manufactured and developed with the intent of using it as the MOAC's main ignition source. It was designed to use oxygen and methane as the propellants in an incremental step towards the goal of a LOX/methane rocket engine. Extensive testing was done on the igniter in the development phase to prove that it will reliable ignite and sustain combustion under a variety of propellant inlet conditions of which include: warm gas, cold gas, and liquid cryogenic conditions. The testing phase also provided data for component reliability and proof of concept for the testing facilities designed, especially for the cryogenic delivery system, and methane condensing unit. Future injector testing parameters of the hardware produced is included along with recommendations to

  14. Development of atomic beam probe for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, M., E-mail: bertam@sze.hu [Széchenyi István University, EURATOM Association, Győr (Hungary); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Anda, G.; Aradi, M.; Bencze, A.; Buday, Cs.; Kiss, I.G.; Tulipán, Sz.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Havlícek, J.; Háček, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • ABP is newly developed diagnostic. • Unique measurement method for the determination of plasma edge current variations caused by different transient events such as ELMs. • The design process has been fruitfully supported by the physically motivated computer simulations. • Li-BES system has been modified accordingly to the needs of the ABP. -- Abstract: The concept and development of a new detection method for light alkali ions stemming from diagnostic beams installed on medium size tokamak is described. The method allows us the simultaneous measurement of plasma density fluctuations and fast variations in poloidal magnetic field, therefore one can infer the fast changes in edge plasma current. The concept has been worked out and the whole design process has been done at Wigner RCP. The test detector with appropriate mechanics and electronics is already installed on COMPASS tokamak. General ion trajectory calculation code (ABPIons) has also been developed. Detailed calculations show the possibility of reconstruction of edge plasma current density profile changes with high temporal resolution, and the possibility of density profile reconstruction with better spatial resolution compared to standard Li-BES measurement, this is important for pedestal studies.

  15. The first results of electrode biasing experiments in the IR-T1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A; Mohammadi, S; Arvin, R, E-mail: salari_phy@yahoo.co [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    We report here the first results of our movable electrode biasing experiments performed in the IR-T1 tokamak. For this study, a movable electrode biasing system was designed, constructed and installed on the IR-T1 tokamak. A positive voltage was applied to an electrode inserted in the tokamak limiter. The plasma current, poloidal and radial components of the magnetic fields, loop voltage and diamagnetic flux in the absence and presence of the biased electrode were measured. Results of the improvement done to plasma equilibrium behaviour are compared and discussed in this paper.

  16. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  17. An enhanced tokamak startup model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rajiv; Artaud, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    The startup of tokamaks has been examined in the past in varying degree of detail. This phase typically involves the burnthrough of impurities and the subsequent rampup of plasma current. A zero-dimensional (0D) model is most widely used where the time evolution of volume averaged quantities determines the detailed balance between the input and loss of particle and power. But, being a 0D setup, these studies do not take into consideration the co-evolution of plasma size and shape, and instead assume an unchanging minor and major radius. However, it is known that the plasma position and its minor radius can change appreciably as the plasma evolves in time to fill in the entire available volume. In this paper, an enhanced model for the tokamak startup is introduced, which for the first time takes into account the evolution of plasma geometry during this brief but highly dynamic period by including realistic one-dimensional (1D) effects within the broad 0D framework. In addition the effect of runaway electrons (REs) has also been incorporated. The paper demonstrates that the inclusion of plasma cross section evolution in conjunction with REs plays an important role in the formation and development of tokamak startup. The model is benchmarked against experimental results from ADITYA tokamak.

  18. Overview of the ITER Tokamak complex building and integration of plant systems toward construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: jean-jacques.cordier@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bak, Joo-Shik [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Baudry, Alain [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Benchikhoune, Magali [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Carafa, Leontin; Chiocchio, Stefano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Darbour, Romaric [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Elbez, Joelle; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Jeannoutot, Thomas; Kotamaki, Miikka; Kuehn, Ingo; Lee, Andreas; Levesy, Bruno; Orlandi, Sergio [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Packer, Rachel [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Patisson, Laurent; Reich, Jens; Rigoni, Giuliano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Tokamak complex consists of Tokamak, diagnostic and tritium buildings. The Tokamak machine is located in the bioshield pit of the Tokamak building. Plant systems are implemented in the three buildings and are strongly interfacing with the Tokamak. The reference baseline (3D) configuration is a set of over 1000 models that today defines in an exhaustive way the overall layout of Tokamak and plant systems, needed for fixing the interfaces and to complete the construction design of the buildings. During the last two years, one of the main ITER challenges was to improve the maturity of the plant systems layout in order to confirm their integration in the building final design and freeze the interface definitions in-between the systems and to the buildings. The propagation of safety requirements in the design of the nuclear building like confinement, fire zoning and radiation shielding is of first priority. A major effort was placed by ITER Organization together with the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect Engineer as a joint team to fix the interfaces and the loading conditions to buildings. The most demanding systems in terms of interface definition are water cooling, cryogenic, detritiation, vacuum, cable trays and building services. All penetrations through the walls for piping, cables and other equipment have been defined, as well as all temporary openings needed for the installation phase. Project change requests (PCR) impacting the Tokamak complex buildings have been implemented in a tight allocated time schedule. The most demanding change was to implement a new design of the Tokamak basic machine supporting system. The 18 supporting columns of the cryostat (2001 baseline) were replaced at the end of 2012 by a concrete crown and radial concrete ribs linked to the basemat and to the bioshield surrounding the Tokamak. The change was implemented successfully in the building construction design to allow basemat construction phase being performed

  19. Fielding the NIF Cryogenic Ignition Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malsbury, T; Haid, B; Gibson, C; Atkinson, D; Skulina, K; Klingmann, J; Atherton, J; Mapoles, E; Kozioziemski, B; Dzenitis, E

    2008-02-28

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer on the inside of a 2 millimeter diameter capsule positioned at the center of a 9 millimeter long by 5 millimeter diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer requires micrometer level accuracy and must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 19 K. At NIF shot time, the target must be positioned at the center of the NIF 10 meter diameter target chamber, aligned to the laser beam lines and held stable to less than 7 micrometers rms. We have completed the final design and are integrating the systems necessary to create, characterize and field the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with emphasis on the challenges of fielding a precision cryogenic positioning system will be presented.

  20. Dynamic diagnostics of the error fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2007-07-01

    The error field diagnostics based on magnetic measurements outside the plasma is discussed. The analysed methods rely on measuring the plasma dynamic response to the finite-amplitude external magnetic perturbations, which are the error fields and the pre-programmed probing pulses. Such pulses can be created by the coils designed for static error field correction and for stabilization of the resistive wall modes, the technique developed and applied in several tokamaks, including DIII-D and JET. Here analysis is based on the theory predictions for the resonant field amplification (RFA). To achieve the desired level of the error field correction in tokamaks, the diagnostics must be sensitive to signals of several Gauss. Therefore, part of the measurements should be performed near the plasma stability boundary, where the RFA effect is stronger. While the proximity to the marginal stability is important, the absolute values of plasma parameters are not. This means that the necessary measurements can be done in the diagnostic discharges with parameters below the nominal operating regimes, with the stability boundary intentionally lowered. The estimates for ITER are presented. The discussed diagnostics can be tested in dedicated experiments in existing tokamaks. The diagnostics can be considered as an extension of the 'active MHD spectroscopy' used recently in the DIII-D tokamak and the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch.

  1. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  2. Tokamak Scenario Trajectory Optimization Using Fast Integrated Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jakub; Artaud, Jean-François; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2015-11-01

    We employ a fast integrated tokamak simulator, METIS, for optimizing tokamak discharge trajectories. METIS is based on scaling laws and simplified transport equations, validated on existing experiments and capable of simulating a full tokamak discharge in about 1 minute. Rapid free-boundary equilibrium post-processing using FREEBIE provides estimates of PF coil currents or forces. We employ several optimization strategies for optimizing key trajectories, such as Ip or heating power, of a model ITER hybrid discharge. Local and global algorithms with single or multiple objective functions show how to reach optimum performance, stationarity or minimum flux consumption. We constrain fundamental operation parameters, such as ramp-up rate, PF coils currents and forces or heating power. As an example, we demonstrate the benefit of current over-shoot for hybrid mode, consistent with previous results. This particular optimization took less than 2 hours on a single PC. Overall, we have established a powerful approach for rapid, non-linear tokamak scenario optimization, including operational constraints, pertinent to existing and future devices design and operation.

  3. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G. [and others

    1996-03-18

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured.

  4. Self-ignition and ignition of aluminum powders in shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, V. M.; Poplavski, S. V.

    Ignition of fine aluminum powders in reflected shock waves has been studied. Two ignition regimes are found: self-ignition observed at temperatures higher than 1800 K and ``low-temperature'' ignition at temperatures of 1000-1800 K. The possibility of initiating the ignition of aluminum powders in air using combustible liquids has been studied too.

  5. Sliding Mode Control of a Tokamak Transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. A.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Moret, J. M.; Paley, J.; Sevillano, G.; Garrido, I.; Le, H. B.

    2012-06-08

    A novel inductive control system for a tokamak transformer is described. The system uses the flux change provided by the transformer primary coil to control the electric current and the internal inductance of the secondary plasma circuit load. The internal inductance control is used to regulate the slow flux penetration in the highly conductive plasma due to the skin effect, providing first-order control over the shape of the plasma current density profile. Inferred loop voltages at specific locations inside the plasma are included in a state feedback structure to improve controller performance. Experimental tests have shown that the plasma internal inductance can be controlled inductively for a whole pulse starting just 30ms after plasma breakdown. The details of the control system design are presented, including the transformer model, observer algorithms and controller design. (Author) 67 refs.

  6. Advantages of iron core in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettis, E.S.; Ballou, J.K.; Becraft, W.R.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Watts, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the iron core vs air core concepts was carried out on a preliminary basis by using a representative tokamak reactor design with the following self-consistent reference parameters. In the area of plasma engineering, poloidal field and MHD equilibrium considerations with an unsaturated iron core is discussed. The question of proper poloidal field coils to maintain D-shaped plasmas of relatively high anti ..beta.. (7%) with a saturated iron core is also discussed. Estimates of the required iron core size, volt seconds, magnetic flux and its influence on force loading on the superconducting toroidal field coils are shown. Conceptual designs of the mechanical structure of an iron core device are presented. Favorable impacts on the OH power supply cost and complexity are indicated.

  7. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  8. CORONA DISCHARGE IGNITION FOR ADVANCED STATIONARY NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul D. Ronney

    2003-09-12

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. This corona generator is adaptable for use as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions. Work is underway to design a corona electrode that will fit in the new test engine and be capable igniting the mixture in one cylinder at first and eventually in all four cylinders. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder. With this configuration it will be possible to switch between corona ignition and conventional spark plug ignition without making any mechanical modifications.

  9. Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targetsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R. B.; Hatchett, S. P.; Tabak, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Bonino, M.; Nikroo, A.; Petrasso, R.; Sangster, T. C.; Smith, J.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current base line FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct- or indirect-drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultraintense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. A theoretical and experimental investigation was undertaken of the collapse of such targets, validating modeling, and exploring the trade-offs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side, hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But for FI it is a liability; the hot, low-density inner core impedes the compaction of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain. Approaches to optimizing this shell design are discussed.

  10. The Velocity Campaign for Ignition on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires a high velocity implosion since the energy required for ignition scales like 1/v8. Beyond ignition, a higher velocity produces more robust performance, which will be useful for applications of ignition. In the velocity campaign, we will explore three methods for increasing implosion velocity: increased laser power and energy, optimized hohlraum and capsule materials, and optimized capsule thickness. The main issue with increasing the laser power and energy is the way in which LPI (laser plasma interactions) and hot electron preheat will change as we increase the laser power. Based on scalings from previous data and theory, we expect to couple 80-85% of 1.5 MJ at 475-500 TW. We can also increase the velocity by optimizing the hohlraum and capsule materials. In this campaign, we will explore depleted uranium hohlraums to reduce wall loss and optimize the capsule dopant by replacing the germanium dopant with silicon. Those two changes are expected to increase velocity by 6-7%. Finally, we will optimize the capsule thickness. The optimal capsule thickness is a trade-off between velocity and mix. A thinner capsule has higher velocity, but is more susceptible to mix of the ablator material into the hotspot due to hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by ablation surface imperfections. Once we have achieved adequate capsule areal density, we will optimize the velocity/mix trade off by varying the capsule thickness. We will also make direct measure of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by backlighting the growth of engineered features on the surface of the capsule. This will allow us to benchmark our models of mix. In this paper, we will describe the designs and experimental results of the velocity campaign. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. The National Ignition Campaign: status and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Collaborators, the NIC

    2013-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and a variety of experiments have been completed and many more are planned in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with nearly 60 x-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. The NIF has also been qualified for the use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high-yield experiments and classified experiments. Implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 7.5 × 1014 neutrons have been achieved. NIF, a Nd : Glass laser facility, is routinely operating at 1.6 MJ of ultraviolet (3ω) light on target with very high reliability. It recently reached its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort with the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory, is making steady progress towards achieving ignition. Other experiments have been completed in support of high-energy science, materials equation of state, and materials strength. In all cases, records of extreme temperatures and pressures, highest neutron yield and highest energy densities have been achieved. This paper describes the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path towards ignition.

  12. Module of lithium divertor for KTM tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyublinski, I., E-mail: yublinski@yandex.ru [FSUE ' Red Star' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Vertkov, A.; Evtikhin, V.; Balakirev, V.; Ionov, D.; Zharkov, M. [FSUE ' Red Star' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Tazhibayeva, I. [IAE NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mirnov, S. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khomiakov, S.; Mitin, D. [OJSC Dollezhal Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazzitelli, G. [ENEA RC Frascati (Italy); Agostini, P. [ENEA RC Brasimone (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    steady-state operating lithium divertor module project for Kazakhstan tokamak KTM. At present the lithium divertor module for KTM tokamak is under development in the framework of ISTC project no. K-1561. Initial heating up to 200 Degree-Sign C and lithium surface temperature stabilization during plasma interaction in the range of 350-550 Degree-Sign C will be provided by external system for thermal stabilization due to circulation of the Na-K heat transfer media. Lithium filled tungsten felt is offered as the base plasma facing material of divertor. Development, creation and experimental research of lithium divertor model for KTM will allow to solve existing problems and to fulfill the basic approaches to designing of lithium divertor and in-vessel elements of new fusion reactor generation, to investigate plasma physics aspects of lithium influence, to develop technology of work with lithium in tokamak conditions. Results of this project addresses to the progress in the field of fusion neutrons source and fusion energy source creation.

  13. Sensitivity of ICF ignition conditions to non-Maxwellian DT fusion reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbett W.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hotspot ignition conditions in ICF are determined by considering the power balance between fusion energy deposition and energy loss terms. Uncertainty in any of these terms has potential to modify the ignition conditions, changing the optimum ignition capsule design. This paper considers the impact of changes to the DT fusion reaction rate due to non-thermal ion energy distributions. The DT fusion reactivity has been evaluated for a class of non-Maxwellian distributions representing a perturbation to the tail of a thermal distribution. The resulting reactivity has been used to determine hotspot ignition conditions as a function of the characteristic parameter of the modified distribution.

  14. STUDY ON INJECTION AND IGNITION CONTROL OF GASOLINE ENGINE BASED ON BP NEURAL NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cuiping; Yang Qingfo

    2003-01-01

    According to advantages of neural network and characteristics of operating procedures of engine, a new strategy is represented on the control of fuel injection and ignition timing of gasoline engine based on improved BP network algorithm. The optimum ignition advance angle and fuel injection pulse band of engine under different speed and load are tested for the samples training network, focusing on the study of the design method and procedure of BP neural network in engine injection and ignition control. The results show that artificial neural network technique can meet the requirement of engine injection and ignition control. The method is feasible for improving power performance, economy and emission performances of gasoline engine.

  15. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  16. Bootstrap Current in Spherical Tokamaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王中天; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    Variational principle for the neoclassical theory has been developed by including amomentum restoring term in the electron-electron collisional operator, which gives an additionalfree parameter maximizing the heat production rate. All transport coefficients are obtained in-cluding the bootstrap current. The essential feature of the study is that the aspect ratio affects thefunction of the electron-electron collision operator through a geometrical factor. When the aspectratio approaches to unity, the fraction of circulating particles goes to zero and the contribution toparticle flux from the electron-electron collision vanishes. The resulting diffusion coefficient is inrough agreement with Hazeltine. When the aspect ratio approaches to infinity, the results are inagreement with Rosenbluth. The formalism gives the two extreme cases a connection. The theoryis particularly important for the calculation of bootstrap current in spherical tokamaks and thepresent tokamaks, in which the square root of the inverse aspect ratio, in general, is not small.

  17. Overview of ARIES-RS tokamak fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najmabadi, F. [California Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). Fusion Energy Research Program

    1998-09-01

    In order for fusion power to be widely accepted in the next century, it should offer advantages compared to available sources of energy. The Starlite study has examined the ability of tokamak-based power plants to compete with fusion energy sources. A set of top-level system requirements and goals for system economics, safety and waste disposal, and reliability and availability were established during extensive consultations with US electric utilities and industry representatives. Five different tokamak plasma operation modes were considered and different technology options (e.g. choice of structural material, coolant, breeder) were developed and assessed. Based on this assessment, the ARIES-RS design study was initiated to examine a power plant based on the reversed-shear mode of plasma operation, coupled to a fusion power core which uses high-performance lithium-cooled vanadium components. An overview of the ARIES-RS design is presented in this paper. (orig.) 14 refs.

