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Sample records for iga class autoantibodies

  1. IgA autoantibodies in the pemphigoids and linear IgA bullous dermatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Niedermeier, Andrea; Podstawa, Eva; Mueller, Ralf; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Karpati, Sarolta; Hertl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP), mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) and pemphigoid gestationis (PG) have IgG antibodies against BP180 and BP230, components of the hemidesmosomes. Patients with linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) have IgA autoantibodies against a 97/120-kDa protein w

  2. Somatic Mutations Modulate Autoantibodies against Galactose-Deficient IgA1 in IgA Nephropathy.

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    Huang, Zhi Qiang; Raska, Milan; Stewart, Tyler J; Reily, Colin; King, R Glenn; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael R; Hargett, Audra; Zhang, Zhixin; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hall, Stacy; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Renfrow, Matthew B; Gharavi, Ali G; Novak, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Autoantibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1 drive formation of pathogenic immune complexes in IgA nephropathy. IgG autoantibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1 in patients with IgA nephropathy have a specific amino-acid sequence, Y1CS3, in the complementarity-determining region 3 of the heavy chain variable region compared with a Y1CA3 sequence in similar isotype-matched IgG from healthy controls. We previously found that the S3 residue is critical for binding galactose-deficient IgA1. To determine whether this difference is due to a rare germline sequence, we amplified and sequenced the corresponding germline variable region genes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of seven patients with IgA nephropathy and six healthy controls from whom we had cloned single-cell lines secreting monoclonal IgG specific for galactose-deficient IgA1. Sanger DNA sequencing revealed that complementarity-determining region 3 in the variable region of the germline genes encoded the Y1C(A/V)3 amino-acid sequence. Thus, the A/V>S substitution in the complementarity-determining region 3 of anti-galactose-deficient-IgA1 autoantibodies of the patients with IgA nephropathy is not a rare germline gene variant. Modeling analyses indicated that the S3 hydroxyl group spans the complementarity-determining region 3 loop stem, stabilizing the adjacent β-sheet and stem structure, important features for effective binding to galactose-deficient IgA1. Understanding processes leading to production of the autoantibodies may offer new approaches to treat IgA nephropathy. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Elevated Levels of Plasma IgA Autoantibodies against Oxidized LDL Found in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy but Not in Nonproliferative Retinopathy

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    Savolainen, Markku J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study investigated the association of autoantibodies binding to oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods. Plasma from 229 types 1 and 2 patients with DR including diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was analysed with ELISA-based assay to determine IgA, IgG, and IgM autoantibody levels binding to oxLDL. The controls were 106 diabetic patients without retinopathy (NoDR) and 139 nondiabetic controls (C). Results. PDR group had significantly higher IgA autoantibody levels than DME or NoDR: mean 94.9 (SD 54.7) for PDR, 75.5 (41.8) for DME (p = 0.001), and 76.1 (48.2) for NoDR (p = 0.008). There were no differences in IgG, IgM, or IgA that would be specific for DR or for DME. Type 2 diabetic patients had higher levels of IgA autoantibodies than type 1 diabetic patients (86.0 and 65.5, resp., p = 0.004) and the highest levels in IgA were found in type 2 diabetic patients with PDR (119.1, p > 0.001). Conclusions. IgA autoantibodies were increased in PDR, especially in type 2 diabetes. The high levels of IgA in PDR, and especially in type 2 PDR patients, reflect the inflammatory process and enlighten the role of oxLDL and its autoantibodies in PDR.

  4. [Autoantibodies].

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    Ishihara, Yasushi

    2005-06-01

    The autoantibody test gives significant information for diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. Since the finding of the LE-cell in 1948, dozens of autoantibodies have been found. Anti nuclear antibody (ANA) is the essential test for the screening of autoantibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is the conventional method for the detection of ANA. IIF can detect a wide spectrum of ANA and gives abundant information obtained from a staining pattern. However under the recent circumstances of using advanced fluorescent microscopes and reagents we often have difficulty interpreting positive results seen in normal individuals and in detailed staining patterns. ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), detecting disease specific autoantibodies alone, is one solution. Some antibodies such as anti-DNA or anti-ENA (extractable nuclear antigen) have a strong relation to specific diseases. These autoantibodies have been detected by IIF, RIA (radioimmunoassay) or DID (double immune diffusion). With the progress of molecular biology many autoantigens have been characterized. Now ELISA is a typical way to detect autoantibodies because purified or recombinant antigens are easily available. Though RF (rheumatoid factor) is the historical autoantibody detected in RA patients, the specificity to RA is low. The new anti-CCP is promising from its high specificity and sensitivity. Now we can choose various kind of autoantibody tests, not only conventional ones but also newly developed ones. For diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases, understanding of both clinical significance and methodology is important.

  5. Low prevalence of IgA anti-transglutaminase 1, 2, and 3 autoantibodies in children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory skin disease presenting with a relapsing clinical pattern similar to chronic autoimmune disease. Several human transglutaminases have been defined and keratinocyte transglutaminase (TG1) and epidermal transglutaminase (TG3) expressed in the epidermis are associated with epidermal barrier dysfunction. Since impairments to the epidermal barrier represent an important factor in AD, we hypothesized that IgA autoantibodies specific for TG1 (IgA-anti-TG1) and TG3 (IgA-anti-TG3) may affect AD development during childhood. Methods Active AD patients (n = 304), 28 patients with biopsy-confirmed coeliac disease (CD), 5 patients with active AD and CD, and 55 control patients without CD and skin diseases were enrolled into the study. IgA-anti-TG1 and IgA-anti-TG3 reactivity was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IgA-anti-TG2 were defined using a fluoroenzyme immunoassay. Results IgA-anti-TG1 antibodies were found in 2% and IgA-anti-TG3 antibodies in 3% of patients with active AD. Two out of the 5 patients with AD and concomitant CD had IgA-anti-TG1 and IgA-anti-TG2 antibodies. In CD patients, 36% of individuals presented with elevated IgA-anti-TG1 antibodies and 18% presented with elevated IgA-anti-TG3 antibodies and all CD patients presented with IgA-anti-TG2 antibodies (significantly different from AD patients and controls, p IgA-anti-TG1 and/or IgA-anti-TG3 seropositivity tended to appear concurrently, whereas only one patient with AD had both types of autoantibodies. Conclusions IgA-anti-TG1 and IgA-anti-TG3 seropositivity was rare in active AD but frequent in CD patients. The level of circulating antibodies related to skin lesions could be studied by determining the levels of IgA-anti-TG1 and IgA-anti-TG3 in skin biopsies of AD patients. PMID:24885370

  6. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

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    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD.

  7. Prevalence of serological markers for celiac disease (IgA and IgG class antigliadin antibodies and IgA class antiendomysium antibodies in patients with autoimmune rheumatologic diseases in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil Pesquisa de anticorpos antigliadina (classes IgA e IgG e anticorpos antiendomísio classe IgA, em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes em Belo Horizonte, Brasil

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    Victor de Barros Koehne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with autoimmune rheumatologic conditions and celiac disease tend to have a variety of autoantibodies, many of which have no clear pathogenic role. The literature contains frequent reports of celiac disease being more prevalent in patients with rheumatologic diseases, although this remains controversial. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of positive serum tests for celiac disease, particularly IgA and IgG antigliadin (AGA antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies (EmA in patients with autoimmune rheumatologic diseases. A second aim was to correlate positive serum tests with prednisone and immunosuppressant medication. METHODS: A total of 190 adults and pediatric patients with a variety of autoimmune rheumatologic diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthrophathies were evaluated and tested for IgA and IgG antigliadin-antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies. Patients with positive serum tests underwent endoscopic duodenal biopsies for pathology studies. RESULTS: There were four positive sera (2.1% for AGA IgA, all of which tested negative for AGA IgG and EmA. Three sera (1.6% tested positive for AGA IgG; all were negative for AGA IgA and EmA. The EmA test at a 1:2.5 serum dilution tested positive in 94 patients (49.5%; at a 1:5 serum dilution it was positive in 41 patients (21.6%. Eleven subjects tested positive for EmA at 1:40 dilution; and all of these tested negative for IgA tissue antitransglutaminase (tTG antibodies. Nine of the 11 EmA-positive patients and all 7 patients with positive antigliadin antibodies tests underwent duodenal endoscopic biopsies, and no significant changes were demonstrated in their duodenal mucosa. A positive EmA was associated with elevated optical density AGA IgA readings; however, there was no relationship between positive EmA and AGA IgG optical density readings. Prednisone and immunosuppressant use were unrelated

  8. Adalimumab (TNFα Inhibitor Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient

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    S. S. Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adalimumab (Humira is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009, Klinkhoff (2004, and Medicare Australia. Use of TNFα inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010. We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab.

  9. Prevalência de deficiência de IgA em pacientes adultos com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e estudo de sua associação com perfil clínico e de autoanticorpos Prevalence of IgA deficiency in adult Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and the study of the association with its clinical and autoantibody profiles

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    Ana Paula França Mantovani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A deficiência de imunoglobulina A (DIgA é a imunodeficiência primária mais comum e pode levar a quadros frequentes de infecções. Sua associação com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES é de extrema importância, dada a alta morbidade e mortalidade que as infecções causam nestes pacientes. OBJETIVOS: Demonstrar a prevalência da deficiência de IgA entre pacientes portadores de LES do sul do Brasil. Comparar o perfil clínico e de autoanticorpos entre pacientes lúpicos com e sem DIgA. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Estudo incluindo 189 pacientes com LES submetidos à dosagem sérica de IgA pelo método de nefelometria, sendo considerados deficientes aqueles com IgA inferior à 50 mg/dL. Dados demográficos, de perfil clínico [artrite, psicoses, convulsões, acidentes vasculares encefálicos (AVE, serosites, hemólise, leucopenia, plaquetopenia, nefrite] e de autoanticorpos [FAN, anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, anti-Sm, anti-DNA, anti-RNP, LAC (anticoagulante lúpico e aCL (anticorpos anticardiolipina] IgG e IgM foram obtidos pela revisão de prontuários. Como controle, foram utilizados dados da literatura de um estudo feito na mesma área geográfica. Os dados foram analisados por tabelas de frequência e contingência aplicando-se os testes de Qui-quadrado, Fisher e Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados 11 (6,17% pacientes com a DIgA (P INTRODUCTION: IgA deficiency (IgAD is the most common primary immunodeficiency, which can cause frequent infections. The association of IgA deficiency with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is very important because of the high morbidity and mortality rates of infections in patients with this disease. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of IgA deficiency in SLE patients from southern Brazil and to compare the clinical and autoantibody profiles of SLE patients with and without IgA deficiency. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and eighty-nine SLE patients were submitted to serum IgA measurement by

  10. Light chain-deficient mice produce novel multimeric heavy-chain-only IgA by faulty class switching.

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    Matheson, Louise S; Osborn, Michael J; Smith, Jennifer A; Corcos, Daniel; Hamon, Maureen; Chaouaf, Rima; Coadwell, John; Morgan, Geoff; Oxley, David; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2009-08-01

    Recently, we identified that diverse heavy chain (H-chain)-only IgG is spontaneously produced in light chain (L-chain)-deficient mice (L(-/-) with silenced kappa and lambda loci) despite a block in B cell development. In murine H-chain IgG, the first Cgamma exon, C(H)1, is removed after DNA rearrangement and secreted polypeptides are comparable with camelid-type H-chain IgG. Here we show that L(-/-) mice generate a novel class of H-chain Ig with covalently linked alpha chains, not identified in any other healthy mammal. Surprisingly, diverse H-chain-only IgA can be released from B cells at levels similar to conventional IgA and is found in serum and sometimes in milk and saliva. Surface IgA without L-chain is expressed in B220(+) spleen cells, which exhibited a novel B cell receptor, suggesting that associated conventional differentiation events occur. To facilitate the cellular transport and release of H-chain-only IgA, chaperoning via BiP association seems to be prevented as only alpha chains lacking C(H)1 are released from the cell. This appears to be accomplished by imprecise class-switch recombination (CSR) from Smu into the alpha constant region, which removes all or part of the Calpha1 exon at the genomic level.

  11. T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination is restricted to the GALT and occurs prior to manifest germinal center formation.

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    Bergqvist, Peter; Stensson, Anneli; Lycke, Nils Y; Bemark, Mats

    2010-04-01

    Recently, we reported that CD40(-/-) mice, exhibiting exclusively T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination (CSR), demonstrated near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the gut lamina propria (LP), despite the complete lack of germinal centers (GCs). In this study, we have extended our analysis focusing on how to reconcile these findings using flow cytometry and molecular markers for IgA CSR. In agreement with our previous results with small intestinal LP, the colon LP was found to host IgA CSR only when lymphoid follicles were present. Thus, no IgA CSR was observed in the nonorganized colon LP. By contrast, the Peyer's patch (PP) was the dominant IgA CSR site in both CD40(-/-) and wild type (WT) mice, and they both hosted similar levels of mRNA expression for B cell activating factor of the TNF family, a proliferation inducing ligand, and inducible NO synthase, potential switch-factors for IgA. Unexpectedly, we found that PP B cells undergoing IgA CSR were GL7-intermediate. These cells had not undergone somatic hypermutations (SHMs), whereas GL7-high cells in WT PP, which exhibited GCs, were heavily mutated. Moreover, IgA plasma cells in the LP of CD40(-/-) mice demonstrated few mutations in their Ig V regions, whereas WT LP B cells from different sites showed extensive SHMs, which were also clonally related. Therefore, IgA CSR can occur in PP at a stage preceding manifest GC (GL7-intermediate), whereas SHM require GC formations (GL7-high). These findings reconcile that IgA CSR can occur in PP in the absence of GC with the fact that CD40(-/-) mice host near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the LP.

  12. Ectopic lymphoid structures support ongoing production of class-switched autoantibodies in rheumatoid synovium.

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    Frances Humby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Follicular structures resembling germinal centres (GCs that are characterized by follicular dendritic cell (FDC networks have long been recognized in chronically inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases, including the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it is debated whether these ectopic structures promote autoimmunity and chronic inflammation driving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA are highly specific markers of RA, predict a poor prognosis, and have been suggested to be pathogenic. Therefore, the main study objectives were to determine whether ectopic lymphoid structures in RA synovium: (i express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, the enzyme required for somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination (CSR of Ig genes; (ii support ongoing CSR and ACPA production; and (iii remain functional in a RA/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID chimera model devoid of new immune cell influx into the synovium. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using immunohistochemistry (IHC and quantitative Taqman real-time PCR (QT-PCR in synovial tissue from 55 patients with RA, we demonstrated that FDC+ structures invariably expressed AID with a distribution resembling secondary lymphoid organs. Further, AID+/CD21+ follicular structures were surrounded by ACPA+/CD138+ plasma cells, as demonstrated by immune reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen. Moreover, we identified a novel subset of synovial AID+/CD20+ B cells outside GCs resembling interfollicular large B cells. In order to gain direct functional evidence that AID+ structures support CSR and in situ manufacturing of class-switched ACPA, 34 SCID mice were transplanted with RA synovium and humanely killed at 4 wk for harvesting of transplants and sera. Persistent expression of AID and Igamma-Cmu circular transcripts (identifying ongoing IgM-IgG class-switching was observed in synovial grafts expressing FDCs/CD21L

  13. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

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    Kosuke Kataoka

    Full Text Available Native cholera toxin (nCT as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs and nasal passages (NPs. Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  14. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

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    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Keiko; Terao, Yutaka; Gilbert, Rebekah S; Sekine, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Shigetada; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2011-01-01

    Native cholera toxin (nCT) as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab) responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs) and nasal passages (NPs). Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR) for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI) mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  15. IgA nephropathy enigma.

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    Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Raska, Milan

    2016-11-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. The disease is characterized by the presence of IgA-containing immune complexes in the circulation and in mesangial deposits with ensuing glomerular injury. Although in humans there are two IgA subclasses, only IgA1 molecules are involved. The exclusivity of participation of IgA1 in IgAN prompted extensive structural and immunological studies of the unique hinge region (HR) of IgA1, which is absent in otherwise highly homologous IgA2. HR of IgA1 with altered O-glycans serves as an antigen recognized by autoantibodies specific for aberrant HR glycans leading to the generation of nephritogenic immune complexes. However, there are several unresolved questions concerning the phylogenetic origin of human IgA1 HR, the structural basis of its antigenicity, the origin of antibodies specific for HR with altered glycan moieties, the regulatory defects in IgA1 glycosylation pathways, and the potential approaches applicable to the disease-specific interventions in the formation of nephritogenic immune complexes. This review focuses on the gaps in our knowledge of molecular and cellular events that are involved in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN.

  16. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  17. Anti-cofactor autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence, clinical and HLA class II associations.

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    Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Morozzi, Gabriella; Bellisai, Francesca; Fineschi, Irene; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Simpatico, Antonella; Font, Josep; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frederic; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; De Ramon Garrido, Enrique; De Pità, Ornella; Smolen, Josef; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and HLA-class II allele associations of some anti-cofactor antibodies in a homogeneous group of European patients with SLE. One hundred thirty-six patients with SLE, fulfilling four or more of the ACR 1997 revised criteria for the classification of the disease, coming from 7 European countries, were enrolled consecutively. Anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-annexin V (anti-AnnV), anti-protein C (anti-Cprot) and anti-protein S (anti-Sprot) were determined by using commercial ELISA kits. Molecular typing of HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci was performed by using PCR-SSOP method, carried out using digoxygenin (DIG) labeled probes. The prevalence of anti-AnnV, anti-PT, anti-Cprot and anti-Sprot was 19%, 10.4%, 4.4% and 8.1%, respectively. Twenty-seven % of anti-AnnV positive patients reported migraine vs 5.5% of anti-AnnV negatives (p = 0.003, but p not significant, odds ratio (OR) = 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2-21). Anti-PT, anti-AnnV and anti-Sprot were positively associated with some HLA alleles, but pc was not significant. In this study we have shown that some HLA alleles carry the risk to produce antibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins, but these association need confirmation in other studies, because they have never been reported and appear to be weak associations.

  18. Autoantibodies in serum and sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis.

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    Schiøtz, P O; Egeskjold, E M; Høiby, N; Permin, H

    1979-10-01

    Sera from 89 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 88 control persons were examined for the occurrence of rheumatoid factors (RF) of the IgG, IgA and IgM classes by an indirect immunofluorescence method and by the latex fixation slide test. The prevalence of RF-IgG was significantly higher (88%) (p less than 0.0005) among the CF patients than among the control persons (7%), while no difference was found between the two groups with regard to RF of the IgA or IgM classes. Fifty-five of the CF patients had chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in their lungs and two or more precipitins against these bacteria in their sera determined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. These CF patients did not differ from the 34 CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa infection, neither with regard to prevalence nor titer of RFs, but there was a positive correlation between the number of P. aeruginosa precipitins in the 55 chronically infected CF patients and their titers of IgG-RF. Nineteen CF patients were examined also for RFs, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-DNA antibodies in their sputum sol phase and corresponding sera. RFs were demonstrated in the sputum sol phase from 6 of the patients by the latex fixation test, whereas their sera were negative in this test, possibly indicating a local production of RF. Positive reactions for ANA and anti-DNA antibodies were found in 7 and 10 of the sputa respectively, and in higher titers than in the corresponding sera, also suggesting a local production. Titers of autoantibodies in sputum were low and no difference was found between patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection and patients without P. aeruginosa infection. The possible role of autoantibodies in the patogenesis of pulmonary tissue damage in CF patients is discussed.

  19. Clinical Relevance of Autoantibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Bullous Dermatosis

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    Lilla Mihályi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present their experience related to the diagnosis, treatment, and followup of 431 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 14 patients with juvenile bullous pemphigoid, and 273 patients with pemphigus. The detection of autoantibodies plays an outstanding role in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Paraneoplastic pemphigoid is suggested to be a distinct entity from the group of bullous pemphigoid in view of the linear C3 deposits along the basement membrane of the perilesional skin and the “ladder” configuration of autoantibodies demonstrated by western blot analysis. It is proposed that IgA pemphigoid should be differentiated from the linear IgA dermatoses. Immunosuppressive therapy is recommended in which the maintenance dose of corticosteroid is administered every second day, thereby reducing the side effects of the corticosteroids. Following the detection of IgA antibodies (IgA pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, and IgA pemphigus, diamino diphenyl sulfone (dapsone therapy is preferred alone or in combination. The clinical relevance of autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune bullous dermatosis is stressed.

  20. Biomarkers in IgA nephropathy: relationship to pathogenetic hits

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    Hastings, Margaret Colleen; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Berthoux, Francois; Julian, Bruce A; Sanders, John T; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction IgA nephropathy, the most prevalent glomerular disease in the world, requires a renal biopsy for diagnosis. Reliable biomarkers are needed for the non-invasive diagnosis of this disease and to more fully delineate its natural history and risk for progression. Areas covered In this review, the authors examine serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) and glycan-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies that are integral to pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. They also explore biomarkers related to alternative and lectin pathways of complement activation and serum and urinary peptide biomarkers detected by mass spectrometric methods. The literature search included review of all publications having IgA nephropathy in the title that were cited in PubMed and Scopus over the past 10 years and a non-systematic review of abstracts published for the annual meetings of the American Society of Nephrology and the International Symposia on IgA Nephropathy. Expert opinion Serum Gd-IgA1 level and glycan-specific autoantibody levels are prime candidates to become diagnostic biomarkers for IgA nephropathy because of their central role in the earliest stages of disease pathogenesis. Assays for serum levels of complement proteins C3 and factor H are readily available in clinical practice and deserve continued study, either alone or in tandem with total serum IgA or serum Gd-IgA1 levels, as prognostic biomarkers for patients with IgA nephropathy. Urinary peptidomic data are also reviewed because this approach can successfully differentiate patients with IgA nephropathy from healthy controls and from patients with other forms of renal disease. PMID:24175678

  1. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  2. Epidermal polymeric immunoglobulin receptors: leads from intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis-type IgA pemphigus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Teye, Kwesi; Sogame, Ryosuke; Koga, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we attempted to identify unknown autoantigen for intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis-type IgA pemphigus by novel IgA-specific immunoprecipitation. Mass-spectrometry study identified polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) as the candidate protein, and we confirmed that PIGR expressed in both epidermis and cultured keratinocytes. Eukaryotic recombinant protein of PIGR expressed in COS7 cells was reacted with both patient and normal sera, indicating that PIGR binds physiologically to IgA. To detect antigen-specific binding by IgA autoantibodies, we performed several experiments using deglycosylated PIGR and F(ab)2 fragments from patient sera. However, these analyses suggested that patient IgA bound physiologically, but not immunologically, to PIGR. Nevertheless, our study provided two important insights. Newly developed IgA-immunoprecipitation system should be a useful tool in the future study of identification of antigens for IgA autoantibodies. Detection of epidermal PIGR in this study confirmed previous results and indicated possible immunological role of PIGR in epidermis.

  3. A case of severe chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with alternating immunoglobulin class to IgM from IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Nagamine, Shun; Makioka, Kouki; Kusunoki, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi

    2016-09-29

    A 71-year-old woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with IgA-λ monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) showed the acute development of tetraplegia, respiratory failure, and a marked fluctuation of the blood pressure. Intravenous (IV) high-dose steroid therapy (methylprednisolone: 1 g/day × 3 days), followed by oral prednisolone (PSL) (40 mg/day), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg, 0.4 g/kg/day × 5 days) administrations resulted in the amelioration of these symptoms. However, they soon relapsed, which eventually led to complete tetraplegia and the need for mechanical ventilation. At this time, serum components of IgA-λ and IgM-λ were biclonally positive. Seven courses of plasma exchange and the alternative administration of dexamethasone (12 mg/day) and methtorexate (15 mg/week) were conducted, but with no significant improvement. Nine months after admission, she showed totally-locked in syndrome. Cryo-preserved serum obtained at this time showed high titers of IgM class antibodies against ganglioside (GD3 +++, GT1a ++++, GT1b ++, GQ1b +++, and GD1b +++), which had been negative on admission. Biopsy of the left sural nerve showed moderate reductions of large and small myelinated fibers with no inflammation, no depositions of amyloid, IgG, IgA, or IgM, and teased fiber findings revealed neither myelin ovoids nor segmental demyelination. Alternatively, melphalan at 5 mg and PSL at 32 mg were administered, with no amelioration, while serum IgA-λ monoclonal protein diminished, and IgM-λ M protein positivity was continuously observed. She frequently developed sepsis; therefore, we could no longer continue any immunosupressive therapies, but monthly IVIg administrations were given. Twelve months after admission, her neurological symptoms gradually improved and she was weaned off of mechanical ventilation. Eighteen months after admission, her muscle strength corresponded to 2 on manual muscle testing

  4. The origin and activities of IgA1-containing immune complexes in IgA nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora eKnoppova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, frequently leading to end-stage renal disease, as there is no disease-specific therapy. IgA nephropathy is diagnosed from pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen based on predominant or co-dominant IgA-containing immunodeposits, usually with complement C3 co-deposits and with variable presence of IgG and/or IgM. The IgA in these renal deposits is galactose-deficient IgA1, with less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. Research from the past decade led to the definition of IgA nephropathy as an autoimmune disease with a multi-hit pathogenetic process with contributing genetic and environmental components. In this process, circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen is bound by anti-glycan IgG or IgA (autoantibodies to form immune complexes. Some of these circulating complexes deposit in glomeruli, and thereby activate mesangial cells and induce renal injury through cellular proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix components and cytokines/chemokines. Glycosylation pathways associated with production of the autoantigen and the unique characteristics of the corresponding autoantibodies in patients with IgA nephropathy have been uncovered. Complement likely plays a significant role in the formation and the nephritogenic activities of these complexes. Complement activation is mediated through the alternative and lectin pathways and probably occurs systemically on IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes as well as locally in glomeruli. Incidence of IgA nephropathy varies greatly by geographical location; the disease is rare in central Africa but accounts for up to 40% of native-kidney biopsies in eastern Asia. Some of this variation may be explained by genetically determined influences on the pathogenesis of the disease. Genome-wide association studies to date have identified 18 risk

  5. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jan; Rizk, Dana; Takahashi, Kazuo; Zhang, XianWen; Bian, Qi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshimi; Reily, Colin; Lai, Ling-Yun; Hao, Chuanming; Novak, Lea; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Julian, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy, a frequent cause of end-stage renal disease, is an autoimmune disease wherein immune complexes consisting of IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-glycans (autoantigen) and anti-glycan autoantibodies deposit in glomeruli and induce renal injury. Multiple genetic loci associated with disease risk have been identified. The prevalence of risk alleles varies geographically: it is the highest in eastern Asia and northern Europe, lower in other parts of Europe and North America, and the lowest in Africa. IgA nephropathy is diagnosed by the pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen. Currently, therapy is not disease targeted but rather focused on maintaining control of blood pressure and proteinuria, ideally with suppression of angiotensin II. Possible additional approaches differ between countries. Disease-specific therapy as well as new tools for the diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of responses to therapy are needed. Summary Glycosylation pathways associated with aberrant O-glycosylation of IgA1 and, thus, production of autoantigen, have been identified. Furthermore, unique characteristics of the autoantibodies in IgA nephropathy have been uncovered. Many of these biochemical features are shared by patients with IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis, suggesting that the two diseases may represent opposite ends of a spectrum of a disease process. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of pathogenic IgA1-containing immune complexes will enable the development of disease-specific therapies as well as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Key Message IgA nephropathy is an autoimmune disease caused by the glomerular deposition of nephritogenic circulating immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) bound by anti-glycan autoantibodies. A better understanding of the multi-step process of the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy and the genetic and environmental contributing

  6. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

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    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  7. Simultaneous detection of celiac disease-specific IgA antibodies and total IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Kai; Röber, Nadja; Hiemann, Rico; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter; Reinhold, Dirk; Laass, Martin W; Conrad, Karsten; Roggenbuck, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) serology requires analysis of tissue transglutaminase type-2 (TG2autoAbs), deamidated gliadin (DGAbs), and as reference endomysial autoantibodies (EmA). Total IgA assessment helps to determine IgA-deficient CD patients. The novel multiplex indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) technique CytoBead was used to develop the first quantitative one-step serological CD assay comprising both simultaneous IgA autoAb and total IgA testing. CytoBead CeliAK detecting TG2autoAb, DGAb, EmA, and simultaneously total IgA uses fluorescent microparticles for antigen and antibody immobilization along with monkey-esophagus tissue sections on glass slides. The assay was interpreted visually by classical fluorescent microscopy and digital IIF using AKLIDES(®). Overall, 380 samples (155 CD patients, 5 with IgA deficiency, 68 with cystic fibrosis, 59 with eye disease, 93 blood donors) were run for performance analysis. Data were compared with classical IgA autoAb analysis by ELISA and IIF. Comparing CD-specific IgA autoAb testing by CytoBead with classical IIF and ELISA, very good agreements for EmA, TG2autoAb, and DGAb were determined (Cohen's κ = 0.98, 0.96, 0.85, respectively). The difference between multiplex and single testing revealed a significant difference for TG2autoAb testing only (McNemar, p = 0.0078). Four CD patients and 4 controls demonstrated TG2autoAb positivity by ELISA but were negative by CytoBead. Further, 140/155 (90.9 %) CD patients demonstrated TG2autoAb levels above ten times the upper normal and all five IgA-deficient samples IgA levels IgA deficiency analyses comparable with classical testing by single-parameter assays. Thus, comprehensive CD serology by CytoBead can alleviate the workload in routine laboratories.

  8. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Agata N. Burska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs. Rheumatoid factor (RF is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential.

  9. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  10. Autoantibody standardization in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, J.; Tervaert, J.W.; Derksen, R.; Hamann, D.; Hooijkaas, H.; Klasen, I.S.; Kallenberg, C.; Limburg, P.; Smeenk, R.

    2009-01-01

    Several initiatives have been undertaken, independent of the European Autoantibody Standardization Initiative (EASI), to standardize autoantibodies in The Netherlands. The Dutch EASI team has made an inventory of which initiatives on autoantibody standardization are already available and what future

  11. IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Kidney Disease IgA Nephropathy Related Topics Section Navigation Kidney Disease Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Amyloidosis & ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Failure Choosing a ...

  12. Autoantibodies in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

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    Carolin Hoffmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of autoantibodies targeting the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R, which causes neurological and psychiatric symptoms, has reinvigorated the hypothesis that other patient subgroups may also suffer from an underlying autoimmune condition. In recent years, a wide range of neuropsychiatric diseases and autoantibodies targeting ion-channels or neuronal receptors including NMDA-R, voltage gated potassium channel complex (VGKC complex, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA-R, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA-R and dopamine receptor (DR were studied and conflicting reports have been published regarding the seroprevalence of these autoantibodies. A clear causative role of autoantibodies on psychiatric symptoms has as yet only been shown for the NMDA-R. Several other autoantibodies have been related to the presence of certain symptoms and antibody effector mechanisms have been proposed. However, extensive clinical studies with large multicenter efforts to standardize diagnostic procedures for autoimmune etiology and animal studies are needed to confirm the pathogenicity of these autoantibodies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of neuronal autoantibodies in the major neuropsychiatric disorders: psychotic, major depression, autism spectrum, obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders.

  13. IMMUNOGLOBULIN A (IgA AND ITS RECEPTORS

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    V. B. Klimovich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Daily IgA production in human organism comprises 3 to 5 g, thus exceeding total synthesis of other Ig classes. IgA in human body is presented by 9 structural variants. Its molecules belong to two subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, the latter represented by two allotypes. In human serum, IgA1 monomers predominate, that are produced by the bone marrow cells. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues produce dimeric IgA1 and IgA2 molecules containing an accessory polypeptide J-chain. When transported across epithelial layer to the mucosal surface, an extracellular segment of polymeric IgA receptor (pIgAR is joining the dimeric IgA1, which becomes a ‘secretory’ component being a part cesretory IgA (sIgA molecule. The main function of sIgA is to bind bacteria and viruses at the mucosal surfaces, thus preventing pathogens to invade the internal spaces of the organism (immune exclusion. If transferred across epithelium, IgA may neutralize the viruses penetrating the cells, like as bind and deliver proteins and other antigens to the mucosal surface. The leukocyte IgA receptor (FcαRI, CD89 is expressed on the neutrophils, eosinophiles, monocytes/macrophages, as well as dendritic and Kupffer cells. The cytoplasmic domain FcαRI is devoid of an activation ITAM motif. To transduce signal, an FcαRI-associated chain of Fcγ receptor is used. Due to this mechanism, IgA binding leads to activation of phagocytosis, endocytosis, antigen presentation, synthesis of proinflammatory mediator and other immune functions. Fcα/μR receptor is a structural homologue of pIgR, and it is able to bind IgA and IgM, being, however, expressed only at the surface of mature B lymphocytes and macrophages. Interaction of IgA with asialoglycoprotein and transferrin (CD71 receptors, like as with some other molecules, that have yet undetermined role in immune defense and development of pathological events.

  14. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  15. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease.

  16. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honglin Zhu; Hui Luo; Mei Yan; Xiaoxia Zuo; Quan-Zhen Li

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplas-mic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epi-topes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection.

  17. The Origin and Activities of IgA1-Containing Immune Complexes in IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppova, Barbora; Reily, Colin; Maillard, Nicolas; Rizk, Dana V.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Raska, Milan; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, frequently leading to end-stage renal disease, as there is no disease-specific therapy. IgAN is diagnosed from pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen based on predominant or codominant IgA-containing immunodeposits, usually with complement C3 co-deposits and with variable presence of IgG and/or IgM. The IgA in these renal deposits is galactose-deficient IgA1, with less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. Research from the past decade led to the definition of IgAN as an autoimmune disease with a multi-hit pathogenetic process with contributing genetic and environmental components. In this process, circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) is bound by antiglycan IgG or IgA (autoantibodies) to form immune complexes. Some of these circulating complexes deposit in glomeruli, and thereby activate mesangial cells and induce renal injury through cellular proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix components and cytokines/chemokines. Glycosylation pathways associated with production of the autoantigen and the unique characteristics of the corresponding autoantibodies in patients with IgAN have been uncovered. Complement likely plays a significant role in the formation and the nephritogenic activities of these complexes. Complement activation is mediated through the alternative and lectin pathways and probably occurs systemically on IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes as well as locally in glomeruli. Incidence of IgAN varies greatly by geographical location; the disease is rare in central Africa but accounts for up to 40% of native-kidney biopsies in eastern Asia. Some of this variation may be explained by genetically determined influences on the pathogenesis of the disease. Genome-wide association studies to date have identified several loci associated with IgAN. Some of these loci are associated

  18. Coeliac disease autoantibodies mediate significant inhibition of tissue transglutaminase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Greg

    2012-02-01

    The detection of antibodies directed against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in serum is a sensitive and specific test for suspected coeliac disease. tTG is a ubiquitous, multifunctional enzyme that has been implicated in many important physiological processes as well as the site-specific deamidation of glutamine residues in gluten-derived peptides. This modification of gluten peptides facilitates their binding to HLA-DQ2, which results in amplification of the T-cell response to gluten. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that patient IgA autoantibodies directed against tTG interfere with the crosslinking activity of the enzyme. IgA autoantibodies against tTG were isolated\\/depleted from patient serum and tested for their capacity to interfere with tTG activity in vitro using a sensitive fluorescence-based activity assay. We have demonstrated that autoantibodies cause significant inhibition of tTG-mediated crosslinking at equimolar and 2:1 ratios of antibody to enzyme.

  19. Characterization Analysis of Human Anti-Ferritin Autoantibodies

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    Shusaku Higashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-ferritin autoantibodies are found in many animals. Human ferritin-binding proteins (FBPs were partially purified from human serum by ion-exchange chromatography and immobilized metal affinity chromatography with Zn2+. Crude FBPs were immunocoprecipitated with canine liver ferritin followed by the addition of anti-ferritin antibodies. Immunoglobulins in the immunocoprecipitate were detected with antibodies specific for human IgG, IgM or IgA heavy chains, and immunoglobulins IgG, IgM and IgA to bind to expressed recombinant human H and L chain homopolymers were also found. A portion of human serum proteins bound to zinc ions immobilized on beads were released upon the addition of canine liver ferritin, and the released protein was identified as IgM antibody. Additionally, the released proteins recognized peptide sequence (DPHLCDF commonly found in amino acid sequences of mammalian ferritin H and L subunits. These results suggest that human serum contains anti-ferritin autoantibodies (IgG, IgM and IgA which bind zinc ions and preferentially bind ferritin over both the H and L subunits, and that a portion of, but not all, the IgM antibodies bound to ferritin with higher affinity than to zinc ions and may recognize the common sequence found in mammalian ferritin H and L subunits.

  20. Cellular Signaling and Production of Galactose-Deficient IgA1 in IgA Nephropathy, an Autoimmune Disease

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    Colin Reily

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A (IgA nephropathy (IgAN, the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by IgA1-containing immunodeposits in the glomeruli. IgAN is a chronic disease, with up to 40% of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease, with no disease-specific treatment. Multiple studies of the origin of the glomerular immunodeposits have linked elevated circulating levels of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (galactose-deficient in some O-glycans; Gd-IgA1 with formation of nephritogenic Gd-IgA1-containing immune complexes. Gd-IgA1 is recognized as an autoantigen in susceptible individuals by anti-glycan autoantibodies, resulting in immune complexes that may ultimately deposit in the kidney and induce glomerular injury. Genetic studies have revealed that an elevated level of Gd-IgA1 in the circulation of IgAN patients is a hereditable trait. Moreover, recent genome-wide association studies have identified several immunity-related loci that associated with IgAN. Production of Gd-IgA1 by IgA1-secreting cells of IgAN patients has been attributed to abnormal expression and activity of several key glycosyltransferases. Substantial evidence is emerging that abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells is related to the production of Gd-IgA1. As Gd-IgA1 is the key autoantigen in IgAN, understanding the genetic, biochemical, and environmental aspects of the abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells will provide insight into possible targets for future disease-specific therapy.

  1. Coexistence of IgA antibodies to desmogleins 1 and 3 in pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus and paraneoplastic pemphigus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentink, L. F.; de Jong, M. C. J. M.; Kloosterhuis, G. J.; Zuiderveen, J.; Jonkman, M. F.; Pas, H. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Pemphigus is a bullous mucocutaneous autoimmune disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies to desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and/or Dsg3. Occasionally direct immunofluorescence of pemphigus skin reveals IgA depositions with an intraepidermal intercellular pattern in addition to the IgG deposition. O

  2. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  3. Scarcity of autoreactive human blood IgA(+) memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Julie; Lorin, Valérie; Kök, Ayrin; Hieu, Thierry; Bourgeau, Salomé; Mouquet, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    Class-switched memory B cells are key components of the "reactive" humoral immunity, which ensures a fast and massive secretion of high-affinity antigen-specific antibodies upon antigenic challenge. In humans, IgA class-switched (IgA(+) ) memory B cells and IgA antibodies are abundant in the blood. Although circulating IgA(+) memory B cells and their corresponding secreted immunoglobulins likely possess major protective and/or regulatory immune roles, little is known about their specificity and function. Here, we show that IgA(+) and IgG(+) memory B-cell antibodies cloned from the same healthy humans share common immunoglobulin gene features. IgA and IgG memory antibodies have comparable lack of reactivity to vaccines, common mucosa-tropic viruses and commensal bacteria. However, the IgA(+) memory B-cell compartment contains fewer polyreactive clones and importantly, only rare self-reactive clones compared to IgG(+) memory B cells. Self-reactivity of IgAs is acquired following B-cell affinity maturation but not antibody class switching. Together, our data suggest the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for removing autoreactive clones from the IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B-cell repertoires, and/or different maturation pathways potentially reflecting the distinct nature and localization of the cognate antigens recognized by individual B-cell populations.

  4. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, A T; Yao, S; Gong, B; Nurieva, R I; Elson, C O; Cong, Y

    2015-09-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific T helper type 17 (Th17) cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into T follicular helper (Tfh) in Peyer's patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) against microbiota; however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B-cell differentiation to IgA(+) cells as mediated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA(+) B-cell development and IgA production and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T-cell-deficient TCRβxδ(-/-) mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen increased the levels of IgA(+) B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B-cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA(+) CSR, IgA production and B-cell trafficking into the intestine.

  5. O-Linked Glycosylation Determines the Nephritogenic Potential of IgA Rheumatoid Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Masao; Ito, Kiyoaki; Nakata, Junichiro; Otani, Masako; Tran, Ngoc Lan; Morito, Naoki; Takahashi, Satoru; Wada, Yoshinao

    2014-01-01

    Deficient glycosylation of O-linked glycans in the IgA1 hinge region is associated with IgA nephropathy in humans, but the pathogenic contribution of the underlying structural aberrations remains incompletely understood. We previously showed that mice implanted with cells secreting the class-switch variant 6-19 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, but not 46-42 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, develop glomerular lesions resembling IgA nephropathy. Because the levels of O-linked glycosylation in the hinge region and the structures of N-linked glycans in the CH1 domain differ in 6-19 IgA and 46-42 IgA, we determined the respective contributions of O- and N-linked glycans to the nephritogenic potential of the 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. Wild-type 6-19 IgA secreted by implanted cells induced significant formation of glomerular lesions, whereas poorly O-glycosylated 6-19 IgA glycovariants or a 6-19 IgA hinge mutant lacking O-linked glycans did not. However, we observed no apparent heterogeneity in the structure of N-linked glycans attached to three different sites of the Fc regions of nephritogenic and non-nephritogenic 6-19 IgAs. Collectively, our data suggest a critical role of O-linked glycans attached to the hinge region in the development of IgA nephropathy–like GN induced by 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. PMID:24511137

  6. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Gong, Bin; Nurieva, Roza I.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific Th17 cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into Tfh in Peyer’s patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal IgA against microbiota, however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in IL-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B cell differentiation to IgA+ cells as mediated by TGFβ1, and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA+ B cell development and IgA production, and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T cell-deficient TCRβxδ−/− mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen, increased levels of IgA+ B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus, IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA+ CSR, IgA production, and B cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  7. Autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis

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    Paweł Żebryk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a rare connective tissue disorder, which leads to progressive fibrosis of many organs. Its course is characterized by the presence of two classical autoantibodies: anti-topoisomerase I (ATA, Scl-70 and anti-centromere (ACA. In recent years, the presence of antibodies against a wider range of antigens was demonstrated, namely: RNA polymerase III, fibrillarin, NOR90, Th/To, PM-Scl-100, PM-Scl-75, Ku, PDGFR, but their clinical significance is relatively little known and until recently the methods of their assessment were available only in specialized laboratories. More and more reports in the literature indicate existence of links between the presence of selected autoantibodies with clinical correlations i.e. anti-RNA polymerase III with scleroderma renal crisis or anti-Ku and myositis, arthritis and joint contractures. The importance of autoantibodies in the diagnostic process was underlined by their inclusion into the new ACR/EULAR 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis. This work reviews the current knowledge on the clinical significance of autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis.

  8. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Honglin Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  9. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are dispensable for noninfectious intestinal IgA responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; This, Sebastien; Blanc, Pascal; Sanlaville, Amelien; Sisirak, Vanja; Bardel, Emilie; Boschetti, Gilles; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Defrance, Thierry; Dubois, Bertrand; Kaiserlian, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal DCs orchestrate gut immune homeostasis by dampening proinflammatory T-cell responses and inducing anti-inflammatory IgA responses. Although no specific DC subset has been strictly assigned so far to govern IgA response, some candidate subsets emerge. In particular, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which notoriously promote anti-viral immunity and T-cell tolerance to innocuous antigens (Ags), contribute to IgA induction in response to intestinal viral infection and promote T-cell-independent IgA responses in vitro. Here, using two transgenic mouse models, we show that neither short-term nor long-term pDC depletion alters IgA class switch recombination in Peyer's patches and frequency of IgA plasma cells in intestinal mucosa at steady state, even in the absence of T-cell help. In addition, pDCs are dispensable for induction of intestinal IgA plasma cells in response to oral immunization with T-cell-dependent or T-cell-independent Ags, and are not required for proliferation and IgA switch of Ag-specific B cells in GALT. These results show that pDCs are dispensable for noninfectious IgA responses, and suggest that various DC subsets may play redundant roles in the control of intestinal IgA responses.

  11. Cross-reactive saliva IgA antibodies to oxidized LDL and periodontal pathogens in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Ramin; Wang, Chunguang; Kyrklund, Mikael; Kummu, Outi; Turunen, Sini Pauliina; Hyvärinen, Kati; Kullaa, Arja; Salo, Tuula; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2017-07-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are formed as a result of lipid peroxidation and are highly immunogenic and proatherogenic. In this study, saliva antibodies binding to oxLDL, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) were characterized and their cross-reactivity was evaluated. Resting and stimulated saliva samples were collected from 36 healthy adults (mean age 26 years). Saliva IgA, IgG and IgM autoantibody levels to copper oxidized LDL (CuOx-LDL) and malondialdehyde acetaldehyde-modified LDL (MAA-LDL) were determined with chemiluminescence immunoassay. Saliva IgA and IgG antibodies binding to MAA-LDL and CuOx-LDL were detected in all samples and they were associated with the saliva levels of IgA and IgG to P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. Competitive immunoassay showed that saliva antibodies to MAA-LDL cross-reacted specifically with P. gingivalis. The autoantibody levels to oxLDL in saliva were not associated with the autoantibody levels to oxLDL in plasma or with saliva apolipoprotein B 100 levels. Saliva contains IgA and IgG binding to oxLDL, which showed cross-reactive properties with the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g). The data suggest that secretory IgA to P.g may participate in immune reactions involved in LDL oxidation through molecular mimicry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Autoantibody Production in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asherson, G. L.; Rose, M. Elaine

    1963-01-01

    The finding that the serum of apparently healthy rabbits fixed complement with rabbit liver and kidney has been confirmed. Experimental infection of rabbits with Eimeria stiedae, the cause of hepatic coccidiosis, led to a rise in the titre of serum complement-fixing factors. The rise was statistically significant 14, 21 and 28 days after infection. The factors were regarded as antibodies because they behaved as macroglobulins on diethylaminoethyl—cellulose chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation, and as autoantibodies because they fixed complement with the kidney of the rabbits in which they occurred. The antibody reacted with widely distributed antigen(s) with high activity in brain and low activity in skeletal muscle. The possibility that coccidial infection may be responsible for the natural autoantibody of rabbits is discussed. PMID:13965167

  13. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Print A A A What's in this article? ... Questions en español Análisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina A (IgA) What It Is An IgA test measures the ...

  14. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Nicola J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function.

  15. IgA Complexes in Plasma and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Induce Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via FcαRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyd, Esil; Al, Marjon; Tuk, Cornelis W; van der Laken, Conny J; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2016-12-15

    Autoantibodies, including rheumatoid factor (RF), are an important characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, several studies reported a correlation between the presence of IgA autoantibodies and worse disease course. We demonstrated previously that triggering the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) on neutrophils results in neutrophil recruitment and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Because this can lead to tissue damage, we investigated whether IgA immune complexes in plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients activate neutrophils. RF isotypes were measured with ELISA, and immune complexes were precipitated using polyethylene glycol 6000. Isolated neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes, and activation and release of NETs were determined in the presence or absence of FcαRI-blocking Abs. Plasma and SF of RA patients contained IgM, IgG, and IgA RFs. Patient plasma IgA RF and IgM RF showed a strong correlation. No uptake of IgM and minimal endocytosis of IgG immune complexes by neutrophils was observed, in contrast to avid uptake of IgA complexes. Incubation of neutrophils with immune complexes resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species, as well as the release of NETs, lactoferrin, and chemotactic stimuli. Importantly, activation of neutrophils was reduced when FcαRI was blocked. Neutrophils were activated by IgA immune complexes, which suggests that neutrophils play a role in inducing joint damage in RA patients who have IgA autoantibody complexes, thereby increasing the severity of disease. Blocking FcαRI inhibited neutrophil activation and, as such, may represent an additional attractive novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RA.

  16. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Daniel S. Smyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. Autoantibodies in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis

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    du Bois Ron

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA involves injury, an immune/inflammatory response and fibrosis. The cause of the injury is unknown, but the identification of serum autoantibodies makes an autoimmune aetiology attractive. The core study on which this commentary is based used novel cloning and serum screening technologies in order to identify new public and private autoantibodies in sera from 12 patients with CFA. Largely negative conclusions were drawn from that study. However, we suggest that the prevalence of autoantibodies may have been underestimated, that the study was timely and that this approach is worth pursuing further.

  18. Autoantibodies in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suveer; du Bois, Ron

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) involves injury, an immune/inflammatory response and fibrosis. The cause of the injury is unknown, but the identification of serum autoantibodies makes an autoimmune aetiology attractive. The core study on which this commentary is based used novel cloning and serum screening technologies in order to identify new public and private autoantibodies in sera from 12 patients with CFA. Largely negative conclusions were drawn from that study. However, we suggest that the prevalence of autoantibodies may have been underestimated, that the study was timely and that this approach is worth pursuing further. PMID:11686865

  19. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  20. TSH RECEPTOR AUTOANTIBODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Krzysztof; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHR-Abs) of the stimulating variety are the hallmark of Graves’ disease. The presence of immune defects leading to synthesis of TSHR-Abs causes hyperthyroidism and is associated with other extrathyroidal manifestations. Further characterization of these antibodies has now been made possible by the generation of monoclonal antibodies with this unique stimulating capacity as well as similar TSHR-Abs not associated with hyperthyroidism. Their present classification divides TSHR-Abs into stimulating, blocking (competing with TSH binding) and neutral (no signaling). Recent studies using monoclonal TSHR-Abs has revealed that stimulating and blocking antibodies bind to the receptor using mostly conformational epitopes, whilst neutral antibodies utilize exclusively linear peptides. Subtle differences in epitopes for stimulating and blocking antibodies account for the diversity of their biological actions. Recently non-classical signaling elicited by neutral antibodies has also been described, raising the need for a new classification of TSHR-Abs. PMID:19332151

  1. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  2. The long and winding road to IgA deficiency: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Ngoc, D T Laura; Krist, Lizette; van Overveld, Frans J; Rijkers, Ger T

    2017-04-01

    The most common humoral immunodeficiency is IgA deficiency. One of the first papers addressing the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying IgA deficiency indicated that immature IgA-positive B-lymphocytes are present in these patients. This suggests that the genetic background for IgA is still intact and that class switching can take place. At this moment, it cannot be ruled out that genetic as well as environmental factors are involved. Areas covered: A clinical presentation, the biological functions of IgA, and the management of IgA deficiency are reviewed. In some IgA deficient patients, a relationship with a loss-of-function mutation in the TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interaction) gene has been found. Many other genes also have been associated. Gut microbiota are an important environmental trigger for IgA synthesis. Expert commentary: Expression of IgA deficiency is due to both genetic and environmental factors and a role for gut microbiota cannot be excluded.

  3. Retinoic acid enhances lactoferrin-induced IgA responses by increasing betaglycan expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Jang, Young-Saeng; Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Sun-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Yoon, Sung-Il; Lee, Geun-Shik; Kim, Woan-Sub; Seo, Goo-Young; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2016-11-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) and retinoic acid (RA) are enriched in colostrum, milk, and mucosal tissues. We recently showed that LF-induced IgA class switching through binding to betaglycan (transforming growth factor-beta receptor III, TβRIII) and activation of canonical TGF-β signaling. We investigated the combined effect of LF and RA on the overall IgA response. An increase in IgA production by LF was further augmented by RA. This combination effect was also evident in Ig germ-line α (GLα) transcription and GLα promoter activity, indicating that LF in cooperation with RA increased IgA isotype switching. We subsequently found that RA enhanced TβRIII expression and that this increase contributed to LF-stimulated IgA production. In addition to the IgA response, LF and RA in combination also enhanced the expression of the gut-homing molecules C-C chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) and α4β7 on B cells. Finally, peroral administration of LF and RA enhanced the frequency of CCR9(+)IgA(+) plasma cells in the lamina propria. Taken together, these results suggest that LF in cooperation with RA can contribute to the establishment of gut IgA responses.

  4. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  5. Autoantibody Profile in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin J Fritzler

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a generalized disorder of connective tissue clinically characterized by thickening and fibrosis of the skin and by distinctive forms of involvement of internal organs. One of the hallmarks of systemic sclerosis is the presence of serum autoantibodies against a variety of nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens. The primary purpose of this study was to identify the autoantibodies profile in the scleroderma sera and the secondary goal was to determine the correlation and discrepancy of autoantibody profile. Autoantibody profile was determined in 118 samples stored in the Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Calgary. 78 sera were provided from Canadian and 40 sera were provided from Ukraine. We used the following techniques to identify autoantibodies profile in scleroderma patients: 1. Antinuclear antibody (ANA by indirect immunofluorescence on human epithelial cell substrate 2. Detection and identification of specific autoantibodies by Innolia strip assay 3. Detection and identification of specific autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens. 111 out of 118 patients showed positive ANA results by indirect immunofluorescence and 7 patients had negative ANA results. Anti-ENA analyses by Inolia were positive in 84 patients, while by western blotting 81 patients showed positive results. In this study, we compared the results of anti-ENA antibody by Innolia with SLR technique. A significant correlation was found between anti-SCl-70 antibodies (P=0.000 and anti- RNP antibodies (P=0.001 and JO-1 antibodies (P=0.014. Thus, we may propose that SLR and Innolia techniques could be used for the detection of autoantibody in systemic sclerosis.

