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Sample records for identifying specific protein

  1. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

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    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  2. Beta atomic contacts: identifying critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces.

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    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Hoi, Steven C H

    2013-01-01

    Specific binding between proteins plays a crucial role in molecular functions and biological processes. Protein binding interfaces and their atomic contacts are typically defined by simple criteria, such as distance-based definitions that only use some threshold of spatial distance in previous studies. These definitions neglect the nearby atomic organization of contact atoms, and thus detect predominant contacts which are interrupted by other atoms. It is questionable whether such kinds of interrupted contacts are as important as other contacts in protein binding. To tackle this challenge, we propose a new definition called beta (β) atomic contacts. Our definition, founded on the β-skeletons in computational geometry, requires that there is no other atom in the contact spheres defined by two contact atoms; this sphere is similar to the van der Waals spheres of atoms. The statistical analysis on a large dataset shows that β contacts are only a small fraction of conventional distance-based contacts. To empirically quantify the importance of β contacts, we design βACV, an SVM classifier with β contacts as input, to classify homodimers from crystal packing. We found that our βACV is able to achieve the state-of-the-art classification performance superior to SVM classifiers with distance-based contacts as input. Our βACV also outperforms several existing methods when being evaluated on several datasets in previous works. The promising empirical performance suggests that β contacts can truly identify critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces. β contacts thus provide a new model for more precise description of atomic organization in protein quaternary structures than distance-based contacts.

  3. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms.

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    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R; Mans, Dorus A; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J C; Coene, Karlien L M; Arts, Heleen H; Betts, Matthew J; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J F; Marcelis, Carlo L; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J P; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L; Blacque, Oliver E; Gibson, Toby J; Huynen, Martijn A; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B; Roepman, Ronald

    2016-05-13

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine.

  4. An All-Recombinant Protein-Based Culture System Specifically Identifies Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance Factors.

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    Ieyasu, Aki; Ishida, Reiko; Kimura, Takaharu; Morita, Maiko; Wilkinson, Adam C; Sudo, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Ohehara, Jun; Tajima, Yoko; Lai, Chen-Yi; Otsu, Makoto; Nakamura, Yukio; Ema, Hideo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Yamazaki, Satoshi

    2017-03-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are considered one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of various blood disorders. However, due to difficulties in establishing stable maintenance and expansion of HSCs in vitro, their insufficient supply is a major constraint to transplantation studies. To solve these problems we have developed a fully defined, all-recombinant protein-based culture system. Through this system, we have identified hemopexin (HPX) and interleukin-1α as responsible for HSC maintenance in vitro. Subsequent molecular analysis revealed that HPX reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species levels within cultured HSCs. Furthermore, bone marrow immunostaining and 3D immunohistochemistry revealed that HPX is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells, known HSC niche constituents. These results highlight the utility of this fully defined all-recombinant protein-based culture system for reproducible in vitro HSC culture and its potential to contribute to the identification of factors responsible for in vitro maintenance, expansion, and differentiation of stem cell populations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An All-Recombinant Protein-Based Culture System Specifically Identifies Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance Factors

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    Aki Ieyasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are considered one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of various blood disorders. However, due to difficulties in establishing stable maintenance and expansion of HSCs in vitro, their insufficient supply is a major constraint to transplantation studies. To solve these problems we have developed a fully defined, all-recombinant protein-based culture system. Through this system, we have identified hemopexin (HPX and interleukin-1α as responsible for HSC maintenance in vitro. Subsequent molecular analysis revealed that HPX reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species levels within cultured HSCs. Furthermore, bone marrow immunostaining and 3D immunohistochemistry revealed that HPX is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells, known HSC niche constituents. These results highlight the utility of this fully defined all-recombinant protein-based culture system for reproducible in vitro HSC culture and its potential to contribute to the identification of factors responsible for in vitro maintenance, expansion, and differentiation of stem cell populations.

  6. Incorporating deep learning with convolutional neural networks and position specific scoring matrices for identifying electron transport proteins.

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    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Ho, Quang-Thai; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-09-05

    In several years, deep learning is a modern machine learning technique using in a variety of fields with state-of-the-art performance. Therefore, utilization of deep learning to enhance performance is also an important solution for current bioinformatics field. In this study, we try to use deep learning via convolutional neural networks and position specific scoring matrices to identify electron transport proteins, which is an important molecular function in transmembrane proteins. Our deep learning method can approach a precise model for identifying of electron transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 80.3%, specificity of 94.4%, and accuracy of 92.3%, with MCC of 0.71 for independent dataset. The proposed technique can serve as a powerful tool for identifying electron transport proteins and can help biologists understand the function of the electron transport proteins. Moreover, this study provides a basis for further research that can enrich a field of applying deep learning in bioinformatics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Empirical Methods for Identifying Specific Peptide-protein Interactions for Smart Reagent Development

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    2012-09-01

    library as C-terminal fusion to the capsid protein D of bacteriophage lambda,” J Mol Biol, 282(1), 125-35 (1998). [10] Z. Ren, and L. W. Black, “ Phage T4 ...alternatives using peptide display techniques such as bacterial display 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 , yeast display 6, 7 , phage display 4, 5, 8, 9, 10 , and synthetic...applications of phage and cell display,” Biotechnol Adv, 19(1), 1-33 (2001). [5] S. Y. Lee, J. H. Choi, and Z. H. Xu, “Microbial cell-surface

  8. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

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    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  9. Identifying long-term memory B-cells in vaccinated children despite waning antibody levels specific for Bordetella pertussis proteins.

