WorldWideScience

Sample records for ignition facility configuration

  1. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  2. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  3. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  4. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  5. National Ignition Facility site requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Site Requirements (SR) provide bases for identification of candidate host sites for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for the generation of data regarding potential actual locations for the facilities. The SR supplements the NIF Functional Requirements (FR) with information needed for preparation of responses to queries for input to HQ DOE site evaluation. The queries are to include both documents and explicit requirements for the potential host site responses. The Sr includes information extracted from the NIF FR (for convenience), data based on design approaches, and needs for physical and organization infrastructure for a fully operational NIF. The FR and SR describe requirements that may require new construction or may be met by use or modification of existing facilities. The SR do not establish requirements for NIF design or construction project planning. The SR document does not constitute an element of the NIF technical baseline.

  6. National Ignition Facility under fire over ignition failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The 3.5bn National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California is no nearer to igniting a sustainable nuclear fusion burn - four years after its initial target date - according to a report by the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  7. Polar direct drive: Proof-of-principle experiments on OMEGA and prospects for ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craxton, R.S.; Marshall, F.J.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.W.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.

    2005-04-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD) shows promise for achieving direct-drive ignition while the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is initially configured for indirect drive. Experiments have been carried out using 40 repointed beams of the 60-beam OMEGA laser system to approximate the NIF PDD configuration.

  8. The National Ignition Facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  9. Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Salmonson, J D; Callahan, D A; Town, R P

    2009-12-01

    The National Ignition Campaign, tasked with designing and fielding targets for fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), has carried forward three complementary target designs for the past several years: a beryllium ablator design, a plastic ablator design, and a high-density carbon or synthetic diamond design. This paper describes current simulations and design optimization to develop the plastic ablator capsule design as a candidate for the first ignition attempt on NIF. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve a comparable ignition probability to that with beryllium are emphasized. Large numbers of 1-D simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as 2-D simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are presented.

  10. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear bum in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm3-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIP's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY20l0 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  11. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility

  12. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

  13. National Ignition Facility Comes to Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2003-09-01

    First conceived of nearly 15 years ago, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is up and running and successful beyond almost everyone's expectations. During commissioning of the first four laser beams, the laser system met design specifications for everything from beam quality to energy output. NIF will eventually have 192 laser beams. Yet with just 2% of its final beam configuration complete, NIF has already produced the highest energy laser shots in the world. In July, laser shots in the infrared wavelength using four beams produced a total of 26.5 kilojoules of energy per beam, not only meeting NIF's design energy requirement of 20 kilojoules per beam but also exceeding the energy of any other infrared laser beamline. In another campaign, NIF produced over 11.4 kilojoules of energy when the infrared light was converted to green light. An earlier performance campaign of laser light that had been frequency converted from infrared to ultraviolet really proved NIF's mettle. Over 10.4 kilojoules of ultraviolet energy were produced in about 4 billionths of a second. If all 192 beamlines were to operate at these levels, over 2 megajoules of energy would result. That much energy for the pulse duration of several nanoseconds is about 500 trillion watts of power, more than 500 times the US peak generating power.

  14. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  15. Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Area Economics

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

  16. Preparing for polar-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenty P.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of polar drive (PD at the National Ignition Facility (NIF will enable the execution of direct-drive implosions while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE, in collaboration with LLNL, LANL and GA, is implementing PD on the NIF. LLE has designed and participates in the use of PD implosions for diagnostic commissioning on the NIF. LLE has an active experimental campaign to develop PD in both warm and cryogenic target experiments on OMEGA. LLE and its partners are developing a Polar Drive Project Execution Plan, which will provide a detailed outline of the requirements, resources, and timetable leading to PD-ignition experiments on the NIF.

  17. Indirect drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meezan, N. B.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Patel, P. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Town, R. P. J.; Albert, F.; Amendt, P. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hall, G. N.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Masse, L.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific results from the pursuit of indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and describes the program’s forward looking research directions. In indirect drive on the NIF, laser beams heat an x-ray enclosure called a hohlraum that surrounds a spherical pellet. X-ray radiation ablates the surface of the pellet, imploding a thin shell of deuterium/tritium (DT) that must accelerate to high velocity (v  >  350 km s-1) and compress by a factor of several thousand. Since 2009, substantial progress has been made in understanding the major challenges to ignition: Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability seeded by target imperfections; and low-mode asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray drive, exacerbated by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI). Requirements on velocity, symmetry, and compression have been demonstrated separately on the NIF but have not been achieved simultaneously. We now know that the RT instability, seeded mainly by the capsule support tent, severely degraded DT implosions from 2009-2012. Experiments using a ‘high-foot’ drive with demonstrated lower RT growth improved the thermonuclear yield by a factor of 10, resulting in yield amplification due to alpha particle heating by more than a factor of 2. However, large time dependent drive asymmetry in the LPI-dominated hohlraums remains unchanged, preventing further improvements. High fidelity 3D hydrodynamic calculations explain these results. Future research efforts focus on improved capsule mounting techniques and on hohlraums with little LPI and controllable symmetry. In parallel, we are pursuing improvements to the basic physics models used in the design codes through focused physics experiments.

  18. National Ignition Facility design, performance, and cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, W.J.; Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H. [and others

    1994-09-16

    A conceptual design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and its cost has been estimated by a multilaboratory team. To maximize the performance/cost ratio a compact, segmented amplifier is used in a multipass architecture. Many recent optical and laser technology developments have been incorporated into the final design. The Beamlet project has successfully demonstrated the new concept. The mission of ICF Program using the NEF is to achieve ignition and gain in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects experiments, and for civilian applications such as inertial fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high energy density.

  19. Construction Safety for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predmore, R

    2000-09-01

    This Construction Safety Program (CSP) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and guidelines that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment. Appendix A, a separate companion document, includes further applicable environmental, safety, and health requirements for the NIF Project. Specifically this document: {sm_bullet} Defines the fundamental site safety philosophy, {sm_bullet} Identifies management roles and responsibilities, {sm_bullet} Defines core safety management processes, {sm_bullet} Identifies LLNL institutional requirements, and {sm_bullet} Defines the functional areas and facilities accrued by the program and the process for transition of facilities, functional areas, and/or systems from construction to activation. Anyone willfully or thoughtlessly disregarding standards will be subject to immediate removal from the site. Thorough job planning will help ensure that these standards are met.

  20. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  1. The National Ignition Facility Performance Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C; Auerbach, J; Nicola, J D; Dixit, S; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Jancaitis, K; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mehta, N; Nostrand, M; Orth, C; Sacks, R; Shaw, M; Sutton, S; Wegner, P; Williams, W; Widmayer, C; White, R; Yang, S; Van Wonterghem, B

    2005-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single ''quad'' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the Precision Diagnostics System (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements.

  2. The national ignition facility performance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C.; Auerbach, J.; Bowers, M.; Di-Nicola, J.M.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Jancaitis, K.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Mehta, N.; Nostrand, M.; Orth, C.; Sacks, R.; Shaw, M.; Sutton, S.; Wegner, P.; Williams, W.; Widmayer, C.; White, R.; Yang, S.; Van Wonterghem, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science, including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single 'quad' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the precision diagnostic system (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements. (authors)

  3. Overview of the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. The NIF is a 192-beam, Nd-glass laser facility that is capable of producing 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, and over 50 times more energetic than other existing ICF facilities. The NIF construction began in 1997, and the facility, which was completed in 2009, is now fully operational. The facility is capable of firing up to 192 laser beams onto a target placed at the center of a 10-m-diameter spherical target chamber. Experiments involving the use of tritium have been underway for some time. These experiments present radiological issues: prompt neutron/gamma radiation, neutron activation, fission product generation, and decay radiation. This paper provides an introduction to the NIF facility and its operation, describes plans for the experimental program, and discusses radiological issues associated with the NIF's operations.

  4. The National Ignition Facility: Transition to a User Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Keane, C.; MacGowan, B.; Patterson, R.; Spaeth, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Kauffman, R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density science (HEDS), national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The facility is on track to perform over 200 target shots this year in support of all of its user communities. The facility has nearly 60 diagnostic systems operational and has shown flexibility in laser pulse shape and performance to meet the requirements of its multiple users. Progress continues on its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. It has performed over 40 indirect-drive experiments with cryogenic-layered capsules. New platforms are being developed for HEDS and fundamental science. Equation-of-state and material strength experiments have been done on a number of materials with pressures of over 50 MBars obtained in diamond, conditions never previously encountered in the laboratory and similar to those found in planetary interiors. Experiments are also in progress investigating radiation transport, hydrodynamic instabilities, and direct drive implosions. NIF continues to develop as an experimental facility. Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) is now being installed on NIF for producing high-energy radiographs of the imploded cores of ignition targets and for short pulse laser-plasma interaction experiments. One NIF beam is planned for conversion to two picosecond beams in 2014. Other new diagnostics such as x-ray Thomson scattering, low energy neutron spectrometer, and multi-layer reflecting x-ray optics are also planned. Incremental improvements in laser performance such as improved optics damage performance, beam balance, and back reflection control are being pursued.

  5. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  6. National Ignition Facility Target Design and Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R C; Kozioziemski, B J; Nikroo, A; Wilkens, H L; Bhandarkar, S; Forsman, A C; Haan, S W; Hoppe, M L; Huang, H; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Sater, J D; Seugling, R M; Stephens, R B; Takagi, M; Xu, H W

    2007-12-10

    The current capsule target design for the first ignition experiments at the NIF Facility beginning in 2009 will be a copper-doped beryllium capsule, roughly 2 mm in diameter with 160-{micro}m walls. The capsule will have a 75-{micro}m layer of solid DT on the inside surface, and the capsule will driven with x-rays generated from a gold/uranium cocktail hohlraum. The design specifications are extremely rigorous, particularly with respect to interfaces, which must be very smooth to inhibit Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. This paper outlines the current design, and focuses on the challenges and advances in capsule fabrication and characterization; hohlraum fabrication, and D-T layering and characterization.

  7. Control and Information Systems for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunton, Gordon; Casey, Allan; Christensen, Marvin; Demaret, Robert; Fedorov, Mike; Flegel, Michael; Folta, Peg; Fraizer, Timothy; Hutton, Matthew; Kegelmeyer, Laura; Lagin, Lawrence; Ludwigsen, Pete; Reed, Robert; Speck, Douglas; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-11-03

    Orchestration of every National Ignition Facility (NIF) shot cycle is managed by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which uses a scalable software architecture running code on more than 1950 front-end processors, embedded controllers, and supervisory servers. The ICCS operates laser and industrial control hardware containing 66 000 control and monitor points to ensure that all of NIF’s laser beams arrive at the target within 30 ps of each other and are aligned to a pointing accuracy of less than 50 μm root-mean-square, while ensuring that a host of diagnostic instruments record data in a few billionths of a second. NIF’s automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework that distributes the software across the computer network and achieves interoperation between different software languages and target architectures. A large suite of business and scientific software tools supports experimental planning, experimental setup, facility configuration, and post-shot analysis. Standard business services using open-source software, commercial workflow tools, and database and messaging technologies have been developed. An information technology infrastructure consisting of servers, network devices, and storage provides the foundation for these systems. This paper is an overview of the control and information systems used to support a wide variety of experiments during the National Ignition Campaign.

  8. A Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, L. A.; McCarville, T.; Decker, T.; Pardini, T.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Izumi, N.; Mirkarimi, P.; Pivovaroff, M.; Smalyuk, V.; Vogel, J.; Walton, C.; Kilkenny, J.

    2014-11-01

    Current pinhole x ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is limited in resolution and signal throughput to the detector for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications, due to the viable range of pinhole sizes (10-25 μm) that can be deployed. A higher resolution and throughput diagnostic is in development using a Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope system (KBM). The system will achieve <9 μm resolution over a 300 μm field of view with a multilayer coating operating at 10.2 keV. Presented here are the first images from the uncoated NIF KBM configuration demonstrating high resolution has been achieved across the full 300 μm field of view.

  9. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dun, C

    2003-09-30

    This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES&H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B.

  10. Large optics for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisden, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser with its 192 independent laser beams is not only the world’s largest laser, it is also the largest optical system ever built. With its 192 independent laser beams, the NIF requires a total of 7648 large-aperture (meter-sized) optics. One of the many challenges in designing and building NIF has been to carry out the research and development on optical materials, optics design, and optics manufacturing and metrology technologies needed to achieve NIF’s high output energies and precision beam quality. This paper describes the multiyear, multi-supplier, development effort that was undertaken to develop the advanced optical materials, coatings, fabrication technologies, and associated process improvements necessary to manufacture the wide range of NIF optics. The optics include neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser amplifiers; fused silica lenses, windows, and phase plates; mirrors and polarizers with multi-layer, high-reflectivity dielectric coatings deposited on BK7 substrates; and potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal optics for fast optical switches, frequency conversion, and polarization rotation. Also included is a discussion of optical specifications and custom metrology and quality-assurance tools designed, built, and fielded at supplier sites to verify compliance with the stringent NIF specifications. In addition, a brief description of the ongoing program to improve the operational lifetime (i.e., damage resistance) of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm (3ω) is provided.

  11. Shot Automation for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L J; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bowers, G A; Carey, R; Casavant, D D; Cline, B D; Demaret, R D; Domyancic, D M; Elko, S D; Fisher, J M; Hermann, M R; Krammen, J E; Kohut, T R; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Ludwigsen, A P; Patterson, Jr., R W; Sanchez, R J; Stout, E A; Van Arsdall, P J; Van Wonterghem, B M

    2005-09-21

    A shot automation framework has been developed and deployed during the past year to automate shots performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the Integrated Computer Control System This framework automates a 4-8 hour shot sequence, that includes inputting shot goals from a physics model, set up of the laser and diagnostics, automatic alignment of laser beams and verification of status. This sequence consists of set of preparatory verification shots, leading to amplified system shots using a 4-minute countdown, triggering during the last 2 seconds using a high-precision timing system, followed by post-shot analysis and archiving. The framework provides for a flexible, model-based execution driven of scriptable automation called macro steps. The framework is driven by high-level shot director software that provides a restricted set of shot life cycle state transitions to 25 collaboration supervisors that automate 8-laser beams (bundles) and a common set of shared resources. Each collaboration supervisor commands approximately 10 subsystem shot supervisors that perform automated control and status verification. Collaboration supervisors translate shot life cycle state commands from the shot director into sequences of ''macro steps'' to be distributed to each of its shot supervisors. Each Shot supervisor maintains order of macro steps for each subsystem and supports collaboration between macro steps. They also manage failure, restarts and rejoining into the shot cycle (if necessary) and manage auto/manual macro step execution and collaborations between other collaboration supervisors. Shot supervisors execute macro step shot functions commanded by collaboration supervisors. Each macro step has database-driven verification phases and a scripted perform phase. This provides for a highly flexible methodology for performing a variety of NIF shot types. Database tables define the order of work and dependencies (workflow) of macro steps to be

  12. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Myatt, J. F. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Marozas, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Michel, D. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Seka, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Bates, J. W. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Bonino, M. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Collins, T. J. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Craxton, R. S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Edgell, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Fiksel, G. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Harding, D. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kalantar, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Karasik, M. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Kessler, T. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kurz, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Lafon, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; LaFortune, K. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Meeker, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Obenschain, S. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Rosenberg, M. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Schmitt, A. J. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Wallace, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Weaver, J. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Widmayer, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Solodov, A. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Zuegel, J. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500-750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 x 1014 to 1.2 x 1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  13. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D{sub 2} gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ∼500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 × 10{sup 14} to 1.2 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2}. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  14. Shock-Ignited High Gain/Yield Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Bedrosiian, P.; Tabak, M.; Miles, A.; Dixit, S.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Zhou, C.

    2006-10-01

    Shock-ignition, a new concept for ICF ignition [C.Zhou, R.Betti Bull APS, v50, 2005], is being studied as a future option for efficiently achieving high gains in large laser facilities such as NIF. Accordingly, this offers the potential for testing: (1)High yield (up to 200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy (2)High fusion yield targets for DOE NNSA stockpile application (3)Targets with appreciable gain at low laser drive energies (gains of 10's at 150kJ) (4)Ignition of simple, non-cryo (room temperature) single shell gas targets at (unity gain). By contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, we separate the assembly and ignition phases by initially imploding a massive cryogenic shell on a low adiabat (alpha 0.7) at low velocity (less than 2e7cm/s) using a direct drive pulse of modest total energy. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherically convergent shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating and starting to rebound. Like fast ignition, shock ignition can achieve high gains with low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements.

  15. National Ignition Facility Shot Data Analysis Module Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S; Glenn, S; Lopez, A; Warrick, A; Beeler, R

    2007-10-03

    This document provides the guidelines for software development of modules to be included in Shot Data Analysis (SDA) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). An Analysis Module is a software entity that groups a set of (typically cohesive) functions, procedures and data structures for performing an analysis task relevant to NIF shot operations. Each module must have its own unique identification (module name), clear interface specifications (data inputs and outputs), and internal documentation. It is vitally important to the NIF Program that all shot-related data be processed and analyzed in a consistent way that is reviewed by scientific and engineering experts. SDA is part of a NIF Integrated Product Team (IPT) whose goal is to provide timely and accurate reporting of shot results to NIF campaign experimentalists. Other elements of the IPT include the Campaign Management Tool (CMT) for configuring experiments, a data archive and provisioning system called CMS, a calibration and configuration database (CDMS), and a shot data visualization tool (SDV). We restrict our scope at this time to guidelines for modules written in Interactive Data Language, or IDL1. This document has sections describing example IDL modules and where to find them, how to set up a development environment, IDL programming guidelines, shared IDL procedures for general use, and revision control.

  16. Shock Timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Robey, H. F.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G. F.; Jackson, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments are proceeding to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The results of these measurements will be used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Robustness studies of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility in two dimensionsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Haan, Steven W.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2008-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of 2000 two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code LASNEX, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ignition cliff is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of Levedahl and Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and Kishony and Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  18. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  19. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will

  20. Ignition and Thermonuclear Burn on the National Ignition Facility with Imposed Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. G.; Rhodes, M. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Ho, D. D.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We are studying the impact of highly compressed magnetic fields on enhancing the prospects for ignition and burn on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Both magnetized room-temperature DT gas targets and cryo-ignition capsules are under study. Applied seed fields of 20-70T that compress to greater than 10000T (100MG) under implosion can reduce hotspot conditions required for ignition and propagating burn through range reduction and magnetic mirror trapping of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and potential stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. The applied field may also reduce hohlraum laser-plasma instabilities and suppress the transport of hot electron preheat to the capsule. These combined B-field attributes may permit recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in capsules that are otherwise submarginal through adverse hydrodynamic or hohlraum-drive conditions. Simulations indicate that optimum initial fields of 50T may produce multi-MJ-yields when applied to our present best experimental capsules. Proof-of-principle experiments for magnetized ignition capsules and hohlraum physics on NIF are now being designed. This work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhlelmsen, K C; Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W; Horowitz, B; Miller Kamm, V J; Reynolds, C A

    2007-10-04

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 30 minutes. The system commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics. Twenty-two control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beam and references. Process-leveling assures the computational load is evenly spread on the cluster. Algorithms also estimate measurement accuracy and reject off-normal images. One challenge to achieving rapid alignment of beams in parallel is the efficient coordination of shared laser devices, such as sensors that are configurable to monitor multiple beams. Contention for shared resources is managed by the Component Mediation System, which precludes deadlocks and optimizes device motions using a hierarchical component structure. A reservation service provided by the software framework prevents interference from competing instances of automated controls or from the actions of system operators. The design, architecture and performance of the system will be discussed.

  2. The National Ignition Facility modular Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Buscho, J. G.; Bradley, D.; Decker, T.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kilkenny, J.; McCarville, T.; Pardini, T.; Vogel, J.; Walton, C.

    2016-11-01

    Current two-dimensional X-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) uses time resolved pinhole cameras with ˜10-25 μm pinholes. This method has limitations in the smallest resolvable features that can be imaged with reasonable photon statistics for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. ICF sources have a broadband self-emission spectrum that causes the pinhole images obtained, through thin foil filters, to contain a similarly broadband spectrum complicating the interpretation of structure in the source. In order to study phenomena on the scale of ˜5 μm, such as dopant mix in the ICF capsule, a narrow energy band, higher spatial resolution microscope system with improved signal/noise has been developed using X-ray optics. Utilizing grazing incidence mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope (KBM) configuration [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766-774 (1948)], an X-ray microscope has been designed and fielded on NIF with four imaging channels. The KBM has ˜12 × magnification, <8 μm resolution, and higher throughput in comparison to similar pinhole systems. The first KBM mirrors are coated with a multilayer mirror to allow a "narrow band" energy response at 10.2 keV with ΔE ˜ 3 keV. By adjusting the mirror coating only, the energy response can be matched to the future experimental requirements. Several mirror packs have been commissioned and are interchangeable in the diagnostic snout.

  3. The National Ignition Facility: Enabling Fusion Ignition for the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I; Miller, G H; Wuest, C R

    2004-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is housed in a 26,000 square meter environmentally controlled building and is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system. NIF provides a scientific center for the study of inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF is currently configured with four laser beams activated in late 2002. These beams are being regularly used for laser performance and physics experiments and to date nearly 250 system shots have been conducted. NIF's laser beams have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5-ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). A number of target experimental systems are being commissioned in support of experimental campaigns. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from laser commissioning shots. We also discuss NIF's high -energy density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  4. Computational Modeling in Support of National Ignition Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M J; Sacks, R A; Haynam, C A; Williams, W H

    2001-10-23

    Numerical simulation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser performance and automated control of laser setup process are crucial to the project's success. These functions will be performed by two closely coupled computer codes: the virtual beamline (VBL) and the laser operations performance model (LPOM).

  5. Magnetic Fields on the National Ignition Facility (MagNIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Folta, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    A magnetized target capability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been investigated. Stakeholders’ needs and project feasibility analysis were considered in order to down-select from a wide variety of different potential magnetic field magnitudes and volumes. From the large range of different target platforms, laser configurations, and diagnostics configurations of interest to the stakeholders, the gas-pipe platform has been selected for the first round of magnetized target experiments. Gas pipe targets are routinely shot on the NIF and provide unique value for external collaborators. High-level project goals have been established including an experimentally relevant 20Tesla magnetic field magnitude. The field will be achieved using pulsed power-driven coils. A system architecture has been proposed. The pulsed power drive system will be located in the NIF target bay. This decision provides improved maintainability and mitigates equipment safety risks associated with explosive failure of the drive capacitor. High-level and first-level subsystem requirements have been established. Requirements have been included for two distinct coil designs – full solenoid and quasi-Helmholtz. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been performed and documented. Additional requirements have been derived from the mitigations included in the FMEA document. A project plan is proposed. The plan includes a first phase of electromagnetic simulations to assess whether the design will meet performance requirements, then a second phase of risk mitigation projects to address the areas of highest technical risk. The duration from project kickoff to the first magnetized target shot is approximately 29 months.

  6. Optical pulse generation system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penko, F; Braucht,; Browning, D; Crane, J K; Dane, B; Deadrick, F; Dreifuerst, G; Henesian, M; Jones, B A; Kot, L; Laumann, C; Martinez, M; Moran, B; Rothenberg, J E; Skulina, K; Wilcox, R B

    1998-06-18

    We describe the Optical Pulse Generation (OPG) system for the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ). The OPG system begins with the Master Oscillator Room ( MOR ) where the initial, seed pulse for the entire laser system is produced and properly formatted to enhance ignition in the target. The formatting consists of temporally shaping the pulse and adding additional bandwidth to increase the coupling of the laser generated x-rays to the high density target plasma. The pulse produced in the MOR fans out to 48 identical preamplifier modules where it is amplified by a factor of ten billion and spatially shaped for injection into the 192 main amplifier chai

  7. The National Ignition Facility front-end laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, S.C.; Beach, R.J.; Crane, J.H.; Davin, J.M.; Perry, M.D.; Wilcox, R.B.

    1995-07-07

    The proposed National Ignition Facility is a 192 beam Nd:glass laser system capable of driving targets to fusion ignition by the year 2005. A key factor in the flexibility and performance of the laser is a front-end system which provides a precisely formatted beam to each beamline. Each of the injected beams has individually controlled energy, temporal pulseshape, and spatial shape to accommodate beamline-to-beamline variations in gain and saturation. This flexibility also gives target designers the options for precisely controlling the drive to different areas of the target. The design of the Front-End laser is described, and initial results are discussed.

  8. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bowers, M. W.; Brereton, S. J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Coffee, K. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D. G.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J. L.; Krauter, K. G.; Kroll, J. J.; LaFortune, K. N.; Le Pape, S.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H. B.; Ross, G. F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R. F.; Sterne, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Throop, A.; Town, R. P. J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Walters, C. F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B. K.; Atherton, L. J.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  9. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  10. The National Ignition Facility modular Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickworth, L. A., E-mail: pickworth1@llnl.gov; Ayers, J.; Bell, P.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Buscho, J. G.; Bradley, D.; Decker, T.; Hau-Riege, S.; McCarville, T.; Pardini, T.; Vogel, J.; Walton, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Current two-dimensional X-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) uses time resolved pinhole cameras with ∼10-25 μm pinholes. This method has limitations in the smallest resolvable features that can be imaged with reasonable photon statistics for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. ICF sources have a broadband self-emission spectrum that causes the pinhole images obtained, through thin foil filters, to contain a similarly broadband spectrum complicating the interpretation of structure in the source. In order to study phenomena on the scale of ∼5 μm, such as dopant mix in the ICF capsule, a narrow energy band, higher spatial resolution microscope system with improved signal/noise has been developed using X-ray optics. Utilizing grazing incidence mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope (KBM) configuration [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766–774 (1948)], an X-ray microscope has been designed and fielded on NIF with four imaging channels. The KBM has ∼12 × magnification, <8 μm resolution, and higher throughput in comparison to similar pinhole systems. The first KBM mirrors are coated with a multilayer mirror to allow a “narrow band” energy response at 10.2 keV with ΔE ∼ 3 keV. By adjusting the mirror coating only, the energy response can be matched to the future experimental requirements. Several mirror packs have been commissioned and are interchangeable in the diagnostic snout.

  11. Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Cassata, W. S.; Church, J. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Határik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Cooper, G. W.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, E. R.; Faye, S. A.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu; Grant, P. M.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, K. J.; Moran, M. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Phillips, T. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Sepke, S. M.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoeffl, W.; Velsko, C. A.; Volegov, P.

    2016-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) relies on a suite of nuclear diagnostics to measure the neutronic output of experiments. Neutron time-of-flight (NTOF) and neutron activation diagnostics (NAD) provide performance metrics of absolute neutron yield and neutron spectral content: spectral width and non-thermal content, from which implosion physical quantities of temperature and scattering mass are inferred. Spatially-distributed flange- mounted NADs (FNAD) measure, with nearly identical systematic uncertainties, primary DT neutron emission to infer a whole-sky neutron field. An automated FNAD system is being developed. A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) shares few systematics with comparable NTOF and NAD devices, and as such is deployed for independent measurement of the primary neutronic quantities. The gas-Cherenkov Gamma Reaction History (GRH) instrument records four energy channels of time-resolved gamma emission to measure nuclear bang time and burn width, as well as to infer carbon areal density in experiments utilizing plastic or diamond capsules. A neutron imaging system (NIS) takes two images of the neutron source, typically gated to create coregistered 13-15 MeV primary and 6-12 MeV downscattered images. The radiochemical analysis of gaseous samples (RAGS) instrument pumps target chamber gas to a chemical reaction and fractionation system configured with gamma counters, allowing measurement of radionuclides with half-lives as short as 8 seconds. Solid radiochemistry collectors (SRC) with backing NAD foils collect target debris, where activated materials from the target assembly are used as indicators of neutron spectrum content, and also serve as the primary diagnostic for nuclear forensic science experiments. Particle time-of-flight (PTOF) measures compression-bang time using DT- or DD-neutrons, as well as shock bang-time using D3He-protons for implosions with lower x-ray background. In concert, these diagnostics serve to measure the basic and advanced

  12. Analysis of optics damage growth at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z. M.; Nostrand, M.; Whitman, P.; Bude, J.

    2015-11-01

    Optics damage growth modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica. We will show the results of single shot growth comparisons, damage site lifetime comparisons as well as growth metrics for each individual NIF beamline. These results help validate the consistency of the damage growth models and allow us to have confidence in our strategic planning in regards to projected optic usage.

  13. The National Ignition Facility Data Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, R W; Adams, P A; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Foxworthy, C B; Frazier, T M; Hutton, M S; Lagin, L J; Townsend, S L

    2009-09-24

    NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. This presentation discusses the design, architecture, and implementation of the NIF Data Repository (NDR), which provides for the capture and long-term digital storage of peta-scale datasets produced by conducting experimental campaigns. The NDR is a federated database that provides for the capture of: experimental campaign plans, machine configuration & calibration data, raw experimental results and the processed results produced by scientific workflows. The NDR provides for metadata, pedigree, quality, effectivity, versioning and access control for each of the data categories. A critical capability of the NDR is its extensive data provisioning capabilities and protocols that enable scientists, local and remote alike, to review the results of analysis produced by the NDR's analysis pipeline or to download datasets for offline analysis. The NDR provides for the capture of these locally-produced analysis results to enable both peer review and follow-on automated analysis.

  14. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  15. National Ignition Facility pollution prevention and waste minimization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, B.; Celeste, J.

    1998-09-01

    This document is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization Plan. It will not only function as the planning document for anticipating, minimizing, and mitigating NIF waste generation, but it is also a Department of Energy (DOE) milestone document specified in the facility's Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). As such, it is one of the ''living'' reference documents that will guide NIF operations through all phases of the project. This document will be updated periodically to reflect development of the NIF, from construction through lifetime operations.

  16. Design and modeling of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.; Powers, L.V.; Alley, W.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Futterman, J.A.; Levedahl, W.K.; Rosen, M.D.; Rowley, D.P.; Sacks, R.A.; Shestakov, A.I.; Strobel, G.L.; Tabak, M.; Weber, S.V.; Zimmerman, G.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Krauser, W.J.; Wilson, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Harris, D.B.; Hoffman, N.M.; Wilde, B.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several targets are described that in simulations give yields of 1--30 MJ when indirectly driven by 0.9--2 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m laser light. The article describes the targets, the modeling that was used to design them, and the modeling done to set specifications for the laser system in the proposed National Ignition Facility. Capsules with beryllium or polystyrene ablators are enclosed in gold hohlraums. All the designs utilize a cryogenic fuel layer; it is very difficult to achieve ignition at this scale with a noncryogenic capsule. It is necessary to use multiple bands of illumination in the hohlraum to achieve sufficiently uniform x-ray irradiation, and to use a low-{ital Z} gas fill in the hohlraum to reduce filling of the hohlraum with gold plasma. Critical issues are hohlraum design and optimization, Rayleigh--Taylor instability modeling, and laser--plasma interactions.

  17. National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

  18. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  20. Laser ignition of an experimental combustion chamber with a multi-injector configuration at low pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Michael; Manfletti, Chiara; Kroupa, Gerhard; Oschwald, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In search of reliable and light-weight ignition systems for re-ignitable upper stage engines, a laser ignition system was adapted and tested on an experimental combustion chamber for propellant injection into low combustion chamber pressures at 50-80 mbar. The injector head pattern consisted of five coaxial injector elements. Both, laser-ablation-driven ignition and laser-plasma-driven ignition were tested for the propellant combination liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. The 122 test runs demonstrated the reliability of the ignition system for different ignition configurations and negligible degradation due to testing. For the laser-plasma-driven scheme, minimum laser pulse energies needed for 100% ignition probability were found to decrease when increasing the distance of the ignition location from the injector faceplate with a minimum of 2.6 mJ. For laser-ablation-driven ignition, the minimum pulse energy was found to be independent of the ablation material tested and was about 1.7 mJ. The ignition process was characterized using both high-speed Schlieren and OH* emission diagnostics. Based on these findings and on the increased fiber-based pulse transport capabilities recently published, new ignition system configurations for space propulsion systems relying on fiber-based pulse delivery are formulated. If the laser ignition system delivers enough pulse energy, the laser-plasma-driven configuration represents the more versatile configuration. If the laser ignition pulse power is limited, the application of laser-ablation-driven ignition is an option to realize ignition, but implies restrictions concerning the location of ignition.

  1. Laser ignition of an experimental combustion chamber with a multi-injector configuration at low pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Michael; Manfletti, Chiara; Kroupa, Gerhard; Oschwald, Michael

    2017-06-01

    In search of reliable and light-weight ignition systems for re-ignitable upper stage engines, a laser ignition system was adapted and tested on an experimental combustion chamber for propellant injection into low combustion chamber pressures at 50-80 mbar. The injector head pattern consisted of five coaxial injector elements. Both, laser-ablation-driven ignition and laser-plasma-driven ignition were tested for the propellant combination liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. The 122 test runs demonstrated the reliability of the ignition system for different ignition configurations and negligible degradation due to testing. For the laser-plasma-driven scheme, minimum laser pulse energies needed for 100% ignition probability were found to decrease when increasing the distance of the ignition location from the injector faceplate with a minimum of 2.6 mJ. For laser-ablation-driven ignition, the minimum pulse energy was found to be independent of the ablation material tested and was about 1.7 mJ. The ignition process was characterized using both high-speed Schlieren and OH* emission diagnostics. Based on these findings and on the increased fiber-based pulse transport capabilities recently published, new ignition system configurations for space propulsion systems relying on fiber-based pulse delivery are formulated. If the laser ignition system delivers enough pulse energy, the laser-plasma-driven configuration represents the more versatile configuration. If the laser ignition pulse power is limited, the application of laser-ablation-driven ignition is an option to realize ignition, but implies restrictions concerning the location of ignition.