  6. Defective anti-polysaccharide IgG vaccine responses in IgA deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoichi; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S; Roberts, Sean; Racine, Rachael; Wilson-Welder, Jennifer; Sanfilippo, Alan M; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W

    2017-09-05

    We report that IgA(-/-) mice exhibit specific defects in IgG antibody responses to various polysaccharide vaccines (Francisella tularensis LPS and Pneumovax), but not protein vaccines such as Fluzone. This defect further included responses to polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Prevnar and Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid vaccine). In agreement with these findings, IgA(-/-) mice were protected from pathogen challenge with protein- but not polysaccharide-based vaccines. Interestingly, after immunization with live bacteria, IgA(+/+) and IgA(-/-) mice were both resistant to lethal challenge and their IgG anti-polysaccharide antibody responses were comparable. Immunization with live bacteria, but not purified polysaccharide, induced production of serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF), a cytokine important for IgG class switching; supplementing IgA(-/-) cell cultures with BAFF enhanced in vitro polyclonal IgG production. Taken together, these findings show that IgA deficiency impairs IgG class switching following vaccination with polysaccharide antigens and that live bacterial immunization can overcome this defect. Since IgA deficient patients also often show defects in antibody responses following immunization with polysaccharide vaccines, our findings could have relevance to the clinical management of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  8. Iga viies SVH on ennetatav

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    ONTARGET uuring tõestab, et telmisartaan kaitseb kõrge kardiovaskulaarse riskiga patsiente sama tõhusalt kui ramipriil, kuid on paremini talutav. Uuringust võib järeldada, et telmisartaaniga saab ennetada iga viiendat tõsist kardiovaskulaarset juhtumit. Eesti arstidele tutvustati uuringut 6. mail toimunud sümpoosiumil

  9. Iga viies SVH on ennetatav

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    ONTARGET uuring tõestab, et telmisartaan kaitseb kõrge kardiovaskulaarse riskiga patsiente sama tõhusalt kui ramipriil, kuid on paremini talutav. Uuringust võib järeldada, et telmisartaaniga saab ennetada iga viiendat tõsist kardiovaskulaarset juhtumit. Eesti arstidele tutvustati uuringut 6. mail toimunud sümpoosiumil

  10. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the h...

  11. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoul Nada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi, and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun to 35% (ileum at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum or IgM (duodenum plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses

  12. Selective IgA Deficiency and Common Variable Immunodeficiency

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    Kadri Kamber

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD, using 5 mg/dl of serum IgA as the upper limit for diagnosis and concomitant lack of secretory IgA, is the most common form of primary immunodeficiency. The pathogenesis of IgA deficiency is not known, although abnormalities in Ig class switching and the cytokines involved in isotype switching have been implicated. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID is a heterogenous group of B cell deficiency syndromes characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, impaired antibody production and recurrent bacterial infections. Defective T-cell activation may lead to an impairment in cognate T-B-cell interaction due to impaired expression of CD40 ligand and/or abnormalities in the production of T-cell-derived cytokines required for fully functional B-cell activation, proliferation and/or differentiation which could indeed explain the impairment in antibody production present in CVID patients. It has been found that cytokines are produced in low levels due to the decreased T cell function which occurs as a result of the defect in CD40L expression in CVID patients. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 90-5

  13. Mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase impair IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuiki, Noriko; Yang, Xi; Bartol, Sophinus J W; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Imai, Kohsuke; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Shuki; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Zelm, Menno C; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is characterized by markedly decreased numbers of blood B cells and an absence of all immunoglobulin isotypes. We performed whole exome sequencing in a male pediatric patient with dysgammaglobulinemia with IgA deficiency. Genetic analysis revealed a BTK missense mutation (Thr316Ala). To investigate whether a BTK mutation underlay this antibody deficiency with marked decrease of IgA in this patient, we performed functional analyses of B cells and phagocytes, and molecular analyses of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. The BTK missense mutation resulted in B cells with reduced BTK and high IgM expression. Equal proportions of CD19(low) and CD19(normal) fractions were observed, and both included naïve and memory B cells. Calcium influx and phospholipase Cγ2 phosphorylation upon IgM stimulation were marginally impaired in CD19(low), but not in CD19(+) B cells. Similar to XLA patients, IgA transcripts showed low SHM levels, whereas IgG transcripts were hardly affected. Our analyses suggest that the BTK mutation likely underlies the disease in this case, and that hypomorphic BTK mutations can result in normal circulating B cell numbers, but specifically impair IgA responses.

  14. Mesangial IgA deposits indicate pathogenesis of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aifeng; Wang, Yongping; Wang, Guobao; Zhou, Zhanmei; Xun, Zhang; Tan, Xiaohui

    2012-05-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is characterized by crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies to the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of α3(IV) collagen presenting along the GBM. The patient clinically manifests with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) with pulmonary hemorrhage (Goodpasture syndrome). In rare cases, other immunocomplexes of IgA or IgM are involved, but their specificities have not been determined. We report a rare case of a 31-year-old female who was diagnosed as having anti-GBM disease with extensive IgA deposits in the mesangium. This patient presented heavy hematuria, proteinuria with increasing creatinine, but no lung hemorrhage. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis (type Ⅰ) with strong IgA (3+) as lump and branch shape. Therapies with pulse methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide administration were less effective. This case is different from the present type Ⅰ crescentic glomerulonephritis and the specificity of IgA deposits may implicate the pathogenesis of anti-GBM disease.

  15. The Expression of Soluble and Active Recombinant Haemophilus influenzae IgA1 Protease in E. coli

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    Shinong Long

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1 proteases from Haemophilus influenzae are extracellular proteases that specifically cleave the hinge region of human IgA1, the predominant class of immunoglobulin present on mucosal membranes. The IgA1 proteases may have the potential to cleave IgA1 complexes in the kidney and be a therapeutic agent for IgA1 nephropathy (IgAN, a disease characterized by deposition of the IgA1 antibody in the glomerulus. We have screened for the expression of recombinant H. influenzae IgA1 protease by combining various expression plasmids, IgA1 protease constructs, and E. coli strains under multiple conditions. Using the method we have developed, approximately 20–40 mg/L of soluble and active H. influenzae IgA1 protease can be produced from E. coli strain C41(DE3, a significant increase in yield compared to the yield upon expression in H. influenzae or other related bacteria.

  16. Pancreatic-specific autoantibodies to glycoprotein 2 mirror disease location and behaviour in younger patients with Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanos Dimitrios P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein 2 (GP2 was discovered as the major autoantigen of Crohn’s disease (CD-specific pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB. We investigated anti-GP2 IgA and IgG antibodies as novel serological parameters in CD and assessed their association with distinct disease phenotypes. Methods Anti-GP2 and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA IgA and IgG were detected by ELISA employing recombinant human GP2 and phosphopeptidomannan, respectively and PAB by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF in 271 sera, 169 with CD and 102 with ulcerative colitis (UC. As healthy controls 160 adult blood donors and 65 children were included. Results Anti-GP2 IgG and/or IgA were more prevalent in CD (51/169, 30.2% than in UC (9/102, 8.9% patients and in controls (9/225, 4% (p  Conclusions Anti-GP2 IgG and IgA, constituting novel CD specific autoantibodies, appear to be associated with distinct disease phenotypes identifying patients at a younger age, with ileocolonic location, and stricturing behaviour with perianal disease.

  17. Autoantibodies in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johannes Roksund Hov; Kirsten Muri Boberg; Tom H Karlsen

    2008-01-01

    The aetiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)is not known and controversy exists as to whether PSC should be denominated an autoimmune disease.A large number of autoantibodies have been detected in PSC patients,but the specificity of these antibodies is generally low,and the frequencies vary largely between different studies.The presence of autoantibodies in PSC may be the result of a nonspecific dysregulation of the immune system,but the literature in PSC points to the possible presence of specific antibody targets in the biliary epithelium and in neutrophil granulocytes.The present review aims to give an overview of the studies of autoantibodies in PSC,with a particular emphasis on the prevalence,clinical relevance and possible pathogenetic importance of each individual marker.

  18. Crescentic IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Esparza, A R; Matarese, R A; Endreny, R G; Carvalho, J S; Allegra, S R

    1984-11-01

    We report five cases of crescentic IgA nephropathy. All are males, 16-60 years of age. One case each came to medical attention with uremia, nephrotic syndrome, and gross hematuria; two cases presented with microhematuria and proteinuria on routine urinalysis. All had hypertension, azotemia (serum creatinine 1.6-9.4 mg/dl), proteinuria (greater than 6 g/24 hr in four cases), hypoalbuminemia (less than 3 g/dl), and hematuria (gross in two cases). All progressed to end-stage renal failure renal failure ending in dialysis (three cases) or death from unrelated causes (two cases). Prednisone, 60 mg/day for 1 month in two patients (with two 1-g doses of iv methylprednisolone in 1 case) did not improve the serum creatinine level, but one patient subsequently experienced a less rapid fall in renal function. A crescentic glomerulonephritis was present in all biopsies (crescents in 31-80% of glomeruli; mean, 50%). The size and stage of the crescents were variable. Numerous glomeruli had focal or diffuse sclerosis. In all cases, there was a 3 or 4+ deposition of IgA. Low-intensity staining for IgG and IgM was noted in four and three patients, respectively. On electron microscopy, dense granular mesangial deposits were noted in all cases and in four patients capillary subepithelial deposits were also observed. This form of IgA nephropathy is not common, but some studies indicate that it may occur in about 5% of patients with IgA nephropathy.

  19. Glyco-engineering for the production of recombinant IgA1 with distinct mucin-type O-glycans in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Martina; Maresch, Daniel; Strasser, Richard

    2016-11-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a common autoimmune disease that is characterized by formation and deposition of IgA1-containing immune complexes frequently leading to end-stage kidney disease. The IgA1 in these immune complexes carries aberrantly glycosylated O-glycans. In circulating IgA1 these galactose-deficient mucin-type O-glycans are bound by autoantibodies and thus, contribute to immune complex formation and pathogenesis. Even though the disease is associated with the overproduction of aberrant O-glycans on IgA1, specific structure-function-studies of mucin-type O-glycans are limited. Compared to other expression hosts, plants offer the opportunity for de novo synthesis of O-glycans on recombinant glycoproteins as they are lacking the mammalian O-glycosylation pathway. Recently, we demonstrated that Nicotiana benthamiana are suitable for the generation of distinct O-glycans on recombinant IgA1. Here, we expand our engineering repertoire by in planta generation of galactose-deficient and α2,6-sialylated O-glycans which are the prevailing glycans detected on IgA1 from patients with IgAN.

  20. IgA Structure Variations Associate with Immune Stimulations and IgA Mesangial Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, Zeliha; Oblet, Christelle; Boumediene, Ahmed; Druilhe, Anne; Pascal, Virginie; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Cuvillier, Armelle; El Hamel, Chahrazed; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Leanderson, Tomas; Morelle, Willy; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Aldigier, Jean-Claude; Cogné, Michel

    2016-09-01

    IgA1 mesangial deposition is the hallmark of IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura, the onset of which often follows infections. Deposited IgA has been reported as polymeric, J chain associated, and often, hypogalactosylated but with no information concerning the influence of the IgA repertoire or the link between immune stimuli and IgA structure. We explored these issues in the α1KI mouse model, which produces polyclonal human IgA1 prone to mesangial deposition. Compared with mice challenged by a conventional environment, mice in a specific pathogen-free environment had less IgA deposition. However, serum IgA of specific pathogen-free mice showed more galactosylation and much lower polymerization. Notably, wild-type, α1KI, and even J chain-deficient mice showed increased polymeric serum IgA on exposure to pathogens. Strict germfree conditions delayed but did not completely prevent deposition; mice housed in these conditions had very low serum IgA levels and produced essentially monomeric IgA. Finally, comparing monoclonal IgA1 that had different variable regions and mesangial deposition patterns indicated that, independently of glycosylation and polymerization, deposition might also depend on IgA carrying specific variable domains. Together with IgA quantities and constant region post-translational modifications, repertoire changes during immune responses might, thus, modulate IgA propensity to deposition. These IgA features are not associated with circulating immune complexes and C3 deposition and are more pertinent to an initial IgA deposition step preceding overt clinical symptoms in patients.

  1. IgA1 dominant subclass of latent IgA mesangial deposition in donated kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Kazumasa; Nishimura, Kenji; Kishikawa, Hidefumi; Ichikawa, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), the IgA1 subclass is more important than the IgA2 subclass. In healthy men, the prevalence of mesangial IgA deposition has been previously investigated. However, it remains unknown whether the presence of urinary abnormalities depends on the subclass of IgA deposition. We researched the subclasses of IgA (IgA1 and IgA2) by the direct immunofluorescence (IF) staining method using specimens in which we identified the deposition of IgA through zero-hour renal transplant biopsies from donors without urinary abnormalities. The samples of the zero-hour biopsies were collected from 46 cases of living renal transplant patients at Nishinomiya Hospital, Hyogo Prefecture, from January 2011 to December 2013. In seven of the 46 cases (15%), IgA deposition and C3 in mesangium were confirmed. All seven cases showed IgA1 predominant mesangial deposition on IF. The results of the histological evaluations for all seven cases were Oxford Classification M0.S0.E0.T0. This study showed similar patterns of latent mesangial IgA deposition according to IgA subclass and frequency of C3 deposition as IgAN. Latent mesangial IgA deposition may require some, as yet undefined factors, to become clinically apparent as IgAN.

  2. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-09

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity.

  3. The loss of opsonic activity of bovine milk whey following depletion of IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, D P; Meneely, D J; Pollock, D A; Logan, E F

    1986-02-01

    The role of the IgA antibody to Streptococcus agalactiae found in the whey of milks 12 hours after the first intramammary infection of six Friesian first lactation heifers was assessed using an in vitro bactericidal assay. The mean percentage kill of the streptococci by neutrophils in the presence of these wheys was 36.2% while the equivalent figure for the non-infected quarter whey was 0%. When the IgA antibody was absorbed from the infected quarter wheys using class specific IgA antiserum cross linked with glutaraldehyde the percentage kill of the test system fell to 0%. Elution of the absorbed antibody partially restored the activity to a mean percentage kill of 18.2%. The results indicated that the IgA antibody found in infected quarter whey during the acute stages of intramammary infection with Streptococcus agalactiae was responsible for the opsonic activity which pertained at that time.

  4. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  5. Characterization of autoantibodies to vasoactive intestinal peptide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S; Said, S I; Thompson, A B; Volle, D J; Agrawal, D K; Foda, H; de la Rocha, S

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent relaxant of the airway smooth muscle. In this study, VIP-binding autoantibodies were observed in the plasma of 18% asthma patients and 16% healthy subjects. Immunoprecipitation studies and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and immobilized protein G indicated that the plasma VIP-binding activity was largely due to IgG antibodies. Saturation analysis of VIP binding by the plasmas suggested the presence of one or two classes of autoantibodies, distinguished by their apparent equilibrium affinity constants (Ka). The autoantibodies from asthma patients exhibited a larger VIP-binding affinity compared to those from healthy subjects (Ka 7.8 x 10(9) M-1 and 0.13 x 10(9) M-1, respectively; P less than 0.005). The antibodies were specific for VIP, judged by their poor reaction with peptides bearing partial sequence homology with VIP (peptide histidine isoleucine, growth hormone releasing factor and secretin). IgG prepared from the plasma of an antibody-positive asthma patient inhibited the saturable binding of 125I-VIP by receptors in guinea pig lung membranes (by 39-59%; P less than 0.001). These observations are consistent with a role for the VIP autoantibodies in the airway hyperresponsiveness of asthma.

  6. Prognostic Value of Serum Biomarkers of Autoimmunity for Recurrence of IgA Nephropathy after Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoux, Francois; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mohey, Hesham; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A

    2017-06-01

    A prognostic biomarker for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) recurrence after renal transplant is lacking. We followed 96 consecutive first renal transplant recipients with native kidney IgAN (79 men; 92 deceased donors; mean age =48.1 years) on calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppression over 10 years for death, allograft failure, and clinicopathologic recurrence (CPR; clinically evident and biopsy-proven). Using time-dependent Cox regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves, we assessed prognostic significance of levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1; autoantigen) and Gd-IgA1-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies in serum obtained at time of transplant or native-kidney IgAN diagnosis (30 patients only). Overall, 13 patients died, 34 kidneys failed (17 due to CPR), and 34 patients developed CPR after a mean interval of 5.8 years. Compared with healthy controls (n=30), patients had significantly elevated serum Gd-IgA1 levels at diagnosis and transplant, but levels did not associate with any outcome. Patients also had significantly elevated levels of normalized (but not total) serum Gd-IgA1-specific IgG autoantibodies at diagnosis and transplant, and the level at transplant associated with higher risk of CPR (relative risk, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 5.71; P=0.01; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.51 to 0.74; P=0.05). Normalized Gd-IgA1-specific IgG autoantibody level remained an independent risk factor for CPR in multivariate analysis. Serum Gd-IgA1-specific IgA autoantibody level did not change between diagnosis and transplant or predict outcome. This study emphasizes post-transplant prognostic value of normalized serum IgG antiglycan autoantibody level in patients with IgAN. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Immune regulation in IgA nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Jan-Willem

    2008-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The hallmark of the disease is depositions of polymeric IgA1 in the mesangium of the glomeuli. These depositions will lead to inflammation in the kidneys and eventually to deterioration of renal function. The

  8. IgA as therapeutic antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2015-01-01

    This review is focused on the promises of IgA as a new therapeutic antibody. For more than 30 years IgG molecules have been used in the clinic in the fields of oncology, hematology, auto immune diseases and infections. However, IgA might be a good alternative, since it recruits different effector ce

  9. Immune regulation in IgA nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Jan-Willem

    2008-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The hallmark of the disease is depositions of polymeric IgA1 in the mesangium of the glomeuli. These depositions will lead to inflammation in the kidneys and eventually to deterioration of renal function. The pathogenesi

  10. [Clinical symptoms in IgA deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira-Serra, Flavio Augusto; Mosca, Tainá; Santos de Menezes, Maria da Conceição; Carvalho-Neves Forte, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    Antecedentes: La deficiencia de inmunoglobulina A (IgA) es la inmunodeficiencia primaria más frecuente. El diagnóstico oportuno y el seguimiento clínico pueden mejorar la calidad de vida de los portadores. Para ello, deben estudiarse y entenderse las manifestaciones clínicas de este trastorno. Objetivo: Determinar las manifestaciones clínicas de la deficiencia de IgA. Métodos: Estudio transversal, retrospectivo, exploratorio, realizado mediante análisis de expedientes de 39 pacientes con deficiencia de IgA. Resultados: De los pacientes analizados, 10 fueron diagnosticados con deficiencia total de IgA y 29 con deficiencia parcial. Las principales manifestaciones clínicas fueron rinoconjuntivitis y asma alérgicas. En los pacientes con deficiencia total de IgA, además de las enfermedades alérgicas se observó un mayor número de cuadros infecciosos de rinosinusitis, amigdalitis y conjuntivitis (p IgA fueron los cuadros alérgicos de rinoconjuntivitis y el asma; además, los pacientes portadores de deficiencia total de IgA presentaron aumento significativo de cuadros infecciosos de rinosinusitis, amigdalitis y conjuntivitis, comparados con los pacientes con deficiencia parcial de IgA.

  11. Microbiota metabolite short-chain fatty acid acetate promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota which is mediated by GPR43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W; Sun, M; Chen, F; Cao, A T; Liu, H; Zhao, Y; Huang, X; Xiao, Y; Yao, S; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z; Cong, Y

    2016-12-14

    Intestinal IgA, which is regulated by gut microbiota, has a crucial role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and in protecting the intestines from inflammation. However, the means by which microbiota promotes intestinal IgA responses remain unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that the host can sense gut bacterial metabolites in addition to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that recognition of these small molecules influences host immune response in the intestines and beyond. We reported here that microbiota metabolite short-chain fatty acid acetate promoted intestinal IgA responses, which was mediated by "metabolite-sensing" GPR43. GPR43(-/-) mice demonstrated lower levels of intestinal IgA and IgA(+) gut bacteria compared with those in wild type (WT) mice. Feeding WT but not GPR43(-/-) mice acetate but not butyrate promoted intestinal IgA response independent of T cells. Acetate promoted B-cell IgA class switching and IgA production in vitro in the presence of WT but not GPR43(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, acetate-induced DC expression of Aldh1a2, which converts Vitamin A into its metabolite retinoic acid (RA). Moreover, blockade of RA signaling inhibited the acetate induction of B-cell IgA production. Our studies thus identified a new pathway by which microbiota promotes intestinal IgA response through its metabolites.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 14 December 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.114.

  12. IgA nephropathy and infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollino, Cristiana; Vischini, Gisella; Coppo, Rosanna

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we concentrate on the role of infections in IgA nephropathy both from a pathogenetic and clinic point of view. The current hypotheses as regards the role of infections in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy are: (a) role of particular pathogens, (b) chronic exposure to mucosal infections, (c) abnormal handling of commensal microbes (gut microbiota). We also focus on particular infections reported in association with classic IgA nephropathy (HIV, malaria, Chlamydia, Lyme disease), as well as on IgA dominant-infection-associated glomerulonephritis. This is a unique form of glomerulonephritis, where IgA deposition is dominant. It is mostly recognized in old, diabetic patients and in association with staphylococcal infection.

  13. Pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody profiling by proteomic technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Kalantari-Dehaghi

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a mucocutaneous blistering disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies against the stratified squamous epithelium. Current understanding of PV pathophysiology does not explain the mechanism of acantholysis in patients lacking desmoglein antibodies, which justifies a search for novel targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. We tested 264 pemphigus and 138 normal control sera on the multiplexed protein array platform containing 701 human genes encompassing many known keratinocyte cell-surface molecules and members of protein families targeted by organ-non-specific PV antibodies. The top 10 antigens recognized by the majority of test patients' sera were proteins encoded by the DSC1, DSC3, ATP2C1, PKP3, CHRM3, COL21A1, ANXA8L1, CD88 and CHRNE genes. The most common combinations of target antigens included at least one of the adhesion molecules DSC1, DSC3 or PKP3 and/or the acetylcholine receptor CHRM3 or CHRNE with or without the MHC class II antigen DRA. To identify the PV antibodies most specific to the disease process, we sorted the data based on the ratio of patient to control frequencies of antigen recognition. The frequency of antigen recognition by patients that exceeded that of control by 10 and more times were the molecules encoded by the CD33, GP1BA, CHRND, SLC36A4, CD1B, CD32, CDH8, CDH9, PMP22 and HLA-E genes as well as mitochondrial proteins encoded by the NDUFS1, CYB5B, SOD2, PDHA1 and FH genes. The highest specificity to PV showed combinations of autoantibodies to the calcium pump encoded by ATP2C1 with C5a receptor plus DSC1 or DSC3 or HLA-DRA. The results identified new targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. Novel autoantibody signatures may help explain individual variations in disease severity and treatment response, and serve as sensitive and specific biomarkers for new diagnostic assays in PV patients.

  14. Autoantibodies in Patients with Fasciolosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Korkmaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Antiself humoral immune responses have been detected not only in classical autoimmune dis­eases, but autoantibodies have also been found in sera of patients suffering from chronic parasitic dis­eases. We aimed to investigate the role of fasciolosis as a trigger factor of autoimmune reactivity by searching some anti­bodies related to hepatobiliary systems, in patients with fasciolosis. "nMethods: Thirty-two patients (17 males, 15 females with fasciolosis were included in this case-control study. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA Screen (antigen mixture of dsDNA, histones, nRNP/Sm, Sm, SS-A, SS-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ribosomal P-proteins, centromere ELISA and single-antigen ELISAs for detection of some antibodies (dsDNA, Anti-M2, Anti- liver-kidney microsomes type 1 (LKM-1 and Myeloperoxidase (MPO were carried out. "nResults: ANA-screen, M-2, LKM-1, MPO and anti-dsDNA positivity were detected with ELISA in 7, 7, 4, 2 and 2 of 32 patients with fasciolosis, consecutively. No statistically significant difference was de­tected for any of the autoantibodies' frequency between patients with fasciolosis and control group. How­ever, autoantibody positivity rate was significantly higher in patients with fasciolosis (50 % than control group (12.5 %. Absorbance values of all autoantibodies in patients with fasciolosis were statistically sig­nificant higher than controls. "nConclusion: These results lent support to the role of fasciolosis as a trigger factor of autoimmune reactiv­ity by the breakdown of tolerance. In spite of the extensive knowledge that has accumulated, the specific relationship be­tween fasciolosis and autoimmunity is still obscure.

  15. O-Glycosylated IgA Rheumatoid Factor Induces IgA Deposits and Glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Masako; Nakata, Junichiro; Kihara, Masao; Leroy, Valérie; Moll, Solange; Wada, Yoshinao

    2012-01-01

    Structural aberrations of O-linked glycans present in the IgA1 hinge region are associated with IgA nephropathy, but their contribution to its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. In this study, mice implanted with hybridoma secreting 6-19 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, but not 46-42 IgA rheumatoid factor bearing the same IgA allotype, developed mesangial deposits consisting of IgA, IgG2a, and C3. Studies in immunoglobulin- and C3-deficient mice revealed that the development of these glomerular lesions required the formation of IgA-IgG2a immune complexes and subsequent activation of complement. The proportion of polymeric and monomeric forms, the IgG2a-binding affinity, and the serum levels of IgA-IgG2a immune complexes were similar between 6-19 IgA– and 46-42 IgA–injected mice. In contrast, the analysis of oligosaccharide structures revealed highly galactosylated O-linked glycans in the hinge region of 6-19 IgA and poorly O-glycosylated in the hinge region of 46-42 IgA. Furthermore, the structure of N-linked glycans in the CH1 domain was the complex type in 6-19 IgA and the hybrid type in 46-42 IgA. In summary, this study demonstrates the presence of O-linked glycans in the hinge region of mouse IgA and suggests that 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor–induced GN could serve as an experimental model for IgA nephropathy. PMID:22193386

  16. IgA deficiency in wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Hellman, Lars; Zhao, Yaofeng; Arnemo, Jon M; Lin, Miaoli; Tengvall, Katarina; Møller, Torsten; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hammarström, Lennart

    2013-06-01

    Low mean concentrations of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) and an increased frequency of overt IgA deficiency (IgAD) in certain dog breeds raises the question whether it is a breeding-enriched phenomenon or a legacy from the dog's ancestor, the gray wolf (Canis lupus). The IgA concentration in 99 serum samples from 58 free-ranging and 13 captive Scandinavian wolves, was therefore measured by capture ELISA. The concentrations were markedly lower in the wolf serum samples than in the dog controls. Potential differences in the IgA molecule between dogs and wolves were addressed by sequencing the wolf IgA heavy chain constant region encoding gene (IGHA). Complete amino acid sequence homology was found. Detection of wolf and dog IgA was ascertained by showing identity using double immunodiffusion. We suggest that the vast majority of wolves, the ancestor of the dog, are IgA deficient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TGF-β1 improves mucosal IgA dysfunction and dysbiosis following intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Yu; Liu, Zi-Meng; Zhang, Hu-Fei; Li, Yun-Sheng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Shen, Jian-Tong; Huang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) severely disrupts gut barriers and leads to high mortality in the critical care setting. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 plays a pivotal role in intestinal cellular and immune regulation. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on intestinal I/R injury remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on gut barriers after intestinal I/R and the molecular mechanisms. Intestinal I/R model was produced in mice by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 hr followed by reperfusion. Recombinant TGF-β1 was intravenously infused at 15 min. before ischaemia. The results showed that within 2 hrs after reperfusion, intestinal I/R disturbed intestinal immunoglobulin A class switch recombination (IgA CSR), the key process of mucosal IgA synthesis, and resulted in IgA dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased production and bacteria-binding capacity of IgA. Meanwhile, the disruptions of intestinal microflora and mucosal structure were exhibited. Transforming growth factor-β1 activated IgA CSR as evidenced by the increased activation molecules and IgA precursors. Strikingly, TGF-β1 improved intestinal mucosal IgA dysfunction, dysbiosis and epithelial damage at the early stage after reperfusion. In addition, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activating mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (SMAD) 2/3, totally blocked the inductive effect of TGF-β1 on IgA CSR and almost abrogated the above protective effects on intestinal barriers. Taken together, our study demonstrates that TGF-β1 protects intestinal mucosal IgA immunity, microbiota and epithelial integrity against I/R injury mainly through TGF-β receptor 1/SMAD 2/3 pathway. Induction of IgA CSR may be involved in the protection conferred by TGF-β1.

  18. Measurement of ferritin and anti-ferritin autoantibodies in serum and colostrum of Holstein and Japanese Black cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yoshiya; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    Anti-ferritin autoantibody is a ferritin-binding protein commonly found in mammals; it is thought to form an immune complex with ferritin and thereby mediate the rapid clearance of circulating ferritin. The aim of this study is to determine concentrations of ferritin and anti-ferritin autoantibodies (immunoglobulin (Ig)M, IgG and IgA) in serum and colostrum of Holstein (H) and Japanese Black (JB) cows within 24 h of normal calving. Blood and colostrum samples were collected from cows of various ages (2-11 years) and calving number (1-8 live births). Mean ferritin concentrations were higher in colostrum than in serum for both breeds, and higher colostrum ferritin concentrations were found in H than JB cows. IgA antibodies in serum and colostrum from both breeds had negligible ferritin-binding activity. For both breeds, IgM and IgG antibodies had higher ferritin-binding activity in colostrum than in serum. There was a significant correlation between IgM and IgG ferritin-binding activities in serum and colostrum of H and JB cows. These results suggest that ferritin and IgM and IgG autoantibodies are actively transferred from the blood stream to the colostrum at prepartum or early lactation.

  19. Cleavage of a recombinant human immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 hybrid antibody by certain bacterial IgA1 proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senior, B; Dunlop, JI; Batten, MR

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated...... sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcalpha receptors and trigger respiratory bursts...... in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica...

  20. Peptide mimetics of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and FcαRI block IgA-induced human neutrophil activation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Marieke H; van der Steen, Lydia P E; Korthouwer, Rianne M; Hage, J Joris; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Benschop, Joris J; Bakema, Jantine E; Slootstra, Jerry W; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2017-07-24

    The cross-linking of the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) by IgA induces release of the chemoattractant LTB4, thereby recruiting neutrophils in a positive feedback loop. IgA autoantibodies of patients with autoimmune blistering skin diseases therefore induce massive recruitment of neutrophils, resulting in severe tissue damage. To interfere with neutrophil mobilization and reduce disease morbidity, we developed a panel of specific peptides mimicking either IgA or FcαRI sequences. CLIPS technology was used to stabilize three-dimensional structures and to increase peptides' half-life. IgA and FcαRI peptides reduced phagocytosis of IgA-coated beads, as well as IgA-induced ROS production and neutrophil migration in in vitro and ex vivo (human skin) experiments. Since topical application would be the preferential route of administration, Cetomacrogol cream containing an IgA CLIPS peptide was developed. In the presence of a skin permeation enhancer, peptides in this cream were shown to penetrate the skin, while not diffusing systemically. Finally, epitope mapping was used to discover sequences important for binding between IgA and FcαRI. In conclusion, a cream containing IgA or FcαRI peptide mimetics, which block IgA-induced neutrophil activation and migration in the skin may have therapeutic potential for patients with IgA-mediated blistering skin diseases. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  2. Haridus - iga lapse õigus / Gerd Tarand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tarand, Gerd, 1985-

    2009-01-01

    MTÜ Mondo alustas veebruaris maailmaharidusprojektiga „Haridus - iga lapse õigus“, mille üldine eesmärk on tõsta Eesti elanikkonna, eriti noorte huvi arengumaade vastu ning teadmisi ja arusaamist arengumaade haridusega seonduvatest probleemidest

  3. Haridus - iga lapse õigus / Gerd Tarand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tarand, Gerd, 1985-

    2009-01-01

    MTÜ Mondo alustas veebruaris maailmaharidusprojektiga „Haridus - iga lapse õigus“, mille üldine eesmärk on tõsta Eesti elanikkonna, eriti noorte huvi arengumaade vastu ning teadmisi ja arusaamist arengumaade haridusega seonduvatest probleemidest

  4. Myositis specific autoantibodies : specificity and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengstman, G.J.D.

    2005-01-01

    The sera of about half of the patients with myositis contain autoantibodies that are specific for this group of diseases compared to other inflammatory connective tissue disorders. In a recent study we showed that these myositis specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are also specific for myositis as compar

  5. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  6. Myositis specific autoantibodies : specificity and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengstman, G.J.D.

    2005-01-01

    The sera of about half of the patients with myositis contain autoantibodies that are specific for this group of diseases compared to other inflammatory connective tissue disorders. In a recent study we showed that these myositis specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are also specific for myositis as compar

  7. Detection of autoantibodies to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, K; Hansen, M B; Ross, C;

    2000-01-01

    Autoantibodies to various cytokines have been reported in normal individuals and in patients with various infectious and immunoinflammatory disorders, and similar antibodies (Ab) may be induced in patients receiving human recombinant cytokines. The clinical relevance of these Ab is often difficult...... to evaluate. Not only are in vitro neutralizing cytokine Ab not necessarily neutralizing in vivo, but assays for binding and neutralizing Ab to cytokines are often difficult to interpret. For example, denaturation of immobilized cytokines in immunoblotting techniques and immunometric assays may leave Ab...

  8. Linear IgA dermatosis: report of an infantile case and analysis of 213 cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Yuji; Ikoma, Akihiko; Sakai, Rie; Masatsugu, Asako; Ohta, Miyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with multiple vesicles, showing a rosette-like arrangement around the crusts. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations demonstrated subepidermal blistering with neutrophilic infiltration associated with deposition of IgA, but not IgG, linearly distributed along the basement membrane zone (BMZ) of the epidermis. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed circulating antibodies (IgA class, x160) against the BMZ of guinea pig lip skin. Based on the diagnosis of linear IgA dermatosis (LAD) of childhood, administration of dexamethasone (2 mg/day) was started, and the eruptions diminished immediately. Western blot analysis using extract of the HaCaT cell as a substrate, demonstrated the corresponding antigen at 120-kDa molecular weight. There have been 213 cases of LAD reported in Japan including conference abstracts and these were studied to determine whether infantile cases differed from adult ones, and whether cases associated with IgG as well as IgA (IgA/G type), differed from the cases associated with IgA only (IgA type). IgG contributed less frequently to the infantile type (age of onset, or =16 years). Clinical appearance did not show any obvious difference between the IgA/G type and IgA type. However, three-quarters of cases showing localization of antigen to the dermal side were the IgA/G type.

  9. Buckling analysis of nanoplates using IGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung-Van, P.; Abdel-Wahab, M.; Nguyen-Xuan, H.

    2017-05-01

    Isogeometric analysis (IGA) based on HSDT is used to simulate buckling analysis of nanoplates. The material properties of nanoplates based on the Mori-Tanaka schemes and the rule of mixture are used. The differential nonlocal equations with size effect are utilized. The nonlocal governing equations are approximated according to IGA, that satisfies naturally the higher-order derivatives continuity requirement in weak form of nanoplates. Several numerical results are presented to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed method.

  10. The impact of genes on the occurrence of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Hjelmborg, Jacob V; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2013-01-01

    -keratin antibodies (AKA), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), IgA- and IgM rheumatoid factor (IgA-RF and IgM-RF). The odds ratio for these autoantibodies based on both conditional and unconditional logistic regression adjusting for the two major genetic risk factors as well as smoking. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: To assess the genetic effect on the occurrence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) associated autoantibodies. METHODS: A co-twin control study of 27 monozygotic (MZ) and 51 dizygotic same sexed (DZss) RA discordant twins. Outcome measures: The probandwise concordance rate of anti......: The probandwise concordance rates (95% CI) of ACPA, AKA, IgM-RF and IgA-RF were 78.6 (55.4-92.4), 16.7 (0.6-58.4), 30.0 (7.3-60.6), 42.1 (14.5-71.1) in MZ twins and 25.0 (10.3-44.4), 0.0 (0.0-27.7), 10.5 (1.4-31.5) and 22.2 (6.8-45.0) in DZss twins. In twin pairs discordant for both RA and autoantibodies...

  11. Tumor-infiltrating T cells correlate with NY-ESO-1-specific autoantibodies in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Milne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells are correlated with prolonged progression-free and overall survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. A significant fraction of EOC patients mount autoantibody responses to various tumor antigens, however the relationship between autoantibodies and tumor-infiltrating T cells has not been investigated in EOC or any other human cancer. We hypothesized that autoantibody and T cell responses may be correlated in EOC and directed toward the same antigens. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained matched serum and tumor tissue from 35 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Serum samples were assessed by ELISA for autoantibodies to the common tumor antigen NY-ESO-1. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry for expression of NY-ESO-1, various T cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, FoxP3, TIA-1 and Granzyme B and other immunological markers (CD20, MHC class I and MHC class II. Lymphocytic infiltrates varied widely among tumors and included cells positive for CD3, CD8, TIA-1, CD25, FoxP3 and CD4. Twenty-six percent (9/35 of patients demonstrated serum IgG autoantibodies to NY-ESO-1, which were positively correlated with expression of NY-ESO-1 antigen by tumor cells (r = 0.57, p = 0.0004. Autoantibodies to NY-ESO-1 were associated with increased tumor-infiltrating CD8+, CD4+ and FoxP3+ cells. In an individual HLA-A2+ patient with autoantibodies to NY-ESO-1, CD8+ T cells isolated from solid tumor and ascites were reactive to NY-ESO-1 by IFN-gamma ELISPOT and MHC class I pentamer staining. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that tumor-specific autoantibodies and tumor-infiltrating T cells are correlated in human cancer and can be directed against the same target antigen. This implies that autoantibodies may collaborate with tumor-infiltrating T cells to influence clinical outcomes in EOC. Furthermore, serological screening methods may prove useful for identifying clinically relevant

  12. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders.

  13. Autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in juvenile dermatomyositis are associated with calcinosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gunawardena, H

    2009-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: The identification of novel autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) may have etiologic and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to describe autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in children recruited to the Juvenile DM National Registry and Repository for UK and Ireland. METHODS: Clinical data and sera were collected from children with juvenile myositis. Sera that recognized a 140-kd protein by immunoprecipitation were identified. The identity of the p140 autoantigen was investigated by immunoprecipitation\\/immunodepletion, using commercial monoclonal antibodies to NXP-2, reference anti-p140, and anti-p155\\/140, the other autoantibody recently described in juvenile DM. DNA samples from 100 Caucasian children with myositis were genotyped for HLA class II haplotype associations and compared with those from 864 randomly selected UK Caucasian control subjects. RESULTS: Sera from 37 (23%) of 162 patients with juvenile myositis were positive for anti-p140 autoantibodies, which were detected exclusively in patients with juvenile DM and not in patients with juvenile DM-overlap syndrome or control subjects. No anti-p140 antibody-positive patients were positive for other recognized autoantibodies. Immunodepletion suggested that the identity of p140 was consistent with NXP-2 (the previously identified MJ autoantigen). In children with anti-p140 antibodies, the association with calcinosis was significant compared with the rest of the cohort (corrected P < 0.005, odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0-16.1). The clinical features of patients with anti-p140 autoantibodies were different from those of children with anti-p155\\/140 autoantibodies. The presence of HLA-DRB1*08 was a possible risk factor for anti-p140 autoantibody positivity. CONCLUSION: This study has established that anti-p140 autoantibodies represent a major autoantibody subset in juvenile DM. This specificity may identify a further immunogenetic and clinical phenotype within the

  14. Lack of cleavage of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from rhesus monkeys by bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    OpenAIRE

    Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases cleaving IgA1 and secretory IgA1 molecules in the hinge region are believed to be important virulence factors. Previous studies have indicated that IgA of humans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are the exclusive substrates of these enzymes. In a recent study, IgA from the rhesus monkey was found to be susceptible to the IgA1 protease activity of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In an attempt to reproduce this observation, we found that neither five isolates of...

  15. Alpha-fodrin autoantibodies are reliable diagnostic markers for juvenile and adult Sjogren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawind, Mohamed F; Alyasky, Ahmed; Elwan, Nahed M; Mourad, Heba; Al-Bendary, Amal

    2004-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is like other systemic autoimmune diseases, characterized by a large number of autoantigens and autoantibodies and infiltration of glandular tissue by predominantly CD4 T lymphocytes. The presence of certain autoantibodies is required for the diagnosis to be made, especially Anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of anti-alpha fodrin and its association with anti-Ro and anti-La in juvenile and adult SS. Thirteen cases with juvenile SS and 11 old SS patients were examined. Selection and classification of the patients was based on the revised European Community Criteria. The Juvenile SS group included 10 girls and 3 boys, their age ranged from 7 to 14 years. Adult SS group included 2 males and 9 female, their age ranged from 21 to 54 years. Blood samples were subjected to Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) mm/1 degree h, Complete blood count (CBC), Latex agglutination test for estimating rheumatoid factor (RF) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and assessment of Anti-alpha Fodrin IgG/IgA, anti-Ro and anti-La using ELISA. The two groups were matched for sex ratio. There was a significant difference of age (10.1 +/- 2.4 vs 35.1 +/- 9.3 yr) between both groups (P anti-Ro, anti-La and anti-alpha fodrin IgG/IgA autoantibodies concentration in the sera of SS patients in both groups (P > 0.05) although their levels were elevated. The percentage of detection of anti-Ro, anti- La and anti-alpha fodrin IgG and IgA antibodies in the sera of Juvenile SS was 61.5%, 53.8%, 53.8% and 61.5% respectively, while in adult SS was 63.6%, 45.5%, 45.5% and 81.8%, respectively. Anti alpha fodrin IgA and IgG were positively detected in SS patients who had negative anti-Ro and/or anti-La. The anti-alpha fodrin IgG and IgA antibodies did not significantly correlated with antibodies against Ro and La, ESR and ANA (r 0.05). The detection of anti-alpha fodrin antibodies may prove to be a useful sensitive marker for SS. Routine

  16. IgA pemphigus showing IgA antibodies to desmoglein 1 and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Salama; Bouchouicha, Sana; Khaled, Aida; Laadher, Lilia; Sellami, Maryem Kallel; Zeglaoui, Faten

    2016-10-01

    IgA pemphigus is a rare autoimmune vesiculo-pustular skin disease. Only approximately 70 cases have been reported to date. We report a case of IgA pemphigus with IgA antibodies to desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) and desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). We report the case of an 60-year-old man with intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA pemphigus with IgA antibodies to Dsg1 and Dsg3. Histologic examination revealed subcorneal neutrophilic pustules with few acantholytic cells. The disease was not effectively controlled by conventional therapeutic regimens (colchicine, dapsone). Systemic treatment with isotretinoin 25 mg/d and prednisone 20 mg/d achieved only a slight effect after six months. Our case confirmed the recalcitrant nature of IgA pemphigus in response to distinct therapies, indicating that further research focusing on therapeutic approaches for this type of pemphigus is needed. Physicians should keep IgA pemphigus in mind when approaching patients with bullous eruption.

  17. Behcet's disease and IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Mustafa; Secilmis, Sema; Unverdi, Selman; Ceri, Mevlut; Duranay, Murat

    2012-07-01

    Although Behçet's disease (BD) is a kind of systemic disease, renal involvement is rare, especially IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Renal manifestations in BD range from mild urinary abnormalities to glomerulonephritis with persistent renal failure, which includes minimal change disease, proliferative glomerulonephritis, rapidly crescentic glomerulonephritis, renal amyloidosis and IgA nephropathy. Amyloidosis seems to be the most common type of renal lesion in BD, and several cases of nephrotic syndrome secondary to amyloidosis have been documented. Co-occurrence of BD and IgA nephropathy has only been reported in only few cases. We describe two patients with the rare association of BD and IgAN. We suggested that it is important to periodically perform renal function assessment in patients with BD, through urinalysis and measurement of serum creatinine for detecting any abnormality and providing an early adequate treatment.

  18. Association of persisting IgA response with yersinia triggered reactive arthritis: a study on 104 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, A; Lahesmaa-Rantala, R; Vuento, R; Granfors, K

    1987-01-01

    Twelve to 16 months after Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 enteritis 33 (85%) of the 39 patients who developed reactive arthritis as a postinfection complication had IgA class and 28 (72%) had IgG class anti-yersinia antibodies. In contrast, 7 (32%) of the 22 patients who did not develop arthritis were positive in the IgA test and 11 (50%) positive in the IgG test. The results were about the same when the material was divided into cases with diagnosis of yersiniosis verified by stool culture or by...

  19. Autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis: Unanswered questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIANE eKAYSER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis.

  20. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Nordal, Ellen; Fasth, Anders; Aalto, Kristiina; Herlin, Troels; Nielsen, Susan; Rygg, Marite; Zak, Marek; Rönnelid, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied.

  1. Clinicopathological significance of monoclonal IgA deposition in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Hiroshi; Tsuchimoto, Akihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kawahara, Shota; Shimomura, Yukiko; Noguchi, Hideko; Masutani, Kosuke; Katafuchi, Ritsuko; Kitazono, Takanari

    2017-04-01

    Clinicopathological significance of monoclonal IgA deposition and its relation to bone marrow abnormalities in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remains unclear. We retrospectively investigated the prevalence and clinicopathological significance of monoclonal IgA deposition in 65 patients with IgAN. Serum-free light chain ratio, and urinary Bence Jones protein were also measured. Thirty-nine percent of patients were men, median age was 40 and median observation period was 31 months. Five patients (Group M) showed monoclonal IgA lambda deposition and one showed monoclonal IgA kappa deposition. Fifty-nine patients (Group P) showed polyclonal IgA deposition. There were no significant differences in the degree of proteinuria, hematuria and renal function between Group M and Group P. Total protein and albumin were significantly lower in Group M than in Group P. According to the Oxford classification, the percentage of patients with M1 was significantly higher in Group M than in Group P. One patient in Group P showed serum monoclonal IgG lambda. No patient showed abnormal serum-free light chain ratio. Seventy-five percent in Group M and 42 % in Group P were treated with steroid. Three patients in Group P progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The frequency of disappearance of proteinuria or hematuria and progression to ESRD was not different between the groups. The prevalence of monoclonal IgA deposition was 9.2 %. Although some parameters differed between the groups, renal outcome were similar. Thus, IgAN with monoclonal IgA deposition seems not to be different entity from those with polyclonal IgA deposition.

  2. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, ...

  3. Relevance of anti-C1q autoantibodies to lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Soufleros, Kostantinos

    2009-09-01

    The first component of the classical pathway of the complement system (C1q) is considered to have a crucial role in the clearance of immune complexes (ICs) as well as in the removal of waste material originating from apoptotic cells. A prolonged exposure of C1q epitopes to the immune system could eventually lead to an autoimmune response against itself. Although autoantibodies against C1q are found in several diseases, their clinical interest originates from their strong association to active lupus nephritis (LN). Several studies indicate that anti-C1q autoantibodies could serve as a reliable serologic marker in the assessment of LN activity compared to other immunological tests. Additionally, it was suggested that anti-C1q autoantibodies could play a role in LN pathogenesis. Their potential pathogenic actions likely depend on genetic background, titers, Ig classes and subclasses, and specific epitopes of anti-C1q autoantibodies as well as C1q availability and allocation. It is still unclear which different types of anti-C1q autoantibodies dominate in each case and if their upregulation is pathogenic, an epiphenomenon of aberrant tissue damage, or compensatory to an uncontrolled immune response.

  4. [Linear IgA bullous dermatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorette, Gérard; Georgesco, Gabriella

    2010-10-01

    The linear IgA bullous dermatosis can have various aspects involving erythema and bullous lesions. It is a rare disease. Two peaks of frequency are noticed in children before puberty and in adults around 60 years of age. The histological and immunological characterisation is infraepidermal bullous lesions and linear deposits of IgA along the dermoepidermal basement membrane. There are some targets antigens. There is often a medical condition that seems to trigger. The link with drugs in particular with vancomycin was established. The mainstay of treatment is dapsone generally associated with steroids.

  5. Oats do not induce systemic or mucosal autoantibody response in children with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Outi; Villanen, Mikko; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2009-05-01

    A gluten-free diet omitting wheat, rye, and barley is the only effective treatment for coeliac disease. The necessity of excluding oats from the diet has remained controversial. We studied the toxicity of oats in children with coeliac disease during a 2-year follow-up by investigating jejunal transglutaminase 2 (TG2)-targeted IgA-class autoantibody deposits, a potentially more sensitive disease marker than serum antibodies or conventional histology. Twenty-three coeliac children in remission were randomized to undergo oat or gluten challenge with wheat, rye, barley, and oats. When jejunal histological relapse was evident after gluten challenge, patients excluded wheat, rye, and barley but continued with oats. Mucosal morphology and TG2-targeted autoantibody deposits were studied in jejunal biopsies taken at baseline and after 6 and 24 months. Furthermore, serum IgA-class TG2 antibodies were measured. At baseline, serum TG2 antibodies were negative in all 23 patients, but 7 of them had minor mucosal deposits. In the oats group, there was no significant change in the intensity of the deposits within 2 years. In contrast, during the gluten challenge, the intensity of the deposits clearly increased and decreased again when wheat, rye, and barley were excluded but consumption of oats was continued; this was in line with serum autoantibodies. The intensity of the mucosal deposits correlated well with both villous morphology and serum autoantibody levels. Consumption of oats does not induce TG2 autoantibody production at mucosal level in children with coeliac disease. Measurement of small-intestinal mucosal autoantibody deposits is suitable for monitoring treatment in coeliac patients.

  6. Thioredoxin is involved in endothelial cell extracellular transglutaminase 2 activation mediated by celiac disease patient IgA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Antonella Nadalutti

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the role of thioredoxin (TRX, a novel regulator of extracellular transglutaminase 2 (TG2, in celiac patients IgA (CD IgA mediated TG2 enzymatic activation. METHODS: TG2 enzymatic activity was evaluated in endothelial cells (HUVECs under different experimental conditions by ELISA and Western blotting. Extracellular TG2 expression was studied by ELISA and immunofluorescence. TRX was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Serum immunoglobulins class A from healthy subjects (H IgA were used as controls. Extracellular TG2 enzymatic activity was inhibited by R281. PX12, a TRX inhibitor, was also employed in the present study. RESULTS: We have found that in HUVECs CD IgA is able to induce the activation of extracellular TG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Particularly, we noted that the extracellular modulation of TG2 activity mediated by CD IgA occurred only under reducing conditions, also needed to maintain antibody binding. Furthermore, CD IgA-treated HUVECs were characterized by a slightly augmented TG2 surface expression which was independent from extracellular TG2 activation. We also observed that HUVECs cultured in the presence of CD IgA evinced decreased TRX surface expression, coupled with increased secretion of the protein into the culture medium. Intriguingly, inhibition of TRX after CD IgA treatment was able to overcome most of the CD IgA-mediated effects including the TG2 extracellular transamidase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether our findings suggest that in endothelial cells CD IgA mediate the constitutive activation of extracellular TG2 by a mechanism involving the redox sensor protein TRX.

  7. Do we need to measure total serum IgA to exclude IgA deficiency in coeliac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, D; Saas, M; Turk, A; Goble, M; Kerr, D

    2006-01-01

    Background Screening for IgA deficiency in patients with coeliac disease is essential because of the increased incidence of IgA deficiency associated with the disease, which usually relies on the estimation of IgA levels in each case. Aim To devise a method of excluding IgA deficiency without measuring total serum IgA in each case. Materials and methods The optical density readings on enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of 608 routine samples received for tissue transglutaminase (TTG) antibody testing for coeliac disease were compared with their total IgA concentrations. Dilution experiments were also carried out to ensure linear relationships between optical density on ELISA and IgA concentrations and to compare the sensitivities for TTG and endomysium antibodies in TTG‐positive samples. Results and discussion A clear relationship was shown between total IgA concentration and TTG optical density readings by ELISA. To ensure a positive TTG result if antibodies are present, it was possible to recommend an optical density level above which all samples have sufficient IgA. Samples with optical density <0.05 should be investigated further by estimating total IgA and, if low, samples should be subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy testing for IgA and IgG endomysium antibodies. Conclusions An easier, more cost‐effective and practical way of excluding IgA deficiency in the investigation on coeliac disease is reported. PMID:16489174

  8. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  9. Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lings, Kristina; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune, chronic bullous disease affecting primarily young children and adults. Studies on LAD are relatively sparse and from Scandinavia we could only find a few case reports. Therefore we decided to conduct a retrospective investigation of patients...