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    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-04

    Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Since the 1950s in developed countries pertussis vaccinations are included in the national immunization program. However, antibody levels rapidly wane after both whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccination. Therefore protection against pertussis may depend largely on long-term B- and T-cell immunities. We investigated long-term pertussis-specific memory B-cell responses in children who were primed at infant age with the Dutch wP-vaccine (ISRCTN65428640). Purified B-cells were characterized by FACS-analysis and after polyclonal stimulation memory B-cells were detected by ELISPOT-assays specific for pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and tetanus. In addition, plasma IgG levels directed to the same antigens were measured by a fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay. Two and 3 years after wP priming as well as 2 and 5 years after the aP booster at the age of 4, low plasma IgG levels to the pertussis proteins were found. At the same time, however pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells could be detected and their number increased with age. The number of tetanus-specific memory B-cells was similar in all age groups, whereas IgG-tetanus levels were high 2 years after tetanus booster compared to pre- and 5 years post-booster levels. This study shows the presence of long-term pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells in children despite waning antibody levels after vaccination, which suggests that memory B-cells in addition to antibodies may contribute to protection against pertussis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

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    Daniel Belstrøm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity.

  11. An analysis approach to identify specific functional sites in orthologous proteins using sequence and structural information: application to neuroserpin reveals regions that differentially regulate inhibitory activity.

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    Lee, Tet Woo; Yang, Annie Shu-Ping; Brittain, Thomas; Birch, Nigel P

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of sequence conservation is commonly used to predict functionally important sites in proteins. We have developed an approach that first identifies highly conserved sites in a set of orthologous sequences using a weighted substitution-matrix-based conservation score and then filters these conserved sites based on the pattern of conservation present in a wider alignment of sequences from the same family and structural information to identify surface-exposed sites. This allows us to detect specific functional sites in the target protein and exclude regions that are likely to be generally important for the structure or function of the wider protein family. We applied our method to two members of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors. We first confirmed that our method successfully detected the known heparin binding site in antithrombin while excluding residues known to be generally important in the serpin family. We next applied our sequence analysis approach to neuroserpin and used our results to guide site-directed polyalanine mutagenesis experiments. The majority of the mutant neuroserpin proteins were found to fold correctly and could still form inhibitory complexes with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Kinetic analysis of tPA inhibition, however, revealed altered inhibitory kinetics in several of the mutant proteins, with some mutants showing decreased association with tPA and others showing more rapid dissociation of the covalent complex. Altogether, these results confirm that our sequence analysis approach is a useful tool that can be used to guide mutagenesis experiments for the detection of specific functional sites in proteins. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Disease specific protein corona

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    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  13. Protein Correlation Profiles Identify Lipid Droplet Proteins with High Confidence*

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    Krahmer, Natalie; Hilger, Maximiliane; Kory, Nora; Wilfling, Florian; Stoehr, Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Farese, Robert V.; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are important organelles in energy metabolism and lipid storage. Their cores are composed of neutral lipids that form a hydrophobic phase and are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer that harbors specific proteins. Most well-established LD proteins perform important functions, particularly in cellular lipid metabolism. Morphological studies show LDs in close proximity to and interacting with membrane-bound cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endosomes. Because of these close associations, it is difficult to purify LDs to homogeneity. Consequently, the confident identification of bona fide LD proteins via proteomics has been challenging. Here, we report a methodology for LD protein identification based on mass spectrometry and protein correlation profiles. Using LD purification and quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified LD proteins by correlating their purification profiles to those of known LD proteins. Application of the protein correlation profile strategy to LDs isolated from Drosophila S2 cells led to the identification of 111 LD proteins in a cellular LD fraction in which 1481 proteins were detected. LD localization was confirmed in a subset of identified proteins via microscopy of the expressed proteins, thereby validating the approach. Among the identified LD proteins were both well-characterized LD proteins and proteins not previously known to be localized to LDs. Our method provides a high-confidence LD proteome of Drosophila cells and a novel approach that can be applied to identify LD proteins of other cell types and tissues. PMID:23319140

  14. iRPIS-PseNNC: identifying RNA-protein interaction sites by incorporating the position-specific dinucleotide propensity into ensemble random forest approach

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    Li, Long; Chen, Guojin; Jin, Tingdu

    2017-06-01

    As the pile of RNA-Protein complexes sequences mounted, in order to overcome time-consuming problem of the traditional identify RNA-Protein interaction sites (RPIS) method, it is urgent need develop intelligent recognition approach for quickly and reliable recognition of the RNA-Protein interaction sites (RPIS). To settle the question, we developed a new method named iRPIS-PseNNC, in which each sample is a nineteen nucleotides segment that for positive the centre of the segments is RPIS and for negative the segments centre is non-RPIS, and the sample was obtained by sliding window. The RNA sample was formulated by combining the dipeptide position-specific propensity into random forest approach, and by using the random sampling to balance the training dataset. According the voting system, we combine eleven random forest together to construct an ensemble classifier. It is shown that via the rigorous cross validations that the new predictor “iRPIS-PseNNC” achieved very high percentage of accuracy than any other existing algorithms in this field, indicating that the iRPIS-PseNNC predictor will be an effective tool for prediction RNA-Protein interaction sites.

  15. A systems-wide comparison of red rice (Oryza longistaminata) tissues identifies rhizome specific genes and proteins that are targets for cultivated rice improvement.

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    He, Ruifeng; Salvato, Fernanda; Park, Jeong-Jin; Kim, Min-Jeong; Nelson, William; Balbuena, Tiago S; Willer, Mark; Crow, John A; May, Greg D; Soderlund, Carol A; Thelen, Jay J; Gang, David R

    2014-02-12

    The rhizome, the original stem of land plants, enables species to invade new territory and is a critical component of perenniality, especially in grasses. Red rice (Oryza longistaminata) is a perennial wild rice species with many valuable traits that could be used to improve cultivated rice cultivars, including rhizomatousness, disease resistance and drought tolerance. Despite these features, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to rhizome growth, development and function in this plant. We used an integrated approach to compare the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of the rhizome to other tissues of red rice. 116 Gb of transcriptome sequence was obtained from various tissues and used to identify rhizome-specific and preferentially expressed genes, including transcription factors and hormone metabolism and stress response-related genes. Proteomics and metabolomics approaches identified 41 proteins and more than 100 primary metabolites and plant hormones with rhizome preferential accumulation. Of particular interest was the identification of a large number of gene transcripts from Magnaportha oryzae, the fungus that causes rice blast disease in cultivated rice, even though the red rice plants showed no sign of disease. A significant set of genes, proteins and metabolites appear to be specifically or preferentially expressed in the rhizome of O. longistaminata. The presence of M. oryzae gene transcripts at a high level in apparently healthy plants suggests that red rice is resistant to this pathogen, and may be able to provide genes to cultivated rice that will enable resistance to rice blast disease.