  18. A lithium deposition system for tokamak devices*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziul, Christopher; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Hoffman, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Card, David

    2002-11-01

    The production of a lithium deposition system using commercially available components is discussed. This system is intended to provide a fresh lithium wall coating between discharges in a tokamak. For this purpose, a film 100-200 Å thick is sufficient to ensure that the plasma interacts solely with the lithium. A test system consisting of a lithium evaporator and a deposition monitor has been designed and constructed to investigate deposition rates and coverage. A Thermionics 3kW e-gun is used to rapidly evaporate small amounts of solid lithium. An Inficon XTM/2 quartz deposition monitor then measures deposition rate at varying distances, positions and angles relative to the e-gun crucible. Initial results from the test system will be presented. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  19. General Tokamak Circuit Simulation Program-GTCSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukawa, Makoto; Miura, Yushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Aoyagi, Tetsuo

    1997-05-01

    General Tokamak Circuit Simulation Program (GTCSP) was originally developed for the design work of JT-60 Power Supply System in JAERI. Therefore the prepared models (components) to be analyzed are generator, thyristor converter and coils. This is one of the unique points of GTCSP in comparison with other conventional electric circuit analysis program, because they make a circuit from the small devices such as resister, coil, condenser, transistor and so on. However, GTCSP is also clearly conventional because it is possible to construct an electric circuit freely with the prepared components. Moreover, a similar function could be realized by addition a new component to GTCSP. This report is assumed to be used as an User Manual of the GTCSP, not only to present the development and the analytical functions. Then some useful examples are described, and how to get graphic outputs are also mentioned. (author)

  20. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  1. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  2. ICF Ignition, the Lawson Criterion, and Comparison with MFE Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R.

    2009-11-01

    The Lawson criterion, which determines the onset of thermonuclear ignition, is usually expressed through the product pτ > 10 atm . s, where p is the plasma pressure in atm and τ is the energy confinement time in seconds. In magnetic fusion devices, both the pressure and confinement time are routinely measured and the performance of each discharge can be assessed by comparing the value of pτ with respect to the ignition value (10 atm . s). In inertial confinement fusion, both p and τ cannot be directly measured and the performance of surrogate and/or subignited ICF implosions cannot be assessed with respect to the ignition condition. This makes it difficult to compare the performance of ICF implosions with that of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) discharges. Here, we define the meaning of ignition in ICF implosions and compare it to MFE ignition. We then show that a multidimensional ignition condition for inertial confinement fusion can be cast in a form that depends on three measurable parameters of the compressed-fuel assembly: the hot-spot ion temperature T, the neutron yield normalized to the 1-D prediction (yield over clean or YOC) and the total areal density ρR, which includes the cold shell's contribution. A family of marginal-ignition curves are derived in the ρR--T plane.footnotetext C. D. Zhou and R. Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008). On this plane, hydrodynamic-equivalent curves show how a given implosion would perform with respect to the ignition condition when the laser-driver energy is varied. Such a criterion can be used to measure the ignition marginfootnotetext D. S. Clark, S. W. Haan, and J. D. Salmonson, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056305 (2008). of NIF targets and to predict the performance of OMEGA targets when scaled up to NIF energies. This work has been supported by the US Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC02-ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  3. The National Ignition Facility front-end laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, S.C.; Beach, R.J.; Crane, J.H.; Davin, J.M.; Perry, M.D.; Wilcox, R.B.

    1995-07-07

    The proposed National Ignition Facility is a 192 beam Nd:glass laser system capable of driving targets to fusion ignition by the year 2005. A key factor in the flexibility and performance of the laser is a front-end system which provides a precisely formatted beam to each beamline. Each of the injected beams has individually controlled energy, temporal pulseshape, and spatial shape to accommodate beamline-to-beamline variations in gain and saturation. This flexibility also gives target designers the options for precisely controlling the drive to different areas of the target. The design of the Front-End laser is described, and initial results are discussed.

  4. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  5. Paths to ignition by radio frequency heating during the B-field ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myra, J. R.; Aamodt, R. E.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2000-05-01

    To conserve transformer volt-seconds, power to toroidal magnetic field coils, and to trigger an early transition into high confinement (H) mode, where the requirements on auxiliary power are lower, rf heating during the B-field ramp phase of ignition-class tokamaks is considered. The scheme is analyzed by modifying the usual plasma operating condition diagrams to apply to the ramp phase where the magnetic field, plasma current, and density are changing. It is shown that ion cyclotron range-of-frequencies direct electron heating during the ramp phase of IGNITOR [B. Coppi, M. Nassi, and L. E. Sugiyama, Phys. Scr. 45, 112 (1992)], as proposed by Majeski [R. Majeski, in AIP Conference Proceedings 485—Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, Annapolis, MD (AIP, New York, 1999), p. 353], may be useful in optimizing the operating condition path to ignition.

  6. Recent Advances in Cigarette Ignition Propensity Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Hillel R; O'Connor, Richard J; Spalletta, Ron; Connolly, Gregory N

    2010-04-01

    Major U.S. cigarette companies for decades conducted research and development regarding cigarette ignition propensity which has continued beyond fire safety standards for cigarettes that have recently been legislated. This paper describes recent scientific advances and technological development based on a comprehensive review of the physical, chemical, and engineering sciences, public health, and trade literature, U.S. and international patents, and research in the tobacco industry document libraries.Advancements since the first implementation of standards have made been in: a) understanding the key parameters involved in cigarette smoldering combustion and ignition of substrates; b) developing new cigarette and paper wrapper designs to reduce ignition propensity, including banded and non-banded cigarette paper approaches, c) assessing toxicology, and d) measuring performance. While the implications of manufacturers' non-safety related aims are of concern, this research indicates possible alternative designs should experience with fire loss and existing technologies on the market suggest need for improvement.

  7. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Rodney J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  8. The role of limiter in Egyptor Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Ei-Sisi, A B

    2002-01-01

    In Egyptor Tokamak, the limiter is used for separation of the plasma from the vessel. In this work an overview of limiter types, and construction of limiter in Egyptor Tokamak is discussed. Also simulation results of the radial electron density distribution in case of limiter are presented. The results of the simulation are in agreement with the experimental and analytical results.

  9. Preparing for polar-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenty P.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of polar drive (PD at the National Ignition Facility (NIF will enable the execution of direct-drive implosions while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE, in collaboration with LLNL, LANL and GA, is implementing PD on the NIF. LLE has designed and participates in the use of PD implosions for diagnostic commissioning on the NIF. LLE has an active experimental campaign to develop PD in both warm and cryogenic target experiments on OMEGA. LLE and its partners are developing a Polar Drive Project Execution Plan, which will provide a detailed outline of the requirements, resources, and timetable leading to PD-ignition experiments on the NIF.

  10. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  11. First Neutron Spectrometry Measurement at the HL-2A Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Yuan; Xufei, Xie; Zhongjing, Chen; Xingyu, Peng; Tieshuan, Fan; Jinxiang, Chen; Xiangqing, Li; Guoliang, Yuan; Jinwei, Yang; Qingwei, Yang

    2013-01-01

    A compact neutron spectrometer based on the liquid scintillator is presented for the neutron energy spectrum measurement at the HL-2A tokamak. The spectrometer has been well characterized and a fast digital pulse shape discrimination software has been developed using the charge comparison method. A digitizer data acquisition system with the maximum frequency of 1 MHz can work under the high count rate environment at HL-2A. Specific radiation shielding and magnetic shielding for the spectrometerhas been designed for the neutron spectrum measurement at the HL-2A Tokamak. For the analysis of the pulse height spectrum, dedicated numerical simulation utilizing NUBEAM combining with GENESIS has been made to obtain the neutron energy spectrum, following which the transportation process from the plasma to the detector has been evaluated with Monte Carlo calculations. The distorted neutron energy spectrum has been folded with response matrix of the liquid scintillation spectrometer, and good consistency has been found...

  12. A quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The development of a quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas, ultimately designed to provide physically comprehensive predictions of the time evolution of the thermodynamic relevant quantities, is a task that requires tight links among theoretical, experimental and numerical studies. The framework of the model here proposed, which operates a reduction of complexity on the nonlinear self-organizing plasma dynamics, allows in fact multiple validations of the current understanding of the tokamak micro-turbulence. The main outcomes of this work stem from the fundamental steps involved by the formulation of such a reduced transport model, namely: (1) the verification of the quasi-linear plasma response against the nonlinearly computed solution, (2) the improvement of the turbulent saturation model through an accurate validation of the nonlinear codes against the turbulence measurements, (3) the integration of the quasi-linear model within an integrated transport solver.

  13. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, T.; Dix, D.; El-Guebaly, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2011-10-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  14. Non-Axisymmetric Shaping of Tokamaks Preserving Quasi-Axisymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2009-06-05

    If quasi-axisymmetry is preserved, non-axisymmetric shaping can be used to design tokamaks that do not require current drive, are resilient to disruptions, and have robust plasma stability without feedback. Suggestions for addressing the critical issues of tokamaks can only be validated when presented with sufficient specificity that validating experiments can be designed. The purpose of this paper is provide that specificity for non-axisymmetric shaping. To our knowledge, no other suggestions for the solution of a number of tokamak issues, such as disruptions, have reached this level of specificity. Sequences of three-field-period quasi-axisymmetric plasmas are studied. These sequences address the questions: (1) What can be achieved at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping? (2) What simplifications to the coils can be achieved by going to a larger aspect ratio? (3) What range of shaping can be achieved in a single experimental facility? The sequences of plasmas found in this study provide a set of interesting and potentially important configurations.

  15. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  16. 液体危险化学品自燃温度检测电路的设计%Design of Self-ignition Temperature Detecting Circuit for Hazardous Liquid Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华伟; 陈飞; 李忠海; 吴庆定

    2015-01-01

    The high accurate temperature detecting circuit based on K-type thermocouple is introduced. It is used for detecting the temperature inside the combustion chamber of the self-ignition temperature detector for hazardous liquid chemicals. The experiments show that the circuit meets the requirements of wide range and high accuracy for such detector. In addition, the design principle and method of this temperature detecting circuit can also be widely used in other temperature detection systems.%介绍了一种基于K型热电偶传感器的高精度温度检测电路,用于液体危险化学品自燃温度检测仪燃烧室内温度的检测。试验表明,该电路满足液体危险化学品自燃温度检测仪对其测温范围广、精度高的要求。同时,该温度检测电路的设计原理与方法也可以广泛应用于其他温度检测系统中。

  17. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  18. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  19. Fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion target by jet impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pedro@din.upm.es; Ogando, F. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (Spain); Eliezer, S. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel); Martinez-Val, J.M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel)

    2005-05-21

    A new target design for HIF, based on the fast-ignition principles, is proposed. Unlike the previous designs proposed so far, in this case just one energy source is needed to drive the whole process to ignition. The ultra-fast deposition of energy onto the compressed core is produced in this case by hypervelocity jets generated during the process. The collision of jets converts their kinetic energy into thermal energy of the nuclear fuel, which is expected to produce ignition under proper design. The process is studied in this paper, describing its most relevant features like jet production and later collision.

  20. A Steam-Plasma Igniter for Aluminum Powder Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghyup, Lee; Kwanyoung, Noh; Jihwan, Lim; Woongsup, Yoon

    2015-05-01

    High-temperature ignition is essential for the ignition and combustion of energetic metal fuels, including aluminum and magnesium particles which are protected by their high-melting-temperature oxides. A plasma torch characterized by an ultrahigh-temperature plasma plume fulfills such high-temperature ignition conditions. A new steam plasma igniter is designed and successfully validated by aluminum power ignition and combustion tests. The steam plasma rapidly stabilizes in both plasma and steam jet modes. Parametric investigation of the steam plasma jet is conducted in terms of arc strength. A high-speed camera and an oscilloscope method visualize the discharge characteristics, and optical emission spectroscopy measures the thermochemical properties of the plasma jet. The diatomic molecule OH fitting method, the Boltzmann plot method, and short exposure capturing with an intensified charge coupled device record the axial distributions of the rotational gas temperature, excitation temperature, and OH radical distribution, respectively. The excitation temperature at the nozzle tip is near 5500 K, and the gas temperature is 5400 K.

  1. Path To Ignition: US Indirect Target Physics (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, M.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The United States ICF Program has been pursuing an aggressive research program in preparation for an ignition demonstration on the National Ignition Facility. Los Alamos and Livermore laboratories have collaborated on resolving indirect drive target physics issues on the Nova laser at Livermore National Laboratory. This combined with detailed modeling of laser heated indirectly driven targets likely to achieve ignition, has provided the basis for planning for the NIF. A detailed understanding of target physics, laser performance, and target fabrication is required for developing robust ignition targets. We have developed large-scale computational models to simulate complex physics which occurs in an indirectly driven target. For ignition, detailed understanding of hohlraum and implosion physics is required in order to control competing processes at the few percent level. From crucial experiments performed by Los Alamos and Livermore on the Nova laser, a comprehensive indirect drive database has been assembled. Time integrated and time dependent measurements of radiation drive and symmetry coupled with a detailed set of plasma instability measurements have confirmed our ability to predict hohlraum energetics. Implosion physics campaigns are focused on underdstanding detailed capsule hydrodynamics and instability growth. Target fabrication technology is also an active area of research at Los Alamos, Livermore, and General Atomics for NIF. NIF targets require developing technology in cryogenics and manufacturing in such areas as beryllium shell manufacture. Descriptions of our NIF target designs, experimental results, and fabrication technology supporting NIF target performance predictions will be given.

  2. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bowers, M. W.; Brereton, S. J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Coffee, K. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D. G.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J. L.; Krauter, K. G.; Kroll, J. J.; LaFortune, K. N.; Le Pape, S.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H. B.; Ross, G. F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R. F.; Sterne, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Throop, A.; Town, R. P. J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Walters, C. F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B. K.; Atherton, L. J.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  3. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  4. Compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, S. P.; Gelfand, B. E.; Khomik, S. V.; Agafonov, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The state of the art of the problem of discrepancy between the values measured in shock tubes and calculated for the delay of ignition of hydrogen-containing systems has been analyzed. It is shown that in the low-temperature region the off-design appearance of reaction sites leads to the propagation of a flame in a mixture heated by a reflected shock wave. The parameter of the time of mixture combustion in a deflagration regime has been introduced and the use of it together with the calculated delay in self-ignition for delimitation and classification of thermal and gas-dynamic phenomena on compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes has been suggested.

  5. WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

    2012-10-10

    This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

  6. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  7. Laser diode ignition characteristics of Zirconium Potassium Perchlorate (ZPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Jerry D.; Tindol, Scot

    1993-01-01

    Hi-Shear Technology, Corp., (HSTC) has designed and built a Laser equivalent NASA Standard Initiator (LNSI). Langlie tests with a laser diode output initiating ZPP were conducted as a part of this effort. The test parameters include time to first pressure, laser power density requirements, and ignition time. The data from these laser tests on ZPP are presented.

  8. An H{sup {infinity}} system identification algorithm applied to tokamak modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutlis, A.; Limebeer, D.J.N.; Wainwright, J. [Centre for Process Systems Eng. and Dept. of Electrical Eng., Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Lister, J.B.; Vyas, P.; Ward, D.J. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we describe the application of MISO System Identification to Tokamak simulations and machines. The work is motivated by the desire to create linear models for the design of modern controllers. The method described in this paper is a worst-case identification technique, in that it aims to minimise the H{sup {infinity}} error between the identified model and the plant. Such a model is particularly suited for robust controller design. The method is fully detailed from the design of identification experiments through to the creation of a low-order model from a combination of Hankel model reduction and Chebycheff approximation. We show results from the application of this method to a powerful Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and discuss results on the TCV Tokamak in Lausanne. (author) 2 figs., 11 refs.

  9. Design of feedback control system for HL-2M tokamak%HL-2M装置反馈控制系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国辉; 夏凡; 宋显明; 罗萃文; 宋啸; 赵丽; 廖敏

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of HL-2M control system is simply presented, and the feedback control system which is the most important part of the whole control system is mainly introduced, feedback control program is rewrited. In order to satisfy the further requirements from control system in HL-2M, the feedback control system program has been redesigned. Some improvement of methods on how to achieve partial functions has been done. The real-time communication network will be builded based on reflection memory cards, and the structure of feedback control system is constructed through the real-time network. In the Linux operating system, simulation tests have been made on new feedback control system with old experiment data, the result of tests shows well and meets the expected requirements.%简要描述HL-2M控制系统的概念设计,主要对其中反馈控制部分作了介绍,重新编写了反馈控制程序.为了满足HL-2M装置对控制系统的进一步要求,重新设计了反馈控制系统程序.对其中一些功能的实现方法进行了设计改进,引入了由反射内存卡构建的实时通讯网络,并以此通讯网络为基础进行了反馈控制系统的架构布局.在Linux操作系统中,利用以前放电的实验数据,模拟测试了新的反馈控制系统.测试结果良好,满足预期要求.

  10. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  11. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  12. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet igni

  13. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet

  14. Anomalous particle pinch in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miskane, F.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dezairi, A.; Saifaoui, D. [Faculte des Sciences Ain Chok, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2000-06-01

    The diffusion coefficient in phase space usually varies with the particle energy. A consequence is the dependence of the fluid particle flux on the temperature gradient. If the diffusion coefficient in phase space decreases with the energy in the bulk of the thermal distribution function, the particle thermodiffusion coefficient which links the particle flux to the temperature gradient is negative. This is a possible explanation for the inward particle pinch that is observed in tokamaks. A quasilinear theory shows that such a thermodiffusion is generic for a tokamak electrostatic turbulence at low frequency. This effect adds to the particle flux associated with the radial gradient of magnetic field. This behavior is illustrated with a perturbed electric potential, for which the trajectories of charged particle guiding centers are calculated. The diffusion coefficient of particles is computed and compared to the quasilinear theory, which predicts a divergence at low velocity. It is shown that at low velocity, the actual diffusion coefficient increases, but remains lower than the quasilinear value. Nevertheless, this differential diffusion between cold and fast particles leads to an inward flux of particles. (author)

  15. Microwave Imaging Reflectometer (MIR) Development for the EAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domier, Calvin; Hu, Xing; Spear, Alexander; Zhu, Yilun; Xie, Jinlin; Luhmann, Neville

    2016-10-01

    An upgraded MIR system is being developed for the EAST tokamak based on the successful DIII-D MIR system. The EAST MIR system has 8 radial channels consisting of 8 independent probing frequencies ranging from 75 to 103 GHz, driven by fast tuning synthesizers and active frequency multipliers. There are 12 poloidal channels in the heterodyne down-conversion receiver system, with each channel corresponding to a separate poloidal position inside the tokamak. The down-conversion electronics are designed to optimize signal to noise ratio and are embedded with a microcontroller to realize remote computer control. Considerable improvements are also seen in the front-end plasma facing optics. This new optical system provides features including focusing, zoom, field curvature adjustment, and incident angle adjustment. These functions can be realized together or independently depending on the configuration setup of the large aperture lenses. This MIR system is expected to be installed on the EAST tokamak in December 2016, co-located with the Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) system, to simultaneously measure electron density and temperature fluctuations. This work was supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54531 and by the National MCF energy development program of China.