  10. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  11. A study of the association of human secretory component with IgA and IgM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weicker, J; Underdown, B J

    1975-04-01

    Human secretory component (SC) was isolated from colostral whey, and the binding of 125I-SC to purified IgA and IgM monoclonal proteins was studied using two methods to separate free from immunoglobulin-bound 125I-SC: a) gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, and b) precipitation of 125I-SC-Ig complexes with anti-Ig antibody. Both IgA dimeric proteins and IgM pentamers bound 125I-SC with approximately one SC-binding site per mole of polymer and similar affinity. Assuming a reversible equilibrium, an apparent association constant congruent to 10-8 M-1 was calculated to govern the binding of 125I-SC to immunoglobulin polymers. The assignment of a single association constant may be an oversimplication, particularly for the case of IgA polymers, since evidence was obtained that disulfide bonds were formed in the 125I-SC-IgA complex. Despite the complexity of the reaction, binding of 125I-SC to both IgA and IgM polymers could be analyzed by standard methods of saturation analysis, and both were shown to have a similar affinity for 125I-SC. No differences were noted in the affinity of 125I-SC binding to the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses. Binding of monomeric IgA and IgM proteins could not be measured and was at least 100-fold lower than that found for IgA and IgM polymers. Complexes of 125I-SC with IgA dimers were presumed to involve covalent bond formation, since these complexes did not dissociate in guanidine-HCl. One IgA2 trimer did not form a covalent bond since it was completely dissociated in guanidine. In contrast, 125I-SC-IgM complexes were dissociated in denaturing solvent, indicating that such complexes were held together primarily by non-covalent bonds. Experiments with (Fc)5 mu isolated by high temperature tryptic digestion of IgM showed that binding of 125I-SC was to the Fc region of IgM proteins. It was suggested that the binding of SC with similar affinity to both IgA and IgM polymers may be important in the biologic function of both these immunoglobulin classes.

  12. High Prevalence of Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies in Infants with Food Protein-Induced Proctitis/Proctocolitis: Autoimmunity Involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Sekerkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis (FPIP is the most common noninfectious colitis in children in the first year of life. Along with the overall clinical symptoms, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding are the main manifestations of the disease. There is no routine noninvasive test that would be specific for this type of colitis. The aim of our study was to find a noninvasive laboratory test or tests that may be helpful in differential diagnosis of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis. Methods. ANA, ANCA, ASCA, a-EMA, a-tTg, specific IgE, total IgE, IgG, IgA, IgM, and concentration of serum calprotectin were measured in a group of 25 patients with colitis and 18 children with other diagnoses. Results. Atypical-pANCA antibodies of IgG isotype were detected in the sera of 24 patients by the method of indirect immunofluorescence, and 5 patients showed also the positivity of IgA isotype. In control samples these autoantibodies were not detected. Other autoantibodies were not demonstrated in either patient or control group. Conclusions. Of the parameters tested in noninfectious colitis, atypical-pANCA on ethanol-fixed granulocytes appears to be a suitable serological marker of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis and suggests a possible involvement of an autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. B-1 cells as a source of IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin found primarily on mucosal surfaces. The generation of IgA and its involvement in mucosal immune responses have been intensely studied over the past years. IgA can be generated in T cell-dependent and T cell-independent pathways, and it has an important impact on maintaining homeostasis within the mucosal immune system. There is good evidence that B-1 cells contribute substantially to the production of mucosal IgA and thus play an important role in regulating commensal microbiota. However, whether B-1 cells produce antigen-specific or only nonspecific IgA remains to be determined. This review will discuss what is currently known about IgA production by B-1 cells and the functional relevance of B-1 cell-derived IgA both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Spectrum of IgA nephropathy in a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttara Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A (IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common biopsy-proven primary glomerular disease in the world and a major contributor to the worldwide burden of endstage renal failure, with a wide geographical variation. To determine the incidence, clinical profile and histological pattern of IgAN in our institute, we reviewed all the patients who had native kidney biopsies with the diagnosis of primary IgAN during the period from 1998 to 2009 in the context of the clinical features. A total of 116 patients with IgAN were finally analyzed; 85 (73% of the patients were male, the mean age of the patients was 29.2 ± 12.2 (range 10-70 years and the mean duration of disease was 10.4 ± 18.7 months (median: 2 months. Hypertension was present in 74 (63.2% cases. Gross hematuria was rare. The most common clinical presentation was nephrotic syndrome, followed by chronic renal failure. The mean proteinuria level was 2.5 ± 2.3 g/day (median: 1.7 g/day and the mean serum creatinine level was 3.04 ± 3.3 mg/dL (median:1.7 mg/dL. The morphological sub-classification (Haas: Class I was the most common (44.4%, followed by class V (23%. IgA co-deposition with C3 and lambda was the most common finding in the immunofluorescence study. The glomerular filtration rate decreased with advanced histological damage. The incidence of IgAN was 7.5%, which is lower as compared with studies from elsewhere. IgAN in our population had a more severe clinical presentation.

  15. The generation and evaluation of recombinant human IgA specific for Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1-19 (PfMSP119

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corran Patrick H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunoglobulin G (IgG plays an important role in mediating protective immune responses to malaria. Although human serum immunoglobulin A (IgA is the second most abundant class of antibody in the circulation, its contribution, if any, to protective responses against malaria is not clear. Results To explore the mechanism(s by which IgA may mediate a protective effect, we generated fully human IgA specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (PfMSP119, a major target of protective immune responses. This novel human IgA bound antigen with an affinity comparable to that seen for an epitope-matched protective human IgG1. Furthermore, the human IgA induced significantly higher NADPH-mediated oxidative bursts and degranulation from human neutrophils than the epitope-matched human IgG1 from which it was derived. Despite showing efficacy in in vitro functional assays, the human IgA failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo in mice transgenic for the human Fcα receptor (FcαRI/CD89. A minority of the animals treated with IgA, irrespective of FcαRI expression, showed elevated serum TNF-α levels and concomitant mouse anti-human antibody (MAHA responses. Conclusions The lack of protection afforded by MSP119-specific IgA against parasite challenge in mice transgenic for human FcαRI suggests that this antibody class does not play a major role in control of infection. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that protective capacity may have been compromised in this model due to rapid clearance and inappropriate bio-distribution of IgA, and differences in FcαRI expression profile between humans and transgenic mice.

  16. Research on Autoantibodies Against Myocardial β1-adrenergic and M2 Cholinergic Receptors in Patients With Chronic Keshan Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhenhua; Niu Xiaolin; Ren Fuxian

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between serum autoantibodies against myocardial β1-adrenergic, M2-cholinergic receptors and chronic Keshan disease (CKD). Methods The second extracellular loops of β1 and M2 receptors on human cardiomyocytes were used as the antigens.Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to determine serum autoantibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors in 32 CKD patients. 31 healthy subjects from endemic area were selected as the control. Results Positive rate of autoantibodies against myocardial β1 adrenergic (51.3%, 17/32) and M2cholinergic (56.3% , 18/32) receptors weresignificantly higher than those in the control (9.7%, 3/31; 12.9%, 4/31) (both P < 0.01). Both positive rate and titers of above autoantibodies in NYHA Ⅱ~Ⅲ CKD patients were significantly higher than those in NYHA Ⅳ , demonstrating an apparently positive correlation between serum antibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors (r=0.95). Conclusions Autoantibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors were found in sera of CKD patients; distribution of positive rate and titers of the autoantibodies in CKD patients in various NYHA classes of cardiac function are significantly different.

  17. Autoantibodies against the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Subunit NR1: Untangling Apparent Inconsistencies for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2017-01-01

    This viewpoint review provides an integrative picture of seemingly contradictory work published on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 1 (NMDAR1) autoantibodies (AB). Based on the present state of knowledge, it gives recommendations for the clinical decision process regarding immunosuppressive treatment. Brain antigen-directed AB in general and NMDAR1-AB in particular belong to a preexisting autoimmune repertoire of mammals including humans. Specific autoimmune reactive B cells may get repeatedly (perhaps transiently) boosted by various potential stimulants (e.g., microbiome, infections, or neoplasms) plus less efficiently suppressed over lifespan (gradual loss of tolerance), likely explaining the increasing seroprevalence upon aging (>20% NMDAR1-AB in 80-year-old humans). Pathophysiological significance emerges (I) when AB-specific plasma cells settle in the brain and produce large amounts of brain antigen-directed AB intrathecally and/or (II) in conditions of compromised blood–brain barrier (BBB), for instance, upon injury, infection, inflammation, or genetic predisposition (APOE4 haplotype), which then allows substantial access of circulating AB to the brain. Regarding NMDAR1-AB, functional effects on neurons in vitro and elicitation of brain symptoms in vivo have been demonstrated for immunoglobulin (Ig) classes, IgM, IgA, and IgG. Under conditions of brain inflammation, intrathecal production and class switch to IgG may provoke high NMDAR1-AB (and other brain antigen-directed AB) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum, causing the severe syndrome named “anti-NMDAR encephalitis,” which then requires immunosuppressive therapy on top of the causal encephalitis treatment (if available). However, negative CSF NMDAR1-AB results cannot exclude chronic effects of serum NMDAR1-AB on the central nervous system, since the brain acts as “immunoprecipitator,” particularly in situations of compromised BBB. In any case of suspected symptomatic consequences of

  18. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement of thyroid autoantibodies may aid in the diagnosis of certain thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto's disease (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's...

  19. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of reviews This review focuses on recent advance in the diagnosis pathogenesis and treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis. Recent findings Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are closely associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and micro

  20. Role of IgA receptors in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Papista, Christina; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world and one of the first causes of end-stage renal failure. IgAN is characterized by the accumulation of immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1 in mesangial areas. The pathogenesis of this disease involves the deposition of polymeric and hypogalactosylated IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the mesangium. Quantitative and structural changes of Gd-IgA1 play a key role in the development of the disease due to functional abnormalities of two IgA receptors: the FcαRI (CD89) expressed by blood myeloid cells and the transferrin receptor (CD71) on mesangial cells. Abnormal Gd-IgA1 induces release of soluble CD89, which participates in the formation of circulating IgA1 complexes. These complexes are trapped by CD71 that is overexpressed on mesangial cells in IgAN patients together with the crosslinking enzyme transglutaminase 2 allowing pathogenic IgA complex formation in situ and mesangial cell activation. A humanized mouse model expressing IgA1 and CD89 develops IgAN in a similar manner as patients. In this model, a food antigen, the gliadin, was shown to be crucial for circulating IgA1 complex formation and deposition, which could be prevented by a gluten-free diet. Identification of these new partners opens new therapeutic prospects for IgAN treatment.

  1. An impedimetric immunosensor for the detection of autoantibodies directed against gliadins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenhohl, T; Lisdat, F

    2007-04-01

    An immunosensor has been developed for the detection of autoantibodies directed against wheat gliadin, a protein fraction of cereal gluten which is involved in celiac disease. The immunosensor is based on the immobilization of gliadins onto gold electrodes covered with a polyelectrolyte layer of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid sodium salt). The immobilization was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. The antigen-antibody interaction signal was amplified by an incubation step with peroxidase-labeled immunoglobulins and subsequent peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). Changes in the insulating properties of the electrode layer were measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence of ferri/ferro-cyanide. Impedance spectra could be fitted to a Randles equivalent circuit with high accuracy. Exposing the sensor electrodes to various antigliadin antibody concentrations resulted in proportional changes in the charge transfer resistance. A calibration graph for the detection of antigliadin antibodies was established for antibody concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M. Finally, the sensor was used for the determination of antigliadin autoantibodies of the IgG and IgA type in several human sera.

  2. Autoantigen microarrays reveal autoantibodies associated with proliferative nephritis and active disease in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, D James; Diep, Vivian K; Price, Jordan V; Limb, Cindy; Utz, Paul J; Balboni, Imelda

    2015-06-17

    Pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) patients often initially present with more active and severe disease than adults, including a higher frequency of lupus nephritis. Specific autoantibodies, including anti-C1q, anti-DNA and anti-alpha-actinin, have been associated with kidney involvement in SLE, and DNA antibodies are capable of initiating early-stage lupus nephritis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Over 100 different autoantibodies have been described in SLE patients, highlighting the need for comprehensive autoantibody profiling. Knowledge of the antibodies associated with pSLE and proliferative nephritis will increase the understanding of SLE pathogenesis, and may aid in monitoring patients for renal flare. We used autoantigen microarrays composed of 140 recombinant or purified antigens to compare the serum autoantibody profiles of new-onset pSLE patients (n = 45) to healthy controls (n = 17). We also compared pSLE patients with biopsy-confirmed class III or IV proliferative nephritis (n = 23) and without significant renal involvement (n = 18). We performed ELISA with selected autoantigens to validate the microarray findings. We created a multiple logistic regression model, based on the ELISA and clinical information, to predict whether a patient had proliferative nephritis, and used a validation cohort (n = 23) and longitudinal samples (88 patient visits) to test its accuracy. Fifty autoantibodies were at significantly higher levels in the sera of pSLE patients compared to healthy controls, including anti-B cell-activating factor (BAFF). High levels of anti-BAFF were associated with active disease. Thirteen serum autoantibodies were present at significantly higher levels in pSLE patients with proliferative nephritis than those without, and we confirmed five autoantigens (dsDNA, C1q, collagens IV and X and aggrecan) by ELISA. Our model, based on ELISA measurements and clinical variables, correctly identified patients with proliferative

  3. Transient glyco-engineering to produce recombinant IgA1 with defined N- and O-glycans in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eDicker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG, less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA, which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumour activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered deltaXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that deltaXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants can be engineered towards the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  4. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  5. An LGG-derived protein promotes IgA production through upregulation of APRIL expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Liu, L; Moore, D J; Shen, X; Peek, R M; Acra, S A; Li, H; Ren, X; Polk, D B; Yan, F

    2017-03-01

    p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived protein, transactivates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells, leading to amelioration of intestinal injury and inflammation. To elucidate mechanisms by which p40 regulates mucosal immunity to prevent inflammation, this study aimed to determine the effects and mechanisms of p40 on regulation of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) expression in intestinal epithelial cells for promoting immunoglobulin A (IgA) production. p40 upregulated April gene expression and protein production in mouse small intestine epithelial (MSIE) cells, which were inhibited by blocking EGFR expression and kinase activity. Enteroids from Egfr(fl/fl), but not Egfr(fl/fl)-Vil-Cre mice with EGFR specifically deleted in intestinal epithelial cells, exhibited increased April gene expression by p40 treatment. p40-conditioned media from MSIE cells increased B-cell class switching to IgA(+) cells and IgA production, which was suppressed by APRIL receptor-neutralizing antibodies. Treatment of B cells with p40 did not show any effects on IgA production. p40 treatment increased April gene expression and protein production in small intestinal epithelial cells, fecal IgA levels, IgA(+)B220(+), IgA(+)CD19(+), and IgA(+) plasma cells in lamina propria of Egfr(fl/fl), but not of Egfr(fl/fl)-Vil-Cre, mice. Thus p40 upregulates EGFR-dependent APRIL production in intestinal epithelial cells, which may contribute to promoting IgA production.

  6. AIRE gene mutations and autoantibodies to interferon omega in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism without APECED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato, Sara; Morlin, Luca; Albergoni, Maria Paola; Masiero, Stefano; Greggio, Nella; Meossi, Cristiano; Chen, Shu; del Pilar Larosa, Maria; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Kämpe, Olle; Valenzise, Mariella; Betterle, Corrado

    2010-11-01

    To assess autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene mutations, class II HLA haplotypes, and organ- or non-organ-specific autoantibodies in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism (CH) without associated Addison's disease (AD) or chronic candidiasis (CC). Twenty-four patients who had CH without AD or CC were included in the study. AIRE gene mutations in all 14 exons were studied using PCR in 24 patients, 105 healthy controls and 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations. Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined for all 24 patients and 105 healthy controls. Autoantibodies to a range of antigens including NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein-5 (NALP5) and interferon omega (IFNω) were tested in all 24 patients. AIRE gene mutations were found in 6 of 24 (25%) patients, all females, and this was significantly higher (P AIRE mutations found in healthy controls (2/105). Three patients (12·5%) had homozygous AIRE mutations characteristic of Autoimmune-Poly-Endocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy and all three were also positive for IFNω-autoantibodies. Three patients (12·5%) had heterozygous AIRE mutations; two of these were novel mutations. One of the patients with heterozygous AIRE mutations was positive for both NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 and IFNω autoantibodies. Heterozygous AIRE mutations were found in 10 of 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations, although none was affected by CH. Class II HLA haplotypes were not statistically different in patients with CH compared to healthy controls. Analysis of AIRE gene mutations together with serum autoantibody profile should be helpful in the assessment of patients with CH, in particular young women with associated autoimmune diseases. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4--a blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander;

    2014-01-01

    of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where...... women gave annual blood samples for several years. Cases were 97 postmenopausal women who developed colorectal cancer after recruitment and were age-matched to 97 women without any history of cancer. MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 IgG autoantibodies identified cases with 8.2 and 13.4% sensitivity, respectively......, at 95% specificity. IgA to MUC4 glycoforms were unable to discriminate between cases and controls in the UKCTOCS sera. Additional analysis was undertaken by combining the data of MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 with previously generated data on autoantibodies to p53 peptides, which increased the sensitivity...

  8. Autoantibodies in SLE: Specificities, Isotypes and Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dema

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is characterized by a wide spectrum of auto-antibodies which recognize several cellular components. The production of these self-reactive antibodies fluctuates during the course of the disease and the involvement of different antibody-secreting cell populations are considered highly relevant for the disease pathogenesis. These cells are developed and stimulated through different ways leading to the secretion of a variety of isotypes, affinities and idiotypes. Each of them has a particular mechanism of action binding to a specific antigen and recognized by distinct receptors. The effector responses triggered lead to a chronic tissue inflammation. DsDNA autoantibodies are the most studied as well as the first in being characterized for its pathogenic role in Lupus nephritis. However, others are of growing interest since they have been associated with other organ-specific damage, such as anti-NMDAR antibodies in neuropsychiatric clinical manifestations or anti-β2GP1 antibodies in vascular symptomatology. In this review, we describe the different auto-antibodies reported to be involved in SLE. How autoantibody isotypes and affinity-binding to their antigen might result in different pathogenic responses is also discussed.

  9. Anti-C1q autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this co

  10. Nefropatia por IgA nas espondiloartrites IgA nephropathy in spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Castelo Azevedo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com espondiloartrites poderiam ser mais acometidos pela nefropatia por IgA do que a população geral, havendo, possivelmente, um mecanismo etiopatogênico comum. O seguinte artigo relaciona quatro casos que exemplificam essa possível associaçãoSpondyloarthritis patients can be more frequently affected by IgA nephropathy than the general population, and a common etiopathogenic mechanism can be involved. We report four cases that may exemplify that association

  11. Linear IgA disease: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning, Vanessa A

    2012-05-01

    Linear IgA disease is one of the rarer subepidermal blistering diseases. Linear IgA disease is a chronic, acquired, autoimmune blistering disease that is characterized by subepidermal blistering and linear deposition of IgA basement membrane antibodies. The disease affects both children and adults and, although there are some differences in their clinical presentations, there is considerable overlap with shared immunopathology and immunogenetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TCM Differential Treatment of IgA Nephrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂莉芳

    2005-01-01

    @@ IgA nephrosis, with an incidence of 38%-49% in the primary glomerulopathy in China, is one of the main causes for the late renal failure. In view of the fact that there are no specific Western remedies for IgA nephrosis characterized by hematuria, the researches on TCM differential treatment of IgA nephrosis have been listed in the major projects of "the Scientific Technologies in thel0th 5-year plan of China".

  13. Autoantibody profiling in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh SC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Song-Chou Hsieh,1 Chia-Li Yu1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Molecular Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an archetype of systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of a broad spectrum of autoantibodies. More than 100 autoantibodies have been found in the sera of patients with SLE, including antibodies against nuclear, cytoplasmic, surface-membrane, and extracellular antigens. There has been considerable debate as to whether these antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs are merely biomarkers for disease or are responsible for organ/tissue damage in SLE. In recent years, sufficient evidence has supported the hypothesis that many ANAs, such as anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA, antiribosomal P, anti-Sm, antiribonucleoprotein (anti-RNP, and even anti-Sjögren's syndrome (SS-B/La antibodies not only act against specific nuclear antigens but also cross-react with different surface-expressed cognate molecules. The binding of autoantibodies to the cell surface leads to their penetration into the cell's interior to elicit cellular damage. There are at least four conceivable routes for ANAs to penetrate the cytoplasm: (1 nonspecific Fcγ receptor-mediated uptake, (2 cell-surface caveolae-mediated endocytosis, (3 electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids of the complementarity-determining regions of the antibody molecule and the negatively charged surface membrane, and (4 the binding of the autoantibody with its cross-reactive cell surface-expressed cognate molecule, and its subsequent endocytosis into the cytoplasm. In this review, we discuss in detail the immunopathogenic mechanisms of the commonly encountered ANAs, such as anti-dsDNA, antiribosomal P, and anti-SSB/La, that are associated with lupus pathogenesis. Additionally, the detrimental thromboembolism-inducing anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with SLE

  14. Oral manifestations caused by the linear IgA disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguia del Valle, Asier; Aguirre Urízar, José Manuel; Martínez Sahuquillo, Angel

    2004-01-01

    The Linear IgA deposit related disease or Linear IgA disease (LAD) is a chronic, uncommon and autoimmunological mucocutaneous disease, characterised by linear IgA deposits along the basement membrane zone. In mainly cases, moreover cutaneous lesions, there are oral mucosal and other mucosal lesions. There are also, some cases published of Linear IgA disease limited to oral mucosa. The known of this disease is important for the establishment of a correct differential diagnosis in cases of blistering mucocutaneous diseases. In this paper, we analyze the most important features of this disease, attending specially to the oral manifestations.

  15. [How can we diagnose and better understand inflammatory myopathies? The usefulness of auto-antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilia, Jean; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Meyer, Alain; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sordet, Christelle; Goetz, Joëlle

    2010-10-01

    The inflammatory myopathies are a group of quite proteiform, systemic auto-immune diseases which include polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myopathies. To facilitate the diagnosis, classification criteria (Bohan and Peter, 1975) have been proposed, based essentially on clinical criteria. In addition, over the past fifteen years, auto-antibodies characterizing certain forms of inflammatory myopathy have been identified. One distinguishes schematically: auto-antibodies specific for myositis and auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis. Concerning the myositis specific auto-antibodies (MSA), schematically there are a dozen specificities which are classed according to the cellular distribution of the auto-antigen. The most characteristic are certainly the auto-antibodies directed against cytoplasmic antigens: the anti-tRNA synthetases (anti-Jo-1 (PL-1), anti-PL-7, PL-12, EJ, OJ, JS, KS, ZO, YRS), anti-SRP (signal recognition particle), anti-Mas and anti-KJ, anti-Fer (eEF1), anti-Wa and anti-CADM p140. Other auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear auto-antigens: the anti-Mi-2, anti-PMS (PMS1, PMS2) and related antibodies (MLH1, DNA PKcs…), anti-56 kDa, anti-MJ (NXP-2), anti-SAE and anti-p155/p140 (TIF-1γ). Concerning the auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis (myositis associated auto-antibodies or MAA), they can also be observed in other auto-immune diseases. These auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear or nucleolar auto-antigens: the anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, anti-RNP (U1 RNP and U2 RNP, U4/U6 RNP and U5 RNP), anti-Ro 52 kDa and more rarely, anti-Ro 60 kDa and anti-La. The auto-antibodies related to myositis are biological tools which are of interest in two main ways. They have allowed us to sort out the nosology of these inflammatory myopathies, in particular by defining anti-tRNA synthetase syndrome. It now remains to determine how they might be employed to complement the classical clinico-biological diagnostic criteria

  16. Aberrantly Glycosylated IgA1 as a Factor in the Pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mototsugu Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Predominant or codominant immunoglobulin (Ig A deposition in the glomerular mesangium characterizes IgA nephropathy (IgAN. Accumulated glomerular IgA is limited to the IgA1 subclass and usually galactose-deficient. This underglycosylated IgA may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. Recently, antibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1 were found to be well associated with the development of IgAN. Several therapeutic strategies based on corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents have been shown to at least partially suppress the progression of IgAN. On the other hand, several case reports of kidney transplantation or acquired IgA deficiency uncovered a remarkable ability of human kidney to remove mesangial IgA deposition, resulting in the long-term stabilization of kidney function. Continuous exposure to circulating immune complexes containing aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 and sequential immune response seems to be essential in the disease progression of IgAN. Removal of mesangial IgA deposition may be a challenging, but fundamental approach in the treatment of IgAN.

  17. The Kinetics of Glomerular Deposition of Nephritogenic IgA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Kenji; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Satake, Kenji; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Novak, Jan; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Whether IgA nephropathy is attributable to mesangial IgA is unclear as there is no correlation between intensity of deposits and extent of glomerular injury and no clear mechanism explaining how these mesangial deposits induce hematuria and subsequent proteinuria. This hinders the development of a specific therapy. Thus, precise events during deposition still remain clinical challenge to clarify. Since no study assessed induction of IgA nephropathy by nephritogenic IgA, we analyzed sequential events involving nephritogenic IgA from IgA nephropathy-prone mice by real-time imaging systems. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that serum IgA from susceptible mice had strong affinity to mesangial, subepithelial, and subendothelial lesions, with effacement/actin aggregation in podocytes and arcade formation in endothelial cells. The deposits disappeared 24-h after single IgA injection. The data were supported by a fluorescence molecular tomography system and real-time and 3D in vivo imaging. In vivo imaging showed that IgA from the susceptible mice began depositing along the glomerular capillary from 1 min and accumulated until 2-h on the first stick in a focal and segmental manner. The findings indicate that glomerular IgA depositions in IgAN may be expressed under the balance between deposition and clearance. Since nephritogenic IgA showed mesangial as well as focal and segmental deposition along the capillary with acute cellular activation, all glomerular cellular elements are a plausible target for injury such as hematuria. PMID:25409466

  18. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies and hypertension: preeclampsia and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E

    2013-06-21

    Hypertensive disorders are life-threatening diseases with high morbidity and mortality, affecting billions of individuals worldwide. A multitude of underlying conditions may contribute to hypertension, thus the need for a plethora of treatment options to identify the approach that best meets the needs of individual patients. A growing body of evidence indicates that (1) autoantibodies that bind to and activate the major angiotensin II type I (AT₁) receptor exist in the circulation of patients with hypertensive disorders, (2) these autoantibodies contribute to disease pathophysiology, (3) antibody titers correlate to the severity of the disease, and (4) efforts to block or remove these pathogenic autoantibodies have therapeutic potential. These autoantibodies, termed AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies have been extensively characterized in preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive condition of pregnancy. As reviewed here, these autoantibodies cause symptoms of preeclampsia when injected into pregnant mice. Somewhat surprisingly, these auto antibodies also appear in 3 animal models of preeclampsia. However, the occurrence of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies is not restricted to pregnancy. These autoantibodies are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients who develop severe transplant rejection and malignant hypertension during the first week after transplantation. AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies are also highly abundant among a group of patients with essential hypertension that are refractory to standard therapy. More recently these autoantibodies have been seen in patients with the autoimmune disease, systemic sclerosis. These 3 examples extend the clinical impact of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies beyond pregnancy. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia and other hypertensive conditions are autoimmune diseases characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT₁. These

  19. Purification and characterisation of immunoglobulins from the Australian black flying fox (Pteropus alecto using anti-fab affinity chromatography reveals the low abundance of IgA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Wynne

    Full Text Available There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that implicates bats in the dissemination of a long list of emerging and re-emerging viral agents, often causing illnesses or death in both animals and humans. Despite this, there is a paucity of information regarding the immunological mechanisms by which bats coexist with highly pathogenic viruses. Immunoglobulins are major components of the adaptive immune system. Early studies found bats may have quantitatively lower antibody responses to model antigens compared to conventional laboratory animals. To further understand the antibody response of bats, the present study purified and characterised the major immunoglobulin classes from healthy black flying foxes, Pteropus alecto. We employed a novel strategy, where IgG was initially purified and used to generate anti-Fab specific antibodies. Immobilised anti-Fab specific antibodies were then used to capture other immunoglobulins from IgG depleted serum. While high quantities of IgM were successfully isolated from serum, IgA was not. Only trace quantities of IgA were detected in the serum by mass spectrometry. Immobilised ligands specific to IgA (Jacalin, Peptide M and staphylococcal superantigen-like protein also failed to capture P. alecto IgA from serum. IgM was the second most abundant serum antibody after IgG. A survey of mucosal secretions found IgG was the dominant antibody class rather than IgA. Our study demonstrates healthy P. alecto bats have markedly less serum IgA than expected. Higher quantities of IgG in mucosal secretions may be compensation for this low abundance or lack of IgA. Knowledge and reagents developed within this study can be used in the future to examine class-specific antibody response within this important viral host.

  20. Human mucosal IgA in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuvaraj, Saravanan

    2007-01-01

    Het eiwit immunoglobuline A (IgA) is een antistof die het binnendringen van bacteriën en andere ziekmakende stoffen in ons lichaam voorkomt. Daarmee zorgt het voor de eerstelijns afweer tegen infecties. UMCG-promovendus Saravanan Yuvaraj onderzocht de mogelijkheden genetisch gemoduleerde IgA

  1. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis following influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta-Wszolek, Lauren; Mousette, Alyse M; Mahalingam, Meera; Levin, Nikki A

    2009-11-15

    Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis (LABD) is an immune-mediated subepidermal vesiculobullous eruption characterized by linear deposits of IgA at the basement membrane zone. Most cases are idiopathic but medications, infections, and malignancies have also been reported to induce LABD. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed LABD shortly after receiving an influenza vaccination.

  2. Exposures influencing total IgA level in colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munblit, D; Sheth, S; Abrol, P; Treneva, M; Peroni, D G; Chow, L-Y; Boner, A L; Pampura, A; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a predominant immunoglobulin present in human breast milk and is known to play an important role in infant gut immunity maturation. Breast milk composition varies between populations, but the environmental and maternal factors responsible for these variations are still unclear. We examined the relationship between different exposures and levels of IgA in colostrum. The objective of this study was to examine whether exposures analysed influence levels of IgA in colostrum. The present study used 294 colostrum samples from the MecMilk International cohort, collected from women residing in London, Moscow and Verona. Samples were analysed in automated Abbott Architect Analyser. We found an inverse correlation between time postpartum and colostrum total IgA level (r=-0.49, PIgA levels were influenced by colostrum collection time (PIgA (P=0.01). We conclude that the concentration of IgA in colostrum drops rapidly after birth and future studies should always consider this factor in analysis. IgA concentration varied significantly between countries, with the highest level detected in Moscow and lowest in Verona. Mode of delivery effect should be confirmed on larger cohorts. Further work is needed to determine ways to correct for IgA decline over time in colostrum, and to find the cause of variations in IgA levels between the countries.

  3. Incidence of Autoantibodies to C1Q Complement Component in Women with Miscarriages and Autoantibodies to Phospholipids and Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzhinskaya, I V; Van'ko, L V; Kashentseva, M M; Kiryushchenkov, P A; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-12-01

    Autoantibodies to C1q complement component are often detected in patients with autoimmune diseases. The complement system is involved in the pathophysiology of gestosis. The incidence of anti-C1q autoantibodies was studied in women with miscarriages and autoantibodies to phospholipids and chorionic gonadotropin. Serum C3 and C4 complement components and anti-C1Q autoantibodies (IgG) were measured by ELISA. The median levels of C3 and C4 in patients with miscarriages were lower than in healthy women. Anti-C1q autoantibodies were more often found in the patients than in controls; patients with autoantibodies to phospholipids formed a risk group. Median levels of anti-C1q autoantibodies were higher in the patients with autoantibodies to phospholipids and chorionic gonadotropin than in healthy women. Hence, activation of the complement system and hyperproduction of anti-C1q autoantibodies were unfolding in patients with miscarriages, mainly in the patients with autoantibodies to phospholipids.

  4. Strategies for building reference standards for autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eSheldon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a not for profit manner.Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals.

  5. Role of complement in IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daha, Mohamed R; van Kooten, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by the deposition of IgA in the mesangium of glomeruli. This mesangial IgA has been found to consist mainly of polymeric IgA1 which drives the activation of the mesangial cells and results in excessive production of several inflammatory mediators. The activation of mesangial cells is amplified by the ability of IgA to activate the complement system, originally thought to occur mainly via the alternative pathway of complement. However more recent studies indicate that lectin pathway involvement has a strong association with progression of renal disease. In this review we summarize the contribution of complement to the IgA- mediated inflammatory process.

  6. [Stiff-person syndrome and related autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Ryo; Tanaka, Keiko

    2013-04-01

    Central nervous system hyperexcitability disorders, known as stiff-man/person syndrome (SPS), are thought to be related to the regulatory disturbance of inhibitory synaptic transmission of motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. SPS is characterized by stiffness and spasms of the axis and limbs and is divided into two clinical subgroups: classic SPS, which affects the lumbar, trunk, and proximal limb muscles, and SPS-plus syndrome. The latter comprises (1) the stiff-limb subtype, in which symptom is limited to the lower limbs; (2) jerking stiff-man syndrome, characterized by chronically progressive stiffness and myoclonus; and (3) acute-onset and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Almost 80% of patients with classic SPS harbor autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). In approximately 30-40% of patients, SPS accompanies type I diabetes, and anti-GAD65 antibodies are detected frequently in type I diabetes. However, the antibody-recognizing epitopes might be different between SPS and diabetes. Other autoantibodies against glycine receptor α1 (12% of patients with SPS) and GABA(A)-receptor associated protein (70% of patients with SPS) have been reported. In paraneoplastic SPS, anti-amphiphysin antibodies have been shown in patients with breast cancer or small cell lung cancer. One case of mediastinal tumor with anti-gephyrin antibodies has also been reported. However, the roles of these autoantibodies in the pathomechanisms of SPS have not yet been elucidated.

  7. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p coeliac patients on univariate (p coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies.

  8. Diaminodiphenyl Sulfone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia and Alopecia in a Case of Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Eijiro; Kayo, Sato-Jin; Nakano, Hajime; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sawamura, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease characterized by subepidermal blistering induced by IgA autoantibodies against several autoantigens in the basal membranous zone of the skin and mucosal tissue. Although diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), also known as dapsone, is generally recognized as the first-line therapy for LABD, DDS can induce several severe side effects. We present a Japanese case of LABD with DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and alopecia. In the present case, the DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and hair loss made the DDS monotherapy difficult. When DDS is used in LABD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), hemolytic anemia is concealed by IDA. It is thus necessary to carefully and frequently examine the laboratory data to find the signs of DDS-induced hemolytic anemia. Even though there is no literature on DDS-induced alopecia, alopecia was reported as one of the side effects of DDS in an FDA report, and, in our case, hair loss was improved after reducing its dosage. We have to recognize that alopecia is one of the side effects of DDS and that careful management is needed in order not to overlook the adverse side effects of DDS when treating LABD patients.

  9. Diaminodiphenyl Sulfone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia and Alopecia in a Case of Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Akasaka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease characterized by subepidermal blistering induced by IgA autoantibodies against several autoantigens in the basal membranous zone of the skin and mucosal tissue. Although diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS, also known as dapsone, is generally recognized as the first-line therapy for LABD, DDS can induce several severe side effects. We present a Japanese case of LABD with DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and alopecia. In the present case, the DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and hair loss made the DDS monotherapy difficult. When DDS is used in LABD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA, hemolytic anemia is concealed by IDA. It is thus necessary to carefully and frequently examine the laboratory data to find the signs of DDS-induced hemolytic anemia. Even though there is no literature on DDS-induced alopecia, alopecia was reported as one of the side effects of DDS in an FDA report, and, in our case, hair loss was improved after reducing its dosage. We have to recognize that alopecia is one of the side effects of DDS and that careful management is needed in order not to overlook the adverse side effects of DDS when treating LABD patients.

  10. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  11. Autoantibody Standardization in the Netherlands The Past, the Present, and the Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Derksen, Ronald; Hamann, Dorte; Hooijkaas, Herbert; Klasen, Ina; Kallenberg, Cees; Limburg, Pieter; Smeenk, Ruud; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2009-01-01

    Several initiatives have been undertaken, independent of the European Autoantibody Standardization Initiative (EASI), to standardize autoantibodies in the Netherlands. The Dutch EASI team has made an inventory of which initiatives on autoantibody standardization are already available and what future

  12. The Unexplored Roles of Human Serum IgA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ka Wai

    2014-01-01

    The roles of human serum IgA, in contrast to that of mucosal IgA, are relatively unexplored. Previous studies have shown that IgA mediates either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects in innate immune cells. Serum IgA has been shown to interact with many proteins and glycoproteins of which the functions and mechanisms are not fully characterized. Here, we present fresh perspectives into the roles of serum IgA, describing novel IgA–protein interactions, the importance of its glycosylation status in normal functions, and the plausible role of IgA as a driver and regulator of autoimmune diseases/immune overactivation. Other potential roles, including the regulation of cytokines, effector cell function, and homeostasis, are considered in view of the maintenance of immune function. We anticipate future research to uncover new anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory roles of human serum IgA in immune functions and dysfunctions, with implications on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PMID:25188736

  13. Phase Field Modeling Using PetIGA

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe A.

    2013-06-01

    Phase field modeling has become a widely used framework in the computational material science community. Its ability to model different problems by defining appropriate phase field parameters and relating it to a free energy functional makes it highly versatile. Thermodynamically consistent partial differential equations can then be generated by assuming dissipative dynamics, and setting up the problem as one of minimizing this free energy. The equations are nonetheless challenging to solve, and having a highly efficient and parallel framework to solve them is necessary. In this work, a brief review on phase field models is given, followed by a short analysis of the Phase Field Crystal Model solved with Isogeometric Analysis us- ing PetIGA. We end with an introduction to a new modeling concept, where free energy functions are built with a periodic equilibrium structure in mind.

  14. Development of Type 1 Diabetes in Wild Bank Voles Associated With Islet Autoantibodies and the Novel Ljungan Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, Bo; Heller, Knud Erik; Schønecker, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    Clethrionomys Glareolus, Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Autoantibodies, IA-2 Autoantibodies, Insulin Autoantibodies, Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Ljungan Virus, Parechovirus, Picorna Virus......Clethrionomys Glareolus, Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Autoantibodies, IA-2 Autoantibodies, Insulin Autoantibodies, Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Ljungan Virus, Parechovirus, Picorna Virus...

  15. IgA Cutaneous Purpura Post-Renal Transplantation in a Patient With Long-Standing IgA Nephropathy: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodian, Bahman; Robert, Janet; Mahmood, Muhammad N; Yacyshyn, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis is a small-vessel vasculitis caused by deposition of IgA antibodies in tissues. IgA nephropathy and IgAV have long been considered related conditions. To assess the prevalence and implications of new-onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) after renal transplant in patients with underlying IgA nephropathy. The PubMed database was searched for keywords such as IgAV, IgA vasculitis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, HSP, IgA nephropathy, and renal transplant. Two cases of new-onset IgA vasculitis post-renal transplant after stopping the prednisone or receiving seasonal influenza vaccine have been reported. We report the case of new-onset IgA cutaneous vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with IgA nephropathy after reduction in his prednisone dosage. The new development of cutaneous IgA vasculitis is unusual in renal transplant patients with IgA nephropathy. Despite these patients' being immunosuppressed, the presence of IgA vasculitis could signal the recurrence of IgA nephropathy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Serum autoantibodies directed against transglutaminase-2 have a low avidity compared with alloantibodies against gliadin in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, K A; Drop, A C A D; Trouw, L A; Bontkes, H J; Bouma, G; van Hoogstraten, I M W; von Blomberg, B M E

    2014-07-01

    Coeliac disease is characterized by intolerance to gliadin and related gluten components present in wheat, barley and rye. Coeliac disease patients harbour antibodies directed against alloantigens such as gliadin, but also against the autoantigen transglutaminase-2 (TG2). The type and quality of antibody responses provides insight into the underlying immune activation processes. Therefore, in this study we have analysed the avidity of the antibody response directed against the autoantigen TG2 and compared this with antibody responses against the alloantigens gliadin and Escherichia coli. We observed that the immunoglobulin (Ig)A autoantibody response directed against TG2 is of low avidity compared with the IgA response against the alloantigens gliadin and E. coli in the same patients; the same was true for IgG, both in IgA-deficient and in -sufficient coeliac patients. The observed avidities appear not to be related to disease stage, antibody levels, age or duration of exposure to gluten. In conclusion, in coeliac disease there is a clear difference in avidity of the antibody responses directed against the auto- and alloantigens, indicating different regulation or site of initiation of these responses.

  17. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M;

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  18. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  19. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Measurement of multiple autoantibodies aids in the diagnosis of autoimmune disorders (disease produced when... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Neder; Daniel A. Rondon; Silvana S. Cury; Clovis A. da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia), musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis), and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were perfor...

  1. Regulatory and pathogenetic mechanisms of autoantibodies in SLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radic, M.; Herrmann, M.; Vlag, J. van der; Rekvig, O.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the 53 years since the discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus [1, 2, 3] , recalcitrant questions have been pondered and possible answers have been debated. The discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies presented many puzzles: How is immunological tolerance to native B-form DNA broken? What elic

  2. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  3. Infliximab-induced autoantibodies: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, João Luiz Pereira; Fernandes, Vander; Nogueira, Felipe; Arnóbio, Adriano; Levy, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess autoantibody incidence in patients treated with infliximab for various diseases, and the development of autoimmune diseases using a multicenter, longitudinal, open-label, phase IV observational study. All patients received anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) according to local treatment guidelines. The autoantibodies assessed before and after infliximab treatment were ANA, anti-Sm, anti-dsDNA, anticardiolipin IgM/IgG, anti-Scl70, anti-centromere B, anti-chromatin, anti-ribosomal P, anti-Sm-RNP, anti-RNP A, anti-RNP 68 kD, anti-La/SSB, anti-Ro/SSA 52 kD and 60 kD, and anti-Jo1. ANA was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells (INOVA); the remaining was assessed using BioPlexTM 2200. The Fisher exact test, Wilcoxon test, and the McNemar were used when appropriate.Two hundred eighty-six patients were included (139 with rheumatoid arthritis, 77 with ankylosing spondylitis, 29 with inflammatory bowel disease, 27 with psoriatic arthritis, and 14 with psoriasis), 167 females and 119 males, with mean age of 46.3 years. Subjects received at least five infusions of infliximab (6-month treatment). A significant difference was observed in antinuclear antibody (ANA) detection between samplings (p = 0.001). Among patients that had ANA before treatment (n = 92), six became ANA-negative, 48 had increased titers, 29 maintained, and nine decreased titers after treatment; a total of 186 patients had a positive ANA after treatment. Fine speckled nuclear pattern was most commonly observed (both before and after infliximab treatment). The number of patients with anti-dsDNA had a statistically significant increase (p = 0.003). No significant differences were noted for anticardiolipin and the remaining autoantibodies tested. Among the 286 patients included in the study, only one (0.35 %) showed clinical signs of drug-induced lupus, presenting elevated ANA and anti-dsDNA titers that normalized once treatment was

  4. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of MUC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    The most cost-effective blood-based, noninvasive molecular early cancer biomarkers are based on p53 epitopes and MUC1 tandem repeats. Here we use dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis to compare the two distinct and comparable probes, which examine different sections of the autoantibody population, achieving combined sensitivities of order 50%. We explain the experimental observation that glycosylation does not enhance, and can depress, the sensitivity of MUC1 tandem repeat biomarkers. We propose a possible supplementary MUC1 epitope in the SEA region outside the tandem repeats.

  5. Working mechanism of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease: cleavage of IgA1 antibody to Neisseria meningitidis PorA requires de novo synthesis of IgA1 Protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidarsson, G; Overbeeke, N; Stemerding, AM

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis secretes a protease that specifically cleaves the hinge region of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), releasing the effector (Fc) domain of IgA1 from the antigen binding (Fab) determinants. Theoretically, the remaining Fab fragments can block pathogen receptors or toxins and still...... provide protection. Here, we describe binding of V-gene-matched human IgA1 and IgA2 to PorA of strain H44/76. On live meningococci, efficient cleavage of IgA1, but not cleavage of IgA2, was observed, and up to approximately 80% of the IgA1 Fc tails were lost from the meningococcal surface within 30 min....... No cleavage of IgA1 was found on an isogenic H44/76 strain lacking IgA1 protease. Furthermore, our data indicate that PorA-bound IgA1 is masked by the serogroup B polysaccharide capsule, rendering the IgA1 less accessible to degradation by secreted IgA1 protease present in the bacterial surroundings...

  6. Cognitive functions and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoantibodies may occur in the course of various diseases. In the case of systemic lupus erythematosus the presence of specific autoantibodies is included in the classification criteria of the disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of the serologic markers of systemic lupus erythematosus, i.e. anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies of the class IgM and IgG are linked with the results of neuropsychological tests evaluating selected cognitive functions in patients without overt neuropsychiatric lupus and without antiphospholipid syndrome. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. For the assessment of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies the immunoenzymatic method was used. For neuropsychological estimation of the selected cognitive functions the attention switching test and the choice reaction time were applied, in which the results are expressed as the average delay i.e. mean correct latency, using the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB. Results: The results of attention switching test in patients with anti-Sm antibodies were lower, but not significantly different from those obtained by the patients without such antibodies: 75.0 (73.12–88.12 vs. 92.5 (85–95. Choice reaction time was significantly longer in patients with anti-Sm antibodies in comparison to the patients without antiSm antibodies: 614.9 (520.6–740.8 vs. 476.7 (396.6–540 (p = 0.01. No significant difference was demonstrated in the results of attention switching test and choice reaction time with regard to the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies. The results of attention switching test and choice reaction time were not different between the groups of patients with and without anticardiolipin antibodies in the IgM and IgG class. Conclusions: Anti-Sm antibodies seem to contribute to

  7. Linear IgA dermatosis induced by pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Telma Kanagusuko; Valéria Aoki; Antonio José Tebcherani; Ana Paula Galli Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    A dermatose por IgA linear é doença bolhosa auto-imune subepidérmica rara, caracterizada pelo depósito linear de IgA na zona da membrana basal da epiderme. Nos relatos de gestação em pacientes com essa dermatose, nota-se sempre melhora do quadro clínico. Contrariando essas observações,é apresentado caso de dermatose por IgA linear induzida pela gestação, que demonstrou boa resposta terapêutica à dapsona e prednisona , sem complicações materno-fetais.Linear IgA disease is a rare autoimmune sub...

  8. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis with IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Morr, H; Behr, J

    2004-12-22

    Up to now only 3 cases of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) with IgA deficiency have been published worldwide. We had the opportunity to detect two additional cases which will be presented here. Summarizing all cases IgA deficiency is a risk factor for a severe course of the disease and an increased susceptibility to acquire allergic alveolitis by low dose antigen exposure.

  9. Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgA in Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arco, Christina; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Arnaboldi, Paul M

    2017-05-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease is currently dependent on the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of the disease. The significance of serum IgA against B. burgdorferi remains unclear. The production of intrathecal IgA has been noted in patients with the late Lyme disease manifestation, neuroborreliosis, but production of antigen-specific IgA during early disease has not been evaluated. In the current study, we assessed serum IgA binding to the B. burgdorferi peptide antigens, C6, the target of the FDA-cleared C6 EIA, and FlaB(211-223)-modVlsE(275-291), a peptide containing a Borrelia flagellin epitope linked to a modified VlsE sequence, in patients with early and late Lyme disease. Specific IgA was detected in 59 of 152 serum samples (38.8%) from early Lyme disease patients. Approximately 50% of early Lyme disease patients who were seropositive for peptide-specific IgM and/or IgG were also seropositive for peptide-specific IgA. In a subpopulation of patients, high peptide-specific IgA could be correlated with disseminated disease, defined as multiple erythema migrans lesions, and neurological disease complications. These results suggest that there may be an association between elevated levels of antigen-specific IgA and particular disease manifestations in some patients with early Lyme disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgA in Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina D'Arco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease is currently dependent on the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of the disease. The significance of serum IgA against B. burgdorferi remains unclear. The production of intrathecal IgA has been noted in patients with the late Lyme disease manifestation, neuroborreliosis, but production of antigen-specific IgA during early disease has not been evaluated. In the current study, we assessed serum IgA binding to the B. burgdorferi peptide antigens, C6, the target of the FDA-cleared C6 EIA, and FlaB(211-223-modVlsE(275-291, a peptide containing a Borrelia flagellin epitope linked to a modified VlsE sequence, in patients with early and late Lyme disease. Specific IgA was detected in 59 of 152 serum samples (38.8% from early Lyme disease patients. Approximately 50% of early Lyme disease patients who were seropositive for peptide-specific IgM and/or IgG were also seropositive for peptide-specific IgA. In a subpopulation of patients, high peptide-specific IgA could be correlated with disseminated disease, defined as multiple erythema migrans lesions, and neurological disease complications. These results suggest that there may be an association between elevated levels of antigen-specific IgA and particular disease manifestations in some patients with early Lyme disease.

  11. Generalized linear IgA dermatosis with palmar involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Ivy N; Haeberle, M Tye; Callen, Jeffrey P.; Malone, Janine C

    2015-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a sub-epidermal blistering disorder characterized by deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone (BMZ) as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. The diagnosis is made by clinicopathologic correlation with immunofluorescence confirmation. Differentiation from other bullous dermatoses is important because therapeutic measures differ. Prompt initiation of the appropriate therapies can have a major impact on outcomes. We present three cases with ...

  12. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  13. The Gastrointestinal Frontier: IgA and Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blutt, Sarah E.; Conner, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis is one of the leading causes of diseases that kill ~2.2 million people worldwide each year. IgA is one of the major immune effector products present in the gastrointestinal tract yet its importance in protection against gastrointestinal viral infections has been difficult to prove. In part this has been due to a lack of small and large animal models in which pathogenesis of and immunity to gastrointestinal viral infections is similar to that in humans. Much of what we have learned about the role of IgA in the intestinal immune response has been obtained from experimental animal models of rotavirus infection. Rotavirus-specific intestinal IgA appears to be one of the principle effectors of long term protection against rotavirus infection. Thus, there has been a focus on understanding the immunological pathways through which this virus-specific IgA is induced during infection. In addition, the experimental animal models of rotavirus infection provide excellent systems in which new areas of research on viral-specific intestinal IgA including the long term maintenance of viral-specific IgA. PMID:24348474

  14. IgA- and SIgA anti-PR3 antibodies in serum versus organ involvement and disease activity in PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, C; Eriksson, P; Segelmark, M; Skogh, T; Kastbom, A

    2016-05-01

    Circulating immunoglobulin (Ig)A class anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) have been reported in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with mucosal involvement. However, secretory IgA (SIgA) PR3-ANCA has not been reported previously. In this study we compared serum levels of SIgA PR3-ANCA and IgA PR3-ANCA with IgG PR3-ANCA in relation to disease characteristics. Among 73 patients with AAV and PR3-ANCA at diagnosis, 84% tested positive for IgG PR3-ANCA, 47% for IgA-ANCA and 36% for SIgA PR3-ANCA at the time of sampling for the present study. IgA and IgG PR3-ANCA were represented similarly among patients with different organ manifestations, i.e. upper airway, lung or kidney at time of sampling. However, SIgA PR3-ANCA was significantly less represented among patients with upper airway involvement. During active disease, the proportions of IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA-positive patients were significantly higher compared to inactive disease. Eight patients were sampled prospectively during 24 months from onset of active disease. In these patients, IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA turned negative more often after remission induction compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Our findings suggest that serum IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA are related more closely to disease activity in AAV compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Further studies are required to reveal if this has implications for disease activity monitoring. The mean number of PR3-ANCA isotypes increased along with disease activity, suggesting a global B cell activation during active disease.

  15. CCR6 Deficiency Impairs IgA Production and Dysregulates Antimicrobial Peptide Production, Altering the Intestinal Flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Lin; Ip, Peng-Peng; Liao, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal immunity exists as a complex relationship among immune cells, epithelial cells, and microbiota. CCR6 and its ligand–CCL20 are highly expressed in intestinal mucosal tissues, such as Peyer’s patches (PPs) and isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs). In this study, we investigated the role of the CCR6–CCL20 axis in intestinal immunity under homeostatic conditions. CCR6 deficiency intrinsically affects germinal center reactions in PPs, leading to impairments in IgA class switching, IgA affinity, and IgA memory B cell production and positioning in PPs, suggesting an important role for CCR6 in T-cell-dependent IgA generation. CCR6 deficiency impairs the maturation of ILFs. In these follicles, group 3 innate lymphoid cells are important components and a major source of IL-22, which stimulates intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We found that CCR6 deficiency reduces IL-22 production, likely due to diminished numbers of group 3 innate lymphoid cells within small-sized ILFs. The reduced IL-22 levels subsequently decrease the production of AMPs, suggesting a critical role for CCR6 in innate intestinal immunity. Finally, we found that CCR6 deficiency impairs the production of IgA and AMPs, leading to increased levels of Alcaligenes in PPs, and segmented filamentous bacteria in IECs. Thus, the CCR6–CCL20 axis plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal symbiosis by limiting the overgrowth of mucosa-associated commensal bacteria. PMID:28744287

  16. Recombinant human immunoglobulin (Ig)A1 and IgA2 anti-D used for detection of IgA deficiency and anti-IgA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2008-01-01

    To avoid anaphylactic reactions, immunoglobulin (Ig)A-deficient patients with anti-IgA should be transfused with IgA-deficient blood components. There is a need for fast and robust assays for demonstration of IgA deficiency and for detection of anti-IgA.......To avoid anaphylactic reactions, immunoglobulin (Ig)A-deficient patients with anti-IgA should be transfused with IgA-deficient blood components. There is a need for fast and robust assays for demonstration of IgA deficiency and for detection of anti-IgA....

