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Sample records for idf international diabetes

  1. History and current activities of the International Diabetes Federation-Western Pacific Region (IDF-WPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S

    1994-10-01

    International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is one of the biggest non-governmental organizations with its 44-year history since 1950. In 1993, 114 diabetes associations in 96 countries participated in the IDF. In 1982, it was decided to divide the globe into seven regions and to promote the diagnosis, treatment, care and education of diabetes based on the environment, natural features, culture and race of the each region. On January 24, 1984, the IDF-WPR establishment meeting was held in Melbourne, Australia, with eight original member countries (Australia, New Zealand, Korea, The Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Fiji and Japan). In 1993, 13 diabetes associations in 12 countries joined the IDF-WPR. New member associations are from China (Beijing and Taipei), Hong Kong, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. The IDF-WPR has been holding congresses and council meetings every 3 or 4 years since 1984 as well as formulating strategic action plans in the scientific, clinical, health care and education fields of diabetes.

  2. Diabetes and Anemia: International Diabetes Federation (IDF) - Southeast Asian Region (SEAR) position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Manisha; Kalra, Sanjay; Badani, Rajesh; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Bhoraskar, Anil; Das, A K; Dhorepatil, Bharati; Ghosh, Sujoy; Jeloka, Tarun; Khandelwal, Deepak; Latif, Zafar Ahmed; Nadkar, Milind; Pathan, Md Faruque; Saboo, Banshi; Sahay, Rakesh; Shimjee, Suleiman; Shrestha, Dina; Siyan, Ali; Talukdar, Shamim Hayder; Tiwaskar, Mangesh; Unnikrishnan, A G

    2017-12-01

    Anemia is often associated with diabetes mellitus and is known to intensify the risk of developing diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular complications. There is paucity in understanding of co-existence of these conditions, especially in Southeast Asian countries. Iron and/or erythropoietin deficiencies are the major causes of anemia in diabetes, and diabetic kidney disease plays a key role. Patients with diabetes need to be screened for anemia along with other risk factors and anemia should be corrected appropriately to improve overall clinical outcomes. This position statement aims to provide a comprehensive overview and an algorithm for appropriate management of anemia in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in Type 2 diabetes: Comparison of WHO, modified ATPIII and IDF criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Khan, T.E.; Yasmeen, T.; Awan, S.; Islam, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes according to three commonly used operational definitions (World Health Organization(WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel( NCEP ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation( IDF)). To evaluate the agreement between these classifications in the Pakistani cohort. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively of 210 patients with type 2 diabetes visiting outpatient clinics of one of the large tertiary care hospitals at Karachi, Pakistan between June 2008 to November 2008. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was found to be 81.4% (WHO), 86.7 %( IDF) and 91.9 %( NCEP ATPIII). The degree of agreement (kappa statistic) was found to be highest among IDF and NCEP ATPIII (0.728) as compared to (0.436 and 0.417) between WHO and ATP and WHO and IDF respectively. The most significant predictors for metabolic syndrome were found out to be female gender OR= 8.74 95% CI 1.51-50.53, low HDL cholesterol levels OR= 0.89 95% CI 0.84-0.94 and high systolic blood pressure OR= 1.06 95% CI 1.009-1.11. Conclusion: Our study results suggested that NCEP ATPIII and IDF are the most reliable criteria for diagnosing metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetic patients, with NECP capturing more patients in comparison to IDF definition. The alarmingly high frequency of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes found in this study suggests that primary prevention strategies should be initiated earlier and early in this ethnic group and our health care system should be geared up to cope with this deadly quartet. (author)

  4. NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria for metabolic syndrome predict type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Eva Sulistiowati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS have a greater risk for acquiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM. The MetS criteria usually used are those of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel (NCEP and Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III and of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF. This study aimed to evaluate the modified NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria as predictor of type 2 DM among subjects with MetS.   Methods A cohort study was conducted among 4240 subjects with MetS. MetS was determined according to the modified NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria. The study followed up 3324 non-diabetic subjects of the cohort study of non-communicable disease (NCD risk factors (NCD study during a 2-year period. Type 2 DM was determined from the diagnosis by health personnel or from fasting blood glucose of ≥126 mg/dL or blood glucose of ≥200 mg/dL, 2 hours after 75g glucose loading.   Results The MetS prevalence based on modified NCEP ATP III and IDF criteria in non-DM subjects was 17.1% and 15.6%, respectively. The risk for DM in subjects with MetS using modified NCEP ATP III and IDF criteria was 4.7 (CI 95%: 3.4-6.5 and 4.1 (CI 95%: 3.0-5.7, respectively.   Conclusions Both MetS criteria can be used as predictors of the occurrence of DM type 2, but the modified NCEP-ATP III is more properly applied than the IDF criteria in subjects with MetS. Screening programs and routine monitoring of MetS components are required for early detection of type 2 DM.

  5. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

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    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  6. Assessment of metabolic syndrome in Kashmiri population with type 2 diabetes employing the standard criteria's given by WHO, NCEPATP III and IDF.

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    Lone, Shafat; Lone, Kouser; Khan, Saika; Pampori, Rafiq Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Around 20-25 percent of the world's adult populations have the metabolic syndrome and they are twice as likely to die from heart attack or stroke compared with people without the syndrome. The World Health Organization proposed a definition for the metabolic syndrome in 1998 and later on NCEP ATPIII and IDF provided new definitions of this syndrome in 2001 and 2003 respectively. Very few studies have compared the different definitions to diagnose the metabolic syndrome in type two diabetics in India while as for Kashmir valley no such documented study has been carried out till date. To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 Kashmir diabetics and to find out the degree of agreement between three different criteria given by WHO, NCEPATPIII and IDF for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. A cross sectional study was conducted in one of the two tertiary care hospitals of Kashmir, India. About 1000 patients were selected and their demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters were studied after obtaining informed consent from each patient. Prevalance of metabolic syndrome was found to be highest(84.5%) while using WHO definition.Kappa statistic between WHO, ATP III and WHO, IDF definitions was 0.697 (95% CI 0.637-0.754) and 0.775 (95%CI 0.72-0.82) respectively while the degree of agreement between IDF and ATP III definitions was highest with kappa of 0.851 (95%CI 0.810-0.889). Our study warrants for interventions to prevent the progression towards this syndrome among type 2 diabetics as early as the diagnosis of diabetes is made. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Malaysians using the International Diabetes Federation, National Cholesterol Education Program and Modified World Health Organization Definitions.

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    Bee, Ying Tan; Haresh, Kumar Kantilal; Rajibans, Singh

    2008-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program Adults Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have proposed different criteria to diagnose metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, there is no single definition to accurately diagnose MetS. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of MetS using WHO, NCEP ATP III and IDF in the Malaysian community, and to determine the concordance between these definitions for MetS. 109 men and women aged > 30 years participated in the study, and the prevalence of MetS was determined according to the three definitions. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip circumference, blood pressure, blood lipid profile and plasma fasting glucose were measured. In order to determine the concordance between IDF and the other two definitions, the kappa index (κ-test) was used. The prevalence of MetS (95% confidence interval) was 22.9% (22.8-23.1) by IDF definition, 16.5% (16.3-16.9) by NCEP ATP III definition and 6.4% (6.2-6.6) by modified WHO definition. The sensitivity and specificity of IDF against NCEP ATP III were 88.9% and 90.1% respectively, IDF against WHO definition were 85.7% and 81.4%. The κ statistics for the agreement of the IDF definition was 68.3 ± 0.1 with the NCEP ATP III, and 30.5 ± 0.1 with the modified WHO definition. The prevalence of the MetS among respondents using the IDF definition was highest, followed by NCEP ATP III, and finally modified WHO definition. There was a good concordance between the IDF and NCEP ATP III definitions, and a low concordance between IDF and modified WHO definitions.

  8. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among North Indian adolescents using Adult Treatment Panel III and pediatric International Diabetic Federation definitions

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    Riyaz Ahmad Bhat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Childhood obesity is an important risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome (MS in children and adolescent. Because of high prevalence of insulin resistance and MS in Indian adult population, studies are needed to identify the prevalence of these metabolic abnormalities in the adolescent population. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of MS using pediatric International Diabetic Federation (IDF definition and compare it with estimates of Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III definition among adolescents in Northern India. Materials and Methods: At a total of 899 adolescents attending school (aged 10-18 years participated in this population-based prospective study. All the clinical and biochemical assessment were done after proper consent. The MS was determined by the National Cholesterol Education Program ATP III definition modified for age and pediatric IDF definition. Results: The prevalence of MS was 3.5% according to ATP III criteria and 1.5% based on IDF criteria. No significant gender difference was observed in the distribution of MS. Hypertriglyceridemia was the most common and abdominal obesity the least common constituent of MS. Conclusion: This study provides the first estimates of MS using pediatric IDF definition in the adolescent population from Northern India.

  9. Harmonizing the definition of the metabolic syndrome: comparison of the criteria of the Adult Treatment Panel III and the International Diabetes Federation in United States American and European populations.

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    Assmann, Gerd; Guerra, Rudy; Fox, Garrett; Cullen, Paul; Schulte, Helmut; Willett, DuWayne; Grundy, Scott M

    2007-02-15

    The 2 most widely used criteria to diagnose the metabolic syndrome (MS) are those developed by the United States Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program (ATP III) and by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). A major difference between these 2 sets of criteria is that the IDF places more emphasis on waist circumference. We compared the prevalence of MS using the ATP III and the IDF guidelines in 2 American (the Dallas Health Study and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) and 1 German (Prospective Cardiovascular Munster study) population samples. When the ATP III criteria were used, the prevalence of MS was higher in the United States than the German samples in both women (37% vs. 18%) and men (30% vs 25%), whereas when the IDF criteria were used, the prevalence of MS was 25% higher in the German than the American sample. Although in the United States both sets of criteria identified mostly the same people (concordance of about 90%), this was less true in Germany (concordance about 80%). To determine which criteria better predicted adverse cardiovascular outcomes, the incidence of coronary events associated with MS, as defined using the ATP III or the IDF criteria, were compared over a 10-year period among the middle-aged men in the German sample (n = 7,152). A total of 3.4% of men without MS developed an event. A much higher percentage of the men with MS defined by the ATP III criteria (10.7%) than the IDF criteria (5.5%) had a cardiovascular event. In conclusion, although the prevalence of MS was higher when the IDF criteria were used in the German sample, the IDF criteria have lower predictive power for coronary events.

  10. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with carotid disease according to NHLBI/AHA and IDF criteria: a cross-sectional study

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    Maksimovic Milos Z

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS has been related to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Different criteria for diagnosis of MetS have been recommended, but there is no agreement about which criteria are best to use. The aim of the present study was to investigate agreement between the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, American Heart Association (NHLBI/AHA and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of MetS in patients with symptomatic carotid disease and to compare the frequency of cardiovascular risk factor in patients with MetS diagnosed by these two sets of criteria. Methods The study was a cross-sectional one involving 644 consecutive patients with verified carotid disease who referred to the Vascular Surgery Clinic Dedinje in Belgrade during the period April 2006 - November 2007. Anthropometric parameters blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and lipoproteins were measured using standard procedures. Results MetS was present in 67.9% of participants, according to IDF criteria, and in 64.9% of participants, according to the NHLBI/AHA criteria. A total of 119 patients were categorized differently by the two definitions. Out of all participants 10.7% had MetS by IDF criteria only and 7.8% of patients had MetS by NHLBI/AHA criteria only. The overall agreement of IDF and NHLBI/AHA criteria was 81.5% (Kappa 0.59, p Conclusion The MetS prevalence in patients with symptomatic carotid disease was high regardless of criteria used for its diagnosis. Since some patients with known cardiovascular risk factors were lost by the use of IDF criteria it seems that NHLBI/AHA definition is more suitable for diagnosis of MetS. Large follow-up studies are needed to test prognostic value of these definitions.

  11. "KiDS and Diabetes in Schools" project: Experience with an international educational intervention among parents and school professionals.

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    Bechara, Glaucia Margonari; Castelo Branco, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Avelino Luiz; Chinnici, Daniela; Chaney, David; Calliari, Luis Eduardo P; Franco, Denise Reis

    2018-06-01

    Although it is known that school care is a major challenge in diabetes treatment, there is still no published international initiative. The aims of this study were to introduce an international educational intervention tool, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) KiDS and Diabetes in Schools project (KiDS project), and to describe its impact on diabetes knowledge and behavior of caregivers and school professionals. The KiDS project was developed with the support of IDF and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes and provides online free material in 10 languages, directed to caregivers and school personnel. A pilot evaluation of the KiDS intervention was performed in Brazil. An educational intervention was conducted in 5 primary schools, with 42 parents and school staff, followed by 2 individual interviews after 1 and 3 months. The results were evaluated in a qualitative study with a descriptive design based on content analysis. School staff acquired new knowledge on diabetes and its treatment. They felt more confident when helping students with diabetes and said the educational intervention promoted a positive impact on the teacher-student relationship, on the caring for health, and on school infrastructure. Family members of children with diabetes stated that the educational intervention gave them an opportunity to strengthen and update information on treatment and improve their knowledge. The KiDS project is the first international tool directed to foster a safe and supportive environment and a better understanding of diabetes in schools. In this pilot evaluation, it achieved the goal of informing and changing the behavior of parents and school staff, thus improving the care provided to children with diabetes in schools. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effectiveness of IDF and ATP-III in identifying metabolic syndrome and the usefulness of these tools for health-promotion in older Taiwanese.

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    Chen, M M; Tsai, A C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of IDF (International Diabetes Federation) and ATP-III (National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III) for predicting metabolic syndrome, and to evaluate the usefulness of these definitions for health promotion. A cross-sectional study. A national random sample. A population representative sample of 1021 54-91 year-old Taiwanese. Subjects were measured for anthropometric and biochemical indicators and rated for the presence of metabolic syndrome using the two definitions. We evaluated the effectiveness of the two definitions in predicting MetS among those who had specific metabolic disorders. Results were analyzed with Student t-test and McNemar's test. Among the 918 subjects who had one or more MetS-item disorders, ATP-III rated greater proportions of subjects as having MetS than IDF, but both definitions predicted less than 50% (37.7% and 45.4%, respectively) as having MetS. Compared to IDF, ATP-III rated a greater proportion of subjects as having MetS, but both definitions missed more than 50% of subjects who had metabolic disorder(s). Since those who are missed have as much need for lifestyle intervention, the definitions appear not appropriate for health promotion.

  13. IDF-curves for precipitation In Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohymont, Bernard; Demarde, Gaston R.

    2004-01-01

    The Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves for precipitation constitute a relationship between the intensity, the duration and the frequency of rainfall amounts. The intensity of precipitation is expressed in mm/h, the duration or aggregation time is the length of the interval considered while the frequency stands for the probability of occurrence of the event. IDF-curves constitute a classical and useful tool that is primarily used to dimension hydraulic structures in general, as e.g., sewer systems and which are consequently used to assess the risk of inundation. In this presentation, the IDF relation for precipitation is studied for different locations in Belgium. These locations correspond to two long-term, high-quality precipitation networks of the RMIB: (a) the daily precipitation depths of the climatological network (more than 200 stations, 1951-2001 baseline period); (b) the high-frequency 10-minutes precipitation depths of the hydro meteorological network (more than 30 stations, 15 to 33 years baseline period). For the station of Uccle, an uninterrupted time-series of more than one hundred years of 10-minutes rainfall data is available. The proposed technique for assessing the curves is based on maximum annual values of precipitation. A new analytical formula for the IDF-curves was developed such that these curves stay valid for aggregation times ranging from 10 minutes to 30 days (when fitted with appropriate data). Moreover, all parameters of this formula have physical dimensions. Finally, adequate spatial interpolation techniques are used to provide nationwide extreme values precipitation depths for short- to long-term durations With a given return period. These values are estimated on the grid points of the Belgian ALADIN-domain used in the operational weather forecasts at the RMIB.(Author)

  14. The theme of the world diabetes day 2014; healthy living and diabetes; a nephrology viewpoint

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    Beladi-Mousavi Seyed Seifollah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Annually, on November 14, the world diabetes day (WDD is celebrated. WDD is a campaign led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and its member associations throughout the world. It was created in 1991 by IDF and World Health Organization (WHO in response to increasing concerns about the intensifying threat of diabetes worldwide. The WDD 2014 organization marks the first of a three-year (2014-16 emphasis on "healthy living and diabetes". Replacement of whole grain and cereal-based foods with refined grains in diet planning could be an operative and practical strategy in type II diabetic patients. This strategy beyond the development of glycemic control, leads to more benefits for management of other features of diabetes, diminution of diabetes-induced metabolic disorders, and prevents long-term complications especially diabetic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Does the new International Diabetes Federation definition of metabolic syndrome improve prediction of coronary artery disease and carotid intima-media thickening?

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    Timóteo, Ana; Santos, Rui; Lima, Sandra; Mamede, Andreia; Fernandes, Rita; Ferreira, Rui

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with increased incidence of diabetes and atherosclerotic complications. The new definition of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) increases the population with this entity, compared to the NCEP ATP III definition. To study the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with and without MS, according to the NCEP ATP III and IDF definitions, and the predictive ability of carotid IMT for CAD. We studied 270 consecutive patients admitted for elective coronary angiography due to suspicion of CAD. All patients underwent ultrasound study of the carotid arteries to measure IMT (the highest value between the right and left common carotid arteries was used in the analysis). Coronary stenosis of > or =70% (or 50% for the left main coronary artery) was considered significant. By the ATP III definition, 14% of the patients had MS, and these patients had a higher prevalence of CAD (87% vs. 63%, p = 0.004), but no significant difference was found for carotid IMT (1.03 +/- 0.36 mm vs. 0.95 +/- 0.35 mm, p=NS). With the IDF definition, 61% of the patients had MS; this group was slightly older and included more women. There were no differences in terms of CAD (68% vs. 63%) or carotid IMT (0.97 +/- 0.34 vs. 0.96 +/- 0.39 mm). On multivariate analysis, the ATP III definition of MS predicts CAD (OR 4.76, 95% CI 1.71-13.25, p = 0.003), but the IDF definition does not (OR 1.29, 95% CI 0.74-2.27, p = 0.37). On ROC curve analysis, an IMT of > or = 0.95 mm predicts CAD (AUC 0.66, p definition increases the population with MS, decreasing the capacity to predict the presence of CAD. In our population, neither the ATP III nor the IDF definition showed differences in terms of carotid IMT. Carotid IMT can predict CAD, but with only modest sensitivity.

  16. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients according to World Health Organization, Third Report National Cholesterol Education Program, and International Diabetes Federation definitions

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    Angel Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angel Rodríguez1, Helena Delgado-Cohen1, Jesús Reviriego1, Manuel Serrano-Ríos21Clinical Research Department, Eli Lilly and Company, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine II, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainBackground: The availability of several definitions of the metabolic syndrome has created potential confusion concerning its prognostic utility. At present, little data exist about the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.Aim: To identify risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to three diagnostic criteria: World Health Organization (WHO, Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF.Subjects and methods: A logistic regression model was used to identify demographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables related with metabolic syndrome (N = 1259.Results: Hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥7% were associated with increased risk of WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60–3.40; OR, 1.79 95% CI: 1.25–2.55; and OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 1.12–2.22, respectively. The risk of presenting metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATP III criteria was increased in female patients (OR, 2.02; 95% CI: 1.37–2.97, elevated fasting glucose levels (OR, 5.99; 95% CI: 3.56–10.07, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.28; 95% CI: 1.57–3.32, hypertension (OR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.59–3.53, and endocrine disorders (OR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.06–2.57. For the IDF criteria, female patients and patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or insulin treatment were at higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 2.35–6.80; OR, 2.72 95% CI: 1.22–6.04; and OR, 1.96 95% CI: 1.24–3.11, respectively.Conclusions: The

  17. Foot disorders in diabetes mellitus

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    Alla Y. Tokmakova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, by 2035 the number of diabetes patients will reach 592 million people. Various disorders of the structure and function of the soft tissues and skeleton of the lower extremities is the most common reason that patients seek medical care. The paper presents the modern concept of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapeutic and prevention tactics used in the specialized endocrinological and surgical clinics.

  18. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among staff in a Malaysian public university based on Harmonised, International Diabetes Federation and National Cholesterol Education Program Definitions.

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    Heng, K S; Hejar, A R; Rushdan, A Z; Loh, S P

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) as defined by the latest Harmonised definition and the agreement between the Harmonised definition and other definitions is poorly studied among Malaysians. This study was conducted to determine and compare the prevalence of MetSyn according to the Harmonised, International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP ATPIII) definitions among Malay staff of Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM). Subjects aged between 20 to 65 years were recruited by convenient sampling. Waist circumference, blood pressure, lipid profiles and fasting plasma glucose levels were assessed. The agreement between the Harmonised and other definitions was determined by Kappa statistics. A total of 227 subjects with a mean +/- SD age of 37.9 +/- 9.6 years participated in the study. The overall prevalence of MetSyn was 38.3%, 38.8% and 33.5% according to Harmonised, IDF and NCEP ATP III definitions, respectively. Generally, men had higher prevalence of MetSyn than women. The prevalence increased with age in both genders with a more progressive trend in women. Men in the age group of 20-39 years had a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome. A strong agreement was found between the Harmonised and the IDF definitions (Kappa index = 0.991), and between the Harmonised and the NCEP ATP III definitions (Kappa index = 0.857). Regardless of definitions used, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the study, especially in young men, was high and warrants further investigation. The Harmonised definition is suitable for diagnosing metabolic syndrome in any population with similar sociodemographic characteristics.

  19. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Versus International Diabetic Federation Definition of Metabolic Syndrome, Which One is Associated with Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery Disease?

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    Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Namayandeh, Seyedeh-Mahdieh; Sadr, Seyed-Mahmood

    2012-08-01

    A cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occur together more often than by chance alone, have been known as the metabolic syndrome. Various definitions have been proposed by different organizations over the past decade. This study was designed to evaluate a new definition of the metabolic syndrome for the prediction of diabetes mellitus among the Iranian population. This study was carried out in an urban population, aged 20 to 74 years, from Yazd, a city in the center of Iran. The study is a part of the phase I of Yazd Healthy Heart Program, that is, a community-based intervention study for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The significance level has been defined as Pdefinitions of NCEP and IDF criteria, and also, the most important relevant factors of stable angina were: Increased age, male sex, and metabolic syndrome by only IDF definitions, but the NCEP definition of the metabolic syndrome cannot predict diabetes mellitus independent of age and sex. This study showed that increased age and metabolic syndrome are the most important relevant factors for diabetes mellitus, especially by using the IDF criteria for definition of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Bilateral Internal Mammary Artery Utilization in Diabetics: Friend or Foe?

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    Crawford, Todd C; Zhou, Xun; Fraser, Charles D; Magruder, J Trent; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Alejo, Diane; Bobbitt, Jennifer; Fonner, Clifford E; Wehberg, Kurt; Taylor, Brad; Kwon, Christopher; Fiocco, Michael; Conte, John V; Salenger, Rawn; Whitman, Glenn J

    2018-05-11

    Bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) grafting in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains controversial. Our study compared morbidity and mortality between 1)diabetic and non-diabetic BIMA patients and 2)diabetic BIMA versus diabetic patients who underwent left internal mammary artery (LIMA) grafting only. Patients who underwent isolated CABG from July 2011 - June 2016 at any of the 10 centers in Maryland were propensity scored across 16 variables. Diabetic BIMA were matched 1:1 by nearest neighbor matching to non-diabetic BIMA patients, and were separately matched 1:1 to diabetic LIMA patients. We calculated observed to expected (O/E) ratios for composite morbidity/mortality, operative mortality, unplanned reoperation, stroke, renal failure, prolonged ventilation, and deep sternal wound infection) and compared ratios among matched populations. Over the study period, 812 CABG patients received BIMA grafts, including 302 patients (37%) with diabetes. We matched 259 diabetic and non-diabetic BIMA patients. O/E ratios were higher in matched diabetic (vs non-diabetic) BIMA patients when comparing composite morbidity/mortality, reoperation, stroke, renal failure, and prolonged ventilation (all O/E>1.0), however, O/E for operative mortality was higher in non-diabetic BIMA patients. We additionally matched 292 diabetic BIMA to diabetic LIMA patients. Diabetic BIMA patients had a higher O/E for composite morbidity/mortality, operative mortality, stroke, renal failure, and prolonged ventilation. In this statewide analysis, diabetics who received BIMA grafts (compared to diabetics with LIMA grafts or non-diabetics with BIMA grafts) had higher O/E ratios for composite morbidity/mortality as a result of higher O/E ratios for major complications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Optimal cutoff points for the detection of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome in Mexican adults.

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    Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Jiménez-Corona, Aída

    2012-01-01

    To compare the waist circumference cutoff points established by the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) with those of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for the screening of diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome in Mexican adults. This study comprised a subsample of the ENSANUT 2006. Subjects without diabetes and hypertension and non-pregnant women were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were compared using AUC and the positive likelihood ratio test [LR(+)]. In subjects aged ≥40 years, sensitivity for detection of diabetes and hypertension was higher for the IDF thresholds (85.34 and 86.87%, respectively) compared with those of the AHA/NHLBI (59.49 and 52.41%, respectively). LR(+) were higher for IDF thresholds compared with AHA/NHLBI. Similar results in subjects aged ≥65 years were observed. The measurement of abdominal obesity defined by the IDF was a better screening tool for diabetes and hypertension, considering that initially a high sensitivity and low cost tool at population level is required.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes: comparative prevalence according to two sets of diagnostic criteria in sub-Saharan Africans

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    Kengne Andre P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available definition criteria for metabolic syndrome (MS have similarities and inconsistencies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MS in a group of Cameroonians with type 2 diabetes, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and the National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III criteria, and to assess the concordance between both criteria, and the implications of combining them. Methods We collected clinical and biochemical data for 308 patients with type 2 diabetes (men 157 at the National Obesity Center of the Yaounde Central Hospital, Cameroon. Concordance was assessed with the use of the Kappa statistic. Results Mean age (standard deviation was 55.8 (10.5 years and the median duration of diagnosed diabetes (25th–75th percentiles was 3 years (0.5–5.0, similarly among men and women. The prevalence of MS was 71.7% according to the IDF criteria and 60.4% according to NCEP-ATP III criteria. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than in men independently of the criteria used (both p  Conclusions The IDF and NCEP-ATP III criteria do not always diagnose the same group of diabetic individuals with MS and combining them merely increases the yield beyond that provided by the IDF definition alone. This study highlights the importance of having a single unifying definition for MS in our setting.

  3. ILAW Glass Testing for Disposal at IDF: Phase 1 Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papathanassiu, Adonia [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Barkatt, Aaron [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Joseph, Innocent [EnergySolutions Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Brown, Elvie E. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-04-11

    This document reports the results of the testing of phase 1 ORP LAW (low activity waste) glasses, also identified as enhanced LAW glasses. Testing involved are SPFT (Single Pass Flow Through), VHT (Vapor Hydration Test), and PCT (Product Consistency Test), along with the analytical tests (XRD and SEM-EDS). This report contains the data of the high waste loading ORP LAW glasses that will be used for the performance assessment of the IDF (Integrated Disposal Facility).

  4. ILAW Glass Testing for Disposal at IDF: Phase 1 Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papathanassiu, Adonia; Swanberg, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This document reports the results of the testing of phase 1 ORP LAW (low activity waste) glasses, also identified as enhanced LAW glasses. Testing involved are SPFT (Single Pass Flow Through), VHT (Vapor Hydration Test), and PCT (Product Consistency Test), along with the analytical tests (XRD and SEM-EDS). This report contains the data of the high waste loading ORP LAW glasses that will be used for the performance assessment of the IDF (Integrated Disposal Facility).

  5. Optimal cutoff points for the detection of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome in Mexican adults Puntos de corte óptimos para la detección de diabetes tipo 2, hipertensión y síndrome metabólico no diagnosticados en adultos mexicanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Rojas-Martínez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the waist circumference cutoff points established by the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI with those of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF for the screening of diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome in Mexican adults. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study comprised a subsample of the ENSANUT 2006. Subjects without diabetes and hypertension and non-pregnant women were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were compared using AUC and the positive likelihood ratio test [LR(+]. RESULTS: In subjects aged ≥40 years, sensitivity for detection of diabetes and hypertension was higher for the IDF thresholds (85.34 and 86.87%, respectively compared with those of the AHA/NHLBI (59.49 and 52.41%, respectively. LR(+ were higher for IDF thresholds compared with AHA/NHLBI. Similar results in subjects aged ≥65 years were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of abdominal obesity defined by the IDF was a better screening tool for diabetes and hypertension, considering that initially a high sensitivity and low cost tool at population level is required.OBJETIVO: Comparar los puntos de corte de circunferencia de cintura de la American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI y la International Diabetes Federation (IDF para escrutinio de diabetes, hipertensión arterial y síndrome metabólico en adultos mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó una submuestra de la ENSANUT 2006 incluyendo sujetos sin diabetes o hipertensión y mujeres no embarazadas. Se comparó la sensibilidad, especificidad y valores predictivos mediante AUC y la razón de verosimilitudes positiva [LR(+]. RESULTADOS: En personas ≥40 años, la sensibilidad para detección de diabetes e hipertensión usando el criterio de la IDF fue de 85.34% (LR(+=1.1 y 86.87% (LR(+=1.1; mientras que para el criterio de la AHA/NHLBI fue de 59.49% (LR(+=1.34 y 52

  6. The modified NCEP ATP III criteria maybe better than the IDF criteria in diagnosing Metabolic Syndrome among Malays in Kuala Lumpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulgiba Awang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic Syndrome is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, different diagnostic criteria have been recommended by different expert groups. In Malaysia, there is a lack of research comparing these different diagnostic criteria. Therefore, it is our aim to study the concordance between the IDF and the modified NCEP ATP III definitions of Metabolic Syndrome among a Malay cohort in Kuala Lumpur; and to demonstrate if all participants have the same cardiometabolic risks. Methods This was an analytical cross sectional study. Ethics approval was obtained and informed consent was given by all participants. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipid profile were taken following standard protocols. Results Metabolic Syndrome was diagnosed in 41.4% and 38.2% participants using the modified NCEP and IDF criteria respectively. Among those diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome by modified NCEP, 7.6% were missed by the IDF criteria. Participants diagnosed by the modified NCEP criteria had lower BMI and waist circumference but had higher cardiometabolic risks than those diagnosed with both criteria. Their blood pressure, glucose, total cholesterol and triglyceride were more adverse than the IDF group. This demonstrated that central obesity may not be a prerequisite for the development of increased cardiometabolic risks within this Malay cohort. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is common in this Malay cohort regardless of the criterion used. The modified NCEP ATP III criteria may be more suitable in diagnosis of metabolic syndrome for this Malay cohort.

  7. Hyperhomocysteinemia, coronary heart disease, and diabetes mellitus as predicted by various definitions for metabolic syndrome in a hypertensive Saudi population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.

    2007-01-01

    From the emergence of different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MS) we aim to determine the prevalence of such a condition among hypertensive Saudi population and to identify which definition can best assess the risk of hyperhomocysteinemia, coronary heart disease (CHD), and diabetes mellitus. In this cross-sectional study, we studied 581 hypertensive Saudis, aged 21-70, at the King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, from June 2005 to December 2005 Each participant completed the questionnaire and underwent a complete physical examination. Metabolic parameters were measured using routine laboratory procedures and homocysteine using HPLC by the electrochemical detection method. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definition we diagnosed 222 males and 256 females. There is an increased risk for hyperhomocystenemia using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) guidelines (odds ratio [OR] 3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-12.56; p=0.08) compared to IDF (OR 0.59, CI 0.17-2.10; p=0.41) and WHO (OR 0.45, CI 0.16-1.25; p=0.12); increased risk for probable CHD in patients with MS by WHO (OR 2.17, CI 1.11-4.25; p=0.02) compared to ATPIII (OR 2.14, CI 1.05-4.35; p=0.035) and IDF (OR 0.81, CI 0.37-1.78; p=0.6); risk of DM is highest with IDF (OR 13.07, CI 1.66-102.94; p=0.015). There is a high prevalence of MS among hypertensive Saudis regardless of definition used; it is most prevalent using the IDF definition as well as the risk for diabetes Patients diagnosed with ATPIII guidelines have greater risk of hyperhomocysteinemia. We recommend the WHO definition for Arabs since it predicts increased risk for CHD. (author)

  8. PANCREATIC DIABETES TYPE 2 IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: INTERNATIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Vasyukova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Violent growth of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM morbidity in children and adolescents is spread all around the world. Peculiarities of DM type 2 in this age group are: absence of determined diagnostic criteria, difficulty of differential diagnosis with DM type 1, early development of complications. International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes propose Guideline of DM type 2 management, which consider main questions of diagnostics, treatment and prophylaxis of this disease. The agent of choice for treatment of DM type 2 in children upwards 10 years is metformin.Key words: children, diabetes mellitus type 2, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:49-53

  9. Developing Intensity–Duration–Frequency (IDF Curves under Climate Change Uncertainty: The Case of Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Shrestha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and frequency of hydrological events are expected to increase in coming years due to climate change in megacities of Asia. Intensity–Duration–Frequency (IDF curves represent essential means to study effects on the performance of drainage systems. Therefore, the need for updating IDF curves comes from the necessity to gain better understanding of climate change effects. The present paper explores an approach based on spatial downscaling-temporal disaggregation method (DDM to develop future IDFs using stochastic weather generator, Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG and the rainfall disaggregation tool, Hyetos. The work was carried out for the case of Bangkok, Thailand. The application of LARS-WG to project extreme rainfalls showed promising results and nine global climate models (GCMs were used to estimate changes in IDF characteristics for future time periods of 2011–2030 and 2046–2065 under climate change scenarios. The IDFs derived from this approach were corrected using higher order equation to mitigate biases. IDFs from all GCMs showed increasing intensities in the future for all return periods. The work presented demonstrates the potential of this approach in projecting future climate scenarios for urban catchment where long term hourly rainfall data are not readily available.

  10. IDF relationships using bivariate copula for storm events in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, N. M.; Jemain, A. A.; Ibrahim, K.; Wan Zin, W. Z.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryIntensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are used in many hydrologic designs for the purpose of water managements and flood preventions. The IDF curves available in Malaysia are those obtained from univariate analysis approach which only considers the intensity of rainfalls at fixed time intervals. As several rainfall variables are correlated with each other such as intensity and duration, this paper aims to derive IDF points for storm events in Peninsular Malaysia by means of bivariate frequency analysis. This is achieved through utilizing the relationship between storm intensities and durations using the copula method. Four types of copulas; namely the Ali-Mikhail-Haq (AMH), Frank, Gaussian and Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) copulas are considered because the correlation between storm intensity, I, and duration, D, are negative and these copulas are appropriate when the relationship between the variables are negative. The correlations are attained by means of Kendall's τ estimation. The analysis was performed on twenty rainfall stations with hourly data across Peninsular Malaysia. Using Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) for testing goodness-of-fit, both Frank and Gaussian copulas are found to be suitable to represent the relationship between I and D. The IDF points found by the copula method are compared to the IDF curves yielded based on the typical IDF empirical formula of the univariate approach. This study indicates that storm intensities obtained from both methods are in agreement with each other for any given storm duration and for various return periods.

  11. Diabetes in Europe : An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo, T; Rosenbauer, J; Wild, S H; Spijkerman, A M W; Baan, C.A.; Forouhi, N G; Herder, C; Rathmann, W

    Diabetes is among the leading causes of death in the IDF Europe Region (EUR), continues to increase in prevalence with diabetic macro- and microvascular complications resulting in increased disability and enormous healthcare costs. In 2013, the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 56

  12. General aspects of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Uazman; Asghar, Omar; Azmi, Shazli; Malik, Rayaz A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia due to an absolute or relative deficit in insulin production or action. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes mellitus is associated with end organ damage, dysfunction, and failure, including the retina, kidney, nervous system, heart, and blood vessels. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated an overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus to be 366 million in 2011, and predicted a rise to 552 million by 2030. The treatment of diabetes mellitus is determined by the etiopathology and is most commonly subdivided in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a greater propensity towards hyperglycemia in individuals with coexisting genetic predisposition or concomitant drug therapy such as corticosteroids. The screening for diabetes mellitus may either be in the form of a 2hour oral glucose tolerance test, or via HbA1c testing, as recently recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Strong associations have been shown in observational studies suggesting poor clinical outcomes both with chronic hyperglycemia and acutely in intensive care settings. However, tight glycemic control in this setting is a contentious issue with an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and possible increase in morbidity and mortality. In a critically ill patient a glucose range of 140-180mg/dL (7.8-10.0mmol/L) should be maintained via continuous intravenous insulin infusion.

  13. Comparing the disease profiles of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending four public health care facilities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Boon How

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Malaysia is rising. It was less than 10% in the last century, increased to about 15% in the first decade of the 21st century and further increased up to more than 20% in the recent National Health Morbidity Survey 2011.1,2 This translates to a staggering number of 3 million patients with diabetes mellitus. This epidemic is not specific to this country; in fact it is widely reported worldwide, and about one-third of a billion of world population is now living with diabetes.3 The International Diabetes Federation (IDF has classified diabetes mellitus as an “international disaster” and the United Nation Summit in 2011 passed the political declaration to curb diabetes and other non-communicable diseases.

  14. Cardio-Metabolic Features of Type 2 Diabetes Subjects Discordant in the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Rah Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study is to investigate the cardio-metabolic parameters and surrogate markers of insulin resistance in a discordant group of type 2 diabetes (T2DM subjects who satisfy the Adults Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria, but not the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria, for metabolic syndrome (MetS.MethodsWe assessed the prevalence of MetS in T2DM subjects (n=167 who were selected from subjects registered at the diabetes center of Dong-A University Medical Center. We used the ATP III criteria and the IDF criteria for the diagnosis of MetS and sorted the subjects into 2 MetS groups: one group diagnosed per ATP III criteria (MetSa and one diagnosed per IDF criteria (MetSi. We then compared the clinical characteristics, metabolic parameters (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and uric acid values and co-morbidities (prevalence of microalbuminuria, fatty liver, and cardiovascular disease between the MetSa, MetSi, and discordant MetS groups.ResultsThe prevalence of MetS in the MetSa group (73.6% was higher than in the MetSi group (62.2%. The MetS prevalence in the discordant group was 11.4%. The discordant group showed no significant differences in clinical characteristics (except waist circumference and body mass index, metabolic parameters, or prevalence of co-morbidities, as compared with subjects with MetS by both criteria.ConclusionIn this study, cardio-metabolic features of the subjects diagnosed with MetS using ATP III criteria, but not IDF criteria, are not significantly different from those of subjects diagnosed with MetS using both criteria.

  15. Bariatric surgery for diabetes: the International Diabetes Federation takes a position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John B; Zimmet, Paul; Alberti, K George; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Rubino, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity are both complex and chronic medical disorders, each with an escalating worldwide prevalence. When obesity is severe, and/or available medical therapies fail to control the diabetes, bariatric surgery becomes a cost-effective therapy for T2D. When there are other major comorbidities and cardiovascular risk, the option of bariatric surgery becomes even more worthy of consideration. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed and implemented for people with T2D. With this in mind, the International Diabetes Federation convened a multidisciplinary working group to develop a position statement. The key recommendations cover describing those eligible for surgery and who should be prioritized, incorporating bariatric surgery into T2D treatment algorithms, performing surgery in centers with multidisciplinary teams that are experienced in the management of both obesity and diabetes, and developing bariatric surgery registries and reporting standards. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Flame stability and emission characteristics of turbulent LPG IDF in a backstep burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Mahesh; D.P. Mishra [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Combustion Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering

    2008-09-15

    The stability characteristics and emissions from turbulent LPG inverse diffusion flame (IDF) in a backstep burner are reported in this paper. The blow-off velocity of turbulent LPG IDF is observed to increase monotonically with fuel jet velocity. In contrast to normal diffusion flames (NDF), the flame in the present IDF burner gets blown out without getting lifted-off from the burner surface. The soot free length fraction, SFLF, defined as the ratio of visible premixing length, H{sub p}, to visible flame length, H{sub f}, is used for qualitative estimation of soot reduction in this IDF burner. The SFLF is found to increase with central air jet velocity indicating the occurrence of extended premixing zone in the vicinity of flame base. Interestingly, the soot free length fraction (SFLF) is found to be correlated well with the newly devised parameter, global momentum ratio. The peak value of EINOX happens to occur closer to stoichiometric overall equivalence ratio. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Peringkasan Sentimen Esktraktif di Twitter Menggunakan Hybrid TF-IDF dan Cosine Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devid Haryalesmana Wahid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The using of Twitter by selebrities has become a new trend of impression management strategy. Mining public reaction in social media is a good strategy to obtain feedbacks, but extracting it are not trivial matter. Reads hundred of tweets while determine their sentiment polarity are time consuming. Extractive sentiment summarization machine are needed to address this issue. Previous research generally do not include sentiment information contained in a tweet as weight factor, as a results only general topics of discussion are extracted. This research aimed to do an extractive sentiment summarization on both positive and negative sentiment mentioning Indonesian selebrity, Agnes Monica, by combining SentiStrength, Hybrid TF-IDF, and Cosine Similarity. SentiStrength is used to obtain sentiment strength score and classify tweet as a positive, negative or neutral. The summarization of posisitve and negative sentiment can be done by rank tweets using Hybrid TF-IDF summarization and sentiment strength score as additional weight then removing similar tweet by using Cosine Similarity. The test results showed that the combination of SentiStrength, Hybrid TF-IDF, and Cosine Similarity perform better than using Hybrid TF-IDF only, given an average 60% accuracy and 62% f-measure. This is due to the addition of sentiment score as a weight factor in sentiment summ­ari­zation.

  18. FY2016 Update on ILAW Glass Testing for Disposal at IDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, D. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-04-12

    This status report provides a FY2016 update on work performed to collect information on the corrosion behavior of LAW glasses to support the IDF PA. In addition to the development of the baseline operating envelope for the WTP, since 2003, VSL has developed a wide range of LAW formulations that achieve considerably higher waste loadings than the WTP baseline formulations.

  19. Elevated serum triglycerides is the strongest single indicator for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimou Eleni

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with diabetes already fulfill one diagnostic criterion for MS according to the existing classifications. Our aim was to identify one single clinical parameter, which could effectively predict the presence of MS in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied all patients with type 2 diabetes who attended our Diabetes Outpatient Clinic during a three-month period. Waist circumference, blood pressure and serum lipids were measured. Establishment of MS diagnosis was based a on National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III criteria and b on International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was applied in order to identify the clinical parameter with the highest predictive capability for MS. Among the 500 participating patients (231 males, 269 females, MS was diagnosed in 364 patients (72.8% according to the NCEP ATP III criteria and in 408 patients (81.6% according to the IDF criteria. Results For the NCEP ATP III classification, serum triglycerides (in the overall population, waist and HDL (in female population demonstrated the highest predictive capability for MS (AUCs:0.786, 0.805 and 0.801, respectively. For the IDF classification, no single parameter reached an AUC > 0.800 in the overall population. In females, HDL displayed a satisfactory predictive capability for MS with an AUC which was significantly higher than the one in males (0.785 vs. 0.676, respectively, p Conclusion Elevated serum triglycerides strongly indicate the presence of MS in patients with type 2 diabetes. In female patients with type 2 diabetes, central obesity was the second stronger predictor of MS besides hypertriglyceridemia.

  20. Type 1 diabetes: The Bangladesh perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishwar Azad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common endocrine disorder among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. The latest International Diabetes Federation atlas estimated the incidence of type 1 DM (T1DM in Bangladesh as 4.2 new cases of T1DM/100,000 children (0-14 years/year, in 2013. Diabetes, being a lifelong disease, places a huge burden on the economy of the most densely populated, and resource-poor country of the world. The Diabetic Association of Bangladesh (BADAS, the largest of its kind in the world, provides comprehensive care to the biggest number of diabetics at any one centre and is engaged in advocacy. Although sounding grandiose, it′s aims that ′no diabetic shall die untreated, unfed or unemployed, even if poor′ is pursued with a passion. Recently BADAS has been supported in its endeavor for children and adolescents by two programmes; viz the Changing Diabetes in Children program (a joint initiative of BADAS, the World Diabetes Foundation and Novo Nordisk, and the Life for a Child Programme (LFAC supported by the IDF. Numerous studies from the prosperous countries have demonstrated the incidence of T1DM is increasing. Data from the CDiC clinic at BIRDEM shows a rising trend in patients presenting with classical T1DM. In addition, the pattern of DM is changing.

  1. Prevalence of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes, and Metabolic Syndrome in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was carried out to establish the prevalence of cardiovascular risks such as hypertension, obesity, and diabetes in Eastern Nepal. This study also establishes the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS and its relationships to these cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle. Methods. 14,425 subjects aged 20–100 (mean 41.4 ± 15.1 were screened with a physical examination and blood tests. Both the International Diabetic Federation (IDF and National Cholesterol Education Programme’s (NCEP definitions for MS were used and compared. Results. 34% of the participants had hypertension, and 6.3% were diabetic. 28% were overweight, and 32% were obese. 22.5% of the participants had metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria and 20.7% according to the NCEP definition. Prevalence was higher in the less educated, people working at home, and females. There was no significant correlation between the participants’ lifestyle factors and the prevalence of MS. Conclusion. The high incidence of dyslipidemia and abdominal obesity could be the major contributors to MS in Nepal. Education also appears to be related to the prevalence of MS. This study confirms the need to initiate appropriate treatment options for a condition which is highly prevalent in Eastern Nepal.