  16. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases

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    Leinonen Rasko

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. Results We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV or Microsoft Excel (XLS files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. Conclusion We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR

  17. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR) service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases.

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    Côté, Richard G; Jones, Philip; Martens, Lennart; Kerrien, Samuel; Reisinger, Florian; Lin, Quan; Leinonen, Rasko; Apweiler, Rolf; Hermjakob, Henning

    2007-10-18

    Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST) access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc) as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV) or Microsoft Excel (XLS) files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR interface, documentation and code examples are available at

  18. Anti-citrullinated heat shock protein 90 antibodies identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are a marker of lung-specific immune responses.

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    Harlow, Lisa; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Rosas, Ivan O; Doyle, Tracy J; Osorio, Juan C; Travers, Timothy S; Camacho, Carlos C; Oddis, Chester V; Ascherman, Dana P

    2014-11-01

    Previous work has demonstrated a correlation between serum anti-citrullinated HSP90 antibodies and rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). To further investigate this potential pathogenic relationship, we used ELISA-based techniques to assess anti-citrullinated HSP90 antibody profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with different stages of RA-ILD. 9/21 RA-derived BALF specimens demonstrated IgG and/or IgA antibodies targeting citrullinated HSP90 proteins/peptides, highlighting disease specific responses (with a predilection for RA-ILD) that did not occur in IPF patients (0/5) or healthy control subjects (0/5). Comparison of antibody profiles between BALF and matching serum specimens revealed various recognition patterns favoring predominant production of anti-citrullinated HSP90 antibodies within the lung microenvironment-further supporting the connection between this antibody specificity and parenchymal lung disease. Equally important, qualitative as well as quantitative differences in anti-citrullinated HSP90 profiles between BALF and serum indicate that the lung plays a direct role in shaping the immune repertoire of RA/RA-ILD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes encoding products homologous to cysteine cluster proteins or plant lipid transfer proteins are identified in Astragalus sinicus L. by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

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    Chou, Min-Xia; Wei, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Da-Song; Zhou, Jun-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes have been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of infected and uninfected control roots of Astragalus sinicus. Eleven of them encode small polypeptides showing homology to cysteine cluster proteins (CCPs) that contain a putative signal peptide and conserved cysteine residues. Among these CCP-like genes, AsG257 codes for a homologue of the defensin 2 family and AsD255 contains a scorpion toxin-like domain at the C-terminus. Sequence analysis of a genomic AsD255 fragment which was isolated revealed that one intron separates the first exon encoding the signal peptide from the second exon encoding the cysteine cluster domain of this nodulin. Another two genes, AsE246 and AsIB259, encode two different products similar to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Virtual northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the other genes except AsIB259 and AsC2411 were expressed exclusively in inoculated roots and that their expression was 2-4 d later than that of the leghaemoglobin (Lb) gene during nodule development. Transcription of AsIB259 was also detected in uninfected control roots but with a significant decline in expression and a temporal expression similar to Lb. AsC2411 had a basal expression in control roots identified by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment showed that the putative proteins AsE246 and AsIB259 show lower homology with LTPs from legumes than with those from other plants.

  20. Identifying Protein-Calorie Malnutrition Workshop.

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    Walker, Susan S.; Barker, Ellen M.

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to assist in identifying patients at risk with protein-calorie malnutrition and in corrrecting this nutritional deficiency. Representative topics are nutrients; protein, mineral, and vitamin sources, functions, and deficiency symptoms; malnutrition; nutritional deficiency…

  1. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

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    Yang Zhihao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches.

  2. Identifying New Small Proteins in Escherichia coli.

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    VanOrsdel, Caitlin E; Kelly, John P; Burke, Brittany N; Lein, Christina D; Oufiero, Christopher E; Sanchez, Joseph F; Wimmers, Larry E; Hearn, David J; Abuikhdair, Fatimeh J; Barnhart, Kathryn R; Duley, Michelle L; Ernst, Sarah E G; Kenerson, Briana A; Serafin, Aubrey J; Hemm, Matthew R

    2018-04-12

    The number of small proteins (SPs) encoded in the Escherichia coli genome is unknown, as current bioinformatics and biochemical techniques make short gene and small protein identification challenging. One method of small protein identification involves adding an epitope tag to the 3' end of a short open reading frame (sORF) on the chromosome, with synthesis confirmed by immunoblot assays. In this study, this strategy was used to identify new E. coli small proteins, tagging 80 sORFs in the E. coli genome, and assayed for protein synthesis. The selected sORFs represent diverse sequence characteristics, including degrees of sORF conservation, predicted transmembrane domains, sORF direction with respect to flanking genes, ribosome binding site (RBS) prediction, and ribosome profiling results. Of 80 sORFs, 36 resulted in encoded synthesized proteins-a 45% success rate. Modeling of detected versus non-detected small proteins analysis showed predictions based on RBS prediction, transcription data, and ribosome profiling had statistically-significant correlation with protein synthesis; however, there was no correlation between current sORF annotation and protein synthesis. These results suggest substantial numbers of small proteins remain undiscovered in E. coli, and existing bioinformatics techniques must continue to improve to facilitate identification. © 2018 The Authors. Proteomics Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Towson University.