  2. HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R

    2010-05-02

    Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

  3. Recent progress on the National Ignition Facility advanced radiographic capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Heebner, J.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.

    2016-01-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a megajoule (million-joule)-class laser and experimental facility built for Stockpile Stewardship and High Energy Density (HED) science research [1]. Up to several times a day, 192 laser pulses from NIF's 192 laser beamlines converge on a millimeter-scale target located at the center of the facility's 10-meter diameter target chamber. The carefully synchronized pulses, typically a few nanoseconds (billionths of a second) in duration and co-times to better than 20 picoseconds (trillionths of a second), a deliver a combined energy of up to 1.8 megajoules and a peak power of 500 terawatts (trillion watts). Furthermore, this drives temperatures inside the target to tens of millions of degrees and pressures to many billion times greater than Earth's atmosphere.

  4. Design for environment for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, E.; Gobor, K.; Celeste, J.; Cerruti, S.

    1998-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national center for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other research into the physics of high temperatures and high densities, and a vital element of the DOE`s nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. It will be used by scientists from a numerous different institutions and disciplines to support research advancements in national security, energy, basic science, and economic development. Multiple powerful laser beams will `ignite` small fusion targets, helping liberate more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. This paper discusses the Design for Environment process for NIF, some of the subsequent activities resulting from the initial study, and a few of the lessons learned from this process. Subsequent activities include the development of a Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization Plan (P2/WMin) for the facility, which includes Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAS) on predicted waste streams from NIF, development of construction phase recycling plans, analysis of some of the specialized materials of construction to minimize future demolition and decommissioning (D&D) costs and development of cost assessments for more benign cleaning procedures that meet the stringent cleaning specifications for this facility.

  5. The Nova Upgrade Facility for ICF ignition and gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowdermilk, W. H.; Campbell, E. M.; Hunt, J. T.; Murray, J. R.; Storm, E.; Tobin, M. T.; Trenholme, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Research on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is motivated by its potential defense and civilian applications, including ultimately the generation of electric power. The U.S. ICF Program was reviewed recently by the National Academy of Science (NAS) and the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC). Both committees issued final reports in 1991 which recommended that first priority in the ICF program be placed on demonstrating fusion ignition and modest gain (G less than 10). The U.S. Department of Energy and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have proposed an upgrade of the existing Nova Laser Facility at LLNL to accomplish these goals. Both the NAS and FPAC have endorsed the upgrade of Nova as the optimal path to achieving ignition and gain. Results from Nova Upgrade Experiments will be used to define requirements for driver and target technology both for future high-yield military applications, such as the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) proposed by the Department of Energy, and for high-gain energy applications leading to an ICF engineering test facility. The central role and modifications which Nova Upgrade would play in the national ICF strategy are described.

  6. The National Ignition Facility 2007 laser performance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C A; Sacks, R A; Wegner, P J; Bowers, M W; Dixit, S N; Erbert, G V; Heestand, G M; Henesian, M A; Hermann, M R; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C D; Mehta, N C; Menapace, J; Nostrand, M C; Orth, C D; Shaw, M J; Sutton, S B; Williams, W H; Widmayer, C C [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)], E-mail: haynam1@llnl.gov (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains a 192-beam 3.6 MJ neodymium glass laser that is frequency converted to 351nm light. It has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. To meet this goal, laser design criteria include the ability to generate pulses of up to 1.8-MJ total energy at 351nm, with peak power of 500 TW and precisely-controlled temporal pulse shapes spanning two orders of magnitude. The focal spot fluence distribution of these pulses is conditioned, through a combination of special optics in the 1{omega} (1053 nm) portion of the laser (continuous phase plates), smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and the overlapping of multiple beams with orthogonal polarization (polarization smoothing). In 2006 and 2007, a series of measurements were performed on the NIF laser, at both 1{omega} and 3{omega} (351 nm). When scaled to full 192-beam operation, these results lend confidence to the claim that NIF will meet its laser performance design criteria and that it will be able to simultaneously deliver the temporal pulse shaping, focal spot conditioning, peak power, shot-to-shot reproducibility, and power balance requirements of indirect-drive fusion ignition campaigns. We discuss the plans and status of NIF's commissioning, and the nature and results of these measurement campaigns.

  7. Automated Experimental Data Analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S G; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bond, E J; Edwards, P W; Glenn, S M; Liebman, J A; Tappero, J D; Warrick, A L; Williams, W H

    2009-09-24

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam 1.8 MJ ultraviolet laser system designed to support high-energy-density science, including demonstration of inertial confinement fusion ignition. After each target shot lasting {approx}20 ns, scientists require data acquisition, analysis and display within 30 minutes from more than 20 specialized high-speed diagnostic instruments. These diagnostics measure critical x-ray, optical and nuclear phenomena during target burn to quantify ignition results and compare to computational models. All diagnostic data (hundreds of Gbytes) are automatically transferred to an Oracle database that triggers the NIF Shot Data Analysis (SDA) Engine, which distributes the signal and image processing tasks to a Linux cluster. The SDA Engine integrates commercial workflow tools and messaging technologies into a scientific software architecture that is highly parallel, scalable, and flexible. Results are archived in the database for scientist approval and displayed using a web-based tool. The unique architecture and functionality of the SDA Engine will be presented along with an example.

  8. Polar-direct-drive experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Bates, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Karasik, M.; Knauer, J. P.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschein, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S. P.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sio, H.; Skupsky, S.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-05-01

    Polar-direct-drive experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are being used to validate direct-drive-implosion models. Energy coupling and fast-electron preheat are the primary issues being studied in planar and imploding geometries on the NIF. Results from backlit images from implosions indicate that the overall drive is well modeled although some differences remain in the thickness of the imploding shell. Implosion experiments to mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and preheat from two-plasmon decay are planned for the next year.

  9. Prompt radiochemistry at the National Ignition Facility (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Bradley, P. A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Keksis, A. L.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Obst, A. W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Fortner, R. J.; Moody, K. J.; Schneider, D. H.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoeffl, W.; Stoyer, M. A.

    2008-10-01

    Understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility requires the diagnosis of charged-particle reactions within an imploded target. Radiochemical diagnostics of these reactions are currently under study by scientists at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Measurement of these reactions requires assay of activated debris and tracer gases from the target. Presented below is an overview of the prompt radiochemistry diagnostic development efforts, including a discussion of the reactions of interest as well as the progress being made to collect and count activated material.

  10. Prompt radiochemistry at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G P; Bradley, P A; Bredeweg, T A; Keksis, A L; Fowler, M M; Hayes, A C; Jungman, G; Obst, A W; Rundberg, R S; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Bernstein, L A; Cerjan, C J; Fortner, R J; Moody, K J; Schneider, D H; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoeffl, W; Stoyer, M A

    2008-10-01

    Understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility requires the diagnosis of charged-particle reactions within an imploded target. Radiochemical diagnostics of these reactions are currently under study by scientists at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Measurement of these reactions requires assay of activated debris and tracer gases from the target. Presented below is an overview of the prompt radiochemistry diagnostic development efforts, including a discussion of the reactions of interest as well as the progress being made to collect and count activated material.

  11. The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

    2005-11-11

    A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

  12. Optics damage modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z. M.; Raymond, B.; Gaylord, J.; Fallejo, R.; Bude, J.; Wegner, P.

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive modeling of laser-induced damage in optics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica wedge focus lenses with a metric that compares the modeled damage performance to online inspections. The results indicate that damage models are successful in tracking the performance of the fused silica final optics when properly accounting for various optical finishes and mitigation processes. This validates the consistency of the damage models and allows us to further monitor and evaluate different system parameters that potentially can affect optics performance.

  13. Configuration Management Maturity in Scientific Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Niknam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the effectiveness of the development and operation of scientific facilities (especially those presenting specific hazards, such as ionizing radiations relies heavily on state of the art practices, such as systems engineering and product lifecycle management, configuration management (CM is becoming a key management process. However, while some maturity models exist to assess the degree of the implementation and effectiveness of many management processes, such as project management or systems engineering, there is no specific framework available to assess the degree of maturity of an organization towards CM. This paper focuses on revealing the important maturity dimensions and levels for CM as a means towards developing a CM maturity model.

  14. Safety systems and access control in the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert K; Bell, Jayce C

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser system. The facility has the potential to generate ionizing radiation due to the interaction between the laser beams and target material, with neutrons and gamma rays being produced during deuterium-tritium fusion reactions. To perform these experiments, several types of hazards must be mitigated and controlled to ensure personnel safety. NIF uses a real-time safety system to monitor and mitigate the hazards presented by the facility. The NIF facility Safety Interlock System (SIS) monitors for oxygen deficiency and controls access to the facility preventing exposure to laser light and radiation from the Radiation Generating Devices. It also interfaces to radiation monitoring and other radiological monitoring and alarm systems. The SIS controls permissives to the hazard-generating equipment and annunciates hazard levels in the facility. To do this reliably and safely, the SIS has been designed as a fail-safe system with a proven performance record now spanning over 10 y. This paper discusses the SIS, its design, implementation, operator interfaces, validation/verification, and the hazard mitigation approaches employed in the NIF. A brief discussion of the Failure Modes and Effect Analysis supporting the SIS will also be presented. The paper ends with a general discussion of SIS do's and don'ts and common design flaws that should be avoided in SIS design.

  15. Status of the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) on the path to ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: lagin1@llnl.gov; Bettenhausen, R.C.; Bowers, G.A.; Carey, R.W.; Edwards, O.D.; Estes, C.M.; Demaret, R.D.; Ferguson, S.W.; Fisher, J.M.; Ho, J.C.; Ludwigsen, A.P.; Mathisen, D.G.; Marshall, C.D.; Matone, J.T.; McGuigan, D.L.; Sanchez, R.J.; Stout, E.A.; Tekle, E.A.; Townsend, S.L.; Van Arsdall, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility under construction that will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF is comprised of 24 independent bundles of eight beams each using laser hardware that is modularized into more than 6000 line replaceable units such as optical assemblies, laser amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages containing 60,000 control and diagnostic points. NIF is operated by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an architecture partitioned by bundle and distributed among over 800 front-end processors and 50 supervisory servers. NIF's automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework based on CORBA distribution that deploys the software across the computer network and achieves interoperation between different languages and target architectures. A shot automation framework has been deployed during the past year to orchestrate and automate shots performed at the NIF using the ICCS. In December 2006, a full cluster of 48 beams of NIF was fired simultaneously, demonstrating that the independent bundle control system will scale to full scale of 192 beams. At present, 72 beams have been commissioned and have demonstrated 1.4-MJ capability of infrared light. During the next 2 years, the control system will be expanded in preparation for project completion in 2009 to include automation of target area systems including

  16. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  17. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  18. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folta, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wisoff, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  19. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  20. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  1. Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, D; Antipa, N

    2012-02-16

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

  2. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  3. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  4. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  5. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  6. Validating hydrodynamic growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L., E-mail: peterson76@llnl.gov; Casey, D. T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Raman, K. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present new hydrodynamic growth experiments at the National Ignition Facility, which extend previous measurements up to Legendre mode 160 and convergence ratio 4, continuing the growth factor dispersion curve comparison of the low foot and high foot pulses reported by Casey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102(R) (2014)]. We show that the high foot pulse has lower growth factor and lower growth rate than the low foot pulse. Using novel on-capsule fiducial markers, we observe that mode 160 inverts sign (changes phase) for the high foot pulse, evidence of amplitude oscillations during the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase of a spherically convergent system. Post-shot simulations are consistent with the experimental measurements for all but the shortest wavelength perturbations, reinforcing the validity of radiation hydrodynamic simulations of ablation front growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules.

  7. Development of a laser glass for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2007-04-01

    We review the development of a new glass formulation and manufacturing technology for a neodymium-doped phosphate based laser glass used in the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the French Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). The glass development process built on both accumulated experience and the utilization of glass science principles, and the resultant new glass offers superior laser properties in combination with improvements in physical properties to enhance manufacturing yield. Essentially in parallel, a continuous melting production line was also conceived, designed and operated to meet both the schedule and cost targets of the NIF. Prior to 1997, phosphate laser glasses were manufactured by a discontinuous pot-melting process with limited production rate and associated high costs. The continuous melting process met several technical challenges, including producing glass with low residual water content and absence of inclusions which become damage sites when used in the NIF laser system.

  8. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  9. Occupational dose estimates for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F

    1999-08-20

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). During peak operation, the NIF will attain D-T fusion yields of 20 MJ in a single experiment and 1200 MJ/y. With such high yields, neutron activation will be important within the NIF Target Bay. The total dose equivalent (dose) will be maintained {<=} 10 person-rem/y with individual doses {<=} 500 mrem/y, and all doses will be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This work outlines planned maintenance activities, expected dose rates, and the resulting worker dose. Methods for the reduction of this dose are discussed, and a tool for the rapid calculation of the occupational dose is presented.

  10. Next Generation Gamma Ray Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Hernandez, J. E.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Moy, K.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.

    Fusion reaction history and ablator areal density measurements based on gamma ray detection are an essential part of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Capability improvements are being implemented in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m). The ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will provide 200x more sensitivity, reduce the effective temporal resolution from 100 to 10 ps, and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) - a Compton spectrometer intended to provide true gamma energy resolution (<=5%) for isolation of specific lines such as t(d, γ) , D(n, γ) , 12C(n,n' γ) and energetic charged particle nuclear reactions indicative of ablator/fuel mix

  11. Proton pinhole imaging on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Park, H.-S.; Ross, J. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Huntington, C.; Pollock, B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Ryutov, D.; Turnbull, D.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Pinhole imaging of large (mm scale) carbon-deuterium (CD) plasmas by proton self-emission has been used for the first time to study the microphysics of shock formation, which is of astrophysical relevance. The 3 MeV deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton self-emission from these plasmas is imaged using a novel pinhole imaging system, with up to five different 1 mm diameter pinholes positioned 25 cm from target-chamber center. CR39 is used as the detector medium, positioned at 100 cm distance from the pinhole for a magnification of 4 ×. A Wiener deconvolution algorithm is numerically demonstrated and used to interpret the images. When the spatial morphology is known, this algorithm accurately reproduces the size of features larger than about half the pinhole diameter. For these astrophysical plasma experiments on the National Ignition Facility, this provides a strong constraint on simulation modeling of the experiment.

  12. Laser shocking of materials: Toward the national ignition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B.; Bringa, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a powerful experimental tool has been added to the arsenal at the disposal of the materials scientist investigating materials response at extreme regimes of strain rates, temperatures, and pressures: laser compression. This technique has been applied successfully to mono-, poly-, and nanocrystalline metals and the results have been compared with predictions from analytical models and molecular dynamics simulations. Special flash x-ray radiography and flash x-ray diffraction, combined with laser shock propagation, are yielding the strength of metals at strain rates on the order of 107-108 s-1 and resolving details of the kinetics of phase transitions. A puzzling result is that experiments, analysis, and simulations predict dislocation densities that are off by orders of magnitude. Other surprises undoubtedly await us as we explore even higher pressure/strain rate/temperature regimes enabled by the National Ignition Facility.

  13. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  14. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10{sup 13} and ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  15. ICStatus and progress of the National Ignition Facility as ICF and HED user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Kauffman, R. L.; Larson, D. W.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    Since its completion in 2009, the National Ignition Facility has been operated in support of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship mission, providing unique experimental data in the high energy density regime. We will describe the progress made by the National Ignition facility in the user office and management, facility capabilities, target diagnostics and diagnostics development. We will also discuss the results of a major effort to increase the shot rate on NIF. An extensive set of projects, developed in conjunction with the HED community and drawing on best practices at other facilities, improved shot rate by over 80% and recently enabled us to deliver 356 target experiments in FY15 in support of the users. Through an updated experimental set-up and review process, computer controlled set-up of the laser and diagnostics and disciplined operations, NIF also continued to deliver experimental reliability, precision and repeatability. New and complex platforms are introduced with a high success rate. Finally we discuss how new capabilities and further efficiency improvements will enable the successful execution of ICF and HED experimental programs required to support the quest for Ignition and the broader Science Based Stockpile Stewardship mission

  16. Development and testing of an ignition physics test facility and an oxygen/methane swirl torch igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jesus Roberto

    There are many advantages to LOX/methane propulsion, such as in-situ resource utilization from Mars and the Moon, and simplicity of ground operations due to its non-toxic nature. There exists a lack of fundamental understanding of the ignition physics, and flame characteristics of these propellants when related to rocket propulsion, which has created undesirably long design cycles and flight hardware that is not optimized. Motivated by these issues, a study of the ignition physics of a shear coaxial injector is proposed, in which the flow field dynamics and ignition transients will be observed through a visually accessible combustion chamber. The main goal of this work is to study the effects of geometric differences of the injector, such as recess in the liquid oxygen post and thickness of the LOX post, on the jet breakup downstream of the injector, and the flame anchoring mechanism and location. A facility was developed to support this endeavor in a safe and efficient way, including a cryogenic delivery system, a Multipurpose Optically Accessible Combustor (MOAC) with torch igniter, and a bunker with a Data Acquisition and Remote Controls system (DARCS). A swirl coflow premixed torch igniter was designed, manufactured and developed with the intent of using it as the MOAC's main ignition source. It was designed to use oxygen and methane as the propellants in an incremental step towards the goal of a LOX/methane rocket engine. Extensive testing was done on the igniter in the development phase to prove that it will reliable ignite and sustain combustion under a variety of propellant inlet conditions of which include: warm gas, cold gas, and liquid cryogenic conditions. The testing phase also provided data for component reliability and proof of concept for the testing facilities designed, especially for the cryogenic delivery system, and methane condensing unit. Future injector testing parameters of the hardware produced is included along with recommendations to

  17. Beam Diagnostics Systems For The National Ignition Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Demaret, R D; Bliss, E S; Gates, A J; Severyn, J R

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility laser focuses 1.8 Mega-joules of ultraviolet light (wavelength 351 nano-meters) from 192 beams into a 600-micro-meter-diameter volume. Effective use of this output in target experiments requires that the power output from all the beams match within 8% over their entire 20-nanosecond waveform. The scope of NIF beam diagnostics systems necessary to accomplish this task is unprecedented for laser facilities. Each beam line contains 110 major optical components distributed over a 510 meter path, and diagnostic tolerances for beam measurement are demanding. Total laser pulse energy is measured with 2.8% precision, and the inter-beam temporal variation of pulse power is measured with 4% precision. These measurement goals are achieved through use of approximately 160 sensor packages that measure the energy at five locations and power at 3 locations along each beamline using 335 photodiodes, 215 calorimeters and 36 digitizers. Successful operation of such a system requires a high level ...

  18. User Interface Framework for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J M; Bowers, G A; Carey, R W; Daveler, S A; Herndon Ford, K B; Ho, J C; Lagin, L J; Lambert, C J; Mauvais, J; Stout, E A; West, S L

    2007-10-01

    A user interface (UI) framework supports the development of user interfaces to operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). [1] This framework simplifies UI development and ensures consistency for NIF operators. A comprehensive, layered collection of UIs in ICCS provides interaction with system-level processes, shot automation, and subsystem-specific devices. All user interfaces are written in Java, employing CORBA to interact with other ICCS components. ICCS developers use these frameworks to compose two major types of user interfaces: broadviews and control panels. Broadviews provide a visual representation of the NIF beamlines through interactive schematic drawings. Control panels provide status and control at a device level. The UI framework includes a suite of display components to standardize user interaction through data entry behaviors, common connection and threading mechanisms, and a common appearance. With these components, ICCS developers can more efficiently address usability issues in the facility when needed. The ICCS UI framework helps developers create consistent and easy-to-understand user interfaces for NIF operators.

  19. The first target experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Froula, D.H.; Dewald, E.L.; Suter, L.J.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Fernandez, J.C.; Kline, J.L.; Goldman, S.R.; Braun, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Moon, S.J.; Robey, H.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Glendinning, S.G.; Blue, B.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Jones, O.S.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D.H.; Campbell, K.M.; Holder, J.P.; McDonald, J.W.; Niemann, C.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Collins, G.W.; Bradley, D.K.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Young, B.K.; Foster, J.M.; Hansen, J.F.; Perry, T.S.; Munro, D.H.; Baldis, H.A.; Grim, G.P.; Heeter, R.F.; Hegelich, M.B.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rochau, G.A.; Olson, R.E.; Turner, R.E.; Workman, J.B.; Berger, R.L.; Cohen, B.I.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Langer, S.H.; Meezan, N.B.; Rose, H.A.; Still, C.H.; Williams, E.A.; Dodd, E.A.; Edwards, M.J.; Monteil, M.C.; Stevenson, R.M.; Thomas, B.R.; Coker, R.F.; Magelssen, G.R.; Rosen, P.A.; Stry, P.E.; Woods, D.; Weber, S.V.; Young, P.E.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, G.L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P

    2007-08-15

    A first set of shock timing, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and X-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options. The experiments have demonstrated excellent agreement between measured and predicted laser-target coupling in foils and hohlraums, even when extended to a longer pulse regime unattainable at previous laser facilities, validated the predicted effects of beam smoothing on intense laser beam propagation in long scale-length plasmas and begun to test 3-dimensional codes by extending the study of laser driven hydrodynamic jets to 3-dimensional geometries. (authors)

  20. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2001-09-30

    These rules apply to all National Ignition Facility (NIF) workers (workers), which include Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other national laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and contractors/subcontractors. The General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices shall be used by management to promote the prevention of incidents through indoctrination, safety and health training, and on-the-job application. As a condition for contract award, all employers shall conduct an orientation for all newly hired and rehired employees before those workers will be permitted to start work in this facility. This orientation shall include a discussion of the following information. The General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices must be posted at a conspicuous location at the job site office or be provided to each supervisory worker who shall have it readily available. Copies of the General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices can also be included in employee safety pamphlets. The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) rules at the NIF Project site are based upon compliance with the most stringent of Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL, Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), California (Cal)/OSHA, and federal and state environmental requirements.

  1. Spatial filter lens design for the main laser of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korniski, R. J., Optics 1 Inc, Westlake Village, CA

    1998-06-05

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1{omega}) of 1 053{micro}m Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) will produce 1 8 megajoules of the third harmonic light (3{omega} or {lambda}=351{micro}m) at the target The purpose of this paper is to provide the lens design community with the current lens design details of the large optics in the Main Laser This paper describes the lens design configuration and design considerations of the Main Laser The Main Laser is 123 meters long and includes two spatial filters one 13 5 meters and one 60 meters These spatial filters perform crucial beam filtering and relaying functions We shall describe the significant lens design aspects of these spatial filter lenses which allow them to successfully deliver the appropriate beam characteristic onto the target For an overview of NIF please see ``Optical system design of the National Ignition Facility,`` by R Edward English. et al also found in this volume.

  2. Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Lafortune, Kai; Divol, Laurent; Betti, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Shock-ignition is being studied as a future option for achieving high target gains on NIF, offering the potential for testing high yield (200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy and targets with appreciable gains at drive energies much less than 1MJ. In contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, the assembly and ignition phases are separated by imploding a high mass shell at low velocity. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherical shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating. Because the implosion velocity is significantly less than that required for hotspot ignition, considerably more fuel mass can be assembled and burned for the same kinetic energy in the shell. Like fast ignition, shock ignition could achieve high gains at low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. We will discuss gain curves for shock-ignited NIF targets in both UV and green light and examine the feasibility of designs that employ indirect drive fuel assembly with direct drive shock ignition

  3. Discharge ignition in the diaphragm configuration supplied by DC non-pulsing voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlochová, L.; Hlavatá, L.; Kozáková, Z.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the ignition of the discharge in the diaphragm configuration generated in water solutions containing supporting NaCl electrolyte. The reactor has volume of 110 ml and it is made of polycarbonate. HV electrodes made of stainless steel are placed in this reactor. Ceramic (Shapal-MTM) diaphragm is placed in the barrier separating the cathode and the anode space. An electric power source supplies the reactor by constant DC voltage up to 4 kV and electric current up to 300 mA. The discharge ignition is compared in the reactor with different sizes of diaphragms. Measurements are carried out in electrolyte solutions with the same conductivity. Images of plasma streamers and bubble formation are taken by an ICCD camera iStar 734. Electrical characteristics are measured by an oscilloscope LeCroy LT 374 L in order to determine breakdown moments at different experimental conditions.

  4. Self-ignition of an advanced fuel field-reversed configuration reactor by fusion product heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, M.; Ohi, S.; Okamoto, M.; Momota, H.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1987-09-01

    A self-ignition of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D)-/sup 3/He fuel field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by fusion product heating is studied by using the point plasma model, where an FRC plasma equilibrium is taken into account. It is numerically demonstrated that the D-D-/sup 3/He plasma can be evolved from a deuterium-tritium burning plasma in a controlled manner by means of a compression-decompression control as well as a fueling control. It is also indicated that the increase of a trapped flux is effective for suppressing the excessive elongation of a plasma during the transition. The proposed method may provide a solution to the problem on plasma heating to attain a D-D-/sup 3/He self-ignition.

  5. Debris and shrapnel assessments for National Ignition Facility targets and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, N. D.; Fisher, A.; Kalantar, D.; Stölken, J.; Smith, C.; Vignes, R.; Burns, S.; Doeppner, T.; Kritcher, A.; Park, H.-S.

    2016-05-01

    High-energy laser experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) can create debris and shrapnel capable of damaging laser optics and diagnostic instruments. The size, composition and location of target components and sacrificial shielding (e.g., disposable debris shields, or diagnostic filters) and the protection they provide is constrained by many factors, including: chamber and diagnostic geometries, experimental goals and material considerations. An assessment of the generation, nature and velocity of shrapnel and debris and their potential threats is necessary prior to fielding targets or diagnostics. These assessments may influence target and shielding design, filter configurations and diagnostic selection. This paper will outline the approach used to manage the debris and shrapnel risk associated with NIF targets and diagnostics and present some aspects of two such cases: the Material Strength Rayleigh- Taylor campaign and the Mono Angle Crystal Spectrometer (MACS).

  6. Opto-mechanical assembly procurement for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, W; Simon, T

    1999-07-01

    A large number of the small optics procurements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be in the form of completely assembled, tested, and cleaned subsystems. These subsystems will be integrated into the NIF at LLNL. To accomplish this task, the procurement packages will include, optical and mechanical drawings, acceptance test and cleanliness requirements. In January 1999, the first such integrated opto-mechanical assembly was received and evaluated at LLNL. With the successful completion of this important trial procurement, we were able to establish the viability of purchasing clean, ready to install, opto-mechanical assemblies from vendors within the optics industry. 32 vendors were chosen from our supplier database for quote, then five were chosen to purchase from. These five vendors represented a cross section of the optics industry. From a ''value'' catalog supplier (that did the whole job internally) to a partnership between three specialty companies, these vendors demonstrated they have the ingenuity and capability to deliver cost competitive, NIF-ready, opto- mechanical assemblies. This paper describes the vendor selection for this procurement, technical requirements including packaging, fabrication, coating, and cleanliness specifications, then testing and verification. It also gives real test results gathered from inspections performed at LLNL that show how our vendors scored on the various requirements. Keywords: Opto-Mechanical, assembly, NIF, packaging, shipping, specifications, procurement, MIL-STD-1246C, surface cleanliness

  7. Programmable Beam Spatial Shaping System for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Scanlan, M; Haynam, C; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Budge, T; Henesian, M; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J M

    2011-01-21

    A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce 'blocker' obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

  8. Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Bower, John R.; Bradley, David K.; Capelle, Gene A.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eckart, Mark J.; Eggert, Jon H.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Hicks, Damien G.; Kaufman, Morris I.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Montelongo, Samuel; Ng, Edmund W.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.; Zapata, Paul G.

    2005-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

  9. Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

    2004-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

  10. Iron Opacity Platform Performance Characterization at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; McKenty, P. W.; Zhang, R.; Weaver, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Perry, T. S.; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration; University of Rochester LaboratoryLaser Energetics Collaboration; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Collaboration; National Security Technologies, LLC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    A high temperature opacity platform has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The platform will be used to study opacity in iron at a temperature of 160 eV. The platform uses a 6 mm diameter hohlraum driven by 128 laser beams with 530 kJ of energy in a 3 ns pulse to heat an iron sample. Absorption spectra of the heated sample are generated with a broadband pulsed X-ray backlighter produced by imploding a vacuum-filled CH shell. The shell is 2 mm in diameter and 20 microns thick, driven by 64 beams with 250 kJ in a 2.5 ns pulse. The hohlraum and backlighter performance have both been investigated recently and will be discussed in this presentation. This work was performed by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2892.

  11. The Quest for Fusion at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartouni, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Arthur Eddington speculated in 1920 on the internal constitution of stars and described the possibility of nuclear fusion based on the then new results from special relativity and measurements of light nuclei masses. By 1929 Atkinson and Houtermans worked out the calculations for nuclear fusion in stars and initiating nuclear astrophysics. All of these sciences were pressed into service during the World War II, and the applications developed, particularly under the auspices of the Manhattan Project provided both weapons with which to wage and win that conflict, but also the possibilities to harness these applications of the nuclear processes of fission and fusion for peaceful purposes. 32 years after Eddington's speculation the United States demonstrated the application of fusion in a famous nuclear weapons test. In the following years many ideas for producing ``controlled'' fusion through inertial confinement were pursued. The invention of the laser opened up new avenues which have culminated in the National Ignition Facility, NIF. I will attempt to cover the ground between Eddington, through the Manhattan Project and provide a current status of this quest at NIF. LLNL-ABS-704367-DRAFT. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, P. B., E-mail: rbah@lle.rochester.edu; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    Direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.

  13. The Wavefront Control System for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Atta, L; Perez, M; Zacharias, R; Rivera, W

    2001-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires that pulses from each of the 192 laser beams be positioned on target with an accuracy of 50 {micro}m rms. Beam quality must be sufficient to focus a total of 1.8 MJ of 0.351-{micro}m light into a 600-{micro}m-diameter volume. An optimally flat beam wavefront can achieve this pointing and focusing accuracy. The control system corrects wavefront aberrations by performing closed-loop compensation during laser alignment to correct for gas density variations. Static compensation of flashlamp-induced thermal distortion is established just prior to the laser shot. The control system compensates each laser beam at 10 Hz by measuring the wavefront with a 77-lenslet Hartmann sensor and applying corrections with a 39-actuator deformable mirror. The distributed architecture utilizes SPARC AXi computers running Solaris to perform real-time image processing of sensor data and PowerPC-based computers running VxWorks to compute mirror commands. A single pair of SPARC and PowerPC processors accomplishes wavefront control for a group of eight beams. The software design uses proven adaptive optic control algorithms that are implemented in a multi-tasking environment to economically control the beam wavefronts in parallel. Prototype tests have achieved a closed-loop residual error of 0.03 waves rms. aberrations, the spot size requirement and goal could not be met without a wavefront control system.

  14. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  15. The Injection Laser System on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, M; Burkhart, S; Cohen, S; Erbert, G; Heebner, J; Hermann, M; Jedlovec, D

    2006-12-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently the largest and most energetic laser system in the world. The main amplifiers are driven by the Injection Laser System comprised of the master oscillators, optical preamplifiers, temporal pulse shaping and spatial beam formatting elements and injection diagnostics. Starting with two fiber oscillators separated by up to a few angstroms, the pulse is phase modulated to suppress SBS and enhance spatial smoothing, amplified, split into 48 individual fibers, and then temporally shaped by an arbitrary waveform generator. Residual amplitude modulation induced in the preamplifiers from the phase modulation is also precompensated in the fiber portion of the system before it is injected into the 48 pre-amplifier modules (PAMs). Each of the PAMs amplifies the light from the 1 nJ fiber injection up to the multi-joule level in two stages. Between the two stages the pre-pulse is suppressed by 60 dB and the beam is spatially formatted to a square aperture with precompensation for the nonuniform gain profile of the main laser. The input sensor package is used to align the output of each PAM to the main laser and acquire energy, power, and spatial profiles for all shots. The beam transport sections split the beam from each PAM into four main laser beams (with optical isolation) forming the 192 beams of the NIF. Optical, electrical, and mechanical design considerations for long term reliability and availability will be discussed.

  16. High-pressure ignition plasma torch for aerospace testing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Kulikov, Yu M.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The present paper discusses the issues of implementation of high-pressure ignition plasma torch in terms of discharge phenomena in compressed gases, dense nitrogen plasma properties and stable arcing power requirements. Contact ignition has been tested in a pressure range p = 1-25 bar and has proved to be a reliable solution for pilot arc burning.