  2. Do different standard plate counting (IDF/ISSO or AOAC) methods interfere in the conversion of individual bacteria counts to colony forming units in raw milk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassoli, L D; Lima, W J F; Esguerra, J C; Da Silva, J; Machado, P F; Mourão, G B

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to establish the correlation between individual bacterial count (IBC) obtained by flow cytometry and the number of colony forming units (CFU) determined by standard plate count (SPC) in raw milk using two different reference methodologies: the methodology of the International Dairy Federation (IDF) - International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4833, incubation for 72 h at 30°C and the methodology of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC), incubation for 48 h at 35°C. For this, 100 bovine milk samples (80 ml) from different farms were collected in a sterile bottle and maintained refrigerated at 4°C and were delivered to the laboratory. In the laboratory, the samples were divided into two vials of 40 ml each. Then, half of the vials were forwarded for the SPC analysis, and the other half were analysed using the equipment BactoScan FC. The analyses by flow cytometry and SPC were performed at the same time (maximum deviation of +/- 1 h). To transform the data from IBC ml(-1) to CFU ml(-1) (IDF or AOAC methodology), a standard linear regression equation was used, as recommended by IDF/ISO-196. The difference between the reference methodologies affects the equation that transforms IBC into CFU and therefore the accuracy of the results. The results estimated by the equation using the ISO 4833 methodology were on average 0·18 log units higher than the results estimated using the equation using the AOAC methodology. After the comparison of the methodologies, it was concluded that there is an impact of the reference methodologies on the conversion of the results from IBC to CFU. Depending on the methodology adopted by each laboratory or country, there may not be equivalence in the results. Hence, the laboratories specialized in milk quality analysis that have changed their methodology for analysis, passing from the MAPA (AOAC) methodology to the IDF standard, need to develop new conversion equations to make their

  3. IDF Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2008 Compensation Area Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2008-09-01

    This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the CH2MHill Hanford Group (CHG) Compensatory Mitigation Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). It includes time-zero monitoring results for planting activities conducted in December 2007, annual survival monitoring for all planting years, a summary of artificial burrow observations, and recommendations for the successful completion of DOE mitigation commitments for this project.

  4. Impact of metabolic syndrome and its components on cardiovascular disease event rates in 4900 patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to placebo in the field randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Russell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with the metabolic syndrome are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD events.We aimed to establish whether CVD event rates were influenced by the metabolic syndrome as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and to determine which component(s of the metabolic syndrome (MS conferred the highest cardiovascular risk in in 4900 patients with type 2 diabetes allocated to placebo in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD trial. Research design and methods We determined the influence of MS variables, as defined by NCEP ATPIII, IDF and WHO, on CVD risk over 5 years, after adjustment for CVD, sex, HbA1c, creatinine, and age, and interactions between the MS variables in a Cox proportional-hazards model. Results About 80% had hypertension, and about half had other features of the metabolic syndrome (IDF, ATPIII. There was no difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome variables between those with and without CVD at study entry. The WHO definition identified those at higher CVD risk across both sexes, all ages, and in those without prior CVD, while the ATPIII definition predicted risk only in those aged over 65 years and in men but not in women. Patients meeting the IDF definition did not have higher risk than those without IDF MS. CVD risk was strongly influenced by prior CVD, sex, age (particularly in women, baseline HbA1c, renal dysfunction, hypertension, and dyslipidemia (low HDL-c, triglycerides > 1.7 mmol/L. The combination of low HDL-c and marked hypertriglyceridemia (> 2.3 mmol/L increased CVD risk by 41%. Baseline systolic blood pressure increased risk by 16% per 10 mmHg in those with no prior CVD, but had no effect in those with CVD. In those without prior CVD, increasing numbers of

  5. Proceedings from an international consensus meeting on posttransplantation diabetes mellitus : recommendations and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharif, A.; Hecking, M.; de Vries, A. P. J.; Porrini, E.; Hornum, M.; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, S.; Berlakovich, G.; Krebs, M.; Kautzky-Willer, A.; Schernthaner, G.; Marchetti, P.; Pacini, G.; Ojo, A.; Takahara, S.; Larsen, J. L.; Budde, K.; Eller, K.; Pascual, J.; Jardine, A.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Valderhaug, T. G.; Jenssen, T. G.; Cohney, S.; Saeemann, M. D.

    A consensus meeting was held in Vienna on September 8-9, 2013, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic challenges surrounding development of diabetes mellitus after transplantation. The International Expert Panel comprised 24 transplant nephrologists, surgeons, diabetologists and clinical scientists,

  6. Proceedings from an international consensus meeting on posttransplantation diabetes mellitus: recommendations and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharif, A.; Hecking, M.; de Vries, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    A consensus meeting was held in Vienna on September 8-9, 2013, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic challenges surrounding development of diabetes mellitus after transplantation. The International Expert Panel comprised 24 transplant nephrologists, surgeons, diabetologists and clinical scientist...

  7. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  8. Use of Insulin Analogues in Children and Adolescents: Topical Issues and Possibilities for Achieving Optimal Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.A. Budreyko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The review contains an analysis of the data of numerous scientific studies on the results of use of insulin analogues in comprehensive treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. Problem of mitogenic potential of insulin preparations and ways to prevent its realization in clinical practice is discussed. Advisability of the use of insulin analogues glulisine and glargine in children and adolescents is substantiated for achievement of optimal compensation of carbohydrate metabolism due to their high efficiency and adequate level of safety, confirmed by the regulations of international consensuses (ISPAD and IDF.

  9. Incorporating Nonstationarity into IDF Curves across CONUS from Station Records and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are widely used for engineering design of storm-affected structures. Current practice is that IDF-curves are based on observed precipitation extremes fit to a stationary probability distribution (e.g., the extreme value family). However, there is increasing evidence of nonstationarity in station records. We apply the Mann-Kendall trend test to over 1000 stations across the CONUS at a 0.05 significance level, and find that about 30% of stations test have significant nonstationarity for at least one duration (1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, 24-, and 48-hours). We fit the stations to a GEV distribution with time-varying location and scale parameters using a Bayesian- methodology and compare the fit of stationary versus nonstationary GEV distributions to observed precipitation extremes. Within our fitted nonstationary GEV distributions, we compare distributions with a time-varying location parameter versus distributions with both time-varying location and scale parameters. For distributions with two time-varying parameters, we pay particular attention to instances where location and scale trends have opposing directions. Finally, we use the mathematical framework based on work of Koutsoyiannis to generate IDF curves based on the fitted GEV distributions and discuss the implications that using time-varying parameters may have on simple scaling relationships. We apply the above methods to evaluate how frequency statistics based on a stationary assumption compare to those that incorporate nonstationarity for both short and long term projects. Overall, we find that neglecting nonstationarity can lead to under- or over-estimates (depending on the trend for the given duration and region) of important statistics such as the design storm.

  10. An examination of the prevalence of IDF- and ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome in an Irish screening population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, D F

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of ATPIII- and IDF-defined metabolic syndrome (MetS) in an Irish screening population and to determine the calculated cardiovascular risk for each group. DESIGN: A total of 1,716 subjects were enrolled over a 12-month period. MAIN OUTCOMES: The ATPIII-defined prevalence of MetS in this population was 13.2%. Using IDF criteria, 21.4% of subjects were identified as having the MetS. Correlation between the two definitions was high; however, IDF criteria identified an additional 9.5% (n = 164) of the population as having MetS, which ATPIII criteria failed to recognise. CONCLUSION: We noted a higher prevalence of MetS in the studied population when defined by IDF criteria. However, those identified by IDF and not by ATPIII definition did not have a higher cardiovascular risk score by either Framingham or European Score than those without MetS. Thus, application of the ATPIII definition of MetS, may be the more practical.

  11. Development of Sub-Daily Intensity Duration Frequency (IDF) Curves for Major Urban Areas in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H.; Mishra, V.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events disrupt urban transportation and cause enormous damage to infrastructure. Urban areas are fast responding catchments due to significant impervious surface. Stormwater designs based on daily rainfall data provide inadequate information. We, therefore, develop intensity-duration-frequency curves using sub-daily (1 hour to 12 hour) rainfall data for 57 major urban areas in India. While rain gage stations data from urban areas are most suitable, but stations are unevenly distributed and their data have gaps and inconsistencies. Therefore, we used hourly rainfall data from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), which provides a long term data (1979 onwards). Since reanalysis products have uncertainty associated with them we need to enhance their accuracy before their application. We compared daily rain gage station data obtained from Global Surface Summary of Day Data (GSOD) available for 65 stations for the period of 2000-2010 with gridded daily rainfall data provided by Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). 3-hourly data from NOAA/Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN), and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) were aggregated to daily for comparison with GSOD station data . TMPA is found to be best correlated with GSOD data. We used TMPA data to correct MERRA's hourly precipitation, which were applied to develop IDF curves. We compared results with IDF curves from empirical methods and found substantial disparities in the existing stormwater designs in India.

  12. MODEL PENGENDALIAN KADAR GULA DARAH PENDERITA DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisavina Juwita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF there are 382 million people living with diabetes in the world by 2013. It is estimated that of the 382 million people, 175 million of whom remain undiagnosed, so the danger of developing progressive complications unwittingly and without prevention. Complications from diabetes can be prevented or delayed by keeping blood sugar levels are in the normal category so that metabolism can be well controlled. Blood sugar levels can be maintained by a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this study was to determine the control of blood sugar levels by making healthy lifestyle in patients with diabetes mellitus type II in London in 2017: a grounded theory study. Participants in the study of 18 people. Intake of participants in this study begins with purposive sampling. The results showed the main concept of grounded theory is "Behavior Control Blood Sugar Levels". Forms of behavior in blood sugar control in this study consisted of a the body's response to changes result DM, b forms of motivation patients with DM, c Physical Activity DM patients, d Compliance diet, e Management DM therapy, f Compliance controls, g A healthy lifestyle DM family, h Impact of changes in lifestyle. The results of this study can serve as a reference, especially for people with diabetes mellitus and family in order to implement the behavior of controlling blood sugar levels.  Menurut International Diabetes Federation (IDF terdapat 382 juta orang yang hidup dengan diabetes di dunia pada tahun 2013. Diperkirakan dari 382 juta orang tersebut, 175 juta diantaranya belum terdiagnosis, sehingga terancam berkembang progresif menjadi komplikasi tanpa disadari dan tanpa pencegahan. Komplikasi akibat diabetes dapat dicegah atau ditunda dengan menjaga kadar gula darah berada dalam kategori normal sehingga metabolisme dapat dikendalikan dengan baik.  Kadar gula darah dapat dijaga dengan melakukan gaya hidup yang sehat. Tujuan

  13. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD. INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal issues as well as challenges with

  14. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-02-07

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal

  15. Mobile application for diabetes self-management in China: Do they fit for older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chenchen; Zhou, Lanshu; Liu, Zhihui; Wang, Haocen; Bowers, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Despite the exponential proliferation of Chinese diabetes applications, none are designed to meet the needs of the largest potential user population. The purpose of this study is to examine the features and contents of Chinese diabetes mobile applications in terms of their suitability for use by older adults with diabetes. A search of the Apple application store and the 360 Mobile Assistant was conducted to identify Chinese diabetes applications. Next, we compared the features and contents of all the included and most popular diabetes applications with both the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) clinical guideline and recommended usability criteria for older adults respectively. Seventy-one diabetes apps were randomly selected (from a pool of 552 diabetes apps) and reviewed. The features of most apps failed to include content areas of known importance for managing diabetes in older adults. Usability of all tested applications was rated moderate to good. Designing maximally effective medical applications would benefit from attention to both usability and content guidelines targeted for the largest potential user population. Despite the preponderance of older adults in the potential user group, failing to consider the relevance of content, in addition to usability for the specific population will ultimately limit the usefulness of the app. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Design and Usability Evaluation of Social Mobile Diabetes Management System in the Gulf Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanzi, Turki; Istepanian, Robert; Philip, Nada

    2016-09-26

    The prevalence of diabetes in the Gulf States is one of the highest globally. It is estimated that 20% of the population in the region has been diagnosed with diabetes and according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), five of the IDF's "top 10" countries for diabetes prevalence in 2011 and projected for 2030 are in this region. In recent years, there have been an increasing number of clinical studies advocating the use of mobile phone technology for diabetes self-management with improved clinical outcomes. However, there are few studies to date addressing the application of mobile diabetes management in the Gulf region, particularly in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), where there is exponential increase in mobile phone usage and access to social networking. The objective of this paper is to present the design and development of a new mobile health system for social behavioral change and management tailored for Saudi patients with diabetes called Saudi Arabia Networking for Aiding Diabetes (SANAD). A usability study for the SANAD system is presented to validate the acceptability of using mobile technologies among patients with diabetes in the KSA and the Gulf region. The SANAD system was developed using mobile phone technology with diabetes management and social networking modules. For the usability study the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction was used to evaluate the usability aspect of the SANAD system. A total of 33 users with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. The key modules of the SANAD system consist of (1) a mobile diabetes management module; (2) a social networking module; and (3) a cognitive behavioral therapy module for behavioral change issues. The preliminary results of the usability study indicated general acceptance of the patients in using the system with higher usability rating in patients with type 2 diabetes. We found that the acceptability of the system was high among Saudi patients with diabetes, and ongoing

  17. Mobile application to induce lifestyle modifications in type 2 diabetic patients: prototype based on international guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M.; Delgado, J. S.; León-Vargas, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a prototype app to induce lifestyle modifications in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. The app design is based on International Diabetes Federation guidelines and recommendations from clinical studies related to diabetes health-care. Two main approaches, lifestyle modification and self-management education are used owing to significant benefits reported. The method used is based on setting goals under medical support related to physical activity, nutritional habits and weight loss, in addition to educational messages. This is specially implemented to address the main challenges that have limited the success of similar mobile applications already validated on diabetic patients. A traffic light is used to show the overall state of the goals compliance. This state could be understood as excellent (green), there are aspects to improve (yellow), or some individual goals are not carrying out (red). An example of how works this method is presented in results. Furthermore, the app provides recommendations to the user in case the overall state was in yellow or red. The recommendations pretend to induce the user to make changes in their eating habits and physical activity. According to international guidelines and clinical studies, a prototype of mobile application to induce a lifestyle modification in order to prevent adverse risk factors related to diabetes was presented. The resulting application is apparently consistent with clinical judgments, but a formal clinical validation is required. The effectiveness of this app is currently under consideration for the Colombian population with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Diabetes mellitus in older people: position statement on behalf of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG), the European Diabetes Working Party for Older People (EDWPOP), and the International Task Force of Experts in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Alan; Morley, John E; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leo; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Bayer, Tony; Zeyfang, Andrej; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Vischer, Ulrich; Woo, Jean; Chapman, Ian; Dunning, Trisha; Meneilly, Graydon; Rodriguez-Saldana, Joel; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gadsby, Roger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Lorig, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic condition in ageing societies associated with high levels of morbidity, multiple therapies, and functional deterioration that challenges even the best of health care systems to deliver high-quality, individualized care. Most international clinical guidelines have ignored the often-unique issues of frailty, functional limitation, changes in mental health, and increasing dependency that characterize many aged patients with diabetes. A collaborative Expert Group of the IAGG and EDWPOP and an International Task Force have explored the key issues that affect diabetes in older people using a robust method comprising a Delphi process and an evidence-based review of the literature. Eight domains of interest were initially agreed and discussed: hypoglycemia, therapy, care home diabetes, influence of comorbidities, glucose targets, family/carer perspectives, diabetes education, and patient safety. A set of "consensus" statements was produced in each domain of interest. These form a foundation for future policy development in this area and should influence the clinical behavior and approach of all health professionals engaged in delivering diabetes care to older people. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NIDDK international conference report on diabetes and depression: current understanding and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Richard I G; de Groot, Mary; Lucki, Irwin; Hunter, Christine M; Sartorius, Norman; Golden, Sherita H

    2014-08-01

    Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of each condition are worsened by the other. This article is based on the presentations and discussions during an international meeting on diabetes and depression convened by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health and the Dialogue on Diabetes and Depression. While the psychological burden of diabetes may contribute to depression in some cases, this explanation does not sufficiently explain the relationship between these two conditions. Shared biological and behavioral mechanisms, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, inflammation, autonomic dysfunction, sleep disturbance, inactive lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and environmental and cultural risk factors, are important to consider in understanding the link between depression and diabetes. Both individual psychological and pharmacological depression treatments are effective in people with diabetes, but the current range of treatment options is limited and has shown mixed effects on glycemic outcomes. More research is needed to understand what factors contribute to individual differences in vulnerability, treatment response, and resilience to depression and metabolic disorders across the life course and how best to provide care for people with comorbid diabetes and depression in different health care settings. Training programs are needed to create a cross-disciplinary workforce that can work in different models of care for comorbid conditions. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with a foot ulcer. A progress report of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, N. C.; Andros, G.; Apelqvist, J.; Bakker, K.; Lammer, J.; Lepantalo, M.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Hinchliffe, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWDGF) has produced in 2011 a guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes and a foot ulcer. This document, together with a systematic review that provided the background information on

  1. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Aila J; Thorn, Lena M; Saraheimo, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2010-10-01

    Both depression and the metabolic syndrome are frequently found among patients with type 1 diabetes, but their potential association has not yet been investigated. In this paper the relationship between depression and the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes was evaluated. A total of 1226 patients participating in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study between 2003 and 2009 were included. Depression was defined as use of antidepressive medication or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score ≥16. The metabolic syndrome was defined using the criteria established by the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention (IDF); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); American Heart Association (AHA); World Heart Federation (WHF); International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS); and International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO). The metabolic syndrome was more frequently observed among depressed patients (57% versus 46%, P = 0.008). Of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome, waist, triglyceride, and HDL components were more frequently fulfilled among patients with depression. The BDI score increased with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome present. The BDI score was independently associated with the waist component (odds ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status, smoking, nephropathy, and HbA(1c). The metabolic syndrome is frequently found among depressed patients with type 1 diabetes. Whether this association influences the development of diabetic complications is not known.

  2. Diabetes in Africa: the new pandemic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ability of insulin remains a matter of life or death.1 Although the prevalence of. Type 2 diabetes is predicted to increase globally ... ney disease is likely to impact on work- ..... Nevertheless, on balance, ... organizations: IDF-Africa, WHO-AFRO.

  3. A history of diabetes insipidus: paving the road to internal water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an ancient disease considered under the rubric of diabetes, the Greek descriptive term for polyuria, which was unrecognized even after the sweetness of urine was reported as a characteristic of diabetes mellitus in the 17th century. It would be another century before diabetes insipidus was identified from the insipid rather than saccharine taste of urine in cases of polyuria. After its increased recognition, pathologic observations and experimental studies connected diabetes insipidus to the pituitary gland in the opening decades of the 20th century. Simultaneously, posterior pituitary lobe extracts were shown to be vasoconstrictive (vasopressin) and antidiuretic (antidiuretic hormone). As vasopressin was purified and synthesized and its assay became available, it was shown to be released in response to both osmotic and volume stimuli that are integrated in the hypothalamus, and vasopressin thereby was essential to maintaining internal water balance. The antidiuretic properties of vasopressin to treat the rare cases of diabetes insipidus were of limited clinical utility until its vasoconstrictive effects were resuscitated in the 1970s, with the consequent increasing wider use of vasopressin for the treatment of compromised hemodynamic states. In addition, the discovery of antidiuretic hormone receptor blockers has led to their increasing use in managing hypo-osmolar states. Copyright © 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Nontractional Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Jan Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains the leading cause of blindness among working age Americans with diabetic macular edema being the most common cause for moderate and severe vision loss. To investigate the anatomical and visual benefits of pars plana vitrectomy with inner limiting membrane peeling in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema as well as correlation of integrity of outer retinal layers on spectral domain optical coherence tomography to visual outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 42 diabetic patients that underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling for nontractional diabetic macula edema. The integrity of outer retinal layers was evaluated and preoperative central macular thickness and visual acuity were compared with data at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used to compare the groups. 31 eyes were included. While no differences were seen at 1 and 3 months, there was significant improvement of both central macular thickness and visual acuity at the 6 months follow up visit compared to preoperatively (357, 427 microns; p=0.03. 20/49, 20/82; p=0.03) . Patients with intact external limiting membrane and ellipsoid zone had better preoperative vision than patients with outer retinal layer irregularities (20/54, 20/100; p=0.03) and greater visual gains postoperatively (20/33, ppeeling can improve retinal anatomy and visual acuity in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography may help identify patients with potential for visual improvement.

  5. An International Position Statement on the Management of Frailty in Diabetes Mellitus: Summary of Recommendations 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J; Abdelhafiz, A; Dunning, T; Izquierdo, M; Rodriguez Manas, L; Bourdel-Marchasson, I; Morley, J E; Munshi, M; Woo, J; Vellas, B

    2018-01-01

    The International Position Statement provides the opportunity to summarise all existing clinical trial and best practice evidence for older people with frailty and diabetes. It is the first document of its kind and is intended to support clinical decisions that will enhance safety in management and promote high quality care. The Review Group sought evidence from a wide range of studies that provide sufficient confidence (in the absence of grading) for the basis of each recommendation. This was supported by a given rationale and key references for our recommendations in each section, all of which have been reviewed by leading international experts. Searches for any relevant clinical evidence were generally limited to English language citations over the previous 15 years. The following databases were examined: Embase, Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Trials Register, Cinahl, and Science Citation. Hand searching of 16 key major peer-reviewed journals was undertaken by two reviewers (AJS and AA) and these included Lancet, Diabetes, Diabetologia, Diabetes Care, British Medical Journal, New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Journal of Frailty and Aging, Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, and Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. Two scientific supporting statements have been provided that relate to the area of frailty and diabetes; this is accompanied by evidence-based decisions in 9 clinical domains. The Summary has been supported by diagrammatic figures and a table relating to the inter-relations between frailty and diabetes, a frailty assessment pathway, an exercise-based programme of intervention, a glucose-lowering algorithm with a description of available therapies. We have provided an up to date evidence-based approach to practical decision-making for older adults with frailty and diabetes. This Summary document includes a user-friendly set of recommendations that should be

  6. An Overview of Internal and External Fixation Methods for the Diabetic Charcot Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) of the foot and ankle is a challenging disease with regard to clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and prognosis. Its surgical management is equally difficult to interpret based on the wide array of options available. In the presence of an ulceration or concomitant osteomyelitis, internal fixation by means of screws, plates, or intramedullary nailing needs to be avoided when feasible. External fixation becomes a great surgical tool when managing DCN with concomitant osteomyelitis. This article describes internal and external fixation methods along with available literature to enlighten surgeons faced with treating this complex condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects according to different criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Sharmin; Fatema, Kaniz; Ahmed, Kazi R; Akter, Jesmin; Chowdhury, Hasina A; Shahjahan, Md; Acharyya, Amitava; Rahim, M A; Ali, Liaquat

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is becoming a serious global public health problem. The prevalence of MS differs in different population by using different definitions. Present study aimed to find out the prevalence and determinants of MS among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (NDT2D) according to different criteria. This cross-sectional analytic study was conducted among 281 subjects selected purposively from the OPD of BIRDEM. Information on lifestyle factors and disease history were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire by face to face interview. The three definitions of MS used in this study are from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), a modified version of the ATP III criteria for Asian populations (modified ATP III) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Adjusted odds ratio and confidence limit were generated through logistic regression. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome among the study subjects according to modified ATPIII, WHO and IDF criteria were 79% (95% CI: 74.2-83.8), 81% (95% CI: 76.4-85.6) and 68% (95% CI: 62.6-73.5) respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among female were higher compared to males in all the criteria's. Female gender (OR=5.93), family history of diabetes (OR=1.92), overweight (OR=6.2), and obesity (OR=5.13) were found as important confounders associated with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among NDT2D is considerably higher in our population which may indicate considerable risk of cardiovascular diseases in future. Female gender, family history of diabetes, overweight and obesity are important confounders of MS in this population. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Beta cell imaging - a key tool in optimized diabetes prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotthardt, M.; Eizirik, D.L.; Cnop, M.; Brom, M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is 382 million worldwide, and is expected to rise to 592 million in 2035 (http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas); 2.5-15\\% of national annual healthcare budgets are related to diabetes care, potentially increasing to 40\\% in high-prevalence countries. Beta cell dysfunction and

  9. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes as economic and developmental challenges in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; June-Rose McHiza, Zandile; Amoah, Albert George Baidoe; Mbanya, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Current estimates and projections suggest that the burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), diabetes and related risk factors in African countries is important, somewhat unique and rapidly growing. Various segments of the population are affected; however, the group mostly affected is young adults residing in urban areas, and increasingly those in the low socioeconomic strata. The African milieu/environment is compounded by weak health systems, which are unable to cope with the looming double burden of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases. This review discusses the economic and developmental challenges posed by CVDs and diabetes in countries in Africa. Using several lines of evidence, we demonstrate that the cost of care for major CVDs and diabetes is beyond the coping capacities of individuals, households, families and governments in most African countries. We have reviewed modeling studies by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and other major international agencies on the current and projected impact that CVDs and diabetes have on the economy and development of countries in the region. Locally, appropriate strategies to limit the impact of the conditions on the economies and development of countries in Africa are suggested and discussed. These include monitoring diseases and risk factors, and primordial, primary and secondary preventions implemented following a life-course perspective. Structural, logistic, human capacity and organizational challenges to be surmounted during the implementations of these strategies will be reviewed. © 2013.

  10. Recruitment and retention of participants for an international type 1 diabetes prevention trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franciscus, Margaret; Nucci, Anita; Bradley, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    for long-term follow-up assessments. PURPOSE: Our purpose is to summarize the recruitment and retention strategies used to conduct TRIGR from the perspective of the study coordinators. METHODS: TRIGR was designed to test whether weaning to formula containing hydrolyzed versus intact cow's milk protein......BACKGROUND: The Trial to Reduce Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) is the first multicenter international type 1 diabetes (T1D) prevention trial to be undertaken. A unique feature of TRIGR has been recruitment of eligible pregnant women and enrollment of newborns......-year follow-up phases of this study. The TRIGR study met the accrual goal after 4.7 years of recruitment, 2.7 years longer than projected initially. Challenges included difficulty in finding fathers with T1D, a higher than expected rate of premature delivery among T1D mothers, and implementation of new...

  11. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A Vaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  12. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  13. Development of a capitation scale for IDF career soldiers in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Weiss, Yossi; Cohen, Yossi; Shmueli, Amir

    2007-03-01

    The Israeli National Health Insurance Law allocates a national healthcare budget to the sickness funds, which provide medical care to civilian population. Medical care for members of the IDF is financed through the budget of the Ministry of Defense and is not included in the national healthcare budget. Benefits provided to soldiers serving in the permanent forces are far more extensive than those provided to civilians. Because of no co-payments, poor management, and the cost-based budget, military healthcare costs in Israel are expected to exceed civilian healthcare costs, adjusting for age and sex. The present paper derives age- and sex-based capitation rates for military personnel, and compares military and civilian age-based expenditure and capitation rates. The study population comprised career soldiers and civilians aged 21-54 years. Expenses of career soldiers were calculated to provide information on the financial costs of medical services for each age group in 2003. Overall expenses for women were higher than for men in all age groups. As anticipated, the older the group, the higher the total expenditure for both men and women. In-patient care represented a higher percentage of the total costs for men (28.3%) than for women (22.1%). Emergency room care was higher for women in the 22-24 age group but comparable to that of men in higher age groups. Specialist visits represented a significantly higher percentage of the total costs for women than for men in the 22-24 and 25-34 age groups (by 6% and 15%, respectively). The difference decreased to 13% in the 35-44 age groups and, in the 45-54 age group, the difference for men was 14% higher than for women. Military costs were similar to civilian costs in the 22-24 age groups, higher in the following two groups, and lower in the 45-54 age group. Like in other organizations, military healthcare services might benefit from outsourcing. The inequality in medical services to soldiers and civilians, the over-use of the

  14. Control to goal of cardiometabolic risk factors among Nigerians living with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C I; Ofoegbu, E N

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors contribute to morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. National and international guidelines on management of diabetes therefore emphasize control to goals of blood glucose, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and obesity so as to minimize the development of complications and enhance the patients' quality of life. To evaluate the status of control to goals of cardiometabolic risk factors among the diabetic patients attending the Diabetes clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. A survey of 233 type 2 diabetic patients recruited from the Diabetes clinic of our hospital was carried out. Standard procedures as described in the WHO STEP instrument were used to determine the waist circumference, weight, height, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Fasting blood glucose and lipid profiles were also assessed. Therapeutic goals used to define risk or poor control were values adopted by expert groups such as American diabetes association (ADA), National cholesterol education program (NCEP), American association of clinical endocrinologist (AACE) and International diabetes federation (IDF). There were 98 males and 135 females with mean (SD) duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) of 6.7 (6.3) years. Suboptimal glycemic, blood pressure control and dyslipidemia were observed in 65.7%, 51.9%, 97.1% of the subjects respectively while 60.1% of the subjects were found to be overweight/obese. Comparing the mean indices of risk factors with the recommended therapeutic goals, status of control was optimal for HDL-cholesterol, waist circumference and triglycerides. All the other risk factors were suboptimal. Control to goals of cardiovascular risk factors is poor among the patients. There is the need to identify and tackle the possible contributing factors so as to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  15. Sharing data for public health research by members of an international online diabetes social network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa R Weitzman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance and response to diabetes may be accelerated through engaging online diabetes social networks (SNs in consented research. We tested the willingness of an online diabetes community to share data for public health research by providing members with a privacy-preserving social networking software application for rapid temporal-geographic surveillance of glycemic control.SN-mediated collection of cross-sectional, member-reported data from an international online diabetes SN entered into a software application we made available in a "Facebook-like" environment to enable reporting, charting and optional sharing of recent hemoglobin A1c values through a geographic display. Self-enrollment by 17% (n = 1,136 of n = 6,500 active members representing 32 countries and 50 US states. Data were current with 83.1% of most recent A1c values reported obtained within the past 90 days. Sharing was high with 81.4% of users permitting data donation to the community display. 34.1% of users also displayed their A1cs on their SN profile page. Users selecting the most permissive sharing options had a lower average A1c (6.8% than users not sharing with the community (7.1%, p = .038. 95% of users permitted re-contact. Unadjusted aggregate A1c reported by US users closely resembled aggregate 2007-2008 NHANES estimates (respectively, 6.9% and 6.9%, p = 0.85.Success within an early adopter community demonstrates that online SNs may comprise efficient platforms for bidirectional communication with and data acquisition from disease populations. Advancing this model for cohort and translational science and for use as a complementary surveillance approach will require understanding of inherent selection and publication (sharing biases in the data and a technology model that supports autonomy, anonymity and privacy.

  16. Sharing data for public health research by members of an international online diabetes social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, Elissa R; Adida, Ben; Kelemen, Skyler; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2011-04-27

    Surveillance and response to diabetes may be accelerated through engaging online diabetes social networks (SNs) in consented research. We tested the willingness of an online diabetes community to share data for public health research by providing members with a privacy-preserving social networking software application for rapid temporal-geographic surveillance of glycemic control. SN-mediated collection of cross-sectional, member-reported data from an international online diabetes SN entered into a software application we made available in a "Facebook-like" environment to enable reporting, charting and optional sharing of recent hemoglobin A1c values through a geographic display. Self-enrollment by 17% (n = 1,136) of n = 6,500 active members representing 32 countries and 50 US states. Data were current with 83.1% of most recent A1c values reported obtained within the past 90 days. Sharing was high with 81.4% of users permitting data donation to the community display. 34.1% of users also displayed their A1cs on their SN profile page. Users selecting the most permissive sharing options had a lower average A1c (6.8%) than users not sharing with the community (7.1%, p = .038). 95% of users permitted re-contact. Unadjusted aggregate A1c reported by US users closely resembled aggregate 2007-2008 NHANES estimates (respectively, 6.9% and 6.9%, p = 0.85). Success within an early adopter community demonstrates that online SNs may comprise efficient platforms for bidirectional communication with and data acquisition from disease populations. Advancing this model for cohort and translational science and for use as a complementary surveillance approach will require understanding of inherent selection and publication (sharing) biases in the data and a technology model that supports autonomy, anonymity and privacy.

  17. Reliability of AOFAS diabetic foot questionnaire in Charcot arthropathy: stability, internal consistency, and measurable difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Vibhu; Spratt, Kevin F; Pinzur, Michael S; Baumhauer, Judith; Rudicel, Sally; Saltzman, Charles L

    2005-09-01

    The development of Charcot changes is known to be associated with a high rate of recurrent ulceration and amputation. Unfortunately, the effect of Charcot arthropathy on quality of life in diabetic patients has not been systematically studied because of a lack of a disease-specific instrument. The purpose of this study was to develop and test an instrument to evaluate the health-related quality of life of diabetic foot disease. Subjects diagnosed with Charcot arthropathy completed a patient self-administered questionnaire, and clinicians completed an accompanying observational survey. The patient self-administered questionnaire was organized into five general sections: demographics, general health, diabetes-related symptoms, comorbidities, and satisfaction. The scales measured the effect in six health domains: 1) general health, 2) care, 3) worry, 4) sleep, 5) emotion, and 6) physicality. The psychometric properties of the scales were evaluated and the summary scores for the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were compared to published norms for other major medical illnesses. Of the 89 enrolled patients, 57 who completed the questionnaire on enrollment returned a second completed form at 3-month followup. Over the 3-month followup period most of the patients showed an improvement in the Eichenholtz staging. The internal consistency of most was moderate to high and, in general, the scale scores were stable over 3 months. However, several of the scales suffered from low-ceiling or high-floor effects. Patients with Charcot arthropathy had a much lower physical component score on enrollment than the reported norms for other disease conditions, including diabetes. Quality of life represents an important set of outcomes when evaluating the effectiveness of treatment for patients with Charcot arthropathy. This study represents an initial attempt to develop a standardized survey for use with this patient population. Further studies need to be done with larger groups of

  18. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in 52,721 Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: International Comparison Across Three Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Maria E; Prinz, Nicole; Boyle, Claire T; Campbell, Fiona M; Jones, Timothy W; Hofer, Sabine E; Simmons, Jill H; Holman, Naomi; Tham, Elaine; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; DuBose, Stephanie; Thornton, Helen; King, Bruce; Maahs, David M; Holl, Reinhard W; Warner, Justin T

    2017-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has a recognized association with type 1 diabetes. We examined international differences in CD prevalence and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and CD versus type 1 diabetes only. Data sources were as follows: the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up Registry (DPV) (Germany/Austria); the T1D Exchange Clinic Network (T1DX) (U.S.); the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (NPDA) (U.K. [England/Wales]); and the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) (Australia). The analysis included 52,721 youths 1-2 years in 18% of youths, >3-5 years in 23% of youths, and >5 years in 17% of youths. CD prevalence ranged from 1.9% in the T1DX to 7.7% in the ADDN and was higher in girls than boys (4.3% vs. 2.7%, P < 0.001). Children with coexisting CD were younger at diabetes diagnosis compared with those with type 1 diabetes only (5.4 vs. 7.0 years of age, P < 0.001) and fewer were nonwhite (15 vs. 18%, P < 0.001). Height SDS was lower in those with CD (0.36 vs. 0.48, adjusted P < 0.001) and fewer were overweight/obese (34 vs. 37%, adjusted P < 0.001), whereas mean HbA 1c values were comparable: 8.3 ± 1.5% (67 ± 17 mmol/mol) versus 8.4 ± 1.6% (68 ± 17 mmol/mol). CD is a common comorbidity in youth with type 1 diabetes. Differences in CD prevalence may reflect international variation in screening and diagnostic practices, and/or CD risk. Although glycemic control was not different, the lower height SDS supports close monitoring of growth and nutrition in this population. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. Basal C-peptide Level as a Surrogate Marker of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Tae Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that C-peptide induces smooth muscle cell proliferation and causes human atherosclerotic lesions in diabetic patients. The present study was designed to examine whether the basal C-peptide levels correlate with cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients.MethodsData was obtained from 467 patients with T2DM from two institutions who were followed for four years. The medical findings of all patients were reviewed, and patients with creatinine >1.4 mg/dL, any inflammation or infection, hepatitis, or type 1 DM were excluded. The relationships between basal C-peptide and other clinical values were statistically analyzed.ResultsA simple correlation was found between basal C-peptide and components of metabolic syndrome (MS. Statistically basal C-peptide levels were significantly higher than the three different MS criteria used in the present study, the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III of the National Cholesterol Education Program's (NCEP's, World Health Organization (WHO, and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria (NCEP-ATP III, P=0.001; IDF, P<0.001; WHO, P=0.029. The multiple regression analysis between intima-media thickness (IMT and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide significantly correlated with IMT (P=0.043, while the analysis between the 10-year coronary heart disease risk by the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide did not correlate with IMT (P=0.226.ConclusionBasal C-peptide is related to cardiovascular predictors (IMT of T2DM, suggesting that basal C-peptide does provide a further indication of cardiovascular disease.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Confusion among medical doctors caused by multiple international criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Mukesh M; Shah, Syed M; Al Kaabi, Juma; Saquib, Shabnam; Othman, Yusra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to appraise the current regional practices of screening, diagnosis and follow-up of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) because the approach to GDM is frequently inconsistent. A 21-item questionnaire was distributed to physicians taking care of pregnant women in seven hospitals in the United Arab Emirates and one hospital in Oman. Besides assessing their attitudes towards testing for GDM, the questionnaire assessed familiarity with the Hyperglycemia and Pregnancy Outcome study and the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups GDM guidelines. One hundred and forty-eight (93%) of the 159 questionnaires distributed to the medical doctors (106 [72%] obstetricians and 42 [28%] internists) were returned. For GDM screening, six hospitals used five different tests; two hospitals utilized one single test. For GDM diagnosis, six hospitals employed the 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (four different criteria) while two hospitals used the 3-h, 100-g OGTT (single criteria). For post-delivery follow-up, the 2-h, 75-g OGTT and fasting plasma glucose were accepted by 103 (70%) and 38 (26%) of the 148 medical doctors, respectively. Ninety-eight (69%) of 143 responding physicians were aware of the Hyperglycemia and Pregnancy Outcome study, while 85 (61%) of 140 responders were familiar with the guidelines of the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups; this knowledge was independent of specialty, seniority, academia, years in practice or country trained. Although this study is parochial, its implications are global; that is, further education of caregivers would make the discordant approach to GDM (within and between hospitals) more harmonious and improve the obstetric care of pregnant women. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Changes in the Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Bulgaria (2006–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Borissova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim The aim of this study was to compare two nationwide cross-sectional studies of diabetes prevalence in Bulgaria (2006 and 2012 and to assess its dynamics. Material and Methods The two studies included 2396 and 2033 subjects, respectively. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF diagnostic criteria were applied, and the data were weighed for type of settlement and age. Results Diabetes prevalence was found to be 7.9% in 2006 and 9.55% in 2012, P = 0.06, showing an increase of 20.9%. The absolute increase was 0.9% in the females and 2.3% in the males ( P < 0.09. The increase was the largest in those aged 50–59: [9.4%, 2006 vs. 15.7%, 2012, P < 0.01]. Diabetes prevalence increased in the 20–60-year olds by 6.8% and decreased in the elderly by 6.1%. Obesity increased from 26.7 to 32.7%, P < 0.02. Conclusions A significant increase in diabetes prevalence was found that necessitates healthcare measures and resources for community-based awareness and prevention programs.

  2. Diabetes mellitus in childhood: an emerging condition in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Della Manna

    Full Text Available Summary The International Diabetes Federation (IDF-2015 estimates the existence of 30,900 children under 15 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 in Brazil, and an increase of 3.0% per year is expected. This review focused on meta-analysis and pediatric diabetes update articles in order to draw attention to the need of planning coping strategies to support this serious public health problem in coming years. DM1 is considered an immuno-mediated disease with a complex transmission influenced by genetic and environmental factors responsible for a gradual destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells. Seroconversion to DM1-associated autoantibodies and abnormalities in metabolic tests that assess insulin secretion and glucose tolerance can be used as predictive criteria of beta cells functional reserve and the onset of the clinical disease. Symptomatic DM1 treatment is complex and the maintenance of good metabolic control is still the only effective strategy for preserving beta cell function. Disease duration and hyperglycemia are both risk factors for the onset of chronic vascular complications that negatively affect the quality of life and survival of these patients. In this regard, health teams must be trained to provide the best possible information on pediatric diabetes, through continuing education programs focused on enabling these young people and their families to diabetes self-management.

  3. Cultural Perspectives on the Aftereffects of Combat Trauma: Review of a Community Study of Bedouin IDF Servicemen and Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Caspi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Combat trauma may affect servicemen from indigenous, traditional communities in ways that warrant special attention. The Bedouins, who enlist in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF voluntarily, represent a unique, closed, collectivist cultural minority, potentially in a predicament in light of ongoing sociopolitical events. This paper summarizes findings and lessons learned from a community study of Bedouin IDF servicemen and their families residing in Israel’s Western Galilee. This is the only research endeavor to have addressed trauma exposure and posttraumatic reactions in this community. The sampling strategies and interview schedule were designed in consideration of participation barriers typical of hard-to-reach populations. Data collection followed an extended phase of liaising with key informants and building trust. Study limitations are discussed in terms of the challenges presented by this type of research. Interviews conducted with 317 men, 129 wives, and 67 mothers revealed high levels of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the men, and related distress in wives and mothers, but not in the children. The role of aggression in mediating the impact of PTSD and concepts such as shame, the loss of personal resources, and beliefs about retribution are highlighted as key issues for a culturally relevant understanding of traumatized indigenous communities.

  4. Cultural Perspectives on the Aftereffects of Combat Trauma: Review of a Community Study of Bedouin IDF Servicemen and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Yael; Slobodin, Ortal; Klein, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    Combat trauma may affect servicemen from indigenous, traditional communities in ways that warrant special attention. The Bedouins, who enlist in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) voluntarily, represent a unique, closed, collectivist cultural minority, potentially in a predicament in light of ongoing sociopolitical events. This paper summarizes findings and lessons learned from a community study of Bedouin IDF servicemen and their families residing in Israel's Western Galilee. This is the only research endeavor to have addressed trauma exposure and posttraumatic reactions in this community. The sampling strategies and interview schedule were designed in consideration of participation barriers typical of hard-to-reach populations. Data collection followed an extended phase of liaising with key informants and building trust. Study limitations are discussed in terms of the challenges presented by this type of research. Interviews conducted with 317 men, 129 wives, and 67 mothers revealed high levels of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the men, and related distress in wives and mothers, but not in the children. The role of aggression in mediating the impact of PTSD and concepts such as shame, the loss of personal resources, and beliefs about retribution are highlighted as key issues for a culturally relevant understanding of traumatized indigenous communities.

  5. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  6. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  7. Pulmonary tuberculosis among diabetic patients in internal medicine at point g hospital, bamako - mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibé, At; Dembélé, M; Diarra, As; Cissé, I; Bocoum, A; Traoré, Ak; Traoré, Ha

    2005-01-01

    Summary The depression of cellular immunity among diabetic patients exposes them to tuberculosis considered as one of the major diseases of immune-depressive people. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the frequency, gravity, treatment and evolution of pulmonary tuberculosis among our patients affected with diabetes. For that purpose, two descriptive retrospective and prospective studies were undertaken from January 1982 to December 1992 in the Internal Medicine (Internal medicine) department of Hospital of Point G, the national hospital. Thus, 54 diabetics patients hospitalised out of 1 365 had tuberculosis at a frequency rate of 3,95%. The average age of our patients was 49 years +/- 12 and the sex ratio was 2,18 in favour of men. The infection was also more frequent in diabetes type 1 (51,9%) then in type 2 (48,1%), and concerned mainly men (68.51%) who were more than 37 years old (57.41%). Clinically, the common signs to both affections were prevalent namely asthenia: 85,2%, anorexia: 53,7%, weight loss: 66,7%, associated to cough: 81,5% and to dyspnea: 29,6%. However, for a third of the patients (22,2%), tuberculosis was discovered during a systematic check up. All the patients had a glycemia higher than 8mmol/l, with extremes up to 8mmol/l and 32mmol/l, 63% of patient had a febricula. The intradermo cutaneous reaction to tuberculosis (IDR) was negative in 44,4%. The bacilloscopy during direct testing or through the liquid obtained by casing was positive in 64,82%. Tubercular lesions were localised at the top: 91,8%, with an equal attack of the two lungs. During the treatment six products were mainly used comprising Rifampicine (R) isoniazid (INH or H), Streptomycine (S), Ethambutol (E), Thiacetazone (T), and Pyrazinamide (Z). Insulin treatment was done on all patients until tuberculosis was cured. The evolution was favourable after 2 to 3 months of treatment for 48 patients (88,88%) among whom 4: (8,33%) fell sick again. Six patients out of 54 died, i

  8. Metabolic syndrome in Internal Medicine patients: the pilot NIMEC study (National Internal Medicine Equivalent/Complex C-V-@Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metabolic Syndrome (MetS, currently defined as slight differences in the criteria of diagnosis – depending on which authority is quoted [i.e.: NCEP-ATP III (National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III; WHO (World Health Organization; IDF (International Diabetes Federation; AACE (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists], designates a cluster of metabolic risk factors that come together in a single individual, leading to cardiovascular disease. MetS is quite common, approximately 20-30% of the population in industrialized countries being affected. However, most of epidemiological data regarding MetS are derived from populations consisting mostly of middle-aged and younger subjects. AIM OF THE STUDY To assess the prevalence of the MetS in Internal Medicine wards and to determine its related comorbidities, including other clinical forms of atherosclerotic disease such as CHD risk equivalents. METHODS Our study was performed in patients admitted in Internal Medicine wards and selected as a randomization list in 12 Emilia Romagna-Marche FADOI centers. 1.316 patients were registered. According to explicit inclusion/exclusion criteria, we studied overall 902 participants (50.6% men, mean of age: 71-73 years. RESULTS According to NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria the prevalence of MetS was 45.3% (IC 95%: 41.6-49.1 and 38.6% (IC 95%: 34.9-42.3, respectively. Patients with MetS presented a higher significant rate of ALT increase, syncope, atrial fibrillation, COPD, unstable angina, chronic kidney disease, cancer, valvular heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and carotid plaques. A strong association between IDF-MetS and congestive heart failure was observed, suggesting a role of central obesity as an independent risk factor in the elderly. DISCUSSION World-wide populations are becoming older. Aging and MetS are two conditions that represent an important part of health-care spending. Trunkal fatness increases in

  9. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet--an international collaborative clinical trials network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, Jay S; Greenbaum, Carla J; Lachin, John M; Leschek, Ellen; Rafkin-Mervis, Lisa; Savage, Peter; Spain, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an international consortium of clinical research centers aimed at the prevention or delay of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The fundamental goal of TrialNet is to counter the T1D disease process by immune modulation and/or enhancement of beta cell proliferation and regeneration. To achieve this goal, TrialNet researchers are working to better understand the natural history of the disease, to identify persons at risk, and to clinically evaluate novel therapies that balance potential risks and benefits. The particular focus is on studies of preventive measures. In addition, TrialNet evaluates therapies in individuals with newly diagnosed T1D with preserved beta cell function to help determine the risk/benefit profile and gain an initial assessment of potential efficacy in preservation of beta cell function, so that promising agents can be studied in prevention trials. In addition, TrialNet evaluates methodologies that enhance the conduct of its clinical trials, which includes tests of outcome assessment methodology, the evaluation of surrogate markers, and mechanistic studies laying the foundation for future clinical trials.