  16. Optimization study of normal conductor tokamak for commercial neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Sakai, R.; Okamoto, A.

    2017-05-01

    The optimum conceptual design of tokamak with normal conductor coils was studied for minimizing the cost for producing a given neutron flux by using a system code, PEC. It is assumed that the fusion neutrons are used for burning transuranics from the fission reactor spent fuel in the blanket and a fraction of the generated electric power is circulated to opearate the tokamak with moderate plasma fusion gain. The plasma performance was assumed to be moderate ones; {β\\text{N}}~∼ ~3{--}4 in the aspect ratio A~=~2{--}3 and {{H}98y2}~=~1 . The circulating power is an important factor affecting the cost. Though decreasing the aspect ratio is useful to raise the plasma beta and decrease the toroidal field, the maximum field in the coil starts to rise in the very low aspect ratio range and then the circulating power increases with decrease in the plasma aspect ratio A below A~∼ ~2 , while the construction cost increases with A . As a result, the cost per neutron has its minimum around A~∼ ~2.2 , namely, between ST and the conventional tokamak. The average circulating power fraction is expected to be ~51%.

  17. Performance Projections For The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeski, R.; Berzak, L.; Gray, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Levinton, F.; Lundberg, D. P.; Manickam, J.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Snieckus, K.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stotler, D.; Strickler, T.; Timberlake, J.; Yoo, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2009-06-17

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium limiter in the CDX-U tokamak produced the largest relative increase (an enhancement factor of 5-10) in Ohmic tokamak confinement ever observed. The confinement results from CDX-U do not agree with existing scaling laws, and cannot easily be projected to the new lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Numerical simulations of CDX-U low recycling discharges have now been performed with the ASTRA-ESC code with a special reference transport model suitable for a diffusion-based confinement regime, incorporating boundary conditions for nonrecycling walls, with fuelling via edge gas puffing. This model has been successful at reproducing the experimental values of the energy confinement (4-6 ms), loop voltage (<0.5 V), and density for a typical CDX-U lithium discharge. The same transport model has also been used to project the performance of the LTX, in Ohmic operation, or with modest neutral beam injection (NBI). NBI in LTX, with a low recycling wall of liquid lithium, is predicted to result in core electron and ion temperatures of 1-2 keV, and energy confinement times in excess of 50 ms. Finally, the unique design features of LTX are summarized.

  18. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, Ryan [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Clark, Billy [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pantoya, Michelle L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Heaps, Ronald J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daniels, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  19. A comparison of steady-state ARIES and pulsed PULSAR tokamak power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1994-07-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has completed a series of three steady-state and two pulsed cost-optimized conceptual designs of commercial tokamak fusion power plants that vary the level of assumed advances in technology and physics. The cost benefits of various design options are compared quantitatively. Possible means to improve the economic competitiveness of fusion are suggested.

  20. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  1. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  2. Ignitability of crude oil and its oil-in-water products at arctic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranellone, Raymond T; Tukaew, Panyawat; Shi, Xiaochuan; Rangwala, Ali S

    2017-02-15

    A novel platform and procedure were developed to characterize the ignitability of Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil and its water-in-oil products with water content up to 60% at low temperatures (-20-0°C). Time to ignition, critical heat flux, in-depth temperature profiles were investigated. It was observed that a cold boundary and consequent low oil temperature increased the thermal inertia of the oil/mixture and consequently the time to sustained ignition also increased. As the water content in the ANS water-in-oil mixture increased, the critical heat flux for ignition was found to increase. This is mainly because of an increase in the thermal conductivity of the mixture with the addition of saltwater. The results of the study can be used towards design of ignition strategies and technologies for in situ burning of oil spills in cold climates such as the Arctic.

  3. Computer aided engineering in exhaust aftertreatment systems design. Pt. 1. Spark ignition engine; Computergestuetzter Entwurf von Abgas-Nachbehandlungskonzepten. T. 1. Ottomotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatelos, A.M.; Koltsakis, G.C.; Kandylas, I.P. [Aristotelian Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1999-02-01

    At the Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Greece, an integrated Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) methodology assisting the design of SI-engine exhaust aftertreatment systems employing the following computational tools was developed: A computer code which models transient exhaust system heat transfer, a tuneable computer code which models the transient operation of a three-way catalytic converter, a database containing chemical kinetics data for a variety of catalyst formulations, and a methodology for ageing assessment calculations. Application of the CAE methodology, which aids the exhaust aftertreatment system design engineer to meet the upcoming, increasingly stringent emission standards, is high-lighted by referring to a number of representative case studies. (orig.) [Deutsch] An der Aristoteles-Universitaet Thessaloniki, Griechenland, wurde eine computergestuetzte Methode (CAE) entwickelt, die den Entwurf und die Konstruktion von Abgasnachbehandlungskonzepten unterstuetzt. Die Methode setzt auf die folgenden Rechenmodelle und Datenbanken: Ein Rechenmodell zur Berechnung des Waermeuebergangs in Motorabgassystemen, ein Rechenmodell zur Abschaetzung des Katalysatorgegendrucks, eine Datenbank mit den chemischen Kinetikdaten fuer die verschiedenen Typen von Dreiwegekatalysatoren und eine computergestuetzte Prozedur zur Abschaetzung des Alterungsverhaltens von Dreiwegekatalysatoren. Integrierte CAE-Methoden koennen beim Entwurf von modernen Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen angewandt werden, um die Entwicklungszeit und -kosten betraechtlich zu reduzieren. (orig.)

  4. A midsize tokamak as a fast track to burning plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mazzucato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the conceptual design of a midsize tokamak as a fast track to the investigation of burning plasmas. It is shown that it could reach large values of energy gain (≥ 10 with only a modest improvement in confinement over the scaling that was used for designing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER. This can be achieved by operating in a low plasma recycling regime that experiments indicate can lead to improved plasma confinement. The possibility of reaching the necessary conditions of low recycling using a different magnetic divertor from those currently employed in present experiments is discussed.

  5. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Raju; R Jha; P K Kaw; S K Mattoo; Y C Saxena; Aditya Team

    2000-11-01

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as the discharge progresses. It is observed that during the current rise phase, current perturbation undergoes transition from = 5 poloidal structure to = 4 and then to = 3. At the time of current termination, = 2 perturbation is observed. It is observed that the mode frequency remains nearly constant (≈10 kHz) when poloidal mode structure changes from = 4 to = 2. This may be either an indication of mode coupling or a consequences of changes in the plasma electron temperature and density scale length.

  6. A discrete adaptive near-time optimum control for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Scibile, L

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear controller for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak, based on a discrete-time adaptive near time optimum control algorithm (DANTOC) is designed to stabilize the system and to maximize the state-space region over which stability can be guaranteed. The controller is also robust to the edge localized modes (ELMs) and the 600 Hz noise from the thyristor power supplies that are the primary source of disturbances and measurement noise. The controller is tested in simulation for the JET Tokamak and the results confirm its efficacy in controlling the vertical position for different plasma configurations. The controller is also tested experimentally on a real Tokamak, COMPASS-D, and the results demonstrate the improvement with respect to a simple linear PD controller in the presence of disturbances and measurement noise. The emphasis of the is on the development of the design methodology. (38 refs).

  7. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  8. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  9. Initial assessments of ignition spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Borowski, S.K.; Bussell, G.T.; Dalton, G.R.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hamilton, W.R.; Kalsi, S.S.; Lee, V.D.; Miller, J.B.

    1985-12-01

    Initial assessments of ignition spherical tori suggest that they can be highly cost effective and exceptionally small in unit size. Assuming advanced methods of current drive to ramp up the plasma current (e.g., via lower hybrid wave at modest plasma densities and temperatures), the inductive solenoid can largely be eliminated. Given the uncertainties in plasma energy confinement times and the effects of strong paramagnetism on plasma pressure, and allowing for the possible use of high-strength copper alloys (e.g., C-17510, Cu-Ni-Be alloy), ignition spherical tori with a 50-s burn are estimated to have major radii ranging from 1.0 to 1.6 m, aspect ratios from 1.4 to 1.7, vacuum toroidal fields from 2 to 3 T, plasma currents from 10 to 19 MA, and fusion power from 50 to 300 MW. Because of its modest field strength and simple poloidal field coil configuration, only conventional engineering approaches are needed in the design. A free-standing toroidal field coil/vacuum vessel structure is assessed to be feasible and relatively independent of the shield structure and the poloidal field coils. This exceptionally simple configuration depends significantly, however, on practical fabrication approaches of the center conductor post, about which there is presently little experience. 19 refs.

  10. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

    2010-04-12

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  11. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  12. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  13. Simulation of dust statistical characteristics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D.A. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, 92093 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    In this work we analyze the size (radius) distribution function of dust particles in tokamak plasmas during a steady state discharge. A relation between the radius distribution function of dust in the plasma and the radius distribution of dust injected from tokamak walls is obtained using a Green's function formalism. Numerical simulations of the dust radius distribution function in a tokamak plasma with the Dust Transport (DUSTT) code are used to obtain the analytical form of the Green's function semi-empirically. It is demonstrated that the Green's function obtained can be used to predict qualitatively the dust size distributions in the tokamak plasmas. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. The Effect of Spring Design as Return Cycle of Two Stroke Spark Ignition Linear Engine on the Combustion Process and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z.M. Fathallah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statements: The effects of optimization on spring design of the linear engine with spring mechanism in its performance and combustion process have been examined. However, at certain conditions the engine can not work properly as predicted. This can happen because displacement of engine stroke is depending on thrust forces of combustion process in cylinder of the engine. For that, some speed range can not open the scavenging ports, some speed can not open properly and most speeds range work normal. Moreover, pressure ratio also decrease depend on deflection of spring characteristics. Approach: This research examined the performance of engine at certain conditions in which displacement of spring did not work normal, such at 1, 4.1 and 4.6 m sec-1 speed. It was necessary to examine because at that speeds intake scavenging port did not open properly. Therefore, simulation technique had been adopted to solve of the problems. Results: The combustion pressure and power output were compared with prediction result. Conclusion: The results were significant drop of Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP and impacted reduced in power output. At three parts only 1 m sec-1 speed of linear engine could work normal.

  15. The ETE spherical Tokamak project. IAEA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Del Bosco, E.; Berni, L.A.; Ferreira, J.G.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of October, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  16. Plasma diagnostics using synchrotron radiation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Granata, G.

    1995-09-01

    This report deal with the use of synchrotron radiation in tokamaks. The main advantage of this new method is that it enables to overcome several deficiencies, caused by cut-off, refraction, and harmonic overlap. It also makes it possible to enhance the informative contents of the familiar low harmonic scheme. The basic theory of the method is presented and illustrated by numerical applications, for plasma parameters of relevance in present and next step tokamaks. (TEC). 10 refs., 13 figs.

  17. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  18. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1990-08-01

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-{beta} toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E {times} B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Economic considerations of commercial tokamak options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    Systems studies have been performed to assess commercial tokamak options. Superconducting, as well as normal, magnet coils in either first or second stability regimes have been considered. A spherical torus (ST), as well as an elongated tokamak (ET), is included in the study. The cost of electricity (COE) is selected as the figure of merit, and beta and first-wall neutron wall loads are selected to represent the physics and technology characteristics of various options. The results indicate that an economical optimum for tokamaks is predicted to require a beta of around 10%, as predicted to be achieved in the second stability regime, and a wall load of about 5 MW/m/sup 2/, which is assumed to be optimum technologically. This tokamak is expected to be competitive with fission plants if efficient, noninductive current drive is developed. However, if this regime cannot be attained, all other tokamaks operating in the first stability regime, including spherical torus and elongated tokamak and assuming a limiting wall load of 5 MW/m/sup 2/, will compete with one another with a COE of about 50 mill/kWh. This 40% higher than the COE for the optimum reactor in the second stability regime with fast-wave current drive. The above conclusions pertain to a 1200-MW(e) net electric power plant. A comparison was also made between ST, ET, and superconducting magnets in the second stability regime with fast-wave current drive at 600 MW(e).

  20. Self-ignition of diesel spray combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuchakallaya, Isares; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-10-01

    This work presents the development and implementation of auto-ignition modelling for DI diesel engines by using the probability density function-eddy break-up (PDF-EBU) model. The key concept of this approach is to combine the chemical reaction rate dealing with low-temperature mode, and the turbulence reaction rate governing the high-temperature part by a reaction progress variable coupling function which represents the level of reaction. The average reaction rate here is evaluated by a PDF averaging approach. In order to assess the potential of this developed model, the well-known Shell ignition model is chosen to compare in auto-ignition analysis. In comparison, the PDF-EBU ignition model yields the ignition delay time in good agreement with the Shell ignition model prediction. However, the ignition kernel location predicted by the Shell model is slightly nearer injector than that by the PDF-EBU model leading to shorter lift-off length. As a result, the PDF-EBU ignition model developed here are fairly satisfactory in predicting the auto-ignition of diesel engines with the Shell ignition model.

  1. Dynamics and Feedback Control of Plasma Equilibrium Position in a Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenko, Oleg

    A brief history of the beginnings of nuclear fusion research involving toroidal closed-system magnetic plasma containment is presented. A tokamak machine is defined mathematically for the purposes of plasma equilibrium position perturbation analysis. The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form. This symbolic form of the dynamics transfer function makes it possible to study the stability of a tokamak's plasma equilibrium position. Knowledge of the dynamics transfer function permits systematic syntheses of the required plasma displacement feedback control systems. The major parameters governing the plasma equilibrium position stability of a tokamak are shown to be (1) external magnetic field decay index, (2) transformer iron core effect, (3) plasma current, (4) radial rate-of-change inductance parameter, (5) vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and (6) vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant. An important and unique result is derived, showing that for a vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant exceeding a certain value the vertical plasma equilibrium position is stable, in spite of an intentional vertical instability design represented by a negative decay index. It is shown that a tokamak design having a theoretical set of positive decay index, negative radical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and positive vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter is expected to have a better plasma equilibrium position stability tolerance than a tokamak design having the same set with the signs reversed. The results of an actual hardware ISX-A tokamak plasma displacement feed-back control system design are presented. It is shown that a theoretical design computer

  2. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>108 K), pressures (10 GBar) and matter densities (>100 g/cm3). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. The targets for the NIC are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. The DT fuel is contained in a 2-millimeter-diameter graded copper/beryllium or CH shell. The 75-μm-thick cryogenic ice DT fuel layer is formed to sub-micron uniformity at a temperature of approximately 18 Kelvin. The capsule and its fuel layer sit at the center of a gold/depleted uranium 'cocktail' hohlraum. Researchers at LLNL have teamed with colleagues at General Atomics to lead the development of the technologies, engineering design and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to produce these demanding targets. We are also collaborating with colleagues at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester in DT layering, and at Fraunhofer in Germany in nano-crystalline diamond as an alternate ablator to Beryllium and CH. The Beryllium capsules and cocktail hohlraums are made by physical vapor deposition onto sacrificial mandrels. These coatings must have high density (low porosity), uniform microstructure, low oxygen content and low permeability. The ablator

  3. Fast bolometric measurements on the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Weisen, H.; Mlynar, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Llobet, X.; Marmillod, Ph.; Pochon, G. P.

    1999-12-01

    The design and first results are presented from a bolometric diagnostic with high temporal resolution recently installed on the TCV tokamak. The system consists of two pinhole cameras viewing the plasma from above and below at the same toroidal location. Each camera is equipped with an AXUV-16ELO linear array of 16 p-n junction photodiodes, characterized by a flat spectral sensitivity from ultraviolet to x-ray energies, a high temporal response (<0.5 μs), and insensitivity to low-energy neutral particles emitted by the plasma. This high temporal resolution allows the study of transient phenomena such as fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity hitherto inaccessible with standard bolometry. In the case of purely electromagnetic radiation, good agreement has been found when comparing results from the new diagnostic with those from a standard metal foil bolometer system. This comparison has also revealed that the contribution of neutrals to the foil bolometer measurements can be extremely important under certain operating conditions, precluding the application of tomographic techniques for reconstruction of the radiation distribution.

  4. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  5. Remote servicing considerations for near term tokamak power reactors (TNS). Final summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1977-01-01

    Next generation Tokamaks require special consideration for remote servicing. Three major problems are highlighted: (1) movement of heavy components, (2) remote connection/disconnection of joints, and (3) remote cutting, welding, and leak detection. The first problem is assumed to be handled with existing expertise and is not considered. The remaining problems are thought to be minimized by considering two engineering departures from conventional tokamak design; locating the field shaping coils outside of the toroidal coils and enclosing the total device within an evacuated reactor cell. Five topics under this vacuum building concept are discussed: incremental cost, vacuum pumping, tritium containment, activation topology, and first year operations.

  6. Determination of confinement efficiency in tokamaks based on current independent flux loops technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salar Elahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    In this contribution we presented a current independent approximation of the combination of poloidal beta and internal inductance (confinement efficiency) only based on poloidal flux loops measurement in IR-T1 tokamak. The main advantage of this technique is that it based only on the one diagnostic (only flux loops and not need to plasma current measurement). Based on this method, two flux loops were designed, constructed, and installed on outer surface of the IR-T1 tokamak chamber and then the Shafranov parameter was measured from them. Also the result of this technique was compared with conventional magnetic probes technique and found in good agreement with each other.