  17. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL Presentation to: IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science...Conference C. J. Keane Director, NIF User Office June 21, 2013 1491978-1-4673-5168-3/13/$31.00 ©2013 IEEE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  18. National Ignition Facility monthly status report--February 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2000-02-29

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Safety: The Incident Analysis and Construction Management Safety Review Teams were formed to review the January 13, 2000, accident in which a worker received a back injury when a 42-in.-diameter duct fell during installation. One action is to contract DuPont to review the Safety Program. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering; (2) laser glass--a second pilot run at one of the two commercial suppliers is ongoing successfully; and (3) operational costs associated with final optics assembly (FOA) optics components--methods are being developed to mitigate 3{omega} damage and to resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The completion of the Title II design of laser equipment is now approximately 83% complete. The Beampath Infrastructure System is on the critical schedule path. The procurement strategy was evaluated by commercial construction management and Architectural/Engineering (A/E) contractors with a panel of independent experts, the Beampath Infrastructure System (BIS) Implementation Review Committee Advisory Group. The BIS Integration Management and Installation Services (IMI) Subcontractor solicitation package and approach

  19. Status of the National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L; Bryant, R; Carey, R; Casavant, D; Edwards, O; Ferguson, W; Krammen, J; Larson, D; Lee, A; Ludwigsen, P; Miller, M; Moses, E; Nyholm, R; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Van Arsdall, P J; Wuest, C

    2003-10-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). ICCS is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors attached to nearly 60,000 control points and coordinated by supervisor subsystems in the main control room. The functional subsystems--beam control including automatic beam alignment and wavefront correction, laser pulse generation and pre-amplification, diagnostics, pulse power, and timing--implement automated shot control, archive data, and support the actions of fourteen operators at graphic consoles. Object-oriented software development uses a mixed language environment of Ada (for functional controls) and Java (for user interface and database backend). The ICCS distributed software framework uses CORBA to communicate between languages and processors. ICCS software is approximately 3/4 complete with over 750 thousand source lines of code having undergone off-line verification tests and deployed to the facility. NIF has entered the first phases of its laser commissioning program. NIF has now demonstrated the highest energy 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} beamlines in the world

  20. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Vergunova, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the "failure of ignition" of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  1. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Kozioziemski, B.; Schneider, M. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ma, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Hoover, D.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2016-05-01

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  2. Progress in hohlraum physics for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Amendt, P. A.; Baker, K. L.; Bradley, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D.; Hopkins, L. B.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Advances in hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were made this past year in hohlraum efficiency, dynamic shape control, and hot electron and x-ray preheat control. Recent experiments are exploring hohlraum behavior over a large landscape of parameters by changing the hohlraum shape, gas-fill, and laser pulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling, which uses measured backscatter, shows that gas-filled hohlraums utilize between 60% and 75% of the laser power to match the measured bang-time, whereas near-vacuum hohlraums utilize 98%. Experiments seem to be pointing to deficiencies in the hohlraum (instead of capsule) modeling to explain most of the inefficiency in gas-filled targets. Experiments have begun quantifying the Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) rate at several points in time for hohlraum experiments that utilize CBET for implosion symmetry. These measurements will allow better control of the dynamic implosion symmetry for these targets. New techniques are being developed to measure the hot electron energy and energy spectra generated at both early and late time. Rugby hohlraums offer a target which requires little to no CBET and may be less vulnerable to undesirable dynamic symmetry “swings.” A method for detecting the effect of the energetic electrons on the fuel offers a direct measure of the hot electron effects as well as a means to test energetic electron mitigation methods. At higher hohlraum radiation temperatures (including near vacuum hohlraums), the increased hard x-rays (1.8–4 keV) may pose an x-ray preheat problem. Future experiments will explore controlling these x-rays with advanced wall materials.

  3. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Kozioziemski, B.; Schneider, M. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ma, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Hoover, D.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2016-05-01

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  4. National Ignition Facility monthly status report--April 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2000-05-26

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes, deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (SSM PEIS). Safety: On Saturday April 29, 2000, while preparing the Ringer crane for operation at the NIF site, a mechanical malfunction was observed by the operator. He stopped work and consulted with line management. They agreed with the operator's assessment, and with the Livermore Emergency Duty Officer, implemented a precautionary evacuation of the area around the crane. DOE was notified of the situation. The crane was then placed in a safe condition. A crane maintenance vendor is inspecting the crane and a management team headed by the Beampath Infrastructure System Associate Project Manager is reviewing the documentation, crane history, and repairs to ensure that the crane is fully safe before reuse. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering working groups; (2) laser glass, where a second pilot run at both commercial suppliers is expected to confirm the mitigation steps identified in the first pilot run; and (3) operational costs associated with Final Optics Assembly (FOA) optics components, where methods are being developed to mitigate 3 {omega} damage and to resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The project

  5. National Ignition Facility monthly status report-January 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2000-01-31

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Safety: On January 13, 2000, a worker received a back injury when a 42-in.-diameter duct fell during installation. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and released on January 16, 2000. All work in the area was suspended, and the construction contractors went through a thorough safety review before work was started. A DOE occurrence report was filed. An independent LLNL Incident Analysis Team is reviewing the cause of the accident and will report out on March 1. A Project management review team is reviewing construction line management and safety support and will also report out on March 1. Several changes in work planning and site management have been incorporated to increase site safety. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering; (2) laser glass--a second pilot run at one of the two commercial suppliers is ongoing; and (3) operational costs associated with final optics assembly (FOA) optics components--methods are being developed to mitigate 3 {omega}damage and resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The completion of the Title II design of laser equipment is now approximately 80% complete. The Beampath Infrastructure

  6. Impulse responses of visible phototubes used in National Ignition Facility neutron time of flight diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P. S.; Eckart, M.; Moore, A. S.; Thompson, W.; Vergel de Dios, G.

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced visible scintillation in neutron time of flight (NToF) diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is measured with 40 mm single stage micro-channel plate photomultipliers and a 40 mm vacuum photodiode, outside the neutron line of sight. In NIF experiments with 14 MeV neutron yields above Y > 10 × 1015 these tubes are configured to deliver of order 1 nC of charge in the nominally 5 ns NToF into a 50 Ω load. We have examined a number of 40 mm tubes manufactured by Photek Ltd. of St. Leonards on Sea, UK, to determine possible changes in the instrument impulse response as a function of signal charge delivered in 1 ns. Precision NToF measurements at approximately 20 m require that we characterize changes in the impulse response moments to <40 ps for the first central moment and ˜2% rms for the square root of the second central moment with ˜500 ps value. Detailed results are presented for three different diode configurations.

  7. Simulated performance of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic designed for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. S., E-mail: ross36@llnl.gov; Datte, P.; Divol, L.; Galbraith, J.; Hatch, B.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Moody, J. D.; Swadling, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Froula, D. H.; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Weaver, J. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An optical Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed for the National Ignition Facility to characterize under-dense plasmas. We report on the design of the system and the expected performance for different target configurations. The diagnostic is designed to spatially and temporally resolve the Thomson scattered light from laser driven targets. The diagnostic will collect scattered light from a 50 × 50 × 200 μm volume. The optical design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths. A deep-UV probe beam (λ{sub 0} = 210 nm) will be used to Thomson scatter from electron plasma densities of ∼5 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} while a 3ω probe will be used for plasma densities of ∼1 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The diagnostic package contains two spectrometers: the first to resolve Thomson scattering from ion acoustic wave fluctuations and the second to resolve scattering from electron plasma wave fluctuations. Expected signal levels relative to background will be presented for typical target configurations (hohlraums and a planar foil).

  8. Safety and environmental process for the design and construction of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-05-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laser fusion experimental facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This paper describes the safety and environmental processes followed by NIF during the design and construction activities.

  9. Status of the National Ignition Facility and Campaign, and Controls and Information Systems on the Path to Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L.; Azevedo, S.; Bettenhausen, R.; Beeler, R.; Belk, L.; Bowers, G.; Brunton, G.; Carey, R.; Casey, A.; Christensen, M.; Demaret, R.; Edwards, O.; Estes, C.; Fisher, J.; Foxworthy, C.; Frazier, T.; Kegelmeyer, L.; Krammen, J.; Ludwigsen, A.; Mathisen, D.; Marshall, C.; Shelton, R.; Stout, E.; Townsend, S.; Van Arsdall, P.; Wilson, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility under construction that will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-Mega-joule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10- meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF is operated by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an architecture partitioned by bundle and distributed among over 1000 front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. NIF's automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework based on CORBA distribution that deploys the software across the computer network and achieves inter-operation between different languages and target architectures. A shot automation framework has been used to orchestrate and automate over a thousand system shots performed at the NIF using the ICCS. An experimental database and automated shot analysis infrastructure has also been developed and is being used for conducting experiments. In March 2009, the NIF project was completed by successfully demonstrating its formal completion of performance and operational design criteria. At present, all 192 beams have been commissioned to target chamber center. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of target area systems including final optics, target positioners and diagnostics, in preparation for project completion. A detailed set of experiments have begun and are being performed as part of a National

  10. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  11. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Hohlraum-driven ignition-like double-shell implosions on the Omega laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P; Robey, H F; Park, H S; Tipton, R E; Turner, R E; Milovich, J L; Bono, M; Hibbard, R; Louis, H; Wallace, R

    2004-10-01

    High-convergence ignition-like double-shell implosion experiments have been performed on the Omega laser facility [T.R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using cylindrical gold hohlraums with 40 drive beams. Repeatable, dominant primary (2.45 MeV) neutron production from the mix-susceptible compressional phase of a double-shell implosion, using fall-line design optimization and exacting fabrication standards, is experimentally inferred from time-resolved core x-ray imaging. Effective control of fuel-pusher mix during final compression is essential for achieving noncryogenic ignition with double-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  14. The Overview of the National Ignition Facility Distributed Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L J; Bettenhausen, R C; Carey, R A; Estes, C M; Fisher, J M; Krammen, J E; Reed, R K; VanArsdall, P J; Woodruff, J P

    2001-10-15

    The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors (FEP) coordinated by supervisor subsystems including automatic beam alignment and wavefront control, laser and target diagnostics, pulse power, and shot control timed to 30 ps. FEP computers incorporate either VxWorks on PowerPC or Solaris on UltraSPARC processors that interface to over 45,000 control points attached to VME-bus or PCI-bus crates respectively. Typical devices are stepping motors, transient digitizers, calorimeters, and photodiodes. The front-end layer is divided into another segment comprised of an additional 14,000 control points for industrial controls including vacuum, argon, synthetic air, and safety interlocks implemented with Allen-Bradley programmable logic controllers (PLCs). The computer network is augmented asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) that delivers video streams from 500 sensor cameras monitoring the 192 laser beams to operator workstations. Software is based on an object-oriented framework using CORBA distribution that incorporates services for archiving, machine configuration, graphical user interface, monitoring, event logging, scripting, alert management, and access control. Software coding using a mixed language environment of Ada95 and Java is one-third complete at over 300 thousand source lines. Control system installation is currently under way for the first 8 beams, with project completion scheduled for 2008.

  15. Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Justin; Bettencourt, Ron; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Gharibyan, Narek; Talison, Bahram; Morris, Kevin; Smith, Cal

    2015-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the flux of neutrons and charged particles at peak burn in an inertial confinement fusion capsule induces measureable concentrations of nuclear reaction products in the target material. Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris can be used to determine diagnostic parameters associated with implosion of the capsule, including fuel areal density and ablator-fuel mixing. Additionally, analysis of debris from specially doped targets can support nuclear forensic research. We have developed and are deploying the Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) diagnostic to collect shot debris and interact with post-shot reaction products at the NIF. VADER uses quick release collectors that are easily reconfigured for different materials and geometries. Collectors are located ~50 cm from the NIF target; each of up to 9 collectors views ~0.005-0.0125 steradians solid angle, dependent upon configuration. Dynamic loading of the NIF target vaporized mass was modelled using LS-DYNA. 3-dimensional printing was utilized to expedite the design process. Model-based manufacturing was used throughout. We will describe the design and operation of this diagnostic as well as some initial results.

  16. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  17. CVD Diamond Detector Stability Issues for Operation at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Moran, M J; Lerche, R A; Izumi, N; Phillips, T W; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2003-08-22

    Synthetic diamond crystals produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique can serve as fast, radiation hard, neutron sensors for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here we explore the stability issues, such as charge trapping and high-flux saturation, that will be relevant to operation at the NIF.

  18. Ultraviolet Light Generation and Transport in the Final Optics Assembly of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Feit, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozlowski, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitman, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) includes a Final Optics Assembly (FOA) subsystem for ultraviolet (UV) light generation and transport for each of the 192 beamlines. Analytical and experimental work has been done to help understand and predict the performance of FOA.

  19. Cleanliness improvements of NIF (National Ignition Facility) amplifiers as compared to previous large-scale lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, J

    2004-06-09

    Prior to the recent commissioning of the first NIF (National Ignition Facility) beamline, full-scale laser-amplifier-glass cleanliness experiments were performed. Aerosol measurements and obscuration data acquired using a modified flatbed scanner compare favorably to historical large-scale lasers and indicate that NIF is the cleanest large-scale laser built to date.

  20. The National Ignition Facility: the path to a carbon-free energy future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Christopher J

    2012-08-28

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centres on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  1. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J

    2011-03-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  2. Irradiation uniformity at the Laser MegaJoule facility in the context of the shock ignition scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mauro; Temporal; Benoit; Canaud; Warren; J.; Garbett; Rafael; Ramis; Stefan; Weber

    2014-01-01

    The use of the Laser MegaJoule facility within the shock ignition scheme has been considered. In the first part of the study, one-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations were performed for an inertial confinement fusion capsule in the context of the shock ignition scheme providing the energy gain and an estimation of the increase of the peak power due to the reduction of the photon penetration expected during the high-intensity spike pulse. In the second part, we considered a Laser MegaJoule configuration consisting of 176 laser beams that have been grouped providing two different irradiation schemes. In this configuration the maximum available energy and power are 1.3 MJ and 440 TW. Optimization of the laser–capsule parameters that minimize the irradiation non-uniformity during the first few ns of the foot pulse has been performed. The calculations take into account the specific elliptical laser intensity profile provided at the Laser MegaJoule and the expected beam uncertainties. A significant improvement of the illumination uniformity provided by the polar direct drive technique has been demonstrated. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed in order to analyse the magnitude of the azimuthal component of the irradiation that is neglected in twodimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Ignition capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel for the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho D.D.-M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to β-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65 – 75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  4. First liquid-layer implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, Alex; Olson, R.; Leeper, R.; Kline, J.; Yi, S. A.; Peterson, R.; Bradley, P.; Haines, B.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D.; Herrmann, H.; Shah, R.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Hamza, A.; Nikroo, A.; Meezan, N.; Biener, M.; Sater, J.; Walters, C.

    2016-10-01

    Replacing the standard ice layer in an ignition design with a liquid layer allows fielding the target with a higher central vapor pressure, leading to reduced implosion convergence ratio (CR). At lower CR, the implosions are expected to be more robust to instabilities and asymmetries than standard ignition designs. The first liquid-layer implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been performed by wicking the liquid fuel into a supporting foam. A 3-shot series has been conducted at CR=14-16 using a HDC ablator driven by a 3-shock pulse in a near-vacuum Au hohlraum; data and inferred quantities, such as pressure, show good agreement with expectations.

  5. Direct-drive implosion physics: Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ma, T.; Pape, S. Le; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments from both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are critical to gain confidence in ignition predictions on the NIF. Adequate performance of hydrodynamically scaled 1.8-MJ ignition designs must be obtained on OMEGA at 26 kJ. Implosions on the NIF must be used to identify and mitigate the effect of laser-plasma interactions (LPI's) on hydrodynamic parameters at the NIF scale. Results from spherically driven OMEGA cryogenic implosion experiments are described. Mitigation of nonuniformity sources and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is important for improving target performance on OMEGA. Initial polar-driven implosion experiments on the NIF have provided valuable measurements of trajectory and symmetry. Simulations that include the effect of CBET more closely reproduce the observed velocity.

  6. Ignition studies in support of the European High Power Laser Energy Research Facility project

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Pasley

    2010-11-01

    The European High Power Laser Energy Research Facility (HiPER) project is one of a number of large-scale scientific infrastructure projects supported by the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). Part of this project involves the development of a target area for the exploration of inertial fusion energy. This paper describes some of the research that is being carried out by the author in support of this aspect of the program. The effects of different regions of the fusion target mixing prior to thermonuclear ignition have been investigated using the 1D Lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics simulation code HYADES. Results suggest that even low (few parts per million) levels of contamination of fuel by high- ion species may inhibit ignition due to radiative cooling of the ignition spot.

  7. The National Ignition Facility and the Golden Age of High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W; Moses, E I; Newton, M

    2007-09-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) science. When completed, NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and highest-energy laser system. The NIF is poised to become the world's preeminent facility for conducting ICF and fusion energy research and for studying matter at extreme densities and temperatures.

  8. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenphysik, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraus, D. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4–10 keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-α x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  9. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Kilkenny, J D; Conder, A; Cerjan, C; Hagmann, C; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Moody, J; Teruya, A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Khater, H; Eckart, M J; Ayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10(17) neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  10. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 1017 neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  11. Analysis of electromagnetic pulse (EMP measurements in the National Ignition Facility's target bay and chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown C.G.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available From May 2009 to the present we have recorded electromagnetic pulse (EMP strength and spectrum (100 MHz – 5 GHz in the target bay and chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF. The dependence of EMP strength and frequency spectrum on target type and laser energy is discussed. The largest EMP measured was for relatively low-energy, short-pulse (100 ps flat targets.

  12. Recent advances and results from the solid radiochemistry nuclear diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibyan, N.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Faye, S. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The solid debris collection capability at the National Ignition Facility has been expanded to include a third line-of-sight assembly. The solid radiochemistry nuclear diagnostic measurement of the ratio of gold isotopes is dependent on the efficient collection of neutron-activated hohlraum debris by passive metal disks. The collection of target debris at this new location is more reliable in comparison to the historic locations, and it appears to be independent of collector surface ablation.

  13. Design of Initial Opacity Platform at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Ayers, S. L.; Emig, J. A.; Iglesias, C. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Wilson, B. G.; Huffman, E. J.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; McKenty, P. W.; Zhang, R.; Cardenas, T.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Kline, J. L.; Sherrill, M. E.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    The absorption and re-emission of x-rays by partly stripped ions plays a critical role in stars and in many laboratory plasmas. A NIF Opacity Platform has been designed to resolve a persistent disagreement between theory and experiments on the Sandia Z facility, studying iron in conditions closely related to the solar radiation-convection transition boundary. A laser heated hohlraum ``oven'' will produce iron plasmas at temperatures >150 eV and electron densities >=7x1021/cm3, and be probed with continuum X-rays from a capsule implosion backlighter source. The resulting X-ray transmission spectra will be recorded on a specially designed Opacity Spectrometer. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

    2010-04-12

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  15. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Dodd, E.; Huffman, E. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  16. National Ignition Facility Quarterly Status Report Second Quarter 2000, Jan-Mar 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E.

    2000-04-30

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement.

  17. National Ignition Facility Quarterly Status Report - First Quarter 2000, Dec 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatabe, J.

    2000-01-30

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (SSM PEIS).

  18. The role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of inertial fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B.G.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have completed a conceptual design for a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, 0.35-{mu}m solid-state laser system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which will demonstrate inertial fusion ignition and gain for national security, energy, and science applications. The technical goal of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program as stated in the current ICF Five-Year Program Plan is {open_quotes}to produce pure fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, with fusion yields of 200 to 1000 MJ, in support of three missions: (1) to play an essential role in accessing physics regimes of interest in nuclear weapon design...; (2) to provide an above-ground simulation capability for nuclear weapon effects...; and (3) to develop inertial fusion energy for civilian power production.{close_quotes} This article addresses the third goal-- the development of inertial fusion energy (IFE). This article reports a variety of potential contributions the NIF could make to the development of IFE, drawn from a nationally attended workshop held at the University of California at Berkeley in Feb, 1994. In addition to demonstrating fusion ignition as a fundamental basis for IFE, the findings of the workshop, are that the NIF could also provide important data for target physics and fabrication technology, for IFE target chamber phenomena such as materials responses to target emissions, and for fusion power technology-relevant tests.

  19. National direct-drive program on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage of the laser direct-drive (DD) approach to ignition is the increased fraction of laser drive energy coupled to the hot spot and relaxed hot-spot requirements for the peak pressure and convergence ratios relative to the indirect-drive approach at equivalent laser energy. With the goal of a successful ignition demonstration using DD, the recently established national strategy has several elements and involves multiple national and international institutions. These elements include the experimental demonstration on OMEGA cryogenic implosions of hot-spot conditions relevant for ignition at MJ-scale energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and developing an understanding of laser-plasma interactions and laser coupling using DD experiments on the NIF. DD designs require reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The current experiments on OMEGA have achieved inferred peak pressures of 56 Gbar (Regan et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117 025001). Extensive analysis of the cryogenic target experiments and two- and three-dimensional simulations suggest that power balance, target offset, and target quality are the main limiting factors in target performance. In addition, cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been identified as the main mechanism reducing laser coupling. Reaching the goal of demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA includes improving laser power balance, target position, and target quality at shot time. CBET must also be significantly reduced and several strategies have been identified to address this issue.

  20. Symmetry tuning with megajoule laser pulses at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline J.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility using shaped laser pulses with more than 1 MJ of energy have demonstrated the ability to control the implosion symmetry under ignition conditions. To achieve thermonuclear ignition, the low mode asymmetries must be small to minimize the size of the hotspot. The symmetry tuning experiments use symmetry capsules, “symcaps”, which replace the DT fuel with an equivalent mass of CH to emulate the hydrodynamic behavior of an ignition capsule. The x-ray self-emission signature from gas inside the capsule during the peak compression correlates with the surrounding hotspot shape. By tuning the shape of the self-emission, the capsule implosion symmetry can be made to be “round.” In the experimental results presented here, we utilized crossbeam energy transfer [S. H. Glenzer, et al., Science 327, 1228 (2010] to change the ratio of the inner to outer cone power inside the hohlraum targets on the NIF. Variations in the ratio of the inner cone to outer cone power affect the radiation pattern incident on the capsule modifying the implosion symmetry.

  1. Deployment, Commissioning and Operation of Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells in the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Primdahl, K A; Watson, J J; O' Brien, M D; Funkhouser, W G; Biltoft, P J; Shelton, R T; Tapley, W C; DeHope, W J

    2003-12-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4 x 1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90{sup o} on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the

  2. Hohlraum energetics scaling to 520 TW on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Kyrala, G. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Callahan, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Bennedetti, R.; Berger, R. L.; Bradley, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Bass, I.; Bennett, C.; Bowers, M.; Brunton, G.; Bude, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Indirect drive experiments have now been carried out with laser powers and energies up to 520 TW and 1.9 MJ. These experiments show that the energy coupling to the target is nearly constant at 84% ± 3% over a wide range of laser parameters from 350 to 520 TW and 1.2 to 1.9 MJ. Experiments at 520 TW with depleted uranium hohlraums achieve radiation temperatures of ∼330 ± 4 eV, enough to drive capsules 20 μm thicker than the ignition point design to velocities near the ignition goal of 370 km/s. A series of three symcap implosion experiments with nearly identical target, laser, and diagnostics configurations show the symmetry and drive are reproducible at the level of ±8.5% absolute and ±2% relative, respectively.

  3. Overview of Progress and Future Prospects in Indirect Drive Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; ">ICF Program, ignite. For the first time in the laboratory, significant alpha-heating in a fusion plasma was inferred in experiments and fusion fuel gain was demonstrated on the U.S. National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experiments on the NIF have achieved the highest yet recorded stagnation pressures (Pstagnation > 150-230 Gigabar) of any facility based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, albeit they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the NIF (i.e. ∼ 300 - 400 Gbar), and have exhibited undesirable shape distortions that waste kinetic energy. We review the issues that have been uncovered and discuss the program strategy and plan that we are following to systematically address the known issues as we press on.

  4. Characterization of the hot electron population with bremsstrahlung and backscatter measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie; Hohenberger, Matthias; Michel, Pierre; Divol, Laurent; Doeppner, Tilo; Dewald, Edward; Bachmann, Benjamin; Ralph, Joseph; Turnbull, David; Goyon, Clement; Thomas, Cliff; Landen, Otto; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    In indirect-drive ignition experiments, the hot electron population, produced by laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by the interaction of the hot electrons with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the upgraded filter-fluorescer x-ray diagnostic (FFLEX), a 10-channel, time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20- to 500-keV range, provides measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum. It typically shows a two-temperature distribution of the hot electron population inside the hohlraum. In SRS, where the laser is coupled to an electron plasma wave, the backscattered spectrum, measured with the NIF full-aperture backscatter system (FABS), is used to infer the plasma wave phase velocity. We will present FFLEX time-integrated and time-resolved measurements of the hot electron population low-temperature component. We will correlate them with electron plasma wave phase velocities inferred from FABS spectra for a range of recent shots performed at the National Ignition Facility. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I

    2010-12-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

  6. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: The first precision tuning series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robey H.F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (ρR, which show the highest fuel compression (ρR ∼ 1.0 g/cm2 measured to date.

  7. The National Ignition Facility: the World's Largest Optics and Laser System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I; Campbell, J H; Stolz, C J; Wuest, C R

    2003-01-27

    The National Ignition Facility, a center for the study of high energy density plasma physics and fusion energy ignition, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The heart of the NIF is a frequency tripled, flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser system comprised of 192 independent laser beams. The laser system is capable of generating output energies of 1.8MJ at 351nm and at peak powers of 500 TW in a flexible temporal pulse format. A description of the NIF laser system and its major components is presented. We also discuss the manufacture of nearly 7500 precision large optics required by the NIF including data on the manufactured optical quality vs. specification. In addition, we present results from an on-going program to improve the operational lifetime of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm section of the laser.

  8. Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grim Gary P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of data and measurements made to date. Data from directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 ± 3 μm, as indirectly driven cores, 25 ± 4 and 29 ± 4 μm and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. − 14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

  9. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  10. Status of Indirect Drive ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In the quest to demonstrate Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled capsules and propagating thermonuclear burn with net energy gain (fusion energy/laser energy >1), recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have shown progress towards increasing capsule hot spot temperature (Tion>5 keV) and fusion neutron yield (~1016), while achieving ~2x yield amplification by alpha particle deposition. At the same time a performance cliff was reached, resulting in lower fusion yields than expected as the implosion velocity was increased. Ongoing studies of the hohlraum and capsule physics are attempting to disseminate possible causes for this performance ceiling.

  11. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callahan, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dittrich, T. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmonson, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Springer, P. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Church, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dixit, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dylla-Spears, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edgell, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Field, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Grim, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Knauer, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Kohut, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kritcher, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosen, M. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sater, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sayre, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaughnessy, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Town, R.P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Volegov, P. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yeamans, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  12. Target Area design basis and system performance for the National Ignition Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M.; Karpenko, V.; Hagans, K.; Anderson, A.; Latkowski, J.; Warren, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wavrik, R.; Garcia, R.; Boyes, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The NIF Target Area is designed to confine the ICF target experiments leading up to and including fusion ignition and gain. The Target Area will provide appropriate in-chamber conditions before, during, and after each shot. The repeated introduction of large amounts of laser energy into the chamber and emission of fusion energy from targets represents a new challenge in ICF facility design. Prior to a shot, the facility provides proper illumination geometry, target chamber vacuum, and a stable platform for the target and its diagnostics. During a shot, the impact of the energy introduced into the chamber is minimized, and workers and the public are protected from excessive prompt radiation doses. After the shot, the residual radioactivation is managed to allow required accessibility. Tritium and other radioactive wastes are confined and disposed of. Diagnostic data is also retrieved, and the facility is readied for the next shot. The Target Area will accommodate yields up to 20 MJ, and its design lifetime is 30 years. The Target Area provides the personnel access needed to support the use precision diagnostics. The annual shot mix for design purposes is shown. Designing to this experimental envelope ensures the ability and flexibility to move through the experimental campaign to ignition efficiently.

  13. Image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Orth, Charles; Roberts, Randy; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short-pulse kilo-Joule laser pulses with controllable delays that generate X-rays to provide backlighting for high-density internal confinement fusion (ICF) capsule targets. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. ARC is designed to employ up to eight backlighters with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution, to record the dynamics and produce an X-ray "motion picture" of the compression and ignition of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets. ARC will generate tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of ICF shots. Additionally, ARC supports a variety of other high energy density experiments including fast ignition studies on NIF. The automated alignment image analysis algorithms use digital camera sensor images to direct ARC beams onto the tens-of-microns scale metal wires. This paper describes the ARC automatic alignment sequence throughout the laser chain from pulse initiation to target with an emphasis on the image processing algorithms that generate the crucial alignment positions for ARC. The image processing descriptions and flow diagrams detail the alignment control loops throughout the ARC laser chain beginning in the ARC high-contrast front end (HCAFE), on into the ARC main laser area, and ending in the ARC target area.

  14. Neutron reactions in the hohlraum at the LLNL National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Hale, G. M.; Korzekwa, R. C.

    2012-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser energy captured in a hohlraum. The projected yields at NIF suggest that interactions of neutrons with the hohlraum can directly probe the neutron spectrum. Different physical parameters of the burning capsule can be probed by different neutron reactions. We suggest a variety of neutron reactions on the gold and uranium present in National Ignition Campaign hohlraums that will be useful for both neutron diagnostics and dosimetry at the NIF. The radiochemical daughter products may then be used to infer the neutron spectrum from the capsule. The downscattered neutrons may be studied by the (n,γ) and (n,n') reactions to infer the areal density of the capsule. The 14 MeV neutron fluence may be measured by (n,2n) daughter products for comparison to neutron spectrometer data. The hydrodynamical mix in the capsule can be studied with RIF neutrons, which are probed by (n,3n) reactions.

  15. Simulations of indirectly driven gas-filled capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Eder, D. C.; Pino, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    Gas-filled capsules imploded with indirect drive on the National Ignition Facility have been employed as symmetry surrogates for cryogenic-layered ignition capsules and to explore interfacial mix. Plastic capsules containing deuterated layers and filled with tritium gas provide a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas fuel. Other plastic capsules have employed DT or D{sup 3}He gas fill. We present the results of two-dimensional simulations of gas-filled capsule implosions with known degradation sources represented as in modeling of inertial confinement fusion ignition designs; these are time-dependent drive asymmetry, the capsule support tent, roughness at material interfaces, and prescribed gas-ablator interface mix. Unlike the case of cryogenic-layered implosions, many observables of gas-filled implosions are in reasonable agreement with predictions of these simulations. Yields of TT and DT neutrons as well as other x-ray and nuclear diagnostics are matched for CD-layered implosions. Yields of DT-filled capsules are over-predicted by factors of 1.4–2, while D{sup 3}He capsule yields are matched, as well as other metrics for both capsule types.

  16. Automated analysis of hot spot X-ray images at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. F., E-mail: khan9@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Springer, P.; Bradley, D. K.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, the symmetry of the hot spot of imploding capsules is diagnosed by imaging the emitted x-rays using gated cameras and image plates. The symmetry of an implosion is an important factor in the yield generated from the resulting fusion process. The x-ray images are analyzed by decomposing the image intensity contours into Fourier and Legendre modes. This paper focuses on the additional protocols for the time-integrated shape analysis from image plates. For implosions with temperatures above ∼4 keV, the hard x-ray background can be utilized to infer the temperature of the hot spot.

  17. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  18. Prevention of corrosion of silver reflectors for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, N; Siekhaus, W; Farmer, J; Gregg, H; Erlandson, A; Marshall, C; Wolfe, J; Fix, J; Ahre, D

    1999-07-01

    A durable protected silver coating was designed and fabricated for possible use on flashlamp reflectors in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to avoid tarnishing under corrosive conditions and intense visible light (10 J/cm{sup 2}, 360 {micro}s). This coating provides a valuable alternative for mirror coatings where high reflectance and durability are important requirements. This paper describes a protected silver coating having high reflectance from 400 mn to 10,000 mu. The specular reflectance is between 95% and 98% in the visible region and 98% or better in the infrared region.

  19. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility Appendix A: Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-01-14

    These rules apply to all LLNL employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and construction contractors/subcontractors. The General Safety and Health rules shall be used by management to promote accident prevention through indoctrination, safety and health training and on-the-job application. As a condition for contracts award, all contractors and subcontractors and their employees must certify on Form S & H A-1 that they have read and understand, or have been briefed and understand, the National Ignition Facility OCIP Project General Safety Rules.

  20. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyhurst, C.C.; Cunningham, M.A.

    2002-06-04

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium.

  1. A spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G P; Finch, J P; King, N S P; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Johnson, D E

    2008-10-01

    The concepts and initial development efforts for a spatially resolved ion temperature diagnostic are described. The diagnostic is intended for Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility and is an integration of neutron aperture imaging and ion temperature techniques. The neutron imaging technique is extended by recording tomographic projections of the radiation-to-light converter on a streak camera. The streak record is used to calculate images at multiple times during the arrival of the thermally broadened 14.1 MeV neutron flux. The resulting set of images is used to determine the spatially resolved ion temperature.

  2. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I

    2002-11-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  3. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P; Hinz, A; Zacharias, R; Ollis, C; Fulkerson, E; Mchale, B; Runtal, A; Bishop, C

    2007-07-27

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007.

  4. The National Ignition Facility: The world's largest optical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J

    2007-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 192-beam fusion laser, is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with an expected completion in 2008. The facility contains 7,456 meter-scale optics for amplification, beam steering, vacuum barriers, focusing, polarization rotation, and wavelength conversion. A multiphase program was put in place to increase the monthly optical manufacturing rate by up to 20x while simultaneously reducing cost by up to 3x through a sub-scale development, full-scale facilitization, and a pilot production phase. Currently 80% of the optics are complete with over 50% installed. In order to manufacture the high quality optics at desired manufacturing rate of over 100 precision optics per month, new more deterministic advanced fabrication technologies had to be employed over those used to manufacture previous fusion lasers.

  5. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F.; Thorn, D. B.; Kemp, G. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Ping, Y.; Eggert, J. H.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  6. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F; Thorn, D B; Kemp, G E; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Ping, Y; Eggert, J H; Schneider, M B

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  7. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Holder, J. P.; Kalantar, D. K.; MacPhee, A. G.; Telford, S.