  10. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  11. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  12. Double vs single internal thoracic artery harvesting in diabetic patients: role in perioperative infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolari Alessandro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the role in the onset of surgical site infections of bilateral internal thoracic arteries harvesting in patients with decompensated preoperative glycemia. Methods 81 consecutive patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus underwent elective CABG harvesting single or double internal thoracic arteries. Single left ITA was harvested in 41 patients (Group 1, 50.6%, BITAs were harvested in 40 (Group 2, 49.4%. The major clinical end points analyzed in this study were infection rate, type of infection, duration of infection, infection relapse rate and total hospital length of stay. Results Five patients developed sternal SSI in the perioperative period, 2 in group 1 and 3 in group 2 without significant difference. All sternal SSIs were superficial with no sternal dehiscence. The development of infection from the time of surgery took 18.5 ± 2.1 and 7.3 ± 3.0 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. The infections were treated with wound irrigation and debridement, and with VAC therapy as well as with antibiotics. The VAC system was removed after a mean of 12.8 ± 5.1 days, when sterilization was achieved. The overall survival estimate at 1 year was 98.7%. Only BMI was a significant predictor of SSI using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis (Odds Ratio: 1.34; 95%Conficdence Interval: 1.02–1.83; p value: 0.04. In the model, the use of BITA was not an independent predictor of SSI. Conclusion CABG with bilateral pedicled ITAs grafting could be performed safely even in diabetics with poor preoperative glycaemic control.

  13. Changes in the internal structure of the human crystalline lens with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiemer, N.G.M.; Dubbelman, M.; Hermans, E.A.; Ringens, P.J.; Polak, B.C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 and type 2 on the internal structure of the lens. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Participants and Controls: One hundred seven patients with DM type 1, 106 patients with DM type 2, and 75 healthy control subjects.

  14. Recurrent Stroke in Minor Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack With Metabolic Syndrome and/or Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqi; Pan, Yuesong; Jing, Jing; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Meng, Xia; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to determine the risk conferred by metabolic syndrome (METS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to recurrent stroke in patients with minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack from the CHANCE (Clopidogrel in High-risk patients with Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events) trial. In total, 3044 patients were included. Patients were stratified into 4 groups: neither, METS only, DM only, or both. METS was defined using the Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS) and International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) definitions. The primary outcome was new stroke (including ischemic and hemorrhagic) at 90 days. A multivariable Cox regression model was used to assess the relationship of METS and DM status to the risk of recurrent stroke adjusted for potential covariates. Using the CDS criteria of METS, 53.2%, 17.2%, 19.8%, and 9.8% of patients were diagnosed as neither, METS only, DM only, and both, respectively. After 90 days of follow-up, there were 299 new strokes (293 ischemic, 6 hemorrhagic). Patients with DM only (16.1% versus 6.8%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.50, 95% CI 1.89-3.39) and both (17.1% versus 6.8%; adjusted hazard ratio 2.76, 95% CI 1.98-3.86) had significantly increased rates of recurrent stroke. No interaction effect of antiplatelet therapy by different METS or DM status for the risk of recurrent stroke ( P =0.82 for interaction in the fully adjusted model of CDS) was observed. Using the METS (IDF) criteria demonstrated similar results. Concurrent METS and DM was associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke in patients with minor stroke and transient ischemic attack. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. The impact of the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) fasting glucose diagnostic criterion on the prevalence and outcomes of gestational diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S; Mei, J; Song, W; Liu, Y; Tan, Y-D; Chi, S; Li, P; Chen, X; Deng, S

    2014-03-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) proposed that a one-time value of fasting plasma glucose of 5.1 mmol/l or over at any time of the pregnancy is sufficient to diagnose gestational diabetes. We evaluated the repercussions of the application of this threshold in pregnant Han Chinese women. This is a retrospective study of 5360 (72.3% of total) consecutively recruited pregnant Han Chinese women in one centre from 2008 to 2011. These women underwent a two-step gestational diabetes diagnostic protocol according to the previous American Diabetes Association criteria. The IADPSG fasting plasma glucose criterion was used to reclassify these 5360 women. The prevalence, clinical characteristics and obstetric outcomes were compared among the women classified as having gestational diabetes by the previous American Diabetes Association criteria (approximately 90% were treated), those reclassified as having gestational diabetes by the single IADPSG fasting plasma glucose criterion (untreated), but not as having gestational diabetes by the previous American Diabetes Association criteria, and those with normal glucose tolerance. There were 626 cases of gestational diabetes defined by the previous American Diabetes Association criteria (11.7%) and these cases were associated with increased risks of maternal and neonatal outcomes when compared with the women with normal glucose tolerance. With the IADPSG fasting plasma glucose criterion, another 1314 (24.5%) women were reclassified as having gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes classified by the IADPSG fasting plasma glucose criterion was associated with gestational hypertension (P = 0.0094) and neonatal admission to nursery (P = 0.035) prior to adjustment for maternal age and BMI, but was no longer a predictor for adverse pregnancy outcomes after adjustment. The simple IADPSG fasting plasma glucose criterion increased the Chinese population with gestational diabetes by 200%. The

  16. Achievement of metabolic control goals set by the American Diabetes Association and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes, Patricia; Martín-Frías, María; Álvarez, Ma Ángeles; Yelmo, Rosa; Alonso, Milagros; Barrio, Raquel

    2015-02-01

    The "T1D Exchange Clinic Registry" of 13.316 pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in U.S. recently revealed that most children have HbA1c values above target levels established by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD). The aim of this study is to assess the proportion of youngsters with T1D who meet the internationally accepted targets for good metabolic control of diabetes at a single, referral Pediatric Diabetes Center in Spain. Cross-sectional study of 236 children and adolescents with T1D controlled at our Pediatric Diabetes Unit. We analyzed the compliance to metabolic goals set by ADA and ISPAD and the differences between patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections. SPSS™ version 21.0. Mean age: 12.6 ± 4.6 years old, mean age at diagnosis: 6.1 ± 4.3 years old and mean diabetes duration: 6.4 ± 4.3 years; 47% female. HbA1c average: 6.7 ± 0.7% (49.7 ± 7.6 mmol/mol). The age-specific ADA and ISPAD HbA1c targets were achieved by 93% and 91% of patients, respectively. Among pump users, 97%/97% met ADA/ISPAD HbA1c targets compared to 87%/88% of MDI users (p = 0.04/p = 0.03), without significant differences in the analysis by groups of age. Among participants, 95%, 62%, 95%, 98% and 89% met HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides, BP and BMI targets. Most patients in our children and adolescent cohort of T1D patients correctly achieve metabolic goals established by ADA and ISPAD with low incidence of hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Automatic Feature Selection and Weighting for the Formation of Homogeneous Groups for Regional Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curve Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Burn, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme rainfall events can have devastating impacts on society. To quantify the associated risk, the IDF curve has been used to provide the essential rainfall-related information for urban planning. However, the recent changes in the rainfall climatology caused by climate change and urbanization have made the estimates provided by the traditional regional IDF approach increasingly inaccurate. This inaccuracy is mainly caused by two problems: 1) The ineffective choice of similarity indicators for the formation of a homogeneous group at different regions; and 2) An inadequate number of stations in the pooling group that does not adequately reflect the optimal balance between group size and group homogeneity or achieve the lowest uncertainty in the rainfall quantiles estimates. For the first issue, to consider the temporal difference among different meteorological and topographic indicators, a three-layer design is proposed based on three stages in the extreme rainfall formation: cloud formation, rainfall generation and change of rainfall intensity above urban surface. During the process, the impacts from climate change and urbanization are considered through the inclusion of potential relevant features at each layer. Then to consider spatial difference of similarity indicators for the homogeneous group formation at various regions, an automatic feature selection and weighting algorithm, specifically the hybrid searching algorithm of Tabu search, Lagrange Multiplier and Fuzzy C-means Clustering, is used to select the optimal combination of features for the potential optimal homogenous groups formation at a specific region. For the second issue, to compare the uncertainty of rainfall quantile estimates among potential groups, the two sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test-based sample ranking process is used. During the process, linear programming is used to rank these groups based on the confidence intervals of the quantile estimates. The proposed methodology fills the gap

  18. Comparison of the world health organization and the International association of diabetes and pregnancy study groups criteria in diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus in South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivagnanam Nallaperumal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to compare the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG and the World Health Organization (WHO criteria to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the retrospective data of 1351 pregnant women who underwent screening for GDM at four selected diabetes centers at Chennai (three private and one government. All women underwent an oral glucose tolerance test using 75g glucose load and fasting, 1-h, and 2-h samples were collected. The IADPSG and WHO criteria were compared for diagnosis of GDM. Results: A total of 839 women had GDM by either the IADPSG or the WHO criteria, of whom the IADPSG criteria identified 699 and the WHO criteria also identified 699 women as having GDM. However, only 599/839 women (66.6% were identified by both criteria. Thus, 140/839 women (16.7% were missed by both the IADPSG and the WHO criteria. 687/699 (98.2% of the women with GDM were identified by the WHO criteria. In contrast, each value of IADPSG criteria i.e., fasting, 1 h, and 2 h identified only 12.5%, 14%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusions: A single WHO cut-point of 2 h > 140 mg/dl appears to be suitable for large-scale screening for GDM in India and other developing countries.

  19. Peringkasan Tweet Berdasarkan Trending Topic Twitter Dengan Pembobotan TF-IDF dan Single Linkage AngglomerativeHierarchical Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Annisa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Trending topic is a feature provided by twitter that informs something widely discussed by users in a particular time. The form of a trending topic is a hashtag and can be selected by clicking. However, the number of tweets for each trending topics can be very large, so it will be difficult if we want to know all the contents. So, in order to make easy when reading the topic, a small number of tweets can be selected as the main idea of the topic. In this study, we applied the Agglomerative Single Linkage Hierarchical Clustering by calculating the TF-IDF value for each word in advance. We used 100 trending topics, where each topic consists of 50 tweets in Indonesian. For testing, we provided 30 trending topics which consist of 2 until 9 sub-topics. The result is that each trending topics can be summarized into shorter text contains 2 until 9 tweets. We were able to summarize 1 trending topics exactly same as the topic summarized by human expert. However, the rest of topics corresponded partially with human expert.

  20. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the ?Standards? also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States "to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes". Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national population

  1. International challenges without borders: a descriptive study of family physicians' educational needs in the field of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posel Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal care of persons with diabetes by general practitioners and family physicians (GP/FP is complex and requires multiple competencies. This is a fairly unrecognized key challenge in the healthcare systems. In some cases, local and national Continuous Professional Development (CPD initiatives target these challenges; however there have been few international initiatives, possibly because challenges emerging from different studies have not been linked across national boundaries. In this context, the authors have compiled data about gaps and/or barriers inherent to GP/FP care of persons with type 2 diabetes from Austria, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom. Methods Secondary analyzes of pre-existing studies were conducted to identify challenges in the care of patients with type 2 diabetes as faced by GPs/FPs. Two sources of data were reviewed: unpublished research data from collaborating organizations and articles from a literature search (in English and German. Articles retrieved were scanned by the research team for relevance to the study objectives and to extract existing gaps and barriers. The identified challenges were then categorized along three major axes: (1 phase of the continuum of care {from screening to management}; (2 learning domain {knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavior, context}; and (3 by country/region. Compilation and categorization were performed by qualitative researchers and discrepancies were resolved through discussion until concordance was achieved. Results and discussion Thirteen challenges faced by GPs/FPs in the care for patients with type 2 diabetes were common in at least 3 of the 4 targeted countries/regions. These issues were found across the entire continuum of care and included: pathophysiology of diabetes, diagnostic criteria, treatment targets assessment, drugs' modes of action, decision-making in therapies, treatment guidelines, insulin therapy, adherence, management of

  2. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Resource use associated with type 2 diabetes in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia and Turkey: results from the International Diabetes Management Practice Study (IDMPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, Juan J; Atanasov, Petar K; Chan, Juliana C N; Mbanya, Jean C; Shestakova, Marina V; Leguet-Dinville, Prisca; Annemans, Lieven

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its complications form a global healthcare burden but the exact impact in some geographical regions is still not well documented. We describe the healthcare resource usage (HRU) associated with T2D in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia and Turkey. In the fifth wave of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS; 2011-2012), we collected self-reported and physician-reported cross-sectional data from 8156 patients from 18 countries across 5 regions, including different types of HRU in the previous 3-6 months. Negative binomial regression was used to identify parameters associated with HRU, using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to express associations. Patients in Africa (n=2220), the Middle East (n=2065), Eurasia (n=1843), South Asia (n=1195) and Turkey (n=842) experienced an annual hospitalization rate (mean±SD) of 0.6±1.9, 0.3±1.2, 1.7±4.1, 0.4±1.5 and 1.3±2.7, respectively. The annual number of diabetes-related inpatient days (mean±SD) was 4.7±22.7, 1.1±6.1, 16.0±30.0, 1.5±6.8 and 10.8±34.3, respectively. Despite some inter-regional heterogeneity, macrovascular complications (IRRs varying between 1.4 and 8.9), microvascular complications (IRRs varying between 3.4 and 4.3) and, to a large extent, inadequate glycemic control (IRRs varying between 1.89 and 10.1), were independent parameters associated with hospitalization in these respective regions. In non-Western countries, macrovascular/microvascular complications and inadequate glycemic control were common and important parameters associated with increased HRU.

  4. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & ... & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ... & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  8. Fourfold increase in prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus after adoption of the new International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Evelyn A; Massaro, Nadine; Streckeisen, Simone; Manegold-Brauer, Gwendolin; Schoetzau, Andreas; Schulzke, Sven M; Winzeler, Bettina; Hoesli, Irene; Lapaire, Olav

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to evaluate the influence of the new International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) guidelines for screening of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on GDM prevalence in a cohort from a Swiss tertiary hospital. This was a retrospective cohort study involving all pregnant women who were screened for GDM between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. From 2008 until 2010 (period 1), a two-step approach with 1-h 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) was used, followed by fasting, 1- and 2-h glucose measurements after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in case of a positive GCT. From 2010 until 2013 (period 2), all pregnant women were tested with a one-step 75 g OGTT according to new IADPSG guidelines. In both periods, women with risk factors could be screened directly with a 75 g OGTT in early pregnancy. Overall, 647 women were eligible for the study in period 1 and 720 in period 2. The introduction of the IADPSG criteria resulted in an absolute increase of GDM prevalence of 8.5% (3.3% in period 1 to 11.8% in period 2). The adoption of the IADPSG criteria resulted in a considerable increase in GDM diagnosis in our Swiss cohort. Further studies are needed to investigate if the screening is cost effective and if treatment of our additionally diagnosed GDM mothers might improve short-term as well as long-term outcome.

  9. Technetium, Iodine, and Chromium Adsorption/Desorption Kd Values for Vadose Zone Pore Water, ILAW Glass, and Cast Stone Leachates Contacting an IDF Sand Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M.V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Performance and risk assessments of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) have shown that risks to groundwater are quite sensitive to adsorption-desorption interactions occurring in the near- and far-field environment. These interactions between the underlying sediments and the contaminants present in the leachates that descend from the buried glass, secondary waste grouts, and potentially Cast Stone low-activity waste packages have been represented in these assessments using the contaminant distribution coefficient (Kd) construct. Some contaminants (99Tc, 129I, and Cr) present in significant quantities in these wastes have low Kd values and tend to drive risk to public health and the environment. Relatively small changes in the Kd value can cause relatively large changes in the retardation factor. Thus, even relatively small uncertainty in the Kd value can result in a relatively large uncertainty in the risk determined through performance assessment modeling. The purpose of this study is to further reduce the uncertainty in Kd values for 99Tc, iodine (iodide and iodate), and Cr (chromate; CrO42-) by conducting systematic adsorption-desorption experiments using actual sand-dominated Hanford formation sediments from beneath the IDF and solutions that closely mimic Hanford vadose zone pore water and leachates from Cast Stone and ILAW glass waste forms. Twenty-four batch and 21 flow-through column experiments were conducted, yielding 261 Kd measurements for these key contaminants, and contributing to our understanding for predicting transport from wastes disposed to the IDF. While the batch Kd methodology is not well-suited for measuring Kd values for non-sorbing species (as noted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), the batch Kd results presented here are not wholly inconsistent with the column Kd results, and could be used for sensitivity purposes. Results from the column experiments are consistent with the best

  10. Emotional support for diabetes management: an international cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Urlaub, Diana; Guzman-Corrales, Laura; Mayer, Melissa; Ballesteros, Juana; Graffy, Jonathan; Simmons, David; Cummings, Doyle M; Fisher, Edwin B

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how emotional support emerged in interactions between peer supporters (PSs) and adults living with type 2 diabetes. Qualitative data were analyzed from 22 semistructured interviews with PSs in 3 settings: low-income Latinos in Chicago, middle-class Caucasians in the United Kingdom, and low-income African American women in North Carolina. Emotional support was defined as expressions of empathy, trust, and caring. Across all sites, emotional support gradually emerged over time, was often combined with informational support, and was conveyed both implicitly (through nonverbal actions connoting emotional acceptance; eg, a walk together without discussion of problems) and explicitly (eg, by reassurance or discussion of stressors). Cross-site differences did appear regarding the strategies to address barriers to diabetes management (eg, PSs in North Carolina and Chicago reported providing support for social stressors) and the role of PSs (eg, PSs in Chicago reported providing directive support). Across different settings and populations, emotional support for diabetes management evolved over time, was often integrated with informational support, and emerged through both implicit and explicit strategies that addressed varied context-specific stressors. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Prevalence and correlates of depressive disorders in people with Type 2 diabetes: results from the International Prevalence and Treatment of Diabetes and Depression (INTERPRET-DD) study, a collaborative study carried out in 14 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C E; Nouwen, A; Sartorius, N; Ahmed, H U; Alvarez, A; Bahendeka, S; Basangwa, D; Bobrov, A E; Boden, S; Bulgari, V; Burti, L; Chaturvedi, S K; Cimino, L C; Gaebel, W; de Girolamo, G; Gondek, T M; de Braude, M Guinzbourg; Guntupalli, A; Heinze, M G; Ji, L; Hong, X; Khan, A; Kiejna, A; Kokoszka, A; Kamala, T; Lalic, N M; Lecic Tosevski, D; Mankovsky, B; Li, M; Musau, A; Müssig, K; Ndetei, D; Rabbani, G; Srikanta, S S; Starostina, E G; Shevchuk, M; Taj, R; Vukovic, O; Wölwer, W; Xin, Y

    2018-06-01

    To assess the prevalence and management of depressive disorders in people with Type 2 diabetes in different countries. People with diabetes aged 18-65 years and treated in outpatient settings were recruited in 14 countries and underwent a psychiatric interview. Participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale. Demographic and medical record data were collected. A total of 2783 people with Type 2 diabetes (45.3% men, mean duration of diabetes 8.8 years) participated. Overall, 10.6% were diagnosed with current major depressive disorder and 17.0% reported moderate to severe levels of depressive symptomatology (Patient Health Questionnaire scores >9). Multivariable analyses showed that, after controlling for country, current major depressive disorder was significantly associated with gender (women) (P<0.0001), a lower level of education (P<0.05), doing less exercise (P<0.01), higher levels of diabetes distress (P<0.0001) and a previous diagnosis of major depressive disorder (P<0.0001). The proportion of those with either current major depressive disorder or moderate to severe levels of depressive symptomatology who had a diagnosis or any treatment for their depression recorded in their medical records was extremely low and non-existent in many countries (0-29.6%). Our international study, the largest of this type ever undertaken, shows that people with diabetes frequently have depressive disorders and also significant levels of depressive symptoms. Our findings indicate that the identification and appropriate care for psychological and psychiatric problems is not the norm and suggest a lack of the comprehensive approach to diabetes management that is needed to improve clinical outcomes. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  12. Standardizing Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures Beyond HbA1c for Type 1 Diabetes: A Consensus Report of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiostratidou, Gina; Anhalt, Henry; Ball, Dana; Blonde, Lawrence; Gourgari, Evgenia; Harriman, Karen N; Kowalski, Aaron J; Madden, Paul; McAuliffe-Fogarty, Alicia H; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Peters, Anne; Raman, Sripriya; Reifschneider, Kent; Rubin, Karen; Weinzimer, Stuart A

    2017-12-01

    To identify and define clinically meaningful type 1 diabetes outcomes beyond hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) based upon a review of the evidence, consensus from clinical experts, and input from researchers, people with type 1 diabetes, and industry. Priority outcomes include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). While priority outcomes for type 1 and type 2 diabetes may overlap, type 1 diabetes was the focus of this work. A Steering Committee-comprising representatives from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange-was the decision-making body for the Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes Program. Their work was informed by input from researchers, industry, and people with diabetes through Advisory Committees representing each stakeholder group. Stakeholder surveys were used to identify priority outcomes. The outcomes prioritized in the surveys were hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, DKA, and PROs. To develop consensus on the definitions of these outcomes, the Steering Committee relied on published evidence, their clinical expertise, and feedback from the Advisory Committees. The Steering Committee developed definitions for hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, and DKA in type 1 diabetes. The definitions reflect their assessment of the outcome's short- and long-term clinical impact on people with type 1 diabetes. Knowledge gaps to be addressed by future research were identified. The Steering Committee discussed PROs and concluded that further type 1 diabetes-specific development is needed. The Steering Committee recommends use of the defined clinically meaningful outcomes beyond HbA 1c in the research, development, and evaluation of type 1 diabetes

  13. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  14. EFFECT OF INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING DURING VITRECTOMY FOR DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takuya; Roggia, Murilo F; Noda, Yasuo; Ueta, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were systematically reviewed. Eligible studies included randomized or nonrandomized studies that compared surgical outcomes of vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling for diabetic macular edema. The primary and secondary outcome measures were postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness. Meta-analysis on mean differences between vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling was performed using inverse variance method in random effects. Five studies (7 articles) with 741 patients were eligible for analysis. Superiority (95% confidence interval) in postoperative best-corrected visual acuity in ILM peeling group compared with nonpeeling group was 0.04 (-0.05 to 0.13) logMAR (equivalent to 2.0 ETDRS letters, P = 0.37), and superiority in best-corrected visual acuity change in ILM peeling group was 0.04 (-0.02 to 0.09) logMAR (equivalent to 2.0 ETDRS letters, P = 0.16). There was no significant difference in postoperative central macular thickness and central macular thickness reduction between the two groups. The visual acuity outcomes using pars plana vitrectomy with ILM peeling versus no ILM peeling were not significantly different. A larger randomized prospective study would be necessary to adequately address the effectiveness of ILM peeling on visual acuity outcomes.

  15. Influência de diferentes coeficientes de desagregação na determinação de equações IDF para Aquidauana/MS (DOI.: 10.5216/reec.v9i2.28701

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO EDUARDO TEODORO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Na literatura são encontradas diversas pesquisas sobre a desagregação de chuvas diárias para determinação de equações de Intensidade-Duração-Frequência (IDF. Entretanto, ainda não existe um trabalho que avaliou a influência de diferentes coeficientes de desagregação na determinação de equações IDF para uma localidade. Assim, objetivou-se com esta pesquisa desenvolver equações de chuvas intensas (curvas IDF para o município de Aquidauana/MS por meio do emprego de diferentes metodologias de desagregação de chuvas diárias e verificar a influência dos coeficientes utilizados. Foram obtidas as séries de chuvas diárias entre os anos de 2001 a 2013. Foram separados os valores máximos de precipitação para cada ano. Posteriormente, foram aplicados, a cada valor de precipitação os diferentes coeficientes de desagregação de chuvas diária. Verificou-se o ajuste da distribuição de Gumbel aos dados amostrais pelo teste de aderência de Kolmogorov-Sminorv e pelo coeficiente de determinação. Calcularam-se então os valores de precipitação para os períodos de retorno utilizados em projetos de obras hidrológicas: 2, 5, 10, 25, 50 e 100 anos. Para cada período de retorno e com as durações estabelecidas foram determinadas as intensidades máximas médias. De posse das séries de intensidades foram calculados os parâmetros da Equação IDF, via método de regressão linear, logaritmizando-a. Constatou-se que os coeficientes de desagregação de chuvas diárias influenciam consideravelmente na determinação dos parâmetros da equação IDF. As equações IDF determinadas nesta pesquisa poderão contribuir significativamente para o dimensionamento de projetos hidráulicos e de saneamento no município de Aquidauana/MS. ABSTRACT: Several studies in the literature on disaggregation of daily rainfall for determining equations of intensity-duration-frequency (IDF are found. However, there is still no study evaluated

  16. An international, multicenter, observational survey to evaluate diabetes control in subjects using insulin for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic: study protocol for a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brož J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jan Brož,1 Denisa Janickova Zdarska,1 Jana Urbanova,2 Marek Brabec,3 Bohumila Krivska,4 Viera Donicova,5 Radka Stepanova,6 Emil Martinka,7 Milan Kvapil1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Second Faculty of Medicine, 2Center for Research on Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, 3Institute of Computer Science of the ASCR, vvi, 4Sanofi, Prague, Czech Republic; 5Private Department of Diabetology, Internal Medicine and Metabolism, Kosice, Slovak Republic; 6ADDS sro, Brno, Czech Republic; 7National Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Lubochna, Slovak Republic Background: Despite the improvements in insulin therapy, a large number of patients fail to achieve their target glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels. Control of diabetes is often unsatisfactory because the patient does not know about the principles of successful insulin therapy (ie, blood glucose self-monitoring, the principles of insulin administration, titration, current dose adjustments, dietary recommendations, and physical activity preventive measures or because these principles are applied incorrectly or insufficiently. Furthermore, the fear of hypoglycemia may lead to maintaining higher than recommended blood glucose levels. Methods/design: This is a noninterventional, international study focusing on a questionnaire survey of diabetes patients (patient-reported outcome treated with insulin for at least 1 year. It is designed so that the data obtained reflect real access of patients to insulin treatment. The primary objective is to show the results of glycemic control of diabetes (HbA1c achieved in diabetes patients treated with at least one dose of insulin. The secondary objective is to monitor the factors potentially affecting these results, which include the frequency and other characteristics of hypoglycemia, the frequency of blood glucose self-monitoring, and the effects produced when the results

  17. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Pei Pei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The Leptin Receptor (LEPR gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05.

  18. Analysis of Gln223Agr polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in type II diabetic mellitus subjects among Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-09-18

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05).

  19. Patients' education, and its impact on care outcomes, resource consumption and working conditions: data from the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, J J; Aschner, P; Baik, S H; Chan, J; Chantelot, J M; Ilkova, H; Ramachandran, A

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of diabetes education provided to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in non-controlled studies ("real-world conditions") on quality of care, resource consumption and conditions of employment. This cross-sectional study and longitudinal follow-up describe the data (demographic and socioeconomic profiles, clinical characteristics, treatment of hyperglycaemia and associated cardiovascular risk factors, resource consumption) collected during the second phase (2006) of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS). Patients received diabetes education directly from the practice nurse, dietitian or educator, or were referred to ad hoc group-education programmes; all programmes emphasized healthy lifestyle changes, self-care and active participation in disease control and treatment. Educated vs non-educated T2DM patients (n=5692 in each group), paired by age, gender and diabetes duration, were randomly recruited for the IDMPS by participating primary-care physicians from 27 countries in Eastern Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Outcome measures included clinical (body weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, foot evaluation), metabolic (HbA(1c) levels, blood lipid profile) and biochemical control measures. Treatment goals were defined according to American Diabetes Association guidelines. T2DM patients' education significantly improved the percentage of patients achieving target values set by international guidelines. Educated patients increased their insulin use and self-care performance, had a lower rate of chronic complications and a modest increase in cost of care, and probably higher salaries and slightly better productivity. Diabetes education is an efficient tool for improving care outcomes without having a major impact on healthcare costs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of polypeptide hormones is a regulated process: inhibition of [125I]iodoinsulin internalization in hypoinsulinemic diabetes of rat and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, J.L.; Robert, A.; Grunberger, G.; van Obberghen, E.; Freychet, P.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1986-01-01

    Much data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of hormone excess. Thus, in hyperinsulinemic states there is an accelerated loss of cell surface insulin receptors. In the present experiments we addressed this question in hypoinsulinemic states, in which insulin binding to cell surface receptors is generally increased. In hepatocytes obtained from hypoinsulinemic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, [ 125 I]iodoglucagon internalization was increased, while at the same time [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was decreased. The defect in [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was corrected by insulin treatment of the animal. In peripheral blood monocytes from patients with type I insulinopenic diabetes, internalization of [ 125 I]iodoinsulin was impaired; this defect was not present in insulin-treated patients. These data in the hypoinsulinemic rat and human diabetes suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of insulin deficiency as well as insulin excess. Delayed or reduced internalization of the insulin-receptor complex could amplify the muted signal caused by deficient hormone secretion

  1. Reducing and preventing internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in children with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrupp, E M; Northam, E; Lee, K J; Scratch, S E; Cameron, F

    2015-11-01

    Children with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of mental health problems, which in turn are associated with poor glycemic control, diabetes-related complications, and long-term psychiatric morbidity. We tested the efficacy of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program in reducing or preventing mental health problems and improving glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes in a randomized controlled trial. Participants were recruited from the Diabetes Clinic, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, and randomized to Triple P or standard diabetes care. The primary outcome was child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems 3 and 12 months postrandomization. Secondary outcomes were glycemic control, parent mental health, parenting skills, and family functioning at 3 and 12 months, and glycemic control at 24 months. A total of 76 participants were randomized (38 to intervention and 38 to control), 60 completed 3-month, and 57 completed 12-month assessments. Benefits of Triple P were evident at 3 months for parent mental health, parenting skills, and family functioning (p externalizing behavior problems indicated greater improvements in child mental health, parent mental health, parenting skills, and diabetes family conflict (p parenting self-efficacy at 3 months. Improvements in parent mental health and parenting competency associated with Triple P were sustained to 12 months for children with pre-existing mental health problems. This study provides some support for the efficacy of Triple P in improving parent and family outcomes, and reducing child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems primarily in children who have pre-existing mental health problems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Key words: Diabetes mellitus, diabetes distress, HbA1c, glycaemic status ... [3] The management of diabetes mellitus and the ... morbidity and mortality risks associated with ... appropriate policy for prevention, control and ..... Mellitus and its Association Risk Indicators in a ... collaborative Research on Internal Medicine and.

  3. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!. We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the ?Standards? also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States ?to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes?. Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  4. Reproducibility and validity of the French version of the long international physical activity questionnaire in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinière, Lise; Lhommet, Claire; Caille, Agnes; Giraudeau, Bruno; Lecomte, Pierre; Couet, Charles; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Jacobi, David

    2011-08-01

    Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary time are cornerstones in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few instruments available to measure physical activity in this population. We translated the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-L) into French and studied its reproducibility and validity in patients with T2DM. Reproducibility was studied by 2 telephone administrations, 8 days apart. Concurrent validity was tested against pedometry for 7 days during habitual life. One-hundred forty-three patients with T2DM were recruited (59% males; age: 60.9 ± 10.5 years; BMI: 31.2 ± 5.2 kg/m2; HbA1c: 7.4 ± 1.2%). Intraclass correlation coefficients (95% CI) for repeated administration (n = 126) were 0.74 (0.61-0.83) for total physical activity, 0.72 (0.57-0.82) for walking, and 0.65 (0.51-0.78) for sitting time. Total physical activity and walking (MET-min·week-1) correlated with daily steps (Spearman r = .24 and r = .23, respectively, P physical activity and sedentary time in patients with T2DM, confirming previous data in nonclinical populations.

  5. Increased Retinal Thinning after Combination of Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling and Silicone Oil Endotamponade in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hiroki; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Takayama, Kei; Ito, Yasuki; Iwase, Takeshi; Ueno, Shinji; Nonobe, Norie; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Kataoka, Keiko; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the change in retinal thickness after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling and/or silicone oil (SO) endotamponade in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The actual amount and ratio of changes in the retinal thickness were calculated. Compared to control eyes in the ILM peeling (-)/SO (-) group, the central, superior inner, and temporal inner retina in the ILM peeling (+)/SO (-) group, the central and superior inner retina in the ILM peeling (-)/SO (+) group, and the central, inferior inner, temporal inner, and nasal inner retina in the ILM peeling (+)/SO (+) group showed a significant reduction of the retinal thickness. The central, superior inner, and temporal inner retina in the ILM peeling (+)/SO (-) group, the central and superior inner retina in the ILM peeling (-)/SO (+) group, and the central, superior inner, inferior inner, and temporal inner retina in the ILM peeling (+)/SO (+) group showed a significantly increased reduction rate of the retinal thickness compared to the control group. Macular retinal thinning in PDR was observed after ILM peeling and SO endotamponade, and it was increased by the combination of these 2 factors. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Utilization of International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria vs. a two-step approach to screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese women with twin pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Chen, Y; Zhou, Q; Shi, H; Cheng, W W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate prevalence and pregnancy outcomes using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria and screening protocol vs. a standard two-step screening approach for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese twin pregnancies. A retrospective cohort study for pregnancies during 2007-2013 was performed in a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China. Data were abstracted from the medical records of twin pregnancies delivered at the hospital. During the period 2007-2011, this hospital used a two-step approach with a 50 g screening with a cut-off value of ≥ 7.8 mmol/l followed by a 100 g diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) utilizing Carpenter-Coustan criteria. In 2012-2013, the hospital switched to the IADPSG protocol of universal 75 g OGTT. Among 1461 twin pregnancies, 643 were screened utilizing IADPSG criteria and 818 using the two-step protocol. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed more frequently in the IADPSG group than in the two-step group [20.4% and 7.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.30-4.52]. During the IADPSG period, the incidence of pre-eclampsia was 38% lower in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies compared with the two-step period (aOR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.44-0.87). We observed no significant differences in most perinatal outcomes between the two groups. Compared with a standard two-step approach to screening and diagnosis, the IADPSG screening method resulted in a three-fold increase in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus in twin pregnancies, with a 38% lower risk of pre-eclampsia but no significant difference in most perinatal outcomes in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  7. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the

  8. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV, Mayorov AY. 8th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan I. Dedov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues! We are glad to present the 8th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2017, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2017, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012, 2015. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, SAVOR, TECOS, LEADER, EMPA-REG OUTCOME, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM in the world increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 415 million patients by the end of 2015. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 642 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2040. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution on Diabetes 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006, and in 2011 - UN Political Declaration, addressed to national health systems, calling for the establishment of multidisciplinary strategy in the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases, where special attention is drawn to the problem of diabetes as one of the leading causes of disability and mortality. Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian Federal Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.35 million patients with DM in this

  9. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes and multiple chronic conditions: A Delphi consensus of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ena, Javier; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Sánchez-Fuentes, Demetrio; Camafort-Babkowsk, Miguel; Formiga, Francesc; Michán-Doña, Alfredo; Casariego, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    To develop consensus-based recommendations for the management of chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a two round Delphi technique. Experts from the Diabetes and Obesity Working Group (DOWG) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) reviewed MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS and Cochrane Library databases up to September 2014 to gather information on organization and health care management, stratification of therapeutic targets and therapeutic approach for glucose control in chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A list of 6 recommendations was created and rated by a panel of 75 experts from the DOWG by email (first round) and by open discussion (second round). A written document was produced and sent back to DOWG experts for clarification purposes. A high degree of consensus was achieved for all recommendations summarized as 1) there is a need to redesign and test new health care programs for chronic complex patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus; 2) therapeutic targets in patients with short life expectancy should be individualized in accordance to their personal, clinical and social characteristics; 3) patients with chronic complex conditions and type 2 diabetes mellitus should be stratified by hypoglycemia risk; 4) age and specific comorbidities should guide the objectives for glucose control; 5) the risk of hypoglycemia should be a key factor when choosing a treatment; and 6) basal insulin analogs compared to human insulin are cost-effective options. The assessment and recommendations provided herein represent our best professional judgment based on current data and clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional differences in milk and complementary feeding patterns in infants participating in an international nutritional type 1 diabetes prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Anita M; Virtanen, Suvi M; Sorkio, Susa; Bärlund, Sonja; Cuthbertson, David; Uusitalo, Ulla; Lawson, Margaret L; Salonen, Marja; Berseth, Carol L; Ormisson, Anne; Lehtonen, Eveliina; Savilahti, Erkki; Becker, Dorothy J; Dupré, John; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Knip, Mikael; Åkerblom, Hans K

    2017-07-01

    Differences in breastfeeding, other milk feeding and complementary feeding patterns were evaluated in infants at increased genetic risk with and without maternal type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk is an international nutritional primary prevention double-blinded randomized trial to test whether weaning to extensively hydrolyzed vs. intact cow's milk protein formula will decrease the development of T1D-associated autoantibodies and T1D. Infant diet was prospectively assessed at two visits and seven telephone interviews between birth and 8 months. Countries were grouped into seven regions: Australia, Canada, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Central Europe I, Central Europe II and the United States. Newborn infants with a first-degree relative with T1D and increased human leukocyte antigen-conferred susceptibility to T1D were recruited. A lower proportion of infants born to mothers with than without T1D were breastfed until 6 months of age in all regions (range, 51% to 60% vs. 70% to 80%). Complementary feeding patterns differed more by region than by maternal T1D. In Northern Europe, a higher proportion of infants consumed vegetables and fruits daily compared with other regions. Consumption of meat was more frequent in all European regions, whereas cereal consumption was most frequent in Southern Europe, Canada and the United States. Maternal T1D status was associated with breastfeeding and other milk feeding patterns similarly across regions but was unrelated to the introduction of complementary foods. Infant feeding patterns differed significantly among regions and were largely inconsistent with current recommended guidelines. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of "care of the foot" as a risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration: the role of internal physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguejiofor, O C; Oli, J M; Odenigbo, C U

    2009-03-01

    Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration, including "inadequate care of the foot". This risk factor for foot ulceration has not been previously evaluated among Nigeria diabetic patients and is the objective of this study. One hundred and twenty (120) diabetic patients with and without symptoms of peripheral neuropathy receiving care at the medical outpatient department (MOPD) and the diabetic clinic of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi were recruited consecutively as they presented. They were administered structured questionnaires to assess some variables concerning care of their feet as provided to them by their physicians. Among the 120 diabetic participants, 83 (69.2%) had neuropathic symptoms (the symptomatic participants) while 37 (30.8%) were asymptomatic (the asymptomatic participants). Eighty (80; 96.4%) of the symptomatic vs 36 (97.3%) of the asymptomatic participants had never had their feet examined by their physician. Also, 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 12 (32.4%) of the asymptomatic participants had never received any form of advice on how to take special care of their feet by their physician, and 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 6 (16.2%) of the asymptomatic participants walked unshod most times in their immediate surroundings. Physicians do not provide adequate care to the feet of their diabetic patients irrespective of the presence or absence of neuropathic symptoms, making this variable a critical risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration and amputation. Continuing medical education to health care providers emphasizing adequate "care of the foot" of the diabetic patient, will reduce avoidable loss of limbs to diabetes.

  12. Causes of death in patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes receiving dialysis in Japan: Diabetes Epidemiology Research International (DERI) Mortality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Sano, Hironari; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Tajima, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the causes of death and how they changed over time in patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes who were receiving dialysis. Of the 1384 patients who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes atdeath trends were expressed according to the duration of dialysis. The leading causes of death were end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (36.3%), cardiovascular disease (CVD) (31.9%), and infections (20.3%). Among CVD, cerebral hemorrhage was the most frequent (38.9%) and showed a significant trend for an increase in the duration of dialysis (P=0.01, the Cochran-Armitage trend test). The mortality from ESRD concentrated within 5 years of dialysis and that from CVD increased after 10 years of dialysis, while the mortality from infections peaked during 5 to 10 years from initiation of dialysis. The leading causes of death in dialysis patients with type 1 diabetes were ESRD, CVD, and infections. As the duration of dialysis increased, however, CVD contributed more to mortality. Special attention should be paid to CVD, particularly cerebral hemorrhage, to improve the long-term prognosis of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: International Insights From the TECOS Trial (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagidipati, Neha J; Navar, Ann Marie; Pieper, Karen S; Green, Jennifer B; Bethel, M Angelyn; Armstrong, Paul W; Josse, Robert G; McGuire, Darren K; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Cornel, Jan H; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Strandberg, Timo E; Delibasi, Tuncay; Holman, Rury R; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-09-26

    Intensive risk factor modification significantly improves outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, the degree to which secondary prevention treatment goals are achieved in international clinical practice is unknown. Attainment of 5 secondary prevention parameters-aspirin use, lipid control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol diabetes mellitus and known cardiovascular disease at entry into TECOS (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between individual and regional factors and secondary prevention achievement at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline secondary prevention achievement and cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Overall, 29.9% of patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease achieved all 5 secondary prevention parameters at baseline, although 71.8% achieved at least 4 parameters. North America had the highest proportion (41.2%), whereas Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Latin America had proportions of ≈25%. Individually, blood pressure control (57.9%) had the lowest overall attainment, whereas nonsmoking status had the highest (89%). Over a median 3.0 years of follow-up, a higher baseline secondary prevention score was associated with improved outcomes in a step-wise graded relationship (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.77 for those patients achieving all 5 measures versus those achieving ≤2). In an international trial population, significant opportunities exist to improve the quality of cardiovascular secondary prevention care among patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which in turn could lead to reduced risk of downstream cardiovascular events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00790205. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Bone and Joint Problems Associated with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone metabolism (diabetic osteodystrophy): Time for recognition. Osteoporosis International. 2016;27:1931. Hull B, et al. Diabetes and bone. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 2016;351:356. What people with diabetes need ...

  15. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Darwish, Sarah; Al-Hamaq, Abdulla O A; Yousafzai, Mohammad T; Nasralla, Eman A

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. A cross-sectional study. Primary healthcare (PHC) centers. The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71%) gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009). The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005), mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008), maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055), and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010) were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the counterpart. The proportion of consanguineous marriages was almost two times higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (80.9% vs. 41.9%; P Family history of MetS among parents, maternal aunt, maternal grandfather, and consanguineous marriages among patients of MetS are significantly associated with the development of T2DM in Qatar. These results support the necessity of earlier screening for T2DM among MetS patients with positive family history of MetS.

  16. [Multicenter international registry to evaluate the clinical practice delivered to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a sub-analysis of the experience in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghänel Salmón, Guillermo; Sánchez-Reyes, Leticia; Chiquete Anaya, Erwin; de la Luz Castro, Julieta; Escalante Herrera, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the characteristics of the medical attention delivered to Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our aim was to describe the current state on the medical management of T2D in Mexico. Among 17,232 patients included in the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS), 2,620 (15%) corresponded to Mexico. Information regarding clinical, demographics and management characteristics, as well as the impact of T2D in the patient is clinical and social condition was registered. The metabolic control and achievement of therapeutic goals were also analyzed. Diagnosis of T2D was performed by the general practitioner in 76% of cases. Only about a quarter of the cohort had a blood pressure goal of diabetes. The managing physician is personal impression about the quality of the metabolic control was not in accordance with HbA1c. Eight percent of patients had work absences in the last 3 months due to complications of T2D (mean of 15 days lost). In Mexico, quality of metabolic control of T2D patients could have important deficiencies. The personal impression of the physician on the patient is metabolic control is not consistent with objective data.

  17. Combined circular external fixation and open reduction internal fixation with pro-syndesmotic screws for repair of a diabetic ankle fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharia Facaros

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of ankle fractures among the diabetic population is associated with higher complication rates compared to the general population. Efforts toward development of better methods in prevention and treatment are continuously evolving for these injuries. The presence of peripheral neuropathy and the possible development of Charcot neuroarthropathy in this high risk patient population have stimulated much surgical interest to create more stable osseous constructs when open reduction of an ankle fracture/dislocation is required. The utilization of multiple syndesmotic screws (pro-syndesmotic screws to further stabilize the ankle mortise has been reported by many foot and ankle surgeons. In addition, transarticular Steinmann pins have been described as an adjunct to traditional open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF of the ankle to better stabilize the talus, thus minimizing risk of further displacement, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. The authors present a unique technique of ORIF with pro-syndesmotic screws and the application of a multi-plane circular external fixator for management of a neglected diabetic ankle fracture that prevented further deformity while allowing a weight-bearing status. This technique may be utilized for the management of complex diabetic ankle fractures that are prone to future complications and possible limb loss.

  18. [Effect of internal limiting membrane peeling on morpho-functional state of the retina in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (preliminary report)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbov, M M; Fayzrakhmanov, R R; Kalanov, M R

    2018-01-01

    To compare morpho-functional parameters of retina during vitrectomy with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The study included 55 patients (55 eyes) that had underwent vitreoretinal surgery in the setting of antivasoproliferative therapy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Patients of the 1 st group (n=27) underwent vitrectomy with silicone tamponade, 2 nd group (n=28) received similar treatment with the addition of ILM peeling. Three months after the treatment, all patients had silicone oil removed. Best Corrected Visual Acuity before treatment was 0.06±0.02 in both groups; after the treatment it improved to 0.1±0.05 (ppeeling during vitrectomy with following silicone oil tamponade eliminates the risk of ERM formation in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in the follow-up period of up to 6-month and results in better morpho-functional parameters in comparison with patients who received similar treatment but without peeling.