  17. Working mechanism of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease: cleavage of IgA1 antibody to Neisseria meningitidis PorA requires de novo synthesis of IgA1 Protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidarsson, G; Overbeeke, N; Stemerding, AM

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis secretes a protease that specifically cleaves the hinge region of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), releasing the effector (Fc) domain of IgA1 from the antigen binding (Fab) determinants. Theoretically, the remaining Fab fragments can block pathogen receptors or toxins and still....... No cleavage of IgA1 was found on an isogenic H44/76 strain lacking IgA1 protease. Furthermore, our data indicate that PorA-bound IgA1 is masked by the serogroup B polysaccharide capsule, rendering the IgA1 less accessible to degradation by secreted IgA1 protease present in the bacterial surroundings....... Experiments with protein synthesis inhibitors showed that de novo production of IgA1 protease was responsible for cleavage of PorA-bound IgA1 on encapsulated bacteria. Finally, our data suggest that cleavage of IgA1 by IgA1 protease releases a significant proportion of Fab fragments from the bacterium...

  18. Autoantibodies, histocompatibility antigens and testosterone in males with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Tage-Jensen, Ulrik Viggo; Bahnsen, M

    1981-01-01

    Titres and immunoglobulin classes of autoantibodies were examined in 69 male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the findings were related to particular human leucocyte antigens and serum concentration of testosterone. Both anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA...... had higher titres of ANA (n.s.) and SMA (P less than 0.05) than patients without these HLA antigens. Serum concentrations of testosterone were significantly lower in ANA-positive patients than in those negative (P less than 0.05), and a similar tendency was found in SMA-positive patients...

  19. IgA anti-Actin antibodies in children with celiac disease: comparison of immunofluorescence with Elisa assay in predicting severe intestinal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of serum IgA antibodies against actin filaments (AAA in patients with celiac disease (CD is strongly associated with mucosal damage and severe degrees of villous atrophy. The aims of the present study were (1 to verify the effectiveness of IgA-AAA in newly diagnosed CD patients in a clinical setting (2 to compare the immunofluorescence assay with ELISA assay; (3 to compare the correlation of our IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab class with mucosal intestinal lesions. Methods 90 patients underwent endoscopy and multiple biopsies for suspected CD on the basis of symptoms, in presence of positive tTG-Ab tests. Twenty biopsied and 25 not-biopsied subjects with negative tTG-Ab were tested as control groups. IgA-AAA assays were performed by indirect immunofluorescence using rat epithelial intestinal cells, and by ELISA with a commercial kit. tTG-Ab assay was a radio-binding assay. Intestinal specimens were collected by upper endoscopy and the histological study was done according to the Marsh's classification modified by Oberhuber (M/O. Auto-antibodies assays and histological evaluation have been performed blindly by skilled operators. Results CD diagnosis was confirmed in 82 patients (type I M/O in 2 patients, IIIA in 18 patients, IIIB in 29 patients and IIIC in 33 patients. Two patients with type 1 lesion in presence of positive tTG-Ab and abdominal complaints, started a gluten free diet. The rate of IgA-AAA positivity (sensitivity by IFI and ELISA in histologically proven celiac disease patients, were 5.5% and 25% patients in IIIA, 27.5% and 34.4% patients in IIIB, 78.8% and 75% in IIIC patients, respectively. Patients with normal or nearly normal mucosa, regardless of tTG-Ab status, presented negative IgA-AAA IFI assay. On the other hand, 1 patient with normal mucosa but positive tTG-Ab, also presented positive IgA-AAA ELISA. All healthy non biopsied

  20. IgA nephropathy: A clinicopathologic study from two centers in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawajah Azhar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 42 patients, who were diagnosed to have primary Immunoglobulin A neph-ropathy (IgAN at the King Abdul Aziz University Hospital and King Faisal Hospital, Jeddah over the last seven years, were studied. The objective was to analyze their clinical and pathological fea-tures and to classify them according to Hass Classification by using light, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Majority of the study cases were males in the second, third and fourth decades of life. Hematuria was the most common clinical complaint followed by proteinuria. There were varying degrees of mesangial proliferation. Majority of the cases presented with class-2 followed by class-3. Immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse granular deposition of IgA in the glomerular mesangium in majority of the cases. Ultrastructural analysis showed electron dense deposits within the matrix of the mesangium and paramesangium in majority of the cases. Sub-endothelial deposits and mesangial interposition were demonstrated in few cases. Extensive effacement with fusion of the visceral epithelial foot processes was detected in only few patients while focal effacement was demonstrated in many cases. Irregularities of the glomerular basement membrane were seen in some cases. We conclude that IgA nephropathy is an immune-complex glomerular disease, which occurs at all ages and with higher frequency in males and presents mostly with hematuria and proteinuria. Public health awareness is seriously needed to perform the investigations at an early stage.

  1. The role of autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derksen, V F A M; Huizinga, T W J; van der Woude, D

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation. The presence of autoantibodies in the sera of RA patients has provided many clues to the underlying disease pathophysiology. Based on the presence of several autoantibodies like rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP), and more recently anti-acetylated protein antibodies RA can be subdivided into seropositive and seronegative disease. The formation of these autoantibodies is associated with both genetic and environmental risk factors for RA, like specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and smoking. Autoantibodies can be detected many years before disease onset in a subset of patients, suggesting a sequence of events in which the first autoantibodies develop in predisposed hosts, before an inflammatory response ensues leading to clinically apparent arthritis. Research on the characteristics and effector functions of these autoantibodies might provide more insight in pathophysiological processes underlying arthritis in RA. Recent data suggests that ACPA might play a role in perpetuating inflammation once it has developed. Furthermore, pathophysiological mechanisms have been discovered supporting a direct link between the presence of ACPA and both bone erosions and pain in RA patients. In conclusion, investigating the possible pathogenic potential of autoantibodies might lead to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiological processes in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. A necessidade da imunofluorescência direta no diagnóstico da dermatose bolhosa por IgA The need for direct immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of IgA bullous dermatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Chang

    2012-01-01

    A dermatose bolhosa por imunoglobulina da classe A linear (DbIgA) do adulto é uma doença autoimune rara caracterizada por formação de bolhas subepidérmicas e depósito linear de imunoglobulina da classe A (IgA) na zona da membrana basal (ZMB). Por possuir aspectos clínicos e histológicos semelhantes a outras dermatoses bolhosas, principalmente a dermatite herpetiforme e o penfigoide bolhoso, faz-se necessária a realização de imunofluorescência direta para confirmação diagnóstica. Apresenta-se ...

  3. Autoantibody profile and other immunological parameters in recurrent spontaneous abortion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Shankarkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An autoimmune cause and related immunological alterations resulting in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA have been suggested in patients with unknown etiology. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated the autoantibody profile and other immunological parameters among RSA patients and normal pregnant women from Mumbai western India. Fifty RSA patients with unknown cause and greater than three consecutive abortions along with 50 normal pregnant women were studied for various auto antibodies such as ANA, anti-dsDNA, ANCA, AECA, 2 micro globulin, anti-HLA antibodies and ACLA using immunofluorescence microlymphocytotoxicity and ELISA. Immunological parameters such as HLA class I monoclonal antibody expression, CD3 (T cell, CD19 (B cell, and CD56 (NK cell were estimated by flow cytometry. Results: The results revealed 34% positivity of all auto antibodies tested among patients. ANA(12%, ANCA (20%, AECA (24%, ACLA (8%, anti-dsDNA(0%, β2 microglobulin (14%, and anti-HLA antibodies(10% among RSA patients were identified. An increased expression of HLA class I specific monoclonal antibody (10% with HLA A3 (16% specificity were found to correlate with shared HLA alleles among the RSA couples. Among normal pregnant (control group ANA (2%, ANCA (2%, AECA (3%, ACLA (4% and increased expression of CD56 with reduced HLA class I monoclonal were observed. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a possible role of various autoantibodies along with the related immunological parameters underlying RSA.

  4. Dermatomyositis and polymyositis: Clinical presentation, autoantibodies, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Andrew L

    2010-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) are autoimmune myopathies characterized clinically by proximal muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, extramuscular manifestations, and frequently, the presence of autoantibodies. Although there is some overlap, DM and PM are separate diseases with different pathophysiological mechanisms. Furthermore, unique clinical phenotypes are associated with each of the myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) associated with these disorders. This review will focus on the clinical features, pathology, and immunogenetics of PM and DM with an emphasis on the importance of autoantibodies in defining unique phenotypes and, perhaps, as clues to help elucidate the mechanisms of disease.

  5. Testing for IgG class antibodies in celiac disease patients with selective IgA deficiency. A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of 9 IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase, 1 IgG anti-gliadin and 1 IgG anti-deaminated gliadin peptide antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Danilo; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Tampoia, Marilina; Tonutti, Elio; Brusca, Ignazio; Bagnasco, Marcello; Pesce, Giampaola; Stella, Sergio; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic characteristics of commercially available IgG anti-tTG assays in selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD), we tested different IgG anti-tTG methods and compared the results with those obtained from two other tests: one for IgG anti-gliadin (AGA) and one for IgG to deaminated gliadin peptides (DGP). 20 CD patients with SIgAD and 113 controls (9 patients with SIgAD without CD; 54 patients with chronic liver disease; 50 healthy subjects) were tested with 9 IgG anti-tTG assays (2 of which are enriched with gliadin peptides), one IgG AGA assay and one IgG anti-DGP assay. Using optimal cutoffs as determined by ROC curves, the sensitivity of IgG anti-tTG methods ranged from 75% (1 kit) to 95% (7 kits) and the specificity from 94% (1 kit) to 100% (5 kits). Sensitivity and specificity were 40% and 87% for IgG AGA, and 80% and 98% for IgG anti-DGP, respectively. All IgG anti-tTG methods evaluated are reliable serologic assays for the diagnosis of CD in patients with SIgAD and perform better than the gliadin-based assays used in this study. The tests containing both tTG and gliadinic peptides are burdened by a lower specificity than the anti-tTG assays.

  6. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. (Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  7. Microbe-dependent CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells mediate robust early-phase intestinal IgA responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Gohda, Masashi; Hashimoto, Eri; Ishikawa, Izumi; Higuchi, Morio; Suzuki, Yuji; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Panea, Casandra; Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Sumiya, Risa; Aayam, Lamichhane; Wake, Taichi; Tajiri, So; Kurashima, Yosuke; Shikata, Shiori; Akira, Shizuo; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal plasma cells predominantly produce immunoglobulin (Ig) A, however, their functional diversity remains poorly characterized. Here we show that murine intestinal IgA plasma cells can be newly classified into two populations on the basis of CD11b expression, which cannot be discriminated by currently known criteria such as general plasma cell markers, B cell origin and T cell dependence. CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells require the lymphoid structure of Peyer’s patches, produce more IgA than CD11b− IgA+ plasma cells, proliferate vigorously, and require microbial stimulation and IL-10 for their development and maintenance. These features allow CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells to mediate early-phase antigen-specific intestinal IgA responses induced by oral immunization with protein antigen. These findings reveal the functional diversity of IgA+ plasma cells in the murine intestine. PMID:23612313

  8. IgA 肾病患者 IgA1糖基化异常及其致病机制%The pathopoiesis mechanism of abnormal IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林淑芃

    2015-01-01

    IgA 肾病(IgAN)是导致终末期肾病最常见的原发性肾小球疾病。其病理特点为 IgA1在肾小球系膜区沉积,IgA1分子的异常糖基化是导致 IgAN 发病的关键因素。多种与 IgAN 相关的基因位点已经被发现。这些基因编码的细胞因子参与了 IgA1糖基化异常的发病机制。此外糖基化酶缺乏、分子伴侣甲基化异常都可能导致 IgA1异常糖基化。异常糖基化的 IgA1可通过自我聚集或形成免疫复合物沉积于系膜区,进而刺激系膜细胞增殖、分泌系膜基质、细胞因子、趋化因子、生长因子等,导致肾小球损伤。对 IgA1异常糖基化的深入研究有助于了解 IgA 肾病的发病机制并提供新的诊断与治疗措施。%IgA nephropathy (IgAN)is the most common primary glomerular disease that can result in end-stage renal disease,and is histologically characterized by the deposition of IgA1 in the glomerular mesangium.The abnormal IgA1 glycosylation is the key factor in the pathogenesis of IgAN.Multiple genetic loci associated with IgAN have been identified,and the cytokines coded by them are involved in the pathopoiesis mechanism of abnormal IgA1 glycosylation.In addition,the lack of glycosylase and abnormal methylation of molecular chaperone may also be involved in the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1.Abnormally glycosylated IgA1 can deposit in the mesangium through their own assembly together or formation of immunocomplex,which can subsequently stimulate mesangial cell proliferation and secretion of extracellular matrix,cytokines,chemokines,and growth factors,etc,leading to glomerular injury.In-depth research on IgA1 abnormal glycosylation will help to understand the pathogenesis of IgAN and provide new diagnosis and treatment methods.

  9. Autoantibodies against small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes and their clinical associations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Vogelzangs, J.H.P.; Bisschops, L.L.A.; Boome, L.C. te; Seelig, H.P.; Renz, M.; Brouwer, R.; Pluk, W.L.L.P.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Rooij, D.J.R.A.M. de; Pruijn, G.J.M.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van

    2002-01-01

    Sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) have been shown to contain reactivities to nuclear components. Autoantibodies specifically targeting nucleolar antigens are found most frequently in patients

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  11. Clinical and Pathological Roles of Ro/SSA Autoantibody System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are among the most frequently detected autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens and have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS. Although the presence of these autoantibodies is one of the criteria for the diagnosis and classification of SS, they are also sometimes seen in other systemic autoimmune diseases. In the last few decades, the knowledge of the prevalence of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in various autoimmune diseases and symptoms has been expanded, and the clinical importance of these antibodies is increasing. Nonetheless, the pathological role of the antibodies is still poorly understood. In this paper, we summarize the milestones of the anti-Ro/SSA autoantibody system and provide new insights into the association between the autoantibodies and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  13. Autoantibodies against GPIHBP1 as a Cause of Hypertriglyceridemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beigneux, Anne P; Miyashita, Kazuya; Ploug, Michael

    2017-01-01

    lipoprotein lipase from reaching the capillary lumen. Patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency have low plasma levels of lipoprotein lipase, impaired intravascular hydrolysis of triglycerides, and severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia). During the characterization of a monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay...... autoantibodies had a response to treatment with immunosuppressive agents. CONCLUSIONS: In six patients with chylomicronemia, GPIHBP1 autoantibodies blocked the ability of GPIHBP1 to bind and transport lipoprotein lipase, thereby interfering with lipoprotein lipase-mediated processing of triglyceride...

  14. Uncoupling of glomerular IgA deposition and disease progression in alymphoplasia mice with IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Aizawa

    Full Text Available Previous clinical and experimental studies have indicated that cells responsible for IgA nephropathy (IgAN, at least in part, are localized in bone marrow (BM. Indeed, we have demonstrated that murine IgAN can be experimentally reconstituted by bone marrow transplantation (BMT from IgAN prone mice in not only normal mice, but also in alymphoplasia mice (aly/aly independent of IgA+ cells homing to mucosa or secondary lymphoid tissues. The objective of the present study was to further assess whether secondary lymph nodes (LN contribute to the progression of this disease. BM cells from the several lines of IgAN prone mice were transplanted into aly/aly and wild-type mice (B6. Although the transplanted aly/aly showed the same degree of mesangial IgA and IgG deposition and the same serum elevation levels of IgA and IgA-IgG immune-complexes (IC as B6, even in extent, the progression of glomerular injury was observed only in B6. This uncoupling in aly/aly was associated with a lack of CD4+ T cells and macrophage infiltration, although phlogogenic capacity to nephritogenic IC of renal resident cells was identical between both recipients. It is suggested that secondary LN may be required for the full progression of IgAN after nephritogenic IgA and IgA/IgG IC deposition.

  15. [Linear IgA bullous dermatosis of childhood: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Baraona, Francisco; Andino, Romina; Carrasco, Juan Eduardo; Arriagada, Camila; Guerrero, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare acquired autoinmune vesiculobullous disease characterized by linear IgA deposit on the dermo-epidermal basement membrane observed with direct inmunofluorescence. The characteristic lesions are vesicles and tense serous bullae, which most often are grouped giving a "cluster of jewels" appearance. Differential diagnosis must be established with other autoimmune dermatosis, such as dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid. Dapsone is the first line therapy, with excellent response in a short period. This is a benign disease that tends to wax and wane in severity until it disappears spontaneously. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl presenting with bullous lesions, being diagnosed a linear IgA bullous dermatosis, with excellent response to dapsone in less than 2 weeks.

  16. Minimal change disease versus IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabur, Wael Latif

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common type of the glomerulonephritis all over the world. However, its clinical presentation is variable, as is the underlying histopathological lesion. We report herein a case of an adult with steroid responsive minimal change disease and IgA mesangial deposits. During the first two weeks of therapy with prednisolone, the patient reported dramatic improvement in his clinical condition and remitted his disease. Unfortunately, at the end of the second month of prednisolone therapy, an acute flare of viral hepatitis was diagnosed. Interes-tingly, the acute viral flare was without a concomitant relapse of proteinuria.

  17. Minimal change disease versus IgA nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabur Wael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common type of the glomerulonephritis all over the world. However, its clinical presentation is variable, as is the underlying histopathological lesion. We report herein a case of an adult with steroid responsive minimal change disease and IgA mesangial deposits. During the first two weeks of therapy with prednisolone, the patient reported dramatic improvement in his clinical condition and remitted his disease. Unfortunately, at the end of the second month of prednisolone therapy, an acute flare of viral hepatitis was diagnosed. Interes-tingly, the acute viral flare was without a concomitant relapse of proteinuria.

  18. Generalized linear IgA dermatosis with palmar involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ivy N; Haeberle, M Tye; Callen, Jeffrey P; Malone, Janine C

    2015-09-17

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a sub-epidermal blistering disorder characterized by deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone (BMZ) as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. The diagnosis is made by clinicopathologic correlation with immunofluorescence confirmation. Differentiation from other bullous dermatoses is important because therapeutic measures differ. Prompt initiation of the appropriate therapies can have a major impact on outcomes. We present three cases with prominent palmar involvement to alert the clinician of this potential physical exam finding and to consider LABD in the right context.

  19. [Linear IgA bullous dermatosis of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierchalla, A; Bruch-Gerharz, D; Homey, B; Reifenberger, J

    2011-04-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is an acquired autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease, characterized by linear IgA deposits at the basement membrane zone. Described in both children and adults, it occurs as tense pruritic vesicles and bullae in a "cluster of jewels" configuration with central crusting on an inflammatory elevated base. It is typically located on the face, anogenital region and trunk. Whilst the adult manifestations can be chronic, in children a spontaneous remission has often been reported. Our patient showed a spontaneous remission after 8 weeks of symptomatic topic treatment with methylprednisolone and oral cetirizine dihydrochloride.

  20. Isogeometric Analysis of Hyperelastic Materials Using PetIGA

    KAUST Repository

    Bernal, L.M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work different nonlinear hyperelastic models for slightly compressible materials are implemented in an isogeometric finite element model. This is done within the recently developed computational framework called PetIGA, which uses isoge- ometric analysis and modern computational tools to solve systems of equations directly and iteratively. A flexible theoretical background is described to implement other hyperelastic models and possibly transient problems in future work. Results show quadratic convergence of the nonlinear solution consistent with the Newton-Raphson method that was used. Finally, PetIGA proves to be a powerful and versatile tool to solve these types of problems efficiently.

  1. Gluten and IgA nephropathy: you are what you eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chee Kay; Barratt, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Although extensively studied, the relationship between dietary antigens-in particular, gluten-and IgA nephropathy remains unclear. Using a double transgenic mouse model of IgA nephropathy that expresses both human IgA1 and human CD89, Papista et al. report that a gluten-free diet protects against the development of IgA deposition and glomerular injury, and that these events occur with the introduction of dietary gluten.

  2. Linear IgA dermatosis, coeliac disease, and extraintestinal B cell lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, A.; Isaacs, P E; Kelsey, P R

    1995-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis is a malignancy associated rare bullous disorder similar to dermatitis herpetiformis. Linear IgA dermatosis differs from dermatitis herpetiformis in that the IgA deposits in the epidermal basement membrane are linear rather than granular. A patient is presented with coeliac disease who presented with linear IgA dermatosis and anaemia caused by chronic low grade B cell lymphoma.

  3. Circulating Immune Complexes of IgA Bound to Beta 2 Glycoprotein are Strongly Associated with the Occurrence of Acute Thrombotic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, José A.; Serrano, Manuel; Pérez, Dolores; de la Cámara A, Gómez; Lora, David; Morillas, Luis; Ayala, Rosa; Paz-Artal, Estela; Morales, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent thrombosis and/or gestational morbidity in patients with antiphospholipid autoantibodies (aPL). Over recent years, IgA anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (B2GPI) antibodies (IgA aB2GPI) have reached similar clinical relevance as IgG or IgM isotypes. We recently described the presence of immune complexes of IgA bounded to B2GPI (B2A-CIC) in the blood of patients with antecedents of APS symptomalology. However, B2A-CIC's clinical associations with thrombotic events (TEV) have not been described yet. Methods: A total of 145 individuals who were isolate positive for IgA aB2GPI were studied: 50 controls without any APS antecedent, 22 patients with recent TEV (Group-1), and 73 patients with antecedents of old TEV (Group-2). Results: Mean B2A-CIC levels and prevalence in Group-1 were 29.6 ± 4.1 AU and 81.8%, respectively, and were significantly higher than those of Group-2 and controls (p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, positivity of B2A-CIC was an independent variable for acute thrombosis with a 22.7 odd ratio (confidence interval 5.1 –101.6, 95%, p < 0.001). Levels of B2A-CIC dropped significantly two months after the TEV. B2A-CIC positive patients had lower platelet levels than B2A-CIC-negative patients (p < 0.001) and more prevalence of thrombocytopenia (p < 0.019). Group-1 had no significant differences in C3 and C4 levels compared with other groups. Conclusion: B2A-CIC is strongly associated with acute TEV. Patients who did not develop thrombosis and were B2A-CIC positive had lower platelet levels, which suggest a hypercoagulable state. This mechanism is unrelated to complement-fixing aPL. B2A-CIC could potentially select IgA aB2GPI-positive patients at risk of developing a thrombotic event. PMID:27063992

  4. Rheumatoid Rescue of Misfolded Cellular Proteins by MHC Class II Molecules: A New Hypothesis for Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins localized in the endoplasmic reticulum are degraded promptly and thus are not transported outside cells. However, misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are rescued from protein degradation upon association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without being processed to peptides. Studies on the misfolded proteins rescued by MHC class II molecules have revealed that misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules are specific targets for autoantibodies produced in autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, a strong correlation has been observed between autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules and the autoimmune disease susceptibility conferred by each MHC class II allele. These new insights into MHC class II molecules suggest that misfolded proteins rescued from protein degradation by MHC class II molecules are recognized as "neo-self" antigens by immune system and are involved in autoimmune diseases as autoantibody targets.

  5. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodjgani M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoanibodies (ANCA were detecte in patients with certain autoimmune vascular disease such as Wegner’s granulomatosis, polyarthrits nodosa and systemic luuc erythematous. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF technique was employed to detec these autoantibodies.ANCA have been recently detected in some forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, ulcerative colitis (U.C. Crohn’s disease (C.D and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. By IIF method, two general patterns of ANCA were seen: a cytoplasmic (C-ANCA and perinuclear form (P-ANCA. In this study we evaluated the presece of ANCA in 52 U.C. patients and 69 matched normal control group by IIF technique, and it’s relationship with disease activity. Site of colon involvement and, lesion extent. The results showed that all control group were ANCA negative, but 58% of patients had ANCA, and most cases (70% had C- ANCA. The obtained results also revealed that there was no relationship between ANCA and disease activity

  6. Biological variation of thyroid autoantibodies and thyroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Esther; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Blaabjerg, Ole

    2007-01-01

    is unknown, we investigated this in fertile women during one complete regular menstrual cycle. METHODS: A total of 24 healthy women (23-46 years) were investigated twice a week between 07:30 and 11:00 h. Antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb), thyroglobulin (TgAb), and thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) were.......5-258 kIU/L), the CV biological was 11.3%, while the CV analytical was 10.6%. For TgAb (5.6 to 148 kIU/L) CV biological was 8.5% and CV analytical was 9.0%. The woman with TRAb had a CV biological of 4.8%, while the analytical variation in duplicates was 3.9% at a level of 2.8 IU/L. CONCLUSIONS......: It is possible to measure TPOAb and TgAb in all samples with the AutoDELFIA. There is no systematic variation in autoantibodies during the menstrual cycle. The biological coefficient of variation for TPOAb and TgAb was 11.3% and 8.5%, respectively...

  7. Establishment of age-dependent reference values for IgA subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Uwe; Stemberg, Frank; Rieger, Christian H L; Borte, Michael; Schubert, Simone; Riedel, Frank; Herz, Udo; Renz, Harald; Wick, Manfred; Herzog, Wilhelm

    2003-02-01

    Recently, subclass-specific antisera have been introduced for application in a nephelometric assay. The aim of this study was to establish age-dependent reference values for serum concentrations of the two IgA subclasses in children and adults. Serum levels of IgA1 and IgA2 were measured by automated immunonephelometry in samples from 235 clinically healthy children between 6 months and 18 years of age and 36 healthy adults. Both IgA1 and IgA2 were detectable in all samples, and both IgA1 and IgA2 increased with increasing age. In adults, the mean value for IgA1 is 1.46 g/l for IgA2 0.21 g/l and for total IgA 1.94 g/l. Individual IgA2 values correlate significantly (p < 0.0001) with IgA1 values (r(2) = 0.5433). In addition, there was a highly significant (p < 0.0001) correlation (r(2) = 0.9530) between the measured total IgA and the sum of the two IgA subclasses indicating that immunonephelometry using highly specific polyclonal antisera might be superior to other methods. These results and the availability of age-dependent reference values make it worthwhile to reassess the role of IgA subclasses in immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases where conventional methods have led to conflicting results. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Abortide arv kahaneb Eestis iga aastaga / Rebekka Lotman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotman, Rebekka, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Vt. ka Zdorovje dlja Vsehh 2005 märts, lk. 6. Kuigi abortide arv väheneb Eestis iga aastaga, tuleb naistearstide hinnangul oodata veel kümmekond aastat, et see langeks sama madalale tasemele nagu Põhjamaades. Lisaks diagramm abortide arvu kohta 1991-2004

  9. Streikijate armee paisub iga päevaga / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    23. septembril alanud raudteetöötajate streigist osavõtjate arv kasvab iga päevaga, kaubarongid veel liiguvad, kuid kui vajalikke samme ei astuta, võib kogu rongiliiklus seiskuda. Lisa: Ronge asendavad bussid. Vt. ka: Edelaraudtee rendib streigi ajaks bussid

  10. IgA nephropathy: Causes, prognosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Paolo Schena; Diletta Domenica Torres; Giuseppina Cerrullo

    2005-01-01

    @@ IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in many renal biopsy registries and it is very frequent in the Eastern regions of the world, such as China (32,1%), Hong Kong (35%), Japan (47,4% )[1,2].

  11. Streikijate armee paisub iga päevaga / Aivar Reinap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reinap, Aivar, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    23. septembril alanud raudteetöötajate streigist osavõtjate arv kasvab iga päevaga, kaubarongid veel liiguvad, kuid kui vajalikke samme ei astuta, võib kogu rongiliiklus seiskuda. Lisa: Ronge asendavad bussid. Vt. ka: Edelaraudtee rendib streigi ajaks bussid

  12. Abortide arv kahaneb Eestis iga aastaga / Rebekka Lotman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotman, Rebekka, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Vt. ka Zdorovje dlja Vsehh 2005 märts, lk. 6. Kuigi abortide arv väheneb Eestis iga aastaga, tuleb naistearstide hinnangul oodata veel kümmekond aastat, et see langeks sama madalale tasemele nagu Põhjamaades. Lisaks diagramm abortide arvu kohta 1991-2004

  13. Drug-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navi, Daniel; Michael, Daniel J; Fazel, Nasim

    2006-09-08

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to the University of California Davis Medical Center for treatment of a pleural effusion and congestive heart failure. His hospital course was complicated by asymptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia requiring placement of an implantable cardiac defibrillator. The patient was treated with vancomycin and cefazolin during the procedure. After 3 days he developed tense vesicles over the dorsal aspect of the hands. Perilesional skin biopsy showed subepidermal cleavage with a neutrophilic infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence revealed granular IgA and C3 deposition along the dermal epidermal junction. A diagnosis of drug-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis secondary to vancomycin was established. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune blistering disorder with clinical features that can overlap with bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis. Drug-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a less common variant that is correspondingly less well characterized. Although a variety of medications have been implicated, vancomycin is the most common associated drug.

  14. Development of ASSURE® dengue IgA rapid test for the detection of anti-dengue IgA from dengue infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ying Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid and early dengue diagnosis is essential for patient management and early disease intervention. MP Diagnostics ASSURE® Dengue IgA Rapid Test (Dengue IgA RT was developed for the rapid detection of anti-dengue IgA in patients′ biological samples. The performance of Dengue IgA RT was examined using multiple categories of well-characterized samples. Materials and Methods: Dengue IgA RT was designed and developed. Following characterization of samples by reference ELISAs, the performance of the kit was evaluated. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity of Dengue IgA RT were 86.70% (n=233 and 86.05% (n=681 respectively; in which Dengue IgA RT detected 77.42% primary and 92.86% secondary cases; compared to 70.97% and 72.14% by IgM-Cap ELISA and 89.25% and 20% by Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1 Ag ELISA respectively. Using 125 paired samples, Dengue IgA RT showed 84.80% sensitivity at acute phase and 99.20% sensitivity at convalescent phase; with 92% specificity at both phases. Dengue IgA RT also demonstrated a consistent performance (sensitivity: 85.53%, specificity: 80% with 76 whole blood samples. In detecting all four serotypes of DENV (n=162, the performance of Dengue IgA RT was comparable with in-house IgM-Cap ELISA. Kinetics of anti-dengue IgA production was elucidated with 42.86% detection level as early as one-two days after fever onset, which increased to 83.33% between five and seven days after fever onset. Conclusion: Dengue IgA RT demonstrated a good performance and is applicable as one of the dengue early diagnostic tools at all levels of health care system.

  15. Phenotyping and auto-antibody production by liver-infiltrating B cells in primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Guevel, Bardia T; Reynolds, Gary M; Gupta Udatha, D B R K; Henriksen, Eva Kristine Klemsdal; Stamataki, Zania; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Liaskou, Evaggelia

    2017-02-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are immune-mediated biliary diseases that demonstrate prominent and restricted genetic association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. In PBC, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are specific and used as diagnostic biomarkers. PSC-relevant auto-antibodies remain controversial despite a distinct HLA association that mirrors archetypical auto-antigen driven disorders. Herein, we compared antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) in PSC and PBC liver explants to determine if liver-infiltrating ASCs represent an opportune and novel source of disease-relevant auto-antibodies. Using enzymatic digestion and mechanical disruption, liver mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were isolated from fresh PSC and PBC explants and plasmablast (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138-) and plasma cell (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138+) ASCs were enumerated by flow cytometry. We observed 45-fold fewer plasma cells in PSC explants (n = 9) compared to PBC samples (n = 5, p < 0.01) and 10-fold fewer IgA-, IgG- and IgM-positive ASCs (p < 0.05). Liver-infiltrating ASCs from PSC and PBC explants were functional and produced similar concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM following 2 weeks of culture. Antibody production by PBC ASCs (n = 3) was disease-specific as AMA to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit (PDC-E2) was detected by immunostaining, immunoblotting and ELISA. Antibody profiling of PSC supernatants (n = 9) using full-length recombinant human protein arrays (Cambridge Protein Arrays) revealed reactivities to nucleolar protein 3 (5/9) and hematopoietic cell-specific Lyn substrate 1 (3/9). Array analysis of PBC supernatants (n = 3) detected reactivities to PDC-E2 and hexokinase 1 (3/3). In conclusion, we detected unique frequencies of liver-infiltrating ASCs in PSC and PBC and in so doing, highlight a feasible approach for understanding disease-relevant antibodies in PSC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. β2-Glycoprotein I/HLA class II complexes are novel autoantigens in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Kenji; Jin, Hui; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Morikami, Satoko; Arase, Noriko; Kishida, Kazuki; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kohyama, Masako; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Katayama, Ichiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Lanier, Lewis L; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Hideto; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-04-30

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications. β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) complexed with phospholipid is recognized as a major target for autoantibodies in APS; however, less than half the patients with clinical manifestations of APS possess autoantibodies against the complexes. Therefore, the range of autoantigens involved in APS remains unclear. Recently, we found that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules transport misfolded cellular proteins to the cell surface via association with their peptide-binding grooves. Furthermore, immunoglobulin G heavy chain/HLA class II complexes were specific targets for autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we demonstrate that intact β2GPI, not peptide, forms a complex with HLA class II molecules. Strikingly, 100 (83.3%) of the 120 APS patients analyzed, including those whose antiphospholipid antibody titers were within normal range, possessed autoantibodies that recognize β2GPI/HLA class II complexes in the absence of phospholipids. In situ association between β2GPI and HLA class II was observed in placental tissues of APS patients but not in healthy controls. Furthermore, autoantibodies against β2GPI/HLA class II complexes mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing the complexes. These data suggest that β2GPI/HLA class II complexes are a target in APS that might be involved in the pathogenesis.

  17. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Charkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother’s immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation. For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  18. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th-18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  19. Regulatory and pathogenetic mechanisms of autoantibodies in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, Marko; Herrmann, Martin; van der Vlag, Johan; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2011-08-01

    In the 53 years since the discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus [1, 2, 3] , recalcitrant questions have been pondered and possible answers have been debated. The discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies presented many puzzles: How is immunological tolerance to native B-form DNA broken? What elicits characteristic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) autoantibodies? Which of the diverse anti-nuclear reactivities are pathogenic? What is the role of autoantibodies in the clinical presentation of disease? How do genetic predisposition and environmental triggers contribute to SLE? These questions were brought into focus by Professor David Stollar in an introductory presentation to an intense, three-day meeting set among the rugged and inspiring scenery of the Norwegian arctic coastline (the Scientific Program is included as supplemental File 1). Other participants presented and discussed topics directed to understanding the origin and clinico-pathological impact of autoantibodies to chromatin and phospholipid antigens. In the following, several aspects of the workshop are discussed.

  20. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senior, BW; Batten, MR; Kilian, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were...... constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases....

  1. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batten, MR; Senior, BW; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either...... side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial...... effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement...

  2. The prevalence of hypothyroidism after treatment for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas : are autoantibodies of influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo Galbo, Annalisa M.; De Bree, Remco; Kuik, Dirk J.; Lips, Paul Th. A. M.; Von Blomberg, B. Mary E.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions. The incidence rate of hypothyroidism after treatment for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer is high, especially after combination treatment. An association between hypothyroidism and autoantibodies was found. Objectives. The incidences of hypothyroidism and autoantibodies were assessed

  3. NEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC AUTOANTIBODIES AFTER LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, E.B.; MULDER, A.H.L.; Gouw, A.S.H.; MEERMAN, L.; Slooff, M.JH; Kallenberg, Cees; Horst, G.

    1993-01-01

    The immunopathogenic importance of neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis is unknown. These autoantibodies were investigated before and after liver transplantation in 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Sera from 10 patients transpl

  4. Maintenance of anti-Sm/RNP autoantibody production by plasma cells residing in ectopic lymphoid tissue and bone marrow memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jason S; Delano, Matthew J; Xu, Yuan; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Nacionales, Dina C; Li, Yi; Lee, Pui Y; Scumpia, Philip O; Yang, Lijun; Sobel, Eric; Moldawer, Lyle L; Reeves, Westley H

    2013-04-15

    Although ectopic lymphoid tissue formation is associated with many autoimmune diseases, it is unclear whether it serves a functional role in autoimmune responses. 2,6,10,14-Tetramethylpentadecane causes chronic peritoneal inflammation and lupus-like disease with autoantibody production and ectopic lymphoid tissue (lipogranuloma) formation. A novel transplantation model was used to show that transplanted lipogranulomas retain their lymphoid structure over a prolonged period in the absence of chronic peritoneal inflammation. Recipients of transplanted lipogranulomas produced anti-U1A autoantibodies derived exclusively from the donor, despite nearly complete repopulation of the transplanted lipogranulomas by host lymphocytes. The presence of ectopic lymphoid tissue alone was insufficient, as an anti-U1A response was not generated by the host in the absence of ongoing peritoneal inflammation. Donor-derived anti-U1A autoantibodies were produced for up to 2 mo by plasma cells/plasmablasts recruited to the ectopic lymphoid tissue by CXCR4. Although CD4(+) T cells were not required for autoantibody production from the transplanted lipogranulomas, de novo generation of anti-U1A plasma cells/plasmablasts was reduced following T cell depletion. Significantly, a population of memory B cells was identified in the bone marrow and spleen that did not produce anti-U1A autoantibodies unless stimulated by LPS to undergo terminal differentiation. We conclude that 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane promotes the T cell-dependent development of class-switched, autoreactive memory B cells and plasma cells/plasmablasts. The latter home to ectopic lymphoid tissue and continue to produce autoantibodies after transplantation and in the absence of peritoneal inflammation. However, peritoneal inflammation appears necessary to generate autoreactive B cells de novo.

  5. IgA Nephropathy and Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura Nephritis: Aberrant Glycosylation of IgA1, Formation of IgA1-Containing Immune Complexes, and Activation of Mesangial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, J.; Moldoveanu, Z.; Renfrow, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposits of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is aberrantly glycosylated; the hinge-region O-linked glycans are galactose-deficient. The circulating IgA1 of patients with Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) has a similar defect. This aberrancy...... exposes N-acetylgalactosamine-containing neoepitopes recognized by naturally occurring IgG or IgA1 antibodies resulting in formation of immune complexes. IgA1 contains up to six O-glycosylation sites per heavy chain; it is not known whether the glycosylation defect occurs randomly or preferentially...... at specific sites. We sought to define the aberrant glycosylation of a galactose-deficient IgA1 myeloma protein and analyze the formation of the immune complexes and their biological activities. Supplementation of serum or cord-blood serum with this IgA1 protein resulted in formation of new IgA1 complexes...

  6. Autoantibodies to alfa-fodrin in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and Sjögren's syndrome: possible markers for a common secretory disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanto, Antonia; Csipo, Istvan; Horvath, Ildiko; Biro, Edit; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2008-09-01

    Presence of autoantibodies to alfa-fodrin was investigated in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (n = 61), Hashimoto thyroiditis (n = 27), Sjögren's syndrome associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis (n = 31) and in healthy persons (n = 77). In each group, level of alfa-fodrin antibodies was higher than in the controls. There was no significant difference in their presence either between patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis with or without Sjögren's syndrome, or-in IgA isotype-between Sjögren's and Hashimoto thyroiditis patients. Correlation was found between the level of IgG alfa-fodrin and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. Based on these findings, fodrin can be associated with both endocrine and exocrine glandular secretion. Antibodies to alfa-fodrin might have a role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto thyroiditis concerning the "final common effectory pathway", secretion. Alfa-fodrin antibodies can be good markers of secretory disorders. Assessment of these autoantibodies might help the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with impaired secretory capability of not only autoimmune origin.

  7. Autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C: A clinical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Non-organ-specific autoantibodies and thyroid autoantibodieshave been frequently found in chroniccarriers of hepatitis C virus (HCV). With respect toendomysial antibodies and tissue transglutaminase,it is controversial whether the prevalence of glutenrelatedseromarkers is higher in patients with HCV. Insuch cases, in addition to acknowledging any currentlyexisting autoimmune disease, recognizing the risk ofthe patient developing an autoimmune disease duringinterferon (IFN)-based treatment must be a principleconcern. From a clinical point-of-view, the presence ofautoantibodies arouses suspicion that an autoimmunedisease may be present or may be precipitated by IFNbasedHCV treatment. In this paper, we review theprevalence of autoantibodies in individuals with hepatitisC, the clinical significance of these autoantibodies, andthe approach recommended for such situations.

  8. Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens fordetection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the mostcommon tumors worldwide. The survival rate after theonset of symptoms is generally less than one year forthe late presentation of HCC, and reliable tools for earlydiagnosis are lacking. Therefore, novel biomarkers forthe early detection of HCC are urgently required. Recentstudies show that the abnormal release of proteins bytumor cells can elicit humoral immune responses toself-antigens called tumor-associated antigens (TAAs).The corresponding autoantibodies can be detectedbefore the clinical diagnosis of cancer. Therefore, thereis growing interest in using serum autoantibodies ascancer biomarkers. In this review, we focus on theadvances in research on autoantibodies against TAAs asserum biomarker for detection of HCC, the mechanismof the production of TAAs, and the association ofautoantibodies with patients' clinical characteristics.

  9. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  10. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ezzatifar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori.

  11. IgA and IgG antibodies against surface antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum and serum from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Permin, H; Wiik, A

    1979-06-01

    Eleven cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected in the lungs with mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and presenting multiple precipitins in serum against this bacterium (CF + P) and 10 CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection (CF-P) had their serum and sputum sol phase specimens examined for antibodies of the IgA and IgG classes against surface antigens of P. aeruginosa by means of an indirect immunofluorescence technique. Both the IgA and IgG antibody titres demonstrated in serum and sputum of the CF + P patients were significantly higher than in those of the CF-P patients (p less than 0.01). The titre of IgA antibodies in the sputum was higher than in serum in 3 cases indicating local pulmonary production of specific IgA antibodies. The role of the demonstrated antibodies in the local pulmonary immune defense mechanisms and the possible patogenesis of the pulmonary tissue damage in CF patients is discussed.

  12. [Investigation of the presence of autoantibodies in patients with toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Selçuk; Demirci, Mustafa; Sesli Cetin, Emel; Cicioğlu Aridoğan, Buket; Sahin, Mehmet; Taş, Tekin; Korkmaz, Metin

    2009-10-01

    Immunopathologic reactions may occur during toxocariasis due to tissue invasion and destruction by the secretions of larvae containing various enzymes with broad spectrum. The aim of this study was to search for autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear (ANA), anti-mitochondrial (AMA), anti-smooth muscle (ASMA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic (ANCA), anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) and liver-kidney microsomal type 1 (LKM-1) antibodies in patients with toxocariasis, in order to investigate the role of toxocariasis as a trigger factor for autoimmune reactions. Forty patients (22 were male; mean age: 35.6 +/- 10.7 years) diagnosed as toxocariasis by clinical findings (abdominal pain, allergic symptoms and/or eosinophilia, without detection of any other causative agents, and without liver dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, cardiac or renal failure, and autoimmune disease) and in-house ELISA positivity and 32 healthy controls (16 were male; mean age: 40.7 +/- 11.2 years) were included to the study. ANA (screen), dsDNA, SS-A, SS-B, Scl-70, LKM-1, MPO and M2 autoantibodies have been investigated by ELISA (Euroimmun, Germany), while ANCA, AMA and ASMA antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IMMCO, NY) methods. Autoantibody positivity was detected in 18 (45%) patients of whom 11 yielded a single type, and 7 yielded > or = 2 types of autoantibodies. This rate was 12.5% for control group (two subjects were positive for ANA-Screen, one for anti-M2 and one for anti-LKM-1). The difference between the total positivity rates in patient and control groups was found statistically significant (chi2 = 5.72, p = 0.004). The most frequent autoantibody type among patients were ASMA (n = 6), followed by anti-dsDNA (n = 5), anti-M2 (n = 5), anti-SS-B (n = 4), anti-LKM-1 (n = 3), anti-SS-A (n = 2), ANCA (n = 2) and anti-MPO (n = 1). Positivity rate for ASMA was found statistically significant in patients' group compared to controls (chi2 = 12.24, p = 0.03), while there was no significant difference

  13. Thyroid Autoantibodies in Pregnancy: Their Role, Regulation and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis S. Balucan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase are common in the euthyroid population and are considered secondary responses and indicative of thyroid inflammation. By contrast, autoantibodies to the TSH receptor are unique to patients with Graves' disease and to some patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Both types of thyroid antibodies are useful clinical markers of autoimmune thyroid disease and are profoundly influenced by the immune suppression of pregnancy and the resulting loss of such suppression in the postpartum period. Here, we review these three types of thyroid antibodies and their antigens and how they relate to pregnancy itself, obstetric and neonatal outcomes, and the postpartum.

  14. Evaluation of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for human IgA, IgA subclasses and allotypes and secretory component. Results of an IUIS/WHO collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mestecky, J.; Hamilton, R.G.; Magnusson, C.G.M.; Jefferis, R.; Vaerman, J.P.; Goodall, M.; Lange, G.G. de; Moro, I.; Aucouturier, P.; Radl, J.; Cambiaso, C.; Silvain, C.; Preud'homme, J.L.; Kusama, K.; Carlone, G.M.; Biewenga, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Skvaril, F.; Reimer, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    51 monoclonal antibodies (McAb) with putative specificity for human IgA, the IgA subclasses, Am allotypes or secretory component (SC) were evaluated for immunoreactivity and specificity by nine laboratories employing immunodiffusion, agglutination, immunohistological assays, immunoblotting and

  15. Analysis of O-glycan heterogeneity in IgA1 myeloma proteins by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: implications for IgA nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renfrow, MB; Mackay, CL; Chalmers, MJ

    2007-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis. In IgAN, IgA1 molecules with incompletely galactosylated O-linked glycans in the hinge region (HR) are present in mesangial immunodeposits and in circulating immune complexes. It is not known whether the galactose defic...

  16. IgA nephropathy and tonsils--an approach from the structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Horie, Akeyo; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Iwase, Hitoo; Sugiyama, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    Human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which is the predominant subtype to be deposited in glomeruli in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), has a unique mucine-like structure in its hinge region. Namely, it contains O-glycans and proline-rich peptides We previously observed underglycosylation of the hinge region in serum and deposited IgA1 in IgAN. On the other hand, clinical development and exacerbation of IgAN are frequently preceded by episodes of upper respiratory tract infection, and palatine tonsils represent the predominant immunocompetent tissue of the upper respiratory tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that tonsils were one of the origins of glomerular IgA1 in IgAN, and investigated the O-glycan structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes (tonsillar IgA1). A significant increase in asialo-agalacto type O-glycans was found in the tonsillar IgA1 hinge in IgAN. These results suggest that the tonsils produce underglycosylated IgA1 molecules, which enter the bloodstream and are then deposited in the glomeruli.

  17. A monoclonal anti-rat IgA antibody. Detection of IgA antibodies to ovalbumin and antigens of the parasite Trichinella spiralis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren H; Osterhaus ADME; Nagel J; Hakkert B; de Klerk A; Drost G; Vos JG

    1987-01-01

    Dit rapport geeft de resultaten weer van de ontwikkeling van een monoclonaal antilichaam dat specifiek ratte IgA immunglobulinen herkent. IgA is een belangrijk immuunglobuline voor de bescherming van muscosale oppervlakken (o.a. op het niveau van de darm en de luchtwegen). Met behulp van het ontw

  18. Evaluation of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for human IgA, IgA subclasses and allotypes and secretory component. Results of an IUIS/WHO collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mestecky, J.; Hamilton, R.G.; Magnusson, C.G.M.; Jefferis, R.; Vaerman, J.P.; Goodall, M.; Lange, G.G. de; Moro, I.; Aucouturier, P.; Radl, J.; Cambiaso, C.; Silvain, C.; Preud'homme, J.L.; Kusama, K.; Carlone, G.M.; Biewenga, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Skvaril, F.; Reimer, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    51 monoclonal antibodies (McAb) with putative specificity for human IgA, the IgA subclasses, Am allotypes or secretory component (SC) were evaluated for immunoreactivity and specificity by nine laboratories employing immunodiffusion, agglutination, immunohistological assays, immunoblotting and direc

  19. The tetraspanin CD37 protects against glomerular IgA deposition and renal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rops, Angelique L; Figdor, Carl G; van der Schaaf, Alie; Tamboer, Wim P; Bakker, Marinka A; Berden, Jo H; Dijkman, Henry B P M; Steenbergen, Eric J; van der Vlag, Johan; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2010-05-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37(-/-)) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that CD37(-/-) mice spontaneously develop renal pathology with characteristics of human IgA nephropathy. In young naïve CD37(-/-) mice, mild IgA deposition in glomeruli was observed. However, CD37(-/-) mice developed high titers of IgA immune complexes in serum during aging, which was associated with increased glomerular IgA deposition. Severe mesangial proliferation, fibrosis, and hyalinosis were apparent in aged CD37(-/-) mice, whereas albuminuria was mild. To further evaluate the role of CD37 in glomerular disease, we induced anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in mice. CD37(-/-) mice developed higher IgA serum levels and glomerular deposits of anti-GBM IgA compared with wild-type mice. Importantly, glomerular macrophage and neutrophil influx was significantly higher in CD37(-/-) mice during both the heterologous and autologous phase of anti-GBM nephritis. Taken together, tetraspanin CD37 controls the formation of IgA-containing immune complexes and glomerular IgA deposition, which induces influx of inflammatory myeloid cells. Therefore, CD37 may protect against the development of IgA nephropathy.

  20. An update on pathology of IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2016-12-01

    IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) is the commonest of the glomerular diseases in the world. Its progression rate of 30-40% of the cases em 20-30 years makes IgAN an important healthcare issue in Nephrology. Diagnosis of IgAN depends on biopsy findings, particularly at immunofluorescence microscopy. The frequence of IgAN diagnosis is variable in different populations and depends on screening and biopsy indication policies. IgAN pathogenesis is considered multifactorial; its primordial defect is the production of galactosis-deficient IgA molecules. This review paper discusses the most uptodate aspects of the pathogenesis, pathological classification and clinical implications of IgAN.

  1. An update on pathology of IgA nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Soares

    Full Text Available Abstract IgA Nephropathy (IgAN is the commonest of the glomerular diseases in the world. Its progression rate of 30-40% of the cases em 20-30 years makes IgAN an important healthcare issue in Nephrology. Diagnosis of IgAN depends on biopsy findings, particularly at immunofluorescence microscopy. The frequence of IgAN diagnosis is variable in different populations and depends on screening and biopsy indication policies. IgAN pathogenesis is considered multifactorial; its primordial defect is the production of galactosis-deficient IgA molecules. This review paper discusses the most uptodate aspects of the pathogenesis, pathological classification and clinical implications of IgAN.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody assays in celiac disease patients with selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, D; Alessio, M G; Tampoia, M; Tonutti, E; Brusca, I; Bagnasco, M; Pesce, G; Bizzaro, N

    2007-08-01

    Clinical studies have estimated a 10- to 20-fold increased risk for celiac disease (CD) in patients with selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD). For this reason, screening for CD is mandatory in SIgAD patients, but it represents a special challenge since the specific IgA class antibodies against gliadin (AGA), endomysium (EMA), and tissue-transglutaminase (tTG) are not produced in patients with CD. IgG class counterparts of these antibodies may be informative; in particular IgG EMA has been demonstrated to be a valid marker for diagnosing CD in SIgAD cases, but it is not used much in clinical laboratories, because it is cumbersome and involves some technical difficulties. Even if it was widely used in clinical laboratories, the measuring of IgG AGA has shown a less-than-optimum diagnostic accuracy, so that now it tends to be substituted by tests for anti-tTG IgG, for which the few available studies have shown diagnostic performances superior to AGA. Since it is not known whether various available methods for measuring IgG anti-tTG antibodies offer similar diagnostic performances, we have compared the results obtained from nine second-generation commercial methods (D-tek, Phadia, Immco, Orgentec, Radim, Euroimmun, Inova, Aesku, Generic Assays), measuring IgG anti-tTG antibodies in 20 patients with CD and SIgAD and in 113 controls (9 patients with SIgAD without CD, 54 patients with chronic liver disease, and 50 healthy individuals). Diagnostic sensitivity, calculated by means of ROC plot analysis, ranged between 75% and 95%, and specificity ranged from 94% to 100%. In the same population, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of AGA IgG were 40% and 87%, respectively. Even though they perform differently, all IgG anti-tTG methods evaluated are reliable serological assays for the diagnosis of CD in SIgAD patients, with diagnostic accuracy superior to the AGA IgG method. The methods that use a mix of tTG and gliadin peptides as the antigenic preparation have a

  3. Linear IgA and IgG bullous dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Karina de Almeida Pinto; Galvis, Kely Hernández; Gomes, Anndressa Camillo da Matta Setubal; Nogueira, Osvania Maris; Felix, Paulo Antônio Oldani; Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Childhood linear immunoglobulin A dermatosis is a rare autoimmune vesiculobullous disease. It results in linear deposition of autoantibodies (immunoglobulin A) against antigens in the basal membrane zone, leading to subepidermal cleavage. Additional depositions of immunoglobulin G and complement-3 might occur. It is still debated whether concomitant findings of immunoglobulins A and G should be considered a subtype of this dermatosis or a new entity. Further studies are needed to recognize this clinical variant.