    2010-10-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  8. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: status of FEDC studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program comprise the report. The technical areas discussed are the mechanical configuration status, magnet analysis, stress analysis, cooling between burns, TF coil joint, and facility/device layout options. (WRF)

  9. Applications and results of X-ray spectroscopy in implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Scott, H. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mancini, R. C.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Nikroo, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Town, R. P. J.; Tucker, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    Current inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] are attempting to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using x-ray drive by imploding spherical targets containing hydrogen-isotope fuel in the form of a thin cryogenic layer surrounding a central volume of fuel vapor [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. The fuel is contained within a plastic ablator layer with small concentrations of one or more mid-Z elements, e.g., Ge or Cu. The capsule implodes, driven by intense x-ray emission from the inner surface of a hohlraum enclosure irradiated by the NIF laser, and fusion reactions occur in the central hot spot near the time of peak compression. Ignition will occur if the hot spot within the compressed fuel layer attains a high-enough areal density to retain enough of the reaction product energy to reach nuclear reaction temperatures within the inertial hydrodynamic disassembly time of the fuel mass [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. The primary purpose of the ablator dopants is to shield the ablator surface adjacent to the DT ice from heating by the hohlraum x-ray drive [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Simulations predicted that these dopants would produce characteristic K-shell emission if ablator material mixed into the hot spot [B. A. Hammel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 6, 171 (2010)]. In NIF ignition experiments, emission and absorption features from these dopants appear in x-ray spectra measured with the hot-spot x-ray spectrometer in Supersnout II [S. P. Regan et al., "Hot-Spot X-Ray Spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility," to be submitted to Review of Scientific Instruments]. These include K-shell emission lines from the hot spot (driven primarily by inner-shell collisional ionization and dielectronic recombination) and photoionization edges, fluorescence, and absorption lines caused by the absorption of the

  10. Results from Direct-Drive Shock-Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Dixit, S.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of multiple shocks is critical to set an inertial confinement capsule on a desired adiabat. Several factors including laser-energy deposition, heat conduction, and equation of state determine the adiabat of the compressing shell. Dual-axis cone-in-shell experiments, performed with plastic, (CH) shells and solid spheres, are used to diagnose the first shock velocity and the catch up of subsequent shocks at the National Ignition Facility. The shocks are launched with multiple pickets, expected to be used in ignition-relevant designs, at two different intensities. In separate experiments, continuous pulse shapes are also diagnosed. The measurements are compared to two-dimensional DRACO simulations that include the effects of nonlocal heat transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and the first-principles equation of state of CH. Designs that could potentially diagnose late-time energy coupling through shocks are also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. First Liquid Layer Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Yi, S. A.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Sater, J. D.; Bradley, P. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Haines, B. M.; Yin, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Walters, C.; Biener, M. M.; Kong, C.; Crippen, J. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Shah, R. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Wilson, D. C.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    The first cryogenic deuterium and deuterium-tritium liquid layer implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) demonstrate D2 and DT layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions that can access a low-to-moderate hot-spot convergence ratio (12 NIF utilized high convergence (CR >30 ) DT ice layer implosions. Although high CR is desirable in an idealized 1D sense, it amplifies the deleterious effects of asymmetries. To date, these asymmetries prevented the achievement of ignition at the NIF and are the major cause of simulation-experiment disagreement. In the initial liquid layer experiments, high neutron yields were achieved with CRs of 12-17, and the hot-spot formation is well understood, demonstrated by a good agreement between the experimental data and the radiation hydrodynamic simulations. These initial experiments open a new NIF experimental capability that provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between hot-spot convergence ratio and the robustness of hot-spot formation during ICF implosions.

  12. The development and advantages of beryllium capsules for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.C.; Bradley, P.A.; Hoffman, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-02-01

    Capsules with beryllium ablators have long been considered as alternatives to plastic for the National Ignition Facility laser ; now the superior performance of beryllium is becoming well substantiated. Beryllium capsules have the advantages of relative insensitivity to instability growth, low opacity, high tensile strength, and high thermal conductivity. 3-D calculation with the HYDRA code NTIS Document No. DE-96004569 (M. M. Marinak et.al. in UCRL-LR-105821-95-3) confirm 2-D LASNEX U. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasmas Phys. Controlled Thermonucl. Fusion, 2, 51(2975) results that particular beryllium capsule designs are several times less sensitive than the CH point design to instability growth from DT ice roughness. These capsule designs contain more ablator mass and leave some beryllium unablated at ignition. By adjusting the level of copper dopant, the unablated mass can increase or decrease, with a corresponding decrease or increase in sensitivity to perturbations. A plastic capsule with the same ablator mass as the beryllium and leaving the same unablated mass also shows this reduced perturbation sensitivity. Beryllium`s low opacity permits the creation of 250 eV capsule designs. Its high tensile strength allows it to contain DT fuel at room temperature. Its high thermal conductivity simplifies cryogenic fielding.

  13. Non-equilibrium between ions and electrons inside hot spots from National Ignition Facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfeng Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-equilibrium between ions and electrons in the hot spot can relax the ignition conditions in inertial confinement fusion [Fan et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 010703 (2016], and obvious ion-electron non-equilibrium could be observed by our simulations of high-foot implosions when the ion-electron relaxation is enlarged by a factor of 2. On the other hand, in many shots of high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility, the observed X-ray enhancement factors due to ablator mixing into the hot spot are less than unity assuming electrons and ions have the same temperature [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062703 (2015], which is not self-consistent because it can lead to negative ablator mixing into the hot spot. Actually, this non-consistency implies ion-electron non-equilibrium within the hot spot. From our study, we can infer that ion-electron non-equilibrium exists in high-foot implosions and the ion temperature could be ∼9% larger than the equilibrium temperature in some NIF shots.

  14. The use of beam propagation modeling of Beamlet and Nova to ensure a ``safe`` National Ignition Facility laser system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henesian, M.A.; Renard, P.; Auerbach, J. [and others

    1997-03-17

    An exhaustive set of Beamlet and Nova laser system simulations were performed over a wide range of power levels in order to gain understanding about the statistical trends in Nova and Beamlet`s experimental data sets, and to provide critical validation of propagation tools and design ``rules`` applied to the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The experiments considered for modeling were at 220-ps FWHM duration with unpumped booster slabs on Beamlet, and 100-ps FWHM with pumped 31.5-cm and 46-cm disk amplifiers on Nova. Simulations indicated that on Beamlet, the AB (the intensity pendent phase shift parameter characterizing the tendency towards beam filamentation) for the booster amplifier stage without pumping, would be nearly identical to the AB expected on NIF at the peak of a typical 20-ns long shaped pulse intended for ICF target irradiation. Therefore, with energies less than I kJ in short-pulses, we examined on Beamlet the comparable AB-driven filamentation conditions predicted for long ICF pulseshapes in the 18 kJ regime on the NIF, while avoiding fluence dependent surface damage. Various spatial filter pinhole configurations were examined on Nova and Beamlet. Open transport spatial filter pinholes were used in some experiments to allow the direct measurement of the onset of beam filamentation. Schlieren images on Beamlet of the far field irradiance measuring the scattered light fraction outside of 33-{micro}radians were also obtained and compared to modeled results.

  15. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  16. Capsule implosions for continuum x-ray backlighting of opacity samples at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Heeter, R. F.; Barrios, M. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; King, J. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; May, M. J.; Zhang, R.; Ross, P. W.; Kline, J. L.; Moore, A. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-06-01

    Direct drive implosions of plastic capsules have been performed at the National Ignition Facility to provide a broad-spectrum (500-2000 eV) X-ray continuum source for X-ray transmission spectroscopy. The source was developed for the high-temperature plasma opacity experimental platform. Initial experiments using 2.0 mm diameter polyalpha-methyl styrene capsules with ˜20 μm thickness have been performed. X-ray yields of up to ˜1 kJ/sr have been measured using the Dante multichannel diode array. The backlighter source size was measured to be ˜100 μm FWHM, with ˜350 ps pulse duration during the peak emission stage. Results are used to simulate transmission spectra for a hypothetical iron opacity sample at 150 eV, enabling the derivation of photometrics requirements for future opacity experiments.

  17. Bayesian Analysis of Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffney, J A; Sonnad, V; Libby, S B

    2012-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian inference method that allows the efficient determination of several interesting parameters from complicated high-energy-density experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The model is based on an exploration of phase space using the hydrodynamic code HYDRA. A linear model is used to describe the effect of nuisance parameters on the analysis, allowing an analytic likelihood to be derived that can be determined from a small number of HYDRA runs and then used in existing advanced statistical analysis methods. This approach is applied to a recent experiment in order to determine the carbon opacity and X-ray drive; it is found that the inclusion of prior expert knowledge and fluctuations in capsule dimensions and chemical composition significantly improve the agreement between experiment and theoretical opacity calculations. A parameterisation of HYDRA results is used to test the application of both Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and genetic algorithm (GA) techniques to e...

  18. eHXI: a permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Huntington, C. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N.; Park, H.-S.; Thomas, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (>= 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. eHXI provides valuable information on hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.

  19. Overview of the gamma reaction history diagnostic for the national ignition facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, Joseph M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Carl S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Malone, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frogget, Brent C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, Morris I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnell, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tibbitts, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palagi, Martin J [NST/LAS VEGAS; Stoeffl, Wolfgang [LLNL

    2010-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 900 off-axis parabolic mirrors to rel ay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This non imaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

  20. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Blue, B. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N. [Fifth Gait Technologies, Inc., 14040 Camden Circle, Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States); Seiler, S. W.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A. [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, 8725 John J. Kingman Road, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-6201 (United States); Hinshelwood, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lilly, M. [Dynasen, Inc., 20 Arnold Pl., Goleta, California 93117 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  1. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  2. X-ray scattering measurements on imploding CH spheres at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D.; Chapman, D. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Baggott, R. A.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Nilsen, J.; Swift, D. C.; Neumayer, P.; Falcone, R. W.; Gericke, D. O.; Döppner, T.

    2016-07-01

    We have performed spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements on highly compressed polystyrene at pressures of several tens of TPa (100 Mbar) created by spherically convergent shocks at the National Ignition Facility. Scattering data of line radiation at 9.0 keV were recorded from the dense plasma shortly after shock coalescence. Accounting for spatial gradients, opacity effects, and source broadening, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the elastic scattering component to carbon K -shell ionization while at the same time constraining the temperature of the dense plasma. For six times compressed polystyrene, we find an average temperature of 86 eV and carbon ionization state of 4.9, indicating that widely used ionization models need revision in order to be suitable for the extreme states of matter tested in our experiment.

  3. Signal and background considerations for the MRSt on the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, C W; Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Bionta, R; Khater, H Y; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) has been conceptually designed for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility. Using the MRSt, the goals are to measure the time-evolution of the spectrum with a time resolution of ∼20-ps and absolute accuracy better than 5%. To meet these goals, a detailed understanding and optimization of the signal and background characteristics are required. Through ion-optics, MCNP simulations, and detector-response calculations, it is demonstrated that the goals and a signal-to background >5-10 for the down-scattered neutron measurement are met if the background, consisting of ambient neutrons and gammas, at the MRSt is reduced 50-100 times.

  4. Software quality assurance plan for the National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, J.

    1996-11-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the activities of the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) organization and its subcontractors. The Plan describes the activities implemented by the ICCS section to achieve quality in the NIF Project`s controls software and implements the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, NIF-95-499, L-15958-2) and the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Order 5700.6C. This SQAP governs the quality affecting activities associated with developing and deploying all control system software during the life cycle of the NIF Project.

  5. A recoverable gas-cell diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Cassata, W. S.; Goldblum, B. L.; Siem, S.; Velsko, C. A.; Wiedeking, M.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The high-fluence neutron spectrum produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides an opportunity to measure the activation of materials by fast-spectrum neutrons. A new large-volume gas-cell diagnostic has been designed and qualified to measure the activation of gaseous substances at the NIF. This in-chamber diagnostic is recoverable, reusable and has been successfully fielded. Data from the qualification of the diagnostic have been used to benchmark an Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code simulation describing the downscattered neutron spectrum seen by the gas cell. We present early results from the use of this diagnostic to measure the activation of natXe and discuss future work to study the strength of interactions between plasma and nuclei.

  6. Signal and background considerations for the MRSt on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, C. W.; Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Bionta, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) has been conceptually designed for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility. Using the MRSt, the goals are to measure the time-evolution of the spectrum with a time resolution of ˜20-ps and absolute accuracy better than 5%. To meet these goals, a detailed understanding and optimization of the signal and background characteristics are required. Through ion-optics, MCNP simulations, and detector-response calculations, it is demonstrated that the goals and a signal-to background >5-10 for the down-scattered neutron measurement are met if the background, consisting of ambient neutrons and gammas, at the MRSt is reduced 50-100 times.

  7. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  8. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  9. Fabrication of Meter-Scale Laser Resistant Mirrors for the National Ignition Facility, a Fusion Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J; Weinzapfel, C L; Rigatti, A L; Oliver, J B; Taniguchi, J; Bevis, R P; Rajasansi, J S

    2003-07-07

    Large-aperture laser-resistant mirrors are required for the construction of the National Ignition Facility, a 1.8 MJ laser. In order to fabricate the 1408 mirrors, a development program was started in 1994 to improve coating quality, manufacturing rate, and lower unit cost. New technologies and metrology tools were scaled to meter size for facilitization in 1999 at Spectra-Physics and the Laboratory of Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Pilot production, to fabricate 5-10% of each component, commenced in 2001 and full production rates were achieved in 2002. Coating production will be completed in 2008 with the coating of 460 m{sup 2} of high-damage-threshold precision coatings on 100 tons of BK7 glass with yields exceeding 90%.

  10. Analyzing neutron time-of-flight spectra from the National Ignition Facility using moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatarik, R.; Field, J.; Eckart, M.; Grim, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Moore, A.; Munro, D.; Sayre, D.

    2016-10-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by an indirectly driven implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides valuable insight into the performance of the capsule. There are four neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers being used at the NIF which can simultaneously measure DD and DT fusion neutrons on NIF shots. The width of theses peaks have been traditionally associated with the temperature of the plasma, recent work shows that it has to be considered a combination of flow and temperature distributions. This leads to a deviation from a pure gaussian shape of a single temperature static plasma and the presence of higher order moments in the neutron spectrum. The current status of the analysis of neutron spectra from the nTOF diagnostics at the NIF will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Demonstration of a long pulse X-ray source at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Opachich, Y. P.; Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Widmann, K. W.; Fournier, K. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Regan, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    A long duration high fluence x-ray source has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The target was a 14.4 mm tall, 4.1 mm diameter, epoxy walled, gas filled pipe. Approximately 1.34 MJ from the NIF laser was used to heat the mixture of (55:45) Kr:Xe at 1.2 atm (˜5.59 mg/cm3) to emit in a fairly isotropic radiant intensity of 400-600 GW/sr from the Ephoton = 3-7 keV spectral range for a duration of ≈ 14 ns. The HYDRA simulated radiant intensities were in reasonable agreement with experiments but deviated at late times.

  12. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  13. Optomechanical considerations for the VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Morris I.; Celeste, John R.; Frogget, Brent C.; Lee, Tony L.; GacGowan, Brian J.; Malone, Robert M.; Ng, Edmund W.; Tunnell, Tom W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2006-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The velocity interferometer for any reflector measures shock velocities at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Our team designed two systems, one for a polar port orientation, and the other to accommodate two equatorial ports. The polar-oriented design requires a 48-m optical relay to move the light from inside the target chamber to a separately housed measurement and laser illumination station. The currently operational equatorial design requires a much shorter relay of 21 m. Both designs posed significant optomechanical challenges due to the long optical path length, large quantity of optical elements, and stringent NIF requirements. System design had to tightly control the use of lubricants and materials, especially those inside the vacuum chamber; tolerate earthquakes and radiation; and consider numerous other tolerance, alignment, and steering adjustment issues. To ensure compliance with NIF performance requirements, we conducted a finite element analysis.

  14. Design of the neutron imaging pinhole for use at the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, Valerie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Felix P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilde, Carl H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilke, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic is designed to be used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This instrument will be used to image both primary (14MeV neutrons) and down scattered (6-8MeV neutrons). The pinhole body sits 225mm from the target, while the scintillator and recording systems are located 28m from the target. The diagnostic uses port 90, 315 and the recording system is located in a specifically built room located outside of switchyard I. The location of the pinhole and the recording system combine to give a magnification of 104. The recording of both the primary and downscattered image is done by recording the image from both the front and back side of the scintillator.

  15. Upgrades to the Radiochemistry Analysis of Gas Samples (RAGS) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Donald; Christensen, Kim; Velsko, Carol; Cassata, Bill; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Lugten, John; Golod, Tony; Massey, Warren

    2015-08-01

    The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus operates at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). At the NIF, xenon is injected into the target chamber as a tracer, used as an analyte in the NIF targets, and generated as a fission product from 14 MeV neutron fission of depleted uranium contained in the NIF hohlraum. Following a NIF shot, the RAGS apparatus used to collect the gas from the NIF target chamber and then to cryogenically fractionate xenon gas. Radio-xenon and other activation products are collected and counted via gamma spectrometry, with the results used to determine critical physics parameters including: capsule areal density, fuel-ablator mix, and nuclear cross sections.

  16. Mach-Zehnder fiber-optic links for reaction history measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. Kirk; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the details of the analog fiber-optic data link that will be used in the chamber-mounted Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in Livermore, California. The system is based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulators integrated into the diagnostic, with the source lasers and bias control electronics located remotely to protect the active electronics. A complete recording system for a single GRH channel comprises two MZ modulators, with the fiber signals split onto four channels on a single digitizer. By carefully selecting the attenuation, the photoreceiver, and the digitizer settings, the dynamic range achievable is greater than 1000:1 at the full system bandwidth of greater than 10 GHz. The system is designed to minimize electrical reflections and mitigate the effects of transient radiation darkening on the fibers.

  17. Simulation of a gamma reaction history (GRH) detector for use at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafil, Elliot; Toebbe, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Reaction history measurements are critical to diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. As such they will be essential components of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics. One proposed method to record the reaction history is the construction of a gamma-sensitive gas Cerenkov detector. An array of these Cerenkov detectors can be used to discriminate between the different gamma ray energies produced during the ICF implosion. These fusion gammas are converted to optical photons for collection by fast recording systems. We have simulated the gamma reaction history (GRH) detector under development at NIF and LANL using Geant4. Our simulations have been used to determine energy cut-off ranges for photon production in various gases, optimizing converter material and thickness, and discriminating between proposed detector geometries in order to minimize the temporal spread of the signal.

  18. ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2012-01-05

    The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

  19. Signal and background considerations for the MRSt on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wink, C. W., E-mail: cwink@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Bionta, R.; Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) has been conceptually designed for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility. Using the MRSt, the goals are to measure the time-evolution of the spectrum with a time resolution of ∼20-ps and absolute accuracy better than 5%. To meet these goals, a detailed understanding and optimization of the signal and background characteristics are required. Through ion-optics, MCNP simulations, and detector-response calculations, it is demonstrated that the goals and a signal-to background >5–10 for the down-scattered neutron measurement are met if the background, consisting of ambient neutrons and gammas, at the MRSt is reduced 50–100 times.

  20. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-19

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  1. A recoverable gas-cell diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratkiewicz, A., E-mail: ratkiewicz1@llnl.gov; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Cassata, W. S.; Velsko, C. A.; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 95440 (United States); Bernstein, L. A.; Bibber, K. van; Goldblum, B. L. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Siem, S. [University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2016-11-15

    The high-fluence neutron spectrum produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides an opportunity to measure the activation of materials by fast-spectrum neutrons. A new large-volume gas-cell diagnostic has been designed and qualified to measure the activation of gaseous substances at the NIF. This in-chamber diagnostic is recoverable, reusable and has been successfully fielded. Data from the qualification of the diagnostic have been used to benchmark an Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code simulation describing the downscattered neutron spectrum seen by the gas cell. We present early results from the use of this diagnostic to measure the activation of {sup nat}Xe and discuss future work to study the strength of interactions between plasma and nuclei.

  2. Inertial Fusion Energy Development: What is Needed and What will be Learned at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1999-10-21

    Successful development of inertial fusion energy (IFE) requires that many technical issues be resolved. Separability of drivers, targets, chambers and other IFE power plant subsystems allows resolution of many of these issues in off-line facilities and programs. Periodically, major integrated facilities give a snapshot of the rate of progress toward the ultimate solutions. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Laser Megajoule (LMJ) are just such integrating facilities. This paper reviews the status of IFE development and projects what will be learned from the NIF and LMJ.

  3. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Lee, J. J.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-01

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic-a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20-500 keV range-has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ˜300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U Kβ). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (˜90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  4. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ∼300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub β}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (∼90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  5. Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell Subsystem Performance in the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    6.25 Ω) pulse forming line (PFL) composed of eight sections of RG-217 configured in parallel, commutated by a thyratron (EEV Model CX-2282). The... thyratron -switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a...current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron -switched pulse

  6. The preliminary design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P.; Ross, J. S.; Froula, D.; Galbraith, J.; Glenzer, S.; Hatch, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Montgomery, D.; Moody, J.; Swadling, G.; Weaver, J.; Vergel de Dios, G.; Vitalich, M.

    2016-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion programs. We report on the preliminary design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beamsplitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ0 between 185-215 nm) will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 5 x 1020 electrons/cm3 while a 3ω probe will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 1 x 1019 electrons/cm3. We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS recording system to measure background levels at NIF and phase II will include the integration of a probe laser.

  7. The design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P. S.; Ross, J. S.; Froula, D. H.; Daub, K. D.; Galbraith, J.; Glenzer, S.; Hatch, B.; Katz, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.; Manha, D.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Montgomery, D.; Moody, J.; Swadling, G. F.; Weaver, J.

    2016-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs. We report on the design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beam splitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ0-210 nm) will be used to optimize the scattered signal for plasma densities of 5 × 1020 electrons/cm3 while a 3ω probe will be used for experiments investigating lower density plasmas of 1 × 1019 electrons/cm3. We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS telescope, spectrometer, and streak camera; these will be used to assess the background levels at NIF. Phase II will include the design and installation of a probe laser.

  8. Next generation gamma-ray Cherenkov detectors for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Stoeffl, W.; Khater, H.; Hernandez, J. E.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.; Shmayda, W. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The newest generation of Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) employed in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility has provided improved performance over previous generations. Comparison of reaction histories measured using two different deuterium-tritium fusion products, namely gamma rays using GCD and neutrons using Neutron Temporal Diagnostic (NTD), have provided added credibility to both techniques. GCD-3 is now being brought to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to supplement the existing Gamma Reaction History (GRH-6m) located 6 m from target chamber center (TCC). Initially it will be located in a reentrant well located 3.9 m from TCC. Data from GCD-3 will inform the design of a heavily-shielded "Super" GCD to be located as close as 20 cm from TCC. It will also provide a test-bed for faster optical detectors, potentially lowering the temporal resolution from the current ˜100 ps state-of-the-art photomultiplier tubes (PMT) to ˜10 ps Pulse Dilation PMT technology currently under development.

  9. SRS analyses of direct-drive ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P.; Rosenberg, M.; Myatt, J.; Solodov, A.; Seka, W.; Chapman, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D.; Regan, S.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    A series of planar target experiments was recently conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the laser-plasma interactions processes responsible for the production of suprathermal electrons, and their scaling from experiments at the Omega facility to full-scale ICF experiments at the MJ level on the NIF. We will present experimental analyses and simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) in these planar target experiments. Our work indicates the presence of purely backscattered SRS refracted off nearly one-dimensional density gradients, as well as more complicated features such as side-scatter and scattering from non-1D features (e.g. edges) in the target. Simulations using ray- and paraxial-wave- based simulation codes are used to extrapolate the hot electron fraction from the SRS measurements, and point to SRS being the primary mechanism for the generation of suprathermal electrons in these experiments. We will also present analyses of spherical implosions experiments and provide extrapolations and implications for future full-scale direct-drive experiments at NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Wavefront control of high power laser beams for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, E; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Koch, J; Lund, L; Sacks, R; Smith, D; Stolz, C; Van Atta, L; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1999-09-22

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focus ability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  11. Polar Direct Drive--Simulations and Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) is a valuable platform to study implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). While hydrodynamic behavior is expected to scale between OMEGA and the NIF, coronal laser-plasma interactions that influence drive and shell preheat are expected to be different because of the larger coronal density scale lengths characteristic of the NIF. The goal of NIF experiments is to validate physics models (e.g., thermal transport and laser-plasma interactions relevant to energy coupling) at these longer scale lengths to gain confidence in hydrodynamic simulations of direct-drive implosions. Models in the hydrodynamic code DRACO, validated using OMEGA implosions, are used to design and interpret NIF experiments. The physics in these models, including cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal transport, is discussed. Comparisons with observations including shell and ablation surface trajectory, temporally resolved scattered light and spectra, bang time, shell shape, time-resolved x-ray emission, and areal density are presented from OMEGA and NIF experiments. Excellent agreement is obtained on the backlit shell trajectories and scattered light, providing confidence in the modeling of the laser drive at the longer scale. Possible reasons for the discrepancy in the predicted trajectory of the ablation surface are discussed and planned experiments to address issues such as imprint and shock timing are presented. As will be shown, high-convergence implosions should be possible with custom phase plates relevant to PDD, improved single-beam smoothing, and laser pulse shaping. Such implosions are a necessary step toward a future direct-drive -ignition campaign. A path forward for direct drive on the NIF is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. An Investigation Into Bayesian Networks for Modeling National Ignition Facility Capsule Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J

    2008-08-18

    Bayesian networks (BN) are an excellent tool for modeling uncertainties in systems with several interdependent variables. A BN is a directed acyclic graph, and consists of a structure, or the set of directional links between variables that depend on other variables, and conditional probabilities (CP) for each variable. In this project, we apply BN's to understand uncertainties in NIF ignition experiments. One can represent various physical properties of National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosions as variables in a BN. A dataset containing simulations of NIF capsule implosions was provided. The dataset was generated from a radiation hydrodynamics code, and it contained 120 simulations of 16 variables. Relevant knowledge about the physics of NIF capsule implosions and greedy search algorithms were used to search for hypothetical structures for a BN. Our preliminary results found 6 links between variables in the dataset. However, we thought there should have been more links between the dataset variables based on the physics of NIF capsule implosions. Important reasons for the paucity of links are the relatively small size of the dataset, and the sampling of the values for dataset variables. Another factor that might have caused the paucity of links is the fact that in the dataset, 20% of the simulations represented successful fusion, and 80% didn't, (simulations of unsuccessful fusion are useful for measuring certain diagnostics) which skewed the distributions of several variables, and possibly reduced the number of links. Nevertheless, by illustrating the interdependencies and conditional probabilities of several parameters and diagnostics, an accurate and complete BN built from an appropriate simulation set would provide uncertainty quantification for NIF capsule implosions.

  13. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  14. Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Short, R. W.; Shaw, J. G.; Regan, S. P.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interaction instabilities, such as two-plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by generated high-energy electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO has been used to design planar-target experiments that generate plasma and interaction conditions relevant to direct-drive-ignition designs (IL 1015 W / cm 2 , Te > 3 KeV density gradient scale lengths of Ln 600 μm) . The hot-electron temperature of 40to50keV and the fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons of 0.5to were inferred based on comparing the simulated and experimentally observed x-ray emission when the laser intensity at the quarter-critical surface increased from 6 to 15 ×1014 W / cm 2 . The measured SRS energy was sufficient to explain the observed total energy in hot electrons. Implications for ignition-scale direct-drive experiments and hot-electron preheat mitigation using mid- Z ablators will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Scope of Work for Integration Management and Installation Services of the National Ignition Facility Beampath Infrastructure System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, P.D.

    2000-03-19

    The goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is to provide an aboveground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation and to provide a facility capable of achieving fusion ignition using solid-state lasers as the energy driver. The facility will incorporate 192 laser beams, which will be focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber--the energy from the laser beams will be deposited in a few billionths of a second. The target will then implode, forcing atomic nuclei to sufficiently high temperatures and densities necessary to achieve a miniature fusion reaction. The NIF is under construction, at Livermore, California, located approximately 50 miles southeast of San Francisco, California.

  16. Scope of Work for Integration Management and Installation Services of the National Ignition Facility Beampath Infrastructure System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, P.D.

    2000-04-25

    The goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is to provide an aboveground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation and to provide a facility capable of achieving fusion ignition using solid-state lasers as the energy driver. The facility will incorporate 192 laser beams, which will be focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber--the energy from the laser beams will be deposited in a few billionths of a second. The target will then implode, forcing atomic nuclei to sufficiently high temperatures and densities necessary to achieve a miniature fusion reaction. The NIF is under construction, at Livermore, California, located approximately 50 miles southeast of San Francisco, California.

  17. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  18. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  19. Technical documentation in support of the project-specific analysis for construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Vinikour, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Allison, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This document provides information that supports or supplements the data and impact analyses presented in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project-Specific Analysis (PSA). The purposes of NIF are to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology and to conduct high- energy-density experiments ins support of national security and civilian application. NIF is an important element in the DOE`s science-based SSM Program, a key mission of which is to ensure the reliability of the nation`s enduring stockpile of nuclear weapons. NIF would also advance the knowledge of basic and applied high-energy- density science and bring the nation a large step closer to developing fusion energy for civilian use. The NIF PSA includes evaluations of the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the facility at one of five candidate site and for two design options.

  20. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Boege, Steven J.; Boyd, Robert D.; Davis, Donald T.; Demaret, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark; Gates, Alan J.; Holdener, Fred R.; Knopp, Carl F.; Kyker, R. D.; Lauman, C. W.; McCarville, Tom J.; Miller, John L.; Miller-Kamm, Victoria J.; Rivera, W. E.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Severyn, J. R.; Sheem, Sang K.; Thomas, Stan W.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Wang, David Y.; Yoeman, M. F.; Zacharias, Richard A.; Chocol, Clifford J.; Hollis, J.; Whitaker, Daniel E.; Brucker, J.; Bronisz, L.; Sheridan, T.

    1999-07-01

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro- E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensor are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams.

  1. Control of Be capsule low mode implosions symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Nagel, S.; Rygg, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of the beryllium experimental campaign on the implosion symmetry properties of beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. These indirect drive experiments measure both the inflight and core self-emission implosion symmetry. The inflight symmetry of the ablator before stagnation is measured using a backlight imaging technique. A copper backlighter was used to measure the transmissions (or backlit absorption) of the copper doped beryllium shells. Images of the x-ray emission from the core around bang time provide a measure of the symmetry near peak compression. Both pieces of information about the 2D symmetry are used to infer the drive and velocity uniformity enabling us to predictably adjust the properties of the incident laser, mainly the time dependent ratio of the inner beam cone power to the outer laser beam powers, to achieve proper symmetry of the implosion. Results from these experiments show inner beam propagation is not degraded compared to similar implosions with CH ablators. Variations in the shape compared with implosions using CH ablators also provides information about the cross beam energy transfer used to adjust the equatorial shape and thus infer information about the differences in plasma conditions near the laser entrance holes. Experimental results of the implosion shape for beryllium capsules will be presented along with comparisons relative to CH ablators.

  2. X-ray drive of beryllium capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Olson, R. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Celliers, P. M.; Schneider, M. B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.

    2016-05-01

    National Ignition Facility experiments with beryllium capsules have followed a path begun with “high-foot” plastic capsule implosions. Three shock timing keyhole targets, one symmetry capsule, a streaked backlit capsule, and a 2D backlit capsule were fielded before the DT layered shot. After backscatter subtraction, laser drive degradation is needed to match observed X-ray drives. VISAR measurements determined drive degradation for the picket, trough, and second pulse. Time dependence of the total Dante flux reflects degradation of the of the third laser pulse. The same drive degradation that matches Dante data for three beryllium shots matches Dante and bangtimes for plastic shots N130501 and N130812. In the picket of both Be and CH hohlraums, calculations over-estimate the x-ray flux > 1.8 keV by ∼100X, while calculating the total flux correctly. In beryllium calculations these X-rays cause an early expansion of the beryllium/fuel interface at ∼3 km/s. VISAR measurements gave only ∼0.3 km/s. The X-ray drive on the Be DT capsule was further degraded by an unplanned decrease of 9% in the total picket flux. This small change caused the fuel adiabat to rise from 1.8 to 2.3. The first NIF beryllium DT implosion achieved 29% of calculated yield, compared to CH capsules with 68% and 21%.

  3. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or "shimmed," so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  4. Overview of the line-imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Ng, Edmund W.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets sized from 1 to 5 millimeters. A 20-cm-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 from the targets inside the 10-meter-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter at the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is split into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A pair of corrector lenses on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Streak cameras perform all VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. Alignment techniques are discussed.

  5. Fielding of an Imaging VISAR Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R; Bower, J; Capelle, G; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Kauffman, M; Lare, G; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Montelongo, S; Thomas, T; Tunnell, T; Watts, P

    2004-06-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

  6. Energetics Measurements of Silver Halfraum Targets at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Dunlop, W. H.; Kane, J. O.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Patterson, R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Guyton, R.; Giraldez, E.

    2013-10-01

    The energetics of silver halfraum targets are presented from laser plasma experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Four beams from the NIF laser were used to heat the halfraum targets with ~ 10 kJ of energy in a 1 ns square laser pulse. The silver halfraum targets were spheres 2 mm in diameter with an 800 μm laser entrance hole (LEH). Targets with different sphere wall thicknesses (8 to 16 μm) were characterized. The energetics and the laser coupling to the targets were determined to be 0.92 by using the NIF X-ray (Dante) and optical backscatter diagnostics (NBI and FABS). The energy losses from the targets were through X-ray radiation and backscatter from laser plasma instabilities (SRS and SBS) from the LEH. As expected the different wall thickness had different levels of burn through emission. The thickest walled target (~ 15.9 μm) had very low radiative losses through the target wall. The thinnest walled targets (~ 8 μm) radiated about 0.2 of the input energy into the X-ray region. This work was done under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  8. Fielding of an imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Bower, John R.; Capelle, Gene A.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lare, Gregory A.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Montelongo, Samuel; Ng, Edmund W.; Thomas, Thayne L., Jr.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2004-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

  9. Frequency converter design and manufacturing considerations for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbard, R.L.; English, R.E., Jr.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Montesanti, R.C.