  19. The present state of the diabetic clinic in the first department of internal medicine of Niigata University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yasuro; Suzuki, Katsunori

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic complications in Niigata University were reported. Of all patients, 23.6% were treated by diabetic therapy alone, 37.8% were administered with SU drug and, in addition, about 50% were treated by a glucosidase inhibitor (αGI) or troglitazone. Insulin was used in 26.2% of the patients. Patients with NIDDM in whom the onset of simple retinopathy could be specified, were divided into 2 groups; Group S, with simple retinopathy without progression and Group P, with progression to preproliferative or proliferative retinopathy. Between the 2 groups, there were significant differences in the period of suffering from simple retinopathy, HbA1c and TC b. The association of the retinopathy with the short period would mean that HbA1c and TC were poorly controlled in these patients. In attention to silent myocardial ischemia and significance of cerebral blood flow scintigraphy, there was no significant difference regarding the presence or absence of angina pain or incidence of abnormal findings of scintigraphy or coronary angiography. It was difficult to predict the presence of silent myocardial ischemia from the presence or absence of diabetic neuropathy. Cerebral blood flow scintigraphy was performed in 37 diabetic patients, 25 patients were allocated to a group having uneven distribution of RI which never detected normally and an ununiform drop of peripheral blood flow (Micro group) and 12 cases without these findings to another group (Non-micro group). In the Micro group, HbA1c was significantly higher and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was also higher. αGI was used to improve postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM. It was more effective when being used concomitantly with a SU agent although the effect tended to decrease relatively in the cases of long term use. Improvement was observed in 90% of the patients which showed BMI of 24.2 or above. (K.H.)

  20. The present state of the diabetic clinic in the first department of internal medicine of Niigata University Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yasuro; Suzuki, Katsunori [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-10-01

    The treatment of diabetic complications in Niigata University were reported. Of all patients, 23.6% were treated by diabetic therapy alone, 37.8% were administered with SU drug and, in addition, about 50% were treated by a glucosidase inhibitor ({alpha}GI) or troglitazone. Insulin was used in 26.2% of the patients. Patients with NIDDM in whom the onset of simple retinopathy could be specified, were divided into 2 groups; Group S, with simple retinopathy without progression and Group P, with progression to preproliferative or proliferative retinopathy. Between the 2 groups, there were significant differences in the period of suffering from simple retinopathy, HbA1c and TC b. The association of the retinopathy with the short period would mean that HbA1c and TC were poorly controlled in these patients. In attention to silent myocardial ischemia and significance of cerebral blood flow scintigraphy, there was no significant difference regarding the presence or absence of angina pain or incidence of abnormal findings of scintigraphy or coronary angiography. It was difficult to predict the presence of silent myocardial ischemia from the presence or absence of diabetic neuropathy. Cerebral blood flow scintigraphy was performed in 37 diabetic patients, 25 patients were allocated to a group having uneven distribution of RI which never detected normally and an ununiform drop of peripheral blood flow (Micro group) and 12 cases without these findings to another group (Non-micro group). In the Micro group, HbA1c was significantly higher and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was also higher. {alpha}GI was used to improve postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM. It was more effective when being used concomitantly with a SU agent although the effect tended to decrease relatively in the cases of long term use. Improvement was observed in 90% of the patients which showed BMI of 24.2 or above. (K.H.)

  1. Optimal cut-off values for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pre-diabetes screening: Developments in research and prospects for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi; Li, Xueqin; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be increasing rapidly, threatening to reduce life expectancy for humans around the globe. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has estimated that there will be 642 million people living with the disease by 2040 and half as many again who will be not diagnosed. This means that pre-DM screening is a critical issue. Insulin resistance (IR) has emerged as a major pathophysiological factor in the development and progression of DM since it is evident in susceptible individuals at the early stages of DM, and particularly type 2 DM (T2DM). Therefore, assessment of IR via the homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) is a key index for the primary prevention of DM and is thus found in guidelines for screening of high-risk groups. However, the cut-off values of HOMA-IR differ for different races, ages, genders, diseases, complications, etc. due to the complexity of IR. This hampers the determination of specific cut-off values of HOMA-IR in different places and in different situations. China has not published an official index to gauge IR for primary prevention of T2DM in the diabetic and non-diabetic population except for children and adolescents ages 6-12 years. Hence, this article summarizes developments in research on IR, HOMA-IR, and pre-DM screening in order to provide a reference for optimal cut-off values of HOMA-IR for the diagnosis of DM in the Chinese population.

  2. NEW IN THE TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major medical and social problem almost in all countries of the world. Currently, there are more and more various pharmacological agents that make management of the glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes extremely difficult. Therefore, when the physician is faced with the choice of glucose-lowering therapy, he should be clearly aware of all the options in contemporary treatment. 11 groups of hypoglycemic agents are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes The biguanides. According to modern concepts, biguanides inhibit the oxidation of glucose by stimulating anaerobic glycolysis. Both in the consensus of ADA / EASD, and in the IDF recommendations metformin may be the drug of the choice for hypoglycemic therapy of diabetes type 2. Sulfonylurea derivatives: glibenclamide, glimepiride, gliquidone, Glipizide. They belong to a group of secretagogues, as their action is based on the ability to stimulate the secretion of insulin by ß-cells of the pancreas. Prandial glucose regulators. Meglitinides (repaglinide and nateglinide stimulate insulin secretion by ß-cells. Due to the rapid normalization of stimulated insulin level after taking the drugs the risk of hypoglycaemia between meals is minimized. Insulin sensitayzers. Thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, pioglitazone reduce insulin resistance of peripheral tissues by binding to receptors, activating peroxisome proliferation (PPARg in the nuclear membrane. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose, miglitol, voglibose competitively inhibits intestinal enzymes (α-glucosidase. It consequently slows carbohydrate absorption from foods and supply of glucose into the blood. Incretin mimetics. Analogues of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulate the biosynthesis and secretion of insulin, regulate food consumption, support ß-cells in a healthy state, suppress glucagon secretion, depending on the glucose levels, affect the rate of gastric emptying, stimulat proliferation of

  3. Cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: comparison of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts versus UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Herath M Meththananda; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Umesha, Dilini

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, and assessment of their cardiac risk is important for preventive strategies. The Ministry of Health of Sri Lanka has recommended World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts for cardiac risk assessment in individuals with T2DM. However, the most suitable cardiac risk assessment tool for Sri Lankans with T2DM has not been studied. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of two cardiac risk assessments tools; WHO/ISH charts and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine. Cardiac risk assessments were done in 2,432 patients with T2DM attending a diabetes clinic in Southern Sri Lanka using the two risk assessment tools. Validity of two assessment tools was further assessed by their ability to recognize individuals with raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and raised diastolic blood pressure in a cohort of newly diagnosed T2DM patients (n=332). WHO/ISH charts identified 78.4% of subjects as low cardiac risk whereas the UKPDS risk engine categorized 52.3% as low cardiac risk (Pengine identified higher proportions of patients (28%) compared to WHO/ISH charts (7%). Approximately 6% of subjects were classified as low cardiac risk (20%. Agreement between the two tools was poor (κ value =0.144, Pengine. Risk assessment by both assessment tools demonstrated poor sensitivity in identifying those with treatable levels of LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure.

  4. Frecuencia de síndrome metabólico en adultos mayores del Distrito de San Martin de Porres de Lima, Perú según los criterios de ATP III y de la IDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Aliaga

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la frecuencia del Síndrome metabólico en los adultos mayores de la comunidad del distrito de San Martín de Porres de Lima, Perú. Material y métodos: Estudio descriptivo de análisis secundario de base de datos del estudio “Perfil Clínico del Adulto Mayor que habita en la comunidad de San Martín de Porres”, el cual se realizó por muestreo probabilístico entre los meses de febrero y mayo de 2013. Resultados: Se incluyeron a 312 adultos mayores. La frecuencia del síndrome metabólico según los criterios ATP III fue 28,2%, y según los criterios de la IDF 35,3%, siendo más frecuente en mujeres que en varones. La frecuencia de obesidad según el índice de masa corporal fue 19,2%, y la frecuencia de obesidad abdominal según los criterios del ATP III fue 65,4%, siendo mayor en mujeres, mientras que según los criterios de la IDF fueron 32,1% y 59,3% en hombres y mujeres, respectivamente. Conclusiones: La frecuencia del síndrome metabólico en la población adulta mayor es alta, obteniéndose cifras mayores usando los criterios de la IDF en comparación con ATP III, presentándose con mayor frecuencia en mujeres.

  5. Protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis of prognostic factors of foot ulceration in people with diabetes: the international research collaboration for the prediction of diabetic foot ulcerations (PODUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Fay; Anandan, Chantelle; Chappell, Francesca M; Murray, Gordon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Sheikh, Aziz; Simpson, Colin R; Maxwell, Martin; Stansby, Gerard P; Young, Matthew J; Abbott, Caroline A; Boulton, Andrew J M; Boyko, Edward J; Kastenbauer, Thomas; Leese, Graham P; Monami, Matteo; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Rith-Najarian, Stephen J; Veves, Aristidis; Coates, Nikki; Jeffcoate, William J; Leech, Nicola; Fahey, Tom; Tierney, Jayne

    2013-02-15

    multi-level mixed model, using "study" as one of the levels. Such a model can also allow for the within-patient clustering that occurs if a patient contributes data from both feet, although to aid interpretation, we prefer to use patients rather than feet as the unit of analysis. We intend to only attempt this analysis if the results of the investigation of heterogeneity do not rule it out and the model diagnostics are acceptable. This review is central to the development of a global evidence-based strategy for the risk assessment of the foot in patients with diabetes, ensuring future recommendations are valid and can reliably inform international clinical guidelines.

  6. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  7. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome One Year after Delivery in Finnish Women at Increased Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatta Puhkala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome (MeS after delivery. We studied the prevalence of MeS at one year postpartum among Finnish women who in early pregnancy were at increased risk of developing GDM. Methods. This follow-up study is a part of a GDM prevention trial. At one year postpartum, 150 women (mean age 33.1 years, BMI 27.2 kg/m2 were evaluated for MeS. Results. The prevalence of MeS was 18% according tothe International Diabetes Federation(IDF criteria and 16% according toNational Cholestrol Education Program(NCEP criteria. Of MeS components, 74% of participants had an increased waist circumference (≥80 cm. Twenty-seven percent had elevated fasting plasma glucose (≥5.6 mmol/L, and 29% had reduced HDL cholesterol (≤1.3 mmol/L. The odds ratio for the occurrence of MeS at one year postpartum was 3.0 (95% CI 1.0–9.2 in those who were overweight before pregnancy compared to normal weight women. Conclusions. Nearly one-fifth of the women with an increased risk of GDM in early pregnancy fulfilled the criteria of MeS at one year postpartum. The most important factor associated with MeS was prepregnancy overweight. Weight management before and during pregnancy is important for preventing MeS after delivery.

  8. Similar Outcomes in Diabetes Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting With Single Internal Thoracic Artery Plus Radial Artery Grafting and Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Sajjad; Blackstone, Eugene H; Houghtaling, Penny L; Koprivanac, Marijan; Ravichandren, Kirthi; Javadikasgari, Hoda; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Svensson, Lars G; Sabik, Joseph F

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine in patients with diabetes mellitus whether single internal thoracic artery (SITA) plus radial artery (RA) grafting yields outcomes similar to those of bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting. From January 1994 to January 2011, 1,325 diabetic patients underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery with either (1) SITA plus RA with or without saphenous vein (SV) grafts (n = 965) or (2) BITA with or without SV grafts (n = 360); an internal thoracic artery was used in all patients to graft the left anterior descending coronary artery. Endpoints were in-hospital outcomes and time-related mortality. Median follow-up was 7.4 years, with a total follow-up of 9,162 patient-years. Propensity score matching was performed to identify 282 well-matched pairs for adjusted comparisons. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was 0.52% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafts and 0.28% for BITA with or without SV grafts, and prevalence of deep sternal wound infection was 3.2% and 1.7%, respectively. Unadjusted survival at 1, 5, 10, and 14 years was 97%, 88%, 68%, and 51% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafts, and 97%, 95%, 80%, and 66% for BITA with or without SV grafts, respectively. Among propensity-matched patients, in-hospital mortality (0.35% versus 0.35%) and prevalence of deep sternal wound infection (1.4% versus 1.4%) were similar (p > 0.9) in the two groups, as was 1-, 5-, 10-, and 14-year survival: 97%, 90%, 70%, and 58% for SITA plus RA with or without SV grafting versus 97%, 93%, 79%, and 64% for BITA with or without SV grafting, respectively (early p = 0.8, late p = 0.2). For diabetic patients, SITA plus RA with or without SV grafting and BITA with or without SV grafting yield similar in-hospital outcomes and long-term survival after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Therefore, both SITA plus RA and BITA plus SV grafting should be considered for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society

  9. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among People with Type 2 Diabetes in the Ho Municipality, Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Osei-Yeboah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cooccurrence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome potentiates the cardiovascular risk associated with each of the conditions; therefore characterizing metabolic syndrome among people with type 2 diabetes is beneficial for the purpose of cardiovascular disease prevention. This study aims at evaluating the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among 162 patients with type 2 diabetes attending the diabetic clinic of the Ho Municipal Hospital, Ghana. Data obtained included anthropometric indices, blood pressure, serum lipids, glucose, and sociodemographics and clinical information. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome among the study population was 43.83%, 63.58%, and 69.14% using the NCEP-ATP III, the WHO, and the IDF criteria, respectively. The most predominant component among the study population was high blood pressure using the NCEP-ATP III (108 (66.67% and WHO (102 (62.96 criteria and abdominal obesity (112 (69.14% for IDF criteria. High blood pressure was the most prevalent component among the males while abdominal obesity was the principal component among the females. In this population with type 2 diabetes, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome exists. Gender vulnerability to metabolic syndrome and multiple cluster components were skewed towards the female subpopulation with type 2 diabetes.

  10. The Concordance and Heritability of Type 2 Diabetes in 34,166 Twin Pairs From International Twin Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemsen, G.; Ward, K. J.; Bell, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    studies worldwide need to pool their resources. The Discordant Twin (DISCOTWIN) consortium was established for this goal. Here, we describe the DISCOTWIN Consortium and present an analysis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) data in nearly 35,000 twin pairs. Seven twin cohorts from Europe (Denmark, Finland, Norway...... and medication use, fasting glucose and insulin measures, or medical records. The prevalence of T2D ranged from 2.6% to 12.3% across the cohorts depending on age, body mass index (BMI), and national diabetes prevalence. T2D discordance rate was lower for MZ (5.1%, range 2.9-11.2%) than for same-sex dizygotic (DZ......, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom) and one from Australia investigated the rate of discordance for T2D in same-sex twin pairs aged 45 years and older. Data were available for 34,166 same-sex twin pairs, of which 13,970 were MZ, with T2D diagnosis based on self-reported diagnosis...

  11. Frecuencia y caracterización del síndrome metabólico según criterios de la Federación Internacional de Diabetes en familiares de primer grado de personas con diabetes tipo 1 Frequency and characterization of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the International Federation of Diabetes in first degree relatives of persons with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Parlá Sardiñas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el síndrome metabólico se ha definido como la asociación de varios factores precursores de enfermedad cardiovascular y de diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Objetivo: determinar la frecuencia de síndrome metabólico, según los criterios de la Federación Internacional de Diabetes en familiares de primer grado de diabéticos tipo 1. Métodos: se seleccionaron 96 adultos y 97 adolescentes, se les aplicó un cuestionario, y se les realizó un examen físico general. Además, se les realizaron determinaciones en ayunas de glucosa, insulina, colesterol, triglicéridos y HDL colesterol, y se calculó el índice de resistencia a la insulina. Resultados: la frecuencia del síndrome metabólico fue mayor en los adultos 17,7 % (17/96 que en los adolescentes 3,09 % (3/97, y la resistencia a la insulina en los adultos fue similar en los sujetos con y sin síndrome metabólico. La historia familiar de enfermedad cardiovascular, diabetes mellitus tipo 2, obesidad, dislipidemia e hipertensión arterial no está asociada con la presencia del síndrome metabólico en los familiares de primer grado de diabéticos tipo 1. Conclusiones: el síndrome metabólico, según los criterios de la Federación Internacional de Diabetes, es más frecuente en los adultos que en los adolescentes familiares de primer grado de diabéticos tipo 1, y la resistencia a la insulina en estos sujetos no está exclusivamente asociada al síndrome metabólico.Introduction: the metabolic syndrome is defined as the association of some factors causing cardiovascular disease and of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective: to determine the frequency of the metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the International Federation of Diabetes in first degree relatives of persons with type 1diabetes. Methods: ninety six adults and 97 adolescents were selected to apply a questionnaire and a general physical examination. Also, assessment of fast glucose, insulin, cholesterol

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information for Patients Page Last Updated: 02/16/2018 Note: If ... FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's ... Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education ...

  14. Harmonizing the metabolic syndrome: a joint interim statement of the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; American Heart Association; World Heart Federation; International Atherosclerosis Society; and International Association for the Study of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, K G M M; Eckel, Robert H; Grundy, Scott M; Zimmet, Paul Z; Cleeman, James I; Donato, Karen A; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; James, W Philip T; Loria, Catherine M; Smith, Sidney C

    2009-10-20

    A cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occur together more often than by chance alone, have become known as the metabolic syndrome. The risk factors include raised blood pressure, dyslipidemia (raised triglycerides and lowered high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), raised fasting glucose, and central obesity. Various diagnostic criteria have been proposed by different organizations over the past decade. Most recently, these have come from the International Diabetes Federation and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The main difference concerns the measure for central obesity, with this being an obligatory component in the International Diabetes Federation definition, lower than in the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria, and ethnic specific. The present article represents the outcome of a meeting between several major organizations in an attempt to unify criteria. It was agreed that there should not be an obligatory component, but that waist measurement would continue to be a useful preliminary screening tool. Three abnormal findings out of 5 would qualify a person for the metabolic syndrome. A single set of cut points would be used for all components except waist circumference, for which further work is required. In the interim, national or regional cut points for waist circumference can be used.

  15. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but can return later in life How are MODY and neonatal diabetes diagnosed? Because monogenic diabetes is rare, this diagnosis ... type 1 or type 2 diabetes and identify MODY or neonatal diabetes. Blood tests Blood tests of glucose levels, and ...

  16. Van jaarcontrole naar jaargesprek : Zorg op maat voor mensen met diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Guy E H M; Van Vugt, Heidi A.; De Weerdt, Inge; Lamberts, Steven W J; De Koning, Eelco J P

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes care is shifting from disease management to personalised care. Internationally, diabetes care providers are advised to integrate the patient's preferences, wishes and possibilities into diabetes care in order to improve its efficiency. The Dutch Diabetes Federation has developed a

  17. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  18. Secondary hyperparathyroidism prevalence and profile, between diabetic and non-diabetic patients with stage 3 to 4 chronic kidney disease attended in internal medicine wards. MiPTH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos; Carretero-Gómez, Juana; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Maciá-Botejara, Enrique; Ramiro-Lozano, José Manuel; Masero-Carretero, Antonio; Robles, Nicolás Roberto; Bureo-Dacal, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPTH) is a leading cause of renal osteodystrophy, and an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim is to establish differences in prevalence and profile of SHPTH, regarding diabetics or non-diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional multicenter study which included patients with stages 3 to 4 CKD. SHPTH was considered when the intact PTH levels (iPTH) were equal or higher than 70pg/ml. We divided the sample into two groups (diabetics and non-diabetics). We used robust statistical methods. 409 patients (214 diabetics) were studied. HPTH was found in 60.4% of diabetics vs 65% of non-diabetics (P=0.42). Diabetics with HPTH were younger (79.5 vs 82.3 years-old, P=0.005), and had more hypertension (P=0.0014), dyslipidemia (P=0.0001) and comorbidities. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant relationship in case of diabetics, with age (OR: 1.04, 95%CI 1.005-1.09 P=0.02 ), and with statins treatment (OR 2.3, 95%CI 1.17-4.54, P=0.01). The prevalence of SHPTH between the groups was similar, however, diabetics had more presence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and SHPTH in this case was also related with moderate microalbuminuria and lower levels of vitamin D. An association with statins was also found in this group. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interpreting the results of the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test: accounting for false-positive answers in the international consensus on the diabetic foot protocol by a new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Robert A; Koren, Shlomit; Ramot, Yoram; Buchs, Andreas; Rapoport, Micha J

    2014-01-01

    The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament is the most widely used test to diagnose the loss of protective sensation. The commonly used protocol of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot includes a 'sham' application that allows for false-positive answers. We sought to study the heretofore unexamined significance of false-positive answers. Forty-five patients with diabetes and a history of pedal ulceration (Group I) and 81 patients with diabetes but no history of ulceration (Group II) were studied. The three original sites of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot at the hallux, 1st metatarsal and 5th metatarsal areas were used. At each location, the test was performed three times: 2 actual and 1 "sham" applications. Scores were graded from 0 to 3 based upon correct responses. Determination of loss of protective sensation was performed with and without calculating a false-positive answer as a minus 1 score. False-positive responses were found in a significant percentage of patients with and without history of ulceration. Introducing false-positive results as minus 1 into the test outcome significantly increased the number of patients diagnosed with loss of protective sensation in both groups. False-positive answers can significantly affect Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test results and the diagnosis of LOPS. A model that accounts for false-positive answers is offered. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Depression, anxiety and self-care behaviours of young adults with Type 2 diabetes : Results from the International Diabetes Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success (MILES) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, J. L.; Nefs, G.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Young adults with Type 2 diabetes have higher physical morbidity and mortality than other diabetes sub-groups, but differences in psychosocial outcomes have not yet been investigated. We sought to compare depression and anxiety symptoms and self-care behaviours of young adults with Type 2

  1. Dietary Patterns and Their Associations with the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) in Korean Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yuri

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine dietary pattern, nutritional intake, and diet quality of Korean pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Between October 2008 and May 2012, 166 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM completed a questionnaire and dietary intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations were measured and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Two major dietary patterns ("carbohydrate and vegetable" and "western" patterns) were identified through factor analysis. Dietary pattern scores for each dietary pattern were categorized into tertiles. The dietary quality index-international (DQI-I) was used to measure overall diet quality. Subjects with higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores reported less physical activity (p pattern scores were associated with higher sodium intakes (p = 0.02), but lower intakes of fat (p = 0.002) and other micronutrients. On the other hand, higher western pattern scores were associated with higher fat intake (p = 0.0001), but lower intakes of sodium (p = 0.01) and other micronutrients. Higher scores for both dietary patterns were associated with lower scores in the moderation category of the DQI-I (p dietary pattern.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Peru is an upper medium-income developing country with an increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, including diabetes. To review and describe the epidemiology, drivers, and diabetes care plan in Peru. The medical literature was reviewed based on systematic searching of PubMed, Scielo, and various gray literature from the International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organization, and local Peruvian agencies. In Peru, diabetes affects 7% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 96.8% of outpatients visits with this condition. Type 1 diabetes has an incidence of 0.4/100,000 per year, and gestational diabetes affects 16% of pregnancies. The prevalence of glucose intolerance is 8.11% and that of impaired fasting glucose 22.4%. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adults is 34.7%, 17.5%, and 25%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is greater in women and the elderly and at urban and low-altitude locations. Diabetes is the eighth cause of death, the sixth cause of blindness, and the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease and nontraumatic lower limb amputation. In Peru, diabetes accounts for 31.5% of acute myocardial infarctions and 25% of strokes. Infections, diabetic emergencies, and cardiovascular disorders are the main causes for admissions, with a mortality rate Diabetes is a major health care issue in Peru that exposes difficult challenges and shortcomings. The national strategy for tackling diabetes includes promotion of healthy lifestyles; training primary care physicians and providing them with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, safe and effective medications, and tools for monitoring treatment; and, finally, construction of a comprehensive health care network for early referral in order to prevent, detect, and treat diabetic complications. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetic Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic hypoglycemia Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin ... your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of ...

  4. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaigns Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Diabetic Emergencies Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  5. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  6. Diabetic status and the relation of the three domains of glycemic control to mortality in critically ill patients: an international multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsley, James S; Egi, Moritoki; Kiss, Alex; Devendra, Amin N; Schuetz, Philipp; Maurer, Paula M; Schultz, Marcus J; van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T M; Kiyoshi, Morita; Mackenzie, Iain M J; Annane, Djillali; Stow, Peter; Nasraway, Stanley A; Holewinski, Sharon; Holzinger, Ulrike; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2013-03-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability have each been independently associated with increased risk of mortality in critically ill patients. The role of diabetic status on modulating the relation of these three domains of glycemic control with mortality remains uncertain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how diabetic status affects the relation of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability with the risk of mortality in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data involving 44,964 patients admitted to 23 intensive care units (ICUs) from nine countries, between February 2001 and May 2012. We analyzed mean blood glucose concentration (BG), coefficient of variation (CV), and minimal BG and created multivariable models to analyze their independent association with mortality. Patients were stratified according to the diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients without diabetes, mean BG bands between 80 and 140 mg/dl were independently associated with decreased risk of mortality, and mean BG bands>or=140 mg/dl, with increased risk of mortality. Among patients with diabetes, mean BG from 80 to 110 mg/dl was associated with increased risk of mortality and mean BG from 110 to 180 mg/dl with decreased risk of mortality. An effect of center was noted on the relation between mean BG and mortality. Hypoglycemia, defined as minimum BGor=20%, was independently associated with increased risk of mortality only among patients without diabetes. Derangements of more than one domain of glycemic control had a cumulative association with mortality, especially for patients without diabetes. Although hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability is each independently associated with mortality in critically ill patients, diabetic status modulates these relations in clinically important ways. Our findings suggest that patients with diabetes may benefit from higher glucose

  7. Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Bot, Mariska; Browne, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, a more thorough understanding of the psychosocial aspects of living with this condition has become an important health care priority. While our knowledge has grown substantially over the past two decades with respect...... to the physical, emotional and social difficulties that people with diabetes may encounter, many important issues remain to be elucidated. Under the umbrella of the Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Study International Collaborative, Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands aims...... to examine how Dutch adults with diabetes manage their condition and how it affects their lives. Topics of special interest in Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands include subtypes of depression, Type D personality, mindfulness, sleep and sexual functioning. METHODS/DESIGN: Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands...

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-06-06

    Jun 6, 2009 ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and related engineering fields). ... International Journal of Health Research, June 2009; 2(2): 195-199 (e2213p91-95) ... were measured in the diabetic and non-diabetic rats. .... People with Type 2 diabetes are at.

  9. diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban Falahati

    2016-09-01

    candiduria and female gender, high FBS and urine glucose, uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c ≥8, and acidic urine pH (P<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the high incidence rate of candiduria in diabetic patients, control of diabetes, predisposing factors, and causal relationships between diabetes and candiduria should be highlighted.

  10. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy may have rapid onset or worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms and Detection What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and ... with diabetes protect their vision? Vision lost to diabetic retinopathy is ... However, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness ...

  11. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents from Mérida city, Venezuela: Comparison of results using local and international reference values (CREDEFAR study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos Reyes, Marjorie; Mederico, Maracelly; Paoli de Valeri, Mariela; Briceño, Yajaira; Zerpa, Yajaira; Gómez-Pérez, Roald; Camacho, Nolis; Martínez, José Luis; Valeri, Lenín; Arata-Bellabarba, Gabriela

    2014-11-01

    To obtain local reference values for blood lipids and blood pressure (BP), and to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in children and adolescents from Mérida, Venezuela, and to compare results using local and international cut-off values. The study enrolled 916 participants of both sexes aged 9-18 years of age from educational institutions. Demographic, anthropometric, and BP data were collected. Fasting blood glucose and lipid profile were measured. Percentile distribution of lipid and BP values was done by age group and sex. Prevalence of MS was estimated based on the NCEP-ATPIII classification (as modified by Cook et al.) and the classification of the International Diabetes Federation, using percentiles of Mérida and the USA as cut-off points. Agreement between both classifications was estimated using the kappa test (κ). Prevalence of MS was 2.2% by Cook-Merida percentiles, as compared to 1.8% by Cook-USA percentiles, a moderate agreement (κ=0.54). Agreement between Cook et al. and IDF using Merida percentiles was weak (κ=0.28). There was a higher frequency of abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension, and a lower frequency of low HDL-C using Mérida percentiles. The risk (odds ratio) of having MS is greater if abdominal obesity exists (OR: 98.63, CI: 22.45-433.35, p=0.0001). MS was significantly more common in obese subjects (18.3%, p=0.0001). Prevalence of MS in this sample of children and adolescents was 2.2%. Lipid and BP values were lower in Venezuelan as compared to US, European, and Asian children and adolescents, and similar to those in Latin-American references. Own reference values are required for accurate diagnosis of MS, as well as a worldwide consensus on its diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic Foot Australia guideline on footwear for people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Lazzarini, Peter A.; Armstrong, David G.; Bus, Sicco A.; Fitridge, Robert; Harding, Keith; Kinnear, Ewan; Malone, Matthew; Menz, Hylton B.; Perrin, Byron M.; Postema, Klaas; Prentice, Jenny; Schott, Karl-Heinz; Wraight, Paul R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The aim of this paper was to create an updated Australian guideline on footwear for people with diabetes. Methods: We reviewed new footwear publications, (international guidelines, and consensus expert opinion alongside the 2013 Australian footwear guideline to formulate updated

  13. An International, Multicenter, Observational Survey to Evaluate Diabetes Control in Subjects using Insulin for the Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic: Study Protocol for a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Urbanová, J.; Brabec, Marek; Křivská, B.; Doničová, V.; Štěpánová, R.; Martinka, M.; Kvapil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, 9 June (2016), s. 13-20 ISSN 1179-1519 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : insulin therapy * glycemic control * HbA1c * hypoglycemia * education * diabetes regimen adherence Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  14. The Charcot Foot in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykberg, Robert G.; Armstrong, David G.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Edmonds, Michael; Van, Georges Ha; Hartemann, Agnes; Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Jirkovska, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Morbach, Stephan; Morrison, William B.; Pinzur, Michael; Pitocco, Dario; Sanders, Lee; Wukich, Dane K.; Uccioli, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity. PMID:21868781

  15. Evaluation of total dietary fiber concentration and composition of commercial diets used for management of diabetes mellitus, obesity, and dietary fat-responsive disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcas, Amy K; Larsen, Jennifer A; Owens, Tammy J; Nelson, Richard W; Kass, Philip H; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2015-09-01

    To determine total dietary fiber (TDF) concentration and composition of commercial diets used for management of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dietary fat-responsive disease in dogs. Cross-sectional study. Dry (n = 11) and canned (8) canine therapeutic diets. Insoluble and soluble dietary fiber (IDF and SDF), high-molecular-weight SDF (HMWSDF), and low-molecular-weight SDF (LMWSDF) concentrations were determined. Variables were compared among diets categorized by product guide indication, formulation (dry vs canned), and regulatory criteria for light and low-fat diets. SDF (HMWSDF and LMWSDF) comprised a median of 30.4% (range, 9.4% to 53.7%) of TDF; LMWSDF contributed a median of 11.5% (range, 2.7% to 33.8%) of TDF. Diets for diabetes management had higher concentrations of IDF and TDF with lower proportions of SDF and LMWSDF contributing to TDF, compared with diets for treatment of fat-responsive disease. Fiber concentrations varied within diet categories and between canned and dry versions of the same diet (same name and manufacturer) for all pairs evaluated. Diets classified as light contained higher TDF and IDF concentrations than did non-light diets. All canned diets were classified as low fat, despite providing up to 38% of calories as fat. Diets provided a range of TDF concentrations and compositions; veterinarians should request TDF data from manufacturers, if not otherwise available. Consistent responses to dry and canned versions of the same diet cannot necessarily be expected, and diets with the same indications may not perform similarly. Many diets may not provide adequate fat restriction for treatment of dietary fat-responsive disease.

  16. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Primary healthcare (PHC centers. Materials and Methods: The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71% gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results: Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P < 0.0001. The mean age of MetS patients with T2DM was significantly higher than those without T2DM (Mean 48 ± 9.9 vs. 42.5 ± 9.2; P < 0.001. The proportion of females was higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (61% vs. 51%; P = 0.053. In addition, there were significant differences between MetS patients with and without DM in terms of co-morbidities of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and high cholesterol. The proportion of MetS patients with positive family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009. The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005, mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008, maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055, and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010 were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the

  17. A cross-sectional international survey of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in 377 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 10 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danne, T; Battelino, T; Kordonouri, O; Hanas, R; Klinkert, C; Ludvigsson, J; Barrio, R; Aebi, C; Gschwend, S; Mullis, PE; Schumacher, U; Zumsteg, U; Morandi, A; Rabbone, [No Value; Cherubini, [No Value; Toni, S; de Beaufort, C; Hindmarsh, P; Sumner, A; van Waarde, WM; van den Berg, N; Phillip, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical data from children and adolescents in different pediatric diabetes centers from Europe and Israel.