  7. Update on ignition studies at Cea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, P.A.; Casanova, M.; Casner, A.; Cherfils, C.; Dattolo, E.; Disdier, L.; Galmiche, D.; Giorla, J.; Houry, M.; Jadaud, J.P.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Lours, L.; Masse, L.; Monteil, M.C.; Morice, O.; Naudy, M.; Philippe, F.; Poggi, F.; Renaud, F.; Riazuelo, G.; Saillard, Y.; Seytor, P.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Wagon, F. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2007-08-15

    This article sums up the theoretical and experimental studies about ignition. Three experiments are salient this year on the Omega laser in collaboration with DOE laboratories. First, 3 cones of beams have allowed to mimic the LMJ (laser MegaJoule) configuration and to get symmetry measurements. Secondly, we have measured perturbations due to hydro-instability in CHGe planar samples with face-on and side-on radiographs. And thirdly, we have improved our nuclear diagnostics, particularly the neutron image system tested on direct drive implosions. As far as LMJ target design is concerned, we have defined a preliminary domain corresponding to the possible operation at 2{omega}. At 3 {omega} we have studied the low mode instability effects on the DT deformation (due to the laser or to the target) and on the yield. The stability is clearly improved with graded doped CH for our nominal capsule L1215. (authors)

  8. Active cooling system for Tokamak in-vessel operation manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jianjun, E-mail: yuanjj@sjtu.edu.cn; Chen, Tan; Li, Fashe; Zhang, Weijun; Du, Liang

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We summarized most of the challenges of fusion devices to robot systems. • Propose an active cooling system to protect all of the necessary components. • Trial design test and theoretical analysis were conducted. • Overall implementation of the active cooling system was demonstrated. - Abstract: In-vessel operation/inspection is an indispensable task for Tokamak experimental reactor, for a robot/manipulator is more capable in doing this than human being with more precise motion and less risk of damaging the ambient equipment. Considering the demanding conditions of Tokamak, the manipulator should be adaptable to rapid response in the extreme conditions such as high temperature, vacuum and so on. In this paper, we propose an active cooling system embedded into such manipulator. Cameras, motors, gearboxes, sensors, and other mechanical/electrical components could then be designed under ordinary conditions. The cooling system cannot only be a thermal shield since the components are also heat sources in dynamics. We carry out a trial test to verify our proposal, and analyze the active cooling system theoretically, which gives a direction on the optimization by varying design parameters, components and distribution. And based on thermal sensors monitoring and water flow adjusting a closed-loop feedback control of temperature is added to the system. With the preliminary results, we believe that the proposal gives a way to robust and inexpensive design in extreme environment. Further work will concentrate on overall implementation and evaluation of this cooling system with the whole inspection manipulator.

  9. Theory of Fast Electron Transport for Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A P L; Davies, J R; Gremillet, L; Honrubia, J J; Johzaki, T; Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Solodov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion is a variant of inertial fusion in which DT fuel is first compressed to high density and then ignited by a relativistic electron beam generated by a fast (< 20 ps) ultra-intense laser pulse, which is usually brought in to the dense plasma via the inclusion of a re-entrant cone. The transport of this beam from the cone apex into the dense fuel is a critical part of this scheme, as it can strongly influence the overall energetics. Here we review progress in the theory and numerical simulation of fast electron transport in the context of Fast Ignition. Important aspects of the basic plasma physics, descriptions of the numerical methods used, a review of ignition-scale simulations, and a survey of schemes for controlling the propagation of fast electrons are included. Considerable progress has taken place in this area, but the development of a robust, high-gain FI `point design' is still an ongoing challenge.

  10. Electric ignition and airless kindle for underfeed stokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowther, M.E. [CRE Group Ltd., Stoke Orchard (United Kingdom)

    1996-02-01

    The leaflet describes a project carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of two methods of reducing the amount of coal used for kindling on boilers fitted with underfeed stokers. Many coal-fired boilers use underfeed stokers to deliver their fuel. When heat is not required, the stoker is put into standby `kindle` mode, and the fire kept alight by the periodic delivery of small amounts of coal and air. CRE Group Ltd., assessed two techniques for reducing the fuel used for kindling: electric ignition and airless kindle. Electric ignition eliminates entirely the need for kindling by automatically re-igniting the coal in the stoker retort using a hot air jet. CRE Group`s development work aimed to overcome earlier design problems and improve cost-effectiveness and reliability. Airless kindle reduces the size and frequency of coal feed in kindle mode. Although it does not entirely eliminate the use of kindle, it saves almost as much fuel for a lower capital outlay and minimal maintenance costs. This option has proved so attractive to the host organisations (Derbyshire Country Council, Nottinghamshire Country Council and Haven Nurseries) that the boiler used for trials for the electric ignition system has now been converted to airless kindle. 3 figs., 4 photos.

  11. Halo current diagnostic system of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Sun, Y.; Qian, J. P., E-mail: jpqian@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B. J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Granetz, R. S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The design, calibration, and installation of disruption halo current sensors for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak are described in this article. All the sensors are Rogowski coils that surround conducting structures, and all the signals are analog integrated. Coils with two different cross-section sizes have been fabricated, and their mutual inductances are calibrated. Sensors have been installed to measure halo currents in several different parts of both the upper divertor (tungsten) and lower divertor (graphite) at several toroidal locations. Initial measurements from disruptions show that the halo current diagnostics are working well.

  12. Halo current diagnostic system of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Granetz, R. S.; Sun, Y.; Qian, J. P.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    The design, calibration, and installation of disruption halo current sensors for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak are described in this article. All the sensors are Rogowski coils that surround conducting structures, and all the signals are analog integrated. Coils with two different cross-section sizes have been fabricated, and their mutual inductances are calibrated. Sensors have been installed to measure halo currents in several different parts of both the upper divertor (tungsten) and lower divertor (graphite) at several toroidal locations. Initial measurements from disruptions show that the halo current diagnostics are working well.

  13. Resonant magnetic perturbations and divertor footprints in poloidally diverted tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Cahyna, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    General formula describing both the divertor strike point splitting and width of magnetic islands created by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in a poloidally diverted tokamak equilibrium is derived. Under the assumption that the RMP is produced by coils at the low-field side such as those used to control edge localized modes (ELMs) it is demonstrated that the width of islands on different magnetic surfaces at the edge and the amount of divertor splitting are related to each other. Explanation is provided of aligned maxima of the perturbation spectra with the safety factor profile - an effect empirically observed in models of many perturbation coil designs.

  14. Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This apparatus, developed at EL, determines material properties related to piloted ignition of a vertically oriented sample under constant and uniform...

  15. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  16. Development of real-time plasma analysis and control algorithms for the TCV tokamak using Simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felici, F.; Le, H. B.; J. I. Paley,; Duval, B. P.; Coda, S.; Moret, J. M.; Bortolon, A.; L. Federspiel,; Goodman, T. P.; Hommen, G.; A. Karpushov,; Piras, F.; A. Pitzschke,; J. Romero,; G. Sevillano,; Sauter, O.; Vijvers, W.; TCV team,

    2014-01-01

    One of the key features of the new digital plasma control system installed on the TCV tokamak is the possibility to rapidly design, test and deploy real-time algorithms. With this flexibility the new control system has been used for a large number of new experiments which exploit TCV's powerful

  17. A Study on the fusion reactor - Development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Chang Hee; Choi, Il Woo; Shin, Hyun Joon; Cha, Yong Ho; Yang, Ho Soon; Ra, Sun Ae [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Hong [Kyungwon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    The research on the development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak fusion diagnostics investigated the following items: Theoretical investigation of a flat-field XUV spectrograph to determine the position of toroidal mirror, incident slit, varied-line spacing concave grating, detector, etc, Design and fabrication of spectrograph components using Auto CAD, Design and fabrication of film cassette holder and translator, Design and fabrication of vacuum chamber for spectrograph, Computer simulation of aberration, Installation of spectrograph to tokamak, Design of components for soft x-ray CCD. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 23 figs. (author)

  18. TIBER II: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor: 1986 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1986-10-23

    Several chapters are presented that cover the following areas: (1) physics basis; (2) current drive; (3) compact divertors; (4) neutron shielding; (5) high-current density, radiation-tolerant magnets; and (6) costs. (MOW)

  19. Characteristics of Plasma Turbulence in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Ghim, Young-chul

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is a major factor limiting the achievement of better tokamak performance as it enhances the transport of particles, momentum and heat which hinders the foremost objective of tokamaks. Hence, understanding and possibly being able to control turbulence in tokamaks is of paramount importance, not to mention our intellectual curiosity of it.

  20. Local Ignition in Carbon/Oxygen White Dwarfs -- I: One-zone Ignition and Spherical Shock Ignition of Detonations

    CERN Document Server

    Dursi, L J

    2006-01-01

    The details of ignition of Type Ia supernovae remain fuzzy, despite the importance of this input for any large-scale model of the final explosion. Here, we begin a process of understanding the ignition of these hotspots by examining the burning of one zone of material, and then investigate the ignition of a detonation due to rapid heating at single point. We numerically measure the ignition delay time for onset of burning in mixtures of degenerate material and provide fitting formula for conditions of relevance in the Type Ia problem. Using the neon abundance as a proxy for the white dwarf metallicity, we then find that ignition times can decrease by ~20% with addition of even 5% of neon by mass. When temperature fluctuations that successfully kindle a region are very rare, such a reduction in ignition time can increase the probability of ignition by orders of magnitude. We then consider the ignition of a detonation by an explosive energy input in one localized zone, eg a Sedov blast wave leading to a shock-i...

  1. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  2. Application of Dimethyl Ether in Compression Ignition Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene

    -Marathon. The diesel engine test results from 1995 showed that DME is a superb diesel fuel. DME is easy to ignite by compression ignition and it has a molecular structure that results in near-zero emission of particulates when burned. These are features of a fuel that are highly desirable in a diesel engine....... The challenges with DME as a diesel engine fuel are mainly related to poor lubricity and incompatibility with a range of elastomers commonly used for seals in fuel injection systems. This means that although DME burns well in a diesel engine designing a fuel injection system for DME is challenging. Since...... then studies have revealed that the injection pressure for DME does not have to be as high as with diesel to achieve satisfactory performance. This opens for a larger range of possibilities when designing injection systems. In the period from 2004 to 2009 the DME engine was perfected for use in the car DTU...

  3. Localized microwave pulsed plasmas for ignition and flame front enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, James Bennett

    Modern combustor technologies require the ability to match operational parameters to rapidly changing demands. Challenges include variable power output requirements, variations in air and fuel streams, the requirement for rapid and well-controlled ignition, and the need for reliability at low fuel mixture fractions. Work on subcritical microwave coupling to flames and to weakly ionized laser-generated plasmas has been undertaken to investigate the potential for pulsed microwaves to allow rapid combustion control, volumetric ignition, and leaner combustion. Two strategies are investigated. First, subcritical microwaves are coupled to femtosecond laser-generated ionization to ignite methane/air mixtures in a quasi-volumetric fashion. Total energy levels are comparable to the total minimum ignition energies for laser and spark discharges, but the combined strategy allows a 90 percent reduction in the required laser energy. In addition, well-defined multi-dimensional ignition patterns are designated with multiple laser passes. Second, microwave pulse coupling to laminar flame fronts is achieved through interaction with chemiionization-produced electrons in the reaction zone. This energy deposition remains well-localized for a single microwave pulse, resulting in rapid temperature rises of greater than 200 K and maintaining flame propagation in extremely lean methane/air mixtures. The lean flammability limit in methane/air mixtures with microwave coupling has been decreased from an equivalence ratio 0.6 to 0.3. Additionally, a diagnostic technique for laser tagging of nitrogen for velocity measurements is presented. The femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) technique utilizes a 120 fs laser to dissociate nitrogen along a laser line. The relatively long-lived emission from recombining nitrogen atoms is imaged with a delayed and fast-gated camera to measure instantaneous velocities. The emission strength and lifetime in air and pure nitrogen allow

  4. Are Published Minimum Vapor Phase Spark Ignition Energy Data Valid?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staggs, K J; Alvares, N J; Greenwood, D W

    2001-11-21

    The use of sprayed flammable fluids as solvents in dissolution and cleaning processes demand detailed understanding of ignition and fire hazards associated with these applications. When it is not feasible to inert the atmosphere in which the spraying process takes place, then elimination of all possible ignition sources must be done. If operators are involved in the process, the potential for human static build-up and ultimate discharge is finite, and it is nearly impossible to eliminate. The specific application discussed in this paper involved the use of heated Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) to dissolve high explosives (HE). Search for properties of DMSO yielded data on flammability limits and flash point, but there was no published information pertaining to the minimum energy for electrical arc ignition. Due to the sensitivity of this procedure, The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was tasked to determine the minimum ignition energy of DMSO aerosol and vapor an experimental investigation was thus initiated. Because there were no electrical sources in spray chamber, Human Electro-Static Discharge (HESD) was the only potential ignition source. Consequently, the electrostatic generators required for this investigation were designed to produce electrostatic arcs with the defined voltage and current pulse characteristics consistent with simulated human capacitance. Diagnostic procedures required to insure these characteristics involve specific data gathering techniques where the voltage and current sensors are in close proximity to the electrodes, thus defining the arc energy directly between the electrodes. The intriguing finding derived from this procedure is how small these measured values are relative to the arc energy as defined by the capacitance and the voltage measure at the capacitor terminals. The suggested reason for this difference is that the standard procedure for determining arc energy from the relation; E = 1/2CV

  5. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Weiland, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University, S41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Luo, L. [IBM Research, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80308 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  6. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Kritz, A. H.; Luo, L.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  7. Up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Bulk toroidal rotation has proven capable of stabilising both dangerous MHD modes and turbulence. In this thesis, we explore a method to drive rotation in large tokamaks: up-down asymmetry in the magnetic equilibrium. We seek to maximise this rotation by finding optimal up-down asymmetric flux surface shapes. First, we use the ideal MHD model to show that low order external shaping (e.g. elongation) is best for creating up-down asymmetric flux surfaces throughout the device. Then, we calculate realistic up-down asymmetric equilibria for input into nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence analysis. Analytic gyrokinetics shows that, in the limit of fast shaping effects, a poloidal tilt of the flux surface shaping has little effect on turbulent transport. Since up-down symmetric surfaces do not transport momentum, this invariance to tilt implies that devices with mirror symmetry about any line in the poloidal plane will drive minimal rotation. Accordingly, further analytic investigation suggests that non-mirror symmetri...

  8. Development on systems configuration in ITER Tokamak Complex and Auxiliary Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.kuehn@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Kotamaki, Miikka [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Schmieder, Laurent [Fusion for Energy (F4E), CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Chiocchio, Stefano; Carafa, Leontin; Klingsmith, James; Patisson, Laurent; Rigoni, Giuliano [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Tsedri, Thibault [AREVA CNIM KAH System Engineering Support, CS 50497, 13593 Aix en Provence Cedex 3 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The ITER site consists of almost 30 buildings to service the Tokamak machine which is located in the centre of the Tokamak Complex facility with the Tokamak-, Diagnostic- and Tritium building. The design of a large part of the ITER plant systems will be executed by the ITER Domestic Agencies or their industrial suppliers under functional specifications provided by the ITER Organization. At the same time, the detailed design of the building is carried out by the European Domestic Agency 'Fusion for Energy' (F4E). In order to allow an efficient identification of the ITER configuration as well as to manage the concurrent engineering activities and to simplify the identification and assessment of changes, the design of each ITER plant systems is described in the so-called Configuration Management Models (CMM). These are light CATIA 3D models that define the required space envelope and the physical interfaces in-between the systems and the buildings. The paper describes the procedure adopted for the control of the baseline configuration of the Tokamak Complex facility and Auxiliary Buildings with their associated plant systems and illustrates the current status as well as recent developments in the different systems.

  9. Virtual reality applications in remote handling development for tokamaks in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Pramit, E-mail: pramitd@ipr.res.in; Rastogi, Naveen; Gotewal, Krishan Kumar

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Evaluation of Virtual Reality (VR) in design and operation phases of Remote Handling (RH) equipment for tokamak. • VR based centralized facility, to cater RH development and operation, is setup at Institute for Plasma Research, India. • The VR facility system architecture and components are discussed. • Introduction to various VR applications developed for design and development of tokamak RH equipment. - Abstract: A tokamak is a plasma confinement device that can be used to achieve magnetically confined nuclear fusion within a reactor. Owing to the harsh environment, Remote Handling (RH) systems are used for inspection and maintenance of the tokamak in-vessel components. As the number of in-vessel components requiring RH maintenance is large, physical prototyping of all strategies becomes a major challenge. The operation of RH systems poses further challenge as all equipment have to be controlled remotely within very strict accuracy limits with minimum reliance on the available camera feedback. In both design and operation phases of RH equipment, application of Virtual Reality (VR) becomes imperative. The scope of this paper is to introduce some applications of VR in the design and operation cycle of RH, which are not available commercially. The paper discusses the requirement of VR as a tool for RH equipment design and operation. The details of a comprehensive VR facility that has been established to support the RH development for Indian tokamaks are also presented. Further, various cases studies are provided to highlight the utilization of this VR facility within phases of RH development and operation.

  10. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests were designed to investigate the effect of engine speed, compression ratio and equivalence ratio on the combustion timing and the engine performance. It was found that the required compression ratio...

  11. Status of the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) on the path to ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: lagin1@llnl.gov; Bettenhausen, R.C.; Bowers, G.A.; Carey, R.W.; Edwards, O.D.; Estes, C.M.; Demaret, R.D.; Ferguson, S.W.; Fisher, J.M.; Ho, J.C.; Ludwigsen, A.P.; Mathisen, D.G.; Marshall, C.D.; Matone, J.T.; McGuigan, D.L.; Sanchez, R.J.; Stout, E.A.; Tekle, E.A.; Townsend, S.L.; Van Arsdall, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility under construction that will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF is comprised of 24 independent bundles of eight beams each using laser hardware that is modularized into more than 6000 line replaceable units such as optical assemblies, laser amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages containing 60,000 control and diagnostic points. NIF is operated by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an architecture partitioned by bundle and distributed among over 800 front-end processors and 50 supervisory servers. NIF's automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework based on CORBA distribution that deploys the software across the computer network and achieves interoperation between different languages and target architectures. A shot automation framework has been deployed during the past year to orchestrate and automate shots performed at the NIF using the ICCS. In December 2006, a full cluster of 48 beams of NIF was fired simultaneously, demonstrating that the independent bundle control system will scale to full scale of 192 beams. At present, 72 beams have been commissioned and have demonstrated 1.4-MJ capability of infrared light. During the next 2 years, the control system will be expanded in preparation for project completion in 2009 to include automation of target area systems including

  12. Hohlraum-Driven Ignition-Like Double-Shell Implosion Experiments on Omega: Analysis and Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P; Robey, H F; Park, H-S; Tipton, R E; Turner, R E; Milovich, J; Rowley, D; Hibbard, R; Louis, H; Wallace, R; Garbett, W; Dunne, A M; Varnum, W S; Watt, R G; Wilson, D C

    2003-08-22

    An experimental campaign to study hohlraum-driven ignition-like double-shell target performance using the Omega laser facility has begun. These targets are intended to incorporate as many ignition-like properties of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) double-shell ignition design [1,2] as possible, given the energy constraints of the Omega laser. In particular, this latest generation of Omega double-shells is nominally predicted to produce over 99% of the (clean) DD neutron yield from the compressional or stagnation phase of the implosion as required in the NIF ignition design. By contrast, previous double-shell experience on Omega [3] was restricted to cases where a significant fraction of the observed neutron yield was produced during the earlier shock convergence phase where the effects of mix are deemed negligibly small. These new targets are specifically designed to have optimized fall-line behavior for mitigating the effects of pusher-fuel mix after deceleration onset and, thereby, providing maximum neutron yield from the stagnation phase. Experimental results from this recent Omega ignition-like double-shell implosion campaign show favorable agreement with two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulation studies when enhanced (gold) hohlraum M-band (2-5 keV) radiation is included at a level consistent with observations.