    1998-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams, Figure 1. The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1{omega}) of 1.053 {micro}m. Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) produces 1.8 Mj of the third harmonic light (3{omega} or {lambda}=0.35). On NIF the frequency conversion crystals are part of the Final Optics Assembly (FOA), whose two principal functions are to convert the laser light to 3{omega} and focus it on target. In addition, the FOA provides a vacuum window to the target chamber, smoothes the on- target irradiance profile, moves the unconverted light away from the target, and provides signals for alignment and diagnostics. The FOA has four Integrated Optics Modules (IOM), Figure 4, each of which contains two 41 cm square crystals are mounted with the full edge support to micro radian angular and micron flatness tolerances. This paper is intended to be an overview of the important factors that affect frequency conversion on NIF. Chief among these are angular errors arising from crystal growth, finishing, and mounting. The general nature of these errors and how they affect frequency conversion, and finally the importance of a frequency conversion metrology tool in assessing converter performance before opto-mechanical assemblies are installed on NIF will be discussed.

  10. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  11. A test cassette for x-ray-exposure experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Celeste, J.; Rekow, V.; Bopp, D. R.; May, M. J.; Fisher, J. H.; Horton, R.; Newlander, C. D.; Jenkins, P.; Trautz, K.

    2010-07-01

    We present the design and operation of a test cassette for exposure of samples to radiation environments at the National Ignition Facility. The cassette provides options for square and round samples and exposure areas; the cassette provides for multiple levels of filtration on a single sample, which allows dynamic range in experiments. The samples had normal lines of sight to the x-ray source in order to have uniform x-ray illumination. The incident x-radiation onto the samples was determined by the choice of filter thicknesses and materials. The samples were held at precise locations, accurate to within a few hundred microns, in the target chamber in order to have a known fluence incident. In the cassette, the samples were held in place in such a way that a minimal “line contact” allows them to have the maximal mechanical response to the x-ray load. We present postshot images of the debris found on films used for filters, and pre- and postexposure specimens.

  12. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Efthimion, P C; Ellis, R; Gao, L; Maddox, J; Pablant, N A; Schneider, M B; Chen, H; Ayers, S; Kauffman, R L; MacPhee, A G; Beiersdorfer, P; Bettencourt, R; Ma, T; Nora, R C; Scott, H A; Thorn, D B; Kilkenny, J D; Nelson, D; Shoup, M; Maron, Y

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s(2)-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s(2)-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  13. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  14. Performance of indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility using adiabat-shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Baker, K. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    A series of indirectly driven capsule implosions has been performed on the National Ignition Facility to assess the relative contributions of ablation-front instability growth vs. fuel compression on implosion performance. Laser pulse shapes for both low and high-foot pulses were modified to vary ablation-front growth and fuel adiabat, separately and controllably. Three principal conclusions are drawn from this study: (1) It is shown that reducing ablation-front instability growth in low-foot implosions results in a substantial (3-10X) increase in neutron yield with no loss of fuel compression. (2) It is shown that reducing the fuel adiabat in high-foot implosions results in a significant (36%) increase in fuel compression together with a small (10%) increase in neutron yield. (3) Increased electron preheat at higher laser power in high-foot implosions, however, appears to offset the gain in compression achieved by adiabat-shaping at lower power. These results taken collectively bridge the space between the higher compression low-foot results and the higher yield high-foot results.

  15. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.A.Smalyuk; S.V.Weber; D.T.Casey; D.S.Clark; J.E.Field; S.W.Haan; A.V.Hamza; D.E.Hoover; O.L.Landen; A.Nikroo; H.F.Robey; C.R.Weber

    2015-01-01

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional(3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility(NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841(2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3D simulations. At a convergence ratio of~2.4, the measured modulation levels were~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. Future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘nativeroughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.

  16. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ellis, R.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, S.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bettencourt, R.; Ma, T.; Nora, R. C.; Scott, H. A.; Thorn, D. B.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nelson, D.; Shoup, M.; Maron, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s2-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s2-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  17. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatherley, V. E.; Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-11-01

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  18. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel; Weber, Christopher; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Robey, Harry; Kritcher, Andrea; Milovich, Jose; Salmonson, Jay

    2016-10-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or ``shimmed,'' so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleuel D.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ∼20–200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM, 25–50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n′ reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  20. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, V. E., E-mail: vef@lanl.gov; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  1. Complete time-resolved polarimetry of scattered light at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, David; Ayers, Shannon; Bell, Perry; Chow, Robert; Frieders, Gene; Hibbard, Robin L.; Michel, Pierre; Ralph, Joseph E.; Ross, James S.; Stanley, Joel R.; Vickers, James L.; Zeid, Ziad M.; Moody, John D.

    2015-08-01

    The 3ω scattered light polarimetry diagnostic in the 30° incidence cone backscatter diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being upgraded to measure the full time-resolved Stokes vector. Previously, the diagnostic had a single channel capable of diagnosing the time-integrated balance of the horizontal and vertical polarizations. Two additional channels were added - one that measures the balance of the 45° and 135° projections, and another that measures the right- and left-circular polarizations - and together the three complete the Stokes vector measurement. A division-of-aperture scheme is employed in which three nearby portions of the near field are sampled simultaneously. Time resolution is obtained by relaying an image of the measured regions onto a set of fibers coupled to diodes. The new diagnostic will be capable of measuring scattered light signals crossed-beam energy transfer in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. It will also be used to diagnose Faraday rotation induced by magnetic fields in collisionless shock and turbulent dynamo experiments later this year.

  2. A neutron activation spectrometer and neutronic experimental platform for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Gharibyan, N.

    2016-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, the diagnostic instrument manipulator-based neutron activation spectrometer is used as a diagnostic of implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Additionally, it serves as a platform for independent neutronic experiments and may be connected to fast recording systems for neutron effect tests on active electronics. As an implosion diagnostic, the neutron activation spectrometers are used to quantify fluence of primary DT neutrons, downscattered neutrons, and neutrons above the primary DT neutron energy created by reactions of upscattered D and T in flight. At a primary neutron yield of 1015 and a downscattered fraction of neutrons in the 10-12 MeV energy range of 0.04, the downscattered neutron fraction can be measured to a relative uncertainty of 8%. Significant asymmetries in downscattered neutrons have been observed. Spectrometers have been designed and fielded to measure the tritium-tritium and deuterium-tritium neutron outputs simultaneously in experiments using DT/TT fusion ratio as a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas.

  3. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead, J; Moore, A S; Ahmed, M F; Morton, J; Guymer, T M; Soufli, R; Pardini, T; Hibbard, R L; Bailey, C G; Bell, P M; Hau-Riege, S; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Reagan, S; Agliata, T; Jungquist, R; Schmidt, D W; Kot, L B; Garbett, W J; Rubery, M S; Skidmore, J W; Gullikson, E; Salmassi, F

    2016-05-01

    A new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF's x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters were used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300-510 eV and 200-400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.

  4. Considerations for a PDV diagnostic capability on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayer, Daniel K.; Fratanduono, Dayne

    2016-09-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has become widely and routinely used in many high-velocity experimental applications due to its improved ease of use, cost, experimental flexibility, data return, and robustness compared to earlier velocimetric methods. However, these earlier methods have advantages in applications with requirements beyond PDV's current capabilities. Various classes of experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) that are characterized by extremely high velocity or acceleration, or diagnostic requirements for high precision in timing and/or velocity, have historically seen a VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any surface) diagnostic employed due to such advantages. VISAR, however, requires specific, and sometimes challenging, experimental features, including planar geometry and normal incidence, high-reflectivity surface treatment, and a relatively large and inflexible diagnostic footprint. Therefore, the potential for implementing a PDV diagnostic at NIF has been evaluated by researchers from National Security Technologies, LLC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We present the results of this study, weigh the relative merits of the two methodologies with consideration of experimental phenomena and requirements, and discuss possible implementations and future directions.

  5. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, C. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Compton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shingleton, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, J. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtmeier, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loey, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mirkarimi, P. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guyton, R. L. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States); Huffman, E. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  6. Capsule modeling of high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, M. V.; Sepke, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of detailed, capsule-only simulations of a set of high foot implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments span a range of ablator thicknesses, laser powers, and laser energies, and modeling these experiments as a set is important to assess whether the simulation model can reproduce the trends seen experimentally as the implosion parameters were varied. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations have been run including a number of effects—both nominal and off-nominal—such as hohlraum radiation asymmetries, surface roughness, the capsule support tent, and hot electron pre-heat. Selected three-dimensional simulations have also been run to assess the validity of the 2D axisymmetric approximation. As a composite, these simulations represent the current state of understanding of NIF high foot implosion performance using the best and most detailed computational model available. While the most detailed simulations show approximate agreement with the experimental data, it is evident that the model remains incomplete and further refinements are needed. Nevertheless, avenues for improved performance are clearly indicated.

  7. Methods for characterizing x-ray detectors for use at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S F; Benedetti, L R; Hargrove, D R; Glenn, S M; Simanovskaia, N; Holder, J P; Barrios, M A; Hahn, D; Nagel, S R; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K

    2012-10-01

    Gated and streaked x-ray detectors generally require corrections in order to counteract instrumental effects in the data. The method of correcting for gain variations in gated cameras fielded at National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described. Four techniques for characterizing the gated x-ray detectors are described. The current principal method of characterizing x-ray instruments is the production of controlled x-ray emission by laser-generated plasmas as a dedicated shot at the NIF. A recently commissioned pulsed x-ray source has the potential to replace the other characterization systems. This x-ray source features a pulsed power source consisting of a Marx generator, capacitor bank that is charged in series and discharged in parallel, producing up to 300 kV. The pulsed x-ray source initially suffered from a large jitter (∼60 ns), but the recent addition of a pulsed laser to trigger the spark gap has reduced the jitter to ∼5 ns. Initial results show that this tool is a promising alternative to the other flat fielding techniques.

  8. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Rundberg, R.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Boswell, M.; Klein, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first observation of tertiary reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons produced in compressed deuterium and tritium filled capsules using the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. RIF neutrons are produced by third-order, out of equilibrium ("in-flight") fusion reactions, initiated by primary fusion products. The rate of RIF reactions is dependent upon the range of the elastically scattered fuel ions and therefore a diagnostic of Coulomb physics within the plasma. At plasma temperatures of ˜5 keV, the presence of neutrons with kinetic energies greater than 15 MeV is a unique signature for RIF neutron production. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a threshold of 15.0 MeV, and a unique decay scheme making it a suitable diagnostic for observing RIF neutrons. RIF neutron production is quantified by the ratio of 167Tm/168Tm observed in a 169Tm foil, where the reaction 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm samples the primary neutron fluence. Averaged over 4 implosions1-4 at the NIF, the 167Tm/168Tm ratio is measured to be 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10-5, leading to an average ratio of RIF to primary neutron ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10-4. These ratios are consistent with the predictions for charged particle stopping in a quantum degenerate plasma.

  9. First Measurement of Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, Anton; Cerjan, C.; Fortner, D.; Henry, E.; Shaughnessy, D.; Schnieder, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Stoyer, M.; Yeamans, C.; Boswell, M.; Bredeweg, T.; Grim, G.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M.; Hayes, A.; Obst, A.; Rundberg, R.; Schulz, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Wilde, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M.; Howell, C.; Toenow, W.; LLNL/LANL/TUNL Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The first measurement of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons, also known as tertiary neutrons, has been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using an activation technique. Thulium foils positioned at 50 cm from the burning deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule have been exposed to the characteristic DT neutron spectrum. The high-energy part of these neutrons with energies above 15.0 MeV can produce 167Tm via the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. The 208-keV γ-ray, emitted from the decay of 167Tm with a half-life of 9.2 days, has been measured using two clover detectors. The first preliminary result implies that the ratio of RIF neutrons (En>15.0 MeV) versus the total neutrons is 1x10-4 +/- 3x10-5. The important implication of these measurements on our knowledge of the charged-particle stopping power in strongly coupled quantum-degenerate plasma will be presented.

  10. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a signature for shell mixing in National Ignition Facility capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Jungman, Gerard; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic calculations and results from computational simulations are presented that suggest that reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons can be used to diagnose mixing of the ablator shell material into the fuel in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. S. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. Such mixing processes in NIF capsules are of fundamental physical interest and can have important effects on capsule performance, quenching the total thermonuclear yield. The sensitivity of RIF neutrons to hydrodynamical mixing arises through the dependence of RIF production on charged-particle stopping lengths in the mixture of DT fuel and ablator material. Since the stopping power in the plasma is a sensitive function of the electron temperature and density, it is also sensitive to mix. RIF production scales approximately inversely with the degree of mixing taking place, and the ratio of RIF to down-scattered neutrons provides a measure of the mix fraction and/or the mixing length. For sufficiently high-yield capsules, where spatially resolved RIF images may be possible, neutron imaging could be used to map RIF images into detailed mix images.

  11. Near Field Intensity Trends of Main Laser Alignment Images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, R R; Beltsar, I; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Kamm, V M; Salmon, T; Wilhelmsen, K

    2015-01-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years; during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or ‘big data’ archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics over time performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements and was used to view potential trends. Results are presented for the NIF input and output sensor package trends and changes over the three year time-frame.

  12. X-ray area backlighter development at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, M. A., E-mail: barriosgarci1@llnl.gov; Fournier, K. B.; Smith, R.; Lazicki, A.; Rygg, R.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J.; Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O. L.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    1D spectral imaging was used to characterize the K-shell emission of Z ≈ 30–35 and Z ≈ 40–42 laser-irradiated foils at the National Ignition Facility. Foils were driven with up to 60 kJ of 3ω light, reaching laser irradiances on target between 0.5 and 20 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser-to-X-ray conversion efficiency (CE) into the He{sub α} line (plus satellite emission) of 1.0%–1.5% and 0.15%–0.2% was measured for Z ≈ 30–32 and Z ≈ 40–42, respectively. Measured CE into He{sub α} (plus satellite emission) of Br (Z = 35) compound foils (either KBr or RbBr) ranged between 0.16% and 0.29%. Measured spectra are compared with 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetic and radiation transport simulations, providing a fast and accurate predictive capability.

  13. Near field intensity trends of main laser alignment images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Beltsar, Ilona; Burkhart, Scott; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Salmon, Thad; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years and during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or `big data' archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements. Changes in light transmission from the NIF main laser over the three year time-frame are presented.

  14. Correcting raw diagnostic data for oscilloscope recording system distortions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebman, Judith, E-mail: Liebman1@LLNL.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, Steve; Williams, Wade [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Miller, Kirk [NSTec Special Technologies Laboratory (United States); Bettenhausen, Rita; Clowdus, Lisa; Marsh, Amber; Chakicherla, Anu; Hutton, Matthew; Casey, Allan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-speed shot data from NIF oscilloscope waveforms are often distorted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe specialized corrections for two example NIF diagnostic systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Dante, non-uniform time-base corrections for the scopes are applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mach-Zehnder optical demodulation and 'stitching' are applied to GRH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multi-node analysis engine performs scope corrections automatically. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is now producing experimental results for the study of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). These results are captured by complex diagnostic systems and are key to achieving NIF's goal to demonstrate thermonuclear burn of deuterium and tritium fuel in a laboratory setting. High bandwidth gamma-ray fusion-burn measurements and soft X-ray indirect and direct drive energetic measurements are both captured with oscilloscope recording systems that distort or modulate the raw data. The Shot Data Analysis team has developed signal processing corrections for these oscilloscope recording systems through an automated engine. Once these corrections are applied, accurate fundamental quantities can be discerned.

  15. Digitizer architecture analysis for target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, A. C.; Clancy, T. J.; Beeman, B.; Bell, P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper covers a systems engineering analysis of existing scope-based Target Diagnostics (TD) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), for the purpose of selecting a standard digitizer architecture future diagnostics. Key performance criteria and a summary of test results are presented. Currently of the 60+ Target Diagnostics, at least fifteen use a type of high speed electrical signal data read-out device leading to over 200 digitization channels spread over six types of CRT and digital oscilloscopes, each with multiple models and versions. The proposed standard architecture discussed in this paper allows the NIF to efficiently and reliably operate digitizers that meet the required performance metrics for the lifetime of the NIF. The systems engineering analysis identifies key stakeholders for multiple subsets of scope-based diagnostics including but not limited to the nToFs (neutron Time of Flight), DANTE a broadband, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, SPBT (South Pole Bang Time), GRH (Gamma Reaction History), and FFLEX (Filter Fluorescer Diagnostic). From these stakeholders, key performance metrics are derived and feed into test and evaluation criteria for different digitizers and architectures.

  16. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility, July 30, 1999 (NIF-0001374-OC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, D W

    1999-07-30

    These rules apply to all LLNL employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and contractors/subcontractors. The General Rules-Code of Safe Practices shall be used by management to promote accident prevention through indoctrination, safety and health training and on-the-job application. As a condition for contracts award, all contractors and subcontractors and their employees must certify on Form S and H A-l that they have read and understand, or have been briefed and understand, the National Ignition Facility OCIP Project General Rules-Code of Safe Practices. (An interpreter must brief those employees who do not speak or read English fluently.) In addition, all contractors and subcontractors shall adopt a written General Rules-Code of Safe Practices that relates to their operations. The General Rules-Code of Safe Practices must be posted at a conspicuous location at the job site office or be provided to each supervisory employee who shall have it readily available. Copies of the General Rules-Code of Safe Practices can also be included in employee safety pamphlets.

  17. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Diagnostic Set at the Completion of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) September 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkenny, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bell, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, D. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kalantar, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kauffman, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaughnessy, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shelton, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Batha, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grim, G. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangster, T. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edgell, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glebov, V. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regan, S. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gatu-Johnson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Petrasso, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rindernecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cooper, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruiz, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-05

    At the completion of the National Ignition Campaign NIF had about 36 different types of diagnostics. These were based on several decades of development on Nova and OMEGA and involved the whole US ICF community. A plan for a limited of NIF Diagnostics was documented by the Joint Central Diagnostic Team in the NIF Conceptual Design Report in 1994. These diagnostics and many more were installed diagnostics by two decades later. We give a short description of each of the 36 different types of NIC diagnostics grouped by the function of the diagnostics, namely target drive, target response and target assembly, stagnation and burn. A comparison of NIF diagnostics with the Nova diagnostics shows that the NIF diagnostic capability is broadly equivalent to that of Nova’s in 1999. NIF diagnostics have a much greater degree of automation and rigor than Nova’s and the NIF diagnostic suite incorporates some scientific innovation compared to Nova and OMEGA namely one much higher speed x-ray imager. Directions for future NIF diagnostics are discussed.

  18. The National Ignition Facility: Status of the Integrated Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Arsdall, P J; Bryant, R; Carey, R; Casavant, D; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Ferguson, W; Krammen, J; Lagin, L; Larson, D; Lee, A; Ludwigsen, P; Miller, M; Moses, E; Nyholm, R; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Wuest, C

    2003-10-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). ICCS is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors attached to nearly 60,000 control points and coordinated by supervisor subsystems in the main control room. The functional subsystems--beam control including automatic beam alignment and wavefront correction, laser pulse generation and pre-amplification, diagnostics, pulse power, and timing--implement automated shot control, archive data, and support the actions of fourteen operators at graphic consoles. Object-oriented software development uses a mixed language environment of Ada (for functional controls) and Java (for user interface and database backend). The ICCS distributed software framework uses CORBA to communicate between languages and processors. ICCS software is approximately three quarters complete with over 750 thousand source lines of code having undergone off-line verification tests and deployed to the facility. NIF has entered the first phases of its laser commissioning program. NIF's highest 3{omega} single laser beam performance is 10.4 kJ, equivalent to 2 MJ

  19. Facile Thermal and Optical Ignition of Silicon Nanoparticles and Micron Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sidi; Parimi, Venkata Sharat; Deng, Sili; Lingamneni, Srilakshmi; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2017-10-11

    Silicon (Si) particles are widely utilized as high-capacity electrodes for Li-ion batteries, elements for thermoelectric devices, agents for bioimaging and therapy, and many other applications. However, Si particles can ignite and burn in air at elevated temperatures or under intense illumination. This poses potential safety hazards when handling, storing, and utilizing these particles for those applications. In order to avoid the problem of accidental ignition, it is critical to quantify the ignition properties of Si particles such as their sizes and porosities. To do so, we first used differential scanning calorimetry to experimentally determine the reaction onset temperature of Si particles under slow heating rates (∼0.33 K/s). We found that the reaction onset temperature of Si particles increased with the particle diameter from 805 °C at 20-30 nm to 935 °C at 1-5 μm. Then, we used a xenon (Xe) flash lamp to ignite Si particles under fast heating rates (∼10(3) to 10(6) K/s) and measured the minimum ignition radiant fluence (i.e., the radiant energy per unit surface area of Si particle beds required for ignition). We found that the measured minimum ignition radiant fluence decreased with decreasing Si particle size and was most sensitive to the porosity of the Si particle bed. These trends for the Xe flash ignition experiments were also confirmed by our one-dimensional unsteady simulation to model the heat transfer process. The quantitative information on Si particle ignition included in this Letter will guide the safe handling, storage, and utilization of Si particles for diverse applications and prevent unwanted fire hazards.

  20. Multi-objective optimization for the National Ignition Facility's Gamma Reaction History diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaria, George R.; Liebman, Judith A.; Sayre, Daniel B.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Bond, Essex J.; Church, Jennifer A.

    2013-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is producing experimental results for the study of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at NIF can detect gamma rays to measure fusion burn parameters such as fusion burn width, bang time, neutron yield, and areal density of the compressed ablator for cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions. Gamma-ray signals detected with this diagnostic are inherently distorted by hardware impulse response functions (IRFs) and gains, and are comprised of several components including gamma rays from laser-plasma interactions (LPI). One method for removing hardware distortions to approximate the gamma-ray reaction history is deconvolution. However, deconvolution of the distorted signal to obtain the gamma-ray reaction history and its associated parameters presents an ill-posed inverse problem and does not separate out the source components of the gamma-ray signal. A multi-dimensional parameter space model for the distorted gamma-ray signal has been developed in the literature. To complement a deconvolution, we develop a multi-objective optimization algorithm to determine the model parameters so that the error between the model and the collected gamma-ray data is minimized in the least-squares sense. The implementation of the optimization algorithm must be suffciently robust to be used in automated production software. To achieve this level of robustness, impulse response signals must be carefully processed and constraints on the parameter space based on theory and experimentation must be implemented to ensure proper convergence of the algorithm. In this paper, we focus on the optimization algorithm's theory and implementation.

  1. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  2. Clean Construction Protocol for the National Ignition Facility Beampath and Utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predmore, R A; VanDoren, D E; Stowers, I F; Stephenson, S A

    2002-01-04

    When the stadium-size, National Ignition Facility (NIF) is fully operational at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), its 192 laser beams will deliver 1.8 megajoules (500 terawatts) of energy onto a target to create extremely high temperatures and pressures for inertial confinement fusion research. Due to the high-energy-physics requirements of the NIF optical components, the optics and their surrounding beampath as well as the supporting utility systems must be fabricated, cleaned, assembled, and commissioned for precision cleanliness. This paper will provide an overview of the NIF cleanliness requirements, the clean construction protocol (CCP) specifications for the beampath and clean utilities, and techniques for verifying the CCP specifications. The NIF cleanliness requirements define limits for molecular and particulate contamination; the goal of these limits is to prevent contamination of the optical components. To prevent laser-induced damage and poor laser quality in the optical components, requirements for cleaning, assembly, installation, and commissioning in terms of particle and nonvolatile residue (NVR) levels are defined. The requirements in the interior of the beampath are parts-per-billion airborne molecular contamination (AMC) and Class 1 particulate levels. To achieve the cleanliness requirements for the beampath interior, a graded CCP approach is used as the NIF beampath and utilities are being constructed by a partnership between LLNL and the construction contractor, Jacobs Facilities, Inc. in a stadium-size Class 100,000 building. Installation of the beampath components utilizes localized mini-environments of Class 100 or better, with budgets of cleanliness exposure or ''class-hours'' for each clean connection. Garment, equipment, and operational considerations are evaluated with process verification. Verification of the beampath and utility cleanliness is performed with cleanliness exposure monitoring

  3. Observations and modeling of debris and shrapnel impacts on optics and diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of targets with laser energies spanning two orders of magnitude have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC targets are cryogenic with Si supports and cooling rings attached to an Al Thermo-Mechanical Package (TMP with a thin (30 micron Au hohlraum inside. Particular attention is placed on the low-energy shots where the TMP is not completely vaporized. In addition to NIC targets, a range of other targets has also been fielded on NIF. For all targets, simulations play a critical role in determining if the risks associated with debris and shrapnel are acceptable. In a number of cases, experiments were redesigned, based on simulations, to reduce risks or to obtain data. The majority of these simulations were done using the ALE-AMR code, which provides efficient late-time (100 – 1000 X the pulse duration 3 D calculations of complex NIF targets.

  4. Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, E

    2009-08-06

    The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the

  5. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  6. A Robust In-Situ Warp-Correction Algorithm For VISAR Streak Camera Data at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labaria, George R. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warrick, Abbie L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, Peter M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kalantar, Daniel H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam pulsed laser system for high-energy-density physics experiments. Sophisticated diagnostics have been designed around key performance metrics to achieve ignition. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is the primary diagnostic for measuring the timing of shocks induced into an ignition capsule. The VISAR system utilizes three streak cameras; these streak cameras are inherently nonlinear and require warp corrections to remove these nonlinear effects. A detailed calibration procedure has been developed with National Security Technologies (NSTec) and applied to the camera correction analysis in production. However, the camera nonlinearities drift over time, affecting the performance of this method. An in-situ fiber array is used to inject a comb of pulses to generate a calibration correction in order to meet the timing accuracy requirements of VISAR. We develop a robust algorithm for the analysis of the comb calibration images to generate the warp correction that is then applied to the data images. Our algorithm utilizes the method of thin-plate splines (TPS) to model the complex nonlinear distortions in the streak camera data. In this paper, we focus on the theory and implementation of the TPS warp-correction algorithm for the use in a production environment.

  7. Characterization of x-ray framing cameras for the National Ignition Facility using single photon pulse height analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J. P.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    Single hit pulse height analysis is applied to National Ignition Facility x-ray framing cameras to quantify gain and gain variation in a single micro-channel plate-based instrument. This method allows the separation of gain from detectability in these photon-detecting devices. While pulse heights measured by standard-DC calibration methods follow the expected exponential distribution at the limit of a compound-Poisson process, gain-gated pulse heights follow a more complex distribution that may be approximated as a weighted sum of a few exponentials. We can reproduce this behavior with a simple statistical-sampling model.

  8. Concept of operations for channel characterization and simulation of coaxial transmission channels at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jr., Charles G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) executes experiments for inertial con nement fusion (ICF), world-class high energy density physics (HEDP), and critical national security missions. While the laser systems, target positioners, alignment systems, control systems, etc. enable the execution of such experiments, NIF’s utility would be greatly reduced without its suite of diagnostics. It would be e ectively “blind” to the incredible physics unleashed in its target chamber. Since NIF diagnostics are such an important part of its mission, the quality and reliability of the diagnostics, and of the data recorded from them, is crucial.

  9. Calibration of scintillation-light filters for neutron time-of-flight spectrometers at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, D. B.; Barbosa, F.; Caggiano, J. A.; DiPuccio, V. N.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Weber, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    Sixty-four neutral density filters constructed of metal plates with 88 apertures of varying diameter have been radiographed with a soft x-ray source and CCD camera at National Security Technologies, Livermore. An analysis of the radiographs fits the radial dependence of the apertures' image intensities to sigmoid functions, which can describe the rapidly decreasing intensity towards the apertures' edges. The fitted image intensities determine the relative attenuation value of each filter. Absolute attenuation values of several imaged filters, measured in situ during calibration experiments, normalize the relative quantities which are now used in analyses of neutron spectrometer data at the National Ignition Facility.

  10. Reproducibility of hohlraum-driven implosion symmetry on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrala G.A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Indirectly driven Symcap capsules are used at the NIF to obtain information about ignition capsule implosion performance, in particular shape. Symcaps replace the cryogenic fuel layer with an equivalent ablator mass and can be similarly diagnosed. Symcaps are good symmetry surrogates to an ignition capsule after the peak of the drive, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations predict that doping of the symcaps vary the behavior of the implosion. We compare the equatorial shapes of a symcap doped with Si or Ge, as well as examine the reproducibility of the shape measurement using two symcaps with the same hohlraum and laser conditions.

  11. Tank waste remediation system FSAR hazard identification/facility configuration verification report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, D.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-01

    This document provides the results of the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report (TWRS FSAR) hazards identification/facility configuration activities undertaken from the period of March 7, 1996 to May 31, 1996. The purpose of this activity was to provide an independent overview of the TWRS facility specific hazards and configurations that were used in support of the TWRS FSAR hazards and accident analysis development. It was based on a review of existing published documentation and field inspections. The objective of the verification effort was to provide a `snap shot` in time of the existing TWRS facility hazards and configurations and will be used to support hazards and accident analysis activities.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  13. Investigation of gamma-ray time shifts caused by capsule areal density variations in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the national ignition facility and the omega facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafil, Elliot M.

    This thesis describes work on Cherenkov based gamma detectors used as diag- nostics at Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities. The first part describes the calibration and commissioning of the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic which is a four cell Cherenkov detector array used to characterize the ICF implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by measuring the gamma rays generated during the fusion event. Two of the key metrics which the GRH measures are Gamma Bang Time (GBT) generated from the D(T,α)n thermonuclear burn and Ablator Peak Time (APT) caused by (n,n‧)gamma reactions in the surrounding capsule ablator. Simulations of ignition capsules predict that GBT and APT should be time synchronized. After GRH commissioning, the array was used during first year of NIF operation in the National Ignition Campaign. Contrary to expectations, time shifts between GBT and APT of order 10s of picoseconds were observed. In order to further investigate the possibility of these time shifts in view of testing both instrument and code credibility an ICF shot campaign at the smaller OMEGA facility in Rochester was devised. It was performed during two full shot days in April of 2013 and 2014 and confirmed in principle the viability of the Cherenkov detector approach but raised additional questions regarding the credibility of the simulation codes used to describe ICF experiments. Specifically the measurements show that the understanding of temporal behavior of GBT vs APT may not be properly modeled in the DRACO code used at OMEGA. In view of the OMEGA results which showed no time shifts between GBT and APT, the readout and timing synchronization system of the GRH setup at the NIF was reevaluated in the framework of this thesis. Motivated by the results, which highlighted the use of wrong optical fiber diameters and possible problems with the installed variable optical attenuators, the NIF equipment has been updated over the recent months and new timing tests will

  14. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2002-10-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF will provide 192 energetic laser beams that will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for very high power and extreme electromagnetic field research and applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible, along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to near-exawatt power levels.

  15. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E I

    2002-01-11

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a $2.25B stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Agency and when completed will be the world's largest laser system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of extreme energy densities and pressures. In NIF up to 192 energetic laser beams will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for high power applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to exawatt power levels.