  4. Linear IgA and IgG bullous dermatosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Karina de Almeida Pinto; Galvis, Kely Hernández; Gomes, Anndressa Camillo da Matta Setubal; Nogueira, Osvania Maris; Felix, Paulo Antônio Oldani; Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Childhood linear immunoglobulin A dermatosis is a rare autoimmune vesiculobullous disease. It results in linear deposition of autoantibodies (immunoglobulin A) against antigens in the basal membrane zone, leading to subepidermal cleavage. Additional depositions of immunoglobulin G and complement-3 might occur. It is still debated whether concomitant findings of immunoglobulins A and G should be considered a subtype of this dermatosis or a new entity. Further studies are needed to recognize this clinical variant. PMID:28300887

  5. Igaühele hea haridus!? / Olav Aarna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aarna, Olav, 1942-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Järva Teataja 1. september lk. 2, Meie Maa 1. september lk. 2, Koit 1. september lk. 6, Severnoje Poberezhje 1. september lk. 2, Vali Uudised 2. september lk. 2, Sakala 2. september lk. 2, Hiiu Leht 2. september lk. 2, Kuulutaja 2. september lk. 4, Nädaline 8. september lk. 4. Riigikogu kultuurikomisjoni esimehe sõnul peaks igaüks sõnastama enda jaoks rahuldava vastuse küsimusele, mis on hea haridus

  6. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Ertekin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2, aflatoxin G1 (AFG1, aflatoxin G2 (AFG2 and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1. The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31. The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort.

  7. Igaühele hea haridus!? / Olav Aarna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aarna, Olav, 1942-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Järva Teataja 1. september lk. 2, Meie Maa 1. september lk. 2, Koit 1. september lk. 6, Severnoje Poberezhje 1. september lk. 2, Vali Uudised 2. september lk. 2, Sakala 2. september lk. 2, Hiiu Leht 2. september lk. 2, Kuulutaja 2. september lk. 4, Nädaline 8. september lk. 4. Riigikogu kultuurikomisjoni esimehe sõnul peaks igaüks sõnastama enda jaoks rahuldava vastuse küsimusele, mis on hea haridus

  8. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  9. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-05-12

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort.

  10. Bilateral scleritis and sclerokeratitis associated with IgA nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Garza-Leon, Manuel; Flores, Diana; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report a case of bilateral nodular scleritis in a patient with final diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Methods This is an observational case report. Results A male patient, 42 years old, presented with a bilateral nodular scleritis and OD sclerokeratitis. He had a previous history of acute otitis media and developed posterior renal failure and arterial hypertension. Clinical and systemic findings suggest Wegener's granulomatosis. A kidney biopsy was perform...

  11. The role of tonsillectomy in IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriozzi, Sandro; Polci, Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    The IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a very common glomerulonephritis and can result in end-stage renal disease. From a clinical point of view, IgAN is characterised by repeated events of macrohaematuria associated with infections of the upper airways. In IgAN, the IgA released by the tonsillar lymphatic tissue into blood circulation are defective in glycosylation. These aberrant IgA can reach the glomeruli and deposit into mesangium causing an inflammation with cellular proliferation. The treatment is not yet well defined: steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are suggested in cases with a progressive disease. Tonsillectomy was proposed to reduce the infective events of upper airways and the lymphatic tissue producing undergalactosylated IgA. The experiences in literature coming from Asia report positive effects of tonsillectomy on IgAN. In patients with tonsillectomy, the renal signs improved (less haematuria and proteinuria) and the renal outcome was better (slower progression of renal damage). These were uncontrolled studies and tonsillectomy was associated with steroid and immunosuppressive treatment, so it is not possible to tell the real effect of tonsillectomy. In contrast, the European studies reported that the tonsillectomy was not associated with a better outcome of IgAN. A critical review of the subject reveals that most of the papers with positive results were uncontrolled retrospective experiences, while in a randomised controlled trial paper the advantages of tonsillectomy disappeared. In conclusion, this review, in agreement with the international guidelines, concludes that tonsillectomy does not play any role in the progression of IgAN.

  12. A necessidade da imunofluorescência direta no diagnóstico da dermatose bolhosa por IgA The need for direct immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of IgA bullous dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A dermatose bolhosa por imunoglobulina da classe A linear (DbIgA do adulto é uma doença autoimune rara caracterizada por formação de bolhas subepidérmicas e depósito linear de imunoglobulina da classe A (IgA na zona da membrana basal (ZMB. Por possuir aspectos clínicos e histológicos semelhantes a outras dermatoses bolhosas, principalmente a dermatite herpetiforme e o penfigoide bolhoso, faz-se necessária a realização de imunofluorescência direta para confirmação diagnóstica. Apresenta-se então, neste artigo, relato de caso ilustrando essa necessidade.Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis (DbIgA of adults is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by subepidermal blistering and linear deposits of immunoglobulin A (IgA in the basement membrane zone (BMZ. Owing to the fact it presents clinical and histological aspects similar to other bullous dermatosis, mainly dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid, direct immunofluorescence is required to confirm diagnosis. In this article, we describe a case that illustrates this need.

  13. Estudo de imunoglobulinas, complementos e auto-anticorpos em 58 trabalhadores expostos à sílica Immunoglobulins, complements and autoantibodies in 58 workers exposed to silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermano Albuquerque de Castro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A silicose é a doença pulmonar ocupacional de maior prevalência em nosso meio. O agente patogênico da silicose é a poeira de sílica-livre ou dióxido de silício (SiO2 na forma cristalina. O processo inflamatório envolvendo o sistema imunológico na silicose ainda não está bem esclarecido. OBJETIVO: Estudar o perfil de IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4 e alguns auto-anticorpos no soro de trabalhadores expostos à sílica, com ou sem silicose, através de avaliação laboratorial imunológica, abrangendo tanto a imunidade inespecífica quanto a específica. MÉTODO: Foi examinada uma amostra de 58 pacientes ambulatoriais, do sexo masculino, constituída por trabalhadores expostos à sílica. Foram realizadas avaliações imunológica, radiológica e funcional pulmonar. Foram dosadas as imunoglobulinas IgG, IgA e IgM, os componentes C3 e C4 do sistema complemento e determinados auto-anticorpos. RESULTADOS: Vinte trabalhadores apresentaram radiograma normal e 38 apresentaram-no alterado, compatível com silicose. As médias dos valores de IgG no grupo com silicose foi maior que no grupo com radiograma normal (p 0.05. O percentual de positividade dos auto-anticorpos foi maior no grupo silicótico em relação ao grupo com radiograma normal. CONCLUSÃO: O aumento de IgG nos doentes com silicose constitui um achado importante pois pode indicar a continuidade da reação granulomatosa, mesmo com o trabalhador afastado da exposição. Entretanto, ainda são necessários estudos que possibilitem a compreensão do processo imunogênico na silicose.BACKGROUND: The primary work-related lung disease in Brazil is silicosis. Its pathogenic agent is the dust of crystalline free silica (SiO2; silicon dioxide. The inflammatory process of silicosis is not yet well understood. OBJECTIVE: To analyze, through immunologic laboratory evaluation, including nonspecific and specific immunity, the profile of IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4 and autoantibodies in the serum

  14. Characterization and potential clinical applications of autoantibodies against cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos Rieper, Carina; Galle, Pia; Hansen, Morten Bagge

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies recognizing cytokines arise in certain patients during the course of therapy with recombinant cytokines, although they may arise spontaneously as well. They are typically high avidity and in vitro neutralizing IgG antibodies present in picomolar to nanomolar concentrations. Methodo...

  15. The significance of autoantibodies against beta(2)-glycoprotein I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Philip G.; Urbanus, Rolf T.

    2012-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with a history of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity, including fetal loss. APS is an autoimmune disease with a confusing name because the pathologic auto-antibodies are shown to b

  16. Antinuclear human autoantibodies as markers in Nicotiana tabacum pollen tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Poggialini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we report on the use of antinuclear human autoantibodies as specific markers in Nicotiana tabacum pollen tubes. The antibodies have been tested by fluorescence techniques using a confocal laser scanning microscope. All the antibodies showed specifc labelling pattern and the results, although preliminary in nature, could open new perspectives of research.

  17. Functional and structural characteristics of secretory IgA antibodies elicited by mucosal vaccines against influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tadaki; Ainai, Akira; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2017-09-18

    Mucosal tissues are major targets for pathogens. The secretions covering mucosal surfaces contain several types of molecules that protect the host from infection. Among these, mucosal immunoglobulins, including secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies, are the major contributor to pathogen-specific immune responses. IgA is the primary antibody class found in many external secretions and has unique structural and functional features not observed in other antibody classes. Recently, extensive efforts have been made to develop novel vaccines that induce immunity via the mucosal route. S-IgA is a key molecule that underpins the mechanism of action of these mucosal vaccines. Thus, precise characterization of S-IgA induced by mucosal vaccines is important, if the latter are to be used successfully in a clinical setting. Intensive studies identified the fundamental characteristics of S-IgA, which was first discovered almost half a century ago. However, S-IgA itself has not gained much attention of late, despite its importance to mucosal immunity; therefore, some important questions remain. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular characteristics of S-IgA and its role in intranasal mucosal vaccines against influenza virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  19. Comparison of clinical and laboratory characteristics in children with type 1 diabetes according to pancreatic autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hae Choi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is any difference in the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with autoantibody-positive and patients with autoantibody-negative type 1 diabetes at initial presentation. Methods:We analyzed 96 patients under 18 years of age with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. One or both of the pancreatic autoantibodies-glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA and insulin autoantibody (IAA-were measured in all patients, and we reviewed clinical and laboratory characteristics according to the presence of these autoantibodies. Results:GADA was examined in 48 of 87 patients, and 55.2% of patients were positive. IAA was checked in 88 patients, and 39.8% were positive. Both GADA and IAA were measured in 83 patients, and 22.8% had both antibodies. The patients who had one or both autoantibodies (autoantibody-positive group were younger than those not having any autoantibody (autoantibody-negative group. The autoantibody-positive group had lower BMI, corrected sodium level, and serum effective osmolarity, compared to the autoantibody-negative group (P&lt;0.05. Similar differences were found between the GADA-positive and GADA-negative groups. However, there were no significant differences between the IAA- positive and IAA-negative groups. Conclusion:The prevalence of pancreatic autoantibodies was significantly higher in the under-6 years age group than in the other age groups. These findings suggest that measurement of autoantibodies at the initial diagnosis of diabetes is very useful for detecting immune-mediated type 1 diabetes and providing intensive insulin therapy, especially in younger children.

  20. Specificity of islet cell autoantibodies and coexistence with other organ specific autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Soufleros, Konstantinos

    2009-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been shown to be a disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells (beta-cells) in the pancreas. Intensive studies, in both patients and animal models are trying to elucidate the specific antigenic targets that are responsible for islet cell autoimmunity. So far, the most important molecules that have been recognized are the native insulin, the 65-kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(65)) and the insulinoma-antigen 2 (IA-2). Identification of those specific autoantibodies that are involved in the primary immunological events of the autoimmune disease process will allow the development of novel diagnostic procedures for early detection and initiation of potential therapy prior to irreversible loss of beta-cells. Within the framework of polyglandular disorders, T1DM may coexist with other organ specific autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), autoimmune gastritis (AG), celiac disease (CD) and Addison's disease (AD), which are associated with the production of organ-specific autoantibodies. So, as a subset of patients with those autoantibodies will develop clinical disease, screening T1DM patients could prognosticate morbidity relative to unrecognised clinical entities. The close follow-up of patients with organ-specific autoantibodies could lead to seasonable identification of those requiring therapy.

  1. Efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil treatment in IgA nephropathy: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Youyuan; Li, Yumin; Yang, ShengLin; Li, Yan; Liang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide and also the most frequent cause of kidney failure. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective immunosuppressant widely used in many autoimmune diseases. However, the benefits and risks of MMF for the treatment of IgA nephropathy remain uncertain. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of MMF in IgA nephropathy patient...

  2. Effect of sensory stimulation on salivary IgA secretion rate in karate players

    OpenAIRE

    Baralic, I; MILETIC, I; Djordjevic, B.; Terzic, T.; S Radojevic-Skodric; Nikolic, G

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Secretory IgA is predominant immunoglobulin in secretions of the mucosal immune system. Low concentration of salivary IgA is associated with a higher risk of respiratory tract infections episodes in athletes during the training season. The purpose of this study was to determine whether orange-flavored whey based drink has beneficial effect on level of IgA in saliva after the training. Methods: Twenty healthy, young karate players participated in this study. They were divided into ...

  3. The association of single nucleotide P-selectin gene polymorphism with IgA nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王朝晖

    2006-01-01

    Objective IgA nephropathy is one of the most com- mon form of primary glomerulonephritis throughout the world and a main renal disease which causes renal failure. P-selectin plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of IgA nephropathy. The purpose of this study is to find a possible relationship between P-selectin gene polymorphism and IgA nephropathy. Methods In this study,a comprehensive P-selectin gene sur-

  4. Aberrant IgA responses to the gut microbiota during infancy precede asthma and allergy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzidic, Majda; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Artacho, Alejandro; Björkstén, Bengt; Collado, Maria Carmen; Mira, Alex; Jenmalm, Maria C

    2017-03-01

    Although a reduced gut microbiota diversity and low mucosal total IgA levels in infancy have been associated with allergy development, IgA responses to the gut microbiota have not yet been studied. We sought to determine the proportions of IgA coating together with the characterization of the dominant bacteria, bound to IgA or not, in infant stool samples in relation to allergy development. A combination of flow cytometric cell sorting and deep sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial recognition patterns by IgA in stool samples collected at 1 and 12 months of age from children staying healthy or having allergic symptoms up to 7 years of age. The children with allergic manifestations, particularly asthma, during childhood had a lower proportion of IgA bound to fecal bacteria at 12 months of age compared with healthy children. These alterations cannot be attributed to differences in IgA levels or bacterial load between the 2 groups. Moreover, the bacterial targets of early IgA responses (including coating of the Bacteroides genus), as well as IgA recognition patterns, differed between healthy children and children with allergic manifestations. Altered IgA recognition patterns in children with allergy were observed already at 1 month of age, when the IgA antibodies are predominantly maternally derived in breast-fed children. An aberrant IgA responsiveness to the gut microbiota during infancy precedes asthma and allergy development, possibly indicating an impaired mucosal barrier function in allergic children. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of Polyclonal Antibody Induced by Autoantibody TPO (Thyroidperoxidase) From Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) Serum with ELISA and Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    Maulidya Aulia Fiqriyana; Aulanni'am Aulanni'am; Anna Roosdiana

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibody TPO is a potential marker for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Autoantibody TPO has a specifity and a sensitivity ranging from 82% to100% in comparison to other AITD serology markers. Concentration of autoantibody TPO in sera had a positive correlation with activities of chronic AITD. This research have been conducted to investigate the characteristic of polyclonal antibody TPO induced by autoantibody TPO from serum of AITD patients. The autoantibody TPO was ...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with IgA nephropathy in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Tomino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem that affects millions of people from all racial and ethnic groups. Although CKD is not one specific disease, it is a comprehensive syndrome that includes IgA nephropathy. As reported by the Japanese Society of Nephrology, 13.0 million people have CKD. In Japan, major causes of end-stage kidney disease are type 2 diabetic nephropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis, especially IgA nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and polycystic kidney disease. IgA nephropathy is characterized by polymeric IgA1 with aberrant galactosylation (galactose-deficient IgA1 increased in the blood and deposited in the glomerular mesangial areas, as well as partially in the capillary walls. The tonsils are important as one of the responsible regions in this disease. The clarification of the mechanism of galactose-deficient IgA1 production will pave the way for the development of novel therapies. The results of future research are eagerly awaited. At present, the most important therapeutic goals in patients with IgA nephropathy are the control of hypertension, the decrease of urinary protein excretion, and the inhibition of progression to end-stage kidney disease. Several investigators have reported that renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors reduce levels of urinary protein excretion and preserve renal function in patients with IgA nephropathy. In Japan, tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy are more effective for patients with IgA nephropathy.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with IgA nephropathy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem that affects millions of people from all racial and ethnic groups. Although CKD is not one specific disease, it is a comprehensive syndrome that includes IgA nephropathy. As reported by the Japanese Society of Nephrology, 13.0 million people have CKD. In Japan, major causes of end-stage kidney disease are type 2 diabetic nephropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis, especially IgA nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and polycystic kidney disease. IgA nephropathy is characterized by polymeric IgA1 with aberrant galactosylation (galactose-deficient IgA1) increased in the blood and deposited in the glomerular mesangial areas, as well as partially in the capillary walls. The tonsils are important as one of the responsible regions in this disease. The clarification of the mechanism of galactose-deficient IgA1 production will pave the way for the development of novel therapies. The results of future research are eagerly awaited. At present, the most important therapeutic goals in patients with IgA nephropathy are the control of hypertension, the decrease of urinary protein excretion, and the inhibition of progression to end-stage kidney disease. Several investigators have reported that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors reduce levels of urinary protein excretion and preserve renal function in patients with IgA nephropathy. In Japan, tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy are more effective for patients with IgA nephropathy.

  8. Mesangial cells from patients with IgA nephropathy have increased susceptibility to galactose-deficient IgA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebefors, Kerstin; Liu, Peidi; Lassén, Emelie; Elvin, Johannes; Candemark, Emma; Levan, Kristina; Haraldsson, Börje; Nyström, Jenny

    2016-04-05

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerulonephritis in the world, affecting close to a million people. Circulating galactose-deficient IgA (gd-IgA), present in patients with IgAN, form immune complex deposits in the glomerular mesangium causing local proliferation and matrix expansion. Intriguing though, individuals having gd-IgA deposits in the kidneys do not necessarily have signs of glomerular disease. Recurrence of IgAN only occurs in less than half of transplanted patients with IgAN, indicating that gd-IgA is not the only factor driving the disease. We hypothesize that, in addition to IgA complexes, patients with IgAN possess a subtype of mesangial cells highly susceptible to gd-IgA induced cell proliferation. To test the hypothesis, we designed a technique to culture primary mesangial cells from renal biopsies obtained from IgAN patients and controls. The cell response to gd-IgA treatment was then measured both on gene and protein level and the proliferation rate of the cells in response to PDGF was investigated. When treated with gd-IgA, mesangial cells from patients with IgAN express and release more PDGF compared to controls. In addition, the mesangial cells from patients with IgAN were more responsive to treatment with PDGF resulting in an increased proliferation rate of the cells compared to control. Mesangial cells cultured from patients with IgAN expressed and released more IL-6 than controls and had a higher expression of matrix genes. Both mesangial cells derived from patients with IgAN and controls increased their expressed TGFβ1 and CCL5 when treated with gd-IgA. We conclude that mesangial cells derived from IgAN patients have a mesangioproliferative phenotype with increased reactivity to IgA and that these cellular intrinsic properties may be important for the development of IgA nephropathy.

  9. Dermatose por IgA linear induzida pela gestação Linear IgA dermatosis induced by pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Kanagusuko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A dermatose por IgA linear é doença bolhosa auto-imune subepidérmica rara, caracterizada pelo depósito linear de IgA na zona da membrana basal da epiderme. Nos relatos de gestação em pacientes com essa dermatose, nota-se sempre melhora do quadro clínico. Contrariando essas observações,é apresentado caso de dermatose por IgA linear induzida pela gestação, que demonstrou boa resposta terapêutica à dapsona e prednisona , sem complicações materno-fetais.Linear IgA disease is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by linear IgA deposits at the epidermal basement membrane zone. According to the literature, in patients who have linear IgA disease and become pregnant, the disease tends to improve. We report a case of linear IgA disease induced by pregnancy, successfully treated with dapsone and prednisone with no adverse effects observed in the patient and her newborns.

  10. Identification of distinct glycoforms of IgA1 in plasma from patients with IgA nephropathy and healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehoux, Sylvain; Mi, Rongjuan; Aryal, Rajindra P

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis worldwide and is histologically characterized by the deposition of IgA1 and consequent inflammation in the glomerular mesangium. Prior studies suggested that serum IgA1 from IgAN patients contains aberrant...... there are different glycoforms of IgA1 in plasma from patients with IgAN and healthy individuals. While total plasma IgA in IgAN patients was elevated ~1.6-fold compared to that in healthy donors, IgA1 in all samples was unexpectedly separable into two distinct glycoforms: one with core 1 based O......-glycans, and the other exclusively containing Tn/STn structures. Importantly, Tn antigen present on IgA1 from IgAN patients and controls was convertible into the core 1 structure in vitro by recombinant T-synthase. Our results demonstrate that undergalactosylation of O-glycans in IgA1 is not restricted to Ig...

  11. Analysis of O-glycan heterogeneity in IgA1 myeloma proteins by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: implications for IgA nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renfrow, MB; Mackay, CL; Chalmers, MJ

    2007-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis. In IgAN, IgA1 molecules with incompletely galactosylated O-linked glycans in the hinge region (HR) are present in mesangial immunodeposits and in circulating immune complexes. It is not known whether the galactose...... deficiency in IgA1 proteins occurs randomly or preferentially at specific sites. We have previously demonstrated the first direct localization of multiple O-glycosylation sites on a single IgA1 myeloma protein by use of activated ion-electron capture dissociation (AI-ECD) Fourier transform ion cyclotron...... resonance (FT-ICR) tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report the analysis of IgA1 O-glycan heterogeneity by use of FT-ICR MS and liquid chromatography FT-ICR MS to obtain unbiased accurate mass profiles of IgA1 HR glycopeptides from three different IgA1 myeloma proteins. Additionally, we report the first AI...

  12. Autoantibody profile in individuals with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Luciana Marconcini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Autoantibodies are often produced during infection with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV, but it remains controversial whether they influence the biochemical profile and histological features of this disease. Therefore, this current study sought to describe these autoantibodies and evaluate their impact on the clinical and histological presentation of hepatitis C. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study assessed patients with HCV (RNA+ from October 2011 to July 2012. Results This study included 66 patients, with a mean age of 53.2±10.5 years. Of these patients, 60.6% were male, and 54.3% presented with genotype 1. Non-organ-specific autoantibodies (NOSA were detected in 24% of the patients; of these, 7.6% were anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA+, 26.7% were anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA+ and 6.8% were liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies (LKM1+. With respect to the thyroid autoantibodies, 7.4% were anti-peroxidase (ATPO+ antibodies, and none were anti-thyroglobulin (ATG+ antibodies. Regarding celiac disease autoantibodies, 5.8% were endomysial antibodies (EMA+, and no transglutaminase (TTG+ antibodies were detected. Cryoglobulins were found in 2.1% of patients. When NOSA+ individuals were compared to patients without the presence of NOSAs, they exhibited higher median alkaline phosphatase (0.7 vs. 0.6 xULN; p=0.041, lower median platelet counts (141,500.0 vs. 180,500.0/mm 3 ; p=0.036, lower mean prothrombin activity (72.6±11.5% vs. 82.2±16.0%; p=0.012 and an increased prevalence of significant fibrosis (E≥2 (45.5% vs. 18.2%; p=0.012. There was also a tendency for a greater proportion of NOSA+ cases to have marked periportal activity (APP≥3 (44.5% vs. 15.6%; p=0.087. Conclusions In addition to the high prevalence of autoantibodies associated with HCV infection, it was observed that NOSA positivity was associated with a more severe histological and biochemical profile of hepatitis C infection.

  13. Two major autoantibody clusters in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn H Ching

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease of complex clinical presentation and etiology and is likely influenced by numerous genetic and environmental factors. While a large number of susceptibility genes have been identified, the production of antibodies against a distinct subset of nuclear proteins remains a primary distinguishing characteristic in disease diagnosis. However, the utility of autoantibody biomarkers for disease sub-classification and grouping remains elusive, in part, because of the difficulty in large scale profiling using a uniform, quantitative platform. In the present study serological profiles of several known SLE antigens, including Sm-D3, RNP-A, RNP-70k, Ro52, Ro60, and La, as well as other cytokine and neuronal antigens were obtained using the luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS approach. The resulting autoantibody profiles revealed that 88% of a pilot cohort and 98% of a second independent cohort segregated into one of two distinct clusters defined by autoantibodies against Sm/anti-RNP or Ro/La autoantigens, proteins often involved in RNA binding activities. The Sm/RNP cluster was associated with a higher prevalence of serositis in comparison to the Ro/La cluster (P = 0.0022. However, from the available clinical information, no other clinical characteristics were associated with either cluster. In contrast, evaluation of autoantibodies on an individual basis revealed an association between anti-Sm (P = 0.006, RNP-A (P = 0.018 and RNP-70k (P = 0.010 autoantibodies and mucocutaneous symptoms and between anti-RNP-70k and musculoskeletal manifestations (P = 0.059. Serologically active, but clinically quiescent disease also had a higher prevalence of anti-IFN-α autoantibodies. Based on our findings that most SLE patients belong to either a Sm/RNP or Ro/La autoantigen cluster, these results suggest the possibility that alterations in RNA-RNA-binding protein interactions may

  14. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Toward a new autoantibody diagnostic orthodoxy: understanding the bad, good and indifferent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2012-08-01

    Rapid advances in diagnostic technologies used to detect autoantibodies have made it difficult for even the most modern laboratory to keep abreast of the changing approaches and platforms, not to mention the clinicians who are hard pressed to keep abreast of evolving diagnostic paradigms attended by these newer techniques. While autoantibody testing is traditionally considered to be primarily serving the realm of diagnostic medicine, there is little doubt that autoantibodies are also being recognized as an approach to providing prognostic and therapeutic information. Accordingly, along with related proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, it is taking on increasing importance in the realm of personalized medicine. In today's world of autoantibody diagnostics, overarching concerns about false-negative and false-positive autoantibodies tests cannot be summarily dismissed by citing pros or cons of any one technology or diagnostic platform, but often point to persisting gaps in our knowledge about, and understanding of, the origin and roles of autoantibodies. Before we can hope to completely understand the enigmas that attend the results of autoantibody diagnostic tests, perhaps it is time to step back and re-examine long-accepted paradigms and beliefs. This review will address some of the issues that impact on autoantibody detection technologies and some of the considerations and issues that will attend a new orthodoxy of autoantibody diagnostics. These issues will be addressed in the context of "bad" (pathogenic), "good" (protective) or "indifferent" (no apparent role in disease) autoantibodies.

  16. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Linear IGA bullous dermatosis in Tunisian children : 31 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharfi Monia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LAD of children is relatively frequent in Africa. Aim: We undertook this study to evaluate the frequency of this disease among autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs in Tunisian children. Materials and Methods: We present a 32-year retrospective study (January 1976 to December 2007. Children with chronic acquired bullous diseases seen at the Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis and for who direct immunofluorescence (DIF of the perilesional skin demonstrated linear IgA immunoglobulin deposits were included in the study population. Results: Thirty-one children with LAD were selected representing 65.9% of all AIBDs of children selected in the same period, with a mean age of 5.5 years and a sex ratio (M/F of 2.4. Most of the children had generalized eruption (28/31, more profuse on the face, pelvic region, buttocks and limbs. Mucosal lesions happened in only four children (12.9%. The mean duration of the disease was 14 months. DIF demonstrated linear IgA deposits along the dermal-epidermal junction in all patients. IgG, IgM, and complement were also seen (20/31. Indirect immunofluorescence was negative in 67% of cases. Eight patients responded to dapsone; however, prednisone had to be added in seven children to control the disease and erythromycin in four others. A long-term remission period was achieved in 76.1% of patients. Conclusion: This study confirms that LAD is the most common AIBD in children in Tunisia which frequently occurs in preschool-aged males. Independently of the used drug, a long-term remission is frequently observed.

  18. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Felix; Danielczyk, Antje; Goletz, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich) and hematological (CD20) cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  19. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich and hematological (CD20 cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  20. "Iga päev..." : [luuletused] / Doris Kareva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kareva, Doris, 1958-

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. D. Kareva lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 175. Sisu: "Iga päev..." = "Every day..." ; "Ma nägin unes - Saatan kõneles..." = "I dream that I heard Satan speak..." ; "Viib sünnieelsest unest surmaunne..." = "Rainbow-coloured confusion bears us..." ; "Vaadeldes vikerkaarlevat maailma..." = "Viewing the rainbowing world..." ; "Ei jõua kirjutada puhtandit..." = "No time to write the final draft..." ; "Põletatud luuletused..." = ""Burnt poems..." ; Fraktalia ; Müsteerium 1-5 = Enigma 1-5 ; "Jumal juhtub..." = "God happens..." ; Moira 1-7 = Wishing well 1-7 ; Concerto strumenti e voce

  1. "Iga päev..." : [luuletused] / Doris Kareva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kareva, Doris, 1958-

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. D. Kareva lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 175. Sisu: "Iga päev..." = "Every day..." ; "Ma nägin unes - Saatan kõneles..." = "I dream that I heard Satan speak..." ; "Viib sünnieelsest unest surmaunne..." = "Rainbow-coloured confusion bears us..." ; "Vaadeldes vikerkaarlevat maailma..." = "Viewing the rainbowing world..." ; "Ei jõua kirjutada puhtandit..." = "No time to write the final draft..." ; "Põletatud luuletused..." = ""Burnt poems..." ; Fraktalia ; Müsteerium 1-5 = Enigma 1-5 ; "Jumal juhtub..." = "God happens..." ; Moira 1-7 = Wishing well 1-7 ; Concerto strumenti e voce

  2. Lupus vulgaris with tubercular lymphadenitis and IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaira, Ambar; Rathi, Om P; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sharma, Alok; Dinda, Amit K; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 10-year history of a large crusted plaque over the right thigh for 10 years and small reddish plaque over the left upper back for 3 months. On routine evaluation, she was found to have hematuria. Skin biopsy from the lesion was suggestive of skin tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris), and kidney biopsy showed features of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Fine-needle aspiration from the inguinal lymph node was consistent with granulomatous disease. The patient has been on anti-tubercular treatment, and the hematuria has subsided.

  3. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible ...

  4. Serum Autoantibodies as Biomarkers for Parkinsons Disease: Background and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra A DeMarshall

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are no definitive diagnostic tests for early detection, diagnosis and staging of Parkinson's disease (PD. Available methods have thus far failed to yield high accuracy, are expensive, and can be highly invasive to the patient. The use of serum biomarkers for the diagnosis of early-stage PD has the potential to provide an accurate, inexpensive, and non-invasive alternative to conventional tests. Recently, investigations into the role of the immune system in the development of PD and other diseases have led to the identification of potential PD-specific autoantibodies. This mini review focuses on the background and utility of these autoantibodies as diagnostic biomarkers of PD. Advantages of serum biomarkers as well as potential benefits of a blood-based diagnostic test to clinical medicine are discussed.

  5. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  6. Protein microarray applications: Autoantibody detection and posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atak, Apurva; Mukherjee, Shuvolina; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shabarni; Singh, Vedita Anand; Gahoi, Nikita; K P, Manubhai; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of DNA microarrays was a major milestone in genomics; however, it could not adequately predict the structure or dynamics of underlying protein entities, which are the ultimate effector molecules in a cell. Protein microarrays allow simultaneous study of thousands of proteins/peptides, and various advancements in array technologies have made this platform suitable for several diagnostic and functional studies. Antibody arrays enable researchers to quantify the abundance of target proteins in biological fluids and assess PTMs by using the antibodies. Protein microarrays have been used to assess protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions, and autoantibody profiling in various disease conditions. Here, we summarize different microarray platforms with focus on its biological and clinical applications in autoantibody profiling and PTM studies. We also enumerate the potential of tissue microarrays to validate findings from protein arrays as well as other approaches, highlighting their significance in proteomics.

  7. Immunoregulation by naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    -receptors on antigen-presenting cells and thereby regulate T-cell activity. Knowledge of the influence of NAbs against cytokines on immune homeostasis is likely to have wide-ranging implications both in understanding pathogenesis and in treatment of many immunoinflammatory disorders, including a number of autoimmune......The role of naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs) in homeostasis and in disease manifestations is poorly understood. In the present chapter, we review how NAbs may interfere with the cytokine network and how NAbs, through formation of complement-activating immune complexes with soluble self......-antigens, may promote the uptake and presentation of self-molecules by antigen-presenting cells. Both naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies against a variety of cytokines have been reported, including NAbs against interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony...

  8. [Autoantibody detection by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, U; Conrad, K; Csernok, E; Frank, I; Hiepe, F; Krieger, T; Kromminga, A; Landenberg, P von; Messer, G; Witte, T; Mierau, R

    2009-06-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the presence of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). Diluted patient sera are typically used to screen for the presence of ANA by immunfluorescence microscopy with fixed HEp-2 cells. Despite high-quality test kits, reports of different laboratories frequently present controversial results. This article recommends unified processing and interpretation of HEp-2 based screening for autoantibodies. Suggestions are made for the selection of high-quality test kits, optimized processing and diagnostic procedures. In addition to a relevant clinical diagnosis and an experienced laboratory specialist, the following procedure is highly recommended to achieve good laboratory practice: Initial HEp-2 based screening by indirect immunofluorescence, starting with a 1:80 serum dilution, and evaluation in a bright fluorescence microscope, pathological values from a titer of 1:160 upwards, internal quality checks and unified interpretation. We aim to improve diagnosis and care of patients with autoimmune diseases as a central focus of the European Autoimmunity Standardization Initiative (EASI).

  9. Pathogenicity of autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Vafia

    Full Text Available Recently, the C-terminus of laminin γ1 has been identified as target antigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid and the disease was renamed as anti-laminin γ1 pemphigoid. However, the pathogenic relevance of these autoantibodies has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, we employed an ex vivo model of autoantibody-mediated leukocyte-dependent neutrophil activation and dermal-epidermal separation (DES using cryosections of human skin. We showed that anti-p200 pemphigoid sera (n = 7 induced DES in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to sera from healthy controls. Furthermore, laminin γ1-specific IgG and serum depleted from anti-laminin γ1 reactivity were generated using the recombinant C-terminus of laminin γ1 (LAMC1-term; amino acids 1364 to 1609. Interestingly, both fractions labeled the dermal-epidermal-junction (DEJ by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on human foreskin and recognized a 200 kDa protein by immunoblotting with dermal extract. Human and rabbit IgG against LAMC1-cterm failed to attract neutrophils at the DEJ and to induce DES. In contrast, patient serum depleted from LAMC1-cterm reactivity led to the same extent of DES as non-depleted IgG. Repeated injection of rabbit anti-murine LAMC1-cterm IgG into both neonatal and adult C57BL/6mice as well as repetitive immunization of various mouse strains with murine LAMC1-cterm failed to induce macro- and microscopic lesions. In all mice, circulating anti-LAMC1-cterm antibodies were present, but only in some mice, IgG deposits were seen at the DEJ. We conclude that autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid sera are pathogenic while pathogenicity is not mediated by autoantibodies against laminin γ1. Further studies are needed to identify the pathogenically relevant autoantigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid.

  10. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis:What do autoantibodies tell us?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC) is a chronic,progressive,cholestatic,organ-specific autoimmune disease of unknown etiology.It predominantly affects middle-aged women,and is characterized by autoimmune-mediated destruction of small-and medium-size intrahepatic bile ducts,portal inflammation and progressive scarring,which without proper treatment can ultimately lead to fibrosis and hepatic failure.Serum autoantibodies are crucial tools for differential diagnosis of PBC.While it is currently accepted that antim...

  12. Female Infertility and Serum Auto-antibodies: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroux, Alban; Dumestre-Perard, Chantal; Dunand-Faure, Camille; Bouillet, Laurence; Hoffmann, Pascale

    2016-09-14

    On average, 10 % of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Auto-immune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome) accounts for a part of these cases. In the last 20 years, aspecific auto-immunity, defined as positivity of auto-antibodies in blood sample without clinical or biological criteria for defined diseases, has been evoked in a subpopulation of infertile women. A systematic review was performed (PUBMED) using the MESH search terms "infertility" and "auto-immunity" or "reproductive technique" or "assisted reproduction" or "in vitro fertilization" and "auto-immunity." We retained clinical and physiopathological studies that were applicable to the clinician in assuming joint management of both infertility associated with serum auto-antibodies in women. Thyroid auto-immunity which affects thyroid function could be a cause of infertility; even in euthyroidia, the presence of anti-thyroperoxydase antibodies and/or thyroglobulin are related to infertility. The presence of anti-phospholipid (APL) and/or anti-nuclear (ANA) antibodies seems to be more frequent in the population of infertile women; serum auto-antibodies are associated with early ovarian failure, itself responsible for fertility disorders. However, there exist few publications on this topic. The methods of dosage, as well as the clinical criteria of unexplained infertility deserve to be standardized to allow a precise response to the question of the role of serum auto-antibodies in these women. The direct pathogenesis of this auto-immunity is unknown, but therapeutic immunomodulators, prescribed on a case-by-case basis, could favor pregnancy even in cases of unexplained primary or secondary infertility.

  13. Autoimmune disease and multiple autoantibodies in 42 patients with RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaio, Caio R D C; Carvalho, Jozélio F; da Silva, Clovis A; Bueno, Cleonice; Brasil, Amanda S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Jorge, Alexander A L; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R

    2012-05-01

    The association of RASopathies [Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan-related syndromes] and autoimmune disorders has been reported sporadically. However, a concomitant evaluation of autoimmune diseases and an assessment of multiple autoantibodies in a large population of patients with molecularly confirmed RASopathy have not been performed. The clinical and laboratory features were analyzed in 42 RASopathy patients, the majority of whom had NS and five individuals had Noonan-related disorders. The following autoantibodies were measured: Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-SS-A/Ro, anti-SS-B/La, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-Scl-70, anti-Jo-1, anti-ribosomal P, IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL), thyroid, anti-smooth muscle, anti-endomysial (AE), anti-liver cytosolic protein type 1 (LC1), anti-parietal cell (APC), anti-mitochondrial (AM) antibodies, anti-liver-kidney microsome type 1 antibodies (LKM-1), and lupus anticoagulant. Six patients (14%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for autoimmune diseases [systemic lupus erythematous, polyendocrinopathy (autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease), primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), autoimmune hepatitis, vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroiditis]. Autoimmune antibodies were observed in 52% of the patients. Remarkably, three (7%) of the patients had specific gastrointestinal and liver autoantibodies without clinical findings. Autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies were frequently present in patients with RASopathies. Until a final conclusion of the real incidence of autoimmunity in Rasopathy is drawn, the physicians should be alerted to the possibility of this association and the need for a fast diagnosis, proper referral to a specialist and ultimately, adequate treatment.

  14. Autoantibodies and Neuropsychiatric events at diagnosis of SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, J. G.; Urowitz, M. B.; Siannis, F.; Farewell, V.; Gordon, C.; Bae, S.C.; Isenberg, D.; Dooley, M.A.; Clarke, A.; Bernatsky, S.; Gladman, D.; Fortin, P.R.; Manzi, S.; Steinsson, K.; Bruce, I.; Ginzler, E.; Aranow, C.; Wallace, D.J.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Van Vollenhoven, R.; Sturfelt, G.; Nived, O.; Sanchez-Guerrero, J.; Alarcón, G.S.; Petri, M.; Khamashta, M.; Zoma, A.; Kalunian, K.; Douglas, J.; Qi, Qiufen; Merrill, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between neuropsychiatric (NP) events with antiphospholipid antibodies (lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin), anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies in an international inception cohort. Methods NP events were identified using the ACR case definitions and clustered into central/peripheral and diffuse/focal events. Attribution of NP events was determined using decision rules of different stringency (model A and model B). Autoantibodies were measured without knowledge of NP events or their attribution. Results 412 patients (87.3% female; mean (± SD) age of 34.9 ± 13.5 years; mean disease duration 5.0 ± 4.2 months) were studied. There were 214 NP events in 133 (32.3%) patients. NP events attributed to SLE varied from 15% (model A) to 36% (model B). There was no association between autoantibodies and NP events from all causes. However the frequency of anti-ribosomal P antibodies in patients with NP events due to SLE (model A) was 4/24 (16.6%) compared to 3/109 (2.8%) for all other NP events and 24/279 (8.6%) with no NP events (P=0.07). Furthermore anti-ribosomal P antibodies in patients with central NP events attributed to SLE (model A) was 4/20 (20%) vs. 3/107 (2.8%) for other NP events and 24/279 (8.6%) with no NP events (P = 0.04). For diffuse NP events the antibody frequencies were 3/11 (27%) compared to 4/111 (3.6%) and 24/279 (8.6%) respectively (P=0.02). Conclusion NP events at onset of SLE were associated with anti-ribosomal P antibodies, suggesting a pathogenetic role for this autoantibody. There was no association with other autoantibodies. PMID:18311802

  15. Clinical Relevance of Autoantibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Bullous Dermatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lilla Mihályi; Mária Kiss; Attila Dobozy; Lajos Kemény; Sándor Husz

    2012-01-01

    The authors present their experience related to the diagnosis, treatment, and followup of 431 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 14 patients with juvenile bullous pemphigoid, and 273 patients with pemphigus. The detection of autoantibodies plays an outstanding role in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Paraneoplastic pemphigoid is suggested to be a distinct entity from the group of bullous pemphigoid in view of the linear C3 deposits along the basement membrane of the perilesional skin ...

  16. Neuromyelitis optica in a young child with positive serum autoantibody

    OpenAIRE

    Loma, Ingrid P.; Asato, Miya R.; Filipink, Robyn A.; Alper, Gulay

    2008-01-01

    Relapsing neuromyelitis optica is rare in children. The identification of highly specific serum autoantibody marker (neuromyelitis optica –immunoglobulin G) differentiates neuromyelitis optica from other demyelinating disorders particularly in clinically challenging cases. We present a child with multiple episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis with positive neuromyelitis optica-immunoglobulin G titers consistent with a diagnosis of relapsing neuromyelitis optica. Serial titers of ...

  17. Adenine nucleotide concentrations in patients with erythrocyte autoantibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, V F; Sokol, R J; Rodgers, S A; Hewitt, S.

    1985-01-01

    Erythrocyte adenine nucleotide concentrations were measured in 154 patients with erythrocyte autoantibodies and 811 normal subjects using a luciferin-luciferase bioluminescent assay. The patients were initially divided into haemolysing and non-haemolysing groups. Red cell adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were significantly raised in the 96 patients with active haemolysis compared with the normal subjects and with the 58 patients in the non-haemolysing group. Although the patients c...

  18. Extrahepatic Manifestations and Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders.

  19. Extrahepatic manifestations and autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders.

  20. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  1. A case of vancomycin-associated linear IgA bullous dermatosis and IgA antibodies to the α3 subunit of laminin-332.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenke, Y; Nakano, T; Eto, H; Koga, H; Hashimoto, T

    2014-04-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare autoimmune bullous disease, which is defined by the histopathological finding of subepidermal vesicles with neutrophilic infiltration and linear IgA deposits in the basement membrane zone, revealed by immunofluorescence study. We present a case of LABD in which vancomycin (VCM) administration triggered LABD, and immunoblot analysis showed IgA antibodies reactive to the 145- and 165-kDa α3 subunits of laminin-332. This is the first report of VCM-associated LABD in which the target antigen was laminin-332. In the present case, we were compelled to continue administration of VCM along with systemic steroids, which eventually led to the attenuation of the symptoms, normalization of the serum IgA level, and negative results on both indirect immunofluorescence of 1 mol L(-1) NaCl-split skin and immunoblot analysis.

  2. [Pathomechanisms of autoantibody production against the nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    In immune-mediated neurological disorders, the production of autoantibodies against the nervous system occurs mainly because of impaired immune tolerance. In myasthenia gravis (MG), the thymus shows pathologic alterations, particularly in anti-AChR antibody-positive patients. Further, resection of the thymus induces a clinical recovery. The MG thymus contains all the elements, including AChR antigens, AChR-specific T cells, and antigen-secreting B cells, that are required to initiate and sustain autoantibody production. Central tolerance, established by the repertoire selection of immature T lymphocytes in the thymus, is impaired in MG patients who are positive for anti-AChR antibodies. Recent evidence suggests that chronic inflammation elicited by viral infection is important for the production of AChR antibodies. Antibodies against ganglioside are crucial for the diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Molecular mimicry between the lipooligosaccharides of Camplylobacter jejuni and gangliosides of the peripheral nerve causes the production of antibodies. However, less than 1 in 1000 patients infected with C. jejuni develop GBS. This fact suggests that some host factors might influence the production of antibodies. A recent hypothesis suggests that transient impairment of peripheral tolerance due to infection may play a crucial role in GBS pathogenesis. In summary, autoantibody production might correlate with the impairment of immune tolerance as well as with innate immunity.

  3. Evidence for local expansion of IgA plasma cell precursors in human ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuvaraj, S.; Dijkstra, G.; Burgerhof, J.G.M.; Dammers, P.M.; Stoel, M.; Visser, Annie; Kroese, F.G.M.; Bos, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    IgA plays a crucial role in establishment and maintenance of mucosal homeostasis between host cells and commensal bacteria. To this end, numerous IgA plasma cells are located in the intestinal lamina propria. Whether the (immediate) precursor cells for these plasma cells can expand locally is not

  4. Rat salivary gland reveals a more restricted IgA repertoire than ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoel, Maaike; Evenhuis, Willem N. H.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    Secretory IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig in different mucosal tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and the salivary glands. These mucosal tissues are considered to be part of the common mucosal immune system. The specificity and immunoglobulin (19) V-H gene repertoire of the IgA

  5. Pathogenic role of (S)IgA in IgA nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortwijn, Beatrijs Dorinda

    2007-01-01

    Primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis world wide and leads to end stage renal disease in 30-50% of patients. The hallmark of IgAN is the deposition of IgA1 in the mesangial area of the kidney. Since the inflammatory response which leads to progressive

  6. The tetraspanin CD37 protects against glomerular IgA deposition and renal pathology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rops, A.L.; Figdor, C.G.; Schaaf, A. van der; Tamboer, W.P.M.; Bakker, M.; Berden, J.H.M.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Steenbergen, E.J.; Vlag, J. van der; Spriel, A.B. van

    2010-01-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37(-/-)) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that

  7. Salivary IgA response of triathletes participating in the French Iron Tour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libicz, S; Mercier, B; Bigou, N; Le Gallais, D; Castex, F

    2006-05-01

    Athletes are susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) during intense training and after major competitions. Secretory IgA, which is the predominant antibody of the mucosal immune system, is the major effector of host-resistance to many microorganisms causing URTI. Previous studies have shown that salivary IgA-mediated immunity decreases after a single short distance triathlon, but the effect of repeated triathlon competitions on secretory IgA levels remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the salivary IgA response of elite triathletes in repeated triathlon races during the 2001 French Iron Tour (FIT). Eight triathletes participated in this study. Saliva samples were collected daily after waking up (fasting basal state), before (pre-race) and after (post-race) each day's competition. Salivary IgA, total protein, and flow rate were measured. Salivary IgA concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The salivary flow rate was significantly decreased after each race compared with the fasting basal state (p < 0.01). The salivary IgA concentration of the fasting basal state decreased over the FIT and was even lower than that of the post-race values (p < 0.05). The salivary IgA secretion rate of the fasting basal state decreased by 51.9% over the FIT (p < 0.05). Our data suggest that intense exercise repeated daily has a cumulative negative effect on basal levels of salivary IgA.

  8. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis in a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Waal, RIF; Van de Scheur, MR; Pas, HH; Jonkman, MF; Van Groeningen, CJ; Nieboer, C; Starink, TM

    2001-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations, characterized by linear deposition of IgA along the epidermal basement membrane zone. We report a patient with a metastasized renal cell carcinoma who developed an extensive

  9. The Role of TNF Superfamily Member 13 in the Progression of IgA Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Seok; Yang, Seung Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Hang-Rae; Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Sangmoon; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Hajeong; Lee, Jung Pyo; Jung, Ji Yong; Kim, Sejoong; Joo, Kwon Wook; Lim, Chun Soo; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Dong Ki

    2016-11-01

    TNF superfamily member 13 (TNFSF13) has been identified as a susceptibility gene for IgA nephropathy in recent genetic studies. However, the role of TNFSF13 in the progression of IgA nephropathy remains unresolved. We evaluated two genetic polymorphisms (rs11552708 and rs3803800) and plasma levels of TNFSF13 in 637 patients with IgA nephropathy, and determined the risk of ESRD according to theses variable. Neither of the examined genetic polymorphisms associated with a clinical outcome of IgA nephropathy. However, high plasma levels of TNFSF13 increased the risk of ESRD. To explore the causal relationship and underlying mechanism, we treated B cells from patients (n=21) with or without recombinant human TNFSF13 (rhTNFSF13) and measured the expression of IgA and galactose-deficient IgA (GdIgA) using ELISA and flow cytometry. Treatment with rhTNFSF13 significantly increased the total IgA level among B cells, and TNFSF13 receptor blockade abrogated this increase. Furthermore, the absolute levels of GdIgA increased with rhTNFSF13 treatment, but the total IgA-normalized levels did not change. Both RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR results showed that rhTNFSF13 did not alter the expression of glycosyltransferase enzymes. These results suggest that high plasma TNFSF13 levels associate with a worse prognosis of IgA nephropathy through the relative increase in GdIgA levels.

  10. Pathogenic role of (S)IgA in IgA nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortwijn, Beatrijs Dorinda

    2007-01-01

    Primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis world wide and leads to end stage renal disease in 30-50% of patients. The hallmark of IgAN is the deposition of IgA1 in the mesangial area of the kidney. Since the inflammatory response which leads to progressive r

  11. BALB/c and C57BL/6 Mice Differ in Polyreactive IgA Abundance, which Impacts the Generation of Antigen-Specific IgA and Microbiota Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Floris; Zagato, Elena; Mazzini, Elisa; Fosso, Bruno; Manzari, Caterina; El Aidy, Sahar; Chiavelli, Andrea; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Sethi, Maya K; Pabst, Oliver; Marzano, Marinella; Moretti, Silvia; Romani, Luigina; Penna, Giuseppe; Pesole, Graziano; Rescigno, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interrelationship between IgAs and microbiota diversity is still unclear. Here we show that BALB/c mice had higher abundance and diversity of IgAs than C57BL/6 mice and that this correlated with increased microbiota diversity. We show that polyreactive IgAs mediated the entrance of non-invasive

  12. Serum Galactose-Deficient IgA1 Level Is Not Associated with Proteinuria in Children with IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colleen Hastings

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Percentage of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1 relative to total IgA in serum was recently reported to correlate with proteinuria at time of sampling and during follow-up for pediatric and adult patients with IgA nephropathy. We sought to determine whether this association exists in another cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy. Methods. Subjects were younger than 18 years at entry. Blood samples were collected on one or more occasions for determination of serum total IgA and Gd-IgA1. Gd-IgA1 was expressed as serum level and percent of total IgA. Urinary protein/creatinine ratio was calculated for random specimens. Spearman’s correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between study variables. Results. The cohort had 29 Caucasians and 11 African-Americans with a male : female ratio of 1.9 : 1. Mean age at diagnosis was 11.7 ± 3.7 years. No statistically significant correlation was identified between serum total IgA, Gd-IgA1, or percent Gd-IgA1 versus urinary protein/creatinine ratio determined contemporaneously with biopsy or between average serum Gd-IgA1 or average percent Gd-IgA1 and time-average urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusion. The magnitude of proteinuria in this cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy was influenced by factors other than Gd-IgA1 level, consistent with the proposed multi-hit pathogenetic pathways for this renal disease.