  13. Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

  14. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M. van; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The inco

  15. Heat transfer characteristics of igniter output plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N. A.; Durand, N. A.

    Seven types of pyrotechnic igniters were each mounted at one end of a closed cylindrical bore hole representative of the center hole in a thermal battery. Measurements of local bore wall temperature, T(sub w), using commercially available, fast response (10 microsec) sheathed chromel-constantan thermocouples allowed calculation of local heat transfer rates, q, and wall heat flows, Q. The principal charge constituents of all these igniters were titanium and potassium perchlorate, while three types also contained barium styphnate as an ignition sensitizer. Igniter closure disc materials included glass-ceramic, glass, metal (plain, scored, with and without capture cone), and kapton/RTV. All igniters produced the lowest values of T(sub w) and q at the beginning of the bore, and, except for the igniter with the kapton/RTV closure disc, these quantities increased with distance along the bore. For igniters containing only titanium/potassium perchlorate, the rates of increase of Q along the bore length, compared with those for T(sub w) and q, were generally lower and more variable. The inclusion of barium styphnate produced rates of change in Q that were essentially constant to the end of the bore. The highest overall average wall temperatures were achieved by two igniter types with metal closure discs and no capture cone. No clear correlation was established between peak bore pressure and maximum wall temperature.

  16. Heat transfer characteristics of igniter output plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, N.A.; Durand, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seven types of pyrotechnic igniters were each mounted at one end of a closed cylindrical bore hole representative of the center hole in a thermal battery. Measurements of local bore wall temperature, T/sub w/, using commercially available, fast response (10 /mu/sec) sheathed chromel-constantan thermocouples allowed calculation of local heat transfer rates, q, and wall heat flows, Q. The principal charge constituents of all these igniters were titanium and potassium perchlorate, while three types also contained barium styphnate as an ignition sensitizer. Igniter closure disc materials included glass-ceramic, glass, metal (plain, scored, with and without capture cone), and kapton/RTV. All igniters produced the lowest values of T/sub w/ and q at the beginning of the bore, and, except for the igniter with the kapton/RTV closure disc, these quantities increased with distance along the bore. For igniters containing only titanium/potassium perchlorate, the rates of increase of Q along the bore length, compared with those for T/sub w/ and q, were generally lower and more variable. The inclusion of barium styphnate produced rates of change in Q that were essentially constant to the end of the bore. The highest overall average wall temperatures were achieved by two igniter types with metal closure discs and no capture cone. No clear correlation was established between peak bore pressure and maximum wall temperature. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Global gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, G.; Horton, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies]|[Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    A kinetic simulation code based on the gyrokinetic ion dynamics in global general metric (including a tokamak with circular or noncircular cross-section) has been developed. This gyrokinetic simulation is capable of examining the global and semi-global driftwave structures and their associated transport in a tokamak plasma. The authors investigate the property of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or {eta}{sub i}({eta}{sub i} {equivalent_to} {partial_derivative}{ell}nT{sub i}/{partial_derivative}{ell}n n{sub i}) driven drift waves in a tokamak plasma. The emergent semi-global drift wave modes give rise to thermal transport characterized by the Bohm scaling.

  18. Effects of methyl substitution on the auto-ignition of C16 alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Lapuerta, Magín

    2015-12-18

    The auto-ignition quality of diesel fuels, quantified by their cetane number or derived cetane number (DCN), is a critical design property to consider when producing and upgrading synthetic paraffinic fuels. It is well known that auto-ignition characteristics of paraffinic fuels depend on their degree of methyl substitution. However, there remains a need to study the governing chemical functionalities contributing to such ignition characteristics, especially in the case of methyl substitutions, which have not been studied in detail. In this work, the auto-ignition of 2,6,10-trimethyltridecane has been compared with the reference hydrocarbons used for cetane number determination, i.e. n-hexadecane and heptamethylnonane, all of them being C16 isomers. Results from a constant-volume combustion chamber under different pressure and temperature initial conditions showed that the ignition delay time for both cool flame and main combustion events increased less from n-hexadecane to trimethyltridecane than from trimethyltridecane to heptamethylnonane. Additional experimental results from blends of these hydrocarbons, together with kinetic modelling, showed that auto-ignition times and combustion rates were correlated to the concentration of the functional groups indicative of methyl substitution, although not in a linear manner. When the concentration of these functional groups decreased, the first stage OH radical concentration increased and ignition delay times decreased, whereas when their concentration increased, H2O2 production was slower and ignition was retarded. Contrary to the ignition delay times, DCN was correlated linearly with functional groups, thus homogenizing the range of values and clarifying the differences between fuels.

  19. Physics of Tokamak Plasma Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    This tutorial describes and reviews the state-of-art in tokamak plasma start-up and its importance to next step devices such as ITER, a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility and a Tokamak/ST demo. Tokamak plasma start-up includes breakdown of the initial gas, ramp-up of the plasma current to its final value and the control of plasma parameters during those phases. Tokamaks rely on an inductive component, typically a central solenoid, which has enabled attainment of high performance levels that has enabled the construction of the ITER device. Optimizing the inductive start-up phase continues to be an area of active research, especially in regards to achieving ITER scenarios. A new generation of superconducting tokamaks, EAST and KSTAR, experiments on DIII-D and operation with JET's ITER-like wall are contributing towards this effort. Inductive start-up relies on transformer action to generate a toroidal loop voltage and successful start-up is determined by gas breakdown, avalanche physics and plasma-wall interaction. The goal of achieving steady-sate tokamak operation has motivated interest in other methods for start-up that do not rely on the central solenoid. These include Coaxial Helicity Injection, outer poloidal field coil start-up, and point source helicity injection, which have achieved 200, 150 and 100 kA respectively of toroidal current on closed flux surfaces. Other methods including merging reconnection startup and Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) plasma start-up are being studied on various devices. EBW start-up generates a directed electron channel due to wave particle interaction physics while the other methods mentioned rely on magnetic helicity injection and magnetic reconnection which are being modeled and understood using NIMROD code simulations.

  20. The National Ignition Facility 2007 laser performance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C A; Sacks, R A; Wegner, P J; Bowers, M W; Dixit, S N; Erbert, G V; Heestand, G M; Henesian, M A; Hermann, M R; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C D; Mehta, N C; Menapace, J; Nostrand, M C; Orth, C D; Shaw, M J; Sutton, S B; Williams, W H; Widmayer, C C [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)], E-mail: haynam1@llnl.gov (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains a 192-beam 3.6 MJ neodymium glass laser that is frequency converted to 351nm light. It has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. To meet this goal, laser design criteria include the ability to generate pulses of up to 1.8-MJ total energy at 351nm, with peak power of 500 TW and precisely-controlled temporal pulse shapes spanning two orders of magnitude. The focal spot fluence distribution of these pulses is conditioned, through a combination of special optics in the 1{omega} (1053 nm) portion of the laser (continuous phase plates), smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and the overlapping of multiple beams with orthogonal polarization (polarization smoothing). In 2006 and 2007, a series of measurements were performed on the NIF laser, at both 1{omega} and 3{omega} (351 nm). When scaled to full 192-beam operation, these results lend confidence to the claim that NIF will meet its laser performance design criteria and that it will be able to simultaneously deliver the temporal pulse shaping, focal spot conditioning, peak power, shot-to-shot reproducibility, and power balance requirements of indirect-drive fusion ignition campaigns. We discuss the plans and status of NIF's commissioning, and the nature and results of these measurement campaigns.

  1. Theoretical study on ignition compensating temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensitivity of the propellant has significant influence on the interior ballistic performance of guns. Many physical and chemical approaches are employed to decrease this temperature sensitivity of the propellant. In this article, it is proposed that the temperature sensitivity of the propellant is changed by altering the factors required to ignition. A one-dimensional two-phase flow interior ballistic model is established to analyze the relation between ignition factors and temperature sensitivity. The simulation results show that the propellant temperature sensitivity is changed by altering the ignition factors. That is, the interior ballistic performance is affected by altering the size of fire hole, breaking liner pressure, and ignition location. Based on the simulation results, the temperature sensitivity can be controlled by matching of charges and intelligent control ignition system.

  2. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the T-10 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyuchnikov, L. A., E-mail: lklyuchnikov@list.ru; Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Korobov, K. V.; Nemets, A. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Serov, S. V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” Moscow (Russian Federation); Naumenko, N. N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics NASB, Minsk, Republic of Belarus (Belarus)

    2016-05-15

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics on the T-10 tokamak is described. The system is based on a diagnostic neutral beam and includes three high etendue spectrometers designed for the ITER edge CXRS system. A combined two-channel spectrometer is developed for simultaneous measurements of two beam-induced spectral lines using the same lines of sight. A basic element of the combined spectrometer is a transmitting holographic grating designed for the narrow spectral region 5291 ± 100 Å. The whole CXRS system provides simultaneous measurements of two CXRS impurity spectra and H{sub α} beam line. Ion temperature measurements are routinely provided using the C{sup 6+} CXRS spectral line 5291 Å. Simultaneous measurements of carbon densities and one more impurity (oxygen, helium, lithium etc.) are carried out. Two light collecting systems with 9 lines of sight in each system are used in the diagnostics. Spatial resolution is up to 2.5 cm and temporal resolution of 1 ms is defined by the diagnostic neutral beam diameter and pulse duration, respectively. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate a wide range of the CXRS diagnostic capabilities on T-10 for investigation of impurity transport processes in tokamak plasma. Developed diagnostics provides necessary experimental data for studying of plasma electric fields, heat and particle transport processes, and for investigation of geodesic acoustic modes.

  3. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the T-10 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyuchnikov, L A; Krupin, V A; Nurgaliev, M R; Korobov, K V; Nemets, A R; Dnestrovskij, A Yu; Tugarinov, S N; Serov, S V; Naumenko, N N

    2016-05-01

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics on the T-10 tokamak is described. The system is based on a diagnostic neutral beam and includes three high etendue spectrometers designed for the ITER edge CXRS system. A combined two-channel spectrometer is developed for simultaneous measurements of two beam-induced spectral lines using the same lines of sight. A basic element of the combined spectrometer is a transmitting holographic grating designed for the narrow spectral region 5291 ± 100 Å. The whole CXRS system provides simultaneous measurements of two CXRS impurity spectra and Hα beam line. Ion temperature measurements are routinely provided using the C(6+) CXRS spectral line 5291 Å. Simultaneous measurements of carbon densities and one more impurity (oxygen, helium, lithium etc.) are carried out. Two light collecting systems with 9 lines of sight in each system are used in the diagnostics. Spatial resolution is up to 2.5 cm and temporal resolution of 1 ms is defined by the diagnostic neutral beam diameter and pulse duration, respectively. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate a wide range of the CXRS diagnostic capabilities on T-10 for investigation of impurity transport processes in tokamak plasma. Developed diagnostics provides necessary experimental data for studying of plasma electric fields, heat and particle transport processes, and for investigation of geodesic acoustic modes.

  4. The vacuum vessel thermal shield of the KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, B.J. E-mail: bjyoon@kaeri.re.kr; In, S.R.; Cho, S.Y

    2003-09-01

    The Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) tokamak has an all-superconductor magnet system and needs a thermal shield to cut off thermal radiation from the components of room temperature. The vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) cooled to 70 K is placed in the narrow gap between the 5 K TF magnets and the 300 K vacuum vessel (VV). The VVTS is designed to be divided into 16 assembly modules of 22.5 deg. sector, each unit has an electrical insulation along the center line in the toroidal direction and four insulations in the poloidal direction to reduce eddy currents induced during plasma operations. All connections are bolted. The VVTS becomes consequently a rigid torus composed of 64 electrically insulated pieces. A key point of designing the VVTS is that supports of the VVTS are to be flexible enough to allow thermal constriction during cooling down to 70 K as well as sufficiently strong to withstand electromagnetic (EM) forces exerted on the VVTS during plasma disruptions. Leaf spring type supports devised to satisfy these requirements are to be installed along the mid plane of the VVTS. The cryopanel of the VVTS is of quilted plate type whose total thickness is 12 mm, cooled by 60 K, 20 bar GHe.

  5. Overview of the Pegasus Extremely Low-Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonck, R.; Garstka, G.; Intrator, T.; Lewicki, B.; Thorson, T.; Toonen, R.; Tritz, K. L.; White, B.; Winz, G.

    1996-11-01

    Pegasus is a new experiment designed to explore the potential of Extremely Low Aspect Ratio Tokamaks (ELART) at very high toroidal β. Ohmic induction for plasma startup will be followed by ohmic sustainment initially and noninductive RF current drive in the future. Plasma parameters are projected to be Ip ≈ 5-40 % or higher, A=1.1-2, R=0.2-0.4 m, and P_RF <= 2MW. Goals of the program include: demonstrate high-β spherical tokamak operation in the near term; examine the stability, n=0 stability properties at high elongation and low- A, confinement and scaling characteristics at A <= 1.25; and extend high power ST operation to the extrema of A <= 1.1. Hollow current profiles should be accessible in Pegasus using a fast current ramp during formation plus off-axis FWCD in the longer term. Recent changes to the design include: increased vacuum vessel height to allow for divertor operation with an internal X-point plus increased accessible elongations (i.,e., κ <= 3.7 at A = 1.25); additional coils for X-point control; and elimination of toroidal gaps in favor of a resistive vacuum vessel. Initial operation will emphasize ohmic access to high- β, followed by high power RF heating.

  6. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  7. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, C.; Salvador, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Munoz, O.; Tapia, A.; Arredondo, V.; Chavez, R.; Nieto, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Garza, A.; Estrada, I.; Jasso, E.; Acosta, C.; Briones, C.; Cavazos, G.; Martinez, J.; Morones, J.; Almaguer, J.; Fonck, R.

    2011-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R Mexican Fusion Network. Strong liaison within national and international plasma physics communities is expected. New activities on plasma & engineering modeling are expected to be developed in parallel by using the existing facilities such as a multi-platform computer (Silicon Graphics Altix XE250, 128G RAM, 3.7TB HD, 2.7GHz, quad-core processor), ancillary graph system (NVIDIA Quadro FE 2000/1GB GDDR-5 PCI X16 128, 3.2GHz), and COMSOL Multiphysics-Solid Works programs.

  8. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  9. Overview of spherical tokamak research in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Fujita, T.; Fukumoto, N.; Fukuyama, A.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Nagata, M.; Ono, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Uchida, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Kamada, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Masuzaki, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Oishi, T.; Saito, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2017-10-01

    Nationally coordinated research on spherical tokamak is being conducted in Japan. Recent achievements include: (i) plasma current start-up and ramp-up without the use of the central solenoid by RF waves (in electron cyclotron and lower hybrid frequency ranges), (ii) plasma current start-up by AC Ohmic operation and by coaxial helicity injection, (iii) development of an advanced fuelling technique by compact toroid injection, (iv) ultra-long-pulse operation and particle control using a high temperature metal wall, (v) access to the ultra-high-β regime by high-power reconnection heating, and (vi) improvement of spherical tokamak plasma stability by externally applied helical field.

  10. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  13. Large optics for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisden, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser with its 192 independent laser beams is not only the world’s largest laser, it is also the largest optical system ever built. With its 192 independent laser beams, the NIF requires a total of 7648 large-aperture (meter-sized) optics. One of the many challenges in designing and building NIF has been to carry out the research and development on optical materials, optics design, and optics manufacturing and metrology technologies needed to achieve NIF’s high output energies and precision beam quality. This paper describes the multiyear, multi-supplier, development effort that was undertaken to develop the advanced optical materials, coatings, fabrication technologies, and associated process improvements necessary to manufacture the wide range of NIF optics. The optics include neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser amplifiers; fused silica lenses, windows, and phase plates; mirrors and polarizers with multi-layer, high-reflectivity dielectric coatings deposited on BK7 substrates; and potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal optics for fast optical switches, frequency conversion, and polarization rotation. Also included is a discussion of optical specifications and custom metrology and quality-assurance tools designed, built, and fielded at supplier sites to verify compliance with the stringent NIF specifications. In addition, a brief description of the ongoing program to improve the operational lifetime (i.e., damage resistance) of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm (3ω) is provided.

  14. WILDCAT: a catalyzed D-D tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed D-D, tokamak, commercial, fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing D-T designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete, conceptual design.

  15. Tokamak fusion reactors with less than full tritium breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Gilligan, J.G.; Jung, J.

    1983-05-01

    A study of commercial, tokamak fusion reactors with tritium concentrations and tritium breeding ratios ranging from full deuterium-tritium operation to operation with no tritium breeding is presented. The design basis for these reactors is similar to those of STARFIRE and WILDCAT. Optimum operating temperatures, sizes, toroidal field strengths, and blanket/shield configurations are determined for a sequence of reactor designs spanning the range of tritium breeding, each having the same values of beta, thermal power, and first-wall heat load. Additional reactor parameters, tritium inventories and throughputs, and detailed costs are calculated for each reactor design. The disadvantages, advantages, implications, and ramifications of tritium-depleted operation are presented and discussed.