  18. Persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus in Europe and Canada: results of the Dyslipidaemia International Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiter, L. A.; Lundman, P.; da Silva, P. M.; Drexel, H.; Jünger, C.; Gitt, A. K.; Absenger, Guun; Albrich, Ernst; Allinger, Berndt; Allinger, Stephan; Anacher, Gerald; Angermayr, Gertraud; Angermeier, Hermann; Anzengruber, Aneas; Archimanitis, Gabriele; Arnsteiner, Patricia; Auberger, Wolfgang; Azhary, Mawaheb; Barfuss, Michael; Bauer, Christian; Bauer, Birgit Elisabeth; Beclin, Thomas; Binder, Thomas; Binder, Gabriele; Böhler, Dietmar; Brändle, Johann; Breslmair, Jörg; Brettlecker, Marlis; Bürger, Michael; Calvi, Inge; Dorfinger, Werner; Doringer-Schnepf, Elisabeth; Eer, Anton; Eckmayr, Christine; Eder, Franz; Egermann, Margit; Erath, Michael; Etzinger, Michael; Etzinger, Claudia; Fiedler, Lothar; Filip, Wolfgang; Filip, Michaela; Föchterle, Johann; Fodor, Anita; Frieden, Thomas; Gareiss, Mertens; Gföllner, Peter; Ghamarian, Thomas; Goritschan, Michael; Haar, Klaus; Habeler, Gerhard; Hadjiivanov, Valery; Haiböck, Christian; Hammer, Regina; Hartmann, Siegfried; Haschkovitz, Herbert; Hauer, Walter; Hauer, Josef; Haunschmidt, Christian; Heimayr, Christine; Hengl, Wolfgang; Hengl, Gunter; Hermann, Rudolf; Herrmann, Rainer; Hillebrand, Roswitha; Hintersteininger, Otto; Hirsch, Michael; Hitzinger, Martin; Hochegger, Tanja; Hockl, Wolfgang; Hoi, Michael; Hörmann, Jan; Hudler, Brigitte; Imb, Gerhard; Joichl, Anea; Jungbauer, Karl; Kapl, Gerlinde; Kerschbaum, Margit; Kienesberger, Franz; Killinger, Gerhard; Kitzler, Gerhard; Klein, Franz; Kleinbichler, Dietmar; Kohr, Anton; Kopetzky, Michael; Korthals, Christian; Kortschak, Werner; Koschutnik, Martin; Kraus, Werner A.; Kurzemann, Susanne; Lavicka, Claus; Lehner, Guido; Lenz, Jürgen; Lepuschütz, Sabine; Lichtenwallner, Michael; Lober, Reinhard; Loidl, Christine; Lopatka, Eduard; Ludwig, Rudolf; Maca, Thomas; Mair, Anneliese; Mandak, Michael; Margreiter, Maria; Margreiter, Anea; Markovics, Michael; Matejicek, Frieich; Mohilla, Maximillian; Moll, Christian; Mörz, Beate; Mörz, Reinhard; Nagl, Heinz; Neumayr, Günther; Oberroitmair, Helmut; Oberzinner, Michael; Pallamar, Walter; Pangratz, Sibylle; Parandian, Laurenz; Paulus, Alexana; Pfaffenwimmer, Christoph; Plaichinger, Peter; Pokorn, Thomas; Polanec, Helmuth; Pöll-Weiss, Barbara; Pralea, Doralina; Puttinger, Johann; Quinton, Thomas; Ranegger, Matthias; Rass, Sepp; Rauch, Heribert; Riehs, Manfred; Robetin, Erich; Rohringer, Jörg; Rupprechter, Josef; Sadjed, Eduard; Schimbach, Johann Alois; Schmid, Jutta; Schneiderbauer, Rotraud; Schopper, Wolfgang; Schulze-Bauer, Alfred; Schuster, Gottfried; Schwarz, Johann; Schwarz, Maria; Schweighofer, Christoph; Schwelle, Franz; Simma, Hanspeter; Sock, Renate; Sock, Reinhard; Sprenger, Fritz; Stiglmayr, Thomas; Stocker, Ilse; Stütz, Pia; Tama, Mustafa; Teleky, Ursula; Tschauko, Werner; Veits, Martin; Vikydal, Gerhard; Vlaschitz, Karl; Wais, Elisabeth; Wais, Adam; Wegmann, Robert; Wehle, Franz; Weindl, Manfred; Weinhandl, Manuela; Wendt, Ursula; Wendt, Klaus; Werner-Tutschku, Volker; Werner-Tutschku, Christine; Wilscher, Josef; Wind, Norbert; Winter, Aneas; Wolfschütz, Gerald; Wolfsgruber, Markus; Wolfsgruber, Brigitte; Wurm, Renate; Ziebart-Schroth, Arno; Zimmermann, Maximillian; Zinnagl, Aneas; Zirm, Anea; Zirm Canada, Bernhard; Bokenfohr, Grace Mary; Liu, Edmond K. H.; Melling, Gordon W.; Papp, Edward William; Sachdeva, Ashok K.; Snyman, Ernst Retief; Varma, Sonya; Ward, Richard A.; Tiong Wong, Anew Pak; Basson, Paul J.; Brodie, Brian D.; Chahal, Sukhjiwan Jeevyn; Chan, William Y.; Chow, John C.; Cormack, Maura; Eddy, Donald H. J.; Ezekiel, Daniel; Farquhar, Anew; Gu, Shian; Hii, Ting H.; Ho-Asjoe, Marianne P. K.; Hosie, Anew; Jaffer, Shahin; Jakubowski, Anew T.; Karim, Mandy; Kiai, Cristina; Kooy, Jacobus; Lytle, Craig R.; Mcleod, Kevin Lain; Morgan, David C.; Myckatyn, Michael M.; Ng, John P. Y.; Schriemer, Ronnald; Schumacher, Gerhard; Grey Stopforth, James; Hoo Tsui, Winston Wai; Wilson, Robin T.; Wong, Danny; Wong, Wilfred T.; Yeung, Margaret M. W.; Cram, David Harvey; Kumari Dissanayake, Dilani Tamara; Gerber, Johan Daniel W.; Haligowski, David; Hrabarchuk, Blair; Kroczak, Tadeusz J.; Lipson, Alan H.; Mahay, Raj K.; Wessels Mare, Abraham Carel; Mohamdee, Feisal John; Olynyk, Frederick Theodore; Pieterse, Wickus; Ramgoolam, Rajenanath; Rothova, Anna; Saunders, Kevin Kenneth; Szajkowski, Stanley; van Gend, Richard F.; van Rensburg, Nicolaas Marthinus Jansen; Anand, Sanjiv; Baer, Carolyn E. H.; Basque, Eric J. Y.; Benaya, Sebastian; Bessoudo, Ricardo; Bhalla, Jaswinder; Chettiar, Nataraj V.; Craig, Brian N.; Desrosiers, France; Ranjani Imbulgoda, Manel; Morgan, Gareth M.; Nowak, Zbigniew J.; Scott, Daniel G.; Searles, Gregory R.; Slorach, J. Ninian; Stevenson, Robert N.; Browne, Noel John; Bruff, Karl Joseph; Collingwood, John Maurice; Collins, Wayne; Over, Aidan; Gabriel, Anthony M.; Govender, Moonsamy; Hart, David G.; Hatcher, Lydia B.; Janes, John; Kielty, John F.; Krisdaphongs, Michoke; Lush, Richard Boyd; Moulton, William Bertram; Riche, Cyril R.; Rideout, Gary M.; Roberts, Bernard C.; Walsh, Paul E.; Wight, Harold G.; Woodland, K. Heather; Woodland, Robert C.; Atkinson, Bradley Charles; Chow, Carlyle S. H. A.; Collins, James A.; Graham, Robert D.; Hosein, Jalal; Machel, Teresa M.; Mahaney, Gordon Ralston; Mclean, James Robert Bruce; Murray, Michael R.; Myatt, Gregory Alexander; Ozere, Christopher P.; Saha, Amal Krishna; Sanders, David Herbert; Seaman, Donald Maxwell; Seaman, James Gordon; Swinamer, Deanna; Voon Yee, Kenny Yew; Ali, Mohamed Mustapha; Bankay, Clarence D. C.; Beduhn, Eitel Erich Reinhold; Callaghan, Denis J.; Chan, Yun Kai; Chaudhri, Arif R.; Chen, Richard Y. Y.; Conway, James Robin; Cunningham, William L.; Cusimano, Steven Lawrence; Souza, Eleanor De; de Souza, Selwyn X.; Deyoung, John Paul; Epstein, Ralph; Faiers, Alan Arthur; Figurado, Victor John; Forbes, F. Basil Trayer; Gabor, Zsuzsanna; Gallardo, Rodolfo Canonizado; Gaur, Shiva K.; George, Elizabeth; Hartford, Brian J.; Shiu-Chung Ho, Michael; Ho, Chung; Ismail, Shiraz H.; Bhushan Kalra, Bharat; Koprowicz, Kinga; Kumar, Naresh; Lam, Clement; Lau, Ming-Jarm; Law, Hugo Kwok Cheung; Fung, Max Leung Sui; Liutkus, Joanne Frances; Lotfallah, Talaat K.; Luton, Robert G.; Meneses, Gloria S.; Miller, Mark Lee; Nagji, Noorbegum; Ng, Ken H. M.; Ng Thow Hing, Roland E.; Pandey, Amritanshu Shekhar; Petrov, Ivan; Rosenthall, Wendy; Rudner, Howard; Russell, Alan Douglas; Sanchez, Zenia A.; Shaban, Joseph A.; Shariff, Shiraz B. K.; Shih, Chung Ming; Sinclair, Duncan W.; Spink, Donald Richard; Tung, Tommy Hak Tsun; Vizel, Saul; Yanover, David Frederick; Zavodni, Louis S.; Cusack, Paul; Dewar, Charles M.; Hooley, Peter; Kassner, Rachel Anne; Mackinnon, Randy James; Molyneaux, Harold W.; Shetty, Karunakara Naduhithlu; Barrière, Ginette; Berjat, Maria B.; Bernucci, Bruno; Bérubé, Claude; Boueau, Ghyslain; Chehayeb, Raja; Ciricillo, Domenico; Constance, Christian M.; Côté, Gilles; Desroches, Jacques; Gagnon, Robert; Gaueau, Gilles; Godbout, Jean Louis; Harvey, Pierre; Hassan, Youssef; Hoang, Ngoc Vinh; Houde, Danielle; Lalonde, Alain-Paul; Lavoie, Régis; Leclair, Normand; Meagher, Luc; Ouimet, Alain; Plourde, Simon; Rioux, Denis W.; Roberge, Claude; Roy, Bruno; Sasseville, Richard; Serfaty, Samuel; Theriault, Lyne; Timothée, Jean R.; Tjia, Sabine; Tremblay, Bruno; Turcotte, Jean; Bose, Sabyasachi; Aletta Bouwer, Hester; Chernesky, Patricia A.; Johnson, Mervin Louis; Kemp, David R.; Lai, Raymond Pong-Che; Lee, Frank R.; Lipsett, William G. C.; Lombard, Schalk J.; Majid, Falah S.; Malan, Johannes J.; Maree, Narinda; Nayar, Arun; Nel, Mandi; Oduntan, Oluwole O.; Rajakumar, Alphonsus R. J.; Baraka Ramadan, Fauzi; Shamsuzzaman, Mohammed; Vermeulen, Abraham P. M.; Fred, C.; Anthonsen, Birgitte; Ardest, Steen Pennerup; Arnold-Larsen, Susanne Kajsa; Axelsen, Allan; Barfoed, Klaus; Birkler, Niels Erik; Blokkebak, Jens; Boserup, Jørgen; Kettrup Brassøe, Jens Ole; Chovanec, Martin; Lykke Christensen, Bendt; Christensen, Micael; Skjøth Christensen, Randi; Eidner, Per Olav; Eisbo, Jørn; Elsvor, Jan; Engmann, Ida Veng-Christensen; Eriksen, Rene Milling; Frederiksen, Thorkil; Frølund, Hanne Charlotte; Garne, Susanne; Giørtz, Agnete; Gregersen, Bettina; Halkier, Merete Lundbye; Hansen, Jens Georg; Harder, Jan; Jørgen, Hans; Henriksen, O.; Kirkeby Hoffmann, Michael; Holk, Erik; Hollensen, Jan; Jacobsen, Rune; Jakobsen, Lotte; Jensen, Christian; Jensen, Morten; Jensen, Vibeke; Jepsen, Peter; Johannsen, Jens Arne; Verner Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Ole Steen; Juul, Kristian; Jørgensen, Arvid Frank; Jørgensen, Peter; Jørgensen, Ulrik Miilmann; Kensmark, Lars; Kjellerup, Carsten; Kjaer, Ejner; Kjaersgaard, Morten; Klubien, Peter; Kolby, Peter; Korsgaard Thomsen, Kristian; Krebs, Peter; Kristiansen, Tom; Lyng, Flemming; Madsen, Natalia V.; Meyer-Christensen, Jesper; Mogensen, Ole; Mortensen, Finn; Nielsen, Lotta Marie; Nielsen, Per Schiwe; Nielsen, Søren Kjærem; Ommen, Henrik; Juhl Otte, Jens; Østergaard Paridon, Volle; Parm, Michael; Peampour, Kian; Petersen, Kirsten; Pilgaard, Peder Jensen; Poulsen, Svend Erik; Preisler, Thomas; Hast Prins, Søren Ulrik; Randløv, Annette; Rasmussen, Birgit Reindahl; Elmegaard Rasmussen, Peter; Rasmussen, Regnar; Roed, Søren Flemming; Sander, Kirsten Foltmar; Schmidt, Ejnar Ørum; Jørgen Schultz, Paul; Smidemann, Margit; Solgaard, Jørgen; Stripp, Tommy; Søderlund, Michael Rene M.; Søgaard, Henning; Søndergaard, Dorte E.; Sørensen, Birgitte H.; Sørensen, Gerhard Seth; Thøgersen, Niels; Toftdahl, Hans; Uggerhøj, Hanne; Uhrenholt, Bjarne; Veronika Ullisch, Eva; Valentiner-Branth, Christian; Vinberg, Jørgen; Vinter, Svend Aage; Vittrup, Preben; Winther-Pedersen, Niels; Wøldike, Anne Grete; Zederkof, Jørgen M.; Thue Østergaard, Merete; Abiven, Patrick; Abraham, Dominique; de Beaumais, Philippe Adam; Ado, Jean Pierre; Affres, Helene; Agache, Regis; Airault Leman, Anne Marie; Moussarih, Abdallah Al; Albaric, Christian; Allaouchiche, Thierry; Allignol, Christian; Ammor, Mohammed; Ammoun Bourdelas, Corinne; Amsallem, Luc; Anquez, Denis; Antonini, Jean Michel; Assuied, Virginia; Attia, Gerard; Audebert, Olivier; Audibert, Henri; Ayach, Claude; Bagdadlian, Serge; Bagni, Marina; Baillet, Jean; Ballivian Cardozo, Fernando; Baranes, Robert; Barbier, Patricia; Barousse, Francoise; Bas, Sylvie; Battaglia, Jean Marc; Baudonnat, Bruno; Bauple, Jean Louis; Domengetroy, Frederic Baylac; Beard, Thierry; Beaumier, Eric; Beaumont, Jean Francois; Baylac Domengetroy, Frederic; Beck, Christian; Behar, Michel; Behr, Bernard; Benady, Richard; Benghanem, Mohamed Mounir; Benichou, Herve; Bensoussan, Jean Marc; Bensussan, Pierre; Bercegeay, Pascal; Berneau, Jean Baptiste; Bertolotti, Alexane; Bertrand, Sylviane; Besson, Alain; Bezanson, Christophe; Bezier, Christophe; Bezzina, Remy; Bichon, Herve; Bickar, Pierre; Billot, Pierre; Billot Belmere, Marie Claude; Bisson, Francois; Blanc, Dominique; Bloch, Jean Luc; Bloch, Bernard; Blondin, Hyacinthe; Blot, Jacques; Bloud, Raymond; Blouin, Pascal; Boesch, Christophe; Boiteux, Jean Luc; Bonnafous, Pierre; Bonneau, Yanick; Bonnefoy, Laurent; Borg, Bernard; Borys, Jean Michel; Brunehaut Petaut, Myriam; Boschmans, Sabine; Said, Rami Bou; Bouallouche, Abderrahmane; Bouchet, Jacques; Bouchlaghem, Khaled; Boulen, Yvon; Bouline, Benoit; Bounekhla, Mohamed Salah; Bouquin, Vincent; Bourgeois, Marie Brigitte; Bourgois, Didier; Brandily, Christian; Brandt, Pierre; Branquart, Frederic; Breilh, Patrick; Brilleman, Fabrice; Brisson, Thierry; Brocard, Francis; Bruel, Pierre; Brun, Jean Pierre; Buisson, Jean Gabriel; Buisson Virmoux, Isabelle; Bur, Christian; Cabal Malville, Elodie; Cabantous, Serge; Cabrol, Pierre; Cagnoli Gromovoi, Sylviane; Caillaux, Bruno Xavier; Caillot, Didier; Canchon Ottaviani, Isabelle; Canu, Philippe; Caramella, Alexana; Caramella, Alexane; Cardaillac, Christian; Carrivale, Alain; Cartal, Jean Pierre; Cassany, Bernard; Cauon, Bernard; Causeret, Jean Marie; Caye, Philippe; Cayet, Jean Paul; Cazor, Gilles; Cesarini, Joel; Chakra, Georges; Chambeau, Bernadette; Chambon, Valerie; Chanas, Jack; Chapuzot, Patrick; Charon, Ane; Charpin, Eric; Charton, Frederic; Cheikel, Jean; Chemin, Philippe; Chennouf, Kamel; Chequel, Henri; Chevrier, Denis; Ciroux, Patrick; Cissou, Yves; Claeys, Jean Luc; Clariond, Yves; Classen, Olivier; Cloerec, Ane; Clouet, Sophie; Cloup Lefeuvre, Anne Marie; Cochet, Chantal; Cocuau, Didier; Cohen, Henri; Cohen Presberg, Pascale Cohen; Colin, Stephane; Colin, Remy; Colucci, Robert; Come, Philippe; Condouret, Pierre; Conturie, Agnes; Corbin, Ane; Corticelli, Paola; Coste, Daniel; Cotrel, Olivier; Coueau, Sylvie; Coulon, Paul; Courdy, Christian; Courtin, Marc; Courtot, Pierre; Coutrey, Laurent; Couval, Rene; Cravello, Patrick; Cressey, Olivier; Cuisinier, Yves; Cunin, Bernard; Cunnington, Bernard; Cusseau, Herve; Cuvelier, Christian; Arailh, Bruno D.; Dabboura, Adib; Dages, Laurence; Dahmani, Noureddine; Dandignac, Jean Christophe; Daney, Dominique; Dannel, Bernard; Darbois, Dominique; Dareths, Philippe; Daubin, Daniel; David, Jean Claude; de Foiard, Patrick; de Mallmann Guyot, Veronique De; de Wit, Marie Astrid; Debast, Francoise; Deboute, Eric; Debuc, Jean Pierre; Dechoux, Edouard; Decloux, Olivier; Decruyenaere, Yannick; Dejans, Jacques Maurice; Delarue, Michel; Delattre, Xavier; Delmaire, Patrick; Denis, Lucien; Deschamps Ben Ayed, Myriam; Devins, Pascal; Dezou, Sylvie; Dieuzaide, Pierre; Dirheimer, Bertrand; Dominguez, Paul; Donadille, Florence; Dondain, Benoit; Doridan, Pierre; Ouhet, Pascal; Dubois, Arnaud; Dubois, Ane; Ducharme, Pascal; Duchez, Paul; Dulard, Catherine; Dumoulin, Marc; Duprey, Georges; Durand, Jacques; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Chehab, El; Emery, Bernard; Emmanuel, Georges; Ashari, Ghazaleh Esna; Evrard, Eric; Fargeot Lamy, Aleth; Farges, Jean Louis; Faucher, Patrick; Faucie, Alain; Faure, Yves; Favre, Jean Jacques; Felipe, Jean Louis; Feret, Daniel; Ferragu, Alain; Ferrandin, Gerard; Ferriot, Francois; Finelle, Laurent; Flond, Jacques; Foieri, Jean; Fol, Stephane; Fontaine, Brigitte; Forichon, Dominique; Foucry, Michel; Fournier, Jean Francois; Fregeac, Bernard; Fuchs, Martin; Gabriel, Franck; Gaimard, Didier; Gallois, Stephane; Garapon, Georges; Garas, Mamdouh; Garcia, Pierre; Garcia, Jean Michel; Garcia, Marie Pierre; Garman, Waddah; Garzuel, Dominique; Gaspard, Jean Marc; Gauci, Laurent; Gautheron, Patrick; Gauthier, Jacques; Gauthier Lafaye, Pierre Yves; Gay, Michel Charles; Gay Duc, Bernadette; Gayout, Olivier; Gegu, Yann; Gentile, Francois; Germain, Emmanuel; Gharbi, Gerard; Gigandet Tamarelle, Catherine; Gilardie, Alain; Gilles Verliat, Martine; Gillet, Thierry; Gnana, Philippe; Goguey, Alain; Gombert, Alain; Gonin, Bernard; Gonzales, Philippe; Goulesque, Xavier; Graba, Jean Marc; Granier, Alain; Greiner, Olivier; Groboz, Martial; Gromoff, Serge; Grossemy, Xavier; Grossi, Christian; Guenin, Frederic; Gueranger, Pierre; Guerin, Patrick; Guerineau, Jean Pierre; Guessous Zghal, Fathia; Guicheux, Dominique; Guillere, Jacqueline; Guyonnet, Gilles; Haddad, Samir; Hadj, Nordine; Hamani, Djamel; Hamm, Jacky; Hammoudi, Djamal; Harle, Xavier; Harnie Coussau, Pierre; Hazen, Richard; Hembert, Francois; Hemon, Pierre; Hergue, Michel; Hestin, Christian; Heyraud, Luc; Hindennach, Dieter; Hirot, Etienne; Ho Wang Yin, Chan Shing; Hocquelet Denis, Catherine; Hoppe, Patrice; Horovitz, Daniel; Hours, Jean Michel; Houta, Benjamin; Hua, Gerard; Hui Bon Hoa, Nicole; Humez, Philippe; Hurier, Michel; Husson, Gerald; Hyvernat, Guy; Ichard, Jean Francois; Impens, Claude; Iovescu, Decebal; Jacob, Philippe; Jacob, Gildas; Jacquemart, Jean Pierre; Jacquier, Philippe; Jahanshahi Honorat, Shideh; Jalladeau, Jean Francois; Jan, Luc; Jannel, Yves; Jarrige, Vincent; Jeremiasz, Richard; Annick Jestin Depond, Marie; Joseph, Michel; Joseph Henri Fargue, Helene; Joubrel, Alain; Jouet, Alain; Julien, Bruno; Jullien, Francois; Jullien, Jean Louis; Kadoche, David; Kahl, Etienne; Kanawati, Aiman; Khalife, Sami; Khettou, Christophe; Kiers, Jean Paul; Kissel, Christian; Klein, Jean Claude; Klopfenstein, Samuel; Koch, Alexis; Koenig, Georges; Kohler, Philippe; Koriche, Abdelmalek; Labernardiere, Nicole; Labet, Philippe; Lablanche, Fabien; Laborde Laulhe, Vincent; Lagorce, Xavier; Laine, Eric; Lalague, Pascal; Laleu, Jean Noel; Lambert, Michel; Lambert Ledain, Mireille Lambert; Lambertyn, Xavier; Lame, Jean Francois; Langlois, Frederic; Lanoix, Eric; Laprade, Michel; Lasseri, Charaf; Laterrade, Bernard; Laurent, Jean Claude; Laurier, Bernard; Laval, Laurent; Le Borgne, Patrick; Le Franc, Pierre; Le Henaff, Patrick; Le Noir de Carlan, Herve; Le Roy, Jean Pierre; Le Roy Hennion, Florence; Lebon, Louis; Lecler, Olivier; Leclerc, Philippe; Ledieu, Christian; Lefebvre, Bernard; Lefevre, Philippe; Lehujeur, Catherine; Leiber, Christian; Leick, Gerard; Lemberthe, Thierry; Lenevez, Norbert; Lenoble, Patrick; Leriche, Philippe; Leroux, Eric; Leroy, Jean Michel; Leroy, Christian; Lescaillez, Dominique; Leurele, Christian; Lhermann, Sophie; Libermann, Pierre; Licari, Gilbert; Lo Re, Antoine; Long, Philippe; Long, Jean Louis; Lormeau, Boris; Louchart, Jean Christophe; Lucas, Jean Pierre; Luquet, Thierry; Lussato, Philippe; Maarouf, Moustapha; Mabilais, Francois; Magnier Sinclair, Christine; Mahot Moreau, Pascale; Malafosse, Denis; Mandirac, Jean Paul; Manolis, Jerome; Mante, Jean Pierre; Maquaire, Claude; Marchal, Thierry; Marchand, Guillaume; Marillesse, Olivier; Marmier, Gabriel; Herve Maron, Yves; Marrachelli, Nadine; Marsaux, Michel; Martin, Bruno; Martin, Michel; Deiss, Pascale Martin; Masson, Arnaud; Mativa, Bruno; Matton, Jean Francois; Mauffrey, Jean; Mauriere, Serge; Maurois, Georges; Maury, Joceline; Mayer, Frederic; Menu, Pierre; Mercier, Bernard; Messmer, Daniel; Mestiri, Sami; Meyer, Gilles; Michaelides, Michael; Michaud, Gilles; Michenaud, Bernard; Mielot, Stephane; Millory Marco, Jerry Anne; Mingam, Stephane; Mira, Reginald; Mius, Stephane; Monnier Meteau, Marie Paule; Mora, Francis; Morbois Trabut, Louise; Morosi, Laurent; Mougeolle, Jean Luc; Mouget, Jean Louis; Mouroux, Daniel; Mouthon, Jean Marie; Muller, Jacques; Nakache, Ane; Narbonne, Herve; Navarranne Roumec, Anne; Navarro, Pierre; Neubrand, Jean Yves; Nguyen, Quang Thieu; Nguyen Quang, Guy; Nguyen Xuan, Thong; Niot, Patrice; Oudart, Jean Maurice; Outteryck, Alain; Pages, Jean Marie; Paillet, Charles; Pain, Jean Marie; Pangaud de Gouville, Patricia; Paquin, Olivier; Parent, Vincent; Parer Richard, Claire; Parrot, Francine; Parthenay, Pascal; Pascariello, Jean Claude; Passebon, Jean Claude; Pere, Alain; Perelstein, Laurent; Perot, Michel; Petit, Richard; Petit, Philippe; Petit, Francois; Petruzzi, Philippe; Phelipeau, Denis; Philippon, Jean Claude; Philippon, Gilles; Picard, Bruno; Picard, Jean Claude; Picot, Bernard; Piera, Jean Francois; Pieri, Alain; Piffoux, Eric; Pilard, Patrick; Pillet, Alain; Pinot, Philippe; Pinzani, Alain; Pleskof, Alain; Plessier, Jean Claude; Plisson, Alain; Pochon, Claude; Poggi, Valerie; Poirat, Alain; Poiree, Maurice; Polleux, Janick; Noel Pontecaille, Jean; Posocco, Regis; Pospiech, Jean Claude; Pradies, Felix; Prevot, Remi; Pueyo, Jean Bernard; Quaelli, Jacques; Rabbia, Michel; Rabemananjara, Aimery; Rami, Saad; Rapin, Jean Jacques; Rasquin, Corinne; Ratinaud, Didier; Reboud, Bruno; Reboul, Philippe; Reichman, Jean Jacques; Reinhardt, Patrick; Renard Houta, Catherine Renard; Reverdy, Olivier; Revol, Michel; Rey, Pierre Alain; Richardeau, Yves; Rives, Bernard; Robida, Christine; Rochez Fraiberg, Muriel; Rodet, Jean Pierre; Rolland, Jean Francois; Romand, Bruno; Romano, Jean Paul; Rosati Gretere, Chantal; Rosey, Alain; Rosset, Martial; Rossi, Jean Pierre; Rouquette, Georges; Rousseau, Michel; Rousselon, Xavier; Roy, Christophe; Royer, Denis; Ruetsch, Marcel; Saade, Maurice; Saby Kuchler, Nicolas; Samar, Guy; Sanchez, Pierre Yves; Sane, Alain; Sanz, Jean Paul; Sardon, Michel; Sarrazin, Marc Eric; Sasportes, Gilbert; Saudou, Francis; Sauze, Elisabeth; Savary, Pascal; Schenowitz, Alain; Schmartz, Pierre; Schoepfer, Marc Olivier; Seewagen, Jacques; Serramoune, Denis; Serre, Christian; Sicard Guroo, Helene; Sichãc, Jean Philippe; Sifaoui, Sylvain; Simoncello, Marc; Simonin, Marie Jeanne; Simonnet, Jean Francois; Spindler, Didier; Steier, Alain; Sultan, Charles Raphael; Taghipour, Kouroch; Talayrach, Bruno; Talbot, Francois; Talhouarn, Vanessa; Tallec, Yves; Tarasco Schenrey, Elisabeth; Tarrene, Michel; Tater, Dominique; Tessier, Bernard; Teste, Marie; Thierry, Dominique; Thiollier, Patrice; Thoreau, Frederic; Thual, Jean; Traen, Vincent; Trigano, Jacques Alexane; Troussier, Jean Bernard; Truong Ky Minh, Bernard; van Melckebeke, Gerard; Vaque, Philippe; Vaucelle, Celine; Vedel, Eric; Venu, Didier; Verdavoine, Patrick; Vergeron, Jean; Viallon, Philippe; Viault, Dominique; Vieules, Jean Max; Vigier, Jean Paul; Vilain, Jean Marie; Villard, Bruno; Vitoux, Jean Francois; Viviand, Paul; Vivien, Olivier; Walter, Patrice; Waquier, Patrick; Waszkiewicz, Jean Marc; Weidich, Stephane; Westerfeld, Raymond; Weynachter, Gerald; Wilhelm, Pierre; Wolff, Claude; Wursthorn, Marc; Zammattio, Didier; Zylinski, Bernard; Lauer, Peter; Kühn, Uwe; Weltzel, Wolfgang; Mohr, Hella; Weyland, Klaus; Spittel, Bärbel; Böhm, Günter; Ferdowsy, Said; Hanusch, Peter; Spiekermann, Josef; Albert, Edwin; Stuff, Karl; Jungmair, Wolfgang; Koller, Sabine; Schubert, Wilhelm; Schlehahn, Fred; Bormann, Gundula; Graf, Kristof; Stiehler, Gisela; Bock, Manfred; Müller, Angelika; Haufe, Michael; Nielsen, Lorenz; Raum, Doris; Rogler, Karin; Bürstner, Joachim; Völk, Hans-Jörg; Sachse, Michael; Escher, Torsten; Doumit, Adel; O'dey, Hildegard; Holzmann, Ulrike; Sauer, Hermann; Schellenberg, Gottfried; Carius, Jürgen; Dänschel, Wilfried; Kopf, Aneas; Zerr, Elena; Tatalovic, Ratko; Rupp, Heiun; Anders, Elfriede; Mende, Marion; Volk, Ulrich; Hagenow, Aneas; Lang, Thomas; Schmitz, Karl-Heinz; Gössling, Jan-Henik; Mutsch, Günther; Steidel, Joachim; Osten, Klaus; Giokoglu, Kiriakos; Bellisch, Sabine; Füll, Katja; Walther, Wolfgang; Flick, Sabine; Dünnebier, Rosemarie; Dharmawan, Ichsan; Schönmehl, Wolfgang; Hoss, Valentin; Kipping, Stephan; Wolf, Hans-Joachim; Wolf, Hans-Frieich; Willmann, Volker; Bugarski, Bruno; Hoffschröer, Josef; Von Wallfeld, Siegrun; Ruhland, Guun; Bulling, Daniel; Häusler, Maren; Haustein, Gabriele; Kallenbach, Cornelia; Schwemmler, Claudia; Frank, Antje; Lodder-Bender, Ulrike; Rawe, Klaus; Reinert, Hans-Ferdinand; Schönhof, Petra; Fahrenschon, Klaus; Schorcht, Elisabeth; Etzold, Erika; Brehm, Michael; Paust, Wolf-Dieter; Schulte-Kemna, Achim; Pötter, Klaus-Werner; Ott-Voigtländer, Ulrike; Schwenke, Reto; Thinesse-Mallwitz, Manuela; Siml, Steffi; Stern, Hirene; Roelen, Harald; Scherhag, Klaus-Peter; Matulla, Petra; Herrmann, Hans Joachim; Neumann, Gerhard; Barbuia, Marius; Vormann, Reinhold; Hitzler, Karl; Linum, Aneas; Hanke, Klaus; Hohberg, Hans-Joachim; Klingel, Roger; Hohnstädter, Rainer; Klasen, Hartmut; Aschermann, Peter; Grau, Wilfried; Killinger, Paul; Gross, Kathrin; Naus, Rainer; Todoroff, Karin; Zühlke, Wolfgang; Kellner, Hanns-Ulrich; Hager, Eva; Thieme, Jochen; Kornitzky, Michael; Rösch, Volker; Heinze, Elke; Hiederer, Wolfgang; Konz, Karl-Heinz; Köhler, Michael; Diekmann, Martin; Junghans, Edith; Dietermann, Friedgard; Kerp, Ekkehard; Schäfer-Lehnhausen, Silvia; Kruck, Irmtraut; Ettelt, Rolf; Hölscher, Aneas; Kittler, Sybil; Jung, Heiun; Mailänder, Albert; Nowara, Peter; Ritschl, Harald; Mödl, Bernhard; Gallwitz, Torsten; Meyer, Stephan; Peter, Anton; Peters, Otto; Pflaum, Petra; Fröhlich, Karl-Heinz; Mertens, Hans-Jürgen; Merlin-Sprünken, Verena; Erpenbach, Klaus; Fervers, Frank; Kuhl, Ulrike; Halsig, Friedemann; Rein, Wilfried; Hauser, Ernst-Richard; Laubenthal, Florin; Richard, Frank; Langer, Claus; Lange, Rainer; Eska, Jan; Mohanty, George; Lange, Isengard; Eltges, Nicole; Kuntz, Christoph; Mechery, Thomas; Vöckl, Josef; Viergutz, Christoph; Stähle-Klose, Claudia; Sohr, Katja; Böhler, Steffen; Brecke, Georg; Burls, Malcolm; Werner, Karl-Michael; Vorpahl, Ralf; Stahl-Weigert, Beate; Bunge, Gerd; Thomsen, Jutta; Blessing, Erwin; Bengel, Bengel; Buhlmann, Ulla; Tröger, Tröger; Sippel, Sippel; Vossschulte, Vossschulte; Wilms, Wilms; Appelt, Appelt; Dauterstedt, Dauterstedt; Witte, Witte; Böttger, Uta; Wyborski, Waltraud; Strache, Sabine; Böttger, Werner; Zeiner, Luise; Wuttke, Wanda; Stoidner- Amann, Annette; Stoermer, Brigitte; Bock, Stephan; Groos-März, Cornelia; Thamm, Maria-Elisabeth; Meier, Josef; Schneider, Martin; Niessen, Ulrich; Storm, Gernot-Rainer; Streitbürger, Elmar; Münkel, Thomas; Palfi, Mihai; Naumann, Ulrich; Tannhof, Gabriele; Streibhardt, Frank; Gebhardt, Wolfgang; Nieswandt, Gerhard; Gerke, Ulrich; Nöhring, Axel; Bott, Jochen; Goertz, Jutta; Winkler, Dietmar; Lotter, Edith; Kraaz, Katja; Bärwinkel, Petra; Hildebrandt, Diana; Weyers, Georg; Kubin-Siring, Birgit; Baier, Eduard; Weber, Thomas; Holz, Dirk-Egbert; Wolfers, Johannes; Kihm, Wolfgang; Kamali-Ernst, Schirin; Amann, Wolfgang; Kaase, Hans-Jürgen; Banning, Ottmar; Voigt, Thomas; Grünert, Frank; Gürtler, Michael; Pferdmenges, Karin; van Treek, Heiko; Möller, Bernd; Weigel, Sybille; Jun Hassler, Normann; Mauer, Helmuth; Beckers, Erwin; Weber, Clemens-August; Hawash, Hana; Ladke, Dietrich; Labitzky, Gerlinde; Kunkel, Petra; Hartung, Wolfgang; Pomykaj, Thomas; Prokop, Heiun; Schleif, Thomas; Cascino, Luisa; Exner, Petra; Daelman, Eric; Dietrich, Aneas; Prasse, Thomas; Brundisch, Stefanie; Schipper, Ralf; Duderstaedt, Bernd; de Haan, Fokko; Schmidt-Reinwald, Astrid; Seidel, Peter; Schmitz, Joachim; Bülent, Ergec; Ja Pique, Pyoong; Ding, Roland; Eggeling, Thomas; Duderstaedt, Elvira; Ferchland, Hans-Peter; Kruth, Renate; Gralla, Dieter; Köhler, Angelika; Laborge, Joachim Rene; Hammer, Harald; Richter, Ilona; Sauldie, Happy; Valk-Denkema, Inge Van Der; van der Valk, Leo; Feely, John; Dunne, Liam; Cox, John; Doyle, Michael; O'Gorman, Mary; Kennedy, John; Maher, Brian; Forde, Derek; Harrington, Peter; Cronin, Brian; Coady, Anew; Craig, John; O'Dowd, Caroline; O'Doherty, Brian; O'Connor, Patrick; Ling, Roland; Perry, Majella; Crowley, James; Keaveney, Lynda; Townley, Eadaoin; O'Shea, Eamonn; Regan, Michael; Cunningham, Seamus; Bluett, Desmond; Whyte, Oliver; Casey, Michael; Ruane, Fergal; Fitzgerald, Eleanor; O'Beirn, Eugene; Faller, Eamonn; Moffatt, Sean; Coleman, Michael; Day, Brendan; Mcadam, Brendan; O'Neill, Daragh; Mac Mahon, Conor; Wheeler, Mark; Byrne, Sheila; Fulcher, Kieran; CAREY, Owen; O'Connell, Kieran; Keane, Jack; Almarsomi, Laith; Vaughan, Carl; O'Callaghan, Tom; Grufferty, Tadgh; Shanahan, Eamon; Crowley, Brendan; Moran, Joe; Cotter, Jeremy; Healy, Colin; Curtin, Tom; Dillon, Joe; Dennehy, Thomas; Murphy, Elaine; Kennedy, Michael; Coffey, Donal; Carroll, Paul O.; Oliver, Barry; Mccarthy, Shane; Joyce, Peter; O'Shea, Gerard; Apperloo, A. J.; Basart, D. C. G.; Bax, M.; Beysens, P. A. J.; Breed, J. G. S.; Derks, A.; Eijgenraam, J. W.; Hermann, J. P. R.; Janus, C. L.; Kaasjager, H. A. H.; Klomps, H. C.; Koole, M. A. C.; Koster, T.; Kroon, C.; Lieverse, A. G.; Massaar-Hagen, B. E. M.; Moghaddam, F.; Oldenburg-Ligtenberg, P. C.; Potter van Loon, B. J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Twickler, Th B.; van Asperdt, F. G. M. H.; van Asseldonk, J. P. M.; van der Loos, T. L. J. M.; van der Velde, R. Y.; van der Vring, J. A. F.; van Dorp, W. T.; van Essen, G. G.; van Kalmthout, P. M.; van Liebergen, R. A. M.; van Wissem, S.; Waanders, H.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; Andersen, Per Vidar Klemet; Andersen, Randi F.; Andersson, Egil; Arnstad, Asle; Belguendouz, Larbi; Birkeland, Inge Arve; Bjørkum, Kari; Bredvold, Thor; Brevig, Leif Harald; Buchman, Erik; Burkeland-Matre, Rune; Burski, Krzysztoft; Byre, Roald; Bø, Per Erik; Dahl, Erik; Duch, Anna; Duong, Khoa; Dvergsdal, Peter; Edvardsen, Magne; Ernø, Asbjørn; Fredwall, Svein Otto; Glasø, Morten; Glasø, Jan; Grini, Asbjørn; Hallaråker, Arne; Normann Hansen, Age Normann; Haugland, Helge Haugland; Henrichsen, Svein Høegh; Hestnes, Atle; Idehen, Norman I. E.; Jacobsen, Kristin Løland; Johansen, Ture; Johnsen, Roald; Jonasmo, Kåre; Kirknes, Svetalana; Kjetså, Arild; Kjaer, Peter; Knoph, Erik; Knutssøn, Carl; Koss, Arne; Kravtchenko, Oleg; Krogsæter, Dagfinn; Langaker, Kåre; Lind, Knut W.; Lund, Kjell Rømyhr; Madsbu, Sverre; Mehlum, Yvonne E. Mazurek; Moon, Philipp; Movafagh, Aram; Myhrer, Kurt; Nørager, Dan Michael; Ore, Stephan; Rafat, Hooshang B.; Rød, Reinert; Schmidt-Melbye, Torgeir; Singh, Navneet; Singsås, Tore; Skjelvan, Gunnar; Smet, Arthur; Staalesen, Staale; Storeheier, Espen; Storhaug, Sidsel; Storm-Larsen, Ane; Sundby, Jon Eivind; Syverstad, Dag Eivind; Sørensen, Anne Sissel; Torjusen, Trygve B.; Torkelsen, Arne; Tunby, Jan Reidar; Vanberg, Pål Johan; Vevatne, Audun; Vikse, Arild; Wahlstrøm, Viktor; Walaas, Kirsten; Walløe, Arne Eyolf; Wear-Hansen, Hans-Gunnar; Ole Ystgaard, Ole Aneas; Zimmermann, Birgit; Øvsthus, Knut; Aião, Julio; Albuquerque, Mario; Alves, Fernando; Esteves, Antonio; Amaral, Maria Fatima; Amaral, Fátima; Amorim, Helena; Anade, Benilde; Anade, Maria Benilde; Antonio, Godinho; Araujo, Francisco; Arriaga, Antonio; Baeta, Sonia; Afonso, Francisca Banha; Beato, Vitor; Beirão, Paula; Martins, Ausenda Belo; Bernardes, Jose; Botas, Luis; Baeta, Antonio; Ramos, Manuel Braga; Brandão, Peo; Brandão, Antonio G.; Brandão, Antonio; Raposo, Antonio Caetano; Carrilho, Francisco; Carvalho, Isabel; Carvalho, Patricia; Castel-Branco, Ana; Castellano, Maria Desamparados; Corredoura, Ana; Corredoura, Ana Sofia; Costa, Vitor; Coutinho, João; Crujo, Francisco; Cunha, Damião; Dias, Manuela; Fernandes, Maria Emilia; Ferreira, Gustavo; Ferreira, Dirce; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Fonseca, Antonio; Freitas, Paula; Gago, Amandio; Galego, Rosa; Garrett, Antonio Viriato; Gavina, Cristina; Simões, José Geraldes; Gomes, Maria Fatima; Gomes, Norberto; Gomez, Brigitte; Graça, Peo; Gravato, Antonio; Guedes, Nuno Filipe; Guerra, Fernanda; Issa, Custódio; João, Isabel Fernandes; João, Isabel; Jorge, Vasco; Leite, Maria Salome; Lousada, Nuno; Macedo, Filipe M.; Madeira Lopes, João; Magalhães, Jorge; Marinho, Jose Carlos; Marques, Carlos; Marques, Jose Augusto; Marques Ferreira, Antonio; Martins, Jose Carlos; Martins, J. Belo; Matos, Alice; Melo, Miguel; Miguel, Antonia; Monteiro, Filomena; Monteiro, Francisco; Monteiro, Filomena B.; Sarmento, João Morais; Morato Sá, Maria José; Mota, Joana; Moura, Luis; Moura, Brenda; Neves, Lena; Neves, Celestino; Oliveira, Maria; Oliveira Ramos, Manuel; Osorio, Ramos; Pacheco, Joao; Palma, Isabel; Peixoto, Maria Cristina; Pereira, Helder; Pestana, João; Pignatelli, Duarte; Pinho, Hernani; Puig, Jorge; Raindo, Maria; Ramos, Helena; Rebelo, Marta; Roigues, Antonio; Roigues, Alvaro; Roigues, Elisabete; Rola, José; Rovytchcva, Milena; Sa, João; Santos, Fernando; Santos, João Cesar; Sequeira Duarte, Joao; Serra E Silva, Polybio; Silva, Bernardino; Silva, Paula; Silva, Maria; Silva, Francisco; Silva, Dora; Silva, José; Silvestre, Isabel; Simões, Heleno; Soares, Manuela; Sousa, Nelson; Sousa, Antonio; Souto, Delfina; Teixeira, Esmeralda; Torres, Isabel; Valle, Tahydi; Ventura, Carlos; Vicente, Ana; Vieira, Muriel; Alfaro, Rafael; Alonso, Roigo; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Allut, Germán; Amado, Jose A.; Ampuero, Javier; Angel, Luis Fernando; Antolín, Eduardo; Anton, Javier; Aranda, Jose Luis; Argimon, Jordi; Arques, Francesc; Arribas, Jose Peo; Arroya, Concepción; Arroyo, Jose Antonio; Auladell, Maria Antonia; Bajo, Julian; BALVIN, Alberto; Ballester, Jose Vicente; Barreda Glez, Maria Jesus; Becerra, Antonio; Bermejo, Juan Carlos; Bernacer, Luis; Besada, Ricardo; Blasco, Jesús; Bravo, Manuel; Bueno, Francisco Manuel; Campo, Ignacio; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Catalán, José Ignacio; Cobo, Jose; Coello, Ignacio; Combarro, Jesús; Contreras, Juan A.; Correa, Julian; Cortilla, Alberto; Cuatrecasas, Guillem; Chicharro, Sana; de Dios, Juan; de Los Arcos, Enrique; de Portugal, Jose; del Cañizo, Francisco; del Molino, Fatima; Díaz, Jose Luis; Domingo, Javier; Escobar, Carlos; Escoda, Jaume; Espinosa, Eugenio; Ester, Francisco; Fernandez, Antonio; Ferreiro, Manuel; Fondas, Jose Maria; Fraile, Angel Luis; Franco, Miguel; Fuentes, Francisco; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Garcia, Domingo; Garcia, Manuel Enrique; García, Luis; Garcia, Jesus; Gilabert, Rosa; Goiria, Begoña; Gomez, Purificación; Gomez-Calcerrada, David; Gonzalez, Manuel; Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Guijarro, Carlos; Guirao Gujarro, Victor; Herrera, Carlos; Herrera, Maria Carmen; Herrero, Miguel; Ibarguren, Amaya; Irigoyen, Luis; Jimenez, Blas; Lamelas, Jose Antonio; Laplaza, Ismael; Laporta, Felix; Lazo, Victor; Leal, Mariano; Ledesma, Vicente; Lopez, Peo; Lopez, Pablo; Lopez, Alberto; López, Maria Jose; Lopez-Cepero, Eduardo; Lorenzo, Francisco; Lucena, Javier; Luquín, Rafael; Lloveras, Ariadna; Maceda, Teresa; Macia, Ramon; Marti, Cristina; Martin, Jose Maria; Martin, Isodoro; Martín Lesende, Iñaki; Martinez, Mercedes; Martinez, Juan Alberto; Martinez, Peo; Martinez, Angel; Mato, Fernando; Medel, Federico; Mederos, Ana Maria; Mediavilla, Javier; Mediavilla, Gregorio; Mestron, Antonio; Michans, Antonio; Millán, Jesús; Molina, Carlos; Monroy, Carmelo; Monte, Inés; Montes, Jose Maria; Morales, Clotilde; Morales, Francisco J.; Morata, Carmen; Mori, Carlos; Muñoz, Jaime; Muñoz, Maria Jose; Núnez, Julio; Nuñez, Alfonso; Ocaña, Fermin; Olaz, Fernando; Ollero Artigas, Anes; Ortega, Juan; Oteo, Olga; Pascual, Jose Maria; Paya, Jose Antonio; Pechuan, Joaquín; Penedo Suarez, Ramón; Perez, Eugenia; Pesquera, Carlos; Pia, Gonzalo; Piea, Maria; Pinilla, Martin; Pita, Alejano; Pose, Antonio; Prieto Díaz, Miguel Angel; Quesada, Carmen; Ramirez, Francisco; Ramirez, Carmen; Ramirez, Luisa; Reinares, Leonardo; Rey, Salvador; Ribas, Montse; Ridaura, Amparo; Ridocci, Francisco; Rigueiro, Peo; Rivera, Salomón; Robles, Antonio; Rodero, Estrella; Roiguez, Jose Angel; Romero, Fernando; Romero Hernandez, Franklin; Romeu, Regina; Rubio Buisán, Lorenzo; Salas, Fernando; Sánchez, Carlos; Sánchez, Jesus; Saponi, Jose Maria; Serres, Miguel; Suarez, Saturnino; Suarez, Carmen; Tato, Maria; Tebar, Francisco Javier; Toda, Maria Roca; Tofe, Santiago; Urdiain, Raquel; Vaamonde, Leopoldo; Valderrama, Javier; Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Velazquez, Osvaldo; Venell, Federico; Vilariño, Ruben; Villa, Maria Jesus; Villar, Maria Dolores; Zarauza, Jesus; Zuñiga, Manuel; Abab, Jose Luis; Abad, Eduardo; Abad, Rafael; Afonso, Carmen; Aguilar, Gerardo; Alberiche, Maria Del Pino; Alcolea, Rosa; Alegria, Eduardo; Almagro, Fátima; Almenara, Africa; Almenos, Maria Cruz; Alonso, Javier; Alvarez, Manuel; Ampudia, Javier; Andia, Victor Manuel; Anglada, Jordi; Aranda, Miguel Ángel; Arbelo, Lorenzo; Armengol, Francesc; Arnau, Asunción; Arrarte, Vicente; Arribas, Bienvenido; Artiñano, Yolanda; Avilés, Benjamín; Ayensa, Javier; Ballestar, Enric; Ballester, Javier; Barcelo, Bartolome; Barcena, Felix; Barranco, Mercedes; Barrena, Isabel; Barriales, Vicente; Barrot, Joan; Bartolome, Jose A.; Belmonte, Joan; Bellés, Amadeo; Benito, Josefina; Bernad, Antonio; Biendicho, Armando; Blanco, Rubén; Boix, Evangelina; Bonora, Carlos; Boxó, Jose Ramon; Brea, Angel; Caballero, Peo; Cabrera, Peo; Cabrero, Juan Jose; Calduch, Lourdes; Calero, Francisco; Calvo Garcia, Jose Javier; Camacho, Jose; Canales, Juan Jose; Caparros, Jorge; Carbonell, Francisco; Caro, Manuel; Castilla, Miguel Angel; Castillo, Luis; Cepero, Daniel; Cerdan, Miguel; Cimbora, Antonio; Civera, Miguel; Colchero, Justo; Comas Fuentes, Angel; Corpas, Clara; Corrales, Juan Antonio; Cotobal, Eusebio; Cruz, Carmen; Cruz, Inmaculada; de La Flor, Manuel D.; de Luis, Alberto; del Alamo, Alberto; del Rosario, Victor; Diego, Carlos; D'Lacoste, Marta; Doganis Peppas, Constantino; Dominguez, Jose Ramon; Durá, Francisco Javier; Durand, Jose L.; Ena, Javier; Encinas, Ana Rosa; Erdozain, Juan Peo; Escribano, Jose; Escriva, Blanca; Esteve, Eduardo; Facila, Lorenzo; Fenoll, Federico; Fernandez, Eugenio; Fernandez, Celia; Fernandez, Maria Jesus; Fernandez, Antonia; Fernandez, Jacinto; Fernandez, Severo; Fernandez, Jose Manuel; Fernandez, Jose Manuel Fernandez; Ferrer, Juan Carlos; Ferrer, Peo; Ferrer Bascuñana, Peo; Fierro, Maria Jose; Flores, Julio; Fuentes, Fernando; Fuertes, Jorge; Galgo, Alberto; Galvez, Angel; Gallego, Anea; Garcia, Maria Angeles; Garcia, Jose; Garcia, Maria Luisa; Garcia, Peo; Garcia, Javier; García, Francisco; Garrido, Nícolas Garrido; Gil, Manuel Gil; Ginés Gascón, Ramón; Godoy, Diego; Gomez, Carlos Manuel; Gonzalez, Miguel; Gonzalez, Rosa; Gonzalez, Rocío; Gonzalez, Enrique; Gonzalez, Juan Jose; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Gonzalez Huambos, Adan; Guerrero, Jordi; Guillen, Rosario; Guirao, Lorenzo; Gutierrez, Fernando; Gutierrez, Diego; Hernandez, Alberto; Hernandez, Antonio; Hernandis, Vicenta; Herrero, Jose Vicente; Herreros, Benjamin; Hevia Roiguez, Eduardo; Horgue, Antonio; Illan, Fatima; Inigo, Pilar; Ibrahim Jaber, Ali; Jimenez, Manuel; Jornet, Agusti; Juanola, Ester; Laguna, Alfonso; Latorre, Juan; Lebron, Jose Antonio; Lecube, Albert; Ledesma, Claudio; Ligorria, Cristina; Lima, Joan; López, Jose Enrique; Lopez, Manuel; López, José Antonio; López, Jaime; López, Isio; Lozano, Jose Vicente; Mangas, Miguel Angel; Mangas, Alipio; Manzano, Antonio; Maraver, Juan; Marco, Maria Dolores; Marchán, Enrique; Marchante, Francisco; Marin, Fernando; Marreo, Josefa Esther; Martin, Manuel; Martin, Alberto; Martin, Francisco Javier; Martinez, Antonio; Martinez, Guillermo; Martínez, Luis; Martinez Barselo, Antonio Pablo; Mas, Emili; Mascareño, Isabel; Mascarós, Enrique; Massa, Rita; Mazón, Pilar; Mediavilla, Juan Diego; Mena, Candido; Mendez, Jose; Mendez, Jose Maria; Mezquita Raya, Peo; Millan, Jose Maria; Millaruelo, Jose; Minguela, Ester; Miret, Pere; Molina, Mariano; Molina, Carmen; Montagud, Blanca; Montalban, Coral; Montiel, Angel; Montoro, Javier; Monze, Bernardo; Moreno, Francisco Luis; Morillas, Antonio; Moro, Jose Antonio; Moya, Ana; Muñiz, Ovidio; Muñoz, Manuel; Navarro, Vicente Luis; Nerin, Jesus; Nicolas, Ricardo; Nogueiras, Concepción; Ojeda, Benito; Olmerilla, Javier; Oller, Guillermo; Ortega, Antonio; Ortega, Manuel; Ortega, Miguel; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Otegui Alarduya, Luis; Palet, Jordi; Palomo, Jesus; Paytubí, Carlos; Peiro, Rafael; Pelaez, Carmen; Peña, Peo; Peñafiel, Javier; Perez, Antonia; Perez, Elvira; Perez, Tomas; Peso, Miguel; Pilar, Juan Manuel; Piñeiro, Carlos; Plaza, Jose Antonio; Polo, Noelia; Portal, Maria; Prieto, Jesus; Prieto, Luis; Prieto Novo, Manuel; Puñal, Peo; Quesada, Miguel; Quindimil, Jose Antonio; Rabade, Jose Manuel; Ramila Beraza, Luis Antonio; Ramirez, José Manuel; Ramos, Jose Antonio; Ramos, Francisco; Rayo, Manuel; Reixa Vizoso, Sol; Reyes, Antonio; Rico, Miguel Angel; Ripoll, Tomas; Rivera, Antonio; Robres, Mariano; Rodilla, Enrique; Roiguez, Miguel Angel; Roiguez, Zoilo Jesus; Roiguez, Carlos; Roiguez, Pilar; Roiguez, Melchor; Roiguez, Alfonso; Rojas, Domingo; Rosell, Luis; Rossignoli, Carlos; Rueda, Antonio; Rueda, Eloy; Ruix, Anes; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Ruiz, Luis; Saban, Jose; Saez, Francisco Jose; Salleras, Narcis; Sánchez, Gerardo; Sanchez, Gloria; Sanchez, Angel; Sanfeliu, Josep Maria; Sangros Gonzalez, Javier; Santos, Francisco; Santus, Eufrosina; Sebastian, Alfredo; Seguro, Maria Eugenia; Selles, David; Serrano, Daniel; Serrano, Soledad; Serrano, Adalberto; Sestorain, Francisco; Solbes, Ruben; Soriano, Cristina; Suárez, Héctor; Surroca, Maria Luisa; Tarabini, Ada; Tarraga, Peo; Teixido, Eulalia; Terron, Raquel; Torres, Antonio; Tortosa, Jose Maria; Tortosa, Frederic; Valdés, Carmen; Valdés, Peo; Valiente, Jose Ignacio; Varo, Antonio; Vazquez, Enrique; Vázquez, Luis; Vela Ruiz de Morales, Jose Manuel; Vericat, Antonio; Vicioso, Peo; Vilaplana, Carlos; Villazón, Francisco; Lidia Viñas, Lidia Viñas; Zuagoitia, Jose Felix; Nörgaard, Faris; Dziamski, Ryszard; Haglund, Lars; Holm, Daniela; Sars, Mikael; Jagunic, Ivica; Östgård, Per; Kumlin, Lars; Jacobsson, Michael; Hamad, Yousef; Jäger, Wanje; Särhammar, Lars; Olsson, Anders; Boldt-Christmas, Antonina; Nyborg, Karin; Kjellström, Thomas; Ghazal, Faris; Wikström, Lene; Holby, Torulf; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Kynde, Sara Maria; Eizyk, Enrique Julio; Tengblad, Anders; Christoffersson, Ole; Sjöström, Astrid; Kynde, Christian; Katzman, Per; Tenhunen, Anita; Lennermo, Klas; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Löndahl, Magnus; Elfstrand, Aino; Grönlund-Brown, Inger; Ziedén, Bo; Minnhagen, Karin; Lindvall, Peter; Fant, Kristina; Kaczynski, Jacek; Wallmark, Anders; Wallén, Carl-Erik; Wallberg, Håkan; Grönquist, Lennart; Hansen, John Albert; Björkander, Inge; Timberg, Ingar; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Fries, Robert; Carlsson, Jan-Erik; Rautio, Aslak Tauno; Sjöberg, Lennart; Wirdby, Alexander; Höök, Peter; Larsson, Åsa; Bergström, Catharina Lysell; Jwayed, Addnan; Smolowicz, Adam; Lindman, Anne-Christine; Nilsson, Per; Tarrach, Gerrit; Carlsson, Ingolf; Wieloch, Mattias; Rindevall, Peter; Strömblad, Gunnar; Holmberg, Göran; Shahnazarian, Henrik; Melchior, Jan; Younan, Kamal; Hansson, Anders; Bjurklint, Dag; Borgencrantz, Bertil; Sjöström, Malin; Mullaart, Mikael; Munoz, Marjatta; Jakkola, Vallentina; Romot, Jaan; Dash, Rabinarayan; Magnusson, Jan-Olof; Ahmed, Saman; Jonsson, Christina; Pipkorn, Owe; Bray, Edward; Wolff, Aneas; Black, Iain; Head, Christopher; Allan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes with and without the metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study of 22,063 statin-treated outpatients consecutively recruited by clinicians in Canada and 11 European countries. Patient

  19. Letter to the Editor: The Surge of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in China - an International Alert: Physical Exercise and Low-Caloric Diet May Reduce the Risks of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pai C; Han, Qiao Jun; Liu, Shuyi; Li, Xiu Jun; Inman, Kristin S; Chia, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in China has surged from 0.67% before 1980 to 11.6% currently. It is even higher than the prevalence in the United States. Certainly, China's economic open-ups, improving living standard, and modernization have propagated the surge. From a traditional public-health point of view, increased food intake and decreased exercise were the main contributors. A new knowledge of colon microbiota could be applied to provide a second harvest of food energy; for example, large molecules of carbohydrates, which are undigested by the stomach and small intestine, produce by-products that the body can absorb in the colon. Colon microbiota can ferment these carbohydrates to the short-chain fatty acid butyrate. This is an energy source that may even cause nonalcoholic fatty liver. How these colon microbiota contribute to the surge of diabetes and whether this new knowledge can be used to control diabetes and metabolic syndrome are questions for future scientific studies. Clinically, however, colon microbiota have had immediate applications; fecal microbiota have been transplanted from healthy persons to treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection at Mayo Clinic. In addition, a stool biobank of healthy persons was established at Mayo Clinic for future clinical applications. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  20. Diabetic Foot Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes at the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hosseini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Diabetic foot problems are one of the major causes of mortality and disability in diabetic patients. It is considered one of the costliest conditions for health care systems. This study is designed to identify diabetic foot risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus at Kamkar Hospital diabetes clinic in Qom, Iran during 2006.MethodsThis study was performed on 140 diabetes mellitus patients at the Kamkar Hospital diabetic clinic. International working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF guidelines were used for physical exam of diabetic foot in these patients. The physical exam consisted of inspection of foot appearance for deformity, skin keratosis and ulcer, and neurological and arterial pulse exam of the lower extremities of these patients. Patients in this study were divided into four risk groups based on the IWGDF guidelines. ANOVA method was used for analysis and comparison of the results with P<0.05 considered as significant. ResultsMean age of the participants in this study was 52.4±11.2 years old from which 67.1% were female, 37.1% of patients were illiterate, and 10% were active smokers. Mean duration of diabetes in these patients was 8.9 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 29.4± 4.4 and HbA1C was 9.3 ± 1.9. Percentages of the patients with retinopathy and nephropathy were 33.6% and 17.7% respectively. 95% of the patients did not know the correct way of nail clipping, 95.5% were wearing uncomfortable shoes, and 14.3% of patients had history of foot ulcer. None of the them had any education about foot care. Physical examination with monofilament, ankle reflex and vibration perception were defected in 28.6%, 52.5%, and 32.1% of patients respectively. 37.7% of patients had a decreased lower extremity pulse that was not felt by touch. Based on the IWGDF classifications, 70% of the patients were in the higher-risk group for diabetic foot ulcer. In the high risk group, age, duration of diabetes, illiteracy was

  1. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000320.htm Diabetic ketoacidosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening problem that ...