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    emergence of pandemic strains, a new class of broadly neutralizing antibodies has been recently discovered and may be the key to developing a “universal” influenza virus vaccine. While much has been learned about the biology of these antibodies, most studies have focused only on monoclonal antibodies of IgG subtypes. However, the study of monoclonal antibodies often fails to capture the complexity of antibody functions that occur during natural polyclonal responses. Here, we provide the first detailed analyses of the biological activity of these antibodies in polyclonal contexts, comparing both IgG and IgA isotypes isolated from human donors. The striking differences observed in the functional properties of broadly neutralizing antibodies in polyclonal contexts will be essential for guiding design of “universal” influenza virus vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:25589655

  14. Association of liver cirrhosis related IgA nephropathy with portal hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A high incidence of IgA nephropathy has been reported in patients with liver cirrhosis, though, clinically evident nephrotic syndrome is very uncommon. Impaired hepatic clearance of circulating IgA immune complexes and subsequent deposition in renal glomeruli has been considered principally in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis associated IgA nephropathy. Here we report on a patient with cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and splenic vein thrombosis, who presented with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy showed findings consistent with IgA nephropathy. Lower endoscopy showed features of portal hypertensive colopathy. Following initiation of propranolol and anticoagulant treatment to reduce portal pressure, a gradual decrease of proteinuria and hematuria to normal range was noted. The potential pathogenetic role of portal hypertension in the development of IgA nephropathy in cirrhotic patients is discussed.

  15. Association of liver cirrhosis related IgA nephropathy with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalambokis, Georgios; Christou, Leonidas; Stefanou, Dimitrios; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2007-11-21

    A high incidence of IgA nephropathy has been reported in patients with liver cirrhosis, though, clinically evident nephrotic syndrome is very uncommon. Impaired hepatic clearance of circulating IgA immune complexes and subsequent deposition in renal glomeruli has been considered principally in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis associated IgA nephropathy. Here we report on a patient with cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and splenic vein thrombosis, who presented with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy showed findings consistent with IgA nephropathy. Lower endoscopy showed features of portal hypertensive colopathy. Following initiation of propranolol and anticoagulant treatment to reduce portal pressure, a gradual decrease of proteinuria and hematuria to normal range was noted. The potential pathogenetic role of portal hypertension in the development of IgA nephropathy in cirrhotic patients is discussed.

  16. Impaired selection of IgA and intestinal dysbiosis associated with PD-1-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruya, Mikako; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Kato, Lucia M; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2013-01-01

    A major function of immunoglobulin A (IgA) is to maintain balanced bacterial communities in the gut. We have previously shown that diversification of IgA upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) is critical for IgA function yet the principles governing the selection of IgA in the gut have remained elusive. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding this process as revealed by our studies in mice that lack the inhibitory co-receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). We found that PD-1 affects the dynamics of germinal center (GC) B cells by controlling the number and the nature of T helper cells in the Peyer's patches (PPs). Deregulation of the T cell compartment impacts the selection of IgA plasma cells leading to gut dysbiosis. When the PD-1-dependent checkpoint is missing, gut bacteria go beyond the mucosal barrier and induce systemic GCs that can generate antibodies with auto-reactive properties.

  17. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant.

  18. Reactivities of N-acetylgalactosamine-specific lectins with human IgA1 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, J.S.; Kulhavy, R.; Tomana, M.

    2007-01-01

    Lectins are proteins with specificity of binding to certain monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. They can detect abnormal glycosylation patterns on immunoglobulins in patients with various chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, lectins...... exhibit binding heterogeneity, depending on their source and methods of isolation. To characterize potential differences in recognition of terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) on IgA1, we evaluated the binding characteristics of several commercial preparations of GalNAc-specific lectins using a panel...... of IgA1 and, as controls, IgA2 and IgG myeloma proteins. These lectins originated from snails Helix aspersa (HAA) and Helix pomatia (HPA), and the plant Vicia villosa (VV). Only HAA and HPA bound exclusively to IgA1, with its O-linked glycans composed of GalNAc, galactose, and sialic acid. In contrast...

  19. PetIGA: A framework for high-performance isogeometric analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Dalcin, L.

    2016-05-25

    We present PetIGA, a code framework to approximate the solution of partial differential equations using isogeometric analysis. PetIGA can be used to assemble matrices and vectors which come from a Galerkin weak form, discretized with Non-Uniform Rational B-spline basis functions. We base our framework on PETSc, a high-performance library for the scalable solution of partial differential equations, which simplifies the development of large-scale scientific codes, provides a rich environment for prototyping, and separates parallelism from algorithm choice. We describe the implementation of PetIGA, and exemplify its use by solving a model nonlinear problem. To illustrate the robustness and flexibility of PetIGA, we solve some challenging nonlinear partial differential equations that include problems in both solid and fluid mechanics. We show strong scaling results on up to 40964096 cores, which confirm the suitability of PetIGA for large scale simulations.

  20. Role of Natural Autoantibodies in Ugandans With Rheumatic Heart Disease and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Huck

    2016-03-01

    Interpretation: We found that HIV and RHD are associated with alterations in natural autoantibody responses previously linked to an increased risk for atherosclerosis and autoimmune inflammatory disease.

  1. Injection of recombinant Fc alpha RI/CD89 in mice does not induce mesangial IgA deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Boog, PJM; van Kooten, C; van Zandbergen, G; Klar-Mohamad, N; Oortwijn, B; Bos, NA; van Remoortere, A; Hokke, CH; de Fijter, JW; Daha, MR

    2004-01-01

    Background. Earlier studies have suggested that complexes of the human IgA receptor FcalphaRI/CD89 with mouse IgA are pathogenic upon deposition in the renal mesangium. Transgenic mice expressing FcalphaRI/CD89 on macrophages/monocytes developed massive mesangial IgA deposition and a clinical

  2. Restricted IgA repertoire in both B-1 and B-2 cell-derived gut plasmablasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoel, M; Jiang, HQ; van Diemen, CC; Bun, JCAM; Dammers, PM; Thurnheer, MC; Kroese, FGM; Cebra, JJ; Bos, NA

    2005-01-01

    Mucosal IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig upon colonization of the intestinal tract with commensal organisms in the majority of mammals. The repertoire of these IgA molecules is still largely unknown; a large amount of the mucosal IgA cannot be shown to react with the inducing microorganisms.

  3. [Evaluation of the new Hevylite™ IgA assay for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakomy, Daniela; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Denimal, Damien; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Lafon, Ingrid; Caillot, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma diagnosis and follow-up are based on monoclonal protein measurement. The estimation of monoclonal immunoglobulin production requires serum protein electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis and free light chain assay. However these classical assays have some limitations. Hevylite™ IgA (Binding Site) is a new nephelometric/turbidimetric assay allowing the IgA κ and IgA λ measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of this assay, for the diagnosis and follow-up of myeloma patients at different stages. Sixty seven frozen sera from 26 patients were assayed. Total IgA, IgA κ, IgA λ concentrations, serum protein electrophoresis and serum immunofixation were performed at diagnosis and during follow-up. All myeloma patients had an abnormal IgA κ/IgA λ ratio at diagnosis. During disease monitoring, the IgA κ or IgA λ concentrations correlated well with the electrophoretic estimation of the monoclonal spike and the values of total IgA. Hevylite™ test was more sensitive than serum protein electrophoresis and provided numerical and reproductible assessment of the monoclonal and non-monoclonal isotype. The IgA κ/IgA λ ratio allowed early prediction of disease relapse. Hevylite™ is an interesting assay especially when the monoclonal IgA comigrates on electrophoresis with normal proteins making impossible a reliable densitometric estimation. Hevylite™ might become an important assay in the biological exploration of gammopathies.

  4. An Anti-EGFR IgA That Displays Improved Pharmacokinetics and Myeloid Effector Cell Engagement In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Stefan; Meyer, Saskia; Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; Jansen, J H Marco; Nederend, Maaike; Kretschmer, Anna; Klausz, Katja; Möginger, Uwe; Derer, Stefanie; Rösner, Thies; Kellner, Christian; Schewe, Denis; Sondermann, Peter; Tiwari, Sanjay; Kolarich, Daniel; Peipp, Matthias; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Valerius, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies of IgA isotype effectively engage myeloid effector cells for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we describe preclinical studies with an Fc engineered IgA2m(1) antibody containing the variable regions of the EGFR antibody cetuximab. Compared with wild-type IgA2m(1), the engineered molecule lacked

  5. Injection of recombinant Fc alpha RI/CD89 in mice does not induce mesangial IgA deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Boog, PJM; van Kooten, C; van Zandbergen, G; Klar-Mohamad, N; Oortwijn, B; Bos, NA; van Remoortere, A; Hokke, CH; de Fijter, JW; Daha, MR

    2004-01-01

    Background. Earlier studies have suggested that complexes of the human IgA receptor FcalphaRI/CD89 with mouse IgA are pathogenic upon deposition in the renal mesangium. Transgenic mice expressing FcalphaRI/CD89 on macrophages/monocytes developed massive mesangial IgA deposition and a clinical pictur

  6. IgA antibodies to myeloperoxidase in patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Esha; Hummel, Amber; Allmannsberger, Lisa; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Pagnoux, Christian; Hoffman, Gary S; Jenne, Dieter E; Khalidi, Nader A; Koening, Curry L; Langford, Carol A; McAlear, Carol A; Moreland, Larry; Seo, Philip; Sreih, Antoine; Ytterberg, Steven R; Merkel, Peter A; Specks, Ulrich; Monach, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies of IgA (IgA anti-MPO) isotype in patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), and the association of the IgA antibodies with IgG anti-MPO and with disease activity. Serum samples from patients with EGPA followed in a multicenter longitudinal cohort were tested by ELISA for the presence of IgA anti-MPO and IgG anti-MPO antibodies. Sera from 87 healthy controls were used to define a positive test. Sera from 168 patients with EGPA (298 samples) were tested. Frequencies of positive testing for IgA anti-MPO were compared between patients with active EGPA, patients in remission, and controls. IgA anti-MPO was detected in 10 of 168 (6%) patients with EGPA (11 of 298 serum samples) compared to 1 of 87 (1%) healthy controls (p=0.10). All 11 samples testing positive for IgA anti-MPO also tested positive for IgG anti-MPO. Ninety samples tested positive for IgG anti-MPO but negative for IgA. Samples taken during active EGPA were positive for IgA anti-MPO in 6/72 cases (8%), compared to 5/226 (2%) during remission (p=0.03). Among samples taken during moderate or high disease activity, 5/41 were positive (12%, p=0.01 compared to remission). Although IgA anti-MPO antibodies are detectable in some patients with EGPA and may be detectable more frequently during active disease, their presence seems unlikely to provide information beyond what is obtained from conventional IgG anti-MPO.

  7. The tetraspanin protein CD37 regulates IgA responses and anti-fungal immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek B van Spriel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A (IgA secretion by plasma cells in the immune system is critical for protecting the host from environmental and microbial infections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of IgA(+ plasma cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the B cell-expressed tetraspanin CD37 inhibits IgA immune responses in vivo. CD37-deficient (CD37-/- mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of IgA in serum and significantly elevated numbers of IgA(+ plasma cells in spleen, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue, as well as bone marrow. Analyses of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that CD37-deficiency on B cells was directly responsible for the increased IgA production. We identified high local interleukin-6 (IL-6 production in germinal centers of CD37-/- mice after immunization. Notably, neutralizing IL-6 in vivo reversed the increased IgA response in CD37-/- mice. To demonstrate the importance of CD37-which can associate with the pattern-recognition receptor dectin-1-in immunity to infection, CD37-/- mice were exposed to Candida albicans. We report that CD37-/- mice are evidently better protected from infection than wild-type (WT mice, which was accompanied by increased IL-6 levels and C. albicans-specific IgA antibodies. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CD37-/- serum mediated protection in WT mice and the underlying mechanism involved direct neutralization of fungal cells by IgA. Taken together, tetraspanin protein CD37 inhibits IgA responses and regulates the anti-fungal immune response.

  8. Determination of levels of salivary IgA subclasses in patients with minor recurrent aphthous ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Saluja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recurrent Aphthous Ulcer (RAU is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent, painful oral ulcers. It is of multifactorial etiology. Salivary immunoglobulins have important role in the protection of mucosal surfaces. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine salivary immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1 and IgA2 in acute and remission phases of the disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty clinically confirmed cases of RAU and 30 age-and sex-matched controls were included in the study. After detailed case history and thorough clinical examination, 2 mL of saliva was collected in both acute and remission phases of the disease. The obtained saliva samples were subjected to quantification of IgA1 and IgA2 levels using RID kit. Results: The mean IgA2 level was significantly higher (P<.001 in both acute and remission phase of the study group. The mean IgA1 level also showed a significant increase in the acute phase compared to remission as well as controls (P<.05. Females exhibited a higher level in acute phase for IgA1 and in both phases for IgA2 (P<.05. Conclusion: The results associated with clinical observations suggest that acute phase is characterized with increase in IgA2 that might reflect increased immune response as a possible result of the microbial stimulation seen in the acute phase in comparison to the remission period. IgA plays an important role in the pathogenesis of RAU and it can be used as a parameter to assess the mucosal immune status

  9. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis.

  10. Gluten induces coeliac-like disease in sensitised mice involving IgA, CD71 and transglutaminase 2 interactions that are prevented by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papista, Christina; Gerakopoulos, Vassilis; Kourelis, Andreas; Sounidaki, Maria; Kontana, Anastasia; Berthelot, Laureline; Moura, Ivan C; Monteiro, Renato C; Yiangou, Minas

    2012-04-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a malabsorptive enteropathy resulting from intolerance to gluten. Environmental factors and the microbiota are suggested to have critical roles in the onset of CD. The CD71 IgA receptor on epithelial cells is responsible for abnormal retrotranscytosis of IgA-gluten peptide complexes from the intestinal lumen into the lamina propria, inducing intestinal inflammation. However, understanding the role of gluten in the CD physiopathology has been hindered by the absence of relevant animal models. Here, we generated a mouse model for CD to study the factors controlling its pathogenesis as well as to investigate the influence of oral delivery of probiotics on disease development. Gluten sensitivity was established by feeding three generations of BALB/c mice a gluten-free diet (G-) followed by gluten challenge (G+) for 30 days. The G+ mice developed villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and infiltration of T cells and macrophages in the small intestine. Inflammation was associated with an overexpression of CD71 on the apical side of enterocytes and an increase of plasma cells producing IgA, which colocalised with the CD71. Moreover, IgA colocalised with the transglutaminase 2 (TG2), the production of which was increased in the lamina propria of G+ mice. These mice displayed increased production of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), pro-inflammatory cytokines and IL-15, as well as anti-gliadin and anti-TG2 autoantibodies. The commensal flora-isolated presumptive probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii KK1 strain hydrolysed the 28-kDa α-gliadin fraction, and its oral delivery in G+ mice improved enteropathy development in association with decrease of epithelial cell CD71 expression and local cytokine production. In conclusion, the G+ BALB/c mouse represents a new mouse model for human CD based on histopathological features and expression of common biomarkers. The selected probiotic treatment reversing disease development will allow the study of the role of probiotics

  11. Association between IL-17 and IgA in the joints of patients with inflammatory arthropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliçabe, Ricardo Javier; Silva, Juan Eduardo; Dave, Mabel Noemí; Lacoste, María Gabriela; Tamashiro, Héctor; Blas, Rodrigo; Munarriz, Alicia; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Di Genaro, María Silvia

    2017-02-06

    Hyperactive secretion and pathogenic effects of interleukin (IL)-17 and IgA have been detected in different arthropathies. Recent evidence has revealed that TH17 cytokines regulate mucosal IgA secretion. However, it is unknown whether and how IL-17 mediates synovial IgA production. Here we aim to investigate the connection of synovial IL-17 with IgA production in the joint. In this study we included synovial fluids (SF) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 66), spondyloarthritis (SpA; n = 18) and osteoarthritis (OA; n = 36). The levels of IL-17, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) and anti-lipopolyssacharide (LPS) immunoglobulin (Ig)A were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Total IgA was measured by radial immunodiffusion assay. Synovial fluid-derived mononuclear cells (SFMC) were stimulated with bacterial antigens or SF-conditioned media, and cytokines and IgA were analyzed in the supernatants. IL-17, IL-6 and TGF-β1 were increased in SF from both RA and SpA compared with OA patients. Concentration of IL-17 correlated with the disease activity score (DAS)-28, IL-6 and anti-LPS IgA levels. Bacterial-stimulated SFMCs from RA and SpA patients secreted higher IL-17 than vehicle-stimulated SFMCs. Conditioned media with SF containing IL-17 induced anti-LPS IgA production by SFMCs which was independent of IL-6 activity. Concentrations of synovial TGF-β1 and BAFF correlated with anti-LPS and total IgA levels, respectively. Blockade of IL-17 decreased the production of TGF-β1 and anti-LPS IgA by SF-stimulated SFMCs. This study reports a connection between IL-17 and IgA secretion in the joint. In addition, it demonstrates that enterobacterial antigens trigger synovial IL-17 production, and that TGF-β1 and BAFF may mediate the effect of IL-17 on IgA production. This circuit may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory joint diseases.

  12. Salivary IgA versus HIV and Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradip Kumar; Mitra, Malay; Acharya, Sonu; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Mohanty, Susant; Saha, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    The inter-relationship of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and dental caries as well as Salivary Immunoglobulin-A (S-IgA) level appear to remain under explored while a manual and electronic search of the literature was made. Hence, the present study was undertaken to assess the relationship of S-IgA and dental caries status in HIV positive children. The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of S-IgA antibody with dental caries by measuring the concentration of IgA in saliva of HIV positive and negative children and determine the dental caries status in HIV positive and HIV negative children, which may help in treatment planning and prevention of the same. A total of 28 HIV positive children aged between 6-14 years and 28 age matched HIV negative children were included in this study and both samples were randomly selected from the same Non-Governmental Organization (NGO). The HIV status of both these samples was confirmed from their medical records provided by the NGO. Only 2cc of unstimulated saliva was collected from both groups in special tubes coded numerically using the method described by Collins and Dawes and the samples were analyzed to measure the concentration of IgA using commercially available ELISA kit (DRG Diagnostics, Germany). Examination of dental caries was carried out according to WHO criteria (1997) using a flat mouth mirror and CPI probe. In HIV +ve group mean S-IgA level was calculated as 81.61 ± 6.20 μg/ml, mean DMFT was 3.86 ± 3.37, mean deft was 4.75 ± 2.86. In HIV -ve group mean S-IgA level was calculated as 145.57 ± 17.83μg/ml, mean DMFT was 2.54 ± 0.69, mean deft was 2.43 ± 2.01. Strong-ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.781, t = 6.38, p 0.05) between S-IgA and deft was found in HIV +ve group. Strong -ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.655, t = 4.42, p IgA and deft (r = -0.942, t =14.32, p=IgA deficiency in general, are more susceptible to dental caries than normal individuals.

  13. Association between anti-thyroid peroxidase and anti-cytokeratin 18 autoantibodies and bronchial asthma in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala A. Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Positive anti-TPO autoantibodies and anti-CK18 autoantibodies in asthmatic patients and their higher level in the non-allergic asthma group may strengthen the presence of a hidden autoimmune phenomenon in non-allergic asthma.

  14. Occurrence of vascular IgA deposits in clinically normal skin of patients with renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faille-Kuyper, E H; Kater, L; Kuijten, R H; Kooiker, C J; Wagenaar, S S; van der Zouwen, P; Mees, E J

    1976-05-01

    Skin and kidney biopsies were performed on 262 patients with various nephropathies. In 45 skin biopsy specimens finely granular deposits of predominantly IgA and late-acting complement factors were detected in the walls of superficial capillaries, sometimes concomitantly with IgM, IgG, C4 or a combination of these proteins. Twelve of the 45 patients presented with anaphylactoid purpura and the majority of the other 33 patients had either recurrent macroscopic or microscopic hematuria. The renal lesions in 32 of these 45 patients consisted of focal segmental intracapillary proliferation. In 35 the kidney biopsy specimen showed mesangial deposits of IgA; in one case IgA was deposited along the glomerular basement membrane. In only three of the remaining 217 patients without cutaneous IgA deposits were typical mesangial IgA deposits found. The close correlation between IgA deposits in cutaneous vessels and focal segmental intracapillary proliferation with mesangial IgA deposits suggests that immunofluorescence examination of skin biopsy specimens could prove of diagnostic value. The results provide additional evidence for a close pathogenic relationship between IgA-associated glomerulonephritis and anaphylactoid purpura.

  15. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Rituximab in IgA Nephropathy with Proteinuria and Renal Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafayette, Richard A; Canetta, Pietro A; Rovin, Brad H; Appel, Gerald B; Novak, Jan; Nath, Karl A; Sethi, Sanjeev; Tumlin, James A; Mehta, Kshama; Hogan, Marie; Erickson, Stephen; Julian, Bruce A; Leung, Nelson; Enders, Felicity T; Brown, Rhubell; Knoppova, Barbora; Hall, Stacy; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2017-04-01

    IgA nephropathy frequently leads to progressive CKD. Although interest surrounds use of immunosuppressive agents added to standard therapy, several recent studies have questioned efficacy of these agents. Depleting antibody-producing B cells potentially offers a new therapy. In this open label, multicenter study conducted over 1-year follow-up, we randomized 34 adult patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy and proteinuria >1 g/d, maintained on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers with well controlled BP and eGFRIgA1 or antibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1 did not change. In this trial, rituximab therapy did not significantly improve renal function or proteinuria assessed over 1 year. Although rituximab effectively depleted B cells, it failed to reduce serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 and antigalactose-deficient IgA1 antibodies. Lack of efficacy of rituximab, at least at this stage and severity of IgA nephropathy, may reflect a failure of rituximab to reduce levels of specific antibodies assigned salient pathogenetic roles in IgA nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Re-thinking the functions of IgA+ plasma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gommerman, Jennifer L; Rojas, Olga L; Fritz, Jörg H

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa harbors the largest population of antibody (Ab)-secreting plasma cells (PC) in the human body, producing daily several grams of immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA has many functions, serving as a first-line barrier that protects the mucosal epithelium from pathogens, toxins and food antigens (Ag), shaping the intestinal microbiota, and regulating host–commensal homeostasis. Signals induced by commensal colonization are central for regulating IgA induction, maintenance, positioning and function and the number of IgA+ PC is dramatically reduced in neonates and germ-free (GF) animals. Recent evidence demonstrates that the innate immune effector molecules tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are required for IgA+ PC homeostasis during the steady state and infection. Moreover, new functions ascribed to PC independent of Ab secretion continue to emerge, suggesting that PC, including IgA+ PC, should be re-examined in the context of inflammation and infection. Here, we outline mechanisms of IgA+ PC generation and survival, reviewing their functions in health and disease. PMID:25483334

  17. Human IgA inhibits adherence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga to epithelial cells and contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Oliver-Aguillón, Gabriela; Vega-Pérez, Luz M; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Hernández-Martínez, Dolores; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; González-Robles, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Specific anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies have been detected in the serum and tears of patients and healthy individuals. However, the role of human secretory IgA antibodies in inhibiting the adherence of Acanthamoeba had not been previously investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to purify secretory IgA from human colostrum and analyze its effect on the adherence of Acanthamoeba trophozoites to contact lenses and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. IgA antibodies to Acanthamoeba polyphaga in colostrum of healthy women as well as in saliva and serum of healthy subjects were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. In serum, saliva, and colostrum, we detected IgA antibodies that recognized several antigens of A. polyphaga. In addition, colostrum and IgA antibodies purified from it inhibited adherence of A. polyphaga trophozoites to contact lenses and MDCK cells. These results suggest that IgA antibodies may participate in the resistance to the amoebic infection, probably by inhibiting the adherence of the trophozoites to contact lenses and corneal epithelial cells.

  18. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  19. Specificity of human anti-variable heavy (VH ) chain autoantibodies and impact on the design and clinical testing of a VH domain antibody antagonist of tumour necrosis factor-α receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, J C; Morley, P J; Wright, T J; Birchler, M A; Lewis, A P; Emmins, R; Chen, Y Z; Powley, W M; Bareille, P J; Wilson, R; Tonkyn, J; Bayliffe, A I; Lazaar, A L

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials of a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-R1 domain antibody (dAb™) antagonist (GSK1995057), infusion reactions consistent with cytokine release were observed in healthy subjects with high levels of a novel, pre-existing human anti-VH (HAVH) autoantibody. In the presence of HAVH autoantibodies, GSK1995057 induced cytokine release in vitro due to binding of HAVH autoantibodies to a framework region of the dAb. The epitope on GSK1995057 was characterized and dAbs with reduced binding to HAVH autoantibodies were generated; pharmacological comparability was determined in human in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal experiments. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to investigate the safety and tolerability of the modified dAb (GSK2862277). A significant reduction in HAVH binding was achieved by adding a single alanine residue at the C-terminus to create GSK2862277. Screening a pool of healthy donors demonstrated a reduced frequency of pre-existing autoantibodies from 51% to 7%; in all other respects, GSK2862277 and the parent dAb were comparable. In the Phase I trial, GSK2862277 was well tolerated by both the inhaled and intravenous routes. One subject experienced a mild infusion reaction with cytokine release following intravenous dosing. Subsequently, this subject was found to have high levels of a novel pre-existing antibody specific to the extended C-terminus of GSK2862277. Despite the reduced binding of GSK2862277 to pre-existing HAVH autoantibodies, adverse effects associated with the presence of a novel pre-existing antibody response specific to the modified dAb framework were identified and highlight the challenge of developing biological antagonists to this class of receptor.

  20. IgA deficiency in wolves from Canada and Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Olsson, Mia; Cluff, H Dean; Evans, Alina L; Hellman, Lars; Månsson, Johan; Arnemo, Jon M; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in both humans and selected breeds of domestic dogs. In both species, IgAD is associated with recurrent infections and immune mediated diseases. Previous results imply that IgAD is also common in the wild ancestor of domestic dogs, the gray wolf. Here, we report that serum IgA concentrations are significantly different in Scandinavian and Canadian wolves (p = 3.252e-15) with an increased prevalence for IgAD in Scandinavian wolves (60%), which is as high as those found in high-risk dog breeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of Progression in IgA Nephropathy in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizerska-Wasiak, M; Małdyk, J; Turczyn, A; Cichoń-Kawa, K; Rybi-Szumińska, A; Wasilewska, A; Bieniaś, B; Zajączkowska, M; Miklaszewska, M; Pietrzyk, J; Demkow, U; Roszkowska-Blaim, M; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the usefulness of potential predictors of poor prognosis in IgA nephropathy in children. The study population consisted of 55 children aged 11 ± 4 years, diagnosed on the basis of the Oxford classification and MEST score of kidney biopsy findings. Proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the IgA/C3 serum ratio were assessed in all patients twice: at onset and at follow-up. The patients were treated with steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Follow-up was at 3.9 ± 2.9 (median 2.7) years. The patients were subdivided into two groups: with GFR IgA/C3 ratio at onset of disease. There was a significant association between GFR reductions at onset and follow-up (AUC = 0.660; p IgA/C3 ratio was higher (p IgA/C3 ratio at onset and reduced GFR (AUC = 0.565; p = 0.46) or proteinuria at follow-up (AUC = 0.263; p = 0.20). We conclude that predictors of poor outcome in childhood IgAN include the following: GFR reduction, nephrotic range proteinuria at onset of disease, and high MEST score in Oxford classification of kidney biopsy. Despite a higher serum IgA/C3 ratio in children with impaired renal function in long-term follow-up, we failed to demonstrate a significant association between this ratio at onset of disease and reduced GFR or persistent proteinuria at follow-up. Thus, IgA/C3 ratio is not a good foreteller of progression of IgA nephropathy in childhood.

  2. IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase: An effective diagnostic test for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncone, R; Maurano, F; Rossi, M; Micillo, M; Greco, L; Auricchio, R; Salerno, G; Salvatore, F; Sacchetti, L

    1999-02-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is the main autoantigen recognized by endomysial antibodies. The aim of this study was to assess sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of IgA and IgG antibodies to tTG in the diagnosis of celiac disease compared with endomysial antibodies. We established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures to measure IgA and IgG antibodies to tTG in sera from 48 untreated and 33 treated patients with celiac disease and from 63 patients with gastrointestinal disease who were in a control group. Sera from 10 patients with celiac disease were examined at various times after gluten was reintroduced into the patients' diet. Both IgA and IgG to tTG were significantly (P <.001) higher in serum of untreated patients with celiac disease versus those in the control group; IgA but not IgG was significantly (P <.001) higher in untreated versus treated patients with celiac disease. IgA and IgG antitissue tTG had a diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92% and 21%, 98% and 97%, and 98% and 83%, respectively. The concordance rate of IgA anti-tTG with IgA antiendomysial antibodies was 95%. In 5 of the 10 patients undergoing gluten challenge, IgA antiendomysium antibodies were detected earlier than IgA anti-tTG antibodies. tTG-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is an effective diagnostic test, although immunofluorescent-based assays are more sensitive, particularly during gluten challenge.

  3. Functional Flexibility of Intestinal IgA – Broadening the Fine Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Emma; Balmer, Maria Luisa; Fritz, Jörg H.; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria outnumber our own human cells in conditions of both health and disease. It has long been recognized that secretory antibody, particularly IgA, is produced in response to these microbes and hypothesized that this must play an important role in defining the relationship between a host and its intestinal microbes. However, the exact role of IgA and the mechanisms by which IgA can act are only beginning to be understood. In this review we attempt to unravel the complex interaction between so-called “natural,” “primitive” (T-cell-independent), and “classical” IgA responses, the nature of the intestinal microbiota/intestinal pathogens and the highly flexible dynamic homeostasis of the mucosal immune system. Such an analysis reveals that low-affinity IgA is sufficient to protect the host from excess mucosal immune activation induced by harmless commensal microbes. However, affinity-maturation of “classical” IgA is essential to provide protection from more invasive commensal species such as segmented filamentous bacteria and from true pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium. Thus a correlation is revealed between “sophistication” of the IgA response and aggressiveness of the challenge. A second emerging theme is that more-invasive species take advantage of host inflammatory mechanisms to more successfully compete with the resident microbiota. In many cases, the function of IgA may be to limit such inflammatory responses, either directly by coagulating or inhibiting virulence of bacteria before they can interact with the host or by modulating immune signaling induced by host recognition. Therefore IgA appears to provide an added layer of robustness in the intestinal ecosystem, promoting “commensal-like” behavior of its residents. PMID:22563329

  4. Comparisons of IgA response in saliva and colostrum against oral streptococci species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo, Barbara Bellocchio; Silva, Camilla Beatriz da; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius Rangel; Ferriani, Virginia Paes Leme; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias

    2017-05-15

    The present study compared IgA specificity against oral streptococci in colostrum and saliva samples. Sixty-two mother-and-child pairs were included; samples of colostrum (C) and saliva (MS) were collected from the mothers and saliva samples were collected from babies (BS). The specificity of IgA against Streptococcus mutans and S. mitis were analyzed by western blot. Only 30% of babies' samples presented IgA reactivity to S. mutans, while 74 and 80% of MS and C, respectively, presented this response. IgA reactivity to S. mutans virulence antigens (Ag I/II, Gtf and GbpB) in positive samples showed differences between samples for Gtf and especially for GbpB (p 0.05). The positive response of Gtf-reactive IgA was different between C (90%) and MS (58%) samples (p 0.05). GbpB was the least detected, with 48 and 26% of C and MS, and only 5% of BS samples presenting reactivity (p > 0.05). Eight percent of MS and C samples presented identical bands to SM in the same time-point. In conclusion, the differences of IgA response found between C and MS can be due to the different ways of stimulation, proliferation and transportation of IgA in those secretions. The colostrum has high levels of IgA against S. mutans virulence antigens, which could affect the installation and accumulation process of S. mutans, mainly by supplying anti-GbpB IgA to the neonate.

  5. Purification and functional characterization of mucosal IgA from vaccinated and SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Thomas; Demberg, Thorsten; Morgan, Ian L.; Estes, Jacob D.; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced mucosal antibodies are often evaluated using small volumes of secretory fluids. However, fecal matter containing mucosal IgA is abundant. We purified fecal IgA from five SIV-vaccinated and five SIV-infected rhesus macaques by sequential affinity chromatography. The purified IgA was dimeric by native PAGE, contained secretory component, and was analogous to IgA in colostrum and vaginal fluid by western blot. IgA from one infected and four vaccinated animals neutralized H9-derived SIVmac251 with IC50s as low as 1µg/mL. Purified IgAs inhibited transcytosis and exhibited phagocytic activity, the latter significantly correlated with SIVmac251 Env-specific IgA in the purified samples. Among different affinity resins, peptide M was optimal compared to jacalin, anti-monkey IgA and SSL7 for IgA purification, as confirmed using tandem peptide M/anti-monkey IgA columns. Fecal IgA provided material sufficient for several assays relevant to protective efficacy, and was shown to be multifunctional. Our approach is potentially applicable to human clinical studies. PMID:25840105

  6. Purification and functional characterization of mucosal IgA from vaccinated and SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Thomas; Demberg, Thorsten; Morgan, Ian L; Estes, Jacob D; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2015-06-01

    Vaccine-induced mucosal antibodies are often evaluated using small volumes of secretory fluids. However, fecal matter containing mucosal IgA is abundant. We purified fecal IgA from five SIV-vaccinated and five SIV-infected rhesus macaques by sequential affinity chromatography. The purified IgA was dimeric by native PAGE, contained secretory component, and was analogous to IgA in colostrum and vaginal fluid by western blot. IgA from one infected and four vaccinated animals neutralized H9-derived SIV(mac)251 with IC(50)s as low as 1 μg/mL. Purified IgAs inhibited transcytosis and exhibited phagocytic activity, the latter significantly correlated with SIV(mac)251 Env-specific IgA in the purified samples. Among different affinity resins, peptide M was optimal compared to jacalin, anti-monkey IgA and SSL7 for IgA purification, as confirmed using tandem peptide M/anti-monkey IgA columns. Fecal IgA provided material sufficient for several assays relevant to protective efficacy, and was shown to be multifunctional. Our approach is potentially applicable to human clinical studies.

  7. Serum Autoantibody Measurement for the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Catrin H.; Irving, William; Robertson, John F. R.; Murray, Andrea; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B.; Macdonald, Isabel K.; McElveen, Jane; Allen, Jared; Healey, Graham F.; Thomson, Brian J.; Ryder, Stephen J.; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Chapman, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with liver disease, and especially those with Hepatitis B or C, are at an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Inadequate screening tests largely account for presentation of advanced tumours and high mortality rates. Early detection of HCC amongst high-risk groups is paramount in improving prognosis. This research aimed to further characterise the previously described humoral immune response raised to tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) in the serum of patients with HCC. Methods Serum from 96 patients with confirmed HCC, 96 healthy controls matched for age and sex, 78 patients with confirmed liver cirrhosis and 91 patients with confirmed chronic liver disease were analysed for the presence of IgG autoantibodies raised to 41 recombinant TAAs/antigen fragments by ELISA. Results Varying autoantibody specificities (97–100%) and sensitivities (0–10%) were observed to individual TAAs. A 21-antigen panel achieved a specificity of 92% and sensitivity of 45% for the detection of HCC. This same panel identified 21% of 169 high-risk controls as having elevated autoantibody levels. A reproducible panel of 10 antigens achieved a specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 41% in HCC. 15% of 152 high-risk controls gave positive results with this panel. Conclusions This minimally invasive blood test has the potential to offer advantages over currently available tools for the identification of HCC amongst pre-disposed patients. Results are comparable to current gold standards in HCC (Ultrasonography) and to similar tests in other cancers (EarlyCDT-Lung). PMID:25093332

  8. Serum autoantibody measurement for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin H Middleton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with liver disease, and especially those with Hepatitis B or C, are at an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC which is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Inadequate screening tests largely account for presentation of advanced tumours and high mortality rates. Early detection of HCC amongst high-risk groups is paramount in improving prognosis. This research aimed to further characterise the previously described humoral immune response raised to tumour-associated antigens (TAAs in the serum of patients with HCC. METHODS: Serum from 96 patients with confirmed HCC, 96 healthy controls matched for age and sex, 78 patients with confirmed liver cirrhosis and 91 patients with confirmed chronic liver disease were analysed for the presence of IgG autoantibodies raised to 41 recombinant TAAs/antigen fragments by ELISA. RESULTS: Varying autoantibody specificities (97-100% and sensitivities (0-10% were observed to individual TAAs. A 21-antigen panel achieved a specificity of 92% and sensitivity of 45% for the detection of HCC. This same panel identified 21% of 169 high-risk controls as having elevated autoantibody levels. A reproducible panel of 10 antigens achieved a specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 41% in HCC. 15% of 152 high-risk controls gave positive results with this panel. CONCLUSIONS: This minimally invasive blood test has the potential to offer advantages over currently available tools for the identification of HCC amongst pre-disposed patients. Results are comparable to current gold standards in HCC (Ultrasonography and to similar tests in other cancers (EarlyCDT-Lung.

  9. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of novel autoantibodies for detection of malignant mesothelioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufei Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The malignant mesothelioma (MM survival rate has been hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate early detection methods. The immune system may detect the early changes of tumor progression by responding with tumor-associated autoantibody production. Hence, in this study, we translated the humoral immune response to cancer proteins into a potential blood test for MM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A T7 phage MM cDNA library was constructed using MM tumor tissues and biopanned for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs using pooled MM patient and normal serum samples. About 1008 individual phage TAA clones from the biopanned library were subjected to protein microarray construction and tested with 53 MM and 52 control serum samples as a training group. Nine candidate autoantibody markers were selected from the training group using Tclass system and logistic regression statistical analysis, which achieved 94.3% sensitivity and 90.4% specificity with an AUC value of 0.89 in receiver operating characteristic analysis. The classifier was further evaluated with 50 patient and 50 normal serum samples as an independent blind validation, and the sensitivity of 86.0% and the specificity of 86.0% were obtained with an AUC of 0.82. Sequencing and BLASTN analysis of the classifier revealed that five of these nine candidate markers were found to have strong homology to cancer related proteins (PDIA6, MEG3, SDCCAG3, IGHG3, IGHG1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicated that using a panel of 9 autoantibody markers presented a promising accuracy for MM detection. Although the results need further validation in high-risk groups, they provided the potentials in developing a serum-based assay for MM diagnosis.

  11. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  12. The influence of autoantibody status and characteristics on the course of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemze, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    The identification of ACPA has been a major breakthrough in the understanding of pathogenesis in RA. It has become clear that this unique autoantibody response identifies more homogenous subsets of patients with RA than those characterized by levels of other autoantibodies, and that differing diseas

  13. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we evalua...

  14. Autoantibodies against α1 adrenergic receptor related with cardiac remodeling in hypertensive patients by clinical observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正在

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of autoantibodies against a adrenergic receptor on cardiac remodeling in patients with hypertension. Methods Five hundred and fifty three patients with hypertension in our hospital were selected. The autoantibodies againstα1 adrenergic receptor in sera of donor were detected by ELISA, and the Results of echocardiography were recorded. By

  15. Autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid stain skin lacking laminin 5 and type VII collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillikens, D; Ishiko, A; Jonkman, MF; Chimanovitch, [No Value; Shimizu, H; Hashimoto, T; Brocker, EB

    2000-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a widespread bullous skin disease and linear deposits of IgG and C3 at the dermal-epidermal junction using direct immunofluorescence microscopy. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated circulating IgG autoantibodies that stained, like autoantibodies to

  16. Classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias using anti–myxovirus resistance-protein 1 autoantibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Yoshimasa; Kida, Hiroshi; Ihara, Shoichi; Murakami, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Ken; Honda, Osamu; Tripathi, Lokesh P.; Arai, Toru; Hirose, Masaki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yano, Yukihiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Kato, Yasuhiro; Takamatsu, Hyota; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Minami, Toshiyuki; Hirata, Haruhiko; Inoue, Koji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Takeda, Yoshito; Mori, Masahide; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Kijima, Takashi; Kitaichi, Masanori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) can be divided into two main types: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a steroid-resistant and progressive disease with a median survival of 2–3 years, and idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (INSIP), a steroid-sensitive and non-progressive autoimmune disease. Although the clinical courses of these two diseases differ, they may be difficult to distinguish at diagnosis. We performed a comprehensive analysis of serum autoantibodies from patients definitively diagnosed with IPF, INSIP, autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. We identified disease-specific autoantibodies and enriched KEGG pathways unique to each disease, and demonstrated that IPF and INSIP are serologically distinct. Furthermore, we discovered a new INSIP-specific autoantibody, anti–myxovirus resistance-1 (MX1) autoantibody. Patients positive for anti-MX1 autoantibody constituted 17.5% of all cases of chronic fibrosing IIPs. Notably, patients rarely simultaneously carried the anti-MX1 autoantibody and the anti–aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase autoantibody, which is common in chronic fibrosing IIPs. Because MX1 is one of the most important interferon-inducible anti-viral genes, we have not only identified a new diagnostic autoantibody of INSIP but also obtained new insight into the pathology of INSIP, which may be associated with viral infection and autoimmunity. PMID:28230086

  17. Autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid stain skin lacking laminin 5 and type VII collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillikens, D; Ishiko, A; Jonkman, MF; Chimanovitch, [No Value; Shimizu, H; Hashimoto, T; Brocker, EB

    2000-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a widespread bullous skin disease and linear deposits of IgG and C3 at the dermal-epidermal junction using direct immunofluorescence microscopy. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated circulating IgG autoantibodies that stained, like autoantibodies to

  18. Autoantibodies against interleukin 1alpha in rheumatoid arthritis: association with long term radiographic outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N A; Svenson, M; Tarp, Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  19. Autoantibodies persist in relatives to systemic lupus erythematosus patients during 12 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Henrik; Voss, A; Heegaard, N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with presence of autoantibodies and characteristic multi-organ involvement. Relatives of SLE patients have an increased risk of autoantibody production and autoimmune diseases. METHODS: In 2001, 226 first degree relatives (FDRs...

  20. Autoantibodies against MDA-LDL in subjects with severe and minor atherosclerosis and healthy population controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, L.P.L. van de; Steyger, R.; Poppel, G. van; Boer, J.M.A.; Kruijssen, D.A.C.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) have been reported to be associated with atherosclerosis. However, data are not consistent. We compared the titres of autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified LDL in three groups, a case group with angiographically documented severe

  1. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Tortora, Rosangela P; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Pires, Gisele Viana; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to participate in this study. Prevalence of AAB was 40%. Our data indicate high prevalence of AAB in patients with Hereditary Angioedema. Large-scale studies should be considered to determine the significance of these AAB in the follow-up care of patients with Hereditary Angioedema.

  2. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients.

  3. Antisperm autoantibodies and infertility Anticuerpos antiespermatozoides e infertilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen human infertile couples were studied along with seven fertile control couples in order to determine the presence of antisperm au. toantibodies and to correlate results with their clinical reproductive status, spermogram parameters and the quality of cervical mucus. Immunoglobulins of IgG and IgA isotypes were evaluated on spermatozoa by the direct immunobead technique and in serum and cervical mucus by the indirect method. The following differences were found: Nine of 14 male patients but only 1 of 7 male controls had IgG on spermatozoa (p= 0.042 and OR= 10.8. Seven out of 14 male patiens and 1 of 7 controls were positive for IgA on spermatozoa (p= 0.12. Infertile males had a higher frequency of abnormal spermogram parameters as compared to controls (p= 0.0029 and OR= 3.32. Interestingly, the presence of only IgG in serum appeared to be a "protective factor" against IgG on sperm; only one out of the 16 positive males contradicted this observation. Para determinar la presencia de anticuerpos antiespermatozoides y correlacionarla con la situación reproductiva, el espermograma y la calidad del moco cervical, se estudiaron 7 parejas sanas, con hijos, y 14 infértiles. Se determinaron por las técnicas directa e indirecta de inmunoesferas los anticuerpos de los isotipos IgG e IgA en espermatozoides, suero y moco cervical. En 9 de los 14 hombres infértiles y en 1 de los 7 fértiles se encontraron anticuerpos IgG en la superficie de los espermatozoides (p= 0.042 y una Razón de disparidad [RD] = 10.8 y 8 de éstos también tuvieron IgA en los espermatozoides. El número de pruebas alteradas en el espermograma de los hombres infértiles fue significativamente mayor (p= 0.0029 y RD = 3.32. Tanto en los hombres infértiles como en los fértiles la presencia de sólo IgG en el suero parece ser un "factor de protección" contra IgG en los espermatozoides; de los 16 hombres que presentaron anticuerpos, fuera en el suero o en los espermatozoides, s

  4. A method for preparation of IgA from bovine mammary secretions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for preparing purified IgA from bovine mammary secretions is described. Whey was initially fractionated by gel filtration and fractions containing IgA were pooled, concentrated and digested with pepsin. The digest was rechromatographed on the same type of gel twice and the resulting IgA preparation tested for purity by an enzyme immunoassay procedure. Five different preparations tested were found to contain no measureable IgM or IgG2 and 0.8% to 1.1% IgG1 on a weight basis. If colost...

  5. Vancomycin-associated linear IgA disease mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Amanda Regio; de Moura, Luis Henrique Barbizan; Pinheiro, Jhonatan Rafael Siqueira; Pasin, Victor Pavan; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis is a rare subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease characterized by linear deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone. In the last three decades, many different drugs have been associated with the drug-induced form of the disease, especially vancomycin. We report a case of vancomycin-induced linear IgA disease mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis. The aim of this work is to emphasize the need to include this differential diagnosis in cases of epidermal detachment and to review the literature on the subject and this specific clinical presentation. PMID:28300888

  6. UNUSUAL CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PRESENTATION OF CHRONIC BULLOUS DERMATOSIS OF CHILDHOOD (LINEAR IGA DERMATOSIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saif Fahad; Al-Rikabi Ammar

    2011-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare sulfone-responsive subepidermal blistering disorder of unknown etiology in which smooth linear deposits of IgA are found in the basement membrane zone. Chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood is equivalent to linear IgA disease of adulthood and is characterized by an abrupt onset of large, widespread and tense bullae on a normal or erythematous base. In this case, we describe an unusual presentation of chronic bullous dermatosis in a 14-month-old Saudi ...

  7. Localized linear IgA dermatosis induced by UV light-treatment for herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chundi; Xu, Honghui; Xiao, Ting; Geng, Long; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of localized linear IgA dermatosis (LID). The patient suffered from herpes zoster on the right waist and received three localized ultraviolet (UV) light treatments. One month later he presented with bullae on the same site. Direct immunofluorescence showed deposition of linear IgA and weak C3 along the basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence on the salt-split human skin demonstrated that IgA antibodies were bound to the epidermal side. To our knowledge, this is the first case of localized LID induced by UV light treatment for herpes zoster. It is also the third case of LID induced by UV light.

  8. Circulating CD89-IgA complex does not predict deterioration of kidney function in Korean patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhee, Jong Hyun; Kang, Hye-Young; Wu, Meiyan; Nam, Bo Young; Chang, Tae-Ik; Jung, Su-Young; Park, Seohyun; Kim, Hyoungnae; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2017-06-16

    Soluble CD89 (sCD89)-IgA complex plays a key role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, there is a lack of evidence supporting this complex as a good biomarker for disease progression. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of sCD89-IgA complex for risk stratification of IgAN. A total of 326 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN were included. sCD89-IgA complex was measured by sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study endpoints were a 30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). sCD89-IgA complex levels were inversely and weakly associated with eGFR at the time of biopsy (r=-0.12, p=0.03). However, the significance between the two factors was lost in the multivariate linear regression after adjustment of clinical factors (β=0.35, p=0.75). In a multivariate Cox model, the highest (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-1.61; p=0.45) and middle (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.46-1.89; p=0.84) tertiles of sCD89-IgA complex levels were not associated with an increased risk of developing a 30% decrease in eGFR. Furthermore, the decline rates in eGFR did not differ between groups and C-statistics revealed that the sCD89-IgA complex were not superior to clinical factors in predicting disease progression. This study found no association between sCD89-IgA complex levels and disease progression in IgAN. Although sCD89 can contribute to the formation of immune complexes, our findings suggest that the sCD89-IgA level is not a good predictor of adverse outcomes and has limited clinical utility as a biomarker for risk stratification in IgAN.

  9. β1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 is a novel receptor for IgA in human mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Karen; Wimbury, David; Pawluczyk, Izabella; Muto, Masahiro; Bhachu, Jasraj; Mertens, Peter R; Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2017-07-24

    IgA nephropathy is characterized by mesangial deposition of IgA, mesangial cell proliferation, and extracellular matrix production. Mesangial cells bind IgA, but the identity of all potential receptors involved remains incomplete. The transferrin receptor (CD71) acts as a mesangial cell IgA receptor and its expression is upregulated in many forms of glomerulonephritis, including IgA nephropathy. CD71 is not expressed in healthy glomeruli and blocking CD71 does not completely abrogate mesangial cell IgA binding. Previously we showed that mesangial cells express a receptor that binds the Fc portion of IgA and now report that this receptor is an isoform of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase. A human mesangial cell cDNA library was screened for IgA binding proteins and β-1,4-galactosyltransferase identified. Cell surface expression of the long isoform of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase was shown by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy and confirmed by immunoblotting. Glomerular β-1,4-galactosyltransferase expression was increased in IgA nephropathy. IgA binding and IgA-induced mesangial cell phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and IL-6 synthesis were inhibited by a panel of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase-specific antibodies, suggesting IgA binds to the catalytic domain of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase. Thus, β-1,4-galactosyltransferase is a constitutively expressed mesangial cell IgA receptor with an important role in both mesangial IgA clearance and the initial response to IgA deposition. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoantibody profiling on a plasmonic nano-gold chip for the early detection of hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyang; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; Wheeler, Matthew; Maecker, Holden; Wu, Joseph C; Haddad, Francois; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-07-03

    The role of autoimmunity in cardiovascular (CV) diseases has been increasingly recognized. Autoimmunity is most commonly examined by the levels of circulating autoantibodies in clinical practices. Measurement of autoantibodies remains, however, challenging because of the deficiency of reproducible, sensitive, and standardized assays. The lack of multiplexed assays also limits the potential to identify a CV-specific autoantibody profile. To overcome these challenges, we developed a nanotechnology-based plasmonic gold chip for autoantibody profiling. This approach allowed simultaneous detection of 10 CV autoantibodies targeting the structural myocardial proteins, the neurohormonal regulatory proteins, the vascular proteins, and the proteins associated with apoptosis and coagulation. Autoantibodies were measured in four groups of participants across the continuum of hypertensive heart diseases. We observed higher levels of all 10 CV autoantibodies in hypertensive subjects (n = 77) compared with healthy participants (n = 30), and the autoantibodies investigated were related to each other, forming a highly linked network. In addition, we established that autoantibodies to troponin I, annexin-A5, and beta 1-adrenegic receptor best discriminated hypertensive subjects with adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling or dysfunction (n = 49) from hypertensive subjects with normal LV structure and function (n = 28). By further linking these three significant CV autoantibodies to the innate and growth factors, we revealed a positive but weak association between autoantibodies to troponin I and proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. Overall, we demonstrated that this platform can be used to evaluate autoantibody profiles in hypertensive subjects at risk for heart failure.

  11. Immunoglobulin clases IgG, IgM, IgA and complement component C3 in dental periapical lesions of patients with rheumatoid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, M

    1975-01-01

    To identify the immunoglobulin classes present in dental periapical lesions and to determine how, if at all, the distribution of immunoglobulin classes IgG. IgM and IgA differ in the dental periapical lesions of rheumatoid and control patients, paraffin-embedded and frozen tissues from the dental periapical lesions of 36 rheumatoid and 22 control patients were examined by the direct immunofluorescence technique. In addition, both rheumatoid and control tissues were examined for the presence of complement component C3, albumin and fibrinogen. Neither the greater frequency and abundancy with which IgG and to a lesser degree, IgA occurred in the dental periapical lesions of rheumatoid patients than in the corresponding lesions of control patients, nor the more frequent occurrence of complement component C3 in these same lesions, was statistically significant. No difference in the distribution of the various immunoglobulin classed could be discerned between the rheumatoid and control group. Albumin was distributed almost equally between the two patient groups. The greater abundance of fibrinogen among control patients was, however, statistically significant. These results do not provide evidence that an immunologic reaction takes place in the dental periapical lesions of patients with rheumatoid disease similar to that which characterizes rheumatoid inflammation. However, the presence of such a reaction cannot be excluded without more extensive investigation.

  12. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyao Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs. Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz for 0 (as the control group, 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1 and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation.

  13. Novel Association Between Immune-Mediated Susceptibility Loci and Persistent Autoantibody Positivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, Caroline A; Onengut, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    ), tissue transglutaminase, and 21-hydroxylase was tested using a linear mixed-model regression approach to simultaneously control for population structure and family relatedness. Four loci were associated with autoantibody positivity at genome-wide significance. Positivity for GADA was associated with 3q28......Islet autoantibodies detected at disease onset in patients with type 1 diabetes are signs of an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells. To further investigate the genetic determinants of autoantibody positivity, we performed dense immune-focused genotyping on the Immunochip array...... and tested for association with seven disease-specific autoantibodies in a large cross-sectional cohort of 6,160 type 1 diabetes-affected siblings. The genetic association with positivity for GAD autoantibodies (GADAs), IA2 antigen (IA-2A), zinc transporter 8, thyroid peroxidase, gastric parietal cells (PCAs...