  16. Spectral measurements of runway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudyakov, Timur

    2009-07-22

    The generation of multi-MeV runaway electrons is a well known effect related to the plasma disruptions in tokamaks. The runaway electrons can substantially reduce the lifetime of the future tokamak ITER. In this thesis physical properties of runaway electrons and their possible negative effects on ITER have been studied in the TEXTOR tokamak. A new diagnostic, a scanning probe, has been developed to provide direct measurements of the absolute number of runaway electrons coming from the plasma, its energy distribution and the related energy load in the material during low density (runaway) discharges and during disruptions. The basic elements of the probe are YSO crystals which transform the energy of runaway electrons into visible light which is guided via optical fibres to photomultipliers. In order to obtain the energy distribution of runaways, the crystals are covered with layers of stainless steel (or tungsten in two earlier test versions) of different thicknesses. The final probe design has 9 crystals and can temporally and spectrally resolve electrons with energies between 4 MeV and 30 MeV. The probe is tested and absolutely calibrated at the linear electron accelerator ELBE in Rossendorf. The measurements are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 code. The runaway transport in the presence of the internal and externally applied magnetic perturbations has been studied. The diffusion coefficient and the value of the magnetic fluctuation for runaways were derived as a function of B{sub t}. It was found that an increase of runaway losses from the plasma with the decreasing toroidal magnetic field is accompanied with a growth of the magnetic fluctuation in the plasma. The magnetic shielding picture could be confirmed which predicts that the runaway loss occurs predominantly for low energy runaways (few MeV) and considerably less for the high energy ones. In the case of the externally applied magnetic perturbations by means of the dynamic

  17. Nanostructured energetic composites: synthesis, ignition/combustion modeling, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Torabi, Mohsen; Lu, Jian; Shen, Ruiqi; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-03-12

    Nanotechnology has stimulated revolutionary advances in many scientific and industrial fields, particularly in energetic materials. Powder mixing is the simplest and most traditional method to prepare nanoenergetic composites, and preliminary findings have shown that these composites perform more effectively than their micro- or macro-sized counterparts in terms of energy release, ignition, and combustion. Powder mixing technology represents only the minimum capability of nanotechnology to boost the development of energetic material research, and it has intrinsic limitations, namely, random distribution of fuel and oxidizer particles, inevitable fuel pre-oxidation, and non-intimate contact between reactants. As an alternative, nanostructured energetic composites can be prepared through a delicately designed process. These composites outperform powder-mixed nanocomposites in numerous ways; therefore, we comprehensively discuss the preparation strategies adopted for nanostructured energetic composites and the research achievements thus far in this review. The latest ignition and reaction models are briefly introduced. Finally, the broad promising applications of nanostructured energetic composites are highlighted.

  18. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  19. Status of the National Ignition Facility and Campaign, and Controls and Information Systems on the Path to Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L.; Azevedo, S.; Bettenhausen, R.; Beeler, R.; Belk, L.; Bowers, G.; Brunton, G.; Carey, R.; Casey, A.; Christensen, M.; Demaret, R.; Edwards, O.; Estes, C.; Fisher, J.; Foxworthy, C.; Frazier, T.; Kegelmeyer, L.; Krammen, J.; Ludwigsen, A.; Mathisen, D.; Marshall, C.; Shelton, R.; Stout, E.; Townsend, S.; Van Arsdall, P.; Wilson, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility under construction that will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-Mega-joule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10- meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF is operated by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an architecture partitioned by bundle and distributed among over 1000 front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. NIF's automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework based on CORBA distribution that deploys the software across the computer network and achieves inter-operation between different languages and target architectures. A shot automation framework has been used to orchestrate and automate over a thousand system shots performed at the NIF using the ICCS. An experimental database and automated shot analysis infrastructure has also been developed and is being used for conducting experiments. In March 2009, the NIF project was completed by successfully demonstrating its formal completion of performance and operational design criteria. At present, all 192 beams have been commissioned to target chamber center. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of target area systems including final optics, target positioners and diagnostics, in preparation for project completion. A detailed set of experiments have begun and are being performed as part of a National

  20. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blijderveen, Maarten; Bramer, Eddy A; Brem, Gerrit

    2012-09-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

  1. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  2. Tokamak Transport Studies Using Perturbation Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.; Dehaas, J. C. M.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Orourke, J.; Sips, A.C.C.; Tubbing, B. J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of the transport properties of tokamak plasmas using perturbation analysis are discussed. The focus is on experiments with not too large perturbations, such as sawtooth induced heat and density pulse propagation, power modulation and oscillatory gas-puff experiments. The approximations made

  3. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert John [UCLA/retired

    2014-02-04

    The results of UCLA experimental fusion program are summarized. Starting with smaller devices like Microtor, Macrotor, CCT and ending the research on the large (5 m) Electric Tokamak. CCT was the most diagnosed device for H-mode like physics and the effects of rotation induced radial fields. ICRF heating was also studied but plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the seconds range. However, it presented very good particle confinement due to an "electric particle pinch". This effect prevented us from reaching a quasi steady state. This particle accumulation effect was numerically explained by Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on particle pinching at nominal average densities. The US fusion research program did not study particle transport effects due to its undue focus on the physics of energy confinement time. Energy confinement time is not an issue for energy producing tokamaks. Controlling the ash flow will be very expensive.

  4. Tokamak Transport Studies Using Perturbation Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.; Dehaas, J. C. M.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Orourke, J.; Sips, A.C.C.; Tubbing, B. J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of the transport properties of tokamak plasmas using perturbation analysis are discussed. The focus is on experiments with not too large perturbations, such as sawtooth induced heat and density pulse propagation, power modulation and oscillatory gas-puff experiments. The approximations made

  5. National Ignition Facility Comes to Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2003-09-01

    First conceived of nearly 15 years ago, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is up and running and successful beyond almost everyone's expectations. During commissioning of the first four laser beams, the laser system met design specifications for everything from beam quality to energy output. NIF will eventually have 192 laser beams. Yet with just 2% of its final beam configuration complete, NIF has already produced the highest energy laser shots in the world. In July, laser shots in the infrared wavelength using four beams produced a total of 26.5 kilojoules of energy per beam, not only meeting NIF's design energy requirement of 20 kilojoules per beam but also exceeding the energy of any other infrared laser beamline. In another campaign, NIF produced over 11.4 kilojoules of energy when the infrared light was converted to green light. An earlier performance campaign of laser light that had been frequency converted from infrared to ultraviolet really proved NIF's mettle. Over 10.4 kilojoules of ultraviolet energy were produced in about 4 billionths of a second. If all 192 beamlines were to operate at these levels, over 2 megajoules of energy would result. That much energy for the pulse duration of several nanoseconds is about 500 trillion watts of power, more than 500 times the US peak generating power.

  6. The timing system on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Ming, E-mail: zhangming@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhuang, Ge; Ding, Tonghai; Huang, Fuqiang; Shan, Lingjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •The timing system achieved tree structured timing network with only one type of timing module. •This system is integrated into J-TEXT COADC which is an EPICS based control system. •This system handles multiple timing sequences and events. •This system has been deployed on J-TEXT and working properly in daily experiments. -- Abstract: This paper describes the timing system designed to control the operation time-sequence and to generate clocks for various sub-systems on J-TEXT tokamak. The J-TEXT timing system is organized as a distributed system which is connected by a tree-structured optical fiber network. It can generate delayed triggers and gate signals (0 μs–4000 s), while providing reference clocks for other sub-systems. Besides, it provides event handling and timestamping functions. It is integrated into the J-TEXT Control, Data Access and Communication (J-TEXT CODAC) system, and it can be monitored and configured by Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The configuration of this system including tree-structured network is managed in XML files by dedicated management software. This system has already been deployed on J-TEXT tokamak and it is serving J-TEXT in daily experiments.

  7. Steady-state operation in compact tokamaks with copper coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Bykov, A. S.; Dnestrovsky, A. Yu.; Dokuka, V. N.; Gladush, G. G.; Golikov, A. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Gryaznevich, M.; Gurevich, M. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Khairutdinov, R. R.; Khripunov, V. I.; Kingham, D.; Klishchenko, A. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Savrukhin, P. V.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Shpansky, Yu. S.; Sykes, A.; Voss, G.; Zhirkin, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers a fast track to non-energy applications of nuclear fusion that is associated with the 'fusion for neutrons' (F4N) paradigm. Being a useful product accompanying energy, fusion neutrons are more valuable than the energy released in DT reactions and they are urgently needed for research purposes and to develop and validate modern technologies. In the near future neutron yield in fusion devices will become significantly larger than that of fission and accelerator sources. This paper describes a compact tokamak fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ~0.5 and ~0.3 m with magnetic field ~1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The production rate of DT neutrons of (3-10) × 1017 n s-1 and their flux at the first wall of 0.2 MW m-2 ensure that the device is capable of fusion-fission demonstration experiments. The problems of major concern are discharge initiation, current drive, plasma—fast ion beam stability and high first wall and divertor loads. The conceptual design provides solutions to these problems and suggests the feasibility of the FNS-ST.

  8. Realtime capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, Jonathan; Breton, Sarah; Felici, Federico; Imbeaux, Frederic; Redondo, Juan; Aniel, Thierry; Artaud, Jean-Francois; Baiocchi, Benedetta; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Camenen, Yann; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2015-11-01

    Transport in the tokamak core is dominated by turbulence driven by plasma microinstabilities. When calculating turbulent fluxes, maintaining both a first-principle-based model and computational tractability is a strong constraint. We present a pathway to circumvent this constraint by emulating quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output through a nonlinear regression using multilayer perceptron neural networks. This recovers the original code output, while accelerating the computing time by five orders of magnitude, allowing realtime applications. A proof-of-principle is presented based on the QuaLiKiz quasilinear transport model, using a training set of five input dimensions, relevant for ITG turbulence. The model is implemented in the RAPTOR real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. Progress in generalizing the emulation to include 12 input dimensions is presented. This opens up new possibilities for interpretation of present-day experiments, scenario preparation and open-loop optimization, realtime controller design, realtime discharge supervision, and closed-loop trajectory optimization.

  9. Dynamic simulations of the cryogenic system of a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Poncet, J. M.; Rousset, B.

    2015-12-01

    Power generation in the next decades could be provided by thermo-nuclear fusion reactors like tokamaks. There inside, the fusion reaction takes place thanks to the generation of plasmas at hundreds of millions of degrees that must be confined magnetically with superconductive coils, cooled down to 4.4K. The plasma works cyclically and the coil system is subjected to pulsed heat load which has to be handled by the refrigerator. By smoothing the variable loads, the refrigerator capacity can be set close to the average power; optimizing investment and operational costs. Within the “Broader Approach agreement” related to ITER project, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) is in charge of providing the cryogenic system for the Japanese tokamak (JT-60SA), that is currently under construction in Naka. The system has been designed to handle the pulsed heat loads. To prepare the acceptance tests of the cryogenic system foreseen in 2016, both dynamic modelling and experimental tests on a scaled down mock-up are of high interest for assessing pulsed load smoothing control. After explaining HELIOS (HElium Loop for hIgh lOad Smoothing) operating modes, a dynamic model is presented, with results on the pulsed heat load scenarios. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro® and the associated cryogenic library CRYOLIB.

  10. Development status of the ignition system for Vinci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, G.; Vermeulen, E.; Bouquet, F.; Sanders, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    The development status of ignition system for the new cryogenic upper stage engine Vinci is presented. The concept differs from existing upper stage ignition systems as its functioning is engine independent. The system consists of a spark torch igniter, a highpressure igniter feed system and an exci

  11. Optimization Design and Preliminary Application of Low Ignition Propensity Cigarette Paper%LIP卷烟纸的优化设计及在烤烟型卷烟中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁丽婷; 王笛; 张瑞; 牟定荣

    2011-01-01

    Low ignition propensity (LIP) cigarette can reduce the risk of fire ignited by cigarette.In order to apply LIP paper to flue-cured tobacco cigarette, base paper porosity, content of burning agent and diffusion rate of retardant belt were optimized.Then optimized paper was applied to flue-cured tobacco cigarette.The ignition performance, free air self extinguish and content of CO, tar and nicotine in new LIP cigarette were determined, besides, smoking quality was evaluated.The result showed that: ( 1 ) after optimization, base paper porosity was 95 CU, content of burning agent was 1.0% with diffusion rate of retardant belt for 0.115 cm/s; (2)The ignition performance and free air self extinguish test of LIP cigarette met the requirement of ASTM E2187-04.Content of CO, tar and nicotine in mainstream smoke of LIP cigarette had no change.There was no significant difference in smoking quality between ordinary and LIP cigarette.%低引燃倾向(LIP)卷烟能减少卷烟引发火灾的风险,为了将LIP卷烟纸应用到烤烟型卷烟上,对LIP卷烟纸的原纸透气度、助燃剂含量和阻燃带扩散率进行优化,并将LIP卷烟纸初步应用到烤烟型卷烟上;测定了LIP卷烟的引燃性能、自由燃烧熄灭率及CO、焦油、烟碱含量,并进行感官质景评吸.结果表明,经过优化后,LIP卷烟纸的原纸透气度为95 CU,助燃剂含量为1.0%,阻燃带扩散率为0.115 cm/s;制备的LIP卷烟符合ASTM E2187-04的要求,能有效减少火灾的发生,CO、烟碱、焦油含量变化不大,抽吸品质也没有明显差别.

  12. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  13. An Exploratory Investigation of the Influence of Igniter Chemistry on Ignition in Porous Bed Gun Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    NIAOR Dae intldj UNCLASSIFIED SECURIT 4 LAS S1FICATION OF THIS PAGE(WIh.n D.. E rI.,.d) 20. investigate the ignitibility of NACO propellants when sub...4080 2g 0 24P-NO -007 BP-4080 4g 0 24P-NO Increased Igniter Mass to 4g . -008 BP-4080AV 2g 0 24P-YES Added Center Vent to Igniter. lOg of NACO

  14. Remote network control plasma diagnostic system for Tokamak T-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troynov, V. I.; Zimin, A. M.; Krupin, V. A.; Notkin, G. E.; Nurgaliev, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The parameters of molecular plasma in closed magnetic trap is studied in this paper. Using the system of molecular diagnostics, which was designed by the authors on the «Tokamak T-10» facility, the radiation of hydrogen isotopes at the plasma edge is investigated. The scheme of optical radiation registration within visible spectrum is described. For visualization, identification and processing of registered molecular spectra a new software is developed using MatLab environment. The software also includes electronic atlas of electronic-vibrational-rotational transitions for molecules of protium and deuterium. To register radiation from limiter cross-section a network control system is designed using the means of the Internet/Intranet. Remote control system diagram and methods are given. The examples of web-interfaces for working out equipment control scenarios and viewing of results are provided. After test run in Intranet, the remote diagnostic system will be accessible through Internet.

  15. Engineering aspects of the HT-6M Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The HT-6M is a medium-sized tokamak being built in China. The principal aim of the project is to study high-power auxiliary heating (1-MW neutral beam injection, 1-MW ion cyclotron resonance heating, and 100-kW electron cyclotron resonance heating), high-..beta.. experiments, the transport process, and the formation and diffusion process of impurities. The main device parameters are: major plasma radius R = 65 cm, minor plasma radius a = 20 cm, plasma current I/subP/ = 150 kA, discharge time tau = 150 ms, toroidal field B/subT/ = 15 kG. Simplicity of construction, accessibility to the plasma, reliability in operation, and convenience for maintenance were particularly emphasized in the design. The important design features of the device and power supply system are described.

  16. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Study on the key technologies of the Transfer Equipment Cask for Tokamak Equator Port Plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Buyun, E-mail: ayun@iim.ac.cn [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Gao, Lifu [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cao, Huibin; Sun, Jian [Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Yuxiang; Song, Quanjun; Ma, Chengxue; Chang, Li; Shuang, Feng [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Design on Intelligent Air Transfer System (IATS) for Transfer Equipment Cask (TECA). • A rhombic-like parallel robot for docking with minimum misalignment. • Design on electro-hydraulic servo system of the TECA for Tokamak Equator Port Plug (TEPP) manipulation. • A control architecture with several algorithms and information acquired from sensors could be used by the TECA for Remote Handling (RH). - Abstract: The Transfer Equipment Cask (TECA) is a key solution for Remote Handling (RH) in Tokamak Equator Port Plug (TEPP) operations. From the perspectives of both engineering and technical designs of effective experiments on the TEPP, key technologies on these topics covering the TECA are required. According to conditions in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and features of the TEPP, this paper introduces the design of an Intelligent Air Transfer System (IATS) with an adaptive attitude and high precision positioning that transports a cask system of more than 30 tons from the Tokamak Building (TB) to the Hot Cell Building (HCB). Additionally, different actuators are discussed, and the hydraulic power drive is eventually selected and designed. A rhombic-like parallel robot is capable of being used for docking with minimum misalignment. Practical mechanisms of the cask system are presented for hostile environments. A control architecture with several algorithms and information acquired from sensors could be used by the TECA. These designs yield realistic and extended applications for the RH of ITER.

  18. Ignition and Combustion Characteristics of Pure Bulk Metals: Normal-Gravity Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; Fiechtner, G. J.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental apparatus has been designed for the study of bulk metal ignition under elevated, normal and reduced gravity environments. The present work describes the technical characteristics of the system, the analytical techniques employed, the results obtained from the ignition of a variety of metals subjected to normal gravity conditions and the first results obtained from experiments under elevated gravity. A 1000 W xenon short-arc lamp is used to irradiate the top surface of a cylindrical metal specimen 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm high in a quiescent pure-oxygen environment at 0.1 MPa. Iron, titanium, zirconium, magnesium, zinc, tin, and copper specimens are investigated. All these metals exhibit ignition and combustion behavior varying in strength and speed. Values of ignition temperatures below, above or in the range of the metal melting point are obtained from the temperature records. The emission spectra from the magnesium-oxygen gas-phase reaction reveals the dynamic evolution of the ignition event. Scanning electron microscope and x-ray spectroscopic analysis provide the sequence of oxide formation on the burning of copper samples. Preliminary results on the effect of higher-than-normal gravity levels on the ignition of titanium specimens is presented.