  16. Radiative shocks produced from spherical cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, A.; Divol, L.; Weber, S.; Atherton, J.; Bennedetti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E.; Döppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Lindl, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Spherically expanding radiative shock waves have been observed from inertially confined implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In these experiments, a spherical fusion target, initially 2 mm in diameter, is compressed via the pressure induced from the ablation of the outer target surface. At the peak compression of the capsule, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics indicate the formation of a central core, with a radius and ion temperature of ∼20 μm and ∼ 2 keV, respectively. This central core is surrounded by a cooler compressed shell of deuterium-tritium fuel that has an outer radius of ∼40 μm and a density of >500 g/cm{sup 3}. Using inputs from multiple diagnostics, the peak pressure of the compressed core has been inferred to be of order 100 Gbar for the implosions discussed here. The shock front, initially located at the interface between the high pressure compressed fuel shell and surrounding in-falling low pressure ablator plasma, begins to propagate outwards after peak compression has been reached. Approximately 200 ps after peak compression, a ring of x-ray emission created by the limb-brightening of a spherical shell of shock-heated matter is observed to appear at a radius of ∼100 μm. Hydrodynamic simulations, which model the experiment and include radiation transport, indicate that the sudden appearance of this emission occurs as the post-shock material temperature increases and upstream density decreases, over a scale length of ∼10 μm, as the shock propagates into the lower density (∼1 g/cc), hot (∼250 eV) plasma that exists at the ablation front. The expansion of the shock-heated matter is temporally and spatially resolved and indicates a shock expansion velocity of ∼300 km/s in the laboratory frame. The magnitude and temporal evolution of the luminosity produced from the shock-heated matter was measured at photon energies between 5.9 and 12.4 keV. The observed radial shock expansion, as well as the magnitude and temporal

  17. Measurements of Sensitivity of Implosion-Phase Mixing to Low-Mode Symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, S. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Casey, D. T.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a non-igniting indirect-drive target designed to produce a near 1D-like implosion for hydro-code validation. This is accomplished with a sub-scale (675 µm radius) capsule in a nominal (2.875 mm radius) near-vacuum hohlraum, providing a case-to-capsule ratio 63% larger that that of a standard ignition target. Additionally, the low aspect ratio (3.9) of the capsule shell combined with the temperature of the foot pulse essentially eliminates ablation front instability growth. The result is a platform that is well suited to the study of mixing at the gas-ablator interface without these complicating factors. A layer of CD plastic on the inner 3.2 µm of the CH capsule shell filled with a mixture of hydrogen and tritium allows us to infer the mixture of ablator material into the gas through the ratio of DT to TT neutron production. In 2015, we used the 2-Shock platform to measure the sensitivity of ablator-gas mixing to inner surface roughness and implosion convergence ratio. This year we developed the capability to deliberately adjust the low-mode in-flight symmetry of the implosion in both the prolate and oblate directions. We present the initial results of mix measurements from deliberately low-mode asymmetric implosions aimed at determining the relationship between this type of asymmetry and mix. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Stabilization of Thin-Shell Implosions Using a High-Foot Adiabat-Shaped Drive on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Marion; Gauthier, Pascal; Masse, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    The High Foot (HF) campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has improved the neutron yield by an order of magnitude as compared to the implosions reported during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) while dramatically lowering the ablation-front instability growth. However, this yield increase came at the expense of reduced fuel compression due to higher fuel adiabat. Thinner shell adiabat-shaped HF implosions have been designed to combine the ablation front stability benefits of the current HF pulses with the demonstrated high fuel compressibility of the NIC implosions and increased implosion velocity. This is accomplished by using a hybrid adiabat-shaping technique which both lowers the laser power between the first and second pulses to enhance the ablative stabilization at early times and precisely tailors the rise-to-peak drive to prevent undesired shocks from propagating in the fuel and depositing additional entropy. Ablation front growth factor spectra are generated from two-dimensional simulations with the FCI2 radiation hydrodynamics code. Linear analysis of the instability growth demonstrates that adiabat-shaped pulses provide a path to control and reduce ablation front instability growth while placing the fuel on a lower adiabat to achieve the alpha-heating-dominated regime. Adiabat-shaped pulses without picket are also investigated as a potential way to enhance the stability of the holhraum walls at early times.

  19. A diamond detector for inertial confinement fusion X-ray bang-time measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPhee, A G; Brown, C; Burns, S; Celeste, J; Glenzer, S H; Hey, D; Jones, O S; Landen, O; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N; Parker, J; Edgell, D; Glebov, V Y; Kilkenny, J; Kimbrough, J

    2010-11-09

    An instrument has been developed to measure X-ray bang-time for inertial confinement fusion capsules; the time interval between the start of the laser pulse and peak X-ray emission from the fuel core. The instrument comprises chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond photoconductive X-ray detectors with highly ordered pyrolytic graphite X-ray monochromator crystals at the input. Capsule bang-time can be measured in the presence of relatively high thermal and hard X-ray background components due to the selective band pass of the crystals combined with direct and indirect X-ray shielding of the detector elements. A five channel system is being commissioned at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for implosion optimization measurements as part of the National Ignition Campaign. Characteristics of the instrument have been measured demonstrating that X-ray bang-time can be measured with {+-} 30ps precision, characterizing the soft X-ray drive to +/- 1eV or 1.5%.

  20. Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R; Lagin, L; Nelson, J

    2011-07-25

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

  1. The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

    2012-10-01

    The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of (135)Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched (124)Xe and (126)Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

  2. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C., E-mail: hagmann1@llnl.gov; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  3. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10(16). At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  4. Improving a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döppner, T., E-mail: doeppner1@llnl.gov; Bachmann, B.; Emig, J.; Hardy, M.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Wood, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94720 (United States); Kraus, D.; Saunders, A. M. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We are developing x-ray Thomson scattering for applications in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular we have designed and fielded MACS, a high-efficiency, gated x-ray spectrometer at 7.5–10 keV [T. Döppner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 11D617 (2014)]. Here we report on two new Bragg crystals based on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), a flat crystal and a dual-section cylindrically curved crystal. We have performed in situ calibration measurements using a brass foil target, and we used the flat HOPG crystal to measure Mo K-shell emission at 18 keV in 2nd order diffraction. Such high photon energy line emission will be required to penetrate and probe ultra-high-density plasmas or plasmas of mid-Z elements.

  5. Sensitivity of chemical vapor deposition diamonds to DD and DT neutrons at OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Glebov, V.; Gatu Johnson, M.; MacPhee, A.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is used routinely to measure nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition diamond. Calibration of the detectors sensitivity to neutrons and protons would allow measurement of nuclear bang times and hot spot areal density (ρR) on a single diagnostic. This study utilizes data collected at both NIF and Omega in an attempt to determine pTOF's absolute sensitivity to neutrons. At Omega pTOF's sensitivity to DT-n is found to be stable to within 8% at different bias voltages. At the NIF pTOF's sensitivity to DD-n varies by up to 59%. This variability must be decreased substantially for pTOF to function as a neutron yield detector at the NIF. Some possible causes of this variability are ruled out.

  6. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  7. The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, E I

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

  8. Laser Coupling to Reduced-Scale Targets at the Early Light Program of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Bower, D; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Holder, J P; Holtmeier, G; James, L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Kamperschroer, J; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Langdon, A B; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; Manes, K R; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P T; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Williams, E A; Young, B K; Young, P E

    2004-11-18

    A platform for analysis of material properties under extreme conditions, where a sample is bathed in radiation with a high temperature, is under development. This hot environment is produced with a laser by depositing maximum energy into a small, high-Z can. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility, under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, there is a unique wavelength dependence of the Raman backscattered light that is consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Finally, novel diagnostic capabilities indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light.

  9. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; Colvin, J D; Barrios, M A; Patterson, J R; Regan, S P

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr He_{α} line at 13 keV.

  10. Neutron Yield and Ion Temperature from DD and DT Fusion in National Ignition Facility High-Foot Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, J. P.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Doeppner, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Munro, D. H.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Yeamans, C. B.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous measures of neutrons emitted from DT fusion implosions are postulated to provide insight into the fuel conditions during neutron emission. Neutron spectral diagnostics of National Ignition Facility ``high-foot'' implosions measure both the DT and DD fusion neutron spectra. Equivalent ion temperature is measured from the width of the DT and DD neutron emission and the respective yields from the peak areas. This work has focused on reasons for differing inferred temperatures from the DT and DD spectra and the yield ratio. Spatial and temporal averages of the DT and DD reactivities as corrections to the homogeneous and static temperature distributions are shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenje, J. A., E-mail: jfrenje@psfc.mit.edu; Wink, C. W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (T{sub i}), yield (Y{sub n}), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10{sup 16}. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  12. Quantifying equation-of-state and opacity errors using integrated supersonic diffusive radiation flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guymer, T. M., E-mail: Thomas.Guymer@awe.co.uk; Moore, A. S.; Morton, J.; Allan, S.; Bazin, N.; Benstead, J.; Bentley, C.; Comley, A. J.; Garbett, W.; Reed, L.; Stevenson, R. M. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Cowan, J.; Flippo, K.; Hamilton, C.; Lanier, N. E.; Mussack, K.; Obrey, K.; Schmidt, D. W.; Taccetti, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    A well diagnosed campaign of supersonic, diffusive radiation flow experiments has been fielded on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments have used the accurate measurements of delivered laser energy and foam density to enable an investigation into SESAME's tabulated equation-of-state values and CASSANDRA's predicted opacity values for the low-density C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl foam used throughout the campaign. We report that the results from initial simulations under-predicted the arrival time of the radiation wave through the foam by ≈22%. A simulation study was conducted that artificially scaled the equation-of-state and opacity with the intended aim of quantifying the systematic offsets in both CASSANDRA and SESAME. Two separate hypotheses which describe these errors have been tested using the entire ensemble of data, with one being supported by these data.

  13. Building a World-Class Safety Culture: The National Ignition Facility and the Control of Human and Organizational Error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C T; Stalnaker, G

    2002-12-06

    Accidents in complex systems send us signals. They may be harbingers of a catastrophe. Some even argue that a ''normal'' consequence of operations in a complex organization may not only be the goods it produces, but also accidents and--inevitably--catastrophes. We would like to tell you the story of a large, complex organization, whose history questions the argument ''that accidents just happen.'' Starting from a less than enviable safety record, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has accumulated over 2.5 million safe hours. The story of NIF is still unfolding. The facility is still being constructed and commissioned. But the steps NIF has taken in achieving its safety record provide a principled blueprint that may be of value to others. Describing that principled blueprint is the purpose of this paper. The first part of this paper is a case study of NIF and its effort to achieve a world-class safety record. This case study will include a description of (1) NIF's complex systems, (2) NIF's early safety history, (3) factors that may have initiated its safety culture change, and (4) the evolution of its safety blueprint. In the last part of the paper, we will compare NIF's safety culture to what safety industry experts, psychologists, and sociologists say about how to shape a culture and control organizational error.

  14. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, C

    2001-10-29

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

  15. Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R T; O' Brien, D W; Kamperschroer, J H; Nelson, J R

    2007-10-03

    The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated and gated X-ray sensors, and laser velocity interferometry. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions are being planned. Many diagnostics will be developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. An instrument-based controls (I-BC) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the I-BC architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. I-BCs are reusable by replication and reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and better reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing I-BCs. This paper discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the I-BC architecture and framework.

  16. High-Performance Cryogenic Designs for OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; McCrory, R. L.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvydky, A.

    2016-10-01

    The main advantage of laser symmetric direct drive (SDD) is a significantly higher coupled drive laser energy to the hot-spot internal energy at stagnation compared to that of laser indirect drive. Because of coupling losses resulting from cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), however, reaching ignition conditions on the NIF with SDD requires designs with excessively large in-flight aspect ratios ( 30). Results of cryogenic implosions performed on OMEGA show that such designs are unstable to short-scale nonuniformity growth during shell implosion. Several CBET reduction strategies have been proposed in the past. This talk will discuss high-performing designs using several CBET-mitigation techniques, including using drive laser beams smaller than the target size and wavelength detuning. Designs that are predicted to reach alpha burning regimes as well as a gain of 10 to 40 at the NIF-scale will be presented. Hydrodynamically scaled OMEGA designs with similar CBET-reduction techniques will also be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Upset and Recovery of the National Ignition Facility's Optics Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bernardin

    1999-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed as the latest in a series of high-power laser facilities to study inertial confinement fusion. In particular, the NIF will generate and amplify 192 laser beams and focus them onto a fusion fuel capsule the size of a BB. The energy deposited by the laser beams will raise the core temperature of the target to 100,OOO,OOO C, which will ignite the fusion fuel and produce a fusion energy output that is several times greater than the energy input. The ability to generate, condition, and focus 192 laser beams onto a target the size of a BB, requires precision optical hardware and instrumentation. One of the most critical pieces of optical hardware within the NIF is the Optics Module (OM), a mechanical apparatus which is responsible for optical focusing and frequency conversion of the laser beam to optimize the energy deposition at the fusion target. The OM contains two potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens. The functionality of the KDP crystals is extremely temperature sensitive. Small temperature changes on the order of 0.1 C can significantly alter the performance of these components. Consequently, to maximize NIF system availability and minimize beam conditioning problems, accurate temperature control of the OM optical components was deemed a necessity. In this study, an experimental OM prototype, containing mock frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens, was used determine the thermal stability provided by a prototype water temperature control system. More importantly, the OM prototype was used to identify and characterize potential thermal upsets and corresponding recovery times of the KDP crystals. The results of this study indicate that the water temperature control system is adequate in maintaining uniform steady-state temperatures within the OM. Vacuum pump-down and venting of the OM generated significant

  19. CFD Analysis of Flexible Thermal Protection System Shear Configuration Testing in the LCAT Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents results of computational analysis performed after flexible thermal protection system shear configuration testing in the LCAT facility. The primary objectives were to predict the shear force on the sample and the sensitivity of all surface properties to the shape of the sample. Bumps of 0.05, 0.10,and 0.15 inches were created to approximate the shape of some fabric samples during testing. A large amount of information was extracted from the CFD solutions for comparison between runs and also current or future flight simulations.

  20. Computational Studies of X-ray Framing Cameras for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 USA Abstract The NIF is the world’s most powerful laser facility and is...a phosphor screen where the output is recorded. The x-ray framing cameras have provided excellent information. As the yields at NIF have increased...experiments on the NIF . The basic operation of these cameras is shown in Fig. 1. Incident photons generate photoelectrons both in the pores of the MCP and

  1. Control de configuraciones peligrosas en instalaciones con riesgo asociado // Hazardous configurations control in risk related facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Torres - Valle

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl control de configuraciones peligrosas en instalaciones con riesgo asociado es una aplicación delos Análisis Probabilistas de Seguridad (APS previos de las mismas. Una opción de mayor alcancees el uso de monitores de riesgo los que permiten la detección en tiempo real de talesconfiguraciones. Dada la complejidad de los APS y de los monitores de riesgo, esta tarea requiere depersonal experto. El documento presenta un método cualitativo de control de configuracionespeligrosas basado en matrices de dependencias. El algoritmo, informatizado en el códigoCONFIGURACION, puede ser aplicado sin necesidad de APS previos ni uso de monitores de riesgo.La sencillez del método justifica su extensión a instalaciones donde tales herramientas no se handesarrollado, permitiendo así la detección de las configuraciones peligrosas durante su explotación yelevando la seguridad de las plantas. Un sistema similar al descrito se utiliza como ayuda en laoperación de la central nuclear de Embalse. El artículo muestra el uso del método utilizando comobase un sistema de seguridad simplificado.Palabras claves: control de configuración, Análisis Probabilista de Seguridad (APS, matriz de___________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe hazardous configurations control in risk related facilities is an application of the previousProbabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA. A more complete option is the risk monitoring for the on-linedetection of these configurations. The expert personnel are required for this task take into account thecomplexity of the PSA and risk monitor. The paper presents a method of configuration control, basedon dependence matrixes. The algorithm is included in a computer code called CONFIGURACION, todetermine these situations in a qualitative way, without previous PSA results or using a Risk Monitor.The simplicity of the method warrants its application to facilities where these tools have not

  2. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  3. Development of a polar direct drive platform for mix and burn experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Obrey, K. A. D.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Shah, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Bhandarkar, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Hoppe, M.; Nikroo, A.; McKenty, P.

    2016-03-01

    Capsules driven with polar drive [1, 2] on the National Ignition Facility [3] are being used [4] to study mix in convergent geometry. In preparation for experiments that will utilize deuterated plastic shells with a pure tritium fill, hydrogen-filled capsules with copper- doped deuterated layers have been imploded on NIF to provide spectroscopic and nuclear measurements of capsule performance. Experiments have shown that the mix region, when composed of shell material doped with about 1% copper (by atom), reaches temperatures of about 2 keV, while undoped mixed regions reach about 3 keV. Based on the yield from these implosions, we estimate the thickness of CD that mixed into the gas as between about 0.25 and 0.43 μm of the inner capsule surface, corresponding to about 5 to 9 μg of material. Using 5 atm of tritium as the fill gas should result in over 1013 DT neutrons being produced, which is sufficient for neutron imaging [5].

  4. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  5. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  6. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Di Nicola, P.; Gururangan, G.; Hall, G. N.; Hardy, C. M.; Hargrove, D.; Hermann, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Holder, J. P.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lawson, J.; Martinez, D.; Masters, N.; Nafziger, J. R.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Okui, J.; Palmer, D.; Sigurdsson, R.; Vonhof, S.; Wallace, R. J.; Zobrist, T.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV, of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.

  7. Sensitivity of chemical vapor deposition diamonds to DD and DT neutrons at OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, N. V. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Sio, H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Gatu Johnson, M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; MacPhee, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Li, C. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Seguin, F. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Forrest, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA

    2016-08-09

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is used routinely to measure nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition diamond. Calibration of the detectors sensitivity to neutrons and protons would allow measurement of nuclear bang times and hot spot areal density (ρR) on a single diagnostic. This study utilizes data collected at both NIF and Omega in an attempt to determine pTOF’s absolute sensitivity to neutrons. At Omega pTOF’s sensitivity to DT-n is found to be stable to within 8% at different bias voltages. At the NIF pTOF’s sensitivity to DD-n varies by up to 59%. This variability must be decreased substantially for pTOF to function as a neutron yield detector at the NIF. Some possible causes of this variability are ruled out.

  8. Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algorithm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charles G., Jr.; Adcock, Aaron B.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Liebman, Judith A.; Bond, Essex J.

    2011-03-01

    Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, timevarying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

  9. Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algortihm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C; Adcock, A; Azevedo, S; Liebman, J; Bond, E

    2010-12-28

    Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, time-varying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

  10. Inertial Confinement Fusion alpha-heating signatures in prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Herrmann, Hans; Cerjan, Charlie; Sayre, Daniel; Carpenter, Arthur; Liebman, Judy; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Kim, Yongho

    2015-11-01

    Prompt gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) supply vital diagnostic information, such as the peak burn time, burn width, and total neutron yield, from prompt DT-fusion gamma-ray emission during high convergence implosion experiments. Additionally, the stagnated cold shell density distribution may be inferred from the time-integrated, calibrated 12C (n,n' γ) signal, thus providing estimates of remaining ablator carbon areal density. Furthermore, simulations suggest that alpha heating signatures might be accessible using more highly resolved temporal gamma-ray emission. Correlation of these signatures with time-dependent neutron emission will constrain the implosion dynamics immediately prior to thermonuclear burn. Measurement of these gamma-ray signatures will be discussed along with updates on our work toward inferred total DT yield and 12C areal density. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07-NA27344, LLNL-ABS-670282.

  11. Inference of total DT fusion neutron yield from prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Sayre, D.

    2014-10-01

    Prompt D-T fusion gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) have been used recently to infer the total DT fusion neutron yield of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. DT fusion produces energetic gamma-rays (16.75 MeV) with a small branching ratio of approximately (4.2 +/- 2.0)e-5 γ/n. While the large error bar precludes use of the branching ratio for an accurate yield determination, the gamma-rays themselves provide the most unperturbed measure of fusion burn and can be used for such a purpose. A cross-calibration for the DT fusion gamma-ray to neutron signal is obtained via low areal density exploding pusher implosions which have mostly unperturbed neutron and gamma-ray signals. The calibration is then used to infer total DT neutron yield from gamma-ray measurements on high areal-density, cryogenically layered implosions in which neutrons are heavily down-scattered (up to 30%). Furthermore, the difference between the gamma-ray inferred total DT yield and the primary neutron yield (unscattered neutrons) can be used to estimate the total down-scatter fraction. Error analysis and comparison of yield values will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-657694.

  12. Design and analysis of x-ray driven shock wave equation-of-state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Lazicki, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Erskine, D. J.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Meezan, N. B.; Peterson, J. L.; NIF EOS Team

    2016-10-01

    The equation-of-state (EOS) is important for describing and predicting material properties in the field of high energy density physics. Especially important is the EOS of materials compressed and heated from ambient conditions by shockwaves. For most materials, experimental data at high pressures, much above 10 Mbar, is sparse. The large energy and power of the National Ignition Facility readily enable EOS experiments in a new regime, at pressures on order of 100 Mbar. We describe a platform for EOS measurements using planar shockwaves driven by x rays within a hohlraum target. The EOS is determined by an impedance matching method, using a reference material of known EOS. For transparent materials, the shock velocity is measured directly by optical interferometry, while for opaque materials, the measurement is done by timing the entrance and exit of the shock and correcting for time variations with an adjacent transparent reference. We describe the computational design and analysis of experiments. Predicted shock velocities and transit times are used to set the target layer thicknesses and interferometer timing. Data from several NIF shots are compared to post-shot calculations. New, high pressure EOS data is presented for several materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local T{sub e} via the collisional–radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation T{sub e} is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak T{sub e}, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ∼0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  14. Simulating x-ray Thomson scattering signals from high-density, millimetre-scale plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, D. A., E-mail: david.chapman@awe.co.uk [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Nilsen, J.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. C.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States); Guymer, T. M. [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Redmer, R. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-08-15

    We have developed a model for analysing x-ray Thomson scattering data from high-density, millimetre-scale inhomogeneous plasmas created during ultra-high pressure implosions at the National Ignition Facility in a spherically convergent geometry. The density weighting of the scattered signal and attenuation of the incident and scattered x-rays throughout the target are included using radial profiles of the density, opacity, ionization state, and temperature provided by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. These simulations show that the scattered signal is strongly weighted toward the bulk of the shocked plasma and the Fermi degenerate material near the ablation front. We show that the scattered signal provides a good representation of the temperature of this highly nonuniform bulk plasma and can be determined to an accuracy of ca. 15% using typical data analysis techniques with simple 0D calculations. On the other hand, the mean ionization of the carbon in the bulk is underestimated. We suggest that this discrepancy is due to the convolution of scattering profiles from different regions of the target. Subsequently, we discuss modifications to the current platform to minimise the impact of inhomogeneities, as well as opacity, and also to enable probing of conditions more strongly weighted toward the compressed core.

  15. Laser performance operations model (LPOM): The computational system that automates the setup and performance analysis of the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael; House, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 MJ, 500-TW, 351-nm laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for many target diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. A computational system, the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) has been developed that automates the laser setup process, and accurately predict laser energetics. LPOM uses diagnostic feedback from previous NIF shots to maintain accurate energetics models (gains and losses), as well as links to operational databases to provide `as currently installed' optical layouts for each of the 192 NIF beamlines. LPOM deploys a fully integrated laser physics model, the Virtual Beamline (VBL), in its predictive calculations in order to meet the accuracy requirements of NIF experiments, and to provide the ability to determine the damage risk to optical elements throughout the laser chain. LPOM determines the settings of the injection laser system required to achieve the desired laser output, provides equipment protection, and determines the diagnostic setup. Additionally, LPOM provides real-time post shot data analysis and reporting for each NIF shot. The LPOM computation system is designed as a multi-host computational cluster (with 200 compute nodes, providing the capability to run full NIF simulations fully parallel) to meet the demands of both the controls systems within a shot cycle, and the NIF user community outside of a shot cycle.

  16. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  17. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  18. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Huffman, E. J.; Iglesias, C. A.; King, J. A.; Kline, J. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Opachich, Y. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Ross, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Sherrill, M. E.; Wilson, B. G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative-convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures eV and electron densities 21~\\text{cm}-3$ . The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a ps, diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design, of the NIF beams deliver 500 kJ to the mm diameter hohlraum, and the remaining directly drive the CH capsule with 200 kJ. Calculations indicate this capsule backlighter should outshine the iron sample, delivering a point-projection transmission opacity measurement to a time-integrated X-ray spectrometer viewing down the hohlraum axis. Preliminary experiments to develop the backlighter and hohlraum are underway, informing simulated measurements to guide the final design.

  19. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Peterson, P.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-06-04

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model.

  20. ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector for Gamma Ray Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). A new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide ~ 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from ~ 100 to ~ 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The first phase is to insert the existing coaxial GCD-3 detector into a reentrant well on the NIF chamber which will put it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by ~ 10x relative to current PMT technology. GCD-3 has been thoroughly tested at the OMEGA Laser Facility and characterized at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIgS).

  1. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R.  F.; Bailey, J.  E.; Craxton, R.  S.; DeVolder, B.  G.; Dodd, E.  S.; Garcia, E.  M.; Huffman, E.  J.; Iglesias, C.  A.; King, J.  A.; Kline, J.  L.; Liedahl, D.  A.; McKenty, P.  W.; Opachich, Y.  P.; Rochau, G.  A.; Ross, P.  W.; Schneider, M.  B.; Sherrill, M.  E.; Wilson, B.  G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T.  S.

    2017-01-09

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative–convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures${\\geqslant}150$ eV and electron densities${\\geqslant}7\\times 10^{21}~\\text{cm}^{-3}$. The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a${\\sim}200$ ps,${\\sim}200~\\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\\text{m}$diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design

  2. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Ng, Edmund W.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2005-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  3. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

    2005-01-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  4. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

    2005-07-07

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  5. PETN ignition experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael L; Wente, William B; Kaneshige, Michael J

    2010-04-29

    Ignition experiments from various sources, including our own laboratory, have been used to develop a simple ignition model for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The experiments consist of differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, beaker tests, one-dimensional time to explosion tests, Sandia's instrumented thermal ignition tests (SITI), and thermal ignition of nonelectrical detonators. The model developed using this data consists of a one-step, first-order, pressure-independent mechanism used to predict pressure, temperature, and time to ignition for various configurations. The model was used to assess the state of the degraded PETN at the onset of ignition. We propose that cookoff violence for PETN can be correlated with the extent of reaction at the onset of ignition. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating metal deformation produced from detonators encased in copper as well as comparing postignition photos of the SITI experiments.

  6. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M. B., E-mail: schneider5@llnl.gov; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  7. Determination of relative krypton fission product yields from 14 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, E. R.; Cassata, W. S.; Velsko, C. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Shaughnessy, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precisely-known fission yield distributions are needed to determine a fissioning isotope and the incident neutron energy in nuclear security applications. 14 MeV neutrons from DT fusion at the National Ignition Facility induce fission in depleted uranium contained in the target assembly hohlraum. The fission yields of Kr isotopes (85m, 87, 88, and 89) are measured relative to the cumulative yield of 88Kr and compared to previously tabulated values. The results from this experiment and England and Rider are in agreement, except for the 85mKr/88Kr ratio, which may be the result of incorrect nuclear data.

  8. High-energy-density plasmas generation on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility for fast-ignition laser fusion studies and laboratory astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Yamamoto, N.; Ohira, S.; Fujii, Y.; Ishihara, K.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Nakata, Y.; Kawanaka, J.; Nagatomo, H.; Shiraga, H.; Miyanaga, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.

    2012-12-01

    The world's largest peta watt (PW) laser LFEX, which delivers energy up to 2 kJ in a 1.5 ps pulse, has been constructed beside the GEKKO XII laser at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. The GEKKO-LFEX laser facility enables the creation of materials having high-energy-density which do not exist naturally on the Earth and have an energy density comparable to that of stars. High-energy-density plasma is a source of safe, secure, environmentally sustainable fusion energy. Direct-drive fast-ignition laser fusion has been intensively studied at this facility under the auspices of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project. In this paper, we describe improvement of the LFEX laser and investigations of advanced target design to increase the energy coupling efficiency of the fast-ignition scheme. The pedestal of the LFEX pulse, which produces a long preformed plasma and results in the generation of electrons too energetic to heat the fuel core, was reduced by introducing an amplified optical parametric fluorescence quencher and saturable absorbers in the front-end system of the LFEX laser. Since fast electrons are scattered and stopped by the strong electric field of highly ionized high-Z (i.e. gold) ions, a low-Z cone was studied for reducing the energy loss of fast electrons in the cone tip region. A diamond-like carbon cone was fabricated for the fast-ignition experiment. An external magnetic field, which is demonstrated to be generated by a laser-driven capacitor-coil target, will be applied to the compression of the fuel capsule to form a strong magnetic field to guide the fast electrons to the fuel core. In addition, the facility offers a powerful means to test and validate astronomical models and computations in the laboratory. As well as demonstrating the ability to recreate extreme astronomical conditions by the facilities, our theoretical description of the laboratory experiment was compared with the generally accepted explanation

  9. 124Xe(n,γ125Xe and 124Xe(n,2n123Xe measurements for National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhike Megha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross section for the 124Xe(n,γ125Xe reaction has been measured for the first time for neutron energies above 100 keV. In addition, the 124Xe(n,2n123Xe reaction has been studied between threshold and 14.8 MeV. The results of these measurements provide sensitive diagnostic tools for investigating properties of the inertial confinement fusion plasma in Deuterium-Tritium (DT capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, M., E-mail: gatu@psfc.mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M. P.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ∼200 keV FWHM.

  11. Three- and two-dimensional simulations of counter-propagating shear experiments at high energy densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov; MacLaren, Stephan A.; Huntington, Channing M.; Raman, Kumar S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Doss, Forrest W.; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Three- and two-dimensional numerical studies have been carried out to simulate recent counter-propagating shear flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility. A multi-physics three-dimensional, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code is used. Using a Reynolds Averaging Navier-Stokes model, we show that the evolution of the mixing layer width obtained from the simulations agrees well with that measured from the experiments. A sensitivity study is conducted to illustrate a 3D geometrical effect that could confuse the measurement at late times, if the energy drives from the two ends of the shock tube are asymmetric. Implications for future experiments are discussed.

  12. RFX-mod: A multi-configuration fusion facility for three-dimensional physics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovesan, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Auriemma, F.; Bonomo, F.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piron, L.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Zaniol, B.; Agostini, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); and others

    2013-05-15

    RFX-mod [Sonato et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 66, 161 (2003)] exploits its 192 active coils in both reversed-field pinch (RFP) and tokamak configurations with varying degrees of 3D shaping, providing also a test bed for validating stellarator codes and 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic codes. This makes RFX-mod a unique and flexible facility for comparative studies on 3D shaping and control. The paper discusses how 3D fields allow access to RFP and tokamak advanced regimes. 3D fields are used to feedback control Single Helicity (SH) RFP equilibria with 1/7 helicity up to ∼2 MA. They also allow accessing SH regimes with higher density (Greenwald fraction up to 0.5), presently inaccessible in spontaneous SH regimes. Feedback on the 2/1 resistive-wall mode in RFX-mod tokamak plasmas allows for safe operation at q(a)<2, an almost unexplored promising regime. Forcing the 2/1 mode to saturate at finite but small level, a helical tokamak equilibrium with significant n = 1 modulation is produced and a new way to tailor sawteeth is found. The effects of different levels of 3D shaping on momentum transport in both RFP and tokamak helical states are discussed.

  13. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  14. Analysis of the confluence of three patterns using the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) images for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Bliss, Erlan; Roberts, Randy; Rushford, Michael; Wilhelmsen, Karl; Zobrist, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight highdensity internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Employing up to eight backlighters, ARC can produce an X-ray "motion picture" to diagnose the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-ofpicosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. The function of the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) in ARC is to provide superimposed near-field and far-field images on a common optical path. The Images are then analyzed to extract beam centering and pointing data for the control system. The images contain the confluence of pointing, centering, and reference patterns. The patterns may have uneven illumination, particularly when the laser is misaligned. In addition, the simultaneous appearance of three reference patterns may be co-incidental, possibly masking one or more of the patterns. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the centering and pointing position of ARC from these images. In the paper we describe the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the centers of these patterns. Results are provided, illustrating how well the process meets system requirements.

  15. Experimental results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with adiabat-shaped drives at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Chen, K.-C.; Goyon, C.; Grim, G.; Dixit, S. N.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Farrell, M.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J. P.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Mauldin, M.; Merrill, F. E.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Sayre, D. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Velikovich, A. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Weber, C. R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions were carried out using 3-shock and 4-shock "adiabat-shaped" drives and plastic ablators on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The purpose of these shots was to gain further understanding on the relative performance of the low-foot implosions of the National Ignition Campaign [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] versus the subsequent high-foot implosions [T. Döppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. The neutron yield performance in the experiment with the 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive was improved by factors ˜3 to ˜10, compared to five companion low-foot shots despite large low-mode asymmetries of DT fuel, while measured compression was similar to its low-foot companions. This indicated that the dominant degradation source for low-foot implosions was ablation-front instability growth, since adiabat shaping significantly stabilized this growth. For the experiment with the low-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was significantly increased, by ˜25% to ˜36%, compared to its companion high-foot implosions. The neutron yield increased by ˜20%, lower than the increase of ˜50% estimated from one-dimensional scaling, suggesting the importance of residual instabilities and asymmetries. For the experiment with the high-power, 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was slightly increased by ˜14% compared to its companion high-foot experiments. However, the compression was reduced compared to the lower-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, correlated with the increase of hot electrons that hypothetically can be responsible for reduced compression in high-power adiabat-shaped experiments as well as in high-foot experiments. The total neutron yield in the high-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped shot N150416 was 8.5 × 1015 ± 0.2 × 1015, with the fuel areal density of 0.90 ± 0.07 g/cm2

  16. Configuration management issues and objectives for a real-time research flight test support facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergensen, Stephen; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are some of the critical issues and objectives pertaining to configuration management for the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of Ames Research Center. The primary mission of the WATR is to provide a capability for the conduct of aeronautical research flight test through real-time processing and display, tracking, and communications systems. In providing this capability, the WATR must maintain and enforce a configuration management plan which is independent of, but complimentary to, various research flight test project configuration management systems. A primary WATR objective is the continued development of generic research flight test project support capability, wherein the reliability of WATR support provided to all project users is a constant priority. Therefore, the processing of configuration change requests for specific research flight test project requirements must be evaluated within a perspective that maintains this primary objective.

  17. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  18. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  19. High-energy (>70 keV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Martinez, D. A.; Di Nicola, P.; Tommasini, R.; Landen, O. L.; Alessi, D.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Brunton, G.; Budge, T.; Crane, J.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Döppner, T.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Fishler, B.; Halpin, J.; Hamamoto, M.; Heebner, J.; Hernandez, V. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Homoelle, D.; Honig, J.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; LaFortune, K.; Lawson, J.; Nagel, S. R.; Negres, R. A.; Novikova, L.; Orth, C.; Pelz, L.; Prantil, M.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, M.; Sherlock, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Wegner, P.; Widmayer, C.; Williams, G. J.; Williams, W.; Whitman, P.; Yang, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20-30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4-9 × 10-4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.