  14. Anticorpos antiproteínas citrulinadas e a artrite reumatóide Auto-antibodies to citrullinated proteins and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Trigueirinho Alarcon

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com artrite reumatóide (AR possuem uma variedade de auto-anticorpos no soro e no líquido sinovial. Entre esses auto-anticorpos, destacam-se aqueles direcionados a proteínas citrulinadas, que são específicos para AR, aparecem precocemente durante a evolução da enfermidade e são bastante úteis para auxiliar no diag-nóstico da doença. Entre os antígenos citrulinados reconhecidos por auto-anticorpos na AR, encontram-se a profilagrina, a filagrina e a vimentina. Células e tecidos ricos nessas proteínas serviram de substrato para os primeiros ensaios laboratoriais para detecção dessa classe de auto-anticorpos. A descoberta de que os epitopos reconhecidos por esses auto-anticorpos eram peptídeos contendo citrulina permitiu o desenvolvimento de uma plataforma baseada em ELISA. O formato de ELISA possibilitou maior padronização e reprodutibilidade dos ensaios, resultando em ampla aceitação mundial como os auto-anticorpos mais específicos e precoces para o diagnóstico da AR. Há controvérsia quanto à capacidade dos anticorpos contra proteínas citrulinadas predizerem a gravidade da doença. O papel dos antígenos citrulinados na fisiopatologia da artrite reumatóide é sugerido pela forte especificidade desses auto-anticorpos para a doença, pelo achado de proteínas citrulinadas na sinóvia inflamada, pela produção intra-articular desses auto-anticorpos e pela extrema afinidade de peptídeos citrulinados por moléculas de HLA-DRB1 que contêm o epitopo compartilhado. Esses achados acenam com a possibilidade de novas e fascinantes descobertas rumo à melhor compreensão da fisiopatologia da AR.Rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients have a variety of auto-antibodies in the serum and synovial fluid. Among these auto-antibodies, those directed against citrullinated proteins are distinguished because that are specific for RA, appear early during the evolution of the disease and they are important to assist in the diagnosis of

  15. Use of Autoantibodies to Detect the Onset of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lacombe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of screening mammography has resulted in increased detection of early-stage breast disease, particularly for in situ carcinoma and early-stage breast cancer. However, the majority of women with abnormalities noted on screening mammograms are not diagnosed with cancer because of several factors, including radiologist assessment, patient age, breast density, malpractice concerns, and quality control procedures. Although magnetic resonance imaging is a highly sensitive detection tool that has become standard for women at very high risk of developing breast cancer, it lacks sufficient specificity and costeffectiveness for use as a general screening tool. Therefore, there is an important need to improve screening and diagnosis of early-invasive and noninvasive tumors, that is, in situ carcinoma. The great potential for molecular tools to improve breast cancer outcomes based on early diagnosis has driven the search for diagnostic biomarkers. Identification of tumor-specific markers capable of eliciting an immune response in the early stages of tumor development seems to provide an effective approach for early diagnosis. The aim of this review is to describe several autoantibodies identified during breast cancer diagnosis. We will focus on these molecules highlighted in the past two years and discuss the potential future use of autoantibodies as biomarkers of early-stage breast cancer.

  16. Possible enhancement of BP180 autoantibody production by herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koji; Aoyama, Yumi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Niwa, Haruo; Horio, Ai; Nishio, Eiichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease caused by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen/BP180 (BP180). Although the mechanisms of autoantibody production remain to be elucidated, herpes virus infections have been identified as a possible triggering factor for pemphigus. We report a case of herpes zoster (HZ) having anti-BP180 serum antibodies. The patient developed sudden-onset, tense blisters and edematous erythema on the right anterior chest, shoulder and upper back. Histopathology showed remarkable degeneration of keratinocytes, acantholysis and blister formation with ballooning cells, indicating herpes virus infection. A polymerase chain reaction analysis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) was positive in crusts and effusions from the skin lesions, confirming the definitive diagnosis of HZ. Notably, we found that the patient had anti-BP180 serum antibodies in association with the occurrence of HZ. After successful treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride for 7 days, the serum levels of anti-BP180 antibodies decreased in accordance with the improvement of skin lesions. These findings suggest that the production of anti-BP180 antibodies could be triggered by the reactivation of VZV.

  17. Epileptic syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus and neuronal autoantibody associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampylafka, E I; Alexopoulos, H; Fouka, P; Moutsopoulos, H M; Dalakas, M C; Tzioufas, A G

    2016-10-01

    We investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with epilepsy, a major and organic neurological symptom. Our aim was to test patients for the autoimmune epilepsy-associated antibodies anti-GAD, anti-NMDAR, anti-AMPAR1/2, anti-GABABR and anti-VGKC. We tested sera from ten SLE patients with current or previous episodes of epileptic seizures. In addition, sera were tested for staining on primary hippocampal neurons. The patients' clinical and neuroimaging profile, disease activity and accumulated damage scores and therapeutic regimens administered were recorded, and correlations were evaluated. Patients were negative for all anti-neuronal autoantibodies tested, and showed no staining on primary hippocampal cells, which suggests the absence of autoantibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens. Epileptic seizures were all tonic-clonic, and all patients had high disease activity (mean SLE Damage Acticity Index score 19.3 ± 7.3). Six patients had minor or no brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, and three had major findings. 9/10 patients received immunosuppression for 5 ± 4 months, while anti-convulsive treatment was administered to all patients (4.2 ± 3 years). Our results suggest that the majority of SLE-related epileptic seizures cannot be attributed to the action of a single antibody against neuronal antigens. Studies with larger neuropsychiatric SLE populations and stricter inclusion criteria are necessary to verify these findings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Evaluation of a radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rootwelt, K.

    1988-02-01

    A commercial radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb), based on solubilized porcine receptor and purified radio-iodinated bovine TSH, was tested in 264 subjects with a variety of thyroid disorders. The sensitivity of the assay for the detection of hyperthyroid Graves' disease was 91%. The assay specificity for Graves' disease was 95%. With the exception of one patient with Hashimoto's disease and one patient with de Quervain's subacute thyroiditis no subjects other than Graves' patients had detectable TRAb. Thus purely blocking TSII receptor autoantibodies were not detected with the assay. One female with thyroxine-treated idiopathic primary hypothyroidism who had given birth to two children with transiently elevated TSH, was found to have a circulating TSH-binding substance that resulted in an abnormally negative TRAb value, and highly discrepant results when TSH was measured with a double antibody TSH radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The TSH-binding substance was precipitated like a protein, but was not IgG. Similar findings have not previously been reported.

  19. [Myasthenia gravis and autoantibodies: Pathophysiology of the different subtypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrih-Aknin, S; Le Panse, R

    2014-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is characterized by muscle weakness and abnormal fatigability. It is an autoimmune disease caused by the presence of antibodies against components of the muscle membrane localized at the neuromuscular junction. In most cases, the autoantibodies are directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Recently, other targets have been described, such as muscle-specific kinase protein (MuSK) or lipoprotein related protein 4 (LRP4). The origin of the autoimmune response is not known, but thymic abnormalities and defects in immune regulation certainly play a major role in patients with anti-AChR antibodies. Genetic predisposition probably influences the occurrence of the disease. Sex hormones seem to play a role in the early form of the disease. Muscle weakness is fluctuating and worsens with exercise. Myasthenia gravis could be classified according to the location of the affected muscles (ocular versus generalized), the age of onset of symptoms, thymic abnormalities and profile of autoantibodies. These criteria are used to optimize the management and treatment of patients. In this review, we analyze the latest concepts of the pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis according to the different subgroups of the disease, including a description of the role of immunological, genetic and environmental factors. The potential viral hypothesis of this disease is discussed. Finally, we also discuss the biological assays available to validate the diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellular misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules are possible targets for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Noriko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    The major function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is the presentation of peptide antigens to helper T cells. However, when misfolded proteins are associated with MHC class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, they are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without processing to peptides. Of note, misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are specifically recognized by autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules may be recognized as 'neo-self' antigens by the immune system and be involved in the pathogenicity of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Analüütikud : EL-iga ühinemine kiirendab majanduskasvu / Erkki Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Erkki

    2001-01-01

    Juhtivate majandusanalüütikute hinnangul kasvab Eesti majandus tänu abiprogrammidele ja välisinvesteeringutele kiiremini juhul, kui Eesti liitub EL-iga. Vt. samas Teet Rajasalu art. Majandus ja EL

  2. Euroliidu odava aseaine tunneb ära iga riik / Urmas Paet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paet, Urmas, 1974-

    2007-01-01

    Eesti välisminister Urmas Paet kirjutab Euroopa identiteedist, Euroopa Liidu laienemisest, selle toetamise vajalikkusest ja Türgi ning Balkanimaade perspektiivist EL-iga liitumisel, euroopalike reformide toimumisest neis riikides

  3. Iga sündiv laps muudab pere vaesemaks / Hille Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Hille, 1941-2014

    2000-01-01

    Iga uue lapse sünniga tekib oht, et pere langeb allapoole vaesuspiiri, ütleb ÜRO tellimusel valminud kogumiku "Lapsed Eestis" peatoimetaja Dagmar Kutsar. Lisaks skeem : Leibkonnad - leibkondade jaotus laste arvu järgi (protsentides)

  4. Iga seitsmes kindlustusvõtja üritab seltsi petta / Erkki Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Erkki

    2003-01-01

    Kindlustusseltside hinnangul üritab iga seitsmes kahjukindlustusvõtja kas kahju suurendada või pärast õnnetust tagantjärele kindlustust vormistades seltse petta. Vt. samas: Näiteid petuskeemidest

  5. Iga seitsmes kindlustusvõtja üritab seltsi petta / Erkki Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Erkki

    2003-01-01

    Kindlustusseltside hinnangul üritab iga seitsmes kahjukindlustusvõtja kas kahju suurendada või pärast õnnetust tagantjärele kindlustust vormistades seltse petta. Vt. samas: Näiteid petuskeemidest

  6. Analüütikud : EL-iga ühinemine kiirendab majanduskasvu / Erkki Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Erkki

    2001-01-01

    Juhtivate majandusanalüütikute hinnangul kasvab Eesti majandus tänu abiprogrammidele ja välisinvesteeringutele kiiremini juhul, kui Eesti liitub EL-iga. Vt. samas Teet Rajasalu art. Majandus ja EL

  7. Iga sündiv laps muudab pere vaesemaks / Hille Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Hille, 1941-2014

    2000-01-01

    Iga uue lapse sünniga tekib oht, et pere langeb allapoole vaesuspiiri, ütleb ÜRO tellimusel valminud kogumiku "Lapsed Eestis" peatoimetaja Dagmar Kutsar. Lisaks skeem : Leibkonnad - leibkondade jaotus laste arvu järgi (protsentides)

  8. Euroliidu odava aseaine tunneb ära iga riik / Urmas Paet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paet, Urmas, 1974-

    2007-01-01

    Eesti välisminister Urmas Paet kirjutab Euroopa identiteedist, Euroopa Liidu laienemisest, selle toetamise vajalikkusest ja Türgi ning Balkanimaade perspektiivist EL-iga liitumisel, euroopalike reformide toimumisest neis riikides

  9. A rapid screening test for detection of IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, B J; Plapp, F V; Rachel, J M

    1991-09-01

    A solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay has been developed to screen blood donors for IgA deficiency, and 6117 donor sera have been screened by this method. Eighteen sera were found to be IgA deficient, which represents a frequency of 1 in 340. Seventeen of these sera were retested by passive hemagglutination inhibition, which has a sensitivity of approximately 0.1 mg per dL. Eight sera were confirmed as IgA deficient, and nine were found to contain low levels of IgA (less than 1 mg/dL). The approximate sensitivity of the SPRCA assay is 1 mg per dL. The speed, simplicity, and sensitivity of this assay make it a good alternative to conventional methods of screening.

  10. Unusual clinicopathological and immunological presentation of chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (linear IgA dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Saif Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare sulfone-responsive subepidermal blistering disorder of unknown etiology in which smooth linear deposits of IgA are found in the basement membrane zone. Chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood is equivalent to linear IgA disease of adulthood and is characterized by an abrupt onset of large, widespread and tense bullae on a normal or erythematous base. In this case, we describe an unusual presentation of chronic bullous dermatosis in a 14-month-old Saudi girl. Histopathological examination revealed subepidermal cell poor blisters with linear deposition of IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 along the dermoepidermal junction. The unusual clinical, histopathological and immunofluorescence findings in this patient are discussed, with an account on the differential diagnosis in such cases along with a detailed review of the relevant literature.

  11. Linear IgA dermatosis associated with ulcerative colitis: complete and sustained remission after total colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Fialho, Mônica; Santos, Luiza Tavares dos; Rodrigues, Palmira Assis de Jesus Barreto; Vargas, Ana Luisa Bittencourt Sampaio Jeunon; Sousa, Maria Auxiliadora Jeunon

    2013-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis has been increasingly associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly ulcerative colitis. A 13-year-old male patient with an 11-month history of ulcerative colitis developed vesicles, pustules and erosions on the skin of the face, trunk and buttocks and in the oral mucosa. The work-up revealed a neutrophil-rich sub-epidermal bullous disease and linear deposition of IgA along the dermoepidermal junction, establishing the diagnosis of linear IgA dermatosis. The patient experienced unsatisfactory partial control of skin and intestinal symptoms despite the use of adalimumab, mesalazine, prednisone and dapsone for some months. After total colectomy, he presented complete remission of skin lesions, with no need of medications during two years of follow-up. A review of previously reported cases of the association is provided here and the role of ulcerative colitis in triggering linear IgA dermatosis is discussed.

  12. Unusual clinicopathological and immunological presentation of chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (linear IgA dermatosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Al-Saif; Ammar, Al-Rikabi

    2011-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare sulfone-responsive subepidermal blistering disorder of unknown etiology in which smooth linear deposits of IgA are found in the basement membrane zone. Chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood is equivalent to linear IgA disease of adulthood and is characterized by an abrupt onset of large, widespread and tense bullae on a normal or erythematous base. In this case, we describe an unusual presentation of chronic bullous dermatosis in a 14-month-old Saudi girl. Histopathological examination revealed subepidermal cell poor blisters with linear deposition of IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 along the dermoepidermal junction. The unusual clinical, histopathological and immunofluorescence findings in this patient are discussed, with an account on the differential diagnosis in such cases along with a detailed review of the relevant literature.

  13. Secretory IgA as a diagnostic tool for Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, Kasper; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa sinusitis may be the focus for intermittent lung colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The sinusitis may induce elevated IgA levels in nasal secretion and saliva against P. aeruginosa. METHODS: 120 CF patients chronically infected, intermittently...... colonized or without P. aeruginosa in the lungs participated in this cross-sectional study. IgA and IgG against P. aeruginosa sonicate and alginate were measured in nasal secretions, saliva, and in serum by ELISA. RESULTS: The intermittently colonized patients had significantly higher IgA levels in nasal...... secretions and saliva than those without P. aeruginosa in the lungs, indicating that P. aeruginosa sinusitis may precede intermittent colonization and chronic infection of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: Specific IgA against P. aeruginosa in nasal secretions and saliva can contribute to differentiation between...

  14. Relationship between serum IgA level and allergy/asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Choi, Inseon S; Kim, Chang Seong; Lee, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Hyeon-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) may prevent the entrance of allergens. This study examined the relationship between serum IgA levels (within the normal range) and sensitization to house dust mites (HDM) or airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). The clinical records of 1,136 adult patients with suspected asthma, for whom test data for serum IgA level and methacholine-AHR were available, were reviewed retrospectively. The AHR/allergy indices were compared among patient groups with low (<140 mg/dL, group I), intermediate (140 to 280 mg/dL, group II), or high (≥280 mg/dL, group III) IgA levels in serum. The HDM skin sensitization rate progressively decreased from 30.0% in group I (n = 139) to 26.8% and 18.5% in groups II (n = 684) and III (n = 313), respectively (p = 0.003). Although both the HDM sensitization degree and the IgA level were significantly related to age, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of association of a high IgA level (≥ 280 mg/dL) with HDM sensitization was significant (0.617; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.415 to 0.916; p = 0.017). Among younger subjects (≤ 45 years of age) with AHR, the prevalence of moderate/severe AHR progressively decreased (70.6%, 52.3%, and 47.1% in groups I, II, and III [n = 34, 149, and 51]), respectively (p = 0.045). The IgA < 140 mg/dL was a significant risk factor for moderate/severe AHR (OR, 2.306; 95% CI, 1.049 to 5.071; p = 0.038). Sensitization to HDM and methacholine-AHR were significantly associated with serum IgA levels in suspected asthmatics, even when those levels were normal.

  15. Recurrence and graft loss after renal transplantation in adults with IgA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Mayuko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Katsuma, Ai; Mafune, Aki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Horita, Shigeru; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ishida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-08-01

    IgA vasculitis, a rare condition resulting in end-stage renal disease, is a small-vessel vasculitis that affects the kidney in 49-83 % of adults. The reported recurrence rate of IgA vasculitis in renal transplant recipients is 11.5-60 %, leading to graft loss in 0-50 % of these patients. However, limited data are available on recurrence and graft loss after renal transplantation. We evaluated renal transplant recipients seen from 1987 to 2015 at the Jikei University School of Medicine and the Department of Urology, Tokyo Women's Medical University. Using a 1:2 match, 21 patients with IgA vasculitis and 42 controls were selected. The mean post-transplant follow-up was 121 ± 69 months for IgA vasculitis and 147 ± 66 months for the controls. The 15-year patient survival was 100 % in IgA vasculitis and 97.6 % in the controls (p = 0.22). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year graft survival rates were 95.2, 90.5, and 81 % in IgA vasculitis and 100, 90.5, and 88.1 % in the controls, respectively (p = 0.63). The recurrence rate was 28.6 % (6 of 21 cases) and half of them (3 of 6 cases) showed histological activity (ISKDC III). We treated them with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and/or tonsillectomy. None of the recurrence cases lost the allograft. The long-term patient and graft survival of IgA vasculitis in renal transplantation were comparable with the previous reports. The recurrence rate was 28.6 %, but none of the recurrent cases showed allograft loss in this study. We speculate that methylprednisolone pulse therapy and/or tonsillectomy prevent the progression of recurrent IgA vasculitis.

  16. Rotavirus vaccination and infection induce VP6-specific IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo

    2017-02-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in young children, but RVGE has drastically been reduced with the introduction of live oral RV vaccines into childhood immunization program in many countries. Serum IgA antibody is a marker of clinical protection against severe RVGE after RV infection and vaccination. This study investigated VP6-specificity of anti-RV IgA antibody levels in Finnish children aged 6-23 months before and after introduction of RotaTeq® into national immunization program. Although RV inner capsid protein VP6 is considered as antigenic target in clinical and seroepidemiological studies, at present VP6 protein is not commonly employed as a primary ELISA-antigen. Thus, sera from 20 unvaccinated and 19 vaccinated children were examined in ELISA with recombinant VP6 (rVP6) protein, and the VP6-specific responses were compared to responses observed with human RV Wa and bovine RV WC3 cell culture antigens. Moreover, fecal antibodies were tested with rVP6 and Wa cell culture antigen. Equal levels of serum anti-RV IgA antibodies were detected by the three antigens. Fecal IgA titers against rVP6 and Wa antigen showed a correlation with the corresponding serum levels. The results suggest that the IgA response measured by virus-capture ELISA is mainly directed to VP6 protein, supporting the usage of rVP6 in detection of anti-RV IgA antibodies. Natural RV infections and vaccinations induced similar levels of serum VP6-specific IgA antibodies. Serum IgA antibodies after RotaTeq® vaccination showed sustained levels up to two years of age in line with long term protection. J. Med. Virol. 89:239-245, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of supplemental β-carotene with whey on IgA transfer from maternal milk and mucosal IgA induction in neonatal mice and calves

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Y.; Yasumatsuya, K.; Kasai, K; Sakase, M.; Nishino, O.; Akaike, M; Nagase, T; Sugimoto, M; Ikeda, S.; Kume, S.

    2011-01-01

    Data from 17 pregnant mice and 33 Japanese Black calves were collected to clarify the effect of supplemental β-carotene with whey on IgA transfer from maternal milk and mucosal IgA induction in neonatal mice and calves. Dietary treatments in milk replacers were 1) 26% CP as in skim milk (control), 2) 26% CP as whey and 3) 26% CP as whey and 30 mg/kg β-carotene. Diets were offered from 6.5 days postcoitus to 14 days postpartum in pregnant mice and from 3 to 63 days postpartum in calves. Supple...

  18. Detection of a combination of serum IgG and IgA antibodies against selected mycobacterial targets provides promising diagnostic signatures for active TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoniyi, Dolapo O; Baumann, Ralf; Chegou, Novel N; Kriel, Belinda; Jacobs, Ruschca; Kidd, Martin; Loxton, Andre G; Kaempfer, Susanne; Singh, Mahavir; Walzl, Gerhard

    2017-06-06

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) based tests for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) disease often show a lack of specificity in TB endemic regions, which is mainly due to a high background prevalence of LTBI. Here, we investigated the combined performance of the responses of different Ig classes to selected mycobacterial antigens in primary healthcare clinic attendees with signs and symptoms suggestive of TB. The sensitivity and specificity of IgA, IgG and/or IgM to LAM and 7 mycobacterial protein antigens (ESAT-6, Tpx, PstS1, AlaDH, MPT64, 16kDa and 19kDa) and 2 antigen combinations (TUB, TB-LTBI) in the plasma of 63 individuals who underwent diagnostic work-up for TB after presenting with symptoms and signs compatible with possible active TB were evaluated. Active TB was excluded in 42 individuals of whom 21 has LTBI whereas active TB was confirmed in 21 patients of whom 19 had a follow-up blood draw at the end of 6-month anti-TB treatment. The leading single serodiagnostic markers to differentiate between the presence or absence of active TB were anti-16 kDa IgA, anti-MPT64 IgA with sensitivity and specificity of 90%/90% and 95%/90%, respectively. The combined use of 3 or 4 antibodies further improved this performance to accuracies above 95%. After successful completion of anti-TB treatment at month 6, the levels of 16 kDa IgA and 16 kDa IgM dropped significantly whereas LAM IgG and TB-LTBI IgG increased. These results show the potential of extending investigation of anti-tuberculous IgG responses to include IgM and IgA responses against selected protein and non-protein antigens in differentiating active TB from other respiratory diseases in TB endemic settings.

  19. New developments in the genetics, pathogenesis, and therapy of IgA nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistroni, Riccardo; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Appel, Gerald B.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have brought notable progress in the field of IgA nephropathy. Here, we highlight important new directions and latest developments, including successful discovery of several genetic susceptibility loci, formulation of the multi-hit pathogenesis model that integrates findings from studies of galactose-deficient IgA1, anti-glycan response and immune complex-induced kidney injury, introduction of the Oxford pathology scoring system, and formalization of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) consensus treatment guidelines. We focus on the latest genetic findings that confirm a strong contribution of inherited factors and explain some of the geo-ethnic disparities in disease susceptibility. Most IgA nephropathy susceptibility loci discovered to date encode genes involved in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The concerted pattern of inter-population allelic differentiation across all Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) loci parallels the disease prevalence and correlates with variation in local pathogens, suggesting that multi-locus adaptation might have shaped the present-day landscape of IgA nephropathy. Importantly, the “Intestinal Immune Network for IgA Production” emerged as one of the new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. We place these findings in the context of the multi-hit pathogenesis model and existing knowledge of IgA immunobiology. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing treatment options, discuss areas of clinical uncertainty, and outline ongoing clinical trials and translational studies. PMID:26376134

  20. Protein energy malnutrition alters mucosal IgA responses and reduces mucosal vaccine efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Semi; Kim, Heejoo; Shim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Song, Man Ki; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Jae-Ouk

    2017-08-30

    Oral vaccine responsiveness is often lower in children from less developed countries. Childhood malnutrition may be associated with poor immune response to oral vaccines. The present study was designed to investigate whether protein energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs B cell immunity and ultimately reduces oral vaccine efficacy in a mouse model. Purified isocaloric diets containing low protein (1/10 the protein of the control diet) were used to determine the effect of PEM. PEM increased both nonspecific total IgA and oral antigen-specific IgA in serum without alteration of gut permeability. However, PEM decreased oral antigen-specific IgA in feces, which is consistent with decreased expression of polymeric Immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in the small intestine. Of note, polymeric IgA was predominant in serum under PEM. In addition, PEM altered B cell development status in the bone marrow and increased the frequency of IgA-secreting B cells, as well as IgA secretion by long-lived plasma cells in the small intestinal lamina propria. Moreover, PEM reduced the protective efficacy of the mucosally administered cholera vaccine and recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine in a mouse model. Our results suggest that PEM can impair mucosal immunity where IgA plays an important role in host protection and may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in malnourished subjects. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In silico prediction of specific pathways that regulate mesangial cell proliferation in IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfazeli, Elham Sadat; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Kalantari, Shiva

    2016-12-01

    IgA nephropathy is one of the most common forms of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide leading to end-stage renal disease. Proliferation of mesangial cells, i.e., the multifunctional cells located in the intracapillary region of glomeruli, after IgA- dominant immune deposition is the major histologic feature in IgA nephropathy. In spite of several studies on molecular basis of proliferation in these cells, specific pathways responsible for regulation of proliferation are still to be discovered. In this study, we predicted a specific signaling pathway started from transferrin receptor (TFRC), a specific IgA1 receptor on mesangial cells, toward a set of proliferation-related proteins. The final constructed subnetwork was presented after filtration and evaluation. The results suggest that estrogen receptor (ESR1) as a hub protein in the significant subnetwork has an important role in the mesangial cell proliferation and is a potential target for IgA nephropathy therapy. In conclusion, this study suggests a novel hypothesis for the mechanism of pathogenesis in IgA nephropathy and is a reasonable start point for the future experimental studies on mesangial proliferation process in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life.

  3. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  4. Role of autoantibodies against the linker subdomains of envoplakin and periplakin in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic pemphigus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; BU Ding-fang; HUANG Yong-chu; ZHU Xue-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background The presence of autoantibodies against multiple epidermal proteins is an important feature in paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP). Circulating anti-desmoglein 3 autoantibody, the major pathogenic autoantibody in pemphigus vulgaris (PV), has been proved pathogenic in PNP. Because of many clinical differences between PNP and PV, we speculate about the involvement of other autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of PNP. Envoplakin (EPL) and periplakin (PPL) are recognized by most PNP sere. Their linker subdomains are highly homologous and necessary for the association of intermediate filaments.Methods We characterized the autoantibodies against the linker subdomains of EPL and PPL in PNP patients' sera and their associated tumors by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorence. We also applied the purified autoantibodies against EPL and PPL from PNP sera to cultured human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), to evaluate the changes of cell-cell adhesion.Results Autoantibodies against EPL and PPL were detected in most PNP patients by ELISA, and the decrease of these autoantibodies after removal of the tumors was roughly comparable to the improvement of clinical symptoms. Cultured tumor cells from PNP patients secreted these autoantibodies. Specific immunoglobulin receptors for EPL and PPL were found on B lymphocytes in tumors from PNP. Furthermore, purified anti-EPL and anti-PPL autoantibodies from PNP sere were capable of dissociating cultured human epidermal keratinocytes.Conclusion Autoantibodies against EPL and PPL may also be pathogenic in PNP.

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate B cell microRNAs that silence AID and Blimp-1 expression for epigenetic modulation of antibody and autoantibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Clayton A; Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Tat, Connie; Hayama, Ken L; Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), which require activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and plasma cell differentiation, which requires B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), are critical for the generation of class-switched and hypermutated (mature) Ab and autoantibody responses. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and butyrate dampened AICDA/Aicda (AID) and PRDM1/Prdm1 (Blimp-1) mRNAs by upregulating miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361 to silence AICDA/Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b to silence PRDM1/Prdm1, in human and mouse B cells. This led to downregulation of AID, Blimp-1, and X-box binding protein 1, thereby inhibiting CSR, SHM, and plasma cell differentiation without altering B cell viability or proliferation. The selectivity of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated silencing of AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 was emphasized by unchanged expression of HoxC4 and Irf4 (important inducers/modulators of AICDA/Aicda), Rev1 and Ung (central elements for CSR/SHM), and Bcl6, Bach2, or Pax5 (repressors of PRDM1/Prdm1 expression), as well as unchanged expression of miR-19a/b, miR-20a, and miR-25, which are not known to regulate AICDA/Aicda or PRDM1/Prdm1. Through these B cell-intrinsic epigenetic mechanisms, valproic acid blunted class-switched and hypermutated T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, it decreased class-switched and hypermutated autoantibodies, ameliorated disease, and extended survival in lupus MRL/Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Our findings outline epigenetic mechanisms that modulate expression of an enzyme (AID) and transcription factors (Blimp-1 and X-box binding protein 1) that are critical to the B cell differentiation processes that underpin Ab and autoantibody responses. They also provide therapeutic proof-of-principle in autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity.

  6. Predictors of slow progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Andrea K; Dong, Fran; Waugh, Kathleen; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Yu, Liping; Norris, Jill M; Rewers, Marian J

    2016-08-01

    Although most children with multiple islet autoantibodies develop type 1 diabetes, rate of progression is highly variable. The goal of this study was to explore potential factors involved in rate of progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed 118 children with multiple islet autoantibodies for progression to diabetes. After excluding 27 children currently diabetes-free but followed for 10 years. Islet autoimmunity appeared at 4.0 ± 3.5, 3.2 ± 1.8 and 5.8 ± 3.1 years of age in rapid, moderate and slow progressors, respectively (p = 0.006). Insulin autoantibody levels were lower in slow progressors compared to moderate and rapid progressors. The groups did not differ by gender, ethnicity, family history, susceptibility HLA and non-HLA genes. The rate of development of individual islet autoantibodies including mIAA, GADA, IA-2A and ZnT8A were all slower in the slow versus moderate/rapid progressors. In multivariate analyses, older age at seroconversion and lower initial mIAA levels independently predicted slower progression to diabetes. Later onset of islet autoimmunity and lower autoantibody levels predicted slower progression to diabetes among children with multiple islet autoantibodies. These factors may need to be considered in the design of trials to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  7. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of 64 simultaneously measured autoantibodies for early detection of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Butt, Julia; Michel, Angelika; Knebel, Phillip; Holleczek, Bernd; Zörnig, Inka; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been suggested as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer. However, studies that systematically assess the diagnostic performance of a large number of autoantibodies are rare. Here, we used bead-based multiplex serology to simultaneously measure autoantibody responses against 64 candidate TAAs in serum samples from 329 gastric cancer patients, 321 healthy controls and 124 participants with other diseases of the upper digestive tract. At 98% specificity, sensitivities for the 64 tested autoantibodies ranged from 0–12% in the training set and a combination of autoantibodies against five TAAs (MAGEA4 + CTAG1 + TP53 + ERBB2_C + SDCCAG8) was able to detect 32% of the gastric cancer patients at a specificity of 87% in the validation set. Sensitivities for early and late stage gastric cancers were similar, while chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor lesion of gastric cancer, was not detectable. However, the 5-marker combination also detected 26% of the esophageal cancer patients. In conclusion, the tested autoantibodies and combinations alone did not reach sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer screening. Nevertheless, some autoantibodies, such as anti-MAGEA4, anti-CTAG1 or anti-TP53 and their combinations could possibly contribute to the development of cancer early detection tests (not necessarily restricted to gastric cancer) when being combined with other markers. PMID:27140836

  8. The correlation between peripartum cardiomyopathy and autoantibodies against cardiovascular receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is characterized by left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure. However, its pathogenesis is not clear. Our preliminary study revealed that autoantibodies against β1-adrenergic receptors (β1R-AABs and M2-muscarinic receptors (M2R-AABs participated in heart failure regardless of primary heart disease. Whether β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs participate in the pathogenesis of PPCM is still unknown. METHODS: Totally 37 diagnosed PPCM patients and 36 normal pregnant women were enrolled in this study. Clinical assessment and 2-dimensional echocardiographic studies as well as the measurement of β1R-AABs or M2R-AABs by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were performed. RESULTS: The positive rates for β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs were 59.5% (22/37 and 45.9% (17/37 in PPCM patients, and 19.4% (7/36 (P<0.001 and 16.67% (6/36 (P<0.001 in normal pregnant women, respectively. Both β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs had a positive correlation with serum expression level of NT-proBNP, left ventricular dimension and NYHA FC (rs: 0.496-0.892, P<0.01. In addition, a negative correlation between the activity of β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs and LVEF, LVFS was observed (rs: -0.488-0.568, P<0.01. Moreover, autoantibodies against cardiovascular receptors increased the risk of the onset of PPCM (OR = 18.786, 95% confidence interval 1.926-183.262, P = 0.012. CONCLUSIONS: The β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs reveal a significant elevation and are correlated with the increased left ventricular dimension and worse cardiac contraction function. The autoantibodies of cardiovascular receptors are independent risk factors for the onset of PPCM.

  9. Elevated Plasma P-Selectin Autoantibodies in Primary Sjögren Syndrome Patients with Thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Hui; Zhou, Peng-Fei; Long, Guang-Feng; Tian, Xin; Guo, Yu-Fan; Pang, Ai-Ming; Di, Ran; Shen, Yan-Na; Liu, Yun-De; Cui, Yu-Jie

    2015-11-28

    BACKGROUND Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is one of the most common chronic systemic autoimmune diseases, and thrombocytopenia is one of the hematological manifestations of pSS. When platelet and endothelial cells are activated, P-selectin is expressed on the cell surface. This study aimed to investigate the role of P-selectin autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS. MATERIAL AND METHODS P-selectin autoantibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 38 pSS patients without thrombocytopenia and 32 pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, 32 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients, and 35 healthy controls. RESULTS The plasma P-selectin autoantibodies (A490) in ITP patients and pSS patients with/without thrombocytopenia were significantly higher than those in healthy controls, but there were no significant differences between ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia. The positive rate of P-selectin autoantibodies in pSS patients with thrombocytopenia was significantly higher than that in ITP patients. The platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients, while among pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients than in P-selectin autoantibodies-negative patients. In ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients. CONCLUSIONS Elevated plasma P-selectin autoantibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS patients.

  10. SIGNIFICANCE OF P- SELECTIN EXPRESSION IN IGA NEPHROPATHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴珮; 周同; 李晓; 王伟铭; 陈楠; 董德长

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of P-selectin in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Methods Plasma P-selectin level was measured by ELISA and P-selectin expression in renal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in 45 patients with IgAN. Results Plasma P-selectin levels in the patients with IgAN were significantly higher than those in the controls. In IgAN, the levels in the patients with nephrotic syndrome or renal function insufficiency were much higher than those in the patients with gross hematuria, abnormal urine analyses or nephritis syndrome. P- selectin was widely expressed within renal tissue in IgAN. Glomerular P- selectin expression was remarkably up - regulated in grade Ⅳ and Ⅴ of IgAN than that in grade Ⅱ and Ⅲ. Moreover, the expression of P- selectin on tubular epithelium or within interstitium was strongly associated with the degree of tubulointerstitial lesions. Conclusion The results suggested that P- selectin might play an important role in IgAN, and the level of P - selectin in plasma and renal tissue might predict the progress of IgAN.

  11. Childhood linear IgA bullous dermatosis in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenani, Nesrine; Mebazaa, Amel; Denguezli, Mohamed; Ghariani, Najet; Sriha, Badreddine; Belajouza, Colandane; Nouira, Rafia

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine the demographic characteristics, the clinical features, the immuno-histological findings and response to treatment of childhood linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) in Tunisia. We collected all the cases of auto-immune bullous diseases of childhood, diagnosed from January 1987 to December 2006. Based on clinical, histological, and immunofluorescent features, we identified 25 cases of LABD. Sixteen male and nine female children with a mean age of 7.5 years were identified. Clinical manifestations were characterized by a vesiculo-bullous eruption in all cases associated with mucous membrane involvement in two cases. Dapsone was the main therapy in 19 cases, associated with systemic corticosteroids in eight cases. Exclusive antibiotic therapy was successful in five cases. Sixteen of those patients had resolution of disease after a mean period of 15 months and eight patients had severe clinical presentation and required a prolonged follow-up. Childhood LABD is the most frequent bullous dermatosis in Tunisia. The majority of our patients responded rapidly to dapsone treatment and were stabilized for long time. Our cases were characterized by a minimal mucosal involvement and favorable outcome. Treatment with antibiotherapy was interesting. Erythromycin and oxacillin may be considered as an alternative therapy.

  12. Autoantibodies Targeting a Collecting Duct-Specific Water Channel in Tubulointerstitial Nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landegren, Nils; Pourmousa Lindberg, Mina; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis is a common cause of kidney failure and may have diverse etiologies. This form of nephritis is sometimes associated with autoimmune disease, but the role of autoimmune mechanisms in disease development is not well understood. Here, we present the cases of three patients...... with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 who developed tubulointerstitial nephritis and ESRD in association with autoantibodies against kidney collecting duct cells. One of the patients developed autoantibodies targeting the collecting duct-specific water channel aquaporin 2, whereas autoantibodies...

  13. Complete atrioventricular block in adult Sjögren's syndrome with anti-Ro autoantibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Myung Jun; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Young-Soo; Park, Chul-Yeon; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Anti-Ro autoantibody is associated with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and neonatal lupus syndrome (i.e., congenital complete heart block in newborns). Generally, the adult atrioventricular (AV) node is believed to be relatively resistant to the scarring effects of anti-Ro/anti-La autoantibodies. However, there have been some reports of adult complete AV block in SS and SLE patients. Here, we report a case of complete heart block in primary SS with anti-Ro autoantibodies, with no other risk factor for the development of heart block, and review their etiological association.

  14. A COMPLEX OF INTERMEDIATE FILAMENT PROTEIN-DNA: A TARGET FOR AUTOANTIBODIES IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎锡德; S.Kuhn; P.Traub

    1995-01-01

    Autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus which cross-react with double stranded DNA and in-termediate filament proteins are frequently reported.However,little is Known about the origin and the target of these antibodies.In this paper,a polyspecific monoclonal antibody,XY12,produced by the im-munization of genetically non-autoimmune mice with a DNA-protein complex is detsiled.Its antigen bind-ing patterms are very similar to the autoantibodies.The data suggest that these autoantibodies may be trig-gered by a circulating nucleoprotein.

  15. Quantification of HER2 autoantibodies in the amplification phenomenon of HER2 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauterlein, Jens-Jacob L; Petersen, Eva R B; Olsen, Dorte Aa

    2011-01-01

    Gene amplification of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) is a well-known phenomenon in various cancers. However, little is known about the mechanism of the gene amplification phenomenon itself. Autoantibodies to cellular receptors have been described in several cancer types. We hypot...... hypothesised that autoantibodies against HER2 might have a stimulatory capacity and could be the cause of the HER2 gene amplification phenomenon. To investigate this, we developed a test for the detection of autoantibodies against HER2 in serum (S-HER2Ab)....

  16. A new formulation for air-blast fluid-structure interaction using an immersed approach: part II—coupling of IGA and meshfree discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Moutsanidis, G.; Bueno, J.; Kamran, K.; Kamensky, D.; Hillman, M. C.; Gomez, H.; Chen, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    In this two-part paper we begin the development of a new class of methods for modeling fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena for air blast. We aim to develop accurate, robust, and practical computational methodology, which is capable of modeling the dynamics of air blast coupled with the structure response, where the latter involves large, inelastic deformations and disintegration into fragments. An immersed approach is adopted, which leads to an a-priori monolithic FSI formulation with intrinsic contact detection between solid objects, and without formal restrictions on the solid motions. In Part I of this paper, the core air-blast FSI methodology suitable for a variety of discretizations is presented and tested using standard finite elements. Part II of this paper focuses on a particular instantiation of the proposed framework, which couples isogeometric analysis (IGA) based on non-uniform rational B-splines and a reproducing-kernel particle method (RKPM), which is a meshfree technique. The combination of IGA and RKPM is felt to be particularly attractive for the problem class of interest due to the higher-order accuracy and smoothness of both discretizations, and relative simplicity of RKPM in handling fragmentation scenarios. A collection of mostly 2D numerical examples is presented in each of the parts to illustrate the good performance of the proposed air-blast FSI framework.

  17. A new formulation for air-blast fluid-structure interaction using an immersed approach: part II—coupling of IGA and meshfree discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Moutsanidis, G.; Bueno, J.; Kamran, K.; Kamensky, D.; Hillman, M. C.; Gomez, H.; Chen, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this two-part paper we begin the development of a new class of methods for modeling fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena for air blast. We aim to develop accurate, robust, and practical computational methodology, which is capable of modeling the dynamics of air blast coupled with the structure response, where the latter involves large, inelastic deformations and disintegration into fragments. An immersed approach is adopted, which leads to an a-priori monolithic FSI formulation with intrinsic contact detection between solid objects, and without formal restrictions on the solid motions. In Part I of this paper, the core air-blast FSI methodology suitable for a variety of discretizations is presented and tested using standard finite elements. Part II of this paper focuses on a particular instantiation of the proposed framework, which couples isogeometric analysis (IGA) based on non-uniform rational B-splines and a reproducing-kernel particle method (RKPM), which is a meshfree technique. The combination of IGA and RKPM is felt to be particularly attractive for the problem class of interest due to the higher-order accuracy and smoothness of both discretizations, and relative simplicity of RKPM in handling fragmentation scenarios. A collection of mostly 2D numerical examples is presented in each of the parts to illustrate the good performance of the proposed air-blast FSI framework.

  18. Determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, C S; Levantino, G; Houen, Gunnar

    2000-01-01

    Annexin XI, a calcyclin-associated protein, has been shown to be identical to a 56,000 Da antigen recognized by antibodies found in sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases. In this work hexahistidine-tagged recombinant annexin XI (His6- rAnn XI) was used as antigen in ELISA...... experiments for determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in sera of patients with systemic rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Immunoblotting with HeLa cell extract and with His6-rAnn XI as antigen was used for confirmation of positive ELISA results. We found eleven anti-annexin XI positive sera (3.9%) out...... of 282 sera from patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. The highest number of annexin XI positive sera were found in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (3/17), and in subacute lupus erythematosus (1/6), while lower frequencies of positive sera were found in patients with systemic sclerosis (5...

  19. CYP2E1 autoantibodies in liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutti, Salvatore; Rigamonti, Cristina; Vidali, Matteo; Albano, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions involving cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) are a feature of idiosyncratic liver injury induced by halogenated hydrocarbons and isoniazid, but are also detectable in about one third of the patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In these latter the presence of anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies is an independent predictor of extensive necro-inflammation and fibrosis and worsens the recurrence of hepatitis following liver transplantation, indicating that CYP2E1-directed autoimmunity can contribute to hepatic injury. The molecular characterization of the antigens recognized by anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies in ALD and CHC has shown that the targeted conformational epitopes are located in close proximity on the molecular surface. Furthermore, these epitopes can be recognized on CYP2E1 expressed on hepatocyte plasma membranes where they can trigger antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. This does not exclude that T cell-mediated responses against CYP2E1 might also be involved in causing hepatocyte damage. CYP2E1 structural modifications by reactive metabolites and molecular mimicry represent important factors in the breaking of self-tolerance against CYP2E1 in, respectively, ALD and CHC. However, genetic or acquired interferences with the mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of the immune system are also likely to contribute. More studies are needed to better characterize the impact of anti-CYP2E1 autoimmunity in liver diseases particularly in relation to the fact that common metabolic alterations such as obesity and diabetes stimulates hepatic CYP2E1 expression. PMID:25462068

  20. [Juvenile dermatomyositis and new autoantibodies: Cases and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarella, M; Jurquet, A-L; Retornaz, K; Bardin, N; Chastang, M-C; Desjonquere, M; Fabien, N; Belot, A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy in children. Its diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis following the criteria of Bohan and Peter (1975). Recently, the presence of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) have started to be associated with specific outcome in adult patients; the diagnosis and prognosis value of these autoantibodies remains to be identified in children. We report four cases of JDM with MSAs focusing on clinical, biological, and radiological manifestations, and then we describe associated treatment. The cohort comprises four girls with an average age of 8.5 years. The time to diagnosis was 1 week to 4 months. For these patients, the immunologic study found one patient positive for the MDA5 antibody (or CADM 140), one positive for the TIF1γ antibody (or p155/140), and two patients positive for the NXP2 antibody (or p140/MJ). Each patient showed specific and characteristic cutaneous manifestations. For example, the girl positive for the TIF1γ antibody presented the most severe skin disease with urticaria, face edema, and vascularity of the neck and shoulders. However, regarding muscular features, proximal weakness was present in most of the cohort, except for the child positive for the MDA5 antibody, who presented no sign of muscular disease at the beginning with low CK levels. Importantly, acute pancreatitis also affected this patient. Concerning radiological indications, muscular MRI evidenced hyperinflammation, a sign of diffuse myositis, in all these patients. Treatments consisted in corticosteroids together with methotrexate or mycofenolate mofetil associated or not with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This report highlights the importance of systematic detection and analysis of MSA in diagnosis and characterization of JDM, and describes a new approach that would allow more focused treatments and be a useful predictor of clinical complications and prognosis in JDM-affected subjects.

  1. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Neder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia, musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis, and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were performed in leprosy patients. Results: At least one musculoskeletal manifestation was observed in 14% of leprosy patients and in none of the controls. Five leprosy patients had asymmetric polyarthritis of small hands joints. Nerve function impairment was observed in 22% of leprosy patients, type 1 leprosy reaction in 18%, and silent neuropathy in 16%. None of the patients and controls presented musculoskeletal pain syndromes, and the frequencies of all antibodies and cyoglobulins were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Further analysis of leprosy patients demonstrated that the frequencies of nerve function impairment, type 1 leprosy reaction, and silent neuropathy were significantly observed in patients with versus without musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0036, p = 0.0001, and p = 0.309, respectively, as well as multibacillary subtypes in leprosy (86% vs. 42%, p = 0.045. The median of physicians' visual analog scale (VAS, patients' VAS, pain VAS, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ were significantly higher in leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0001, p = 0.002, p = 0002, and p = 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify musculoskeletal manifestations associated with nerve dysfunction in pediatric leprosy patients. Hansen's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymmetric arthritis, especially in endemic regions.

  2. A study of type-1 diabetes associated autoantibodies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, Philomena; Clair, David St; Halley, Lorna; Mustard, Colette; Wei, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies revealed an association between type-1 diabetes (T1D) and schizophrenia but the findings reported to date have been controversial. To clarify the inconsistency across studies, T1D-associated autoantibodies were examined in plasma samples collected from 272 patients with schizophrenia and 276 control subjects. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using three linear peptide antigens, one of which was derived from glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two were derived from insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA2). Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant decrease in the levels of plasma IgG against the IA2b antigen in schizophrenia patients as compared to control subjects (Z=-3.54, p=0.0007), while no significant difference was found between these two groups either in anti-IA2a IgG levels (Z=-1.62, p=0.105) or in anti-GAD IgG levels (Z=-1.63, p=0.104). Linear regression analysis indicated no association of antipsychotic medication with the levels of plasma IgG against IA2a, IA2b or GAD, while the levels of plasma IgG for these 3 peptide antigens were significantly correlated with each other. Binary logistic regression showed that neither the DQ2.5 variant nor the DQ8 variant was associated with circulating levels of 3 T1D-associated autoantibodies in both the patient group and the control group. The coefficient of variation was 10.7% for anti-IA2a IgG assay, 10.1% for anti-IA2b IgG assay and 10.7% for anti-GAD IgG assay. The present work suggests that T1D-associated antibodies are unlikely to confer risk of schizophrenia and that the in-house ELISA developed with linear peptide antigens is highly reproducible.

  3. [Differences in the synthesis of IgA antibodies against T-dependent antigens in males and females].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, R; Moreno, L; Barranco, C; Kumate, J

    1989-01-01

    Rats immunized with T-dependent antigens revealed a greater specific IgA and IgM antibody response in females. There was no significant difference in the IgG antibody response. Quantitative differences in the IgA and IgM antibody response between males and females may be explained by genetics and hormonals factors. Greater IgA response in females may be another factor explaining the majority of female survival.

  4. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Cytokine profile of NALT during acute stress and its possible effect on IgA secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Meza, Juan Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Rivera-Aguilar, Victor; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Stress stimuli affect the immune system responses that occur at mucosal membranes, particularly IgA secretion. It has been suggested that acute stress increases the levels of IgA and that sympathetic innervation plays an important role in this process. We herein explore in a murine model how acute stress affects the Th1/Th2/Treg cytokine balance in NALT, and the possible role of glucocorticoids in this effect. Nine-week-old male CD1 mice were divided into three groups: unstressed (control), stressed (subjected to 4h of immobilization), and stressed after pretreatment with a single dose of the corticosterone receptor antagonist RU-486. The parameters evaluated included plasma corticosterone and epinephrine, IgA levels in nasal fluid (by ELISA), the percentage of CD19(+)B220(+)IgA(+) lymphocytes and CD138(+)IgA(+) plasma cells, and the mRNA expression of heavy α chain, J chain and pIgR. Moreover, the gene and protein expression of Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IL-2 and INF-γ), Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) and Treg cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ) were determined in nasal mucosa. The results show that acute stress generated a shift towards the dominance of an anti-inflammatory immune response (Th2 and Treg cytokines), evidenced by a significant rise in the amount of T cells that produce IL4, IL-5 and IL-10. This immune environment may favor IgA biosynthesis by CD138(+)IgA(+) plasma cells, a process mediated mostly by glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Clinical Value of Serum Fructosamine Measurement in IgA Type Multiple Myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Yu; Fan, Hong; Chen, Li-Xin; Wang, Li-Fang; Wang, Hong-Fei; Shi, Hai-Xiang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the value of serum fructosamine (FMN) measurement in clinical typing and staging of multiple myeloma(MM) as well as evaluation of curative efficacy and prognosis of IgA type MM. The levels of FMN were detected by nitro-blue-tetrazolium colorimetric method in 62 IgA type MM patients, 65 IgG type MM patients, 24 IgM type MM patients. The difference between the serum FMN levels and different MM types and its relationship with IgA type MM, patients' stages, efficacy and as well as, the effect of FMN level on overall survival (OS) time of IgA type MM patients were analyzed. FMN level of IgA type patients was obviously higher than that of IgG type and IgM type patients. Patients of DS stage III had higher FMN level than that of stage II, and patients of DS stage II had higher FMN level than that of stage I, the differences were statistical significant(P<0.05). Patients of ISS stage III also had higher FMN level than that of stage II, and patients of ISS stage II also had higher FMN level than that of stage I, the differences were statistical significant(P<0.05). After treatment, FMN level of patients obtained complete remission (CR) or very good partial remission(VGPR) obviously decreased, FMN level of patients obtained partial remission(PR) decreased, FMN level of patients obtained less than PR increased. Patients with normal FMN level had longer OS time, while patients with high FMN level had obviously short OS time. Serum FMN is obviously elevated in the IgA type MM, there is a certain association between staging and serum FMN level, the IgA type MM patients with FMN normalization after treatment have better prognosis.

  7. Improvement of the method of obtaining human IgA Fc-fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Galkin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To address a number of fundamental and applied problems in immunology, molecular and cellular biology and biotechnology it is necessary to obtain Fc-fragments of immunoglobulins. Fc-fragments may be used for studying of the effector functions of antibodies which are mediated by these areas. They are often used as an immunogen to produce anti-specie (based on so-called secondary antibody conjugate in the development of serological tests for diagnostics (predominantly such conjugate based on monoclonal antibodies. The work is aimed to develop improved methods of obtaining and allocation of Fc-fragments of human IgA. To achieve this objective, optimization of hydrolysis of IgA with subsequent purification of Fс-fragments have been carried out. Improved method of obtaining Fc-fragments of IgA provides: papain hydrolysis of immunoglobulin in the environment of nitrogen for 4 h, allowing to achieve maximum output of Fc-fragments without their further degradation: isolation and purification of Fc-fragments of human IgA by one-stage gel filtration on sephadex G-100; control of purity of the target product by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel with sodium dodecyl sulfate and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion. Enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out at the optimal temperature of papain (37 °C. As the oxygen in the air may have inhibitory effect on enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, the reaction mixture was incubated in the nitrogen atmosphere to prevent inactivation of papain. To reduce the incident degradation of immunoglobulin molecules, papain hydrolysis was carried out without using an enzyme activator (cysteine. Usage of the proposed scheme allows obtaining Fc-fragments of human IgA of high purity. Outcome of Fc-fragments after all stages of purification was about 18% of the initial amount of IgA in the preparation. Molecular weight from Fc-fragments of human IgA was equal to approximately 70 kDa.