  19. Study on the Engine Electronic Ignition System Based on SCM and LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanzhen Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the operating performance of the electronic control ignition system and meet the requirement of the experiment teaching, an electronic control ignition system based on Lab VIEW and micro-controller was developed in this study. The system was composed of the ignition control circuit, signal processing circuits of various sensors and system software, which combined the functions of data acquisition, analysis and control. According to the working principle of the ignition system and working parameters, the cylinder block temperature signal, throttle position signal and power supply voltage signal were used as the correction references for the ignition advance angle. So the processing circuits of the sensors were designed based on the selection of the sensors and analysis their working principle or characteristic. The software of the host computer was visual and easy to control the slave computer, which realized the control for the ignition timing and dwell time. The experiment results indicated that the system developed in this study was reliable and that the data communication between the host computer and the slave computer reached the expected requirement. The research results provided a foundation for the further study and performance optimization.

  20. Neutron, electron and photon transport in ICF tragets in direct and fast ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusion energy due to inertial confinement has progressed in the last few decades. In order to increase energy efficiency in this method various designs have been presented. The standard scheme for direct ignition and fast ignition fuel targets are considered. Neutrons, electrons and photons transport in targets containing different combinations of Li and Be are calculated in both direct and fast ignition schemes. To compress spherical multilayer targets having fuel in the central part, they are irradiated by laser or heavy ion beams. Neutrons energy deposition in the target is considered using Monte Carlo method code MCNP. A significant amount of neutrons energy is deposited in the target which resulted in growing fusion reactions rates. It is found that Beryllium compared to Lithium is more important. In an introductory consideration of relativistic electron beam transport into central part of a fast ignition target, we have calculated electron energy deposition in highly dense D-T fuel and Beryllium layer of the target. It has been concluded that a fast ignition scheme is preferred to direct ignition because of the absence of hydrodynamic instability.

  1. Experiments and simulations on non-plasma ignition of semiconductor bridge igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Jupeng; Li, Yong; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Since semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter has been invented, it is commonly considered as a plasma generator. However, the plasma ignition mechanism may be affected by the hotspot ignition temperature of the primary explosives that is lower than the melting point of SCB in the igniter. In an effort to investigate the non-plasma ignition performance of SCB igniter, a one-dimensional model was established for temperature distribution analysis under constant current and capacitor discharge excitation. The simulation results featured the progress of heat transfer and the energy level required by non-plasma ignition of SCB was estimated. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments were carried out to test simulation results and to obtain the firing current range of SCB igniter with lead styphnate (LTNR). Experiment results indicated that safety conditions are 1.953 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.072 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation. All-firing conditions of non-plasma ignition are 2.035 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.647 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation.

  2. Initial Testing of a Prototype Laser Ignition Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    investigated for the ignition of many energetic materials, including igniter materials such as black powder, nitrocellulose , M44 propellant (44...nitroglycerin, 52% nitrocellulose ), and numerous other propellants (11–34). Lasers used for these studies included Nd:glass lasers (up to 30 J at 1.054...It was observed that some propellants which do not ignite in air with certain lasers were effectively ignited when enclosed in a laser ignition

  3. MECHANISM ON DISTRIBUTION OF PILOT FUEL SPRAY AND COMPRESSING IGNITION IN PREMIXED NATURAL GAS ENGINE IGNITED BY PILOT DIESEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Chunde; Yao Guangtao; Song Jinou; Wang Yinshan

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of pilot fuel spray and compressing ignition for pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel are described. By means of these modeling, the dual fuel and diesel fuel ignition mechanism of some phenomena investigated on an optional engine by technology of high-speed CCD is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the longer delay of ignition in dual fuel engine is not mainly caused by change of the mixture thermodynamics parameters. The analysis results illustrate that the ignition of pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel taking place in dual fuel engine is a process of homogenous charge compression ignition.

  4. Development of thin foil Faraday collector as a lost alpha particle diagnostic for high yield D-T tokamak fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Cecil, F.E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Alpha particle confinement is necessary for ignition of a D-T tokamak fusion plasma and for first wall protection. Due to high radiation backgrounds and temperatures, scintillators and semiconductor detectors may not be used to study alpha particles which are lost to the first wall during the D-T programs on JET and ITER. An alternative method of charged particle spectrometry capable of operation in these harsh environments, is proposed: it consists of thin foils of electrically isolated conductors with the flux of alpha particles determined by the positive current flowing from the foils. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  6. New experimental technique to determine coal self-ignition duration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhai ZHANG; Guang XI

    2008-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model was adopted to simulate the relationship between self-ignition duration and sulfur content, ash content, oxygen con-sumption rate, carbon monoxide as well as carbon dioxide generation rate of coal at different temperatures of self heating process. The data from spontaneous combustion experiments were used for ANN training to obtain the connection strength between nerve cells. An oil-bath pro-grammed temperature experiment device was designed and the experimental condition and the size of the test tube were determined for testing the oxygen consumption and the gases generation rate of coal during self-heating process. The sulfur content, the ash content and the data from the oil-bath experiment were taken as ANN inputs to calculate the experiment self-ignition duration of coal. Compared with spontaneous combustion experiment, less than 1% of coal sample and 10% of time are required with an error of less than 3 days to test self-ignition duration of coal.

  7. Automated Experimental Data Analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S G; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bond, E J; Edwards, P W; Glenn, S M; Liebman, J A; Tappero, J D; Warrick, A L; Williams, W H

    2009-09-24

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam 1.8 MJ ultraviolet laser system designed to support high-energy-density science, including demonstration of inertial confinement fusion ignition. After each target shot lasting {approx}20 ns, scientists require data acquisition, analysis and display within 30 minutes from more than 20 specialized high-speed diagnostic instruments. These diagnostics measure critical x-ray, optical and nuclear phenomena during target burn to quantify ignition results and compare to computational models. All diagnostic data (hundreds of Gbytes) are automatically transferred to an Oracle database that triggers the NIF Shot Data Analysis (SDA) Engine, which distributes the signal and image processing tasks to a Linux cluster. The SDA Engine integrates commercial workflow tools and messaging technologies into a scientific software architecture that is highly parallel, scalable, and flexible. Results are archived in the database for scientist approval and displayed using a web-based tool. The unique architecture and functionality of the SDA Engine will be presented along with an example.

  8. Silicon-Class Ablators for NIC Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Darwin; Salmonson, Jay; Haan, Steve

    2012-10-01

    We present design studies using silicon-class ablators (i.e., Si, SiC, SiB6, and SiB14) for NIC ignition capsules. These types of ablators have several advantages in that they: (a) require no internal dopant layers and are robust to M-band radiation; (b) have smooth outer surfaces; (c) have stable fuel-ablator interface; and (d) have good 1-D performance. The major disadvantage for some of the ablators in this class is the relatively smaller ablation stabilization. Consequently, the ablator is more susceptible to breakup caused by RT instabilities. However, smoother outer surfaces on this class of ablators can reduce the effect of RT instabilities. 2-D simulations of SiC ablators show ignition failure despite smooth surfaces and good 1-D performance. But SiB6 and SiB14 ablators exhibit promising behaviors. SiB6 (SiB14) ablators have high 1-D ignition margin and high peak core hydrodynamic pressure 880 (900) Gbar. The ablation scale length for SiB6 is longer than that for SiC and for SiB14 is comparable to that of plastic. Therefore, we expect acceptable performance for SiB6 and less RT growth for SiB14. 2-D simulations are now in progress.

  9. Ignition of Propellants Through Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    case gaseous O2 was introduced in a coaxial flow at a rate of 7 Lit/min with a swirl motion in order to produce an effective fuel and oxidizer mixing...system should be robust, efficient , reliable, simple, low cost, and flexible. Also, an ignition system should initiate combustion under a broad range...discovered that the SWCNT material does not ignite well if wet, so we encapsulated the material to protect it from the fuel spray. To improve the

  10. Dynamic Regime of Ignition of Solid Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolotorev Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dynamic regime of exposure of the radiant flux on the sample of gun-cotton. Obtained time the ignition of gun-cotton in the heating conditions of increasing heat flux in the range from 0.2 W/cm2 to 22 W/cm2. A comparison of the delay times of the ignition when heated variable and constant heat flux.

  11. IGNITION ACTIVATION ENERGY OF MATERIALS BASED

    OpenAIRE

    Peter RANTUCH; Igor WACHTER; Ivan HRUŠOVSKÝ; Balog, Karol

    2016-01-01

    This contribution is aimed to compare the values of the ignition activation energies of two types of polyamide – Slovamid 6 FRB and Slovamid GF 50 LTS. Samples were isothermally stressed at five different temperatures between 500 °C a 550 °C, while the time to initiation of the flame combustion was monitored. Subsequently from the measured times were compiled Arrhenius plots under which activation energy of ignition of both polymers were calculated. The values of activation energies were 106 ...

  12. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  13. Ignition Delay Studies on Hypergolic Fuel Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Jain

    1988-07-01

    Full Text Available The ignition delays of several solid hypergolic fuel compositions, casted using various polymeric binders, or as melts, have been determined with fuming nitric acid as oxidizer. The ignition delays of various hypergolic fuel compositions increase drasticaliy on casting with binders like. carboxyl or hydroxyl termninated polybutadiene. Fuel grains cast using some newly syhthesised epoxy  resins with other ingrcdients, such as curing agent, magnesium powder and fuel, have short ignition delays of the order of 200 ms, and also good mechanical strength. Increasing the amount of binder in the composition retards the hypergolicity of the rain. Similar studies have been made on melt-cast systems using low melting hypergolic fuels for casting fuel powders. The ignition delays of the melt-cast grains, are longer than those determined taking the composition in the powder form. The effect of highly hypergolic additives, and metal powders, on the ignition delay of the cast compositions has been determined. Grains having good mechanical strength and short ignition delays have been obtained by optimising the fuel grain composition.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MINIMUM IGNITION TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor WACHTER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is an analysis of the minimum ignition temperature of dust layer and the minimum ignition temperatures of dust clouds. It could be used to identify the threats in industrial production and civil engineering, on which a layer of combustible dust could occure. Research was performed on spent coffee grounds. Tests were performed according to EN 50281-2-1:2002 Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust (Method A. Objective of method A is to determine the minimum temperature at which ignition or decomposition of dust occurs during thermal straining on a hot plate at a constant temperature. The highest minimum smouldering and carbonating temperature of spent coffee grounds for 5 mm high layer was determined at the interval from 280 °C to 310 °C during 600 seconds. Method B is used to determine the minimum ignition temperature of a dust cloud. Minimum ignition temperature of studied dust was determined to 470 °C (air pressure – 50 kPa, sample weight 0.3 g.

  15. Studies of plasma-jet injection systems to improve ignition conditions in S. I. engine combustion. Untersuchung von Plasmastrahl-Zuendsystemen zur Verbesserung der Zuendbedingungen bei der Verbrennung im Ottomotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmi, H.; Lehmann, A. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Industrieofenbau und Waermetechnik im Huettenwesen); Lepperhoff, G.; Schneider, S. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Thermodynamik)

    1992-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements showed that the efficiency of ignition energy transmission can be enhanced by modifying the level and form of stored energy and the geometry of the spark canal. Optical studies reveal the principal benefit of mixture ignition by a plasma jet which is independent of quenching effects. Engine measurements which were designed and implemented as comparative studies on the transistor/coil/ignition and plasma-jet-ignition systems, confirm measurement results obtained in the laboratory. Clear benefits of plasma-jet ignition were identified for all engine parameters, in particular for pollutant emission, fuel consumption and smooth running. (orig./HW).

  16. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas W., III; Schwab, S. T.; Harlowe, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the design of supersonic combustors which will be required in order to achieve the needed reaction rates in a reasonable sized combustor. A fuel additive approach, which is the focus of this research, is the use of pyrophorics to shorten the ignition delay time and to increase the energy density of the fuel. Pyrophoric organometallic compounds may also provide an ignition source and flame stabilization mechanism within the combustor, thus permitting use of hydrocarbon fuels in supersonic combustion systems. Triethylaluminum (TEA) and trimethylaluminum (TMA) were suggested for this application due to their high energy density and reactivity. The objective here is to provide comparative data for the ignition quality, the energy content, and the reaction rates of several different adducts of both TEA and TMA. The results of the experiments indicate the aluminum alkyls and their more stable derivatives reduce the ignition delay and total reaction time to JP-10 jet fuel. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of ignition delay and total reaction time of the blends of the adducts are significantly lower than in neat JP-10.

  17. Liquid Cryogenic Target Development for Fast Ignition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. L.; Russell, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Schroen, D. G.; Taylor, J. L.; Back, C. A.; Steinman, D.; Nikroo, A.; Kaae, J. L.; Giraldez, E.; Johnston, R. R.; Youngman, K.

    2007-11-01

    As an alternative to foam-stabilized cryogenic solid D-T fuel layers for indirect-drive fast ignitor targets, which will tend to β-layer to a nonuniform distribution in a reentrant cone geometry [1], we are investigating hemispherical cryogenic fast ignition capsules with a liquid fuel layer confined between a thick outer ablator shell and a thin inner shell [2]. The shape and surface quality of the fuel layer is determined entirely by the characteristics of the bounding shells. In the present design, structural support for the thin (4.5 um) hemispherical GDP inner shell is provided by a mounting ring. Fabrication of stronger thin Be hemi-shells is also being investigated. Technology issues for liquid cryogenic fuel capsule development and progress toward demonstration of a working target will be presented. [1] J.K. Hoffer et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 50, 15 (2006). [2] D.L. Hanson et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 500 (2006). *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  19. First Divertor Operation on the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing-Wei; CAO Zeng; LI Xiao-Dong; MAO Wei-Cheng; ZHOU Cai-Pin; WANG En-Yao; YAN Jian-Cheng; LIU Yong; HL-2A team; DING Xuan-Tong; YAN Long-Wen; XUAN Wei-Min; LIU De-Quan; CHEN Liao-Yuan; SONG Xian-Ming; YUAN Bao-Shan; ZHANG Jin-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ HL-2A device is the first divertor tokamak in China. One of its main subjects is to study the features of the divertor plasma. In the last campaign, the first divertor configuration has been achieved and sustained on the HL-2A tokamak. Here we give a brief description about the HL-2A tokamak, diagnostics arrangements, and the equilibrium analysis results on divertor configuration. The main results of divertor experiments are also presented.

  20. Robustness and Reliability of the GM Ignition Switch - A forensic Engineering case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses forensic engineering from the perspectives of Robust Design and Reliability Engineering to review one of the most infamous recalls in automotive history, that of the GM ignition switch. The design, engineering and management failures in this case ultimately resulted in a fine of $35...

  1. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  2. Shock ignition: an alternative scheme for HiPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Lafon, M.; Galera, S.; Weber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Two main paths are now under investigation that aim at thermonuclear ignition of hydrogen isotopes using lasers: central hot spot self-ignition and externally driven fast ignition of preassembled fuel. A third, intermediate, scheme is shock ignition, which combines the simplicity of self-ignition capsules to the hydrodynamic robustness of the fast ignition fuel assembly. This study addresses the potential of shock ignition for the HiPER project and provides a preliminary assessment of possible detrimental effects. Monodimensional simulations are performed to study the robustness of the ignition scheme in terms of shock launching time and laser power. Bidimensional simulations address the sensitivity of shock ignition to irradiation nonuniformity and to low mode asymmetries of the fuel assembly.

  3. Shock-Ignited High Gain/Yield Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Bedrosiian, P.; Tabak, M.; Miles, A.; Dixit, S.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Zhou, C.

    2006-10-01

    Shock-ignition, a new concept for ICF ignition [C.Zhou, R.Betti Bull APS, v50, 2005], is being studied as a future option for efficiently achieving high gains in large laser facilities such as NIF. Accordingly, this offers the potential for testing: (1)High yield (up to 200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy (2)High fusion yield targets for DOE NNSA stockpile application (3)Targets with appreciable gain at low laser drive energies (gains of 10's at 150kJ) (4)Ignition of simple, non-cryo (room temperature) single shell gas targets at (unity gain). By contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, we separate the assembly and ignition phases by initially imploding a massive cryogenic shell on a low adiabat (alpha 0.7) at low velocity (less than 2e7cm/s) using a direct drive pulse of modest total energy. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherically convergent shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating and starting to rebound. Like fast ignition, shock ignition can achieve high gains with low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements.

  4. Minitature electro-pyrotechnic igniter, and ignition head for the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.D. van; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Tata Nardini, F.

    2014-01-01

    An electric non-pyrotechnic ignition head (100) suitable for use in an electro- pyrotechnic igniter (1), comprising: a housing (102) defining a front opening (106); - an electrically insulative, thermally conductive bridge filament support body (130) that is at least partly disposed in said front

  5. 基于J-TEXT装置的光耦合隔离放大器设计与分析%Design and analysis of optical coupling isolation amplifier for J-TEXT tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘明俊; 张明; 李霆霆; 郑玮; 饶波; 庄革

    2015-01-01

    A wideband optical coupling isolation amplifier is presented. Experimental results showed that the presented isolation amplifier can transmit an analog signal from dc to 2.7MHz with good linearity and low propagation delay. Effects of the compensation capacitor on the frequency characteristics of the isolation amplifier was studied by simulation analysis. Meanwhile the mathematical model of the circuit was established with parts of the parasitic parameters taken into consideration. The linearity and frequency characteristics of the circuit was studied, combining theoretical analysis, simulation and test. At last, the availability of the presented isolation amplifier was verified in the Langmuir probe floating potential measurement system on J-TEXT tokamak.%基于反馈技术设计了一款带宽 2.7MHz、高线性度、低传输延时的光耦合隔离放大器,仿真分析了I-V 转换电路补偿电容对电路频率特性的影响,并选择了合适的电路参数.将部分寄生参数考虑在内,建立了电路数学模型,仿真、测试与理论分析相结合研究了电路的线性度与频率特性.基于J-TEXT装置静电探针悬浮电位测量系统验证了电路在系统中的可用性.