  3. Specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén González Montoro

    Full Text Available Many proteins are modified after their synthesis, by the addition of a lipid molecule to one or more cysteine residues, through a thioester bond. This modification is called S-acylation, and more commonly palmitoylation. This reaction is carried out by a family of enzymes, called palmitoyltransferases (PATs, characterized by the presence of a conserved 50- aminoacids domain called "Asp-His-His-Cys- Cysteine Rich Domain" (DHHC-CRD. There are 7 members of this family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and each of these proteins is thought to be responsible for the palmitoylation of a subset of substrates. Substrate specificity of PATs, however, is not yet fully understood. Several yeast PATs seem to have overlapping specificity, and it has been proposed that the machinery responsible for palmitoylating peripheral membrane proteins in mammalian cells, lacks specificity altogether.Here we investigate the specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in S. cerevisiae, which is carried out predominantly by two PATs, Swf1 and Pfa4. We show that palmitoylation of transmembrane substrates requires dedicated PATs, since other yeast PATs are mostly unable to perform Swf1 or Pfa4 functions, even when overexpressed. Furthermore, we find that Swf1 is highly specific for its substrates, as it is unable to substitute for other PATs. To identify where Swf1 specificity lies, we carried out a bioinformatics survey to identify amino acids responsible for the determination of specificity or Specificity Determination Positions (SDPs and showed experimentally, that mutation of the two best SDP candidates, A145 and K148, results in complete and partial loss of function, respectively. These residues are located within the conserved catalytic DHHC domain suggesting that it could also be involved in the determination of specificity. Finally, we show that modifying the position of the cysteines in Tlg1, a Swf1 substrate, results in lack of palmitoylation, as

  4. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2018-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  5. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Gilad [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ziv, Tamar [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Braten, Ori [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Admon, Arie [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Udasin, Ronald G. [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ciechanover, Aaron, E-mail: aaroncie@tx.technion.ac.il [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel)

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  6. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  8. Recombinant protein hydrazides: application to site-specific protein PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Jennifer; Anderson, David; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham

    2011-06-15

    Here, we describe a novel method for the site-specific C-terminal PEGylation of recombinant proteins. This general approach exploits chemical cleavage of precursor intein-fusion proteins with hydrazine to directly produce recombinant protein hydrazides. This unique functionality within the protein sequence then facilitates site-specific C-terminal modification by hydrazone-forming ligation reactions. This approach was used to generate folded, site-specifically C-terminal PEGylated IFNalpha2b and IFNbeta1b, which retained excellent antiviral activity, demonstrating the utility of this technology in the PEGylation of therapeutic proteins. As this methodology is straightforward to perform, is compatible with disulfide bonds, and is exclusively selective for the protein C-terminus, it shows great potential as general technology for the site-specific engineering and labeling of recombinant proteins.

  9. Identifying hubs in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravishankar R Vallabhajosyula

    Full Text Available In spite of the scale-free degree distribution that characterizes most protein interaction networks (PINs, it is common to define an ad hoc degree scale that defines "hub" proteins having special topological and functional significance. This raises the concern that some conclusions on the functional significance of proteins based on network properties may not be robust.In this paper we present three objective methods to define hub proteins in PINs: one is a purely topological method and two others are based on gene expression and function. By applying these methods to four distinct PINs, we examine the extent of agreement among these methods and implications of these results on network construction.We find that the methods agree well for networks that contain a balance between error-free and unbiased interactions, indicating that the hub concept is meaningful for such networks.

  10. Species specificity for HBsAg binding protein endonexin II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruin, WCC; Leenders, WPJ; Moshage, H; vanHaelst, UJGM

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus displays a distinct species and tissue tropism, Previously we have demonstrated that a human liver plasma membrane protein,vith a molecular weight of approximately 34 kiloDalton specifically binds to HBsAg. This protein was identified as endonexin II, a Ca2+

  11. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Traister

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD001053. The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes.

  12. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes.

  13. Specific Proteins in Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: New Potential Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Orduña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have been isolated from water, soil, air, food, protozoa, plants, animals, and humans. Although most NTM are saprophytes, approximately one-third of NTM have been associated with human diseases. In this study, we did a comparative proteomic analysis among five NTM strains isolated from several sources. There were different numbers of protein spots from M. gordonae (1,264, M. nonchromogenicum type I (894, M. nonchromogenicum type II (935, M. peregrinum (806, and M. scrofulaceum/Mycobacterium mantenii (1,486 strains, respectively. We identified 141 proteins common to all strains and specific proteins to each NTM strain. A total of 23 proteins were selected for its identification. Two of the common proteins identified (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR and diguanylate cyclase did not align with M. tuberculosis complex protein sequences, which suggest that these proteins are found only in the NTM strains. Some of the proteins identified as common to all strains can be used as markers of NTM exposure and for the development of new diagnostic tools. Additionally, the specific proteins to NTM strains identified may represent potential candidates for the diagnosis of diseases caused by these mycobacteria.

  14. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Dozier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling.

  15. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Sickmann, Albert; Weber, Gerhard; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains. PMID:23303277

  16. Identifying proteins that can form tyrosine-cysteine crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinie, Ryan J; Godakumbura, Pahan I; Porter, Elizabeth G; Divakaran, Anand; Burkhart, Brandon J; Wertz, John T; Benson, David E

    2012-10-01

    Protein cofactors represent a unique class of redox active posttranslational protein modifications formed in or by metalloproteins. Once formed, protein cofactors provide a one-electron oxidant, which is tethered to the protein backbone. Twenty-five proteins are known to contain protein cofactors, but this number is likely limited by the use of crystallography as the identification technique. In order to address this limitation, a search of all reported protein structures for chemical environments conducive to forming a protein cofactor through tyrosine and cysteine side chain crosslinking yielded three hundred candidate proteins. Using hydrogen bonding and metal center proximity, the three hundred proteins were narrowed to four highly viable candidates. An orphan metalloprotein (BF4112) was examined to validate this methodology, which identifies proteins capable of crosslinking tyrosine and cysteine sidechains. A tyrosine-cysteine crosslink was formed in BF4112 using copper-dioxygen chemistry, as in galactose oxidase. Liquid chromatography-MALDI mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy confirmed tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation in BF4112. This finding demonstrates the efficacy of these predictive methods and the minimal constraints, provided by the BF4112 protein structure, in tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation. This search method, when coupled with physiological evidence for crosslink formation and function as a cofactor, could identify additional protein-derived cofactors.