  20. Improved hard x-ray (50-80 keV) imaging of hohlraum implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, B.; Chow, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Hoover, M.; Huffman, E.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Kumar, C.; Hulbert, R. D.; Albert, F.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Hohenberger, M.; Landen, O. L.; Warrick, A.; Döppner, T.

    2016-09-01

    We recently designed, built and commissioned a new pinhole / filter assembly for the equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper we describe the design and metrology of the new diagnostic as well as the spectral and spatial response of the hard x-ray detector. The new eHXI assembly has improved the photon collection efficiency along with spectral and spatial resolution by making use of 1D imaging channels and various hard x-ray filters. In addition we added a Ross pair filter set for Au K-alpha emission (67-69 keV). The new eHXI design will improve our understanding of the sourcing of hot electrons, generated in laser-plasma-instabilities, along the vertical hohlraum axis. This information is an important input for simulating and eventually limiting the DT fuel preheat in ICF implosions.

  1. Using ensembles of simulations to find high-fidelity post-shot models of inertial confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Ryan; Field, John E.; Spears, Brian; Thomas, Cliff A.

    2016-10-01

    The inertial confinement fusion program at the National Ignition Facility is performing subscale experiments for a variety of implosion designs. Successful designs, those with experiments that are similar to postshot simulation, will be fielded at larger scale. This work supports the program's effort by establishing high fidelity post-shot simulations matching all experimental observables: scalar data, such as the neutron yield and areal densities; vector data, such as flange nuclear activation diagnostics; and image data, such as time-dependent x-ray self-emission images. We will present a metric for measuring the nearness of postshot simulations to experiments. In particular, we will emphasize area-based (as opposed to contour-based) image analysis metrics (e.g., Zernike moments) for comparison of x-ray self-emission images. The postshot metrics and methodology will be applied to the Big Foot implosion design as an example.

  2. Optimizing Facility Configurations and Operating Conditions for Improved Performance in the NASA Ames 24 Inch Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) is a shock tube wherein the driver gas can be heated by an electric arc discharge. The electrical energy is stored in a 1.2 MJ capacitor bank. Four inch and 24 inch diameter driven tubes are available. The facility is described and the need for testing in the 24 inch tube to better simulate low density NASA mission profiles is discussed. Three test entries, 53, 53B and 59, are discussed. Tests are done with air or Mars gas (95.7% CO2/2.7% N2/1.6% Ar) at pressures of 0.01 to 0.14 Torr. Velocities spanned 6.3-9.2 km/s, with a nominal center of 7 km/s. Many facility configurations are studied in an effort to improve data quality. Various driver and driven tube configurations and the use of a buffer section between the driver and the driven tube are studied. Diagnostics include test times, time histories of the shock light pulses and tilts of the shock wave off the plane normal to the tube axis. The report will detail the results of the various trials, give the best configuration/operating conditions found to date and provide recommendations for further improvements. Finally, diaphragm performance is discussed.

  3. Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R

    2012-04-05

    Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

  4. Optimal configuration assessments of hybrid renewable power supply for rural healthcare facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanre Olatomiwa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper assessed optimal configurations of hybrid renewable system for rural health clinic (RHC application in three grid-unconnected rural villages in Nigeria. The RHC consist of an emergency room, consulting room, nurse/injection room, male ward, female ward, a delivery room and a laboratory with average total daily energy consumption of 15.5 kWh and 2.75 kW peak demand. The assessment of configurations that optimally meet the daily load demand with zero loss of power supply probability (LPSP was carried out using HOMER software, by considering three energy resources; photovoltaic (PV, wind and diesel with battery energy storage. The result obtained revealed hybrid PV/wind/diesel/battery system as the most cost-effective configuration for powering rural health clinic in both Maiduguri and Enugu sites, while that of Iseyin site was found to be hybrid PV/diesel/battery system. In all the sites, the selected optimal configuration is far better than the conventional diesel stand-alone system in terms of cost and emission reduction.

  5. Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

    2007-07-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  6. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

    2007-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  7. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Ng, Edmund W.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2007-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator-friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities and shock breakout times of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. A third imaging system measures self-emission of the targets. These three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be systematically checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Floating apertures, placed before and after lens groups, display misalignment by showing the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beam splitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment is achieved before each shot.

  8. Absolute x-ray and neutron calibration of CVD-diamond-based time-of-flight detectors for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, A.; Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility routinely measures proton and neutron nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond biased to 250 - 1500 V. This work discusses an absolute measurement of CVD diamond sensitivity to continuous neutrons and x-rays. Although the impulse response of the detector is regularly measured on a diagnostic timing shot, absolute sensitivity of the detector's response to neutrons and x-rays has not been fully established. X-ray, DD-n, and DT-n sources at the MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility provide continuous sources for testing. CVD diamond detectors are also fielded on OMEGA experiments to measure sensitivity to impulse DT-n. Implications for absolute neutron yield measurements at the NIF using pTOF detectors will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DoE and LLNL.

  9. Effect of steam generator configuration in a loss of the RHR during mid-loop operation at PKL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, J. F.; Carlos, S.; Martorell, S.; Sanchez, F. [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica Y Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    The loss of the residual heat removal system in mid-loop conditions may occur with a non-negligible contribution to the plant risk, so the analysis of the accidental sequences and the actions to mitigate the accident are of great interest in shutdown conditions. In order to plan the appropriate measures to mitigate the accident is necessary to understand the thermal-hydraulic processes following the loss of the residual heat removal system during shutdown. Thus, transients of this kind have been simulated using best-estimate codes in different integral test facilities and compared with experimental data obtained in different facilities. In PKL (Primaerkreislauf-Versuchsanlage, primary coolant loop test facility) test facility different series of experiments have been undertaken to analyze the plant response in shutdown. In this context, the E3 and F2 series consist of analyzing the loss of the residual heat removal system with a reduced inventory in the primary system. In particular, the experiments were developed to investigate the influence of the steam generators secondary side configuration on the plant response, what involves the consideration of different number of steam generators filled with water and ready for activation, on the heat transfer mechanisms inside the steam generators U-tubes. This work presents the results of such experiments calculated using, RELAP5/Mod 3.3. (authors)

  10. Plasma grid design for optimized filter field configuration for the NBI test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocentini, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85740 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: riccardo.nocentini@ipp.mpg.de; Gutser, R.; Heinemann, B.; Froeschle, M.; Riedl, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Maintenance-free RF sources for negative hydrogen ions with moderate extraction areas (100-200 cm{sup 2}) have been successfully developed in the last years at IPP Garching in the test facilities BATMAN and MANITU. A facility with larger extraction area (1000 cm{sup 2}), ELISE, is being designed with a 'half-size' ITER-like extraction system, pulsed ion acceleration up to 60 kV for 10 s and plasma generation up to 1 h. Due to the large size of the source, the magnetic filter field (FF) cannot be produced solely by permanent magnets. Therefore, an additional magnetic field produced by current flowing through the plasma grid (PG current) is required. The filter field homogeneity and the interaction with the electron suppression magnetic field have been studied in detail by finite element method (FEM) during the ELISE design phase. Significant improvements regarding the field homogeneity have been introduced compared to the ITER reference design. Also, for the same PG current a 50% higher field in front of the grid has been achieved by optimizing the plasma grid geometry. Hollow spaces have been introduced in the plasma grid for a more homogeneous PG current distribution. The introduction of hollow spaces also allows the insertion of permanent magnets in the plasma grid.

  11. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile (“low-foot” and “high-foot” regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  12. A high-speed two-frame, 1-2 ns gated X-ray CMOS imager used as a hohlraum diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Palmer, N.; Dayton, M.; Carpenter, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Claus, L. D.; Fang, L.; Hilsabeck, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimmel, M. W.; Robertson, G.; Rochau, G.; Sanchez, M. O.; Stahoviak, J. W.; Trotter, D. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    A novel x-ray imager, which takes time-resolved gated images along a single line-of-sight, has been successfully implemented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This Gated Laser Entrance Hole diagnostic, G-LEH, incorporates a high-speed multi-frame CMOS x-ray imager developed by Sandia National Laboratories to upgrade the existing Static X-ray Imager diagnostic at NIF. The new diagnostic is capable of capturing two laser-entrance-hole images per shot on its 1024 × 448 pixels photo-detector array, with integration times as short as 1.6 ns per frame. Since its implementation on NIF, the G-LEH diagnostic has successfully acquired images from various experimental campaigns, providing critical new information for understanding the hohlraum performance in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as the size of the laser entrance hole vs. time, the growth of the laser-heated gold plasma bubble, the change in brightness of inner beam spots due to time-varying cross beam energy transfer, and plasma instability growth near the hohlraum wall.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation via Wavelength Detuning in Directly Driven Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Marozas, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Radha, P. B.; Cao, D.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) affects directly driven, inertial confinement fusion implosions by reducing the absorbed light and the coupling of driver energy to the target. A mitigation strategy is to detune the laser wavelength of interacting beams (Δλ ≠ 0 ) to reduce the CBET interaction volume. In polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the CBET-imposed energy losses occur predominantly in the equatorial region. The NIF does not support a hemispheric wavelength detuning but does have Δλ capabilities between inner and outer quads. Using a north-south asymmetric beam pointing, it is therefore possible to introduce a hemispheric wavelength difference of up to Δλ = 4.6 Å in the UV. We report on experiments to test this CBET mitigation scheme in PDD experiments on the NIF. Using this asymmetric beam pointing, we have completed experiments with both Δλ = 0 and 4.6 Å. The effect of CBET on the driver-target coupling is diagnosed via implosion velocities, implosion shape, and scattered-light spectra and by comparing experimental data to 2-D DRACO simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. A platform for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in a planar geometry at high energy density at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S. R.; Raman, K. S.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Barrios, M. A.; Baumann, T.; Bender, J. D.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Felker, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Flippo, K. A.; Holder, J. P.; Kaczala, D. N.; Perry, T. S.; Seugling, R. M.; Savage, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-07-01

    A new experimental platform has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in a planar geometry at high-energy-densities. The platform uses 60 beams of the NIF laser to drive an initially solid shock tube containing a pre-machined interface between dense and light materials. The strong shock turns the initially solid target into a plasma and the material boundary into a fluid interface with the imprinted initial condition. The interface evolves by action of the RT and RM instabilities, and the growth is imaged with backlit x-ray radiography. We present our first data involving sinusoidal interface perturbations driven from the heavy side to the light side. Late-time radiographic images show the initial conditions reaching the deeply nonlinear regime, and an evolution of fine structure consistent with a transition to turbulence. We show preliminary comparisons with post-shot numerical simulations and discuss the implications for future campaigns.

  15. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  16. X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

    2012-05-02

    The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

  17. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, H., E-mail: hsio@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Using penumbral imaging to measure micrometer size plasma hot spots in Gbar equation of state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, B., E-mail: bachmann2@llnl.gov; Kritcher, A. L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Glenn, S.; Hawreliak, J.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Pérez, F.; Swift, D.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kraus, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have developed an experimental platform for absolute equation of state measurements up to Gbar pressures on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) within the Fundamental Science Program. We use a symmetry-tuned hohlraum drive to launch a spherical shock wave into a solid CH sphere. Streaked radiography is the primary diagnostic to measure the density change at the shock front as the pressure increases towards smaller radii. At shock stagnation in the center of the capsule, we observe a short and bright x-ray self emission from high density (∼50 g/cm{sup 3}) plasma at ∼1 keV. Here, we present results obtained with penumbral imaging which has been carried out to characterize the size of the hot spot emission. This allows extending existing NIF diagnostic capabilities for spatial resolution (currently ∼10 μm) at higher sensitivity. At peak emission we find the hot spot radius to be as small as 5.8 +/− 1 μm, corresponding to a convergence ratio of 200.

  19. Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) upgrades for reliability and operational efficiency in a radiological contamination environment at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The Diagnostic Instrument Manipulators (DIMs) are two-staged, telescoping systems that allow the precise alignment and positioning of various x-ray, optical, nuclear, and other diagnostics in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Target Chamber. Designed to be reconfigurable and exchangeable between NIF experiments, the second stage of the DIM is referred to as the Diagnostic Load Package (DLP), which is most often comprised of a cart, diagnostic, and detachable snout. As experiments continue to increase radiation levels, various upgrades have been made to the DIMs to improve reliability and operational efficiency. These upgrades reduce worker exposure and increase experimental shot rates. Specific to this paper, the design and operation of dedicated DLP handling and storage units (DHUs and DSUs) are discussed in addition to their transport equipment. Hardware and process improvements for reduced worker exposure during general DIM access are also featured. Finally, the DLP limit switches have been upgraded to magneticallyactuated proximity sensors for reliability, improved shot rate, and increased user flexibility.

  20. Application and Analysis of the Isoelectronic Line Ratio Temperature Diagnostic in a Planar Ablating-Plasma Experiment at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The Mn/Co isoelectronic emission-line ratio from a microdot source in planar CH foil targets was measured to infer the electron temperature (Te) in the ablating plasma during two-plasmon-decay experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We examine the systematic uncertainty in the Te estimate based on the temperature and density sensitivities of the line ratio in conjunction with plausible density constraints, and its contribution to the total Te estimate uncertainty. The potential advantages of alternative microdot elements (e.g., Ti/Cr and Sc/V) are considered. The microdot mass was selected to provide ample line strength while minimizing the effect of self-absorption on the line emission, which is of particular concern, given the narrow linewidths of mid- Z emitters at subcritical electron densities. Atomic line-formation theory and detailed atomic-radiative simulations show that the straight forward interpretation of the isoelectronic ratio solely in terms of its temperature independence remains valid with lines of moderate optical thickness (up to ~ 10) at line center. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Vergunova, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile ("low-foot" and "high-foot" regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  2. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platform at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE / E ∼ 4 %) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating that monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. These results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.

  3. Applied Circular Dichroism: A Facile Spectroscopic Tool for Configurational Assignment and Determination of Enantiopurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macduff O. Okuom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine if electronic circular dichroism (ECD is a good tool for the qualitative evaluation of absolute configuration and enantiopurity in the absence of chiral high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, ECD studies were performed on several prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs. Cotton effects (CE were observed for both S and R isomers between 200 and 300 nm. For the drugs examined in this study, the S isomers showed a negative CE, while the R isomers displayed a positive CE. The ECD spectra of both enantiomers were nearly mirror images, with the amplitude proportional to the enantiopurity. Plotting the differential extinction coefficient (Δε versus enantiopurity at the wavelength of maximum amplitude yielded linear standard curves with coefficients of determination (R2 greater than 97% for both isomers in all cases. As expected, Equate, Advil, and Motrin, each containing a racemic mixture of ibuprofen, yielded no chiroptical signal. ECD spectra of Suphedrine and Sudafed revealed that each of them is rich in 1S,2S-pseudoephedrine, while the analysis of Equate vapor inhaler is rich in R-methamphetamine.

  4. National Ignition Facility Project Input for Assessment of Environmental Impacts of NIF for the Sitewide Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S

    2003-10-01

    This report provides the baseline data from which the environmental impacts of bounding NIF operations can be assessed. Included are operations in the NE Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB) and the Optics Assembly Building (OAB), (Buildings 581 and 681), and the Building 582 equipment building. The NIF is an experimental laser fusion facility undergoing construction and commissioning at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The LTAB, the main experimental building of the NIF, is where laser-driven experiments will be conducted. The LTAB consists of two laser bays, two optical switchyards, a target bay, target diagnostics areas, capacitor bays, mechanical equipment areas, control rooms, and operational support areas. The LTAB provides an optically stable and clean environment and provides sufficient shielding against prompt radiation and residual radioactivity to meet the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle.

  5. National Ignition Facility Project Input for Assessment of Environmental Impacts of NIF for the Sitewide Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S

    2003-10-01

    This report provides the baseline data from which the environmental impacts of bounding NIF operations can be assessed. Included are operations in the NE Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB) and the Optics Assembly Building (OAB), (Buildings 581 and 681), and the Building 582 equipment building. The NIF is an experimental laser fusion facility undergoing construction and commissioning at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The LTAB, the main experimental building of the NIF, is where laser-driven experiments will be conducted. The LTAB consists of two laser bays, two optical switchyards, a target bay, target diagnostics areas, capacitor bays, mechanical equipment areas, control rooms, and operational support areas. The LTAB provides an optically stable and clean environment and provides sufficient shielding against prompt radiation and residual radioactivity to meet the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle.

  6. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for LOX/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/methane propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. In order to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability in the vacuum conditions and eliminate corona discharge issues, a coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed. The ICPTA uses spark-plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark-plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp.-2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, Plum Brook testing demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/methane propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  7. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, G. E., E-mail: kemp10@llnl.gov; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9698 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  8. Performance of beryllium targets with full-scale capsules in low-fill 6.72-mm hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Jarrott, L. C.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, Y.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Kong, C.; Jaquez, J.; Mauldin, M.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2017-05-01

    When used with 1.06-mm beryllium (Be) capsules on the National Ignition Facility, gold hohlraums with the inner diameter of 5.75 mm and helium gas fill density of 1.6 mg/cm3 exhibit significant drive degradation due to laser energy backscatter (of order 14%-17%) and "missing" X-ray drive energy (about 32% during the main pulse). Also, hard to simulate cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) must be used to control the implosion symmetry. Larger, 6.72-mm hohlraums with fill densities ≤0.6 mg/cm3 generally offer improved drive efficiency, reduced hot-electron preheat, and better control of the implosion symmetry without CBET. Recently, we carried out an exploratory campaign to evaluate performance of 1.06-mm Be capsules in such hohlraums and determine optimal hohlraum parameters. Specifically, we performed a hohlraum fill-density scan with a three-shock, 9.5-ns laser pulse and found that an appropriate axial laser repointing and azimuthal outer-quad splitting resulted in significantly improved hohlraum energetics at fill densities ≤0.3 mg/cm3 (with backscattered and "missing" energies being of about 5% and 23% of the total laser energy, respectively). The capsule shape at stagnation was slightly oblate and improved with lowering the fill density. We also performed an implosion with a lower-picket, 12.6-ns pulse at the hohlraum fill density of 0.15 mg/cm3 to observe comparable hohlraum energetics (about 3% of backscattered and 27% of "missing" energy) but an even more oblate implosion shape. Thus, achieving symmetric implosions of 1.06-mm Be capsules in low-fill, 6.72-mm gold hohlraums with reasonably low-adiabat pulses may not be feasible. However, symmetric implosions have recently been successfully demonstrated in such hohlraums with 0.8-mm Be capsules.

  9. Progress in the development of the MARBLE platform for studying thermonuclear burn in the presence of heterogeneous mix on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T. J.; Douglas, M. R.; Fincke, J. R.; Olson, R. E.; Cobble, J. A.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Parra-Vasquez, N. A. G.; Randolph, R. B.; Schmidt, D. W.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.; Tregillis, I. L.

    2016-05-01

    Mix of ablator material into fuel of an ICF capsule adds non-burning material, diluting the fuel and reducing burn. The amount of the reduction is dependent in part on the morphology of the mix. A probability distribution function (PDF) burn model has been developed [6] that utilizes the average concentration of mixed materials as well as the variance in this quantity across cells provided by the BHR turbulent transport model [3] and its revisions [4] to describe the mix in terms of a PDF of concentrations of fuel and ablator material, and provides the burn rate in mixed material. Work is underway to develop the MARBLE ICF platform for use on the National Ignition Facility in experiments to quantify the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. This platform consists of a plastic (CH) capsule filled with a deuterated plastic foam (CD) with a density of a few tens of milligrams per cubic centimeter, with tritium gas filling the voids in the foam. This capsule will be driven using x-ray drive on NIF, and the resulting shocks will induce turbulent mix that will result in the mixing of deuterium from the foam with the tritium gas. In order to affect the morphology of the mix, engineered foams with voids of diameter up to 100 microns will be utilized. The degree of mix will be determined from the ratio of DT to DD neutron yield. As the mix increases, the yield from reactions between the deuterium of the CD foam with tritium from the gas will increase. The ratio of DT to DD neutrons will be compared to a variation of the PDF burn model that quantifies reactions from initially separated reactants.

  10. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emulsion of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Thomas W. Tunnell, Robert L. Guyton, Imants P. Reinbachs, Phillip W. Watts, et al.

    2007-08-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 69 feet. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. The orange alignment laser is introduced at the entrance to the two-level interferometer table and passes forward through the optical systems to the recording streak cameras. The red alignment laser is introduced in front of the recording streak cameras and passes in the reverse direction through all optical elements, out of the interferometer table, eventually reaching the target chamber center. Red laser wavelength is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of a special beamsplitter used to separate emission light from the Doppler-shifted interferometer light. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignments spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1- to 15-inch-diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-inch diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  11. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional modulations in radiation-driven implosions with "low-foot" and "high-foot" drives at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Chen, K.-C.; Clark, D. S.; Farrell, M.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D.; Kroll, J. J.; Landen, O. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth has been studied using three-dimensional (3-D) broadband modulations by comparing "high-foot" and "low-foot" spherical plastic (CH) capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial perturbations included capsule outer-surface roughness and capsule-mounting membranes ("tents") that were similar to those used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The tents with thicknesses of 31-nm, 46-nm, and 109-nm were used in the experiments. The outer-surface roughness in the "low-foot" experiment was similar to the standard specification, while it was increased by ˜4 times in the "high-foot" experiment to compensate for the reduced growth. The ablation-front instability growth was measured using a Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography platform at a convergence ratio of ˜3. The dominant capsule perturbations, generated by the tent mountings, had measured perturbation amplitudes comparable to the capsule thickness with the "low-foot" drive. These tent perturbations were reduced by ˜3 to 10 times in implosions with the "high-foot" drive. Unexpectedly, the measured perturbations with initially thinner tents were either larger or similar to the measured perturbations with thicker tents for both "high-foot" and "low-foot" drives. While the measured instability growth of 3-D broadband perturbations was also significantly reduced by ˜5 to 10 times with the "high-foot" drive, compared to the "low-foot" drive, the growth mitigation was stronger than expected based on previous "growth-factor" results measured with two-dimensional modulations [D. T. Casey et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102 (2014)]. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the 3-D modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule having a stronger effect on the overall growth of capsule perturbations than the outer-surface capsule roughness.

  12. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  13. Assessment of Personal Airborne Exposures and Surface Contamination from X-ray Vaporization of Beryllium Targets at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Samuel Y; Epperson, Patrick M; Kasper, Kenneth M

    2017-02-28

    This study presents air and surface sampling data collected over the first two years since beryllium was introduced as a target material at the National Ignition Facility. Over this time, 101 experiments with beryllium-containing targets were executed. The data provides an assessment of current conditions in the facility and a baseline for future impacts as new, reduced regulatory limits for beryllium are being proposed by both the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy. This study also investigates how beryllium deposits onto exposed surfaces as a result of x-ray vaporization and the effectiveness of simple decontamination measures in reducing the amount of removable beryllium from a surface. Based on 1,961 surface wipe samples collected from entrant components (equipment directly exposed to target debris) and their surrounding work areas during routine reconfiguration activities, only one result was above the beryllium release limit of 0.2 μg/100 cm(2) and 27 results were above the analytical reporting limit of 0.01 μg/100 cm(2), for a beryllium detection rate of 1.4%. Surface wipe samples collected from the internal walls of the NIF target chamber, however, showed higher levels of beryllium, with beryllium detected on 73% and 87% of the samples during the first and second target chamber entries (performed annually), respectively, with 23% of the samples above the beryllium release limit during the second target chamber entry. The analysis of a target chamber wall panel exposed during the first 30 beryllium-containing experiments (cumulatively) indicated that 87% of the beryllium contamination remains fixed onto the surface after wet wiping the surface and 92% of the non-fixed contamination was removed by decontaminating the surface using a dry wipe followed by a wet wipe. Personal airborne exposures assessed during access to entrant components and during target chamber entry indicated that airborne beryllium was not present

  14. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  15. DTRA National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-16

    or a small balloon. One can also use aerogels doped with mid-to-high-Z elements like germanium. The aerogels can be made even lower mass-density...Ti or Ge-doped Aerogel . [Modified from ref. 9.] Move forward as it uses its energy to convert more and more of the target material to hot...with a small amount of gold would reduce the fusion yield by a factor of roughly 2, but the radiation would be substantially enhanced, especially above

  16. Configured fuel briquet and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.M.

    1985-01-29

    A charcoal briquet of any selected shape is configured to provide a preselected ignition time and total burning time response. A method of constructing such a briquet for any desired combustion response includes empirically deriving expressions for ignition time as a function of briquet volume, surface area and density, and for burn time as a function of volume and density, and configuring any selected shape briquet in accordance with the parameters found to provide such selected performance.

  17. Performance of beryllium targets with full-scale capsules in low-fill 6.72-mm hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, A. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Yi, S. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Loomis, E. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Zylstra, A. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Strozzi, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Marinak, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Salmonson, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Stadermann, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Baxamusa, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Alford, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Wang, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Nikroo, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA; Rice, N. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Kong, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Mauldin, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Youngblood, K. P. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Xu, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Sio, H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

    2017-05-01

    When used with 1.06-mm beryllium (Be) capsules on the National Ignition Facility, gold hohlraums with the inner diameter of 5.75 mm and helium gas fill density of 1.6 mg/cm3 exhibit significant drive degradation due to laser energy backscatter (of order 14%–17%) and “missing” X-ray drive energy (about 32% during the main pulse). Also, hard to simulate cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) must be used to control the implosion symmetry. Larger, 6.72-mm hohlraums with fill densities ≤0.6 mg/cm3 generally offer improved drive efficiency, reduced hot-electron preheat, and better control of the implosion symmetry without CBET. Recently, we carried out an exploratory campaign to evaluate performance of 1.06-mm Be capsules in such hohlraums and determine optimal hohlraum parameters. Specifically, we performed a hohlraum fill-density scan with a three-shock, 9.5-ns laser pulse and found that an appropriate axial laser repointing and azimuthal outer-quad splitting resulted in significantly improved hohlraum energetics at fill densities ≤0.3 mg/cm3 (with backscattered and “missing” energies being of about 5% and 23% of the total laser energy, respectively). The capsule shape at stagnation was slightly oblate and improved with lowering the fill density. We also performed an implosion with a lower-picket, 12.6-ns pulse at the hohlraum fill density of 0.15 mg/cm3 to observe comparable hohlraum energetics (about 3% of backscattered and 27% of “missing” energy) but an even more oblate implosion shape. Thus, achieving symmetric implosions of 1.06-mm Be capsules in low-fill, 6.72-mm gold hohlraums with reasonably low-adiabat pulses may not be feasible. However, symmetric implosions have recently been successfully demonstrated in such hohlraums with 0.8-mm Be capsules.

  18. Laser-induced multi-point ignition for enabling high-performance engines

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Various multi-point laser-induced ignition techniques were reviewed, which adopted conical cavity and prechamber configurations. Up to five-point ignitions have been achieved with significant reduction in combustion duration, demonstrating potential increase in combustion system efficiency.

  19. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter, E-mail: amendt1@llnl.gov; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and –resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold–helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to

  20. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-11-01

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and -resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold-helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to hindered

  1. Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

  2. Studying areal density evolution in D-3He implosions at the National Ignition Facility using pTOF-measured shock- and compression-bang times and WRF-measured shock and compression ρR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, N.; Sio, H.; Lahmann, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Meezan, N.; Casey, D. T.; Baker, K.; Khan, S.; Thomas, C. A.; Spears, B. K.; Barbosa, F.; Bionta, R. M.; Zylstra, A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the time evolution of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments is critical for making further improvements on the road to ignition. In an ICF implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) shocks are launched into the ablator by a laser pulse. These shocks coalesce at the fuel-shell interface and then converge at the center of the implosion which causes significant heating and a period of nuclear burn (``shock phase''), followed by a compression phase due to the imploding shell. The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) and the magnetic particle-time-of-flight (magPTOF) detectors were developed to measure both the shock and compression bang-times in NIF D-3He implosions. These timing measurements in combination with shock and compression areal densities (ρR) from wedge range filters (WRFs) provide a direct measurement of ρR evolution, which can be used to guide theory and heavily constrain simulations. This presentation shows a first analysis of ρR evolution from shock phase to compression phase in a variety of NIF implosions as measured by pTOF and WRFs. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  3. Heat transfer tests of the NASA-MSC space shuttle configuration at the Langley Research Center Mach 8 Variable Density Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, L. E.; Sparks, V. W.; Bhadsavle, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    The experimental investigations performed on the NASA-Manned Spacecraft Center Space Shuttle orbiter and booster configurations at a Mach 8 variable density facility are presented. The test program was a series of aerothermodynamic wind tunnel tests that were run over a range of angles of attack, yaw angles, and Reynolds numbers. Objectives of the test program were to obtain heat transfer data over the NASA-Manned Spacecraft Center Space Shuttle orbiter, booster, and launch configurations for a range of angles of attack from - 20 to + 30 deg, yaw angles of 0 and + or - 6 deg, and Reynolds numbers of 0.6, 2.0, and 3.7 x one million. The phase-change coating technique was used to obtain heat transfer data. Information received from these tests will be instrumental in performing thermal protection systems studies and vehicle aerodynamic design.

  4. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  5. The Measurable Effects of Germanium Loaded into the Pusher of a Pushered Single Shell Capsule Designed for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Robert; Baker, Kevin; Casey, Daniel; Dewald, Eduard; Graziani, Frank; MacLaren, Steve; Nikroo, Abass; Pino, Jesse; Ralph, Joe; Remington, Bruce; Sacks, Ryan; Salmonson, Jay; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Germanium loaded pushered single shells (PSS) have been designed as a vehicle to study the effects of turbulent mixing between the DT fuel and a pusher which is not fully ionized. This is intended as a surrogate for the high-Z mixing expected in future double-shell ignition capsules. These PSS experiments will be diagnosed by loading deuterium along with the germanium into the GDP pusher and filling the capsule with a mixture of tritium and hydrogen. In such CD mix experiments, the measured number of DT neutrons along with the inferred ion temperature from the time-of-flight thermal broadening provides detailed information about the annular mixing of the fuel and the pusher. This paper will compare the expected DT mix signals from capsules loaded with germanium to control capsules fired without any germanium. Leading turbulent mix models predict the germanium loaded capsules and no-germanium control capsules will produce significantly different results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344,LLNS, LLC.

  6. Test facilities for VINCI®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuel, Dirk; Schäfer, Klaus; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    With the replacement of the current upper-stage ESC-A of the Ariane 5 launcher by an enhanced cryogenic upper-stage, ESA's Ariane 5 Midterm Evolution (A5-ME) program aims to raise the launcher's payload capacity in geostationary transfer orbit from 10 to 12 tons, an increase of 20 %. Increasing the in-orbit delivery capability of the A5-ME launcher requires a versatile, high-performance, evolved cryogenic upper-stage engine suitable for delivering multiple payloads to all kinds of orbits, ranging from low earth orbit to geostationary transfer orbit with increased perigee. In order to meet these requirements the re-ignitable liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engine VINCI® currently under development is designated to power the future upper stage, featuring a design performance of 180 kN of thrust and 464 s of specific impulse. Since 2010 development tests for the VINCI® engine have been conducted at the test benches P3.2 and P4.1 at DLR test site in Lampoldshausen under the ESA A5-ME program. For the VINCI® combustion chamber development the P3.2 test facility is used, which is the only European thrust chamber test facility. Originally erected for the development of the thrust chamber of the Vulcain engine, in 2003 the test facility was modified that today it is able to simulate vacuum conditions for the ignition and startup of the VINCI® combustion chamber. To maintain the test operations under vacuum conditions over an entire mission life of the VINCI® engine, including re-ignition following long and short coasting phases, between 2000 and 2005 the test facility P4.1 was completely rebuilt into a new high-altitude simulation facility. During the past two P4.1 test campaigns in 2010 and 2011 a series of important milestones were reached in the development of the VINCI® engine. In preparation for future activities within the frame of ESA's A5-ME program DLR has already started the engineering of a stage test facility for the prospective upper stage

  7. Stability of Ignition Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey of published data on experimental and theoretical studies on ignition stability is offered. The comparison between theory and experiment is shown to prove qualitatively the efficiency of the phenomenological approach in the theory. However, the methods of mathematical simulation as well as those of experimental studying of ignition phenomenon, especially at high fluxes, need to be improved.

  8. Review of the National Ignition Campaign 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindl, John; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John; Moses, Ed

    2014-02-01

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) was a multi-institution effort established under the National Nuclear Security Administration of DOE in 2005, prior to the completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in 2009. The scope of the NIC was the planning and preparation for and the execution of the first 3 yr of ignition experiments (through the end of September 2012) as well as the development, fielding, qualification, and integration of the wide range of capabilities required for ignition. Besides the operation and optimization of the use of NIF, these capabilities included over 50 optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems, target fabrication facilities, experimental platforms, and a wide range of NIF facility infrastructure. The goal of ignition experiments on the NIF is to achieve, for the first time, ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory via inertial confinement fusion and to develop a platform for ignition and high energy density applications on the NIF. The goal of the NIC was to develop and integrate all of the capabilities required for a precision ignition campaign and, if possible, to demonstrate ignition and gain by the end of FY12. The goal of achieving ignition can be divided into three main challenges. The first challenge is defining specifications for the target, laser, and diagnostics with the understanding that not all ignition physics is fully understood and not all material properties are known. The second challenge is designing experiments to systematically remove these uncertainties. The third challenge is translating these experimental results into metrics designed to determine how well the experimental implosions have performed relative to expectations and requirements and to advance those metrics toward the conditions required for ignition. This paper summarizes the approach taken to address these challenges, along with the progress achieved to date and the challenges that remain. At project completion in 2009, NIF lacked

  9. A technique for extending by ~103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGAa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Séguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Zylstra, A. B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Rosenberg, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Li, C. K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D3He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 102 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 103 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 108 and 109 cm-2, respectively. Finally, using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ~108 and ~1012, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±~10 mg/cm2.