  6. Assessment of options for attractive commercial and demonstration tokamak fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najmabadi, F. [Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Starlite Project was initiated to investigate the mission, requirements and goals, features, and the R&D needs of the Fusion Demonstration Power Plant based on tokamak confinement concept. It is obvious that the Fusion Demo should demonstrate that a commercial fusion power plant would be accepted by utility and industry (i.e., it is affordable and profitable) and by the general public and government (i.e., it has superior safety and environmental features). Therefore, as the first step in the Starlite project, a set of quantifiable top-level requirements, and goals for both commercial fusion power plants and the Fusion Demo were developed. Next, several candidate options for physics operation regime as well as engineering design of various components (e.g., choice of structural material, coolant, breeder) have been developed and assessed. In each area, this assessment was aimed at investigating (1) the potential to satisfy the requirements and goals, and (2) the feasibility e.g., critical issues and credibility (e.g., degree extrapolation required from present data base). This assessment led to the choice of the reversed-shear as the tokamak plasma operation regime and a self-cooled lithium design with vanadium alloy for blanket and in-vessel structures for detailed design. This paper presents a summary of top-level requirements and goals for fusion power and overviews the results of our assessment of tokamak plasma physics and technology options and designs. 21 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, S C; Ferraro, N; Krebs, I

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to nonlinearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary nonsawtoothing "hybrid" discharges, often referred to as "flux pumping."

  8. Neoclassical transport in high [beta] tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, S.C.

    1992-12-01

    Neoclassical, transport in high [beta] large aspect ratio tokamaks is calculated. The variational method introduced by Rosenbluth, et al., is used to calculate the full Onsager matrix in the banana regime. These results are part of a continuing study of the high [beta] large aspect ratio equilibria introduced in Cowley, et al. All the neoclassical coefficients are reduced from their nominal low [beta] values by a factor ([var epsilon]/q[sup 2][beta])[sup [1/2

  9. Resistive interchange instability in reversed shear tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Masaru; Nakamura, Yuji; Wakatani, Masahiro [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Resistive interchange modes become unstable due to the magnetic shear reversal in tokamaks. In the present paper, the parameter dependences, such as q (safety factor) profile and the magnetic surface shape are clarified for improving the stability, using the local stability criterion. It is shown that a significant reduction of the beta limit is obtained for the JT-60U reversed shear configuration with internal transport barrier, since the local pressure gradient increases. (author)

  10. Axisymmetric instability in a noncircular tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipschultz, B.

    1979-10-01

    The stability of dee, inverse-dee and square cross section plasmas to axisymmetric modes has been investigated experimentally in Tokapole II, a tokamak with a four-null poloidal divertor. Experimental results are closely compared with predictions of two numerical stability codes - the PEST code (ideal MHD, linear stability) adapted to tokapole geometry and a code which follows the nonlinear evolution of shapes similar to tokapole equilibria.

  11. Internal Kink Instability in Shaped Tokamaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王中天; 王龙

    2002-01-01

    A criterion of an ideal internal kink mode is derived for a shaped tokamak configuration in which q-profile is very flat in the core region. A combining criterion is obtained including the necessary criterion of Mercier and the sufficient criterion of Lortz. The new criterion makes progress compared with the necessary criterion of Mercier. In the elongated plasma, a poloidal beta can cause instability, while the triangularity has a stabilizing effect. The result is applicable for DIII-D and SUNIST.

  12. EU Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Becoulet

    2007-01-01

    @@ At the end of 2003, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) structure set-up a long-term European task force (TF) in charge of "co-ordinating the development of a coherent set of validated simulation tools for the purpose of benchmarking on existing tokamak experiments, with the ultimate aim of providing a comprehensive simulation package for ITER plasmas" [http://www.efda-taskforce-itm.org/].

  13. Tokamaks: from A D Sakharov to the present (the 60-year history of tokamaks)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E. A.

    2012-02-01

    The paper is prepared on the basis of the report presented at the session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) at the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 25 May 2011, devoted to the 90-year jubilee of Academician Andrei D Sakharov - the initiator of controlled nuclear fusion research in the USSR. The 60-year history of plasma research work in toroidal devices with a longitudinal magnetic field suggested by Andrei D Sakharov and Igor E Tamm in 1950 for the confinement of fusion plasma and known at present as tokamaks is described in brief. The recent (2006) agreement among Russia, the EU, the USA, Japan, China, the Republic of Korea, and India on the joint construction of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) in France based on the tokamak concept is discussed. Prospects for using the tokamak as a thermonuclear (14 MeV) neutron source are examined.

  14. Effect of Fusion Neutron Source Numerical Models on Neutron Wall Loading in a D-D Tokamak Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈义学; 吴宜灿

    2003-01-01

    Effect of various spatial and energy distributions of fusion neutron source on the calculation of neutron wall loading of Tokamak D-D fusion device has been investigated by means of the 3-D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A realistic Monte Carlo source model was developed based on the accurate representation of the spatial distribution and energy spectrum of fusion neutrons to solve the complicated problem of tokamak fusion neutron source modelling. The results show that those simplified source models will introduce significant uncertainties. For accurate estimation of the key nuclear responses of the tokamak design and analyses, the use of the realistic source is recommended. In addition, the accumulation of tritium produced during D-D plasma operation should be carefully considered.

  15. How to upgrade a control system for a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenten, W. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Dohms, U. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Fuss, L. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Huppertz, H. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Lerch, J. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Mueller, K.D. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Reinhart, P. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany)); Rongen, F. (Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (KFA), 52425 Juelich (Germany))

    1994-12-15

    The TEXTOR tokamak for technology-oriented research in Juelich has been in operation since 1981. Its control system consists basically of a CAMAC computer system (PDP-11) for remote control and display, linked to programmable controllers (SIEMENS S3) for subsystem control via fibre optic cables. Due to several reasons, an upgrade of this well-established control system has become unavoidable. The main objective for this process is to provide better availability and reliability for another decade of operation and to reduce maintenance costs significantly. In this respect all CAMAC instrumentation had to be preserved completely. The paper describes in detail the background, design and layout of the new control system. Because upgrading an existing control system substantially differs from constructing a new system for a new device, special attention is given to the steps of achieving a smooth upgrade procedure that avoids unnecessary interferences with the TEXTOR operation. ((orig.))

  16. Deposition of fuel pellets injected into tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.; Jernigan, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hsieh, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Pellet injection has been used on tokamak devices in a number of experiments to provide plasma fueling and density profile control. The mass deposition of these fuel pellets defined as the change in density profile caused by the pellet, has been found to show an outward displacement of the ablated material from that expected by mapping the theoretical ablation rate onto the flux surfaces. This suggests that fast transport of the pellet ablatant occurs during the flow along field lines that may be driven by {del}B drift effects. A comparison of the deposition of pellets from different machines shows similar behavior. Initial results from alternative injection locations designed to take advantage of the outward ablatant drift is presented.

  17. Spontaneously Igniting Hybrid Fuel-Oxidiser Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Jain

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available After briefly outlining the recent developments in hybrid rockets, the work carried out by the author on self-igniting (hypergolic solid fuel-liquid oxidiser systems has been reviewed. A major aspect relates to the solid derivatives of hydrazines, which have been conceived as fuels for hybrid rockets. Many of these N-N bonded compounds ignite readily, with very short ignition delays, on coming into contact with liquid oxidisers, like HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/ O/sub 4/. The ignition characteristics have been examined as a function of the nature of the functional group in the fuel molecule, in an attempt to establish a basis for the hypergolic ignition in terms of chemical reactivity of the fuel-oxidiser combination. Important chemical reactions occurring in the pre-ignition stage have been identified by examining the quenched reaction products. Hybrid systems exhibiting synergistic hypergolicity in the presence of metal powders have investigated. An estimation of the rocket performance parameters, experimental determination of the heats of combustion in HNO/sub 3/, thermal decomposition characteristics, temperature profile by thin film thermometry and product identification by the rapid scan FT-IR, are among the other relevant studies made on these systems. A significant recent development has been the synthesis of new N-N bonded viscous binders, capable of rataining the hypergolicity of the fuel powders embedded therein as well as providing the required mechanical strength to the grain. Several of these resins have been characterised. Metallised fuel composites of these resins having high loading of magnesium are found to have short ignition delays and high performance parameters.

  18. Relativistic runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, R.E.

    1995-02-03

    Runaway electrons are inherently present in a tokamak, in which an electric field is applied to drive a toroidal current. The experimental work is performed in the tokamak TEXTOR. Here runaway electrons can acquire energies of up to 30 MeV. The runaway electrons are studied by measuring their synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared wavelength range. The studies presented are unique in the sense that they are the first ones in tokamak research to employ this radiation. Hitherto, studies of runaway electrons revealed information about their loss in the edge of the discharge. The behaviour of confined runaways was still a terra incognita. The measurement of the synchrotron radiation allows a direct observation of the behaviour of runaway electrons in the hot core of the plasma. Information on the energy, the number and the momentum distribution of the runaway electrons is obtained. The production rate of the runaway electrons, their transport and the runaway interaction with plasma waves are studied. (orig./HP).

  19. Nonlinear Simulation Studies of Tokamaks and STs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Park; J. Breslau; J. Chen; G.Y. Fu; S.C. Jardin; S. Klasky; J. Menard; A. Pletzer; B.C. Stratton; D. Stutman; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Sugiyama

    2003-07-07

    The multilevel physics, massively parallel plasma simulation code, M3D, has been used to study spherical tori (STs) and tokamaks. The magnitude of outboard shift of density profiles relative to electron temperature profiles seen in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] under strong toroidal flow is explained. Internal reconnection events in ST discharges can be classified depending on the crash mechanism, just as in tokamak discharges; a sawtooth crash, disruption due to stochasticity, or high-beta disruption. Toroidal shear flow can reduce linear growth of internal kink. It has a strong stabilizing effect nonlinearly and causes mode saturation if its profile is maintained, e.g., through a fast momentum source. Normally, however, the flow profile itself flattens during the reconnection process, allowing a complete reconnection to occur. In some cases, the maximum density and pressure spontaneously occur inside the island and cause mode saturation. Gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid studies of NSTX show the effects of fluid compression on a fast-ion-driven n = 1 mode. MHD studies of recent tokamak experiments with a central current hole indicate that the current clamping is due to sawtooth-like crashes, but with n = 0.

  20. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  1. Continuous, saturation, and discontinuous tokamak plasma vertical position control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrishkin, Yuri V., E-mail: y_mitrishkin@hotmail.com [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Pavlova, Evgeniia A., E-mail: janerigoler@mail.ru [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Evgenii A., E-mail: ea.kuznetsov@mail.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Gaydamaka, Kirill I., E-mail: k.gaydamaka@gmail.com [V. A. Trapeznikov Institute of Control Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Robust new linear state feedback control system for tokamak plasma vertical position. • Plasma vertical position relay control system with voltage inverter in sliding mode. • Design of full models of multiphase rectifier and voltage inverter. • First-order unit approximation of full multiphase rectifier model with high accuracy. • Wider range of unstable plant parameters of stable control system with multiphase rectifier. - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the design and comparison of unstable plasma vertical position control systems in the T-15 tokamak with the application of two types of actuators: a multiphase thyristor rectifier and a transistor voltage inverter. An unstable dynamic element obtained by the identification of plasma-physical DINA code was used as the plasma model. The simplest static feedback state space control law was synthesized as a linear combination of signals accessible to physical measurements, namely the plasma vertical displacement, the current, and the voltage in a horizontal field coil, to solve the pole placement problem for a closed-loop system. Only one system distinctive parameter was used to optimize the performance of the feedback system, viz., a multiple real pole. A first-order inertial unit was used as the rectifier model in the feedback. A system with a complete rectifier model was investigated as well. A system with the voltage inverter model and static linear controller was brought into a sliding mode. As this takes place, real time delays were taken into account in the discontinuous voltage inverter model. The comparison of the linear and sliding mode systems showed that the linear system enjoyed an essentially wider range of the plant model parameters where the feedback system was stable.

  2. First liquid-layer implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, Alex; Olson, R.; Leeper, R.; Kline, J.; Yi, S. A.; Peterson, R.; Bradley, P.; Haines, B.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D.; Herrmann, H.; Shah, R.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Hamza, A.; Nikroo, A.; Meezan, N.; Biener, M.; Sater, J.; Walters, C.

    2016-10-01

    Replacing the standard ice layer in an ignition design with a liquid layer allows fielding the target with a higher central vapor pressure, leading to reduced implosion convergence ratio (CR). At lower CR, the implosions are expected to be more robust to instabilities and asymmetries than standard ignition designs. The first liquid-layer implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been performed by wicking the liquid fuel into a supporting foam. A 3-shot series has been conducted at CR=14-16 using a HDC ablator driven by a 3-shock pulse in a near-vacuum Au hohlraum; data and inferred quantities, such as pressure, show good agreement with expectations.

  3. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  4. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  5. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production.

  6. The Effect of the Feedback Controller on Superconducting Tokamak AC Losses + AC-CRPP user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaerz, B.; Bruzzone, P.; Favez, J.Y.; Lister, J.B.; Zapretilina, E

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting coils in a Tokamak are subject to AC losses when the field transverse to the coil current varies. A simple model to evaluate the AC losses has been derived and benchmarked against a complete model used in the ITER design procedure. The influence of the feedback control strategy on the AC losses is examined using this model. An improved controller is proposed, based on this study. (author)

  7. Reactive Power Compensation and Harmonic Suppression for Power Supply System of HT-7U Superconductive Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a strategy for the reactive power compensation and harmonic suppression of the power supply system in HT-7U superconductive Tokamak is proposed. The optimizedapproach is given in the parameters design for passive filter. Also a controlling method with fastresponse time and good accuracy is put forward for the compensator, which is more suitable forthe dynamic load.PAGS: 84.70.+p ,52.55. Fa, 84.30. Vn

  8. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams.

  9. 3rd Conference on Ignition Systems for Gasoline Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Sens, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The volume includes selected and reviewed papers from the 3rd Conference on Ignition Systems for Gasoline Engines in Berlin in November 2016. Experts from industry and universities discuss in their papers the challenges to ignition systems in providing reliable, precise ignition in the light of a wide spread in mixture quality, high exhaust gas recirculation rates and high cylinder pressures. Classic spark plug ignition as well as alternative ignition systems are assessed, the ignition system being one of the key technologies to further optimizing the gasoline engine.

  10. Conditioning of the vacuum chamber of the Tokamak Novillo; Acondicionamiento de la camara de vacio del Tokamak Novillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    The obtained experimental results of the implementation of two techniques of present time for the conditioning of the internal wall of the chamber of discharges of the Tokamak Novillo are presented, which has been designed, built and put in operation in the Laboratory of Plasma Physics of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). These techniques are: the vacuum baking and the low energy pulsed discharges, which were applied after having reached an initial pressure of the order of 10{sup -7} Torr. with a system of turbomolecular pumping previous preparation of surfaces and vacuum seals. The analysis of residual gases was carried out with a mass spectrometer before and after conditioning. The obtained results show that the vacuum baking it was of great effectiveness to reduce the value of the initial pressure in short time, in more of a magnitude order and the low energy discharges reduced the oxygen at worthless levels with regard to the initial values. (Author)

  11. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-02

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10  Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way.

  12. Progress and prospects for an FI relevant point design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M; Amendt, P; Bellei, C; Clark, D; Cohen, B; Divol, L; Ho, D; Kemp, A; Larson, D; Marinak, M; Patel, P; Shay, H; Strozzi, D; Tabak, M

    2011-11-02

    The physics issues involved in scaling from sub ignition to high gain fast ignition are discussed. Successful point designs must collimate the electrons and minimize the stand off distance to avoid multi mega-joule ignition energies. Collimating B field configurations are identified and some initial designs are explored.

  13. Progress and prospects for an IFE relevant FI point design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, M.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Clark, D.; Cohen, B.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Kemp, A.; Larson, D.; Marinak, M.; Patel, P.; Shay, H.; Strozzi, D.; Tabak, M.

    2013-11-01

    The physics issues involved in scaling from sub-ignition to high gain fast ignition are discussed. Successful point designs must collimate the electrons and minimise the standoff distance to avoid multi-megajoule ignition energies. Collimating B field configurations are identified and some initial designs are explored.

  14. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  15. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  16. Ignition and combustion characteristics of molded amorphous boron under different oxygen pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Yunan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-09-01

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of amorphous boron (B) have received much attention from researchers in recent decades. A pressurized concentrated ignition experimental system was designed to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of molded B samples. The ignition experiments were carried out under different oxygen pressures (1-9 atm). The condensed combustion products were then analyzed using a scanning electron microscope, an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, and an X-ray diffractometer. Furthermore, the complete oxidation rates of the samples were detected by inductively coupled plasma chromatography. As the oxygen pressure increased, the combustion intensity of the samples steadily increased, and the ignition delay time and combustion time both decreased. Under the oxygen pressure of 9 atm, the average ignition delay time and combustion time were 2640 ms and 2596 ms, respectively, and the highest combustion temperature reached 1561.5 °C. The initial diffusion flame on the sample surface was green and the brightest, which was produced by an intermediate combustion product, BO2 (corresponding molecular emission spectrum wavelength, 547.3 nm). Emission spectra of another intermediate product, BO (431.9 nm) was also detected. Two different types of structures were found in the condensed combustion products of the samples. The first type was the flaky B2O3 structure, and the second type was the flocculent structure of incomplete combustion products. The B2O3 content in the condensed combustion products increased with the oxygen pressure during combustion. The complete oxidation ratio of the samples also increased with the oxygen pressure, and reached the maximum value of 68.71% under 9 atm. Overall, the samples showed better ignition and combustion characteristics under higher oxygen pressure.

  17. A simulation study of a controlled tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, N.; Niwa, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A tokamak circuit theory, including results of numerical simulation studies, is applied to a control system synthesized for a Joule heated tokamak plasma. The treatment is similar to that of Ogata and Ninomiya (1979) except that in this case a quadrupole field coil current is considered coexisting with image induced on a vacuum chamber.

  18. Soft-X-Ray Tomography Diagnostic at the Rtp Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    An 80-channel soft x-ray tomography system has been constructed for diagnosing the RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) tokamak plasma. Five pinhole cameras, each with arrays of 16 detectors are distributed more or less homogeneously around a poloidal plasma cross section. The cameras are positioned clo

  19. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    An optically thin $p$-$^{11}$B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. The minimum Lawson criterion for thermal $p$-$^{11}$B plasmas and the minimum $\\rho R$ required for ICF volume ignition are calculated. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for this utility, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam- thermal reactivity. Channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and $\\rho R$, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. The gains realized with a beam thus establish an upper bound for the reductions in igniti...

  20. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.