  17. Computational identification of strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Rathi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of unique proteins at different taxonomic levels has both scientific and practical value. Strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins can provide insight into the criteria that define an organism and its relationship with close relatives. Such proteins can also serve as taxon-specific diagnostic targets. Description A pipeline using a combination of computational and manual analyses of BLAST results was developed to identify strain-, species-, and genus-specific proteins and to catalog the closest sequenced relative for each protein in a proteome. Proteins encoded by a given strain are preliminarily considered to be unique if BLAST, using a comprehensive protein database, fails to retrieve (with an e-value better than 0.001 any protein not encoded by the query strain, species or genus (for strain-, species- and genus-specific proteins respectively, or if BLAST, using the best hit as the query (reverse BLAST, does not retrieve the initial query protein. Results are manually inspected for homology if the initial query is retrieved in the reverse BLAST but is not the best hit. Sequences unlikely to retrieve homologs using the default BLOSUM62 matrix (usually short sequences are re-tested using the PAM30 matrix, thereby increasing the number of retrieved homologs and increasing the stringency of the search for unique proteins. The above protocol was used to examine several food- and water-borne pathogens. We find that the reverse BLAST step filters out about 22% of proteins with homologs that would otherwise be considered unique at the genus and species levels. Analysis of the annotations of unique proteins reveals that many are remnants of prophage proteins, or may be involved in virulence. The data generated from this study can be accessed and further evaluated from the CUPID (Core and Unique Protein Identification system web site (updated semi-annually at http://pir.georgetown.edu/cupid. Conclusion CUPID

  18. Stable isotope, site-specific mass tagging for protein identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian

    2006-10-24

    Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily dependent upon the mass accuracy and sequence coverage of the fragment ions generated by peptide ionization. The present invention describes a method for increasing the specificity, accuracy and efficiency of the assignments of particular proteolytic peptides and consequent protein identification, by the incorporation of selected amino acid residue(s) enriched with stable isotope(s) into the protein sequence without the need for ultrahigh instrumental accuracy. Selected amino acid(s) are labeled with .sup.13C/.sup.15N/.sup.2H and incorporated into proteins in a sequence-specific manner during cell culturing. Each of these labeled amino acids carries a defined mass change encoded in its monoisotopic distribution pattern. Through their characteristic patterns, the peptides with mass tag(s) can then be readily distinguished from other peptides in mass spectra. The present method of identifying unique proteins can also be extended to protein complexes and will significantly increase data search specificity, efficiency and accuracy for protein identifications.

  19. Identifying Bacterial Immune Evasion Proteins Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional identification. Here we describe a high-throughput genomic strategy to functionally identify bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display technology. Genomic bacterial DNA is randomly fragmented and ligated into a phage display vector that is used to create a phage display library expressing bacterial secreted and membrane bound proteins. This library is used to select displayed bacterial secretome proteins that interact with host immune components.

  20. Specific detection of proteins using Nanomechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Wright, V.A.; Guthy, C.

    2008-01-01

    of probes onto their surfaces in order to enable the specificity of the detection. Such nanoresonator-based specific detection of proteins is here reported using streptavidin as target system, and immobilized biotin as probe. Nanomechanical resonators resistant to stiction were first realized from silicon...... carbonitride using a novel fabrication method. Vapor-phase deposition of mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane was performed, and an added mass of 2.22 +/- 0.07 fg/mu m(2) was measured. This linker molecule was used to attach biotin onto the devices, enabling the specific detection of streptavidin. A mass of 3.6 fg....../mu m(2) was attributed to the added streptavidin, corresponding to one molecule per 27 nm(2). The specificity of this recognition was confirmed by exposing the devices to a solution of streptavidin that was already saturated with biotin. An additional negative control was also performed by also...

  1. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in the study of a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases, it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, investigators have dedicated many recent efforts to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural or environmental properties. In this review, we highlight recent advancements in this rapidly growing research area.

  2. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in studying a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and/or environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, many recent efforts have been dedicated to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural and/or environmental properties. In this Review, we highlight some recent advancements of this rapidly growing research area. PMID:25580624

  3. Combinatorial Drug Screening Identifies Ewing Sarcoma-specific Sensitivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radic-Sarikas, Branka; Tsafou, Kalliopi P; Emdal, Kristina B.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in survival for Ewing sarcoma pediatric and adolescent patients have been modest over the past 20 years. Combinations of anticancer agents endure as an option to overcome resistance to single treatments caused by compensatory pathways. Moreover, combinations are thought to lessen any...... associated adverse side effects through reduced dosing, which is particularly important in childhood tumors. Using a parallel phenotypic combinatorial screening approach of cells derived from three pediatric tumor types, we identified Ewing sarcoma-specific interactions of a diverse set of targeted agents...... including approved drugs. We were able to retrieve highly synergistic drug combinations specific for Ewing sarcoma and identified signaling processes important for Ewing sarcoma cell proliferation determined by EWS-FLI1 We generated a molecular target profile of PKC412, a multikinase inhibitor with strong...

  4. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yingang, E-mail: fengyg@qibebt.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Song, Xiaxia [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lin, Jinzhong [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xuan, Jinsong [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cui, Qiu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Wang, Jinfeng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  5. A coevolution analysis for identifying protein-protein interactions by Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan; Yau, Stephen S. -T.

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play key roles in life processes, such as signal transduction, transcription regulations, and immune response, etc. Identification of PPIs enables better understanding of the functional networks within a cell. Common experimental methods for identifying PPIs are time consuming and expensive. However, recent developments in computational approaches for inferring PPIs from protein sequences based on coevolution theory avoid these problems. In the coevolution theory model, interacted proteins may show coevolutionary mutations and have similar phylogenetic trees. The existing coevolution methods depend on multiple sequence alignments (MSA); however, the MSA-based coevolution methods often produce high false positive interactions. In this paper, we present a computational method using an alignment-free approach to accurately detect PPIs and reduce false positives. In the method, protein sequences are numerically represented by biochemical properties of amino acids, which reflect the structural and functional differences of proteins. Fourier transform is applied to the numerical representation of protein sequences to capture the dissimilarities of protein sequences in biophysical context. The method is assessed for predicting PPIs in Ebola virus. The results indicate strong coevolution between the protein pairs (NP-VP24, NP-VP30, NP-VP40, VP24-VP30, VP24-VP40, and VP30-VP40). The method is also validated for PPIs in influenza and E.coli genomes. Since our method can reduce false positive and increase the specificity of PPI prediction, it offers an effective tool to understand mechanisms of disease pathogens and find potential targets for drug design. The Python programs in this study are available to public at URL (https://github.com/cyinbox/PPI). PMID:28430779