  2. Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  3. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  4. Diabetes Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Diabetes Myths On behalf of the millions of Americans ... or obese, you will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Fact: Being overweight is a risk factor for ...

  5. Gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000896.htm Gestational diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that starts or ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  7. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes: Tips for American Indians & Alaska ... pressure instead of using a needle to deliver the insulin. What oral ... eating and physical activity habits to manage your type 2 diabetes. You can ...

  8. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  9. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ahmad, T.; Hussain, S.J.; Javed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity and Ischaemic Heart Disease have become a problem of public health magnitude with substantial economic burden both in the developed as well as the developing countries. Obesity is quite frequent in Type 2 diabetics and also plays a central role in causing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Metabolic Syndrome significantly increases the incidence of cardiovascular complications. This study was done to determine the frequency of MetS in our Type 2 diabetic patients as most of the components of MetS can be modified and identifying/managing these at an early stage might be of considerable help in reducing cardiovascular complications. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in Medical B and Medical A wards of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Nov, 08 to April, 09. Type 2 Diabetic patients aged above 40 years who gave informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome was estimated according to the IDF consensus worldwide definition of the MetS. Results: Of the 100 patients enrolled in this study 56 were females and 44 were males with a mean age of 59.9 years. Out of these 100 participants seventy six (76%) were diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Of the 56 females, forty eight (85.71%) were having metabolic syndrome while twenty eight (63.63%) of the 44 male participants were having the syndrome. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: Frequency of MetS was found to be significantly high in this study with female preponderance. All the components, except Hypertension were more frequent in females. Diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome need more aggressive approach in management so as to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular complications. (author)

  10. Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    aspects of the quality of diabetes care as delivered by the specialist in internal medicine (internist) and the diabetes nurse specialist (DNS). Two principal components analyses (internist/DNS) both yielded one 14 item factor with a high internal consistency. Satisfaction with diabetes care, fewer......OBJECTIVES: To develop a brief measure of patients' evaluation of the quality of diabetes care and to study predictors of consumers' rating of the quality of diabetes care. DESIGN: A prospective design. SUBJECTS: 176 adults with type 1 (39%) or type 2 (61%) diabetes. MAIN MEASURES: Demographic...... variables, HbA1c, number of diabetes complications, satisfaction with diabetes care, diabetes related distress, and fear of hypoglycaemia were assessed by self-report. In addition, satisfaction with diabetes care and evaluations about quality of the care were measured at 16 month follow up. Statistical...

  11. Childhood Age and Associations Between Childhood Metabolic Syndrome and Adult Risk for Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Carotid Intima Media Thickness: The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Juha; Magnussen, Costan G; Sinaiko, Alan; Woo, Jessica; Urbina, Elaine; Jacobs, David R; Steinberger, Julia; Prineas, Ronald; Sabin, Matthew A; Burns, Trudy; Berenson, Gerald; Bazzano, Lydia; Venn, Alison; Viikari, Jorma S A; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli; Dwyer, Terence; Juonala, Markus

    2017-08-16

    There is paucity of knowledge concerning the specific age in youth when the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) begin to be operative. Thus, we investigated the relation of age to the associations of childhood MetS with adult MetS, type 2 diabetes mellitus and high carotid intima-media thickness. Five thousand eight-hundred three participants were analyzed in 4 cohort studies (Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns, Bogalusa Heart Study, Princeton Lipid Research Study, Insulin Study). International cutoffs and previously used 75th percentile cutoffs were used for children to define MetS and its components. Mean follow-up period was 22.3 years. Logistic regression was used to calculate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Childhood MetS and overweight were associated with over 2.4-fold risk for adult MetS from the age of 5 years onward. Risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus was increased from the age of 8 (risk ratio, 2.6-4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-6.76 and 1.12-7.24, respectively) onward for the 2 childhood MetS criteria based on international cut-off values and for childhood overweight. Risk for high carotid intima-media thickness was significant at ages 11 to 18 years in relation to childhood MetS or overweight (risk ratio, 2.44-4.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.55 and 2.55-5.66, respectively). Continuous childhood MetS score was associated with adult MetS from the age of 5, with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the age of 14 and with high carotid intima-media thickness from the age of 11 years onward. Adult MetS was predicted by MetS in childhood beginning at age 5. However, adult type 2 diabetes mellitus and subclinical atherosclerosis were not predicted by childhood data until after age 8. Body mass index measurement alone at the same age points provided similar findings. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  13. Medication adherence and direct treatment cost among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Pharmacology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti,. Nigeria. 2. ... According to the International. Diabetic ... 53% non-adherence among diabetics in Malaysia; similar .... Necessary adjustments were made in the contents and.

  14. Use of the smartphone application "Pregnant with Diabetes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Sidse Kjærhus; Nichum, Vibeke Ladefoged; Barfred, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    -hospitalet, to develop the app "Pregnant with Diabetes". The app communicates clinically important antenatal health information to women with diabetes, based on recommendations from our centre. Women with pre-existing diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes) completed an anonymous, structured questionnaire at their first...... antenatal visit in early pregnancy at our centre. National and international data on numbers of downloads were obtained from Google Play, from the App Store and from Google Analytics. RESULTS: Among 139 pregnant women with diabetes (96 with Type 1 diabetes and 43 with Type 2 diabetes), 99% had a smartphone...

  15. Diabetic retinopathy screening using deep neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Nishanthan; Hong, Sheng Chiong; Sime, Mary J; Wilson, Graham A

    2017-09-07

    There is a burgeoning interest in the use of deep neural network in diabetic retinal screening. To determine whether a deep neural network could satisfactorily detect diabetic retinopathy that requires referral to an ophthalmologist from a local diabetic retinal screening programme and an international database. Retrospective audit. Diabetic retinal photos from Otago database photographed during October 2016 (485 photos), and 1200 photos from Messidor international database. Receiver operating characteristic curve to illustrate the ability of a deep neural network to identify referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate or worse diabetic retinopathy or exudates within one disc diameter of the fovea). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. For detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, the deep neural network had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.901 (95% confidence interval 0.807-0.995), with 84.6% sensitivity and 79.7% specificity for Otago and 0.980 (95% confidence interval 0.973-0.986), with 96.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity for Messidor. This study has shown that a deep neural network can detect referable diabetic retinopathy with sensitivities and specificities close to or better than 80% from both an international and a domestic (New Zealand) database. We believe that deep neural networks can be integrated into community screening once they can successfully detect both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  16. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has lots of free information to help you manage your diabetes. General Tips Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and ... Check these resources for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other ... Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need ...

  20. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  1. Genetics of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  2. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  3. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  4. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Managing Diabetes You can manage your diabetes and live a ... you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, ...

  5. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  6. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van’t Riet Esther

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geographical areas in the Netherlands. The aim of the study is to create a research infrastructure that will allow the study of risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic determinants for severe diabetes complications. Methods/design Baseline examinations began November 2009 and will continue through 2012. By the end of 2012, it is expected that 7000 patients with type 2 diabetes will be included in the Diabetes Pearl cohort. To ensure quality of the data collected, standard operation procedures were developed and used in all 8 recruitment centers. From all patients who provide informed consent, the following information is collected: personal information, medication use, physical examination (antropometry, blood pressure, electrocardiography (ECG, retina photographs, ankle-brachial index, peripheral vibration perception, self-report questionnaire (socio-economic status, lifestyle, (family history of disease, and psychosocial well-being, laboratory measurements (glucose, A1c, lipid profile, kidney function, biobank material (storage of urine and blood samples and isolated DNA. All gathered clinical data and biobank information is uploaded to a database for storage on a national level. Biobanks are maintained locally at all recruitment centers. Discussion The Diabetes Pearl is large-scale cohort of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands aiming to study risk factors, including biomarkers and genetic markers, for disease deterioration and the development of severe diabetes complications. As a result of the well-designed research design and the national coverage, the Diabetes Pearl data can be of great value to national and international researchers with

  7. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Jeanette S.; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Kusek, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associa...

  8. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Gestational Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-14

    Gestational diabetes happens in a woman who develops diabetes during pregnancy. This podcast discusses its potential effects and action steps to avoid complications.  Created: 11/14/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) and National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Prevention Research Branch.   Date Released: 11/27/2007.

  9. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes with fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test and A1C level: A1C based screening may be a better diagnostic tool for diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    , Mehmet Ozgur Niflioglu, Mithat Bahceci,; Bahceci, Mithat; Aslan, Sakine Leyla; Shawcross, James S.; Tutuncuoglu, Aliye Pelin; Harman, Ece

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 285 million people around the world have diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has proposed hemoglobin A1C 6.5% (HbA1c) for the diagnosis of diabetes, and 5.7-6.4% as a risk factor for progression to diabetes. This new criterions accuracy is controversial and has not yet been adopted internationally. We aimed to clarify the power of A1C in diagnosis of diabetes and pre-diabetes.

  10. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes with fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test and A1C level: A1C based screening may be a better diagnostic tool for diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    , Mehmet Ozgur Niflioglu, Mithat Bahceci,

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 285 million people around the world have diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has proposed hemoglobin A1C 6.5% (HbA1c) for the diagnosis of diabetes, and 5.7-6.4% as a risk factor for progression to diabetes. This new criterions accuracy is controversial and has not yet been adopted internationally. We aimed to clarify the power of A1C in diagnosis of diabetes and pre-diabetes.

  11. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass versus Intensive Medical Management for the Control of Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension and Hyperlipidemia: An International, Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Korner, Judith; Lee, Wei-Jei; Connett, John E.; Inabnet, William B.; Billington, Charles B.; Thomas, Avis J.; Leslie, Daniel B.; Chong, Keong; Jeffery, Robert W.; Ahmed, Leaque; Vella, Adrian; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Bessler, Marc; Sarr, Michael G.; Swain, James M.; Laqua, Patricia; Jensen, Michael D.; Bantle, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Context Guideline directed care for diabetes calls for control of glycemia, blood pressure and cholesterol (composite goal). Most patients treated medically do not reach this goal. Objective Determine the efficacy and safety of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) added to lifestyle modification and intensive medical management (LS/IMM) to achieve control of all 3 endpoints. Design Two-arm unblinded randomized clinical trial with 120 participants. The primary endpoint of the composite outcome was assessed at 12 months. The study began in April 2008 and completed one year follow-up in all participants in December 2012. Setting Four academic teaching hospitals in the U.S. and Taiwan, involving five operating surgeons. Participants Inclusion criteria for the Diabetes Surgery Study (DSS) included HbA1c ≥ 8.0%, BMI 30.0-39.9 kg/m2, diagnosis and treatment of type 2 diabetes for at least six months, and stimulated C peptide > 1.0 ng/ml. Interventions All patients received lifestyle intervention modeled after the Look AHEAD study. Medications for hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were prescribed according to protocol. RYGB techniques were standardized. Main Outcome Measure Attainment of a composite goal: HbA1c < 7.0%, LDL-C < 100 mg/dl, and SBP < 130 mmHg. Results One hundred and twenty participants were randomized with equal probability into LS/IMM or RYGB (60 in each group). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Mean BMI was 34.6 kg/m2 (95% CI 29.2 to 40.8 kg/m2) with 71 (59%; 95% CI 50% to 68%) participants having BMI < 35 kg/m2, and mean HbA1c was 9.6% (95% CI 9.4% to 9.8%). At 12 months the followup rate was 95%, and 11 (19%) in the LS/IMM group and 28 (49%) in the RYGB group achieved the primary endpoint (OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 11.6). RYGB participants required 3.1 fewer medications than LS/IMM (4.8 versus 1.7, 95% CI -3.6 to -2.3). Weight loss was 7.9% LS/IMM vs. 26.1% RYGB (difference 18.2% 95% CI 14.2% to 20.7%). Regression analyses

  12. Diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Gerdes, V. E.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Meesters, E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol

  13. Gestational diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recognition of diabetes during pregnancy.1D.n However, GOM has sufficient .... If the plasma glucose value at 1 hour is over 7.8 mmolll, the ..... OeFronzo RA Pathogenesis of type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes: a balanced overview.

  14. Diabetes Detection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Diabetes is among the most common chronic diseases in the U.S. and the seventh leading cause of death. Over 90 percent of cases are type 2. In this podcast, Dr. Ann Albright discusses ways to prevent or control diabetes.

  15. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens Diabetes Center Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ... Mass Index (BMI) Charts Eating Out When Your Child Has Diabetes Meal Plans and Diabetes Treating Type 2 Diabetes ...

  16. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger, Boyd E; Gabbe, Steven G; Persson, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study showed significant perinatal risks at levels of maternal hyperglycemia below values that are diagnostic for diabetes. A Consensus Panel of the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) reviewed HAPO Study...

  17. [Position statement: surgery and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, Peter; Huber, Joakim; Clodi, Martin; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This position statement reflects the opinion of the Austrian Diabetes Association concerning the perioperative management of patients with diabetes mellitus based on the available scientific evidence. The paper covers necessary preoperative examinations from an internal/diabetological point of view as well as the perioperative metabolic control by means of oral antidiabetics and/or insulin therapy.

  18. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy ...

  19. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Skiadopoulos, Dionysios

    2013-01-01

    This theses on Diabetes Mellitus aims at giving an insight at various aspects of this chronic disease and the risk factors that lead to it; the varius ways it develops in the human body; the old and new approaches to treatment, both from a pharmacological and a non- pharmacologiacal point of view; ways to prevent and to manage the diabetes complications; how to improve the live of the diabetic patients who are faced with not only physical but also psychological problems; statistical data from...

  20. Profile of Nigerians with diabetes mellitus - Diabcare Nigeria study group (2008: Results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus is the commonest endocrine-metabolic disorder in Nigeria similar to the experience in other parts of the world. The aim was to assess the clinical and laboratory profile, and evaluate the quality of care of Nigerian diabetics with a view to planning improved diabetes care. Materials and Methods: In a multicenter study across seven tertiary health centers in Nigeria, the clinical and laboratory parameters of diabetic out-patients were evaluated. Clinical parameters studied include type of diabetes, anthropometry, and blood pressure (BP status, chronic complications of diabetes, and treatment types. Laboratory data assessed included fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h post-prandial (2-HrPP glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, urinalysis, serum lipids, electrolytes, urea, and creatinine. Results: A total of 531 patients, 209 (39.4% males and 322 (60.6% females enrolled. The mean age of the patients was 57.1 ± 12.3 years with the mean duration of diabetes of 8.8 ± 6.6 years. Majority (95.4% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM compared to type 1 DM (4.6%, with P < 0.001. The mean FPG, 2-HrPP glucose, and HbA1c were 8.1 ± 3.9 mmol/L, 10.6 ± 4.6 mmol/L, and 8.3 ± 2.2%, respectively. Only 170 (32.4% and 100 (20.4% patients achieved the ADA and IDF glycemic targets, respectively. Most patients (72.8% did not practice self-monitoring of blood glucose. Hypertension was found in 322 (60.9%, with mean systolic BP 142.0 ± 23.7 mmHg, and mean diastolic BP 80.7 ± 12.7 mmHg. Diabetic complications found were peripheral neuropathy (59.2%, retinopathy (35.5%, cataracts (25.2%, cerebrovascular disease (4.7%, diabetic foot ulcers (16.0%, and nephropathy (3.2%. Conclusion: Most Nigerian diabetics have suboptimal glycemic control, are hypertensives, and have chronic complications of DM. Improved quality of care and treatment to target is recommended to reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality.

  1. Use of the smartphone application "Pregnant with Diabetes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Sidse Kjærhus; Nichum, Vibeke Ladefoged; Barfred, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this article was to evaluate the awareness and use of the smartphone application (app) "Pregnant with Diabetes" locally, nationally and internationally. METHODS: In 2013, a patient initiated collaboration with the staff at Centre for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Rigs...... antenatal visit in early pregnancy at our centre. National and international data on numbers of downloads were obtained from Google Play, from the App Store and from Google Analytics. RESULTS: Among 139 pregnant women with diabetes (96 with Type 1 diabetes and 43 with Type 2 diabetes), 99% had a smartphone...

  2. [Diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  3. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ketones build up in the blood and eventually "spill over" into the urine. Diabetic ketoacidosis is usually ... your heart, muscles and nerves. Swelling in the brain (cerebral edema). Adjusting your blood sugar level too ...

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    diabetic foot were significantly associated with DR. Within patients' practice, regular .... Major limb complications included foot ulcer, claudication .... Flat. 217 44.5 66 30.6. Family income / month (KD). 1500. 45 9.2 24 ...

  5. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  6. Prevalence and clinical profile of metabolic syndrome among type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Amy; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ngai, Michelle; Amutha, Anandakumar; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Jebarani, Saravanan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Michael, Edwin; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus(T1DM) and to look at prevalence of diabetes complications in T1DM with and without MetS. We studied 451 T1DM patients attending a tertiary diabetes centre in Chennai, South India. T1DM was diagnosed based on absence of beta cell reserve and requirement of insulin from the time of diagnosis. Data on clinical and biochemical characteristics as well as complications details to study the prevalence were also extracted from electronic records. T1DM patients were divided into those with and without MetS[diagnosed according to the harmonizing the metabolic syndrome criteria(IDF/NHLBI/AHA/WHF/IAS/IASO)]. The overall prevalence of MetS among T1DM was 22.2%(100/451). Patients with MetS were older, had longer diabetes duration, acanthosis nigricans, and increased serum cholesterol. In the unadjusted logistic regression analysis, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy were associated with MetS. However after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes duration, HbA1C and BMI significant association was seen only between MetS and retinopathy [odds ratio (OR) 2.82, 95% CI 1.18-6.74, p = 0.020] and nephropathy [OR 4.92, 95% CI 2.59-9.33, p < 0.001]. Prevalence of MetS is high among Asian Indian T1DM patients, and its presence is associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Aglycosuric Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, W. B.; Spitzer, W. O.; Truscott, P. W.

    1963-01-01

    The usefulness of urine tests for glucose was compared with that of blood sugar determinations in detecting diabetes mellitus in 2000 medical outpatients. Eighty-five patients proved to be diabetic, but 33 of these had no glycosuria on their first visit and would not have been detected by laboratory tests had the blood glucose levels not been measured. Exactly one-half of the new diabetics discovered would have been missed (15 of 30) had only urine tests been performed. The new diabetics who were aglycosuric at their initial examination had a mild form of the disease, were predominantly elderly, and were controlled, in nearly every case, by diet alone. Most of these patients had evidence of an elevated renal threshold for glucose. These results indicate that there is a large group of patients with mild, asymptomatic, diabetes mellitus who remain undetected unless blood tests are employed routinely. Because they have little or no glycosuria these patients do not have polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, or loss of weight. Automation in the medical laboratory has made routine blood tests for glucose feasible and rewarding in detecting diabetes mellitus. PMID:20327667

  8. Hormones of Adipose Tissue and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Payenok

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and gestational diabetes are the risk factors for complications both in the mother and in the fetus. Adipose tissue hormones (leptin, adiponectin, resistin are secreted by the human placenta and regulate the function of trophoblast. The review presents data from the literature on the role of adipocytokines in the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in obese women. The article considers the criteria and algorithms for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes recommended by the World Health Organization and the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group.

  9. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care team is there for you. Your child's diabetes management plan should be easy to understand, detailed, ... Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Monitoring Blood Sugar Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Medicines for Diabetes Type 2 ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicines and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the ... Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering ...

  11. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  13. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  14. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  15. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  16. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women with diabetes can make a difference. Other Resources from the FDA FDA Information on Diabetes Treatment ... for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth ...

  20. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other FDA ... on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  3. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... diabetes. More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's ...

  4. Fruit intake and incident diabetic retinopathy with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kawasaki, Ryo; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Horikawa, Chika; Ohashi, Yasuo; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2013-03-01

    Antioxidants and dietary fiber are postulated to have preventive effects on diabetic retinopathy, but evidence is lacking. We investigated this association in a cohort with type 2 diabetes 40-70 years of age with hemoglobin (Hb)A1C ≥6.5%, originally part of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study. After excluding people who did not respond to a dietary survey and patients with diabetic retinopathy or a major ocular disease at baseline, we analyzed 978 patients. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups and 24-hour dietary records. Primary outcome was incident diabetic retinopathy determined using international severity scales. Mean fruit intake in quartiles ranged from 23 to 253 g/day, with increasing trends across quartiles of fruit intake for vitamin C, vitamin E, carotene, retinol equivalent, dietary fiber, potassium, and sodium. Mean energy intake ranged from 1644 to 1863 kcal/day, and fat intake was approximately 25%. HbA1C, body mass index, triglycerides, and systolic blood pressure were well controlled. During the 8-year follow-up, the numbers of incident cases of diabetic retinopathy from the first through the fourth quartiles of fruit intake were 83, 74, 69, and 59. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of fruit intake compared with the first quartile were 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.92), 0.59 (0.41-0.85), and 0.48 (0.32-0.71) (test for trend, P diabetes duration, overweight, smoking, and hypertension. Risk for diabetic retinopathy declined with increased intake of fruits and vegetables, vitamin C, and carotene. Increased fruit intake in ranges commonly consumed was associated with reduced incident diabetic retinopathy among patients adhering to a low-fat energy-restricted diet.

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy: Clinical Findings and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Murray McGavin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic abnormality in which there is a failure to utilise glucose and hence a state of hyperglycaemia can occur. If hyperglycaemia continues uncontrolled over time, it will lead to significant and widespread pathological changes, including involvement of the retina, brain and kidney.In industrialised countries, approximately 1% of the population is diabetic, and at least another 1% are undiagnosed diabetics. Insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM, accounts for approximately 10-15% of cases, the remainder being maturity onset or non-insulin dependent diabetics (NIDDM. Diabetes mellitus is an international public health problem with estimated prevalences ranging from 2.0% to 11.7% in studied populations across the world.

  6. Aging, female sex, migration, elevated HDL-C, and inflammation are associated with prevalence of metabolic syndrome among African bank employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gombet T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thierry Gombet,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Bertrand Ellenga-Mbolla,1 Meo Stephane Ikama,3 Etienne Mokondjimobe,4 Gisele Kimbally-Kaky,3 Jean-Louis Nkoua,31Emergency Department, University Hospital Center of Brazzaville, Brazzaville, Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha, Eastern Cape, South Africa; 3Department of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, University Hospital Center of Brazzaville, Brazzaville, Congo; 4Laboratory of Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Brazzaville, CongoBackground: The objective of this study was to compare four different criteria for diagnosing metabolic syndrome (MS and to correlate sociodemographic data, liver enzymes, lipids, inflammation, and insulin resistance with MS definitions.Methods: This cross-sectional study included a random number of 126 African bank employees from Brazzaville, Congo.Results: The prevalence of MS varied according to the different definitions used: 4.8% under World Health Organization (WHO criteria, 8.7% under the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP-ATPIII criteria, 14.3% under the International Diabetes Federation (IDF for Europe, and 15.9% by the IDF for Central Africa. According to the IDF, specific cutoff points for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ≥13 mm at first hour and ≥30 mm at second hour, defined MS for Central Africa. The best agreement was observed between the IDF for Europe and the IDF for Central Africa (Kappa = 0.938; P < 0.0001 criteria. The worst agreements were between the WHO and IDF for Central Africa (Kappa = 0.419; P < 0.0001 criteria and between the WHO and IDF for Europe (Kappa = 0.462; P < 0.0001 criteria. The NECP-ATPIII criteria did not agree with either the IDF for Europe or the IDF for Central Africa criteria. There was a significant relationship between female sex, aging, elevated liver enzymes, elevated phospholipids, high homeostasis model assessment of insulin

  7. Masked hypertension in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Stanley S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood...

  8. NIV-richtlijn: Zwangerschap bij diabetes [NIV-richtlijn: Screening and diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, A. de; Sluisveld, I. van; Rijnders, M.; Peeters, L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (CBO) and the Association of Physicians in Internal Medicine (NIV) have revised their guideline on diabetes and pregnancy. One chapter deals with the question of whether it is useful to screen for diabetes in pregnancy. The complications

  9. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to various definitions and hypertriglyceridemic-waist in malaysian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Laila Ruwaida Mohd; Isa, Nurfirdaus; Muda, Wan Manan Wan; Mohamed, Hamid Jan

    2011-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome can be diagnosed according to several different criteria such as the latest International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Program III (NCEP ATPIII), and World Health Organization (WHO). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the concordance between the above mentioned definition, and hypertriglyceridemic-waist criteria. This cross sectional study was done in Bachok, Malaysia and involved 298 respondents aged between 18 to 70 years. Multistage random sampling method was used to identify study locations while convenient random sampling method was applied to select individuals. Hypertriglyceridemic waist was defined from an internationally acceptable cut-off criterion. Kappa statistic (κ test) was used to determine the concordance between various definitions and hypertriglyceridemic-waist. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on different definitions was 32.2% (IDF), 28.5% (NCEP ATP III) and 12.4% (modified WHO). The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic-waist was 19.7% and based on the IDF criteria a total of 97.5% participants with hypertriglyceridemic-waist had metabolic syndrome. The IDF criteria showed the highest concordance with NCEP ATPIII criteria (κ = 0.63), followed by hypertriglyceridemic-waist criteria (κ = 0.62) and WHO criteria (κ = 0.26). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was highest using the IDF criteria compared to NCEP ATPIII, modified WHO and hypertriglyceridemic-waist. There was a good concordance of IDF criteria with NCEP ATP III and hypertriglyceridemic-waist criteria.

  10. Differential Relationships Between Diabetes Knowledge Scales and Diabetes Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Aprill Z; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2017-08-01

    Background Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the US and requires daily self-management in addition to knowledge of the disease. Three knowledge assessments used are the Michigan Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), Starr County Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), and Kaiser DISTANCE Survey (DISTANCE). Purpose The purpose of the study was to test the discriminate validity of 3 diabetes knowledge scales and determine which is best associated with diabetes self-care and glycemic control. Methods Three hundred sixty-one adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from primary care clinics. Four analyses were conducted to investigate the validity and relationships of the scale: alpha statistic to test internal validity, factor analysis to determine how much of the variance was explained, Pearson's correlation between the 3 scales, and Pearson's correlation between each scale, self-care, and outcomes. Results The DKQ had an alpha of 0.75, the DKT had an alpha of 0.49, and DISTANCE had an alpha of 0.36. The DKQ was significantly correlated with glycemic control. The DKT scale was significantly associated with general diet, the DISTANCE survey was significantly associated with exercise, and both DKT and DISTANCE were significantly associated with foot care. Conclusion Correlations among the 3 scales were modest, suggesting the scales are not measuring the same underlying construct. These findings indicate that researchers should carefully select scales appropriate for study goals or to appropriately capture the information being sought to inform practice.

  11. Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H A Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of water and electrolyte balance is frequently encountered in clinical medicine. Regulating water metabolism is critically important. Diabetes insipidus (DI) presented with excessive water loss from the kidney is a major disorder of water metabolism. To understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of DI and rationales of clinical management of DI is important for both research and clinical practice. This chapter will first review various forms of DI focusing on central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI ) . This is followed by a discussion of regulatory mechanisms underlying CDI and NDI , with a focus on the regulatory axis of vasopressin, vasopressin receptor 2 (V2R ) and the water channel molecule, aquaporin 2 (AQP2 ). The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various forms of DI will also be discussed with highlights of some of the latest therapeutic strategies that are developed from in vitro experiments and animal studies.

  12. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Monogenic Diabetes (Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus & MODY) The most common forms of diabetes, ... from each parent. What are monogenic forms of diabetes? Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  13. Validation of BP devices QardioArm® in the general population and Omron M6 Comfort® in type II diabetic patients according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Mirna N; Topouchian, Jirar; Zelveian, Parounak; Hakobyan, Zoya; Melkonyan, Arevik; Azaki, Alaa; Diab, Reem; Harb, Aya; Asmar, Roland

    2018-01-01

    Following the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) Revision 2010, QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort IT ® oscillometric devices were evaluated in the general population and in patients with type II diabetes, respectively, for self-blood pressure (BP) measurement. Both devices, QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® , measure BP at the brachial level. The ESH-IP Revision 2010 includes a total number of 33 subjects. For each measure, the difference between observer and device BP values was calculated. In all, 99 pairs of BP differences are classified into three categories (≤5, ≤10, and ≤15 mmHg). The protocol procedures were followed precisely. QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® fulfilled the requirements of the ESH-IP and passed the validation process successfully. For QardioArm ® , a total of 69 out of 99 comparisons for systolic blood pressure (SBP) showed an absolute difference within 5 mmHg and 82 out of 99 for diastolic blood pressure (DBP). As for Omron M6 Comfort ® , a total of 83 out of 99 comparisons for SBP showed an absolute difference within 5 mmHg and 77 out of 99 for DBP. The mean differences between the device and mercury readings were 0.7±5.9 mmHg for SBP and 0.3±4.1 mmHg for DBP for QardioArm ® and -1.4±4.7 mmHg for SBP and -2.1±4.3 mmHg for DBP for Omron M6 Comfort ® . With regard to part 2 of ESH-IP 2010, 27 out of 33 subjects had a minimum of two out of three measurements within 5 mmHg difference for SBP and 31 out of 33 subjects for DBP for the QardioArm ® , and 29 out of 33 patients had a minimum of two out of three measurements within 5 mmHg difference for SBP and 26 out of 33 patients for DBP for Omron M6 Comfort ® . QardioArm ® and Omron M6 Comfort ® readings differing from the mercury standard by <5, 10, and 15 mmHg fulfill the ESH-IP Revision 2010 requirements. Consequently, these two devices are suitable for use in the general population and non-insulin-dependent type II diabetic patients

  14. Diabetes research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linfoot, J.A.; Stubbs, H.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term effects of alpha-particle pituitary irradiation in patients being treated for diabetic retinopathy. Of particular interest is whether the altered hormonal environment influences vision, renal function, and survival

  15. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity: should we treat the obesity or the diabetes?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Alejandro Durán

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we review the results that can be expected after significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We provide consensus-based documentation supported by the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation on the importance of physical exercise, metabolic-bariatric surgery, and drug therapy. Lastly, we report the results of studies published in the last few years on glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs and the new family of oral drugs known as gliflozins, specifically studies published on dapagliflozin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitamin D and gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jan S; Lamont, Ronald F; Torloni, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Vitamin D status (which is involved in glucose homeostasis) is related to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM is characterized by increased resistance to and impaired secretion of insulin and results in higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes including operative delivery......, macrosomia, shoulder dystocia and neonatal hypoglycemia. Women with GDM and their babies are at increased risk for developing type II diabetes. RECENT FINDINGS: International definitions of vitamin D deficiency and normality are inconsistent. Vitamin D deficiency is common in pregnant women particularly...

  17. Fats for diabetics. (Letter).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katan, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Opinion. Comments on the treatment of type 2 diabetes from the interaction between nature and nurture. Effective form of treatment for type 2 diabetes; Composition of the diet for diabetics; Identification of unsaturated fats in the diabetic diet; Risks faced by diabetic patients.

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical ...

  19. Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients. ... Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) criteria and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. ... Results: By using the NCEP-ATP III criteria 26 out of 91 patients (28.6%) had the metabolic syndrome. MS was ...

  20. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (pmetabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (pmetabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Bowen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Bowen1,2, Russell L Rothman2,31Veterans Affairs Quality Scholars Fellowship Program, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes.Keywords: adolescent, type 2 diabetes, multidisciplinary

  2. Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Eating out when you have diabetes Diabetes nutrition — Make restaurant meals a healthy part of your diabetes ... have diabetes, eating out while sticking to your nutrition plan has gotten easier. Many restaurants offer healthy ...

  3. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus – clinical and biochemical differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  4. Diabetic Foot Australia guideline on footwear for people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; Lazzarini, Peter A; Armstrong, David G; Bus, Sicco A; Fitridge, Robert; Harding, Keith; Kinnear, Ewan; Malone, Matthew; Menz, Hylton B; Perrin, Byron M; Postema, Klaas; Prentice, Jenny; Schott, Karl-Heinz; Wraight, Paul R

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to create an updated Australian guideline on footwear for people with diabetes. We reviewed new footwear publications, (inter)national guidelines, and consensus expert opinion alongside the 2013 Australian footwear guideline to formulate updated recommendations. We recommend health professionals managing people with diabetes should: (1) Advise people with diabetes to wear footwear that fits, protects and accommodates the shape of their feet. (2) Advise people with diabetes to always wear socks within their footwear, in order to reduce shear and friction. (3) Educate people with diabetes, their relatives and caregivers on the importance of wearing appropriate footwear to prevent foot ulceration. (4) Instruct people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration to obtain footwear from an appropriately trained professional to ensure it fits, protects and accommodates the shape of their feet. (5) Motivate people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration to wear their footwear at all times, both indoors and outdoors. (6) Motivate people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration (or their relatives and caregivers) to check their footwear, each time before wearing, to ensure that there are no foreign objects in, or penetrating, the footwear; and check their feet, each time their footwear is removed, to ensure there are no signs of abnormal pressure, trauma or ulceration. (7) For people with a foot deformity or pre-ulcerative lesion, consider prescribing medical grade footwear, which may include custom-made in-shoe orthoses or insoles. (8) For people with a healed plantar foot ulcer, prescribe medical grade footwear with custom-made in-shoe orthoses or insoles with a demonstrated plantar pressure relieving effect at high-risk areas. (9) Review prescribed footwear every three months to ensure it still fits adequately, protects, and supports the foot. (10) For people with a plantar diabetic

  5. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (years of age) will be included. MAIN VARIABLES: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes......, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ∼3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients years of age were diagnosed in 2014). The disease management has...... classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Email Print Diabetes is a serious illness that affects over 29 million people in the United States. ... help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse ...

  7. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

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    Full Text Available ... tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy- ... to Store your Insulin during Storms and Blackouts Safety Information for Diabetes Medicines and Devices Beware of ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

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    Full Text Available ... day. FDA has lots of free information to help you manage your diabetes. General Tips Diabetes Treatments ... General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People ...

  10. Causes of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Neonatal diabetes occurs in the first 6 months of life. Doctors usually diagnose MODY during adolescence or early adulthood, but sometimes the ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  12. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  13. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  14. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  15. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  16. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... to help control symptoms and restore intimacy. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  17. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Zika and Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  18. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's Story ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

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    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your ... and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your health ...

  20. Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type 2 diabetes; Oral hypoglycemic - type 2 diabetes; High blood sugar - type 2 diabetes ... your kidneys are working well ( microalbuminuria and serum creatinine ). Visit your eye doctor at least once a ...

  1. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of diabetes, or are overweight. Physical inactivity, race, certain health problems such as high blood pressure, ... diabetes: meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies . Diabetes Car e. 2011;34(9):2116-2122. Haritoglou C, ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ... Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy- ... resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes for the first time when they become pregnant. This is called gestational (jes-Tay-shun-ul) diabetes. Other women have diabetes before they get pregnant. Use these resources to help you talk to ...

  7. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  8. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and ...

  10. Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichiro; Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    It is believed that the pancreas is low sensitive to radiation. In this chapter, the effect of radiation on the pancreas is discussed in the light of the radiosensitivity of the pancreas in animal experiments and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in A-bomb survivors. In an experiment on the whole-body irradiation with 800 rad using rats, a decrease in insulin secretion itself has not been noted, although a decrease in blood insulin and an increase in glucagon were associated with transiently increased blood glucose. In other studies, there was neither histologically nor endocrinologically abnormal findings due to several hundreds rad of radiation in the acute stage. For A-bomb survivors, blood levels of insulin tended to be slightly increased in the 40-59 age group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤1.5 km than those exposed at ≥3.0 km; and in the other age groups, there was no tendency for decreased blood levels of insulin. The ABCC-RERF Adult Health Study data (1958-1960) has revealed that there is no statistically significant correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and A-bomb radiation; nor has this been noted in any other study. Neither the prevalence of diabetes mellitus nor its complications is found to be independent upon distance from the hypocenter. (N.K.)

  11. International Trade. International Business

    OpenAIRE

    Мохнюк, А. М.; Mokhniuk, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Work programme of the study course “International Trade. International Business” was prepared in accordance with educational and vocational training program for bachelors of training direction 6.030601 “Management”.

  12. Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  13. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Zanariah; Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Hussain, Husni; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteris...

  14. Clinical Diabetes Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this series for medical professionals, specialists from pharmacy, podiatry, optometry, and dental professions discuss preventing diabetes complications and working as part of the diabetes care team.

  15. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  16. Continuing stability of center differences in pediatric diabetes care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Beaufort, Carine E.; Swift, Peter G.F.; Skinner, Chas T.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- To reevaluate the persistence and stability of previously observed differences between pediatric diabetes centers and to investigate the influence of demography, language communication problems, and changes in insulin regimens on metabolic outcome, hypoglycemia, and ketoacidosis....... CONCLUSIONS - Despite many changes in diabetes management, major differences in metabolic outcome between 21 international pediatric diabetes centers persist. Different application between centers in the implementation of insulin treatment appears to be of more importance and needs further exploration....

  17. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Asish; Coughlan,Kimberly; Valentine,Rudy; Ruderman,Neil

    2014-01-01

    Kimberly A Coughlan, Rudy J Valentine, Neil B Ruderman, Asish K Saha Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a...

  18. Use of the smartphone application "Pregnant with Diabetes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Sidse Kjærhus; Nichum, Vibeke Ladefoged; Barfred, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this article was to evaluate the awareness and use of the smartphone application (app) "Pregnant with Diabetes" locally, nationally and internationally. METHODS: In 2013, a patient initiated collaboration with the staff at Centre for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Rigs-hos...... by Novo Nordisk, Bayer A/S, Diabetes Care, Abbott, MSD Denmark, A.D.I.P.S and Rigshospitalet. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other ... YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information ...

  1. What Is Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Home Current issue contents Features: Diabetes Follow us What is Diabetes? Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, ... of First Automated Insulin Device for Type 1 Diabetes Spring 2017 Issue: Volume 12 ... Magazine Information Contact Us Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Monitoring Devices FDA Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  3. duration diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... group, type of diabetes, age of onset and duration of diabetes), presence of retinopathy, markers of nephropathy and biochemical variables. ... type 2 diabetes and for each ethnic group. Results. ... time of diabetes diagnosis in blacks than Indians. In the type ... countries, minority groups and disadvantaged communities in.

  4. Evaluation of the difference in caries experience in diabetic and non-diabetic children-A case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lai

    Full Text Available To evaluate the caries prevalence and related variables in Type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic children and among the diabetic children according to their metabolic status.Sixty-eight diabetic and 136 non-diabetic children, matching by gender and age (4-14 years were enrolled. The diabetic children were divided: a 20 children in good metabolic control (Hb1ac≤7.5 and b 48 children in bad metabolic control (Hb1ac>7.5. Dietary and oral hygiene habits were investigated. Caries status was registered using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. Oral microflora was analysed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation method. Plaque acidogenicity was recorded after a sucrose rinse.Sugared beverage and snack intake was higher in diabetic group compared to non-diabetic group (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively and in subjects in bad metabolic control (p = 0.03 and p<0.01, respectively. Oral hygiene habits were similar, except for the use of fluoridated adjuvants, higher in non-diabetic children (p = 0.04. No statistically significant differences were observed regarding caries figures, but a higher number of caries free subjects was found in diabetic subjects in good metabolic control (p<0.01. Significant difference for the main cariogenic bacteria was found between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05. The pH values showed statistically significant differences between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and between diabetic subjects in good and bad metabolic control (p<0.01.Diabetic children in good metabolic control might even be considered at low caries risk, while those in bad metabolic control showed an oral environment prone to a high caries risk.

  5. Controversies in gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and controversy are old friends. However, several major studies in the field have clarified some of the main issues. There is now no doubt that hyperglycaemia, at levels less than those that occur in overt diabetes, is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as large-for-gestational age infants, neonatal hyperinsulinism, neonatal hypoglycaemia and pre-eclampsia. We also have evidence now that a standard approach to GDM with diagnosis at 24-28 weeks, dietary advice, self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin therapy as needed reduces these adverse perinatal outcomes. Unknown, however, is if this same approach is effective at reducing long-term risks of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in both the mothers and babies. For example, could our management strategies miss critical time points of fuel-mediated injury to the foetus important for the baby's long-term metabolic health? The implications of a recent international consensus statement on new diagnostic criteria for GDM are discussed, as well as issues relating to the timing of diagnosis. The potential place for a risk calculator for adverse outcomes in GDM pregnancy that takes into account glycaemic and non-glycaemic risk factors is considered. Such a tool could help stratify GDM women to different levels of care. Ongoing issues relating to maternal glycaemic and foetal growth targets, and the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents in GDM are discussed. To resolve some of the remaining controversies, further carefully designed randomised controlled trials in GDM with long-term follow-up of both mothers and babies are necessary. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genomet og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

    2014-01-01

    In terms of their genetic architecture monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes represent two extremes. Whereas each subtype of monogenic diabetes is caused by one penetrant, rare mutation in a single gene, the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be attributed to many low-penetrant variants...... across the genome. At present, only 10% of the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be explained by the hitherto identified 90 genomic loci. Here we briefly review the genetics of monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes and outline future directions of research within this field....

  7. Dificultades en la clasificación del síndrome metabólico: El ejemplo de los adolescentes en México

    OpenAIRE

    Eneida Camarillo-Romero

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO. Determinar la diferencia entre las definiciones del National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATPIII) y de la International Diabetes Federation (IDF) para síndrome metabólico (SM) en adolescentes mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Estudio transversal en 575 adolescentes de 14 a 16 años. Se utilizaron pruebas t de Student, ji cuadrada y correlación de Spearman. RESULTADOS. La prevalencia de SM fue mayor por ATPIII (18.6%) versus IDF (8.2%) (p

  8. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğrul, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health problem. Its prevalence is 1.5-2 times higher in diabetic population than that in non-diabetic individuals. Its pathogenesis depends on diabetic nephropathy in type 1, whereas may be multifactorial in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In diabetics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are most widely preferred in the treatment of hypertension because of their numerous desirable effects. In this article, the most recent data are presented on the relationshi...

  9. Increased sympathetic activity during sleep and nocturnal hypertension in Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F S; Hansen, H P; Jacobsen, P

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To elucidate the putative factors involved in the blunted nocturnal blood pressure reduction in hypertensive Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Extracellular fluid volume and fluid shift from interstitial to plasma volume (haematocrit), sympathetic nervous activity...... (plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline) and the internal 'body clock' (serum melatonin) were investigated in 31 hypertensive Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with diabetic nephropathy (24 males, age 60 (45-73) years). All variables, except extracellular volume, were measured repeatedly...... constant in both groups. Extracellular fluid volume and plasma melatonin levels were comparable in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Sustained adrenergic activity during sleep is associated with blunted nocturnal blood pressure reduction in hypertensive Type 2DM patients with diabetic nephropathy, probably...