  10. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  11. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  12. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  13. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  14. Fusion ignition via a magnetically-assisted fast ignition approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W -M; Sheng, Z -M; Li, Y T; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards laser-driven fusion ignition via different schemes, including direct and indirect central ignition, fast ignition, shock ignition, and impact ignition schemes. However, to reach ignition conditions, there are still various technical and physical challenges to be solved for all these schemes. Here, our multi-dimensional integrated simulation shows that the fast-ignition conditions could be achieved when two 2.8 petawatt heating laser pulses counter-propagate along a 3.5 kilotesla external magnetic field. Within a period of 5 picoseconds, the laser pulses heat a nuclear fuel to reach the ignition conditions. Furthermore, we present the parameter windows of lasers and magnetic fields required for ignition for experimental test.

  15. Hot-wire ignition of AN-based emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Richard; Goldthorp, Sandra; Badeen, Christopher M. [Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G1 (Canada); Chan, Sek Kwan [Orica Canada Inc., Brownsburg-Chatham, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Emulsions based on ammonium nitrate (AN) and water locally ignited by a heat source do not undergo sustained combustion when the pressure is lower than some threshold value usually called the Minimum Burning Pressure (MBP). This concept is now being used by some manufacturers as a basis of safety. However, before a technique to reliably measure MBP values can be designed, one must have a better understanding of the ignition mechanism. Clearly, this is required to avoid under ignitions which could lead to the erroneous interpretation of failures to ignite as failures to propagate. In the present work, facilities to prepare and characterize emulsions were implemented at the Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory. A calibrated hot-wire ignition system operated in a high-pressure vessel was also built. The system was used to study the ignition characteristics of five emulsion formulations as a function of pressure and ignition source current. It was found that these mixtures exhibit complicated pre-ignition stages and that the appearance of endotherms when the pressure is lowered below some threshold value correlates with the MBP. Thermal conductivity measurements using this hot-wire system are also reported. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Localized flame extinction and re-ignition in turbulent jet ignition assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad; Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Team

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent jet ignition (TJI)-assisted combustion of ultra-lean fuel-air is performed in a three-dimensional planar jet configuration. TJI is a novel ignition enhancement method which facilitates the combustion of lean and ultra-lean mixtures by rapidly exposing them to high temperature combustion products. Fully compressible gas dynamics and species equations are solved with high order finite difference methods. The hydrogen-air reaction is simulated with a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of 9 species and 38 elementary reactions. The interesting phenomena involved in TJI combustion including localized premixed flame extinction/re-ignition and simultaneous premixed/non-premixed flames are investigated by using the flame heat release, temperature, species concentrations, and a newly defined TJI progress variable.

  17. Information configuration?

    OpenAIRE

    Lauro Cesar Araujo; Mamede Lima-Marques

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The term "configuration information" has emerged in the works of Information Architecture; however, there isn’t a conceptualization of “configuration” within Information Architecture. Objective: The objective is propose a definition for "configuration" and "information configuration" within the Information Architecture discipline, and indicate a teleological corpus from configuration management that can be used as paxis in Information Architecture. Methodolo...

  18. National Ignition Facility (NIF) operations procedures plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantrom, D.

    1998-05-06

    The purpose of this Operations Procedures Plan is to establish a standard procedure which outlines how NIF Operations procedures will be developed (i.e , written, edited, reviewed, approved, published, revised) and accessed by the NIF Operations staff who must use procedures in order to accomplish their tasks. In addition, this Plan is designed to provide a guide to the NIF Project staff to assist them in planning and writing procedures. Also, resource and scheduling information is provided.

  19. Ignition Studies on Aluminised Propellant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Bhaskaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on the ignition of metallised propellants (APIHTPB/AI has been carried out 10 determine the ignition delay, minimum ignition energy and corresponding heat flux,threshold heat flux for ignition and minimum ignition temperature, Ignition experiments were conductedusing a shock tube under convectiveheating conditions similar to those prevailingin a rocket motor. Heat flux at propellant location was measured by thin film heat flux gauge and also calculated from a ribbon thermocouple output under similar test conditions. The igntion delay was measured as the time lag between the arrival of hot gas at the propellant and the light emission due to actual ignition of the propellant. The experimental results indicate that the ignition delay characteristics are independent of pressure. The minimum energy for ignition obtained for the propellant is 1100J/m2 corresponding to the heat flux range of 80·120 WIcm2 for a gas velocity of 110 mls. The threshold heat flux required to ignite the propellant was 40 W/cm2 at a velocity of 110 mls. Heat flux corresponding to minimum ignition energy and the threshold heat flux increase with gas velocity. The threshold ignition temperature of the propellant was found to be 600 ± 20 K.

  20. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  1. Kinetic model for DT ignition and burn in ICF targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, S.I.; Oparin, A.M.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]|[L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 117940 Moscow (Russia)

    1996-05-01

    Ignition and burn of DT targets is studied taking into account kinetic effects. Kinetic equations describing the interaction of the high-energy reaction products with target plasma are solved using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code for collisional plasma. Volume and spark ignition configurations are simulated for initial temperatures and {l_angle}{rho}{ital R}{r_angle} values of practical interest and target masses between 0.1 and 10 mg. Optically thick configurations igniting at temperatures below 5 keV are considered. Burn of the targets with reduced tritium content is simulated. It was shown that, for 25{percent} tritium concentration, the energy output is reduced only by 15{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. AN INTRODUCTION TO A HOMOGENEOUS CHARGE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Hairuddin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine technology is relatively new and has not matured sufficiently to be commercialised compared with conventional engines. It can use spark ignition or compression ignition engine configurations, capitalizing on the advantages of both: high engine efficiency with low emissions levels. HCCI engines can use a wide range of fuels with low emissions levels. Due to these advantages, HCCI engines are suitable for use in a hybrid engine configuration, where they can reduce the fuel consumption even further. However, HCCI engines have some disadvantages, such as knocking and a low to medium operating load range, which need to be resolved before the engine can be commercialised. Therefore, a comprehensive study has to be performed to understand the behaviour of HCCI engines.

  3. Integrated thermodynamic model for ignition target performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer P.T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have derived a 3-dimensional synthetic model for NIF implosion conditions, by predicting and optimizing fits to a broad set of x-ray and nuclear diagnostics obtained on each shot. By matching x-ray images, burn width, neutron time-of-flight ion temperature, yield, and fuel ρr, we obtain nearly unique constraints on conditions in the hotspot and fuel in a model that is entirely consistent with the observables. This model allows us to determine hotspot density, pressure, areal density (ρr, total energy, and other ignition-relevant parameters not available from any single diagnostic. This article describes the model and its application to National Ignition Facility (NIF tritium–hydrogen–deuterium (THD and DT implosion data, and provides an explanation for the large yield and ρr degradation compared to numerical code predictions.

  4. 40 CFR 264.281 - Special requirements for ignitable or reactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.281 Special requirements for ignitable or reactive waste. The owner or operator must not apply ignitable or reactive waste to the treatment zone unless the...

  5. Robustness studies of NIF ignition targets in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300 eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of two thousand two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code Lasnex, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ``ignition cliff'' is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of W. K. Levedahl and J. D. Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and R. Kishony and D. Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  6. Direct drive targets for the megajoule facility UFL-2M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Vergunova, G. A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Stepanov, R. V.; Doskoch, I. Ya; Yakhin, R. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Development of direct drive target schemes for the megajoule facility is a topical problem of up-to-date inertial fusion physics. The choice of possible schemes and solutions depends essentially on the irradiation conditions. The installations both running (NIF) and under construction (LMJ) are destined to the 3ω irradiation in PDD (polar direct drive) configuration. The UFL-2M installation that is under construction is based on 2ω irradiation and a symmetrical scheme of direct drive target irradiation. Under these conditions possible schemes for direct drive targets demonstrating the ignition and the achievement of gain G=10÷20 are considered in this report. At the same time, the possibilities are analyzed for the target compression and ignition with a reliability reserve at the conditions that can deviate from the standard ones, and if our understanding of the physics of the processes is not completely adequate to the physics of the real processes.

  7. The National Ignition Campaign: status and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Collaborators, the NIC

    2013-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and a variety of experiments have been completed and many more are planned in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with nearly 60 x-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. The NIF has also been qualified for the use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high-yield experiments and classified experiments. Implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 7.5 × 1014 neutrons have been achieved. NIF, a Nd : Glass laser facility, is routinely operating at 1.6 MJ of ultraviolet (3ω) light on target with very high reliability. It recently reached its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort with the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory, is making steady progress towards achieving ignition. Other experiments have been completed in support of high-energy science, materials equation of state, and materials strength. In all cases, records of extreme temperatures and pressures, highest neutron yield and highest energy densities have been achieved. This paper describes the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path towards ignition.

  8. CORONA DISCHARGE IGNITION FOR ADVANCED STATIONARY NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul D. Ronney

    2003-09-12

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. This corona generator is adaptable for use as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions. Work is underway to design a corona electrode that will fit in the new test engine and be capable igniting the mixture in one cylinder at first and eventually in all four cylinders. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder. With this configuration it will be possible to switch between corona ignition and conventional spark plug ignition without making any mechanical modifications.

  9. Burner ignition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  10. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  11. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  12. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices.

  13. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E. M.; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55∘ are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55∘ are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28 .5∘ and 55∘, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28 .5∘ in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55∘ injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35 -μ m incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  14. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E M; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55^{∘} are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55^{∘} are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28.5^{∘} and 55^{∘}, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28.5^{∘} in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55^{∘} injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35-μm incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Ignition and combustion temperatures determined by laser heating. [for metals deriving from failures in development of Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransford, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A laser heating technique and facility have been developed to study metal ignition and combustion in high-pressure oxygen. The ignition and combustion temperatures, estimates of oxidation rates, and ignition and combustion morphology can be determined. This facility and the laser heating techniques are described. Examples of the type of data obtained are presented and discussed. The ignition temperature curves for an aluminum alloy - Unified Numbering System (UNS) A96061, a stainless steel - UNS S30200, and two nickel alloys - UNS N07718 and N04400 are given.

  16. Computational Modeling in Support of the National Ignition Facilty Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, M J; Haynam, C A; Williams, W H

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser performance and automated control of the laser setup process are crucial to the project's success. These functions will be performed by two closely coupled computer code: the virtual beamline (VBL) and the laser performance operations model (LPOM).

  17. Fielding the NIF Cryogenic Ignition Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malsbury, T; Haid, B; Gibson, C; Atkinson, D; Skulina, K; Klingmann, J; Atherton, J; Mapoles, E; Kozioziemski, B; Dzenitis, E

    2008-02-28

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer on the inside of a 2 millimeter diameter capsule positioned at the center of a 9 millimeter long by 5 millimeter diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer requires micrometer level accuracy and must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 19 K. At NIF shot time, the target must be positioned at the center of the NIF 10 meter diameter target chamber, aligned to the laser beam lines and held stable to less than 7 micrometers rms. We have completed the final design and are integrating the systems necessary to create, characterize and field the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with emphasis on the challenges of fielding a precision cryogenic positioning system will be presented.

  18. Initial assessments of ignition spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Borowski, S.K.; Bussell, G.T.; Dalton, G.R.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hamilton, W.R.; Kalsi, S.S.; Lee, V.D.; Miller, J.B.

    1985-12-01

    Initial assessments of ignition spherical tori suggest that they can be highly cost effective and exceptionally small in unit size. Assuming advanced methods of current drive to ramp up the plasma current (e.g., via lower hybrid wave at modest plasma densities and temperatures), the inductive solenoid can largely be eliminated. Given the uncertainties in plasma energy confinement times and the effects of strong paramagnetism on plasma pressure, and allowing for the possible use of high-strength copper alloys (e.g., C-17510, Cu-Ni-Be alloy), ignition spherical tori with a 50-s burn are estimated to have major radii ranging from 1.0 to 1.6 m, aspect ratios from 1.4 to 1.7, vacuum toroidal fields from 2 to 3 T, plasma currents from 10 to 19 MA, and fusion power from 50 to 300 MW. Because of its modest field strength and simple poloidal field coil configuration, only conventional engineering approaches are needed in the design. A free-standing toroidal field coil/vacuum vessel structure is assessed to be feasible and relatively independent of the shield structure and the poloidal field coils. This exceptionally simple configuration depends significantly, however, on practical fabrication approaches of the center conductor post, about which there is presently little experience. 19 refs.

  19. Large eddy simulations of coal jet flame ignition using the direct quadrature method of moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedel, Julien

    The Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) was implemented in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tool ARCHES to model coal particles. LES coupled with DQMOM was first applied to nonreacting particle-laden turbulent jets. Simulation results were compared to experimental data and accurately modeled a wide range of particle behaviors, such as particle jet waviness, spreading, break up, particle clustering and segregation, in different configurations. Simulations also accurately predicted the mean axial velocity along the centerline for both the gas phase and the solid phase, thus demonstrating the validity of the approach to model particles in turbulent flows. LES was then applied to the prediction of pulverized coal flame ignition. The stability of an oxy-coal flame as a function of changing primary gas composition (CO2 and O2) was first investigated. Flame stability was measured using optical measurements of the flame standoff distance in a 40 kW pilot facility. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the facility provided valuable insight into the experimentally observed data and the importance of factors such as heterogeneous reactions, radiation or wall temperature. The effects of three parameters on the flame stand-off distance were studied and simulation predictions were compared to experimental data using the data collaboration method. An additional validation study of the ARCHES LES tool was then performed on an air-fired pulverized coal jet flame ignited by a preheated gas flow. The simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to experimental observations for different inlet stoichiometric ratios. LES simulations were able to capture the various combustion regimes observed during flame ignition and to accurately model the flame stand-off distance sensitivity to the stoichiometric ratio. Gas temperature and coal burnout predictions were also examined and showed good agreement with experimental data. Overall, this research shows that high

  20. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  1. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  2. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    CERN Document Server

    Honrubia, J J

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  3. Hypertext Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2016-01-01

    , links, interactive processes, and time scalings, and that the hypertext configuration is a major but not sole source of the messiness of big data. The notion of hypertext will be revalidated, placed at the center of the interpretation of networked digital media, and used in the analysis of the fast...

  4. Self-ignition and ignition of aluminum powders in shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, V. M.; Poplavski, S. V.

    Ignition of fine aluminum powders in reflected shock waves has been studied. Two ignition regimes are found: self-ignition observed at temperatures higher than 1800 K and ``low-temperature'' ignition at temperatures of 1000-1800 K. The possibility of initiating the ignition of aluminum powders in air using combustible liquids has been studied too.

  5. Path To Ignition: US Indirect Target Physics (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, M.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The United States ICF Program has been pursuing an aggressive research program in preparation for an ignition demonstration on the National Ignition Facility. Los Alamos and Livermore laboratories have collaborated on resolving indirect drive target physics issues on the Nova laser at Livermore National Laboratory. This combined with detailed modeling of laser heated indirectly driven targets likely to achieve ignition, has provided the basis for planning for the NIF. A detailed understanding of target physics, laser performance, and target fabrication is required for developing robust ignition targets. We have developed large-scale computational models to simulate complex physics which occurs in an indirectly driven target. For ignition, detailed understanding of hohlraum and implosion physics is required in order to control competing processes at the few percent level. From crucial experiments performed by Los Alamos and Livermore on the Nova laser, a comprehensive indirect drive database has been assembled. Time integrated and time dependent measurements of radiation drive and symmetry coupled with a detailed set of plasma instability measurements have confirmed our ability to predict hohlraum energetics. Implosion physics campaigns are focused on underdstanding detailed capsule hydrodynamics and instability growth. Target fabrication technology is also an active area of research at Los Alamos, Livermore, and General Atomics for NIF. NIF targets require developing technology in cryogenics and manufacturing in such areas as beryllium shell manufacture. Descriptions of our NIF target designs, experimental results, and fabrication technology supporting NIF target performance predictions will be given.

  6. Hypertext Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2016-01-01

    , links, interactive processes, and time scalings, and that the hypertext configuration is a major but not sole source of the messiness of big data. The notion of hypertext will be revalidated, placed at the center of the interpretation of networked digital media, and used in the analysis of the fast......The article presents a conceptual framework for distinguishing different sorts of heterogeneous digital materials. The hypothesis is that a wide range of heterogeneous data resources can be characterized and classified due to their particular configurations of hypertext features such as scripts......-growing amounts of heterogeneous digital collections, assemblages, and corpora. The introduction summarizes the wider background of a fast-changing data landscape....

  7. Usefulness of a Rugby-shaped hohlraum in a Laser M'egaJoule (LMJ) 40-quad configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinie, G.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Bastian, J.; Galmiche, D.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.

    2007-11-01

    The LMJ setup will consist of 60 quads in a 3-cone configuration, at angles 33.2^o, 49^o and 59.5^o. First ignition attempts in indirect drive are planned to be made on the way to the completion of the full facility, with only 40 quads in a 2-cone configuration, at angles 33.2^o and 49^o. By analytic considerations, we show that in a 40-quad configuration, the angular location of the hohlraum outer irradiating ring, as seen from the capsule, must be closer to the laser entrance hole than with the full LMJ. The use of a Rugby-shaped hohlraum instead of a cylinder therefore allows to keep a correct symmetry while reducing the wall surface, which improves the global energetic efficiency of the target. Simplified 2D numerical simulations of Rugby hohlraums are presented, achieving a yield of about 30 MJ with our 1.215 mm-radius, CH-uniform-ablator capsule. These results suggests this kind of hohlraum might be an interesting candidate for 40-quad ignition experiments. Work on optimizing the present design and refining the numerical simulations is currently pursued.

  8. Update on ignition studies at Cea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, P.A.; Casanova, M.; Casner, A.; Cherfils, C.; Dattolo, E.; Disdier, L.; Galmiche, D.; Giorla, J.; Houry, M.; Jadaud, J.P.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Lours, L.; Masse, L.; Monteil, M.C.; Morice, O.; Naudy, M.; Philippe, F.; Poggi, F.; Renaud, F.; Riazuelo, G.; Saillard, Y.; Seytor, P.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Wagon, F. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2007-08-15

    This article sums up the theoretical and experimental studies about ignition. Three experiments are salient this year on the Omega laser in collaboration with DOE laboratories. First, 3 cones of beams have allowed to mimic the LMJ (laser MegaJoule) configuration and to get symmetry measurements. Secondly, we have measured perturbations due to hydro-instability in CHGe planar samples with face-on and side-on radiographs. And thirdly, we have improved our nuclear diagnostics, particularly the neutron image system tested on direct drive implosions. As far as LMJ target design is concerned, we have defined a preliminary domain corresponding to the possible operation at 2{omega}. At 3 {omega} we have studied the low mode instability effects on the DT deformation (due to the laser or to the target) and on the yield. The stability is clearly improved with graded doped CH for our nominal capsule L1215. (authors)

  9. ICF Ignition, the Lawson Criterion, and Comparison with MFE Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R.

    2009-11-01

    The Lawson criterion, which determines the onset of thermonuclear ignition, is usually expressed through the product pτ > 10 atm . s, where p is the plasma pressure in atm and τ is the energy confinement time in seconds. In magnetic fusion devices, both the pressure and confinement time are routinely measured and the performance of each discharge can be assessed by comparing the value of pτ with respect to the ignition value (10 atm . s). In inertial confinement fusion, both p and τ cannot be directly measured and the performance of surrogate and/or subignited ICF implosions cannot be assessed with respect to the ignition condition. This makes it difficult to compare the performance of ICF implosions with that of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) discharges. Here, we define the meaning of ignition in ICF implosions and compare it to MFE ignition. We then show that a multidimensional ignition condition for inertial confinement fusion can be cast in a form that depends on three measurable parameters of the compressed-fuel assembly: the hot-spot ion temperature T, the neutron yield normalized to the 1-D prediction (yield over clean or YOC) and the total areal density ρR, which includes the cold shell's contribution. A family of marginal-ignition curves are derived in the ρR--T plane.footnotetext C. D. Zhou and R. Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008). On this plane, hydrodynamic-equivalent curves show how a given implosion would perform with respect to the ignition condition when the laser-driver energy is varied. Such a criterion can be used to measure the ignition marginfootnotetext D. S. Clark, S. W. Haan, and J. D. Salmonson, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056305 (2008). of NIF targets and to predict the performance of OMEGA targets when scaled up to NIF energies. This work has been supported by the US Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC02-ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  10. Fusion ignition research experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  11. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  12. Modular small hydro configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  13. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Rodney J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  14. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>108 K), pressures (10 GBar) and matter densities (>100 g/cm3). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. The targets for the NIC are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. The DT fuel is contained in a 2-millimeter-diameter graded copper/beryllium or CH shell. The 75-μm-thick cryogenic ice DT fuel layer is formed to sub-micron uniformity at a temperature of approximately 18 Kelvin. The capsule and its fuel layer sit at the center of a gold/depleted uranium 'cocktail' hohlraum. Researchers at LLNL have teamed with colleagues at General Atomics to lead the development of the technologies, engineering design and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to produce these demanding targets. We are also collaborating with colleagues at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester in DT layering, and at Fraunhofer in Germany in nano-crystalline diamond as an alternate ablator to Beryllium and CH. The Beryllium capsules and cocktail hohlraums are made by physical vapor deposition onto sacrificial mandrels. These coatings must have high density (low porosity), uniform microstructure, low oxygen content and low permeability. The ablator

  15. Options for an ignited tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon ..beta../sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed.

  16. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  17. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  18. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  19. Ignition delay time measurements of primary reference fuel blends

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-02-07

    Ignition delay times of four different primary reference fuels (PRF), mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane, were measured behind reflected shock waves in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The PRFs were formulated to match the RON of two high-octane gasolines (RON 95 and 91) and two prospective low-octane naphtha fuels (RON 80 and 70). Experiments were carried out over a wide range of temperatures (700–1200K), pressures (10, 20, and 40bar) and equivalence ratios (0.5 and 1). Kinetic modeling predictions from four chemical kinetic mechanisms are compared with the experimental data. Ignition delay correlations are developed to reproduce the measured ignition delay times. Brute force sensitivity analyses are carried out to identify reactions that affect ignition delay times at specific temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio. The large experimental data set provided in the current work will serve as a benchmark for the validation of chemical kinetic mechanisms of primary reference fuel blends.

  20. Analysis of Possible Explosion at KSC Due to Spontaneous Ignition of Hypergolic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    VAB ) for stacking to the first stage booster motors prior to ARES move to the launch pad. The new Constellation Program philosophy to process in this...surrounding facilities near the VAB and the Multi Purpose Processing Facility (MPPF), where the SM will be serviced with nearly 18,000 pounds of...ignition of hypergolic fuel stored in the CEV SM. The facilities considered included • Vehicle Assembly Building ( VAB ) • Multi-Payload

  1. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet igni

  2. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet

  3. Auto-ignition and stabilization mechanism of diluted H2 jet flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei FENG; Zhi-jun WU; Jun DENG; Li-guang LI

    2011-01-01

    The controllable active thermo-atmosphere combustor (CATAC) has become a utilizable and effective facility because it benefits the optical diagnostics and modeling.This paper presents the modeling research of the auto-ignition and flames of the H2/N2 (H2/CH4/N2,or H2/H2O2/N2) mixture on a CATAC,and shows curves varying with temperatures of auto-ignition delay,the height of the site of auto-ignition of lifted flames,and flame lift-off height.The results of auto-ignition delay and the lifi-off height are compared the experimental results to validate the model.A turning point can be seen on each curve,identified with criterion temperature.It can be concluded that when the co-flow temperature is higher than the criterion temperature,the auto-ignition and lifted flame of the mixture are not stable.Conversely,below the criterion temperature,the mixture will auto-ignite in a stable fashion.Stabilization mechanisms of auto-ignition and lifted flames are analyzed in terms of the criterion temperature.

  4. Hohlraum-Driven Ignition-Like Double-Shell Implosion Experiments on Omega: Analysis and Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P; Robey, H F; Park, H-S; Tipton, R E; Turner, R E; Milovich, J; Rowley, D; Hibbard, R; Louis, H; Wallace, R; Garbett, W; Dunne, A M; Varnum, W S; Watt, R G; Wilson, D C

    2003-08-22

    An experimental campaign to study hohlraum-driven ignition-like double-shell target performance using the Omega laser facility has begun. These targets are intended to incorporate as many ignition-like properties of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) double-shell ignition design [1,2] as possible, given the energy constraints of the Omega laser. In particular, this latest generation of Omega double-shells is nominally predicted to produce over 99% of the (clean) DD neutron yield from the compressional or stagnation phase of the implosion as required in the NIF ignition design. By contrast, previous double-shell experience on Omega [3] was restricted to cases where a significant fraction of the observed neutron yield was produced during the earlier shock convergence phase where the effects of mix are deemed negligibly small. These new targets are specifically designed to have optimized fall-line behavior for mitigating the effects of pusher-fuel mix after deceleration onset and, thereby, providing maximum neutron yield from the stagnation phase. Experimental results from this recent Omega ignition-like double-shell implosion campaign show favorable agreement with two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulation studies when enhanced (gold) hohlraum M-band (2-5 keV) radiation is included at a level consistent with observations.

  5. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, Ryan [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Clark, Billy [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pantoya, Michelle L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Heaps, Ronald J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daniels, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  6. Update to Rev6 ignition designs NIF, with details about support tent in particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, S. W.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Ho, D.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A.; Lafortune, K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Simakov, A. N.; Yi, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.; Hoover, D.

    2013-10-01

    Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility will use an indirectly driven spherical implosion to assemble and ignite a mass of DT fuel. Requirements describing the specifics of the experiment and the corresponding expected performance were established several years prior. These requirements include laser features, target fabrication and characterization, and data obtained from pre-ignition experiments. Since those requirements were originally set, various NIF experiments using surrogate targets have motivated updates to the target designs and requirements. A summary of these updates will be presented. Rev6 designs for CH(Si), C(W), and Be(Cu) will be summarized. One particularly significant change regards the thickness of the tent films supporting the capsule, and the presentation will include updated thickness goals and the experimental motivation for the change. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  8. Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1994-12-01

    The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

  9. Development of Beryllium-Copper Alloy Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Jason; Alexander, David; Thoma, Daniel; Field, Robert; Day, Robert; Cameron, Bernard; Nobile, Arthur; Rivera, Gerald; Kelly, Ann; Papin, Pallas; Schulze, Roland; Dauelsberg, Lawrence; Alexander, Neil; Galix, Remy

    2004-11-01

    Cu-doped Be capsules are being developed for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our fabrication approach is based on bonding of cylindrical parts containing precision machined hemispherical cavities, followed by machining an external spherical contour to produce a spherical shell. While we have demonstrated this approach, there are several key issues that need to be resolved before a shell meeting NIF specifications can be produced. These issues are synthesis of high purity small grain size Be0.9at%Cu alloy, formation of a strong hemishell bond that will allow the capsule to contain its 400 atm fill gas at room temperature, precision machining and polishing of the capsule to meet stringent specifications for surface finish and spherical quality, and filling with DT. In this paper we report on the progress that has been made in resolving these key issues.

  10. Flame ignition studies of conventional and alternative jet fuels and surrogate components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning

    Practical jet fuels are widely used in air-breathing propulsion, but the chemical mechanisms that control their combustion are not yet understood. Thousands of components are contained in conventional and alternative jet fuels, making thus any effort to model their combustion behavior a daunting task. That has been the motivation behind the development of surrogate fuels that contain typically a small number of neat components, whose physical properties and combustion behavior mimic those of the real jet fuel, and whose kinetics could be modeled with increased degree of confidence. Towards that end, a large number of experimental data are required both for the real fuels and the attendant surrogate components that could be used to develop and validate detailed kinetic models. Those kinetic models could be used then upon reduction to model a combustor and eventually optimize its performance. Among all flame phenomena, ignition is rather sensitive to the oxidative and pyrolytic propensity of the fuel as well as to its diffusivity. The counterflow configuration is ideal in probing both the fuel reactivity and diffusivity aspects of the ignition process and it was used in the present work to determine the ignition temperatures of premixed and non-premixed flames of a variety of fuels relevant to air-breathing propulsion. The experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, elevated unburned fuel mixture temperatures, and various strain rates that were measured locally. Several recent kinetic models were used in direct numerical simulations of the experiments and the computed results were tested against the experimental data. Furthermore, through sensitivity, reaction path, and structure analyses of the computed flames, insight was provided into the dominant mechanisms that control ignition. It was found that ignition is primarily sensitive to fuel diffusion and secondarily sensitive to chemical kinetics and intermediate species diffusivities under the low fuel

  11. Self-ignition of diesel spray combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuchakallaya, Isares; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-10-01

    This work presents the development and implementation of auto-ignition modelling for DI diesel engines by using the probability density function-eddy break-up (PDF-EBU) model. The key concept of this approach is to combine the chemical reaction rate dealing with low-temperature mode, and the turbulence reaction rate governing the high-temperature part by a reaction progress variable coupling function which represents the level of reaction. The average reaction rate here is evaluated by a PDF averaging approach. In order to assess the potential of this developed model, the well-known Shell ignition model is chosen to compare in auto-ignition analysis. In comparison, the PDF-EBU ignition model yields the ignition delay time in good agreement with the Shell ignition model prediction. However, the ignition kernel location predicted by the Shell model is slightly nearer injector than that by the PDF-EBU model leading to shorter lift-off length. As a result, the PDF-EBU ignition model developed here are fairly satisfactory in predicting the auto-ignition of diesel engines with the Shell ignition model.

  12. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  13. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  14. Ignition Process Evolution at High Supersonic Velocities in Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.A. Goldfeld; A.V. Starov; K.Yu. Timofeev; V.A. Vinogradov

    2009-01-01

    The results of experimental research of multi-injector combustors in the regime of the attached pipe are presented.As a source of high-enthalpy working gas (air), hot shot wind tunnel IT-302M of ITAM, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences was used. Tests have been carried out at Mach numbers 3, 4 and 5, in a range of change of total temperature from 2000K up to 3000K and static pressure from 0.08MPa up to 0.23MPa. Injector section has been manufactured in two versions with a various relative height of wedge-shaped injectors with par-allel fuel injection. Influence of conditions on the entrance of the combustion chamber on ignition and a stable combustion of hydrogen was investigated. Intensive combustion of hydrogen has been received only at Mach numbers 3 and 4. Advantage of injector section with the greater relative height of injectors is revealed. The mechanism of fuel ignition in the combustion chamber of the given configuration was investigated: two-step igni-tion process including "kindling" and intensive combustion over all channel volume.

  15. Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This apparatus, developed at EL, determines material properties related to piloted ignition of a vertically oriented sample under constant and uniform...

  16. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  17. Ignition of alkane-rich FACE gasoline fuels and their surrogate mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum derived gasoline is the most used transportation fuel for light-duty vehicles. In order to better understand gasoline combustion, this study investigated the ignition propensity of two alkane-rich FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline test fuels and their corresponding PRF (primary reference fuel) blend in fundamental combustion experiments. Shock tube ignition delay times were measured in two separate facilities at pressures of 10, 20, and 40 bar, temperatures from 715 to 1500 K, and two equivalence ratios. Rapid compression machine ignition delay times were measured for fuel/air mixtures at pressures of 20 and 40 bar, temperatures from 632 to 745 K, and two equivalence ratios. Detailed hydrocarbon analysis was also performed on the FACE gasoline fuels, and the results were used to formulate multi-component gasoline surrogate mixtures. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling results are presented herein to provide insights into the relevance of utilizing PRF and multi-component surrogate mixtures to reproduce the ignition behavior of the alkane-rich FACE gasoline fuels. The two FACE gasoline fuels and their corresponding PRF mixture displayed similar ignition behavior at intermediate and high temperatures, but differences were observed at low temperatures. These trends were mimicked by corresponding surrogate mixture models, except for the amount of heat release in the first stage of a two-stage ignition events, when observed. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  19. Spontaneous ignition of biodiesel: A potential fire risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Yasuhito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous ignition of biodiesel was for the first time suspected to be the cause of a recent fire in Japan. We herein present experimental evidence implying this potential risk of biodiesel. Thus, three independent biodiesel samples were subjected to a series of experiments, including a thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis, a differential scanning calorimetry analysis and a modified wire basket test. The results were comparatively evaluated with reference to vegetable oils, of which spontaneous ignition has been well reported as a cause of fires. The heat onset temperature of biodiesel samples was determined to be ~100 °C, which was ~45 °C lower than those of vegetable oils. Furthermore, under the isothermal condition at 100 °C, the inner temperature of biodiesel samples rose rapidly with the generation of smoke after short induction periods owing to their exothermal decomposition, whereas for vegetable oils neither change in the inside temperature nor generation of smoke was observed even after 10 hours. It was therefore concluded that biodiesel possesses the higher risk of spontaneous ignition than vegetable oils. This is very important information to minimize the fire risk in biodiesel production facilities and so on. .

  20. Local Ignition in Carbon/Oxygen White Dwarfs -- I: One-zone Ignition and Spherical Shock Ignition of Detonations

    CERN Document Server

    Dursi, L J

    2006-01-01

    The details of ignition of Type Ia supernovae remain fuzzy, despite the importance of this input for any large-scale model of the final explosion. Here, we begin a process of understanding the ignition of these hotspots by examining the burning of one zone of material, and then investigate the ignition of a detonation due to rapid heating at single point. We numerically measure the ignition delay time for onset of burning in mixtures of degenerate material and provide fitting formula for conditions of relevance in the Type Ia problem. Using the neon ab