  6. A coevolution analysis for identifying protein-protein interactions by Fourier transform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchuan Yin

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs play key roles in life processes, such as signal transduction, transcription regulations, and immune response, etc. Identification of PPIs enables better understanding of the functional networks within a cell. Common experimental methods for identifying PPIs are time consuming and expensive. However, recent developments in computational approaches for inferring PPIs from protein sequences based on coevolution theory avoid these problems. In the coevolution theory model, interacted proteins may show coevolutionary mutations and have similar phylogenetic trees. The existing coevolution methods depend on multiple sequence alignments (MSA; however, the MSA-based coevolution methods often produce high false positive interactions. In this paper, we present a computational method using an alignment-free approach to accurately detect PPIs and reduce false positives. In the method, protein sequences are numerically represented by biochemical properties of amino acids, which reflect the structural and functional differences of proteins. Fourier transform is applied to the numerical representation of protein sequences to capture the dissimilarities of protein sequences in biophysical context. The method is assessed for predicting PPIs in Ebola virus. The results indicate strong coevolution between the protein pairs (NP-VP24, NP-VP30, NP-VP40, VP24-VP30, VP24-VP40, and VP30-VP40. The method is also validated for PPIs in influenza and E.coli genomes. Since our method can reduce false positive and increase the specificity of PPI prediction, it offers an effective tool to understand mechanisms of disease pathogens and find potential targets for drug design. The Python programs in this study are available to public at URL (https://github.com/cyinbox/PPI.

  7. Identifying specificity groups in the T cell receptor repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, Jacob; Huang, Huang; Nau, Allison; Hatton, Olivia; Wagar, Lisa E; Rubelt, Florian; Ji, Xuhuai; Han, Arnold; Krams, Sheri M; Pettus, Christina; Haas, Nikhil; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam; Sette, Alessandro; Boyd, Scott D; Scriba, Thomas J; Martinez, Olivia M; Davis, Mark M

    2017-07-06

    T cell receptor (TCR) sequences are very diverse, with many more possible sequence combinations than T cells in any one individual. Here we define the minimal requirements for TCR antigen specificity, through an analysis of TCR sequences using a panel of peptide and major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-tetramer-sorted cells and structural data. From this analysis we developed an algorithm that we term GLIPH (grouping of lymphocyte interactions by paratope hotspots) to cluster TCRs with a high probability of sharing specificity owing to both conserved motifs and global similarity of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences. We show that GLIPH can reliably group TCRs of common specificity from different donors, and that conserved CDR3 motifs help to define the TCR clusters that are often contact points with the antigenic peptides. As an independent validation, we analysed 5,711 TCRβ chain sequences from reactive CD4 T cells from 22 individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We found 141 TCR specificity groups, including 16 distinct groups containing TCRs from multiple individuals. These TCR groups typically shared HLA alleles, allowing prediction of the likely HLA restriction, and a large number of M. tuberculosis T cell epitopes enabled us to identify pMHC ligands for all five of the groups tested. Mutagenesis and de novo TCR design confirmed that the GLIPH-identified motifs were critical and sufficient for shared-antigen recognition. Thus the GLIPH algorithm can analyse large numbers of TCR sequences and define TCR specificity groups shared by TCRs and individuals, which should greatly accelerate the analysis of T cell responses and expedite the identification of specific ligands.

  8. The specificity of interactions between proteins and sulfated polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulloy Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides are capable of binding with proteins at several levels of specificity. As highly acidic macromolecules, they can bind non-specifically to any basic patch on a protein surface at low ionic strength, and such interactions are not likely to be physiologically significant. On the other hand, several systems have been identified in which very specific substructures of sulfated polysaccharides confer high affinity for particular proteins; the best-known example of this is the pentasaccharide in heparin with high affinity for antithrombin, but other examples may be taken from the study of marine invertebrates: the importance of the fine structure of dermatan sulfate (DS to its interaction with heparin cofactor II (HCII, and the involvement of sea urchin egg-jelly fucans in species specific fertilization. A third, intermediate, kind of specific interaction is described for the cell-surface glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS, in which patterns of sulfate substitution can show differential affinities for cytokines, growth factors, and morphogens at cell surfaces and in the intracellular matrix. This complex interplay of proteins and glycans is capable of influencing the diffusion of such proteins through tissue, as well as modulating cellular responses to them.

  9. Machine Learning Identification of Protein Properties Useful for Specific Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah

    2016-03-31

    Proteins play critical roles in cellular processes of living organisms. It is therefore important to identify and characterize their key properties associated with their functions. Correlating protein’s structural, sequence and physicochemical properties of its amino acids (aa) with protein functions could identify some of the critical factors governing the specific functionality. We point out that not all functions of even well studied proteins are known. This, complemented by the huge increase in the number of newly discovered and predicted proteins, makes challenging the experimental characterization of the whole spectrum of possible protein functions for all proteins of interest. Consequently, the use of computational methods has become more attractive. Here we address two questions. The first one is how to use protein aa sequence and physicochemical properties to characterize a family of proteins. The second one focuses on how to use transcription factor (TF) protein’s domains to enhance accuracy of predicting TF DNA binding sites (TFBSs). To address the first question, we developed a novel method using computational representation of proteins based on characteristics of different protein regions (N-terminal, M-region and C-terminal) and combined these with the properties of protein aa sequences. We show that this description provides important biological insight about characterization of the protein functional groups. Using feature selection techniques, we identified key properties of proteins that allow for very accurate characterization of different protein families. We demonstrated efficiency of our method in application to a number of antimicrobial peptide families. To address the second question we developed another novel method that uses a combination of aa properties of DNA binding domains of TFs and their TFBS properties to develop machine learning models for predicting TFBSs. Feature selection is used to identify the most relevant characteristics