  8. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  9. Effects of astaxanthin-enriched yeast on mucosal IgA induction in the jejunum and ileum of weanling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuhiko; Sugimoto, Miki; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Kume, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the effects of astaxanthin-enriched yeast on the concentration of immunoglobulin A (IgA), the numbers of IgA antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IgA C-region in the jejunum and ileum of weanling mice. Weanling mice were fed rodent feed or astaxanthin-enriched yeast-supplemented rodent feed for 7, 14 or 21 days. Supplemental astaxanthin-enriched yeast increased the numbers of IgA ASC in the jejunum and ileum after 7, 14 and 21 days of treatment. Supplemental astaxanthin-enriched yeast increased IgA concentrations in the jejunum after 21 days of treatment, but IgA concentrations in the ileum were not affected by the treatment. The mRNA expressions of IgA C-region in the jejunum after 14 and 21 days of treatment and the ileum after 14 days of treatment were enhanced by supplementation of astaxanthin-enriched yeast. These results indicate that supplementation of astaxanthin-enriched yeast is effective to enhance the numbers of IgA ASC in the jejunum and ileum and IgA concentrations in the ileum of weanling mice.

  10. A case of rapidly progressive IgA nephropathy in a patient with exacerbation of Crohn’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Choi Ji-Young; Yu Chung; Jung Hee-Yeon; Jung Min; Kim Yong-Jin; Cho Jang-Hee; Kim Chan-Duck; Kim Yong-Lim; Park Sun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background IgA nephropathy has been reported as a renal involvement in Crohn’s disease. Crescentic IgA nephropathy, which accounts for fewer than 5% of cases of IgA nephropathy, has a poorer prognosis than other forms of crescentic glomerulonephritis. We recently experienced a case of rapidly progressive IgA nephropathy concurrent with exacerbation of Crohn’s disease. Case presentation An 18-year-old male diagnosed with Crohn’s disease underwent a hemicolectomy 2 years prior previous...

  11. Intramuscular Priming and Intranasal Boosting Induce Strong Genital Immunity Through Secretory IgA in Minipigs Infected with Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Bøje, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    -titered neutralizing IgG response. Following genital challenge, intranasally boosted groups mounted an accelerated, highly significant genital IgA response that correlated with enhanced bacterial clearance on day 3 post infection. By detecting antigen-specific secretory component (SC), we showed that the genital IgA...... was locally produced in the genital mucosa. The highly significant inverse correlation between the vaginal IgA SC response and the chlamydial load suggests that IgA in the minipig model is involved in protection against C. trachomatis. This is important both for our understanding of protective immunity...

  12. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of a new dengue IgA capture assay (Platelia Dengue IgA Capture, Bio-Rad for dengue infection detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie De Decker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the short lifetime of IgA antibodies in serum and the key advantages of antibody detection ELISAs in terms of sensitivity and specificity, Bio-Rad has just developed a new ELISA test based on the detection of specific anti-dengue IgA. This study has been carried out to assess the performance of this Platelia Dengue IgA Capture assay for dengue infection detection. A total of 184 well-characterized samples provided by the French Guiana NRC sera collection (Laboratory of Virology, Institut Pasteur in French Guiana were selected among samples collected between 2002 and 2013 from patients exhibiting a dengue-like syndrome. A first group included 134 sera from confirmed dengue-infected patients, and a second included 50 sera from non-dengue infected patients, all collected between day 3 and day 15 after the onset of fever. Dengue infection diagnoses were all confirmed using reference assays by direct virological identification using RT-PCR or virus culture on acute sera samples or on paired acute-phase sera samples of selected convalescent sera. This study revealed: i a good overall sensitivity and specificity of the IgA index test, i.e., 93% and 88% respectively, indicating its good correlation to acute dengue diagnosis; and ii a good concordance with the Panbio IgM capture ELISA. Because of the shorter persistence of dengue virus-specific IgA than IgM, these results underlined the relevance of this new test, which could significantly improve dengue diagnosis accuracy, especially in countries where dengue virus is (hyper- endemic. It would allow for additional refinement of dengue diagnostic strategy.

  13. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of a new dengue IgA capture assay (Platelia Dengue IgA Capture, Bio-Rad) for dengue infection detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Decker, Sophie; Vray, Muriel; Sistek, Viridiana; Labeau, Bhety; Enfissi, Antoine; Rousset, Dominique; Matheus, Séverine

    2015-03-01

    Considering the short lifetime of IgA antibodies in serum and the key advantages of antibody detection ELISAs in terms of sensitivity and specificity, Bio-Rad has just developed a new ELISA test based on the detection of specific anti-dengue IgA. This study has been carried out to assess the performance of this Platelia Dengue IgA Capture assay for dengue infection detection. A total of 184 well-characterized samples provided by the French Guiana NRC sera collection (Laboratory of Virology, Institut Pasteur in French Guiana) were selected among samples collected between 2002 and 2013 from patients exhibiting a dengue-like syndrome. A first group included 134 sera from confirmed dengue-infected patients, and a second included 50 sera from non-dengue infected patients, all collected between day 3 and day 15 after the onset of fever. Dengue infection diagnoses were all confirmed using reference assays by direct virological identification using RT-PCR or virus culture on acute sera samples or on paired acute-phase sera samples of selected convalescent sera. This study revealed: i) a good overall sensitivity and specificity of the IgA index test, i.e., 93% and 88% respectively, indicating its good correlation to acute dengue diagnosis; and ii) a good concordance with the Panbio IgM capture ELISA. Because of the shorter persistence of dengue virus-specific IgA than IgM, these results underlined the relevance of this new test, which could significantly improve dengue diagnosis accuracy, especially in countries where dengue virus is (hyper-) endemic. It would allow for additional refinement of dengue diagnostic strategy.

  14. Original paper Prevalence of selected organ-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren’s syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Koszarny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of selected organ-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS patients, and discuss their clinical significance. Material and methods : The study included 121 RA and 30 pSS patients. Sera were tested for the presence of autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, thyroglobulin (anti-TG, TSH receptor (TRAbs, mitochondrial antigen M2 (AMA-M2-3E and gliadin-analogous fusion peptides (anti-GAF(3X using the ELISA method. Non-organ-specific antibodies were determined: rheumatoid factor in IgM class, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and antinuclear antibodies. The occurrence of antibodies was also examined with regards to RA activity. Results : The following autoantibodies were detected in RA patients: anti-TPO – 13 (10.7%, anti-TG – 6 (5%, AMA-M2-3E – 3 (2.5%, anti-GAF(3X – 5 (4.1%. The respective levels of these autoantibodies in pSS patients were 3 (10%, 2 (6.7%, 4 (13.3% and 2 (6.7%. Polyautoimmunity was confirmed in 34 RA patients (including 20 cases of autoimmune thyroid disease [AITD] and in 6 pSS patients (6 cases of AITD. When RA patients were divided into anti-TPO positive and anti-TPO negative groups, we found a statistically significant relationship between groups regarding age and hemoglobin concentration. In pSS patients the anti-TPO positive group was less likely to use immunosuppressive drugs as compared with the anti-TPO negative group. Anti-TPO was significantly more frequently detected in RA + AITD vs. RA, RA + SS + AITD vs. RA and in pSS + AITD vs. pSS patients. Conclusions : Organ-specific autoantibodies are relatively frequently observed in patients with RA and pSS. Their presence is connected with the clinical picture of the diseases.

  15. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first birth and hope to have a vaginal delivery this time, there is a class for that, too. Choose ... t covered in your birthing class, it’s a good idea to take an individual class on it, especially if you are a first-time mother. The health benefits of breastfeeding your baby ...

  16. Simultaneous occurrence of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and neonatal neutropenia due to maternal neutrophilic autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, Ellen; Jensen, Lise; Varming, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and neonatal neutropenia caused by maternal autoantibodies against neutrophils are rare disorders. We describe a newborn with severe thrombocytopenia and intracerebral bleeding caused by maternal anti-HPA-3a alloantibodies and mild neutropenia...

  17. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase cause glomerulonephritis and vasculitis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, H; Heeringa, P; Hu, PQ; Liu, Z; Zhao, ML; Aratani, Y; Maeda, N; Falk, RJ; Jennette, JC

    2002-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) are identified in the circulation of approximately 80% of patients with pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and systemic small vessel vasculitis, such as microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener granulomatosis. The most common

  18. A pseudobiospecific hollow fiber cartridge for in vitro adsorption of autoantibodies from pathological serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventura R.C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The affinity filtration technique using histidine as a pseudobiospecific ligand immobilized on poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol hollow fiber membranes (His-PEVA was used to remove autoantibodies from serum of patients with autoimmune disease. The effects of buffering solution conditions on the efficiency of autoantibodies removal was studied. The removal of anti-dsDNA, anti-SS-A/Ro, anti-Sm, anti-Sm/RNP and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies present in the serum was investigated, comparing the efficiency between Hepes and Tris-HCl buffers. The results showed the potential of the membrane to remove all the autoantibodies studied. Anti SS-A/Ro was removed more efficiently in Tris-HCl buffer system rather than with the Hepes buffer.

  19. Anti-C1q autoantibodies in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Kimura, Akio; Hayashi, Yuichi; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-09-15

    We examined anti-complement C1q (C1q) autoantibody levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). We analyzed the correlations between anti-C1q autoantibody levels and the clinical and other CSF characteristics of NMOSD. Serum and CSF anti-C1q autoantibody levels increased during the acute phase of NMOSD, reverting to the same levels as controls during remission. CSF anti-C1q autoantibody levels during the acute phase correlated with several markers reflecting disease severity, Expanded Disability Status Scale worsening, spinal cord lesion length in cases with myelitis, CSF protein and interleukin-6 levels, and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies to P53 Protein in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene leading to conformational changes in the p53 protein have been well established in many human cancers. Conformational changes and/or cellular accumulation of the protein may induce an immune response, resulting in circulating autoantibodies to p53, which have been documented in several types of cancers. Although rarely associated with autoimmune disease, a few reports have documented titres of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. The clinical relevance of circulating autoantibodies to p53, therefore, remains unclear. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and clinical relevance of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with selected autoimmune liver diseases.

  1. Hyperuricemia is associated with progression of IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Ali; Oral, Alihan; Elcioglu, Omer Celal; Takir, Mumtaz; Kostek, Osman; Ozkok, Abdullah; Basci, Semih; Sumnu, Abdullah; Ozturk, Savas; Sipahioglu, Murat; Turkmen, Aydın; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the world's most common glomerular diseases. Hyperuricemia was recently defined as risk factor for chronic kidney disease. We aimed to investigate the impact of baseline serum uric acid levels on progression of IgAN. A total of 93 patients with IgAN were screened. Demographic information and biochemical data were recorded. eGFR (using the CKD-EPI = Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula) was used as renal function marker. Baseline and sixth month eGFR values were calculated. Progression of renal disease was defined as the difference between baseline eGFR and sixth month eGFR (delta eGFR). Mean age of the patients was 40 ± 11 years (60% were males). Baseline mean eGFR was 77.9 ± 30.2 mL/min, and baseline mean serum uric acid was 5.65 ± 1.68 mg/dL. Importantly, baseline serum uric acid levels were found to be associated with the change in eGFR (r = 0.252, p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis (adjusted R(2) = 0.171, p = 0.031), adjusting for age, gender, baseline eGFR, blood pressure, baseline albumin concentration and ACEI and/or ARB use revealed that the baseline serum uric acid levels significantly predicted the change in eGFR. Baseline serum uric acid concentration is directly proportional to the rate of decline in renal functions in patients with IgAN. Uric acid-lowering treatments may be beneficial for the prevention of progression of IgAN. However, randomized controlled studies are needed for this purpose.

  2. Role of glomerular proteoglycans in IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebefors, Kerstin; Granqvist, Anna; Ingelsten, Madeleine; Mölne, Johan; Haraldsson, Börje; Nyström, Jenny

    2011-04-06

    Mesangial matrix expansion is a prominent feature of the most common form of glomerulonephritis, IgA nephropathy (IgAN). To find molecular markers and improve the understanding of the disease, the gene and protein expression of proteoglycans were investigated in biopsies from IgAN patients and correlated to clinical and morphological data. We collected and microdissected renal biopsies from IgAN patients (n = 19) and from healthy kidney donors (n = 14). Patients were followed for an average time of 4 years and blood pressure was according to target guidelines. Distinct patterns of gene expression were seen in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial cells. Three of the proteoglycans investigated were found to be of special interest and upregulated in glomeruli: perlecan, decorin and biglycan. Perlecan gene expression negatively correlated to albumin excretion and progress of the disease. Abundant decorin protein expression was found in sclerotic glomeruli, but not in unaffected glomeruli from IgAN patients or in controls. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), known to interact with perlecan, decorin and biglycan, were upregulated both on gene and protein level in the glomeruli. This study provides further insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in mesangial matrix expansion in IgAN. We conclude that perlecan is a possible prognostic marker for patients with IgAN. In addition, the up-regulation of biglycan and decorin, as well as TGF-β itself, indicate that regulation of TGF-β, and other profibrotic markers plays a role in IgAN pathology.

  3. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chruscinski

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen. Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient

  4. Autoantibodies to harmonin and villin are diagnostic markers in children with IPEX syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Lampasona

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D, celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92% and 6 (46% of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children.

  5. Autoantibodies to harmonin and villin are diagnostic markers in children with IPEX syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampasona, Vito; Passerini, Laura; Barzaghi, Federica; Lombardoni, Carlo; Bazzigaluppi, Elena; Brigatti, Cristina; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bosi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein) and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein) are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS) quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID) with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92%) and 6 (46%) of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children.

  6. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure is Associated with Clinical and Autoantibody Phenotypes in Juvenile Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mona; Targoff, Ira N.; Rice, Madeline M.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM), systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by muscle and skin inflammation. We investigated the association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and the clinical and autoantibody expression of JIIM. Methods We assessed the relationship between UVR exposure in the month before symptom onset and prevalence of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) versus polymyositis (JPM) in 298 patients. Among JDM patients, the association between UVR exposure and myositis autoantibodies was assessed. Regression models were stratified by sex and race. The association between regional UV index in U.S. geoclimatic zones and the clinical and autoantibody subgroups was examined by weighted least squares regression analysis. Results We observed increasing odds of JDM compared with JPM per unit increase in the patients’ highest UV index in the month before symptom onset in girls (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00–1.40). The average and highest UV indices were associated with increasing odds of anti-p155/140 autoantibodies, which was strongest in white males (OR 1.30 and 1.23, respectively). No association was observed between the UV index and anti-MJ autoantibodies or patients without myositis autoantibodies. Across US geoclimatic regions, the average UV index was associated with increasing odds of JDM and anti-p155/140 autoantibodies but decreasing odds of anti-MJ autoantibodies. Conclusion Short-term UVR exposure prior to illness onset may have a role in the clinical and serologic expression of juvenile myositis. Research examining mechanisms of UVR in JIIM pathogenesis is suggested from these findings. PMID:23658122

  7. Autoantibodies and hepatitis C virus genotypes in chronic hepatitis C patients in Estonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Zusinaite; Kaja Metsküla; Riina Salupere

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of several autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients, and to find out whether the pattern of autoantibodies was associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes.METHODS: Sera from 90 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis C were investigated on the presence of anti-nuclear (ANA), anti-mitochondrial (AMA), anti-smooth muscle (SMA),anti-liver-kidney microsomal type 1 (LKMA1), anti-parietal cell (PCA), anti-thyroid microsomal (TMA), and anti-reticulin (ARA) autoantibodies. The autoantibodies were identified by indirect immunofluorescence. HCV genotypes were determined by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amplified 5' noncoding genome region.RESULTS: Forty-six (51.1%) patients were positive for at least one autoantibody. Various antibodies were presented as follows: ANA in 13 (14.4%) patients, SMA in 39 (43.3%),TMA in 2 (2.2%), and ARA in 1 (1.1%) patients. In 9 cases,sera were positive for two autoantibodies (ANA and SMA).AMA, PCA and LKMA1 were not detected in the observed sera. HCV genotypes were distributed as follows: 1b in 66 (73.3%) patients, 3a in 18 (20.0%), and 2a in 6 (6.7%)patients.CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of ANA and SMA can be found in chronic hepatitis C patients. Autoantibodies are present at low titre (1: 10) in most of the cases. Distribution of the autoantibodies show no differences in the sex groups and between patients infected with different HCV genotypes.

  8. Autoantibodies against serotoninergic 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure.

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    Breidert, M; Wördehoff, S; Hansen, A; Eftekhari, P

    2012-01-01

    Serotoninergic 5-HT(4) receptors have been detected in several tissues including the heart. An autoimmune mechanism may underline the pathogenesis of heart failure. The aim of this work was to look for autoantibodies to the 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure. We looked for the presence of autoantibodies against 5-HT(4) receptor as well as angiotensin II type (AT1), β(1)-adrenoceptor, and muscarinic M2 receptors in the sera of 176 patients with heart failure (female: n=96, male: n=80) and in 108 controls (female: n=69; male: n=39). The prevalence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies was 18.8% (n=33) in the group of patients with heart failure and 4.6% (n=5) in the control group (preceptor M2 4.2 (n=5). Female patients with diabetes and heart failure had a positive trend (p=0.07) to the presence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies. In the group of female heart failure patients we found a significant correlation with the presence of coronary heart disease (p=0.05). The clinical relevance of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies has to be further studied. The prevalence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies was highly significant in patients with chronic heart failure. It was also a significant correlation between these autoantibodies and the female subgroup with coronary heart disease. It is conceivable that the increased prevalence of autoantibodies against the 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure is more than just an epiphenomenon.

  9. Minimal Change Disease and IgA Deposition: Separate Entities or Common Pathophysiology?

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    Brandon S. Oberweis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Minimal Change Disease (MCD is the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in children, while IgA nephropathy is the most common cause of glomerulonephritis worldwide. MCD is responsive to glucocorticoids, while the role of steroids in IgA nephropathy remains unclear. We describe a case of two distinct clinical and pathological findings, raising the question of whether MCD and IgA nephropathy are separate entities or if there is a common pathophysiology. Case Report. A 19-year old man with no medical history presented to the Emergency Department with a 20-day history of anasarca and frothy urine, BUN 68 mg/dL, Cr 2.3 mg/dL, urinalysis 3+ RBCs, 3+ protein, and urine protein : creatinine ratio 6.4. Renal biopsy revealed hypertrophic podocytes on light microscopy, podocyte foot process effacement on electron microscopy, and immunofluorescent mesangial staining for IgA. The patient was started on prednisone and exhibited dramatic improvement. Discussion. MCD typically has an overwhelming improvement with glucocorticoids, while the resolution of IgA nephropathy is rare. Our patient presented with MCD with the uncharacteristic finding of hematuria. Given the improvement with glucocorticoids, we raise the question of whether there is a shared pathophysiologic component of these two distinct clinical diseases that represents a clinical variant.

  10. Minimal change disease and IgA deposition: separate entities or common pathophysiology?

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    Oberweis, Brandon S; Mattoo, Aditya; Wu, Ming; Goldfarb, David S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Minimal Change Disease (MCD) is the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in children, while IgA nephropathy is the most common cause of glomerulonephritis worldwide. MCD is responsive to glucocorticoids, while the role of steroids in IgA nephropathy remains unclear. We describe a case of two distinct clinical and pathological findings, raising the question of whether MCD and IgA nephropathy are separate entities or if there is a common pathophysiology. Case Report. A 19-year old man with no medical history presented to the Emergency Department with a 20-day history of anasarca and frothy urine, BUN 68 mg/dL, Cr 2.3 mg/dL, urinalysis 3+ RBCs, 3+ protein, and urine protein : creatinine ratio 6.4. Renal biopsy revealed hypertrophic podocytes on light microscopy, podocyte foot process effacement on electron microscopy, and immunofluorescent mesangial staining for IgA. The patient was started on prednisone and exhibited dramatic improvement. Discussion. MCD typically has an overwhelming improvement with glucocorticoids, while the resolution of IgA nephropathy is rare. Our patient presented with MCD with the uncharacteristic finding of hematuria. Given the improvement with glucocorticoids, we raise the question of whether there is a shared pathophysiologic component of these two distinct clinical diseases that represents a clinical variant.

  11. Vertically transmitted fecal IgA levels distinguish extra-chromosomal phenotypic variation

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    Wallace, Meghan A.; D, Carey-Ann; Burnham; Virgin, Herbert W.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The proliferation of genetically modified mouse models has exposed phenotypic variation between investigators and institutions that has been challenging to control1-5. In many cases, the microbiota is the presumed culprit of the variation. Current solutions to account for phenotypic variability include littermate and maternal controls or defined microbial consortia in gnotobiotic mice6,7. In conventionally raised mice, the microbiome is transmitted from the dam2,8,9. Here we show that microbially–driven dichotomous fecal IgA levels in WT mice within the same facility mimic the effects of chromosomal mutations. We observed in multiple facilities that vertically-transmissible bacteria in IgA-Low mice dominantly lowered fecal IgA levels in IgA-High mice after cohousing or fecal transplantation. In response to injury, IgA-Low mice showed increased damage that was transferable by fecal transplantation and driven by fecal IgA differences. We found that bacteria from IgA-Low mice degraded the secretory component (SC) of SIgA as well as IgA itself. These data indicate that phenotypic comparisons between mice must take into account the non-chromosomal hereditary variation between different breeders. We propose fecal IgA as one marker of microbial variability and conclude that cohousing and/or fecal transplantation enables analysis of progeny from different dams. PMID:25686606

  12. A method for preparation of IgA from bovine mammary secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K

    1986-04-01

    A method for preparing purified IgA from bovine mammary secretions is described. Whey was initially fractionated by gel filtration and fractions containing IgA were pooled, concentrated and digested with pepsin. The digest was rechromatographed on the same type of gel twice and the resulting IgA preparation tested for purity by an enzyme immunoassay procedure. Five different preparations tested were found to contain no measureable IgM or IgG2 and 0.8% to 1.1% IgG1 on a weight basis. If colostral whey was digested with pepsin prior to chromatography, the IgA preparations contained 1.1% to 2% IgG1 and no measureable IgM and IgG2. The procedure provides a reasonably easy method of eliminating most of the contaminating IgG1 (dimeric) and allows preparation of quantities of IgA for immunochemical studies and standardization of serological techniques.

  13. TTG IgA in Functional Constipation: Is It Rational to Be Evaluated?

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    Iraj Shahramian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is suggested that constipation could be due to celiac disease (CD; therefore, this study aimed to determine the prevalence of positive tissue transglutaminase (tTG IgA test among children with functional constipation (FC. Methods: In this case-control study, 182 consecutive patients with FC who fulfilled the Rome III criteria as cases were compared with 240 healthy children as the control group in terms of suspicious CD by measuring the serum tTG IgA level. Results: There was a significant difference in favor of the case group in terms of serum tTG IgA levels (P = 0.000. The probability of having CD would change based on belonging to each group (case/control odds ratio [OR] = 0.222. Conclusion: With respect to these data, tTG IgA level was observed to be significantly higher in patients relative to healthy children; therefore, it is recommended that patients be screened for CD through the tTG IgA.

  14. Expression of prorenin receptor in renal biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy.

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    Miyazaki, Nagisa; Murata, Ichijiro; Takemura, Genzou; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Matsumoto-Miyazaki, Jun; Yoshida, Gakuro; Izumi, Kumiko; Kashi, Hitomi; Niimi, Kaori; Nishiwaki, Ayuko; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Ohno, Michiya; Ohashi, Hiroshige; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Prorenin receptor (PRR) has been implicated in the onset and progression of various renal diseases, though its possible association with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy remains unclear. In the present study, we tried to clarify expression and pathophysiological significance of PRR in IgA nephropathy. We immunohistochemically assessed PRR levels in renal biopsy specimens from 48 patients with IgA nephropathy and evaluated its relevance to the clinical and pathological features of the disease. PRR was detected mainly in renal tubular cells, which was confirmed at the subcellular level using immunoelectron microscopy. The PRR-positive area (%PRR area) correlated with daily urinary protein, which is known to reflect disease severity (r=0.286, P=0.049). PRR levels were weaker in tubular cells bordering areas of severe interstitial fibrosis, where α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts were present. We also used immunohistochemical detection of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3) and electron microscopy to assess autophagy, a cytoprotective mechanism downstream of PRR. We noted an apparent coincidence between autophagy activation in tubular cells and PRR expression in the same cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that renal expression of PRR in IgA nephropathy may be a compensatory response slowing disease progression by preventing tubular cell death and subsequent fibrosis through activation of cytoprotective autophagic machinery. Further studies using different type of kidney diseases could draw conclusion if the present finding is a generalized observation beyond IgA nephropathy.

  15. Prevalence of IgA deficiency in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Moradinejad, Mohammad Hasan; Rafati, Ali Hoseinpoor; Ardalan, Maryam; Rabiei, Mahnaz; Farghadan, Maryam; Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi Haghi; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate any association between IgA deficiency (IgAD) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) among Iranian children.This case-control study was carried out on 83 children who were diagnosed as JRA according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria; Patients were admitted at the rheumatology clinic of Children's Medical Center, (Tehran). Serum immunoglobulins concentrations were determined by nephelometry method. Control group was 112 healthy children who were matched for age and gender. Informed consent obtained from all parents.Selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD) was found only in a boy (1.2%) among JRA children; however, partial IgA deficiency was found in 6(7.1%) of patients with JRA and in 12(10.7%) of control subjects, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.46). Immunoglobulins levels in patients with JRA (IgM: 126.7±57.2, IgG: 1182.3±351 and IgA:169.3±98) were significantly higher than their controls (IgM: 104±52, IgG:802±220 and IgA: 94.6±47) (pJRA patients and their control counterpart; this might be partly due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages in Iran that resulted in increased prevalence of clinically undiagnosed partial IgAD in general population. Hence, future epidemiological studies are warranted to make it clear.

  16. High fecal IgA is associated with reduced Clostridium difficile colonization in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, Sarah L; Konya, Tedd; Azad, Meghan B; Guttman, David S; Sears, Malcolm R; Becker, Allan B; Turvey, Stuart E; Mandhane, Piush J; Subbarao, Padmaja; Scott, James A; Field, Catherine J; Kozyrskyj, Anita L

    2016-09-01

    Colonization of infants with Clostridium difficile is on the rise. Although better tolerated by infants than adults, it is a risk factor for future allergic disease. The present study describes associations between infant fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and colonization with C. difficile in 47 infants enrolled in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study. C. difficile colonization was observed in over half (53%) of the infants. Median IgA was lower in infants colonized with C. difficile (10.9 μg versus 25.5 μg per g protein; p = 0.18). A smaller proportion of infants with IgA in the highest tertile were colonized with C. difficile compared to the other tertiles (31.3% versus 64.5%, p = 0.03). In unadjusted analysis, odds of colonization with C. difficile was reduced by 75% (OR 0.25 95% CI 0.07, 0.91 p = 0.04) among infants with IgA in the highest tertile compared to those in the other tertiles. Following adjustment for parity, birth mode and breastfeeding, this association was even stronger (aOR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03, 0.94, p = 0.04). Our study provides evidence that high fecal IgA, independent of breastfeeding, is associated with reduced likelihood of C. difficile colonization in infancy.

  17. Phagocytosis of IgA Immune Complexes by Human U937 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彩云; 崔薇; 张伟

    2003-01-01

    In order to study FcαR Ⅰ mediated phagocytosis ot lgA immune complexes by U937 cells, antigen 8.9NIP/BSA was labeled with FITC and reacted with anti-NIP IgA or anti-NIP IgG antibody to form immune complexes (ICs). They were then incubated with phorbol 12-myristate B-acetate (PMA) stimulated U937 cells. The phagocytosed ICs were quantified by flow cytometry. The results was that the expression of FcαR Ⅰ on U937 cells was higher than that of FcγR Ⅰ , FcyR Ⅱ and FcγR Ⅲ. After stimulation by PMA, expression of FcαR Ⅰ on U937 cells was markedly upregulated and the phagocytosis of IgA ICs was enhanced. FcαR Ⅰ mediated specific IgA phagocytosis was stronger than FcγR Ⅰ and FcγR Ⅱ mediated IgG phagocytosis. Complement receptors, CR1 and CR3, enhanced U937 cell phagocytosis of IgA ICs. It concludes that FcγR Ⅰ mediated strong phagocytosis of IgA ICs.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis phenotype at presentation differs depending on the number of autoantibodies present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derksen, V F A M; Ajeganova, S; Trouw, L A; van der Helm-van Mil, A H M; Hafström, I; Huizinga, T W J; Toes, R E M; Svensson, B; van der Woude, D

    2017-04-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), seropositive and seronegative disease may be two entities with different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, long-term outcomes and disease presentations. However, the effect of the conjoint presence of multiple autoantibodies, as proxy for a more pronounced humoral autoimmune response, on clinical phenotype remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigates the association between the number of autoantibodies and initial clinical presentation in two independent cohorts of patients with early RA. Autoantibody status (rheumatoid factor, anticitrullinated protein antibodies and anticarbamylated protein antibodies) was determined at baseline in the Leiden Early Arthritis Cohort (n=828) and the Swedish BARFOT (Better Anti-Rheumatic Farmaco-Therapy, n=802) study. The association between the number of autoantibodies and baseline clinical characteristics was investigated using univariable and multivariable ordinal regression. In both cohorts, the following independent associations were found in multivariable analysis: patients with a higher number of RA-associated antibodies were younger, more often smokers, had a longer symptom duration and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at presentation compared with patients with few autoantibodies. The number of autoantibodies, reflecting the breadth of the humoral autoimmune response, is associated with the clinical presentation of RA. Predisease pathophysiology is thus reflected by the initial clinical phenotype. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. A Novel Method for Detecting p53 Autoantibodies in Sera of Patients with NSCLC

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    Kai TANG

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Serum autoantibody detection is useful means for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. So our objective was to synthesize peptide array to analyse p53 autoantibodies in the sera of patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Cellulose-bound overlapping peptides (12 mers derived from p53 wild type protein were synthesized using SOPTs synthesis technique by an AutoSpot robot –ASP SL (Intavis, Germany. The membrane was incubated with 1/400 dilutions of p53 monoclonal antibody (Sc-53394 to establish a new approach to detect p53 antibody, and the epitopes of the p53 monoclonal antibody is already known. We analysed the p53 autoantibodies from the sera of NSCLC and controls by peptide array and ELISA. Results We synthesized on cellulose membranes twelve-amino-acid overlapping peptides which included all of the sequences of the polypeptide chain of p53. The p53 autoantibody was positive in seven cases of thirty patients’ sera with NSCLC and was negative in sera of the controls, with the same result of ELISA. Conclusion The peptide array could be applied not only to detect the autoantibodies in the sera of patients with lung cancer, but also to map the epitopes of the autoantibodies which might be useful for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  20. Purification of human immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor using affinity chromatography and magnetic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, S V; Golikova, E A; Kireev, F D; Lopatnikova, J A

    2013-04-30

    Autoantibodies to cytokines are important biological effector molecules that can regulate cytokine activities. The aim of the study was to develop a protocol to purify autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor from human serum, for use as a calibration material to determine the absolute content of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proposed protocol includes a set of affinity chromatography methods, namely, Bio-Gel P6DG sorbent to remove albumin from serum, Protein G Sepharose 4 Fast Flow to obtain a total immunoglobulin G fraction of serum immunoglobulins, and Affi-Gel 15 to obtain specifically antibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The addition of a magnetic separation procedure to the protocol eliminated contaminant tumor necrosis factor from the fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The protocol generated a pure fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor, and enabled us to determine the absolute concentrations of different subclasses of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor in apparently healthy donors.

  1. A panel of autoantibodies as potential early diagnostic serum biomarkers in patients with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Mingmei; Xu, Shuang; Li, Siyao; Sun, Baosheng; Lee, Kuang-Hui; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Shilong

    2016-07-01

    The study was designed to test whether circulating autoantibodies against associated antigens (TAAs) were altered in early cervical cancer and benign cervical tumors. A total of 111 cervical cancer patients, 137 cervical benign tumor patients, and 160 healthy volunteers matched in age were recruited in this study. The expression of autoantibodies was tested using in-house developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with linear peptide envelope antigens derived from TAAs. One-way ANOVA test showed that there was no difference in the CD25 autoantibody expression among the cervical cancer group, benign tumor group, and healthy control group (P = 0.063; P = 0.191). The expression of autoantibodies against survivin and TP53 in the cervical cancer group was significantly higher than that in the benign tumor group (P cervical cancer group than in the healthy control group (P = 0.010; P = 0.001), while autoantibodies in the cervical cancer group showed no difference in expression compared with that in the benign tumor group. The panel of five TAAs showed a sensitivity of 37.8 % and a specificity of 90 %, which was much higher than the sensitivity of the single-TAA testing group. The data from this study further support our previous hypothesis that the detection of autoantibodies for the diagnosis of a specific cancer type can be enhanced using a panel of several selected TAAs as target antigens.

  2. A Case of Adenomyosis with a High Titer of IgG Autoantibody to Calreticulin

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    Neil M. Gude BSc, MSc, PhD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. High prevalence of autoantibodies to the calcium-binding, endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein calreticulin has been reported in various autoimmune and parasitic diseases. It has been reported that adenomyosis is associated with the presence of autoantibodies, in particular to phospholipids; however, it is not known whether it is associated with autoimmunity to calreticulin. Results. A 35-year-old gravida 4 para 4 woman presented with a history of many years of intractable menorrhagia. Histopathological examination of a subsequent hysterectomy specimen revealed a bulky uterus, a poorly developed secretory endometrium with decidualization of the stroma and chronic endometritis, as well as the presence of adenomyosis uteri. IgG autoantibodies to calreticulin were measured in the plasma of this and 234 other patients. Nine (3.8% patients tested positive. The titer of anticalreticulin IgG autoantibody in the sole case with adenomyosis was approximately 8 times the average of other positive-testing samples. Conclusions. The etiology of adenomyosis is unclear. The presence of a high titer, blocking anticalreticulin autoantibody may directly increase the risk that adenomyosis might develop. It is also possible that the expansion of endometrial glandular tissue, as well as elevated estrogens, during adenomyosis may lead to elevated calreticulin, which induces an autoimmune reaction to it. Further study is required to determine whether there is a significant association between adenomyosis and the prevalence of calreticulin autoantibodies.

  3. Hello from the Other Side: How Autoantibodies Circumvent the Blood–Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Encephalitis

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    Tyler Cutforth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies against neuronal receptors and synaptic proteins are associated with autoimmune encephalitides (AE that produce movement and psychiatric disorders. In order to exert their pathological effects on neural circuits, autoantibodies against central nervous system (CNS targets must gain access to the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood–brain barrier (BBB, a tightly regulated gateway formed by endothelial cells lining CNS blood vessels. To date, the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autoantibody-triggered encephalitic syndromes are poorly understood, and how autoantibodies breach the barrier remains obscure for almost all AE syndromes. The relative importance of cellular versus humoral immune mechanisms for disease pathogenesis also remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the proposed triggers for various autoimmune encephalopathies and their animal models, as well as basic structural features of the BBB and how they differ among various CNS regions, a feature that likely underlies some regional aspects of autoimmune encephalitis pathogenesis. We then discuss the routes that antibodies and immune cells employ to enter the CNS and their implications for AE. Finally, we explore future therapeutic strategies that may either preserve or restore barrier function and thereby limit immune cell and autoantibody infiltration into the CNS. Recent mechanistic insights into CNS autoantibody entry indicate promising future directions for therapeutic intervention beyond current, short-lived therapies that eliminate circulating autoantibodies.

  4. Hello from the Other Side: How Autoantibodies Circumvent the Blood-Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Maryann P; Agalliu, Dritan; Cutforth, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies against neuronal receptors and synaptic proteins are associated with autoimmune encephalitides (AE) that produce movement and psychiatric disorders. In order to exert their pathological effects on neural circuits, autoantibodies against central nervous system (CNS) targets must gain access to the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a tightly regulated gateway formed by endothelial cells lining CNS blood vessels. To date, the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autoantibody-triggered encephalitic syndromes are poorly understood, and how autoantibodies breach the barrier remains obscure for almost all AE syndromes. The relative importance of cellular versus humoral immune mechanisms for disease pathogenesis also remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the proposed triggers for various autoimmune encephalopathies and their animal models, as well as basic structural features of the BBB and how they differ among various CNS regions, a feature that likely underlies some regional aspects of autoimmune encephalitis pathogenesis. We then discuss the routes that antibodies and immune cells employ to enter the CNS and their implications for AE. Finally, we explore future therapeutic strategies that may either preserve or restore barrier function and thereby limit immune cell and autoantibody infiltration into the CNS. Recent mechanistic insights into CNS autoantibody entry indicate promising future directions for therapeutic intervention beyond current, short-lived therapies that eliminate circulating autoantibodies.

  5. Effect of Immunosuppressive Drugs on the Changes of Serum Galactose-Deficient IgA1 in Patients with IgA Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jeong; Schaub, Stefan; Molyneux, Karen; Koller, Michael T; Stampf, Susanne; Barratt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) and IgA-IgG complexes are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We aimed therefore to determine the impact of immunosuppression on the serum levels of Gd-IgA1, total IgA1 and IgA-IgG complexes in IgAN patients. In a retrospective study, serum samples from IgAN patients collected before transplantation (t0) and at 3- and 6-month posttransplant (t3 & t6) were used to measure the levels of Gd-IgA1, total IgA1 and IgA-IgG complexes. The area under the curves (AUC) of immunosuppressants was calculated by the plot of plasma trough level or dosage of each immunosuppressant versus time and was interpreted as the extent of drug exposure. Thirty-six out of 64 IgAN patients, who underwent kidney transplantation between 2005 and 2012, were enrolled. From t0 to t3, serum Gd-IgA1 and total IgA1 decreased significantly (24.7 AU (18.6-36.1) to 17.2 (13.1-29.5) (pIgA-IgG complexes remained similar. From t3 to t6, Gd-IgA1 and IgA-IgG complexes significantly increased (17.2 AU (13.1-29.5) to 23.9 (16.8-32.0) (p = 0.0143); OD 0.16 (0.06-0.31) to 0.26 (0.14-0.35) (p = 0.0242)), while total IgA1 remained similar. According to median regression analysis, AUC of prednisone t0-6 was significantly associated with the decrease of Gd-IgA1 t0-6 (P = 0.01) and IgA1 t0-6 (p = 0.002), whereas AUC of tacrolimus t0-6 was associated with the decrease of IgA1 t0-6 (p = 0.02). AUC of prednisone t0-3 was associated with the decrease of IgA-IgG complexes t0-3 (p = 0.0036). The association of AUC prednisone t0-6 with Gd-IgA1 t0-6 remained highly significant after adjustment for other immunosuppressants (p = 0.0036). Serum levels of Gd-IgA1, total IgA1 and IgA-IgG in patients with IgAN vary according to the changing degrees of immunosuppression. The exposure to prednisone most clearly influenced the serum levels of Gd-IgA1.

  6. Lack of serologic evidence to link IgA nephropathy with celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten.

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    Sina Moeller

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99, unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96, and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30. All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2. Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy.

  7. Cocoa and cocoa fibre differentially modulate IgA and IgM production at mucosal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Cladera, Malen; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a 10 % cocoa (C10) diet, containing polyphenols and fibre among others, modifies intestinal and systemic Ig production. The present study aimed at evaluating the impact of C10 on IgA and IgM production in the intestinal and extra-intestinal mucosal compartments, establishing the involvement of cocoa fibre (CF) in such effects. Mechanisms by which C10 intake may affect IgA synthesis in the salivary glands were also studied. To this effect, rats were fed either a standard diet, a diet containing C10, CF or inulin. Intestinal (the gut wash (GW), Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN)) and extra-intestinal (salivary glands) mucosal tissues and blood samples were collected for IgA and IgM quantification. The gene expressions of IgA production- and homing-related molecules were studied in the salivary glands. The C10 diet decreased intestinal IgA and IgM production. Although the CF diet decreased the GW IgA concentration, it increased PP, MLN and serum IgA concentrations. Both the C10 and the CF diets produced a down-regulatory effect on IgA secretion in the extra-intestinal tissues. The C10 diet interacted with the mechanisms involved in IgA synthesis, whereas the CF showed particular effects on the homing and transcytosis of IgA across the salivary glands. Overall, CF was able to up-regulate IgA production in the intestinal-inductor compartments, whereas it down-regulated its production at the mucosal-effector ones. Further studies must be directed to ascertain the mechanisms involved in the effect of particular cocoa components on gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

  8. Immunoglobulins in nasal secretions of healthy humans: structural integrity of secretory immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and occurrence of neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of nasal bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, L; Rasmussen, TT; Reinholdt, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro....... Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11...... healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and...

  9. [Disseminated tuberculosis revealing IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome : A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbieu, Caroline; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Canestri, Ana; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    A 27-year-old man without any medical history presented concomitantly a pulmonary and urinary tuberculosis and a nephrotic syndrome with hematuria and renal failure. The renal biopsy showed increased mesangial matrix, few focal segmental lesions, and IgA deposits confirming the diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome remission occurred quickly after antituberculous treatment. The association between tuberculosis and IgA nephropathy has been previously reported in 9 patients. Renal outcome was always favorable with antituberculous treatment. No relapse occurred, with a maximal follow-up of 42 months. Here, we discuss this singular association and previous similar cases. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Extracapillary IgA nephropathy associated with infection with hepatitis C virus and hepatic cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezuelo, J B; Enríquez, R; Andrada, E; Amorós, F; Sirvent, A E; Reyes, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 36 year old man who was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea, edema of the lower limbs, arterial hypertension and oliguric renal failure. He had microhematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria, immunological tests were normal or negative. Renal biopsy revealed global (55%) or segmental glomeruloesclerosis, remaining glomeruli showed extracapillary proliferation (25%). Immunofluorescence study disclosed IgA mesangial deposits. He was also diagnosed as having liver cirrhosis with positive serology against hepatitis C virus. He was treated with dialysis, antihypertensive drugs and steroids with improvement of the renal function. However, ten months later maintenance hemodialysis became necessary. We emphasize two points: first IgA glomerulonephritis is rarely associated with hepatitis C infection, and second crescentic IgA nephropathy has been infrequently reported in liver cirrhosis.

  11. Association of IgA multiple myeloma with pre-existing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, A.I.; Miller, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 153 patients with multiple myeloma was performed for evaluation of the possible significance of pre-existing disease. 37% of the group had no significant antecedent disorder. The most common prior illnesses were peptic ulcer disease and gallbladder disease. Of 12 patients in the group who had prior biliary tract disease and for whom immunoelectrophoretic studies were available, eight (66.7%) had IgA paraproteins. This figure is statistically higher than the 14.1% of prevalence of IgA paraproteins in those myeloma patients without biliary disease. We conclude that prior inflammatory gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and, particularly, biliary disease may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the IgA subset of multiple myeloma.

  12. Detection and specificity of anti-Staphylococcus intermedius secretory IgA in human tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, J; Willcox, M D; Jackson, G D

    1997-05-01

    Secretory IgA (sIgA) is the predominant immunoglobulin present in tears that protects the ocular surface against various antigens. Staphylococcus intermedius is a member of the normal ocular microbiota. The presence and the specificity of immunoglobulin A to S. intermedius was determined by fluorescent assay, ELISA and western blots. Three immunodominant antigens of S. intermedius were detected of 145, 127 and 61 kDa. Staphylococcus intermedius-specific IgA cross reacted with Staphylococcus aureus but not with Gram negative bacteria. This indicates that specific IgA may play an important role in the protection of the eye by limiting the levels of Gram positive normal microbiota and defending against the more pathogenic S. aureus.

  13. Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri, Julie; Raetz, Megan; Sturge, Carolyn R; Wilhelm, Cara L; Benson, Alicia; Savani, Rashmin C; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

  14. [HLA genetic markers and auto-antibody profile in a Mapuche family with a case affected of type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Sylvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Pérez, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys beta cells of pancreas. Not all carriers of susceptible HLA genes and positive for autoantibodies develop the disease. Environmental factors play a role in triggering the autoimmune process. To analyze an exceptional case of DM1 in a Mapuche family in the context of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. A study of a family with an affected female child was carried out in a Mapuche community in Southern Chile (VIII region). This is an unique and sporadic DM1 case with Mapuche heritage. Nutritional and viral infections data were collected by interview and clinical records. A genetic analysis by PCR was done to detect class I and II HLA genes by reverse dot blot. The proband, her mother and sister had positive islet cell antibodies (ICA). Her father and brother were negative. All thefamily was positive for anti glutamic decarboxylase antibodies (GAD65). All subjects had HLA-DRB1 0407/0407 and HLA-DQB1 0302/0302 alleles. The index case and her father were homozygotes for the HLA-A1:A*68012/A*68012 allele. Mean breastfeeding lapse was 18 months in all children. No evidences for viral infections such as rubella, mumps or measles were found in this family. There was an altered profile of autoantibodies in the family of the index case. All genotypes were comparable with the European population where the diabetogenic combination DR4/DQB1*0302 is the most prevalent. No environmental factors could be incriminated as triggers of the disease.

  15. Urinary uromodulin excretion predicts progression of chronic kidney disease resulting from IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uromodulin, or Tamm-Horsfall protein, is the most abundant urinary protein in healthy individuals. Recent studies have suggested that uromodulin may play a role in chronic kidney diseases. We examined an IgA nephropathy cohort to determine whether uromodulin plays a role in the progression of IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 344 IgA nephropathy patients were involved in this study. Morphological changes were evaluated with the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA measured the urinary uromodulin level on the renal biopsy day. Follow up was done regularly on 185 patients. Time-average blood pressure, time-average proteinuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and eGFR decline rate were caculated. Association between the urinary uromodulin level and the eGFR decline rate was analyzed with SPSS 13.0. RESULTS: We found that lower baseline urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.03 and higher time-average proteinuria (P = 0.04 were risk factors for rapid eGFR decline in a follow-up subgroup of the IgA nephropathy cohort. Urinary uromodulin level was correlated with tubulointerstitial lesions (P = 0.016. Patients that had more tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis on the surface had lower urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary uromodulin level is associated with interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy and contributes to eGFR decline in IgA nephropathy.

  16. Role of Microbiota in Strengthening Ocular Mucosal Barrier Function Through Secretory IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Wright, Quentin; Geddes-McAlister, Jennifer; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms controlling secretory IgA (SIgA) production, thereby ensuring maintenance of ocular surface health. To determine whether the presence of specific gut commensal species regulates SIgA levels and IgA transcripts in the eye-associated lymphoid tissues (EALT), specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Swiss Webster (SW) mice were treated with antibiotic cocktails, germ-free (GF) SW mice were reconstituted with diverse commensal gut microbiota, or monocolonized with gut-specific commensals. Proteomic profiling and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were used to quantify SIgA and IgA levels. 16S rDNA sequencing was carried out to characterize commensal microbiota. Commensal presence regulated ocular surface SIgA levels and mRNA IgA transcripts in EALT. Oral antibiotic cocktail intake significantly reduced gut commensal presence, while maintaining ocular surface commensal levels reduced SIgA and IgA transcripts in EALT. Analysis of gut microbial communities revealed that SPF SW mice carried abundant Bacteroides organisms when compared to SPF C57BL6/N mice, with B. acidifaciens being the most prominent species in SPF SW mice. Monocolonization of GF SW mice with B. acidifaciens, a strict gut anaerobe, resulted in significant increase of IgA transcripts in the EALT, implying generation of B-cell memory. These data illustrated a "gut-eye" axis of immune regulation. Exposure of the host to gut commensal species may serve as a priming signal to generate B-cell repertoires at sites different from the gut, such as EALT, thereby ensuring broad protection.

  17. Prevalence of IgA Deficiency in Children with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Moradinejad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate any association between IgA deficiency (IgAD and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA among Iranian children.This case-control study was carried out on 83 children who were diagnosed as JRA according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria; Patients were admitted at the rheumatology clinic of Children's Medical Center, (Tehran. Serum immunoglobulins concentrations were determined by nephelometry method. Control group was 112 healthy children who were matched for age and gender. Informed consent obtained from all parents.Selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD was found only in a boy (1.2% among JRA children; however, partial IgA deficiency was found in 6(7.1% of patients with JRA and in 12(10.7% of control subjects, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.46. Immunoglobulins levels in patients with JRA (IgM: 126.7±57.2, IgG: 1182.3±351 and IgA:169.3±98 were significantly higher than their controls (IgM: 104±52, IgG:802±220 and IgA: 94.6±47 (pPatients with growth failure had higher IgM, IgG and IgA levels in comparison with patients without growth failure; however, this difference was significant about IgM and IgG levels (p<0.05.In contrast to other similar studies, the number of IgAD did not differ significantly between JRA patients and their control counterpart; this might be partly due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages in Iran that resulted in increased prevalence of clinically undiagnosed partial IgAD in general population. Hence, future epidemiological studies are warranted to make it clear.

  18. The coincidence of IgA nephropathy and Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maixnerová Dita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common glomerulonephritis, which may also coexist with other diseases. We present two patients with an unusual coincidence of IgAN and Fabry disease (FD. Case presentation A 26 year-old man underwent a renal biopsy in February 2001. Histopathology showed very advanced IgAN and vascular changes as a result of hypertension. Because of his progressive renal insufficiency the patient began hemodialysis in August 2001. By means of the blood spot test screening method the diagnosis of FD was suspected. Low activity of alpha-galactosidase A in the patient’s plasma and leukocytes and DNA analysis confirmed the diagnosis of FD. Enzyme replacement therapy started in July 2004. Then the patient underwent kidney transplantation in November 2005. Currently, his actual serum creatinine level is 250 μmol/l. Other organ damages included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neuropathic pain and febrile crisis. After enzyme replacement therapy, myocardial hypertrophy has stabilized and other symptoms have disappeared. No further progression of the disease has been noted. The other patient, a 30 year-old woman, suffered from long-term hematuria with a good renal function. Recently, proteinuria (2.6 g/day appeared and a renal biopsy was performed. Histopathology showed IgAN with remarkably enlarged podocytes. A combination of IgAN and a high suspicion of FD was diagnosed. Electron microscopy revealed dense deposits in paramesangial areas typical for IgAN and podocytes with inclusive zebra bodies and myelin figures characteristic of FD. FD was confirmed by the decreased alpha-galactosidase A activity in plasma and leukocytes and by DNA and RNA analysis. Enzyme replacement therapy and family screening were initiated. Conclusions Our results emphasize the role of complexity in the process of diagnostic evaluation of kidney biopsy samples. Electron microscopy represents an integral part of histopathology, and genetic

  19. Comparative analysis of plant-produced, recombinant dimeric IgA against cell wall β-glucan of pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodicasa, Cristina; Catellani, Marcello; Moscetti, Ilaria; Bromuro, Carla; Chiani, Paola; Torosantucci, Antonella; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2017-08-19

    Immunoglobulins A (IgA) are crucially involved in protection of human mucosal surfaces from microbial pathogens. In this work, we devised and expressed in plants recombinant chimeric antifungal antibodies (Abs) of isotype A (IgA1, IgA2, and scFvFcA1), derived from a murine mAb directed to the fungal cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan which had proven able to confer protection against multiple pathogenic fungi. All recombinant IgA (rIgA) were expressed and correctly assembled in dimeric form in plants and evaluated for yield, antigen-binding efficiency and antifungal properties in vitro, in comparison with a chimeric IgG1 version. Production yields and binding efficiency to purified β-glucans showed significant variations not only between Abs of different isotypes but also between the different IgA formats. Moreover, only the dimeric IgA1 was able to strongly bind cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and to restrain its adhesion to human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that IgG to IgA switch and differences in molecular structure among different rIgA formats can impact expression in plant and biological activity of anti-β-glucans Abs and provide new insights for the design of recombinant IgA as anti-infective immunotherapeutics, whose potential is still poorly investigated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Circadian clock-dependent increase in salivary IgA secretion modulated by sympathetic receptor activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Misaki; Orihara, Kanami; Kamagata, Mayo; Hama, Koki; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Miyakawa, Hiroki; Nakao, Atsuhito; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-08-18

    The salivary gland is rhythmically controlled by sympathetic nerve activation from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which functions as the main oscillator of circadian rhythms. In humans, salivary IgA concentrations reflect circadian rhythmicity, which peak during sleep. However, the mechanisms controlling this rhythmicity are not well understood. Therefore, we examined whether the timing of parasympathetic (pilocarpine) or sympathetic (norepinephrine; NE) activation affects IgA secretion in the saliva. The concentrations of saliva IgA modulated by pilocarpine activation or by a combination of pilocarpine and NE activation were the highest in the middle of the light period, independent of saliva flow rate. The circadian rhythm of IgA secretion was weakened by an SCN lesion and Clock gene mutation, suggesting the importance of the SCN and Clock gene on this rhythm. Adrenoceptor antagonists blocked both NE- and pilocarpine-induced basal secretion of IgA. Dimeric IgA binds to the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) on the basolateral surface of epithelial cells and forms the IgA-pIgR complex. The circadian rhythm of Pigr abundance peaked during the light period, suggesting pIgR expression upon rhythmic secretion of IgA. We speculate that activation of sympathetic nerves during sleep may protect from bacterial access to the epithelial surface through enhanced secretion of IgA.