  10. Late Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Severe Acute Systemic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristea Sorina Alina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last International Diabetes Federation statement showed that in 2015, there were 415 million people diagnosed with diabetes and the expectation for 2040 is around 642 million people all over the world. Diabetes Mellitus is a disease associated with major negative consequences due to its acute and chronic complications with chronic hyperglycemia playing a major role.

  11. Minerals and Trace Elements in Milk, Milk Products, Infant Formula, and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula, ICP-MS Method: Collaborative Study, AOAC Final Action 2015.06, ISO/DIS 21424, IDF 243.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquette, Lawrence H; Thompson, Joseph J; Malaviole, I; Zywicki, R; Woltjes, F; Ding, Y; Mittal, A; Ikeuchi, Y; Sadipiralla, B; Kimura, S; Veltman, H; Miura, A

    2018-03-01

    AOAC Final Action Official MethodSM 2015.06 "Minerals and Trace Elements in Milk, Milk Products, Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula, ICP-MS Method" was collaboratively studied. Note that "milk, milk products" has now been added to the title of the Final Action method because whole milk and several dairy ingredients were successfully incorporated into the collaborative study for the purpose of developing an International Organization for Standardization/International Dairy Federation standard (ISO/DIS 21424; in progress). The method determines sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, copper, chromium, molybdenum, and selenium by inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS after microwave digestion. Ten laboratories participated in the study, and data from five different model ICP-MS units were represented. Thirteen products, five placebo products, and six dairy samples were tested as blind duplicates in this study, along with a standard reference material, for a total 50 samples. The overall repeatability and reproducibility for all samples met Standard Method Performance Requirements put forth by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals, with a few exceptions. Comparisons are made to ICP-atomic emission data from a collaborative study of AOAC Official Method 2011.14 carried out concurrently on these same samples.

  12. Physical activity and its correlation to diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praidou, Anna; Harris, Martin; Niakas, Dimitrios; Labiris, Georgios

    2017-02-01

    The lack of physical activity, along with obesity, smoking, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are considered as risk factors for the occurrence of diseases such as diabetes. Primary objective of the study was to investigate potential correlation between physical activity and diabetic retinopathy. Three hundred and twenty patients were included in the study: 240 patients with diabetes type 2 (80 patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 80 patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 80 ones with proliferative diabetic retinopathy) were compared with 80 non-diabetic patients (control group). Physical activity of patients was assessed by the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ, 2002). HbA1c and BMI were also measured in diabetic patients. Group comparisons were attempted for levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Total physical activity was decreased in patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy as compared to patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and to the control group (pdiabetic retinopathy and physical activity has been demonstrated (pdiabetic retinopathy, independent of the effects of HbA1c and BMI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prognostic value of admission plasma glucose in non-diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prognostic value of admission plasma glucose in non-diabetic Nigerians with stroke. ... International Journal of Medicine and Health Development ... Outcome was measured using the Modified Rankin scale based on the last score of each ...

  14. Haemorrheologic and fibrinolytic activities in diabetics resident in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... INTRODUCTION. Diabetes .... Ugwu (1987) Ingram's and Hills (1976) and Nelson (1944) were .... McGraw Hill, pp. ... International committee communications. Reference methods for one stage prothrombin time test on human.

  15. Service availability and readiness for diabetes care at health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EPHA USER33

    2Addis Ababa University, College of Health Science, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, ... Results: Among all health facilities, 59% of health facilities offer services for .... provide good-quality client services for diabetes,.

  16. Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid complications Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes is a serious disease. Following ...

  17. Treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Casandra J; Watson, James C

    2015-02-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. To discuss current treatment recommendations for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Literature review. Systematic review of the literature discussing treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Existing treatment guidelines were studied and compared. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in about one in six people with diabetes. This condition impairs quality of life and increases healthcare costs. Treatment recommendations exist, but individual patient therapy can require a trial-and-error approach. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. Adequate medication titration and a reasonable trial period should be allowed. The treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be challenging, but effective management can improve patient's quality of life. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  18. Design and rationale of a large, international, prospective cohort study to evaluate the occurrence of malformations and perinatal/neonatal death using insulin detemir in pregnant women with diabetes in comparison with other long-acting insulins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Andersen, Henning; Kring, Sofia I.I.

    2017-01-01

    such as overweight neonates, as well as infant outcomes at 1 year of age. It has a fixed recruitment period from 2013 to 2018, enrolling all eligible patients, and is expected to inform future prescribing with basal insulins in diabetic pregnancy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01892319(date registered...

  19. Type 1 diabetes mellitus care and education in China: The 3C study of coverage, cost, and care in Beijing and Shantou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Helen C; Ji, Linong; Kissimova-Skarbek, Katarzyna; Whiting, David; Aguirre, Florencia; Zhang, Puhong; Lin, Shaoda; Gong, Chunxiu; Zhao, Weigang; Lu, Juming; Guo, Xiaohui; Ji, Ying; Seuring, Till; Hong, Tianpei; Chen, Lishu; Weng, Jianping; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2017-07-01

    The paucity of data on Type 1 diabetes in China hinders progress in care and policy-making. This study compares Type 1 diabetes care and clinical outcomes in Beijing and Shantou with current clinical guidelines. The 3C Study was a cross-sectional study of the clinical practices and outcomes of people with Type 1 diabetes. The study sequentially enrolled 849 participants from hospital records, inpatient wards, and outpatient clinics. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews with patients and health professionals, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, medical records, and venous blood samples. Care was audited using ISPAD/IDF indicators. Data underwent descriptive analysis and tests for association. The median age was 22years (IQR=13-34years), and 48.4% of the sample had diabetes less than six years. The median HbA1c was 8.5% (69mmol/mol) (IQR 7.2-10.5%), with significant regional variance (p=0.002). Insulin treatment was predominantly two injections/day (45% of patients). The highest incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis was 14.4 events/100 patient years among adolescents. Of the 57.3% of patients with LDL-C>2.6mmol/L, only 11.2% received treatment. Of the 10.6% considered hypertensive, 47.1% received treatment. Rates of documented screening for retinopathy, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy were 35.2%, 42.3%, and 25.0%, respectively. The median number of days of self-monitoring/week was 3.0 (IQR=1.0-7.0). There were significant differences in care practices across regions. The study documented an overall deficit in care with significant regional differences noted compared to practice guidelines. Modifications to treatment modalities and the structure of care may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Comparison of the clinical parameters of benign prostate hyperplasia in diabetic and non diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ozcan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the correlation between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH measures and diabetes mellitus in men with benign prostate hyperplasia in a prospective study. Materials and methods: Between 2008-2012, 100 diabetic and 200 non diabetic patients undergoing surgery due to benign prostate hyperplasia were enrolled in the study. The parameters evaluated for each patients included prostate volume, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, total testosterone, total prostatic specific antigen (T-PSA, triglicerides, total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI. A questionnaire including international prostate symptom score (IPSS was sdministered and uroflow test measuring the peak urinary flow rate was performed to appreciate the complaints of the patients objectively. Results: Diabetic patients are more likely to have larger prostate volume. The symptom score evaluated by IPSS and post micturition residual volume were also significantly higher in diabetic groups. The other statistically significant different parameter between two groups was total testosterone that diabetic patients tend to have lower levels. Diabetic counterparts were established to have higher BMI. No statistically significant differentiation was observed about trigliceryde and total cholesterol levels and uroflow rates. Conclusions: Our study suggests a positive correlation between high prostate volume and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also observed a positive correlation between symptom scores and post micturion residual volumes and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus suggesting that the presence of diabetes is related to both static and dynamic components of benign prostate hyperplasia. Additionally testosterone levels were lower in diabetic patients. Further studies need to confirm these relationship in a larger population.

  1. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  2. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  3. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

  4. Diabetes Mellitus Tipe II Gula Darah Tak Terkontrol Dengan Ulkus Pedis Dextra Digiti III Dan Prehipertensi

    OpenAIRE

    Sihaloho, Elfrida

    2013-01-01

    Latar Belakang: Diabetes melitus merupakan suatu kelompok penyakit metabolik dengan karakteristik hiperglikemia yang terjadi karena kelainan sekresi insulin, kerja insulin atau kedua-duanya. Diabetes melitus tipe 2 disebabkan kegagalan relatif sel β dan resistensi insulin. Kadar glukosa darah yang tidak terkontrol pada pasien diabetes melitus akan menyebabkan berbagai komplikasi salah satunya ulkus pedis. Tujuan untuk mengidentifikasi faktor-faktor internal dan eksternal pada pasien diabetes ...

  5. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Desta, Semere Tekeste

    2017-01-01

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet Avdeling for helsefag for sykepleiere Tittel: Diabetes type 1 Bakgrunn for val av tema: I 2000 var det ca. 130 000 personer i Norge med diabetes, av disse hadde ca. 20 000 diabetes type 1. I dag er det ca. 230 000 personer som har diabetes i Norge. Av disse ca. 28 000 type 1 diabetes. Tallet viser hvor alvorlig sykdommen er, fordi det har vært og fortsatt er, en økning av antall diabetikere i Norge. Type 1 diabetes kan komme i alle aldersgrupper, men vanligvis...

  6. [Association between sedentary life style and risks of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ying; Zhong, Wenling; Lin, Xiuquan; Lin, Shuguang; Lin, Xi; Li, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tiehui

    2014-11-01

    To explore the association of sedentary life style with risk of metabolic syndrome (MS) and diabetes mellitus type 2(T2DM). A total of 6 016 local residents aged 18 years or older in Fujian province were recruited by multi-stage stratified cluster sampling method in 2010-2011. Data, including demographic information, physical activity and sedentary time were collected. Indices related to height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure and blood lipid were determined while MS and T2DM were diagnosed by IDF (2005) and WHO (1999) criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the correlations between sedentary behavior and MS or T2DM. The prevalence rates of MS and T2DM were 19.0% and 8.0% respectively, in local residents aged 18 years or older, in Fujian province. The overall rate of sedentary behavior was 18.1%, with the mean sedentary time as 4.3 hours. Both data showed significantly differences (P sedentary time sedentary behavior was independently associated with an increased risk of MT group (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.33-2.48, P sedentary behavior/sedentary time. MS and T2DM were associated with sedentary lifestyle, but these findings should be confirmed through further longitudinal studies.

  7. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  8. Increased mean platelet volume in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Coşkun Yenigün

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Platelet functions have important roles in the development of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Platelets with increased volume have increased activity compared to smaller ones; therefore, mean platelet volume (MPV is used as a marker for platelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated MPV in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM and its associations with diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Methods: Consecutive type II diabetic patients were screened from outpatient clinic of Internal Medicine Department of Diskapı Yıldırım Beyazıt Education and Researsch Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. A total of 48 patients with type II DM and 30 age and gender matched healthy subjects constituted the study population. For all subjects a complete blood count including MPV, fasting blood glucose level and lipid parameters were studied. In diabetic patients, duration of diabetes and HbA1C level, presence of microvascular and macrovascular complications were noted additively. Mean platelet volume was compared between diabetic patients and healthy counterparents. Then, among diabetic patients, MPV was compared between the ones with and without microvascular and macrovascular complications. Results: Mean platelet volume was found significantly higher in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic healthy subjects. Diabetic patients with at least one of the microvascular complications had significantly higher MPV than those without microvascular damage.Higher MPV levels have also been shown in diabetics with macrovascular complications compared to the ones without macrovascular disease. Conclusion: Mean platelet volume was found to be higher in type II diabetics and those having any of microvascular or macrovascular diabetic complications.

  9. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS): population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Loumann; Lervang, Hans-Henrik; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several population-based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy. These studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous...... era, suggesting new studies of the present population with diabetes. Aim and methods: This cross-section study included 656 people with type 1 diabetes and 328 with type 2 diabetes. Crude prevalence rates of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, clinically significant macular oedema and several specific...... retinal lesions were assessed, together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The point prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 0.8% and 0.3% for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Equivalent prevalence rates of clinically significant...

  10. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS......: This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two...... and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  11. The multinational second Diabetes, Attitudes, Wishes and Needs study: results of the French survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach,1,2 Silla M Consoli,3,4 Serge Halimi,5 Claude Colas,6 Martine Duclos,7–9 Pierre Fontaine,10 Caroline Martineau,11 Carole Avril,12 Catherine Tourette-Turgis,13 Sylvie Pucheu,4 Olivier Brunet14 1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny, 2EA 3412, CRNH-IDF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, 3Paris Descartes University, Paris Sorbonne Cité, Faculty of Medicine, Paris, 4University Service of Adult and Elderly Psychiatry, European Georges-Pompidou Hospital, Paris, 5Department of Diabetology, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Joseph Fourier University and CHU Grenoble, Grenoble, 6Department of Diabetology, Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, Paris, 7Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations, Montpied Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, 8Department of Human Nutrition, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Clermont-Ferrand, 9Department of Human Nutrition, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, 10Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Huriez Hospital, Lille 2 University, Lille, 11Department of Dietetics, Larrey Hospital, CHU Toulouse, 12French Diabetics Federation, Paris, 13UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, Paris, 14General practitioner, Seraincourt, France Aim: The second Diabetes, Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™ multinational cross-sectional study was aimed at generating insights to facilitate innovative efforts by people with diabetes (PWD, family members (FMs, and health care professionals (HCPs to improve self-management and psychosocial support in diabetes. Here, the French data from the DAWN2™ study are described.Methods: In France, 500 PWD (80 with type 1 diabetes [T1] and 420 with type 2 diabetes [T2], 120 FMs, and 288 HCPs were recruited. The questionnaires assessed the impact of diabetes on quality of life and mood, self-management, attitudes/beliefs, and care/support.Results: Diabetes

  12. Transcultural diabetes nutrition algorithm: a malaysian application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Zanariah; Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Hussain, Husni; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations.

  13. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanariah Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT. Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations.

  14. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations. PMID:24385984

  15. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  16. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  17. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to ...

  19. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology .... the importance of seeking medical attention immediately.

  20. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If the urine test is positive, contact your child's diabetes health care team. Tests done by a lab ... and to learn how to help bring your child's diabetes back under control. Reviewed by: Mauri Carakushansky, MD ...

  1. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch and learn helpful tips about managing your diabetes medicines. Veal el video en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. Follow Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can ...

  3. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  4. Diabetes and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 21. Read More Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE ...

  5. Renal protection in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of diabetes and hypertension increases the chances of progressive renal disorder and, ultimately, renal failure. Roughly 40% of all diabetics, whether insulin-dependent or not, develop diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end...... function in diabetic patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy. There are still no long-term trials using the new long-acting dihydropyridine calcium antagonists to treat patients with incipient nephropathy. A recent, 1-year, randomized, double-blind study in hypertensive insulin-dependent diabetic...... identical in both treatment groups, at 103 (SD 9) and 101 (SD 11) mmHg, respectively. Furthermore, a recent 5-year randomized open study in hypertensive non-insulin-dependent patients with diabetic nephropathy has revealed the same beneficial effect of a calcium antagonist and of ACE inhibition...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a serious illness that affects over 29 million people in the United States. Watch and learn helpful ... help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, ... Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women Other FDA Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people ... back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases ...

  9. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ...

  12. Diabetes guidelines and clinical practice: is there a gap? The South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of this survey was to determine the therapeutic management of patients with diabetes in the South African private healthcare environment. Design: The International Diabetes Management Practices Study is an international multicentre and observational study. In this paper, the local South African ...

  13. Genetics of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Stratakis, Constantine A; Luger, Anton

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to inadequate release of arginine vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus) or due to arginine vasopressin insensitivity by the renal distal tubule, leading to a deficiency in tubular water reabsorption (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). This article reviews the genetics of diabetes insipidus in the context of its diagnosis, clinical presentation, and therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammati...

  15. The diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the princ...

  16. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to ...

  18. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  19. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a ...

  20. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affiliates JDRF Celebrity Ambassadors JDRF Logo Usage Contact Us Donate Events More Type 1 Diabetes Facts Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune ... about Insulin and T1D Learn More What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing ... US CAREERS NEWSROOM FOR RESEARCHERS © JDRF 2018 • Privacy Policy • ...

  1. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  2. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign-up for a ... to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical ...

  4. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Diabetes Movie KidsHealth / For Parents / Diabetes Movie Print Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from ...

  5. Nutritional determinants of worldwide diabetes: an econometric study of food markets and diabetes prevalence in 173 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin; Galea, Gauden

    2013-01-01

    Ageing and urbanization leading to sedentary lifestyles have been the major explanations proposed for a dramatic rise in diabetes worldwide and have been the variables used to predict future diabetes rates. However, a transition to Western diets has been suggested as an alternative driver. We sought to determine what socio-economic and dietary factors are the most significant population-level contributors to diabetes prevalence rates internationally. Multivariate regression models were used to study how market sizes of major food products (sugars, cereals, vegetable oils, meats, total joules) corresponded to diabetes prevalence, incorporating lagged and cumulative effects. The underlying social determinants of food market sizes and diabetes prevalence rates were also studied, including ageing, income, urbanization, overweight prevalence and imports of foodstuffs. Data were obtained from 173 countries. Population-based survey recipients were the basis for diabetes prevalence and food market data. We found that increased income tends to increase overall food market size among low- and middle-income countries, but the level of food importation significantly shifts the content of markets such that a greater proportion of available joules is composed of sugar and related sweeteners. Sugar exposure statistically explained why urbanization and income have been correlated with diabetes rates. Current diabetes projection methods may estimate future diabetes rates poorly if they fail to incorporate the impact of nutritional factors. Imported sugars deserve further investigation as a potential population-level driver of global diabetes.

  6. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  7. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  8. Year in diabetes 2012: The diabetes tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, R; Jastreboff, A M

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of β-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new β-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path.

  9. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu AM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anteneh Messele Birhanu,1 Fekadu Mazengia Alemu,2 Tesfaye Demeke Ashenafie,3 Shitaye Alemu Balcha,4 Berihun Assefa Dachew5 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, 2Department of Midwifery, 3Department of Nursing, 4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results: A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 11.7–19.2. Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0 and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92 were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other

  10. Diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  11. Diabetic neuropathies: update on definitions, diagnostic criteria, estimation of severity, and treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Dyck, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on cla...... on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs.......Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates...

  12. Diabetes Canada Position Statement for People with Types 1 and 2 Diabetes Who Fast During Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Harpreet Singh; Abouhassan, Tyceer; Ahsan, Muhammad Rauf; Arnaout, Amel; Hassanein, Mohamed; Houlden, Robyn L; Khan, Tayyab; Khandwala, Hasnain; Verma, Subodh

    2018-04-27

    Fasting from dawn to dusk during Ramadan, including abstaining from water and food, is 1 of the pillars of Islam and is observed by the majority of Muslims. Most research concerning diabetes and fasting during Ramadan originates from Middle Eastern or South Asian countries; however, differences exist in hours of work and fasting, pharmacotherapy and blood glucose monitoring between these countries and Canada. An expert forum of 7 Canadian experts and 1 international expert collaborated to develop Canadian guidelines using the same evidence-based principles, with the exception of an independent methods review used for the Diabetes Canada clinical practice guidelines. Diabetes Canada scientific leadership and Canadian health-care providers performed independent external reviews. Religious leaders endorsed the position statement and provided letters of support. An informed patient participated in the position-statement development. Each recommendation was approved with 100% consensus of the expert forum. Recommendations for risk stratification, education, pharmacotherapy and blood glucose monitoring for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who intend to fast during Ramadan have been developed. This is the first Canadian position statement on the topic of Ramadan fasting and diabetes. It was developed by an expert faculty and endorsed by Diabetes Canada, and provides guidance about pharmacotherapy and glucose monitoring for health-care providers so that they can assist Canadian Muslims living with diabetes to observe fasting during Ramadan safely. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Diabetes and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Schneider, S H

    1981-01-01

    This review describes (1) the metabolic and hormonal response to exercise in normal and diabetic man, and (2) the potential benefits of physical training in diabetes. Whereas in normal man plasma glucose varies little during exercise, the insulin-dependent diabetic subject may experience...... its site of injection. The response to exercise of noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and of diabetic subjects with autonomic neuropathy is also described. Physical training improves glucose tolerance in some noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and in insulin-dependent patients, it may diminish...... insulin requirements. It may also have a role in retarding the development of cardiovascular complications. Physical training is not totally innocuous, however, and in many patients with diabetes special precautions are required....

  14. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9 am to 4 pm at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 2 pm until 4 pm. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  15. Implant healing in experimental animal models of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nga N; Rose, Michael B; Levinson, Howard; Klitzman, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Additionally, there is an increasing number of patients receiving implantable devices such as glucose sensors and orthopedic implants. Thus, it is likely that the number of diabetic patients receiving these devices will also increase. Even though implantable medical devices are considered biocompatible by the Food and Drug Administration, the adverse tissue healing that occurs adjacent to these foreign objects is a leading cause of their failure. This foreign body response leads to fibrosis, encapsulation of the device, and a reduction or cessation of device performance. A second adverse event is microbial infection of implanted devices, which can lead to persistent local and systemic infections and also exacerbates the fibrotic response. Nearly half of all nosocomial infections are associated with the presence of an indwelling medical device. Events associated with both the foreign body response and implant infection can necessitate device removal and may lead to amputation, which is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Diabetes mellitus is generally indicated as a risk factor for the infection of a variety of implants such as prosthetic joints, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, penile implants, and urinary catheters. Implant infection rates in diabetic patients vary depending upon the implant and the microorganism, however, for example, diabetes was found to be a significant variable associated with a nearly 7.2% infection rate for implantable cardioverter defibrillators by the microorganism Candida albicans. While research has elucidated many of the altered mechanisms of diabetic cutaneous wound healing, the internal healing adjacent to indwelling medical devices in a diabetic model has rarely been studied. Understanding this healing process is crucial to facilitating improved device design. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic factors that

  16. The Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy in Diabetes scale: a diabetes knowledge scale for vulnerable patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Russell L; Malone, Robb; Bryant, Betsy; Wolfe, Catherine; Padgett, Penelope; DeWalt, Darren A; Weinberger, Morris; Pignone, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a new knowledge scale for patients with type 2 diabetes and poor literacy: the Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy patients with Diabetes (SKILLD). The authors evaluated the 10-item SKILLD among 217 patients with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control at an academic general medicine clinic. Internal reliability was measured using the Kuder-Richardson coefficient. Performance on the SKILLD was compared to patient socioeconomic status, literacy level, duration of diabetes, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). Respondents' mean age was 55 years, and they had diabetes for an average of 8.4 years; 38% had less than a sixth-grade literacy level. The average score on the SKILLD was 49%. Less than one third of patients knew the signs of hypoglycemia or the normal fasting blood glucose range. The internal reliability of the SKILLD was good (0.72). Higher performance on the SKILLD was significantly correlated with higher income (r = 0.22), education level (r = 0.36), literacy status (r = 0.33), duration of diabetes (r = 0.30), and lower A1C (r = -0.16). When dichotomized, patients with low SKILLD scores (< or = 50%) had significantly higher A1C (11.2% vs 10.3%, P < .01). This difference remained significant when adjusted for covariates. The SKILLD demonstrated good internal consistency and validity. It revealed significant knowledge deficits and was associated with glycemic control. The SKILLD represents a practical scale for patients with diabetes and low literacy.

  17. Diabetes and dementia links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jankowska

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is growing globally. It is expected to observe 253.4 million sufferers in geriatric population in 2045. In this time, also 131.5 million of people is going to have dementia and other cognitive problems. In people aged over 65 these two diseases are concomitant quite often. What are the connections in the area of etiology and treatment? Aim The purpose of this study is to present links between dementia and diabetes are depicted in professional literature. Results Diabetes and dementia are associated on many levels. These conditions have common risk factors. Diabetes may contribute to cognitive impairment in many ways, promoting development of atherosclerosis, brain vessel damage and vascular dementia. Alzheimer disease may be promoted by hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. On contrary also hypoglycaemia, often met in elderly diabetic patients has negative impact on cognitive function. Dementia seriously affects treatment of diabetes. The main problems are not satisfying adherence and diabetes self-management. Conclusions Prevention of diabetes and dementia risk factors can be performed simultaneously as the are common for both diseases. Enhancing physical activity, reducing saturated fats consumption, levels of cholesterol and body mass are considered to be beneficial in the context of described conditions. Furthermore, treatment of diabetes is strongly affected by cognitive dysfunction. Management of dementive diabetics requires individualization and using long-acting drugs. It is crucial to reduce risk of life-threatening hypoglycaemias and to create wide team to take care of these patients.

  18. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Elderly and Agreement among Four Diagnostic Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Maria Auxiliadora Nogueira; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Velarde, Luis Guillermo Coca; Cruz, Rubens Antunes Filho da

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is an aggregation of risk factors that increase the incidence of cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus (DM). Population aging is accompanied by higher prevalence of MS, which varies depending on the population studied and the diagnostic criteria used. To determine prevalence of MS in the elderly using four diagnostic criteria and agreement between them. Cross-sectional study on 243 patients older than 60 years (180 women) in Niterói, RJ. They were evaluated by clinical examination, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, lipid profile and anthropometric measurements - weight, height, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio. Prevalence of MS was estimated by World Health Organization (WHO) modified, National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria. Prevalence was high with the four criteria WHO (51.9%), NCEP-ATPIII (45.2%), IDF (64.1%) and JIS (69.1%), and agreement between criteria by kappa was moderate in almost all comparisons WHO vs. IDF (k = 0.47;95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35 to 0.58); WHO vs. NCEP-ATPIII (k = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.61); WHO vs. JIS (k = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.56); IDF vs. NCEP-ATPIII (k = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.65) and NCEP-ATPIII vs. JIS (k = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64), except between IDF vs. JIS (K = 0.89;95% CI, 0.83 to 0.95), which was considered good. Prevalence of MS was high with the four diagnostic criteria, mainly by JIS. There was good agreement between JIS and IDF criteria and moderate among the others

  19. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Elderly and Agreement among Four Diagnostic Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Maria Auxiliadora Nogueira, E-mail: auxiliadorasaad@yahoo.com.br [Fundação Municipal de Saúde de Niterói, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Velarde, Luis Guillermo Coca; Cruz, Rubens Antunes Filho da [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is an aggregation of risk factors that increase the incidence of cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus (DM). Population aging is accompanied by higher prevalence of MS, which varies depending on the population studied and the diagnostic criteria used. To determine prevalence of MS in the elderly using four diagnostic criteria and agreement between them. Cross-sectional study on 243 patients older than 60 years (180 women) in Niterói, RJ. They were evaluated by clinical examination, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, lipid profile and anthropometric measurements - weight, height, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio. Prevalence of MS was estimated by World Health Organization (WHO) modified, National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria. Prevalence was high with the four criteria WHO (51.9%), NCEP-ATPIII (45.2%), IDF (64.1%) and JIS (69.1%), and agreement between criteria by kappa was moderate in almost all comparisons WHO vs. IDF (k = 0.47;95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35 to 0.58); WHO vs. NCEP-ATPIII (k = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.61); WHO vs. JIS (k = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.56); IDF vs. NCEP-ATPIII (k = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.65) and NCEP-ATPIII vs. JIS (k = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64), except between IDF vs. JIS (K = 0.89;95% CI, 0.83 to 0.95), which was considered good. Prevalence of MS was high with the four diagnostic criteria, mainly by JIS. There was good agreement between JIS and IDF criteria and moderate among the others.

  20. Diabetic ketoacidosis: a challenging diabetes phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliona Small

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines.

  1. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  2. Comparison of carotid and cerebrovascular disease between diabetic and non-diabetic patients using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ci; Yang Zhigang; Chu Zhigang; Dong Zhihui; Li Yunming; Shao Heng; Deng Wen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the differences of the carotid and cerebrovascular disease between patients with and without type 2 diabetes using dual-source CT angiography. Materials and methods: Dual-source CT angiography of the carotid and cerebrovascular arteries was performed in 79 type 2 diabetic patients and 207 non-diabetic patients. The type, extent and distribution of plaques, and luminal stenosis were compared. Results: Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients had a higher overall incidence of plaque (p 0.05), as well as for the number of diseased segments and the distribution of plaques; both mainly involved the bilateral cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. As for the stenosis, non-obstructive lesions were more common in diabetic patients (p 0.05). Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with a higher incidence of plaque and non-obstructive stenosis. However, no significant differences were observed in the type, extent and distribution of involved plaques between diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  3. Semantic Web Improved with the Weighted IDF Feature

    OpenAIRE

    Mrs. Jyoti Gautam; Dr. Ela Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The development of search engines is taking at a very fast rate. A lot of algorithms have been tried and tested. But, still the people are not getting precise results. Social networking sites are developing at tremendous rate and their growth has given birth to the new interesting problems. The social networking sites use semantic data to enhance the results. This provides us with a new perspective on how to improve the quality of information retrieval. As we are aware, many techniques of tex...

  4. Learning to Mow Grass: IDF Adaptations to Hybrid Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    April 2006. The language of SOD, however, was a mixed bag from “post-modern French philosophy, literary theory, architecture and psychology.”44 It...ground forces OCL soon proved this assessment. Near the end of 2008, Hamas had broken the Egyptian -brokered truce between it and Israel. Having...turned to southern Gaza to destroy more of Hamas tunnel network near the Egyptian border.176

  5. Term frequency inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) technique and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  7. Dificultades en la clasificación del síndrome metabólico: El ejemplode los adolescentes en México Difficulties in the classification of metabolic syndrome: The example of adolescents in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida Camarillo-Romero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Determinar la diferencia entre las definiciones del National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATPIII y de la International Diabetes Federation (IDF para síndrome metabólico (SM en adolescentes mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Estudio transversal en 575 adolescentes de 14 a 16 años. Se utilizaron pruebas t de Student, ji cuadrada y correlación de Spearman. RESULTADOS. La prevalencia de SM fue mayor por ATPIII (18.6% versus IDF (8.2% (pOBJECTIVE. Determine the difference between the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATPIII definition of the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS in Mexican adolescents and that by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF. MATERIAL AND METHODS. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 575 adolescents aged 14 to 16 years using the student's t test, chi square and Spearman correlation. RESULTS. The prevalence of MS was higher by ATPIII (18.6% than by IDF (8.2% (p <0.001 and there was a concordance of 41.1%. CONCLUSIONS. There is a statistical difference in the prevalence of MS depending on the definition.

  8. International consensus on use of continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danne, Thomas; Nimri, Revital; Battelino, Tadej

    2017-01-01

    , have yet to be established. In February 2017, the Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD) Congress convened an international panel of physicians, researchers, and individuals with diabetes who are expert in CGM technologies to address these issues. This article summarizes the ATTD...

  9. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandi Catherine Muze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups.

  10. Skeletonized left internal thoracic artery is associated with lower rates of mediastinitis in diabetic patients Artéria torácica interna esquerda esqueletizada é associada a menores taxas de mediastinite em diabéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira Sá

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mediastinitis is a serious complication of median sternotomy and is associated to significant morbidity and mortality. Diabetes is a feared risk factor for mediastinitis and viewed with caution by cardiovascular surgeons. OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for mediastinitis in diabetics undergoing CABG surgery with use of unilateral ITA in the Division of Cardiovascular Surgery of Pronto Socorro Cardiológico de Pernambuco - PROCAPE. METHODS: Retrospective study of 157 diabetics operated between May 2007 and April 2010. Nine preoperative variables, five intraoperative variables and seven postoperative variables possibly involved in the development of postoperative mediastinitis were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: The incidence of mediastinitis was 7% (n=11, with a lethality rate of 36.1% (n=4. Variables associated with increased risk of mediastinitis were: use of pedicled ITA (OR 8.25, 95% CI 2.03 to 66.10, P=0.016, postoperative renal complications (OR 5.10, 95% CI 1.03 to 25.62, P=0.049 and re-operation (OR 7.45, 95% CI 1.24 to 42.17, P=0.023. In multivariate analysis using backward logistic regression, only one variable remained as independent risk factor: use of pedicled ITA (OR 7.64, 95% CI 1.95 to 61.6, P=0.048, in comparison to skeletonized ITA. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that diabetics should be considered for strategies to minimize risk of infection. In diabetics that undergo unilateral ITA, the problem seems to be related to how ITA is harvested. Diabetics should always be considered for use of skeletonized ITA.INTRODUÇÃO: Mediastinite é uma complicação séria da esternotomia mediana e está associada a significativa morbidade e mortalidade. Diabetes é um temido fator de risco para mediastinite, visto com cautela pelos cirurgiões cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores de risco para mediastinite em diabéticos submetidos à CRM com uso unilateral da

  11. Proteomic prediction and Renin angiotensin aldosterone system Inhibition prevention Of early diabetic nephRopathy in TYpe 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (PRIORITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Morten; Persson, Frederik; Currie, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus affects 9% of the European population and accounts for 15% of healthcare expenditure, in particular, due to excess costs related to complications. Clinical trials aiming for earlier prevention of diabetic nephropathy by renin angiotensin system blocking treatment...... AND DISSEMINATION: The study will be conducted under International Conference on Harmonisation - Good clinical practice (ICH-GCP) requirements, ethical principles of Declaration of Helsinki and national laws. This first new biomarker-directed intervention trial aiming at primary prevention of diabetic nephropathy...

  12. Update on diabetes classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Celeste C; Philipson, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the difficulties in creating a definitive classification of diabetes mellitus in the absence of a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of the major forms. This brief review shows the evolving nature of the classification of diabetes mellitus. No classification scheme is ideal, and all have some overlap and inconsistencies. The only diabetes in which it is possible to accurately diagnose by DNA sequencing, monogenic diabetes, remains undiagnosed in more than 90% of the individuals who have diabetes caused by one of the known gene mutations. The point of classification, or taxonomy, of disease, should be to give insight into both pathogenesis and treatment. It remains a source of frustration that all schemes of diabetes mellitus continue to fall short of this goal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Islamic Fasting and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  14. Differences in the structure of outpatient diabetes care between endocrinologist-led and general physician-led services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Donnell, Máire

    2013-11-25

    Despite a shift in diabetes care internationally from secondary to primary care, diabetes care in the Republic of Ireland remains very hospital-based. Significant variation in the facilities and resources available to hospitals providing outpatient diabetes care have been reported in the UK. The aim of this study was to ascertain the structure of outpatient diabetes care in public hospitals in the Republic of Ireland and whether differences existed in services provided across hospitals.

  15. Children have type 2 diabetes too: an historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Heather J; Sellers, Elizabeth A C

    2015-10-01

    Prior to 1985, type 2 diabetes was a disease of adults. Simultaneously with the global epidemic of childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes has increased in children. Initially, the presentation of small case series of type 2 diabetes in children was met with skepticism. As the number and size of the case series grew and the first long-term outcomes of end-stage complications in young adults appeared in the literature, the international community took notice with guarded interest. Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects the children of specific ethnic groups and from disadvantaged socioeconomic environments, especially Indigenous populations. The past decade has seen unprecedented intense global interest in the etiology, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes in children.

  16. Fasting glycaemia to simplify screening for gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser Rüetschi, J; Jornayvaz, F R; Rivest, R; Huhn, E A; Irion, O; Boulvain, M

    2016-12-01

    Recommendations in Switzerland on screening for gestational diabetes endorse the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group consensus. As universal testing is time consuming and glucose loading is unpleasant, the recommendations include a simplification, not performing the glucose loading in women with fasting glycaemia fasting glycaemia was fasting glycaemia. The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 10.9% in our population. Among 251 women with gestational diabetes, fasting glycaemia was ≥5.1 mmol/l in 119 women (47.4%), between 4.4 and fasting glycaemia between 4.4 and fasting glycaemia is an attractive alternative to universal screening with the complete 75-g glucose tolerance test. This strategy is, however, slightly less sensitive than previously reported in higher-risk populations. Fasting glycaemia can be considered as an alternative to the complete test for gestational diabetes screening. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  18. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS). Population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L.L.; Lervang, H.H.; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    Abstract Purpose: Several population based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of proliferativ retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Despite their importance, these studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore...... reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous era. Studies of the present diabetic population are therefore in demand. Methods: The present cross–section study included 656 type 1 and 328 type 2 diabetic subjects undergoing diabetic retinopathy screening. Crude prevalence rates...... for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy, several specific lesions and non–ophthalmic findings were assessed together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The crude prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 5.6 % and 0.9 % for type 1...

  19. Step 1: Learn about Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 1: Learn About Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... the whole family healthy! Here are four key steps to help you control your diabetes and live ...

  20. Snacking when you have diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy snacking - diabetes; Low blood sugar - snacking; Hypoglycemia - snacking ... When you have diabetes , you need to control your blood sugar. Insulin or diabetes medicines, as well as exercise in general, helps lower ...

  1. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth / For Parents / Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  2. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    decreased survival rate was found in diabetics (p useful in the treatment of critical ischaemia of the lower limb in diabetic patients. The overall results in diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or not, were equal to those in non-diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...

  3. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What tests are used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes? Health care professionals most often use the fasting ... numbers tell me if I have diabetes or prediabetes? Each test to detect diabetes and prediabetes uses ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Gestational diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood ...

  5. Diabetes Care in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Walmir F; Silva Júnior, Wellington Santana

    2015-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic affects most countries across the world and is increasing at alarming rates in Latin America. Nearly 12 million individuals have diabetes in Brazil, and the current prevalence ranges from 6.3% to 13.5%, depending on the region and the diagnostic criteria adopted in each study. To provide an overview of diabetes care in Brazil, focusing on studies of diabetes epidemiology, prevalence of patients within the standard targets of care, and economic burden of diabetes and its complications. SciELO and PubMed searches were performed for the terms "diabetes," "Brazil," "Brazilian," and "health system"; relevant literature from 1990 to 2015 was selected. Additional articles identified from reference list searches were also included. All articles selected were published in Portuguese and/or English. Recent studies detected a prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus of nearly 20%. Among patients with type 1 diabetes, almost 90% fail to reach target of glycemic control, with less than 30% receiving treatment for both hypertension and dyslipidemia. More than 75% of patients with type 2 diabetes are either overweight or obese. Most of these patients fail to reach glycemic targets (42.1%) and less than 30% reached the target for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Only 0.2% of patients reach all these anthropometric and metabolic targets. Brazil is the fourth country in the world in number of patients with diabetes. Regardless of the diabetes type, the majority of patients do not meet other metabolic control goals. The economic burden of diabetes and its complications in Brazil is extremely high, and more effective approaches for preventions and management are urgently needed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  7. Diabetes and Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of insulin restriction is an important women's health issue in type 1 diabetes. This behavior is associated with increased rates of diabetes complications and decreased quality of life. Clinical and technological research is greatly needed to improve treatment tools and strategies for this problem. In this commentary, the author describes the scope of the problem of eating disorders and diabetes, as well as offers ideas about ways technology may be applied to help solve this compl...

  8. Obesity and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Riobó Serván, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion and its possible long term complications. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but both genetic and environmental factors, such as obesity and aging, play a key role. "Diabesity" is a new term which refers to diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology and impact of diabetes and obesity and will also outline the comp...

  9. Diabetes education on wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardway, D; Weatherly, K S; Bonheur, B

    1993-01-01

    Diabetes education programs remain underdeveloped in the pediatric setting, resulting in increased consumer complaints and financial liability for hospitals. The Diabetes Education on Wheels program was designed to provide comprehensive, outcome-oriented education for patients with juvenile diabetes. The primary goal of the program was to enhance patients' and family members' ability to achieve self-care in the home setting. The program facilitated sequential learning, improved consumer satisfaction, and promoted financial viability for the hospital.

  10. Risikofaktorer for diabetes retinopati

    OpenAIRE

    Neset, Liv Siobhain; Dalaker, Nora Marie

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common cause of blindness in the Western world, despite the fact that blindness from DR is preventable with timely detection and retinal photocoagulation. This thesis rewiews the current knowledge of epidemiology, screening and the risk factors for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. A Medline search was conducted using the keywords diabetic retinopathy and risk factors. Only rewiew articles were used. The WESDR and the DCCT st...

  11. Nutrition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Anna Salwa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose of the work. Diabetic kidney disease usually occurs at a late stage of diabetes and is often the result of long-term disease failure. As in diabetes alone, the diet used by the patient has a significant influence on how quickly the nephropathy will proceed. The aim of the study is to present issues related to dietary management in kidney diseases being complication of diabetes. . Brief description of the state of knowledge. People with type 2 diabetes usually struggle with overweight or obesity and hypertension. Obesity is one of the factors that causes the progression of diabetic kidney disease. A diet for such people requires a negative energy balance. Insulin itself increases appetite and the frequent occurrence of hypoglycaemia is the reason for increasing the number of meals. Summary. Diet is a very important element in the treatment of diabetes. It determines the maintenance of proper blood glucose and lipid (lipid levels and optimal blood pressure values. A well-chosen diet reduces the risk of diabetic complications, as well as reduces the risk of vascular diseases. The right model of nutrition also plays an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diabetes complications.

  12. Nutrition in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Osama; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd-Yusof

    2016-12-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a key component of diabetes management. The importance of balancing macronutrients, reducing carbohydrate load, lowering glycemic index, and implementing an overall healthy dietary pattern are emerging as better approaches for MNT in diabetes. Recent research points to improved glycemic control, reduction in body weight, and improvement in many cardiovascular risk factors when these approaches are provided by registered dietitians or health care providers. This review article discusses the current evidence about the role of sensible nutrition in diabetes management. Specific eating plans for weight reduction and for patients with type 1 diabetes are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave i sykepleie, 2014 Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturst...

  14. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  15. Diabetes in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Kovačec

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, the number of women who have some form of diabetes during their pregnancies is increasing. Diabetes in pregnancy entails an increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity, as well as complications in mother. These are mainly the result of fetal exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia. Undelayed achievement of normoglycemia is therefore crucial for optimizing maternal and fetal outcomes in all women with diabetes during pregnancy, regardless of the type of diabetes. In light of this, we would like to address the importance of early detection of likely prepregnancy diabetes – mostly T2DM, and the value of preconception care in women with preexisting T2DM and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This review is aimed to discus pregestational and gestational diabetes and the associated health risk to the developing fetus and the mother. The management should take into account the clinical evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of T2DM published by the Slovenian Endocrine Society in June 2011.

  16. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models......, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin resistance in vivo and should, thus, be sufficient to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept of a TRP antagonist in type 2 diabetes in rodents. The experiments are suggestions and could be replaced or supplemented by others....

  17. PRE-DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Pre-diabetes is a condition where the body's cells begin to show resistance to insulin. Glucose circulates in the blood instead of being used by the cells for energy. Blood sugar levels become elevated. Increased weight, unhealthy diet and a sedentary lifestyle can lead to pre-diabetes. WHAT IS PRE-DIABETES A diagnosis of pre-diabetes means that the cells in your body are becoming resistant to insulin and your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be. Since the levels aren't as hig...

  18. Osteoporosis and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbagallo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis are chronic diseases with an elevated and growing incidence in the elderly. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an elevated risk of hip, humerus and foot fractures in elder diabetic subjects. While type 1 diabetes is generally associated with a mild reduction in bone mineral density (BMD, type 2 diabetes, more prevalent in old subjects, is frequently linked to a normal or high BMD. Studies on experimental models of diabetes have suggested an altered bone structure that may help to explain the elevated risk of fractures observed in these animals and may as well help to explain the paradox of an incremented risk of fractures in type 2 diabetic elderly in the presence of normal or elevated BMD. In addition, diabetic elderly have an increased risk of falls, consequent at least in part to a poor vision, peripheral neuropathy, and weaken muscular performance. Diabetes may affect bone tissue by different mechanisms including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, deposit of advanced glycosilation end products in collagen fibre, reduced circulating levels of IGF-1, hypercalciuria, renal function impairment, microangiopathy and chronic inflammation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help implement the prevention of fractures in the growing population of mature diabetics.

  19. Preventing diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H P; Lund, S S; Rossing, P

    2001-01-01

    In type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria not receiving antihypertensive treatment, an increase in urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) of 6% to 14%/year and a risk for the development of diabetic nephropathy of 3% to 30%/year have previously been reported. The aim of the present study...... was to audit the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the progression of microalbuminuria and development of diabetic nephropathy. We consecutively identified 227 type 1 diabetic patients with persistent microalbuminuria (urinary AER between 30 and 300mg/24h, ELISA). According...... been reported in intervention trials....

  20. Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs Past Issues / Fall ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  1. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes means you have glucose ( ...

  2. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  3. Treatment options for diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senneville, Eric; Robineau, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis therapeutical options are based on antibiotic therapy and surgical resection of the infected bone(s). Surgical and medical approaches of patients suffering from a diabetic foot osteomyelitis do not oppose but are complementary and need to be discussed as a tailored manner. Areas covered: The aim of the present article is to discuss data issued from the most recent guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot on the management of the diabetic foot infection and from a search in the current literature using the terms diabetic foot osteomyelitis and treatment/therapy/therapeutical in both PubMed and Medline, restricted to the last five years. Expert opinion: Surgical removal of the entire infected bone(s) has been considered in the past as the standard treatment but medical approach of these patients has now proven efficacy in selected situations. The current emergence of bacteria, especially among Gram negative rods, resistant to almost all the available antibiotics gradually augments the complexity of the management of these patients and is likely to decrease the place of the medical approach and to worsen the outcome of these infections in the next future.