  10. Sequence-specific capture of protein-DNA complexes for mass spectrometric protein identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsien Wu

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene transcription is fundamental to the existence of complex multicellular organisms such as humans. Although it is widely recognized that much of gene regulation is controlled by gene-specific protein-DNA interactions, there presently exists little in the way of tools to identify proteins that interact with the genome at locations of interest. We have developed a novel strategy to address this problem, which we refer to as GENECAPP, for Global ExoNuclease-based Enrichment of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics. In this approach, formaldehyde cross-linking is employed to covalently link DNA to its associated proteins; subsequent fragmentation of the DNA, followed by exonuclease digestion, produces a single-stranded region of the DNA that enables sequence-specific hybridization capture of the protein-DNA complex on a solid support. Mass spectrometric (MS analysis of the captured proteins is then used for their identification and/or quantification. We show here the development and optimization of GENECAPP for an in vitro model system, comprised of the murine insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 promoter region and FoxO1, a member of the forkhead rhabdomyosarcoma (FoxO subfamily of transcription factors, which binds specifically to the IGFBP1 promoter. This novel strategy provides a powerful tool for studies of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions.

  11. Sequence motifs in MADS transcription factors responsible for specificity and diversification of protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and

  12. SitesIdentify: a protein functional site prediction tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doig Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of protein structures being deposited in the Protein Data Bank surpasses the capacity to experimentally characterise them and therefore computational methods to analyse these structures have become increasingly important. Identifying the region of the protein most likely to be involved in function is useful in order to gain information about its potential role. There are many available approaches to predict functional site, but many are not made available via a publicly-accessible application. Results Here we present a functional site prediction tool (SitesIdentify, based on combining sequence conservation information with geometry-based cleft identification, that is freely available via a web-server. We have shown that SitesIdentify compares favourably to other functional site prediction tools in a comparison of seven methods on a non-redundant set of 237 enzymes with annotated active sites. Conclusion SitesIdentify is able to produce comparable accuracy in predicting functional sites to its closest available counterpart, but in addition achieves improved accuracy for proteins with few characterised homologues. SitesIdentify is available via a webserver at http://www.manchester.ac.uk/bioinformatics/sitesidentify/

  13. Identifying unexpected therapeutic targets via chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE, and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER and histone deacetylase (HDAC, which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover "behind-the-scenes" aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm.

  14. Prioritizing disease candidate proteins in cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks based on "guilt by association" analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Li

    Full Text Available The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial. Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on "guilt by association" analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on "guilt by association" analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  15. Lack of specificity of fibroblast-specific protein 1 in cardiac remodeling and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Saxena, Amit; Su, Ya; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the role of fibroblasts in pathologic conditions is hampered by the absence of specific markers. Fibroblast-specific protein (FSP)1 has been suggested as a fibroblast-specific marker in normal and fibrotic tissues; FSP1 reporter mice and FSP1-Cre-driven gene deletion are considered reliable strategies to investigate fibroblast biology. Because fibroblasts are abundant in normal and injured mammalian hearts, we studied the identity of FSP1(+) cells in the infarcted and remodeling myocardium using mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression driven by the FSP1 promoter. Neonatal and adult mouse hearts had low numbers of FSP1(+) cells. Myocardial infarction induced marked infiltration with FSP1-expressing cells that peaked after 72 h of reperfusion. Using flow cytometry, we identified 50% of FSP1(+) cells as hematopoietic cells; many endothelial cells were also FSP1(+). Increased infiltration with FSP1(+) cells was also noted in the pressure-overloaded myocardium. Although some FSP1(+) cells had fibroblast morphology, >30% were identified as hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, or vascular smooth muscle cells. In contrast, periostin did not stain leukocytes or vascular cells but labeled spindle-shaped interstitial cells and, as a typical matricellular protein, was deposited in the matrix. CD11b(+) myeloid cells sorted from the infarcted heart had higher FSP1 expression than corresponding CD11b-negative cells, highlighting the predominant expression by hematopoietic cells. FSP1 is not a specific marker for fibroblasts in cardiac remodeling and fibrosis.

  16. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    specific marker. St-specific markers for wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. An introgression line Z148 was selected from the progeny of hybrid between wheat and wheat–Th. intermedium ssp. trichorophrum partial amphiploid (Yang et al. 2006). The chromosome constitution of Z148 was determined using the.

  17. Tissue-type-specific transcriptome analysis identifies developing xylem-specific promoters in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Hwang, Ildoo; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Plant biotechnology offers a means to create novel phenotypes. However, commercial application of biotechnology in crop improvement programmes is severely hindered by the lack of utility promoters (or freedom to operate the existing ones) that can drive gene expression in a tissue-specific or temporally controlled manner. Woody biomass is gaining popularity as a source of fermentable sugars for liquid fuel production. To improve the quantity and quality of woody biomass, developing xylem (DX)-specific modification of the feedstock is highly desirable. To develop utility promoters that can drive transgene expression in a DX-specific manner, we used the Affymetrix Poplar Genome Arrays to obtain tissue-type-specific transcriptomes from poplar stems. Subsequent bioinformatics analysis identified 37 transcripts that are specifically or strongly expressed in DX cells of poplar. After further confirmation of their DX-specific expression using semi-quantitative PCR, we selected four genes (DX5, DX8, DX11 and DX15) for in vivo confirmation of their tissue-specific expression in transgenic poplars. The promoter regions of the selected DX genes were isolated and fused to a β-glucuronidase (GUS)-reported gene in a binary vector. This construct was used to produce transgenic poplars via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The GUS expression patterns of the resulting transgenic plants showed that these promoters were active in the xylem cells at early seedling growth and had strongest expression in the developing xylem cells at later growth stages of poplar. We conclude that these DX promoters can be used as a utility promoter for DX-specific biomass engineering. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Juvenile hormone-binding proteins of Melanoplus bivittatus identified by EFDA photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins that bind juvenile hormone in the hemolymph and fat body of the grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus were identified by photoaffinity labeling with radiolabeled epoxyfarnesyl diazoacetate ( 3 H-EFDA), and were characterized by electrophoretic analysis. A protocol was developed which allowed detection of 3 H-EFDA that was covalently linked to proteins upon exposure to ultraviolet light at 254 nm. Quantification of protein-linked 3 H-EFDA by liquid scintillation spectrometry took advantage of the differential solubility of unlinked 3 H-EFDA in toluene alone, and of the protein-linked 3 H-EFDA in toluene plus the detergent, Triton X-100. Competition between EFDA and juvenile hormone (JH) for binding to JH-specific binding sites was measured by hydroxyapatite protein binding assays in the presence of radiolabeled JH or EFDA and competing non-radiolabeled hormone. The protein-linked EFDA was detected on fluorograms of SDS or nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (PAGE), and by liquid scintillation spectrometry of membranes to which the proteins had been electrophoretically transferred. Proteins which specifically bound JH were identified by photolabeling proteins in the presence and absence of nonlabeled JH-III