  4. Quality assurance for diabetic retinopathy telescreening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Aldington, S J; Kohner, E M; Luzio, S; Owens, D R; Schmidt, V; Schuell, H; Zahlmann, G

    2005-06-01

    TOSCA was an EU-Commission supported international research project designed to develop telescreening services in diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper describes the quality assurance methods developed for the diabetic retinopathy telescreening service within the TOSCA project. The study was performed in 1895 patients with diabetes between 2000 and 2002 at diabetic retinopathy screening sites in five European countries. Data were analysed centrally. Patients attending each clinic's diabetic retinopathy screening service received standardized retinal photography. The images and associated data were transferred electronically to a remote location for grading. Each photographer uploading images and each grader downloading images for assessment was controlled by a systematic quality management approach. The quality assurance measures defined were image quality, intragrader reliability. A cockpit chart was developed for the management and presentation of relevant results and quality measures. For the intragrader reliability tests, 10% of the images were processed for a second grading. An algorithm for calculating differences between repeated gradings was developed. The assessment of image quality for the different sites showed that only 0-0.7% were unassessable. One hundred per cent agreement for both gradings was achieved in 50-85% of graded cases, depending on site and grader, and an agreement better than 95% in 71-100% of cases. A telemedicine-supported quality assurance process is practical and advantageous. The cockpit charts have proven to be useful tools when monitoring the performance of a telescreening service. Grader feedback showed high satisfaction with the quality assurance process.

  5. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Alkan , Manal; Machavoine , François; Rignault , Rachel; Dam , Julie; Dy , Michel; Thieblemont , Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC −/− m...

  6. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Michael E; Rothman, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    Michael E Bowen1,2, Russell L Rothman2,31Veterans Affairs Quality Scholars Fellowship Program, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is inc...

  7. Low Self-Confidence and Diabetes Mismanagement in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mediate the Relationship between Behavioral Problems and Elevated HbA1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilander, Minke M. A.; de Wit, Maartje; Rotteveel, Joost; Snoek, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated an association between behavior problems (internalizing, externalizing) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study is to examine if this association is mediated by self-confidence and mismanagement of diabetes. Problem behavior

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  9. Algorithm for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a position statement of Brazilian Diabetes Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerario, Antonio C; Chacra, Antonio R; Pimazoni-Netto, Augusto; Malerbi, Domingos; Gross, Jorge L; Oliveira, José Ep; Gomes, Marilia B; Santos, Raul D; Fonseca, Reine Mc; Betti, Roberto; Raduan, Roberto

    2010-06-08

    The Brazilian Diabetes Society is starting an innovative project of quantitative assessment of medical arguments of and implementing a new way of elaborating SBD Position Statements. The final aim of this particular project is to propose a new Brazilian algorithm for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, based on the opinions of endocrinologists surveyed from a poll conducted on the Brazilian Diabetes Society website regarding the latest algorithm proposed by American Diabetes Association /European Association for the Study of Diabetes, published in January 2009.An additional source used, as a basis for the new algorithm, was to assess the acceptability of controversial arguments published in international literature, through a panel of renowned Brazilian specialists. Thirty controversial arguments in diabetes have been selected with their respective references, where each argument was assessed and scored according to its acceptability level and personal conviction of each member of the evaluation panel.This methodology was adapted using a similar approach to the one adopted in the recent position statement by the American College of Cardiology on coronary revascularization, of which not only cardiologists took part, but also specialists of other related areas.

  10. Algorithm for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a position statement of Brazilian Diabetes Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerario Antonio C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brazilian Diabetes Society is starting an innovative project of quantitative assessment of medical arguments of and implementing a new way of elaborating SBD Position Statements. The final aim of this particular project is to propose a new Brazilian algorithm for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, based on the opinions of endocrinologists surveyed from a poll conducted on the Brazilian Diabetes Society website regarding the latest algorithm proposed by American Diabetes Association /European Association for the Study of Diabetes, published in January 2009. An additional source used, as a basis for the new algorithm, was to assess the acceptability of controversial arguments published in international literature, through a panel of renowned Brazilian specialists. Thirty controversial arguments in diabetes have been selected with their respective references, where each argument was assessed and scored according to its acceptability level and personal conviction of each member of the evaluation panel. This methodology was adapted using a similar approach to the one adopted in the recent position statement by the American College of Cardiology on coronary revascularization, of which not only cardiologists took part, but also specialists of other related areas.

  11. Prevalence and Impact of Unknown Diabetes in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Xu, Kejun; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with diabetes and their care providers are unaware of the presence of the disease. Dysglycemia encompassing hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glucose variability is common in the ICU in patients with and without diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of unknown diabetes on glycemic control in the ICU. Prospective observational study. Nine ICUs in an academic, tertiary hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. Hemoglobin A1c levels were ordered at all ICU admissions from March 1, 2011 to September 30, 2013. Electronic medical records were examined for a history of antihyperglycemic medications or International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition diagnosis of diabetes. Patients were categorized as having unknown diabetes (hemoglobin A1c > 6.5%, without history of diabetes), no diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5%, with documented history of diabetes). None. A total of 15,737 patients had an hemoglobin A1c and medical record evaluable for the history of diabetes, and 5,635 patients had diabetes diagnosed by either medical history or an elevated hemoglobin A1c in the ICU. Of these, 1,460 patients had unknown diabetes, accounting for 26.0% of all patients with diabetes. This represented 41.0% of patients with an hemoglobin A1c > 6.5% and 9.3% of all ICU patients. Compared with patients without diabetes, patients with unknown diabetes had a higher likelihood of requiring an insulin infusion (44.3% vs 29.3%; p 180 mg/dL; p < 0.0001) and hypoglycemia (8.9% vs 2.5%; blood glucose < 70 mg/dL; p < 0.0001), higher glycemic variability (55.6 vs 28.8, average of patient SD of glucose; p < 0.0001), and increased mortality (13.8% vs 11.4%; p = 0.01). Patients with unknown diabetes represent a significant percentage of ICU admissions. Measurement of hemoglobin A1c at admission can prospectively identify a population that are not known to have diabetes but have significant challenges in glycemic control in the ICU.

  12. Audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire: usefulness in diabetes self-management education in the Slovak population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmanová, Elena; Ziaková, Katarína

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports a study to test validity and internal consistency of the audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire in the Slovak population and to evaluate its usefulness in the context of education of people with diabetes. The individualised instruments designed to measure individuals' perceptions of the impact of diabetes on their quality of life may be helpful to identify individuals' preferences, motivational deficits in diabetes management and to tailor individual treatment strategies. Survey. After linguistic validation, the structure of the questionnaire was tested using factor analysis on 104 patients who were recruited from the National Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology in Lubochna. Internal consistency was evaluated by computing Cronbach's alpha. Clinical variables related to the quality of life were analysed using one-way ANOVA, multifactor ANOVA, Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. A one-dimensional scale structure was supported and internal consistency was high (alpha = 0.93). Variance in impact of diabetes on quality of life was explained by age, presence of late complications and type of insulin regimen. The audit diabetes-dependent quality of life is culturally appropriate, valid and reliable in the sample of Slovak patients attending the educational programme. Our results agreed with previous European and Asian studies supporting its usefulness in the context of diabetes self-management education. Individualised diabetes-specific quality of life measures allow better understanding of patients' treatment preferences and, consequently, more effective prioritizing and targeting of appropriate educational interventions. This instrument may be useful in routine clinical practice and as an outcome measure for international clinical research trials evaluating effectiveness of educational programmes.

  13. The Evaluation of Screening and Early Detection Strategies for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (DETECT-2) update of the Finnish diabetes risk score for prediction of incident type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alssema, M; Vistisen, D; Heymans, M W

    2011-01-01

    the ROC curve to 0.766 (95% CI 0.750-0.783). Additional items such as male sex, smoking and family history of diabetes (parent, sibling or both) improved the area under the ROC curve and net reclassification. Bootstrapping showed good internal validity. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The predictive value...... of the original Finnish risk questionnaire could be improved by adding information on sex, smoking and family history of diabetes. The DETECT-2 update of the Finnish diabetes risk questionnaire is an adequate and robust predictor for future screen-detected and clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes in Europid...

  14. Metformin in adults with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ford, Ian

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a major cause of reduced life expectancy in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Intensive insulin therapy prevents CV complications but is constrained by hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Adjunct metformin reduces insulin dose requirement and stabilizes weight...... but there are no data on its cardiovascular effects. We have therefore initiated an international double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (REMOVAL: REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions in type 1 diabetes) to examine whether metformin reduces progression of atherosclerosis in adults with T1D....... Individuals ≥40 years of age with T1D for ≥5 years are eligible if they have ≥3 of 10 specified CV risk factors. The enrolment target is 500 participants in 17 international centres. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After 12 weeks of single-blind placebo-controlled run-in, participants with ≥ 70% adherence...

  15. Prevalence of positive gated myocardial SPECT in diabetic and non-diabetic women and impact of other factors; KIHD perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maseeh-uz-Zaman; Fatima, N.; Samad, A.; Rasheed, S.Z.; Ishaq, M.; Rehman, K.; Wali, A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (NDM) women using Gated SPECT (GSPECT) and to study the impact of other. risk factors like hypertension (HTN), dyslipidemia, family history and menopause. This is a prospective cross-sectional study on a consecutive sample of 287 women referred to Nuclear Cardiology Department of Karachi Institute of Heart Diseases (KIHD) for GSPECT for evaluation of known or suspected CAD (from January 2009 till June 2009). Women with a history of DM diagnosed less than 5 years were excluded. Same day (reststress) GSPECT study was conducted and fixed or reversible perfusion defects were considered positive GSPECT for CAD. GSPECT was positive for CAD in 41/115 (36%, P 0.002) diabetic women and 37/172 (21 %, P 0.005) non-diabetic cohort. In diabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 5/9 (56%, P 0.013) women with diabetes only, 17/35 (48%, P 0.02) DM with HTN, 12/15 (80%, P value 0.02) DM with dyslipidemia and 11/43 (26%, P 0.001) DM with >2 risk factors. GSPECT was normal in all 3 diabetic women with positive family history for CAD. In nondiabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 9/32 (28%, P value 0.739) women with no risk factor, 5/58 (26%, P 0.866) HTN only, 2/5 (40%, P value 0.655) only dyslipidemic women, 1/12. (8%, P 0.004) with family history only and 4/23 (17%, P value 0.166) non-diabetic with >2 risk factors. Interestingly, 35/93 post-menopausal diabetic (38%, p value 0.017) had positive GSPECT while 33/123 non-diabetic postmenopausal women (27%, p 0.03) had positive perfusion scans. GSPECT was positive in 6/26 (23%, P 0.006) and 4/49 (8%, P 0.05) in diabetic and non-diabetic pre-menopausal women. The prevalence of CAD in our diabetic women is as high as internationally reported and diabetes is a strong risk factor for CAD. Dyslipidemia with diabetes is a major contributor to CAD than HTN and F/H. Diabetes erases the protective effect of estrogen

  16. Prevalence of positive gated myocardial SPECT in diabetic and non-diabetic women and impact of other factors; KIHD perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maseeh-uz-Zaman,; Fatima, N; Samad, A; Rasheed, S Z; Ishaq, M; Rehman, K; Wali, A [Karachi, Inst. of Heart Diseases, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15

    The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among diabetic (DM) and nondiabetic (NDM) women using Gated SPECT (GSPECT) and to study the impact of other. risk factors like hypertension (HTN), dyslipidemia, family history and menopause. This is a prospective cross-sectional study on a consecutive sample of 287 women referred to Nuclear Cardiology Department of Karachi Institute of Heart Diseases (KIHD) for GSPECT for evaluation of known or suspected CAD (from January 2009 till June 2009). Women with a history of DM diagnosed less than 5 years were excluded. Same day (reststress) GSPECT study was conducted and fixed or reversible perfusion defects were considered positive GSPECT for CAD. GSPECT was positive for CAD in 41/115 (36%, P 0.002) diabetic women and 37/172 (21 %, P 0.005) non-diabetic cohort. In diabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 5/9 (56%, P 0.013) women with diabetes only, 17/35 (48%, P 0.02) DM with HTN, 12/15 (80%, P value 0.02) DM with dyslipidemia and 11/43 (26%, P 0.001) DM with >2 risk factors. GSPECT was normal in all 3 diabetic women with positive family history for CAD. In nondiabetic cohort, GSPECT was positive in 9/32 (28%, P value 0.739) women with no risk factor, 5/58 (26%, P 0.866) HTN only, 2/5 (40%, P value 0.655) only dyslipidemic women, 1/12. (8%, P 0.004) with family history only and 4/23 (17%, P value 0.166) non-diabetic with >2 risk factors. Interestingly, 35/93 post-menopausal diabetic (38%, p value 0.017) had positive GSPECT while 33/123 non-diabetic postmenopausal women (27%, p 0.03) had positive perfusion scans. GSPECT was positive in 6/26 (23%, P 0.006) and 4/49 (8%, P 0.05) in diabetic and non-diabetic pre-menopausal women. The prevalence of CAD in our diabetic women is as high as internationally reported and diabetes is a strong risk factor for CAD. Dyslipidemia with diabetes is a major contributor to CAD than HTN and F/H. Diabetes erases the protective effect of estrogen

  17. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  19. Neonatal delivery weight and risk of future maternal diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrea E; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Källen, Karin B M

    2018-01-01

    To investigate associations between neonatal delivery weight and future risk of maternal type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Data included in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and Swedish National Diabetes Registry were merged to include all women born during 1930-1989; patients with pre-existing diabetes or gestational diabetes were excluded. Cox regression analyses were performed to identify associations between the neonatal delivery weight from the most recent pregnancy and later occurrence of diabetes. There were 1 873 440 patients included in the analyses. An increased risk of type 1 (hazard ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.23-4.01) or type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 2.77, 95% CI 2.68-2.87) was observed among patients who had a large for gestational age neonate compared with patients who had neonates within one standard definition of the mean weight for gestational age; the odds of developing type 1 (odds ratio 10.27, 95% CI 7.37-14.31) or type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 8.50, 95% CI 6.01-12.02) within 1 year of delivery was also increased compared with patients who had a neonate within one standard deviation of the mean weight for gestational age. Delivering a large for gestational age neonate was a potent risk factor for the later development of maternal type 1 or type 2 diabetes. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  20. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fractures (Part II) Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Severed or Constricted Limbs or Digits Soft-Tissue ...

  1. Cities Changing Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    for diabetes in Copenhagen. As part of the quantitative mapping phase of the Cities Changing Diabetes project in Copenhagen, a RoH analysis was conducted. The results of this analysis are summarized below. The figure shows that the ‘Halves’ rule does not generally apply for Copenhagen. On most of the levels...

  2. Diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-07-30

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg.

  3. Uveitis and diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothova, A.; Meenken, C.; Michels, R. P.; Kijlstra, A.

    1988-01-01

    Of 340 patients with anterior uveitis, 20 (6%) had diabetes mellitus. This is significantly higher than the prevalence of 1.4% in the normal Dutch population (P less than .001). Of 128 patients with idiopathic anterior uveitis, 16 (12.5%) had diabetes mellitus compared to only four (1.9%) of 212

  4. Diabetes, Distress, and Depression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-10

    This webinar is a discussion on incorporating the emotional side of diabetes into clinical care.  Created: 7/10/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention’s Division of Diabetes Translation (NCCDP/DDT).   Date Released: 7/10/2014.

  5. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et.al. Clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316( ... of Washington, Associate Director, Kidney Research Institute ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center ...

  6. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Diabetes Movie KidsHealth / For Parents / Diabetes ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics ... Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination ...

  8. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  9. International Relations

    OpenAIRE

    McGlinchey, S.

    2017-01-01

    A ‘Day 0’ introduction to International Relations for beginners. Written by a range of emerging and established experts, the chapters offer a broad sweep of the basic components of International Relations and the key contemporary issues that concern the discipline. The narrative arc forms a complete circle, taking readers from no knowledge to competency. The journey starts by examining how the international system was formed and ends by reflecting that International Relations is always adapti...

  10. Diabetes Care in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis; González-Rivas, Juan P; Lima-Martínez, Marcos; Stepenka, Victoria; Rísquez, Alejandro; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its economic burden have increased in Venezuela, posing difficult challenges in a country already in great turmoil. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence, causes, prevention, management, health policies, and challenges for successful management of diabetes and its complications in Venezuela. A comprehensive literature review spanning 1960 to 2015 was performed. Literature not indexed also was reviewed. The weighted prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was estimated from published regional and subnational population-based studies. Diabetes care strategies were analyzed. In Venezuela, the weighted prevalence of diabetes was 7.7% and prediabetes was 11.2%. Diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death (7.1%) in 2012 with the mortality rate increasing 7% per year from 1990 to 2012. In 2012, cardiovascular disease and diabetes together were the leading cause of disability-adjusted life years.T2D drivers are genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle, including unhealthy dietary patterns and physical inactivity. Obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome are present at lower cutoffs for body mass index, homeostatic model assessment, and visceral or ectopic fat, respectively. Institutional programs for early detection and/or prevention of T2D have not been established. Most patients with diabetes (∼87%) are cared for in public facilities in a fragmented health system. Local clinical practice guidelines are available, but implementation is suboptimal and supporting information is limited. Strategies to improve diabetes care in Venezuela include enhancing resources, reducing costs, improving education, implementing screening (using Latin America Finnish Diabetes Risk Score), promoting diabetes care units, avoiding insulin levels as diagnostic tool, correct use of oral glucose tolerance testing and metformin as first-line T2D treatment, and reducing health system fragmentation. Use of the Venezuelan adaptation of

  11. Endo-Perio Lesion and Uncontrolled Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Dhoum, Sara; Laslami, Kaoutar; Rouggani, Fatimazahraa; El Ouazzani, Amal; Jabri, Mouna

    2018-01-01

    This work is to discuss the management of an endo-perio lesion, which represents a challenge to clinicians when it comes to diagnosis and prognosis of the involved teeth and especially with an altered general condition. A 50-year-old female patient with uncontrolled diabetes type 2 is suffering from a purulent discharge coming from the upper right canine. Endodontic and periodontal treatments were realized with 36 months radiological and clinical follow-up with the collaboration of her intern...

  12. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. However, a meta-analysis does not support the suggestion that this factor plays any role for the initiation of diabetic nephropathy. Similar negative results have been obtained in relation to polymorphisms of the genes encoding for angiotensinogen......Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria, a relentless decline in GFR, raised arterial blood pressure, and increased relative mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure. The pathogenesis...... of diabetic nephropathy is multifactorial, with contributions from metabolic abnormalities, hemodynamic alterations, and various growth factors and genetic factors. Epidemiologic and family studies have demonstrated that only a subset of the patients develop this complication that family clustering...

  13. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  14. Built environment and diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, ‘the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.’ Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

  15. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness worldwide. The associated loss of productivity and quality of life of the patients with diabetic retinopathy will lead to additional socioeconomic burden. This study aims to determine the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients. Materials ...

  16. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  17. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  18. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  19. Cardiovascular Response Of Diabetic And Non-Diabetic Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the cardiovascular responses of diabetic and non-diabetic subjects to a single bout of bicycle ergometry. Ten male volunteer diabetics and ten male non-diabetic healthy subjects constituted the study and control groups respectively. The subjects exercised for ten minutes on a bicycle ergometer.

  20. Evaluation of the difference in caries experience in diabetic and non-diabetic children-A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Stefano; Cagetti, Maria Grazia; Cocco, Fabio; Cossellu, Dina; Meloni, Gianfranco; Campus, Guglielmo; Lingström, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the caries prevalence and related variables in Type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic children and among the diabetic children according to their metabolic status. Sixty-eight diabetic and 136 non-diabetic children, matching by gender and age (4-14 years) were enrolled. The diabetic children were divided: a) 20 children in good metabolic control (Hb1ac≤7.5) and b) 48 children in bad metabolic control (Hb1ac>7.5). Dietary and oral hygiene habits were investigated. Caries status was registered using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. Oral microflora was analysed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation method. Plaque acidogenicity was recorded after a sucrose rinse. Sugared beverage and snack intake was higher in diabetic group compared to non-diabetic group (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively) and in subjects in bad metabolic control (p = 0.03 and pgood metabolic control (pgood and bad metabolic control (pgood metabolic control might even be considered at low caries risk, while those in bad metabolic control showed an oral environment prone to a high caries risk.

  1. Family history of diabetes and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Asemi, Zatollah; Lankarani, Kamran B; Tabrizi, Reza; Maharlouei, Najmeh; Naghibzadeh-Tahami, Ahmad; Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Reza; Khatibi, Seyed Reza; Afshari, Mahdi; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Akbari, Maryam

    2017-11-01

    Gestational diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder being firstly diagnosed during pregnancy. The relationship between the family history of diabetes and the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been investigated in several primary studies with a number of contradictions in the results. Hence, the purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between the GDM and the family history of diabetes using the meta-analysis method. All published papers in main national and international databases were systematically searched with some specific keywords to find the related studies between 2000 and 2016. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) in analysis for each study using a random-effect and Mantel-Haenzel method. We also determined heterogeneity among these 33 articles and their publication bias. We entered 33 relevant studies of 2516 articles into the meta-analysis process including 2697 women with family history of diabetes mellitus as well as 29134 women without. Of them, 954 and 4372 subjects developed GDM respectively. Combining the results of the primary studies using the meta-analysis method, the overall odds ratio of family history for developing GDM was estimated as of 3.46 (95% CI: 2.80-4.27). This meta-analysis study revealed that the family history of diabetes is an important risk factor for the gestational diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Depression, anxiety and stress among patients with diabetes in primary care: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Kean Chye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a common chronic disease worldwide. Its prevalence is increasing and expected to be 366 million by the year 2030. According to the Malaysian National Health and Morbidity Survey III (NHMS, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus among individuals aged 18 years or more has increased from 11.6% in 2006 to 15.2% in 2011. It is well recognised that many individuals with chronic illnesses also have co-morbid unrecognised mental health disorders. Detecting depression in a diabetic patient has important significance with regard to mortality, as there was a 54% greater mortality in patients with diabetics and depression than the non-diabetic ones. The International Diabetes Federation has stressed the importance of integrating psychological care in the management of diabetes.

  3. Diabetes and thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barnard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a significant complication of b-thalassaemia major. The aetiology includes iron overload causing b-cell destruction, autoimmunity, insulin resistance secondary to liver disease and development of type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are specific issues for patients with diabetes and thalassaemia which will be discussed here. Impaired carbohydrate metabolism must be detected early, to allow intensification of iron chelation. As life expectancy in thalassaemia rises, diabetic complications are seen. Optimising blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factor control is essential. Insulin remains critical for severely symptomatic patients. With milder hyperglycaemia, oral antidiabetic drugs are increasingly used. At Whittington Hospital, we wanted to address these issues. In 2005, we developed a unique Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, where patients are reviewed jointly by specialist teams, including Consultant Diabetologist and Haematologist. The Joint Clinic aims to optimise diabetes, endocrine and thalassaemia care, while supporting patient self-management. A retrospective audit of the Joint Clinic (2005-09, showed improvement in glycaemic control, (Fructosamine falling from 344 umol/l to 319 umol/l. We compared our cohort to the National Diabetes Audit for England (2007-08. Patients attending the Joint Clinic achieved better glycaemic control (target reached: 73% Joint Clinic vs. 63% Nationally, blood pressure control (target reached: 58% Joint Clinic vs. 30% Nationally and cholesterol control (target reached: 81% Joint Clinic vs. 78% Nationally. 22.7% of our patients had ≥1 microvascular complication. A significant proportion had endocrinopathies (86% hypogonadism, 23% hypoparathyroidism, 18% hypothyroidism. Managing diabetes is one of the greatest challenges a person with thalassaemia can face. Training people to self-manage their diabetes and providing support from specialist teams working together are critical. The unique partnership

  4. Off-label prescriptions in diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Jesuíno de Oliveira Andrade

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prescription of a drug outside of the indications for which it was originally approved by regulators is internationally known as "off-label" prescription. We describe off-label treatments for the diabetic foot reported in international scientific literature. This is a qualitative and descriptive bibliographical review based on the results of a search of the Medline international database. The criteria for review were publication between January 1985 and November 2013, and the MeSH (Medical Subject Heading keywords "off-label use" OR "off-label" OR "off-label prescribing" plus "diabetic foot" were input on the search form. Nine studies were selected that contained information about off-label treatments for the diabetic foot. We conclude that the practice of off-label prescribing has potential benefits. In some situations an off-label prescription is the only treatment available for patients, either because a more targeted drug does not exist, or because other methods of treatment are ineffective or unavailable due to patient intolerance.

  5. International law

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Malcolm N

    2017-01-01

    International Law is the definitive and authoritative text on the subject, offering Shaw's unbeatable combination of clarity of expression and academic rigour and ensuring both understanding and critical analysis in an engaging and authoritative style. Encompassing the leading principles, practice and cases, and retaining and developing the detailed references which encourage and assist the reader in further study, this new edition motivates and challenges students and professionals while remaining accessible and engaging. Fully updated to reflect recent case law and treaty developments, this edition contains an expanded treatment of the relationship between international and domestic law, the principles of international humanitarian law, and international criminal law alongside additional material on international economic law.

  6. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jannet Svensson,1 Charlotte Cerqueira,2 Per Kjærsgaard,3 Lene Lyngsøe,4 Niels Thomas Hertel,5 Mette Madsen,6 Henrik B Mortensen,1 Jesper Johannesen1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev and Gentofte, Herlev, 2Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 3Pediatric Department, County Hospital Herning, Herning, 4Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Nordsjællands Hospital, Hillerød, 5HC Andersen Childrens Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Pediatric Department, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Aim: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Study population: The study population consists of all children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (<18 years of age will be included. Main variables: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. Descriptive data: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ~3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients <15 years of age were diagnosed in 2014. The disease management has changed dramatically with more children treated intensively with multiple daily injections, insulin pumps

  7. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Fisher-Hoch

    Full Text Available Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC; a two-stage randomly selected 'Framingham-like' cohort of Mexican Americans on the US Mexico border with severe health disparities. We examined prevalence, risk factors and metabolic health in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. Two thirds of this Mexican American population has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was 28.0%, nearly half undiagnosed, and pre-diabetes 31.6%. Mean BMI among those with diabetes was 33.5 kg/m2 compared with 29.0 kg/m2 for those without diabetes. Significant risk factors were low income and educational levels. Most with diabetes had increased waist/hip ratio. Lack of insurance and access to health services played a decisive role in failure to have diabetes diagnosed. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes had similar measures of poor metabolic health similar but generally not as severe as those with diagnosed diabetes. More than 50% of a minority Mexican American population in South Texas has diabetes or pre-diabetes and is metabolically unhealthy. Only a third of diabetes cases were diagnosed. Sustained efforts are imperative to identify, diagnose and treat individuals in underserved communities.

  8. Race/Ethnic Difference in Diabetes and Diabetic Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Spanakis, Elias K.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in diabetes and its complications and co-morbidities exist globally. A recent Endocrine Society Scientific Statement described the Health Disparities in several endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize that statement and provide novel updates on race/ethnic differences in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, children with type 2 diabetes and in Latino subpopulations. We also review race/ethnic differences in the epidemiology of diabet...

  9. Diabetes screening in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Genetic Counseling for Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stephanie A.; Maloney, Kristin L.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2014-01-01

    Most diabetes is polygenic in etiology, with (type 1 diabetes, T1DM) or without (type 2 diabetes, T2DM) an autoimmune basis. Genetic counseling for diabetes generally focuses on providing empiric risk information based on family history and/or the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on pregnancy outcome. An estimated one to five percent of diabetes is monogenic in nature, e.g., maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), with molecular testing and etiology-based treatment available. However, recent studies show that most monogenic diabetes is misdiagnosed as T1DM or T2DM. While efforts are underway to increase the rate of diagnosis in the diabetes clinic, genetic counselors and clinical geneticists are in a prime position to identify monogenic cases through targeted questions during a family history combined with working in conjunction with diabetes professionals to diagnose and assure proper treatment and familial risk assessment for individuals with monogenic diabetes. PMID:25045596

  11. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  12. History of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad M

    2002-04-01

    Clinical features similar to diabetes mellitus were described 3000 years ago by the ancient Egyptians. The term "diabetes" was first coined by Araetus of Cappodocia (81-133AD). Later, the word mellitus (honey sweet) was added by Thomas Willis (Britain) in 1675 after rediscovering the sweetness of urine and blood of patients (first noticed by the ancient Indians). It was only in 1776 that Dobson (Britain) firstly confirmed the presence of excess sugar in urine and blood as a cause of their sweetness. In modern time, the history of diabetes coincided with the emergence of experimental medicine. An important milestone in the history of diabetes is the establishment of the role of the liver in glycogenesis, and the concept that diabetes is due to excess glucose production Claude Bernard (France) in 1857. The role of the pancreas in pathogenesis of diabetes was discovered by Mering and Minkowski (Austria) 1889. Later, this discovery constituted the basis of insulin isolation and clinical use by Banting and Best (Canada) in 1921. Trials to prepare an orally administrated hypoglycemic agent ended successfully by first marketing of tolbutamide and carbutamide in 1955. This report will also discuss the history of dietary management and acute and chronic complications of diabetes.

  13. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  14. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9:00 to 16:00 at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 14:00 until 16:00. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  15. Diabetes in Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, G; Formenti, A M; Frara, S; Maffezzoni, F; Doga, M; Giustina, A

    2017-05-01

    This review focuses on the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of diabetes mellitus occurring in patients with Cushing disease (CD). Insulin resistance and impairment in insulin secretion are both involved in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes. Correction of glucocorticoid excess does not always resolve abnormalities of glucose homeostasis, and correction of hyperglycaemia is specifically required. In fact, insulin resistance may persist even after correction of glucocorticoid excess and diabetes needs to be treated for long term. On the other hand, emerging drugs used in the treatment of CD, such as the novel somatostatin analog pasireotide, may have direct effects on glucose homeostasis regardless of control of cortisol excess. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent and early complication of CD with important diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications. Specifically, diagnosis of CD in patients with diabetes may be difficult due to potential misinterpretation of markers of cortisol hypersecretion. Moreover, diabetes mellitus is often difficult to be controlled in CD requiring a careful and dedicated therapeutic approach. Finally, the coexistence of diabetes may influence the therapeutic decision making in CD, since drugs used in this setting may variably influence glucose homeostasis regardless of control of hypercortisolism.

  16. Bouncing forward: families living with a type I diabetic child | Brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Despite the multitude of challenges that families living with a child with diabetes face, they have been found to adapt to such an extent that diabetes is viewed as a manageable condition. This study was concerned with the factors that enable these families to adapt. The internationally acclaimed Resiliency Model of Stress, ...

  17. Some Relations of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome to Colorectal Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svačina, Š.; Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Visokai, V.; Lipská, L.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 29, 4 suppl. (2003), s. 359 ISSN 0338-1684. [International Diabetes Federation Congress /18./. 24.08.2003-29.08.2003, Paris] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : diabetes type 2 * metabolic syndrome * colorectal cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  18. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM and osteoporotic fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity in older subjects. Recent reports have revealed close association between fracture risk and DM types 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2, respectively. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of these diseases in the elderly and examine certain etiopathogenetic aspects of DM associated osteoporosis, which could be useful in management of diabetic patients. Materials and methods: We searched the Embase and PubMed databases using diabetes, osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD as search terms and 1989-2009 as publication dates. Discussion: The risk of fractures seems to be increased in both types of DM although DM2 seems to be associated with normal-high BMDs compared with the normal population. This apparent paradox could reflect greater bone frailty in diabetic patients that are unrelated to adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia, deposition of advanced glycosylation end products in collagen, reduced serum IGF-1 levels, hypercalciuria, renal failure, microangiopathy, and/or inflammation. Diabetic patients’ propensity to fall and multiple comorbidities might also explain their higher fracture rates. The effects of drugs that inhibit bone resorption in diabetic patients are probably similar to those obtained in nondiabetics although there is little information on this issue. In general, effective treatment of diabetes has positive effects on bone metabolism. Metformin acts directly on bone tissue, reducing AGE accumulation, and insulin has direct effects on osteoclast activity. In contrast, the thiazolidinediones seem to have negative effects since they orient mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation toward adipose rather than bone tissue. Incretin therapy is a newer approach that appears to modify interactions between nutrition and bone turnover (e.g., postprandial suppression of bone resorption. Conclusions: Better understanding of how

  19. Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Backholer, Kathryn; Peeters, Anna; Herman, William H.; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Liew, Danny; Ademi, Zanfina; Magliano, Dianna J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Effective interventions to prevent, delay, or remit diabetes are currently available. However, their impact on the prevalence of diabetes at the population level is unknown. This study aimed to estimate the impact of a range of diabetes interventions on the population prevalence of diabetes for Australian adults between 2010 and 2025. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used the Australian Diabetes Projection Model to estimate the impact of a population-wide strategy, high-risk preventio...

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid levels in blood and metabolic syndrome in obese children: is there a link?

    OpenAIRE

    Lassandro, C.; Banderali, G.; Radaelli, G.; Borghi, E.; Moretti, F.; Verduci, E.

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing in the pediatric population. Considering the different existing criteria to define metabolic syndrome, the use of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria has been suggested in children. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been associated with beneficial effects on health. The evidence about the relationship of DHA status in blood and components of the metabolic syndrome is unclear. This review discusses the possible association between DH...

  1. Diabetic Cataract—Pathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pollreisz

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics.

  2. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, A.; Sortso, C.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation of the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes in Denmark 2000 through 2011. The Diabetes Impact Study 2013 is based on all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register as of July 3rd 2013 (n=497,232). Record linkage with the Danish...... National Patient Register was used to defining the first date of experiencing a cardiovascular event by means of a discharge diagnosis and/or having performed a coronary bypass operation or revascularization of the coronary arteries. The proportion of patients with already established CVD at the diagnosis...

  3. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons...... as one sporadic case of early-onset diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing of the sporadic case of diabetes insipidus revealed a highly unusual mosaicism for a variation in the gene encoding the AVP receptor (AVPR2). This mosaicism had resulted in a partial phenotype and initial diagnostic difficulties...

  4. Analysis of agreement among definitions of metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic Turkish adults: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersot Thomas P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to explore the agreement among World Health Organization (WHO, European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR, National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, American College of Endocrinology (ACE, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Methods 1568 subjects (532 men, 1036 women, mean age 45 and standard deviation (SD 13 years were evaluated in this cross-sectional, methodological study. Cardiometabolic risk factors were determined. Insulin sensitivity was calculated by HOMA-IR. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were used to compare multiple groups. Results The agreement between WHO and EGIR definitions was very good (kappa: 0.83. The agreement between NCEP, ACE, and IDF definitions was substantial to very good (kappa: 0.77–0.84. The agreement between NCEP or ACE or IDF and WHO or EGIR definitions was fair (kappa: 0.32–0.37. The age and sex adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 38% by NCEP, 42% by ACE and IDF, 20% by EGIR and 19% by WHO definition. The evaluated definitions were dichotomized after analysis of design, agreement and prevalence: insulin measurement requiring definitions (WHO and EGIR and definitions not requiring insulin measurement (NCEP, ACE, IDF. One definition was selected from each set for comparison. WHO-defined subjects were more insulin resistant than subjects without the metabolic syndrome (mean and SD for log HOMA-IR, 0.53 ± 0.14 vs. 0.07 ± 0.23, respectively, p 0.05, but lower log HOMA-IR values (p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome definitions that do not require measurement of insulin levels (NCEP, ACE and IDF identify twice more patients with insulin resistance and increased Framingham risk scores and are more useful than the definitions that require measurement of insulin levels (WHO and EGIR.

  5. Obstetric medicine: Interlinking obstetrics and internal medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Mayo Clinic Hospitals, Division of Hospital Internal Medicine, Rochester, Minn, USA ... Obstetric physicians have a specific role in managing pregnant and postpartum women with ... problems may also affect pregnancy outcomes, with increased risk of ... greatly benefited from good control of her diabetes and hypertension.

  6. internal branding

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Anu; Omanga, Josphat

    2014-01-01

    The project report provides an insight into internal branding of two different leading firms – Coca-Cola and Google. The aim of this project report is to study how these two companies use internal branding to promote or build brand performance of the company. This report follows a qualitative research method. The report is deductive in nature and hence, it is guided by the literatures of internal branding. The project report conducted research on brand identity, brand commitment and brand loy...

  7. Internal branding

    OpenAIRE

    Rijal, Ramesh; Dhakal, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The project report provides an insight into internal branding of two different leading firms – Coca-Cola and Google. The aim of this project report is to study how these two companies use internal branding to promote or build brand performance of the company. This report follows a qualitative research method. The report is deductive in nature and hence, it is guided by the literatures of internal branding. The project report conducted research on brand identity, brand commitment and brand loy...

  8. The Diabetic Foot Attack: "'Tis Too Late to Retreat!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Prashanth R J; Edmonds, Michael; Kavarthapu, Venu; Rashid, Hisham; Ahluwalia, Raju; Pankhurst, Christian; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2018-03-01

    The "diabetic foot attack" is one of the most devastating presentations of diabetic foot disease, typically presenting as an acutely inflamed foot with rapidly progressive skin and tissue necrosis, at times associated with significant systemic symptoms. Without intervention, it may escalate over hours to limb-threatening proportions and poses a high amputation risk. There are only best practice approaches but no international protocols to guide management. Immediate recognition of a typical infected diabetic foot attack, predominated by severe infection, with prompt surgical intervention to debride all infected tissue alongside broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is vital to ensure both limb and patient survival. Postoperative access to multidisciplinary and advanced wound care therapies is also necessary. More subtle forms exist: these include the ischemic diabetic foot attack and, possibly, in a contemporary categorization, acute Charcot neuroarthropathy. To emphasize the importance of timely action especially in the infected and ischemic diabetic foot attack, we revisit the concept of "time is tissue" and draw parallels with advances in acute myocardial infarction and stroke care. At the moment, international protocols to guide management of severe diabetic foot presentations do not specifically use the term. However, we believe that it may help increase awareness of the urgent actions required in some situations.

  9. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available John J Chen,1,2,* Lucas J Wendel,1,3,* Emily S Birkholz,1 John G Vallone,4 Anne L Coleman,5,6 Fei Yu,7 Vinit B Mahajan1,3,8 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, 7Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: A retrospective case–control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups.Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001 (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76–10.49; P=0.0004. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates

  10. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and one home-based care facility in Norway. We examined the reliability and content and construct validity of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test. The items in both the general diabetes subscale and the insulin-use subscale were considered relevant and appropriate. The instrument showed satisfactory properties for distinguishing between groups. Item response theory-based measurements and item information curves indicate maximum information at average or lower knowledge scores. Internal consistency and the item-total correlations were quite weak, indicating that the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a set of items related to various relevant knowledge topics but not necessarily related to each other. The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a broad range of topics relevant to diabetes care. It is an appropriate instrument for identifying individual and distinct needs for diabetes education among nursing personnel. The knowledge gaps identified by the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test could also provide useful input for the content of educational activities. However, some revision of the test should be considered.

  11. Development and validation of a Spanish diabetes-specific numeracy measure: DNT-15 Latino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard O; Osborn, Chandra Y; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L

    2011-09-01

    Although deficits in health literacy and numeracy have been described among Latinos, the impact of low numeracy on diabetes outcomes has not been studied. Study objectives were (1) to establish the reliability and validity of a 15-item Spanish, diabetes-specific numeracy measure (Diabetes Numeracy Test [DNT]-15 Latino) and (2) to examine the relationship between diabetes-specific numeracy and diabetes-related outcomes among a sample of Latino adults with diabetes. Data collection included patient demographics, health literacy, general numeracy, diabetes-specific numeracy, acculturation, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and most recent glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Participants (n=144) were on average 47.8 years old (SD=12.1). The majority were female (62%), uninsured (81%), and of Mexican nationality (78%) and reported low levels of acculturation (96%). The DNT-15 Latino had high internal reliability (Kruder-Richardson 20=0.78). The DNT-15 Latino demonstrated construct validity, correlating with measures of health literacy (ρ=0.291), general numeracy (ρ=0.500), education (ρ=0.361), and income (ρ=0.270) (Pvalid measure of diabetes-specific numeracy for Latino patients with diabetes; however, additional studies are needed to further explore the association between diabetes-specific numeracy and acculturation and their impact on diabetes-related outcomes for Latinos.

  12. Skin, a mirror reflecting diabetes mellitus: A longitudinal study in a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahora, Roshni; Thakkar, Sejal; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common of the endocrine disorders. Mucocutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are many and vary from trivial to life-threatening. Sometimes, mucocutaneous disorders may herald the onset of diabetes. To study the pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in diabetics and role of it in diagnosing diabetes mellitus and its complications. It was a longitudinal observational study of patients having diabetes with skin complaints attending skin outdoor department or admitted in wards for any reason in a tertiary care hospital. Total 300 patients were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations were done to diagnose the mucocutaneous disorders, diabetes, and diabetic complications. The data was analyzed by using Epi info software. Demographic profile shown majority of cases (78.66%) in more than 40 years of age with almost equal male and female preponderance. Mucocutaneous manifestations as presenting feature of diabetes were observed in 21.67% cases. Infections were most common in 119 (39.66%) cases, followed by acanthosis nigricans in 46 (15.33%) cases. Various associated complications like hypertension, retinopathy, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, and diabetic ketoacidosis were observed in 160 (53.3%). Skin is the mirror, which reflects internal diseases; this aptly applies to skin and diabetes mellitus. Through awareness about cutaneous manifestations of DM, dermatologist can not only take credit for detecting DM but also facilitate early diagnosis of systemic complications of DM. This is immensely beneficial to patients in long run.

  13. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Factors Associated With Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Two Regional Hospitals in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindong, Maxime; Palle, John N; Nebongo, Daniel; Aminde, Leopold Ndemnge; Mboue-Djieka, Yannick; Mbarga, Nicole T Fouda; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Choukem, Siméon-Pierre

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcer and high risk for ulceration, describe the clinical presentation, and identify factors associated with diabetic foot ulcer in the Southwest regional hospitals of Cameroon. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected using a structured questionnaire administered to consecutive patients with diabetes. Findings from detailed foot examination were recorded. Diabetic foot ulcer was diagnosed according to the International Working Group on Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) definition. Data were analyzed with Stata IC version 12. Of the 203 participants included, 63.1% were females. Age ranged from 26 to 96 years. The median duration of diabetes was 4.0 years (interquartile range 1.0-8.0 years). The prevalence of diabetic foot ulcer was 11.8% (24), of whom 29.2% (7) had high grade (grades 2 to 4), and most of the ulcers 58.3% (14) were located at the plantar region. The prevalence of high risk for ulceration was 21.8% (39). Loss of protective sensation (OR = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.43-9.71; P = .007), and peripheral arterial disease (OR = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.14-10.56; P = .028) were independently associated with diabetic foot. Diabetic foot ulcer is a common complication among patients with diabetes attending these regional hospitals. Loss of protective sensation, and peripheral arterial disease increase the odds of having diabetic foot ulcer, and we suggest them as the main target of interest for prevention.

  14. Gender difference in components of metabolic syndrome among patients of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Muhammad Ahmad; Javid, Riaz Ahmad; Hameed, Abdul; Mustafa, Irum

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia are the integral components that constitute metabolic syndrome. It has emerged as cause of substantial mortality with gender difference. To compare the gender characteristics of metabolic syndrome in subjects of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This observational comparative prospective study was conducted in medical ward of BVH Bahawalpur over period of 6 month from January 2014 to June 2014. Sample size of 100 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetics (comprising equal number of males and females) were collected. As defined by WHO and IDF, variables of metabolic syndrome studied were BMI, hypertension, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. The lipid values were interpreted in normal or high risk category by applying NCEP ATPIII criterion. Fasting sample were collected for sugar and lipid profile. Anthropometric, demographic and biochemical data was tabulated. Continuous and categorical variables were displayed as mean ± standard deviation and percentage respectively. Student 't' test was use to assess the difference for the lipid profile at 5% significance level. Female patients were found to be overweight, hypertensive and had uncontrolled hyperglycemia as compared to male subjects. Their systolic blood pressure was 150±25.75 and diastolic was 90±17mm/hg. The mean blood glucose concentration was 246.64±105mg/dl. In age group 35-44 years, the mean triglycerides and cholesterol levels in females were 184.54±42.05 and 192.5±34mg/dl respectively. HDL-C was 33.2±5.19mg/dl. In females with age group of 45-54 years, the mean concentration of triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-C were 217.75±77.6mg/dl, 190.95±14.4mg/dl and 31.75±3.8mg/dl respectively, and all were in high risk category when compared to cut off values determined by NCEP/ADA. While in females of age group 55-64 years, the values of TGs, total cholesterol and HDL-C were 204±154.11mg/dl, 200.09± 47.8 mg/dl and 33.4±4.6mg/dl respectively and again

  15. Cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot: a Markov analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Ortegon (Monica); W.K. Redekop (Ken); L.W. Niessen (Louis Wilhelmus)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the lifetime health and economic effects of optimal prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot according to international standards and to determine the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in the Netherlands. RESEARCH DESIGN AND

  16. RENOPROTECTION IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes mellitus (DM) (Table I).1 In response to the increasing threat ... formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); generation of advanced glycation ... There is sufficient evidence that certain therapies protect the kidneys from the long-term ...

  17. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ... and delivering it to the trillions of cells that make up the body. Watch this movie to learn more about diabetes. More ...

  18. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    , and common and divergent roles of receptors for nucleotides and nucleosides in different organ systems will be given. This integrated picture will aid our understanding of the challenges of the potential and currently used drugs targeted to specific organ/cells or disorders associated with diabetes.......The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering with the NIH Office of Research ...

  20. Cities Changing Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Clare Kristensen, Elisabeth; Malling, Gritt Marie Hviid

    in relation to their diabetes. The Community domain: Almost all informants enjoyed the green areas near their neighbourhood which gave them the possibilities to meet up and do social and physical activities together. Due to physical limitations only few liked to do more vigorous exercise. Gym facilities...... not find that social activities in their neighbourhood met their interests. Managing diabetes and keeping the prescribed diet was difficult when participating in social activities with friends and family. Some felt uncomfortable talking about their diabetes as they did not want to draw negative attention......The overall objectives of the Vulnerability Assessmentis to gain in-depth information on what attributes the most to vulnerability seen from the perspectives of vulnerable diabetes patients and citizens at risk. In Copenhagen, we focused on how everyday life influences the perceptions...