  19. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chromosome-specific PLUG and SCAR markers, and successfully used them to detect the St-chromosome in wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. Materials and methods. Plant materials. Wheat line ML13 was provided by International Maize and.

  20. Identifying common metalloprotease inhibitors by protein fold types using Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer K; Pitcher, Desley; McArdle, Bernadette M; Alnefelt, Terese; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky; Quinn, Ronald J

    2007-12-01

    Fourteen natural products, known to inhibit other proteins of the Zincin-like fold class, were screened for inhibition of the Zincin-like fold metalloprotease thermolysin using mass spectrometry. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry was successful in identifying actinonin, a known inhibitor of astacin and stromelysin, to be an inhibitor of thermolysin. Molecular modelling studies have shown that specificity within the Zincin-like fold is determined by Protein Fold Topology.

  1. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jamsheer K

    Full Text Available Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  2. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  3. Arabidopsis Yak1 protein (AtYak1) is a dual specificity protein kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2015-10-09

    Yak1 is a member of dual-specificity Tyr phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) that are evolutionarily conserved. The downstream targets of Yak1 and their functions are largely unknown. Here, a homologous protein AtYAK1 was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and the phosphoprotein profiles of the wild type and an atyak1 mutant were compared on two-dimensional gel following Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein gel staining. Annexin1, Annexin2 and RBD were phosphorylated at serine/ threonine residues by the AtYak1 kinase. Annexin1, Annexin2 and Annexin4 were also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Our study demonstrated that AtYak1 is a dual specificity protein kinase in Arabidopsis that may regulate the phosphorylation status of the annexin family proteins.

  4. Novel Approaches to the Characterization of Specific Protein-Protein Interactions Important in Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somerville, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    .... This dimeric protein interacts with specific operator targets associated with promoters that drive the production of proteins essential for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis or transport. Like its E...

  5. Identified adjustability dimensions when generating a product specific requirements specification by requirements reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauksdóttir, Dagný; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Nielsen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    set. In this paper the objective is not to present a specific method for requirements reuse but to introduce and discuss the possible dimensions of adjustability when generating a product requirement set by reusing requirements from a reusable set. Six adjustability dimensions have been identified....... This discussion should help practitioners to better understand the possible methods that can be implemented and to design a user friendly and sustainable approach. A case study, describing how the dimensions are incorporated in two requirements reuse approaches, for Danfoss Solar Inverters (SI) and Danfoss...

  6. Substrate specificities of tyrosine-specific protein kinases toward cytoskeletal proteins in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, T.; Kadowaki, T.; Nishida, E.; Kadooka, T.; Ogawara, H.; Fukami, Y.; Sakai, H.; Takaku, F.; Kasuga, M.

    1986-11-05

    The authors have previously reported that fodrin (..beta.. subunit), tubulin (..cap alpha.. subunit) and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs; MAP2 and tau) are good substrates for the purified insulin receptor kinase. In this study, to investigate the substrate specificities of tyrosine kinases, they have examined the actions of the purified epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase and Rous sarcoma virus src kinase on purified microfilament- and microtubule-related proteins. Among microfilament-related proteins examined, the purified EGF receptor kinase phosphorylated the ..beta.. subunit, but not the ..cap alpha.. subunit, of fodrin on tyrosine residues with a K/sub m/ below the micromolar range. The fodrin phosphorylation by the EGF receptor kinase was markedly inhibited by F-actin. In contrast, the purified src kinase preferentially phosphorylated the ..cap alpha.. subunit of fodrin on tyrosine residues. Fodrin phosphorylation by the src kinase was not inhibited by F-actin. Among microtubule proteins examined, MAP-2 was the best substrate for the EGF receptor kinase. The peptide mapping of MAP2 phosphorylated by the EGF receptor kinase and by the insulin receptor kinase produced very similar patterns of phosphopeptides, while that of MAP2 phosphorylated by the src kinase gave a distinctly different pattern. When the phosphorylation of the tubulin subunits was examined, the EGF receptor kinase preferred ..beta.. subunit to ..cap alpha.. subunit, but the src kinase phosphorylated both ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits to a similar extent. These results, together with our previous results, indicate that the substrate specificities of the EGF receptor kinase and the insulin receptor kinase are very similar, but not identical, while that of the src kinase is distinctly different from that of these growth factor receptor kinases.

  7. Protein scissors: Photocleavage of proteins at specific locations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The current design of protein cleavage reagents combines the structural features that are needed for the recognition of the ... (MW = 18,365) were purchased from Sigma Chemical Co. Protein solutions were pre- ... photocleavage properties of Py-Phe, containing a six-atom tether, are described here. 3.1 Absorption studies.

  8. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  9. Identification of species- and tissue-specific proteins using proteomic strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernukha, I. M.; Vostrikova, N. L.; Kovalev, L. I.; Shishkin, S. S.; Kovaleva, M. A.; Manukhin, Y. S.

    2017-09-01

    Proteomic technologies have proven to be very effective for detecting biochemical changes in meat products, such as changes in tissue- and species-specific proteins. In the tissues of cattle, pig, horse and camel M. longissimus dorsi both tissue- and species specific proteins were detected using two dimensional electrophoresis. Species-specific isoforms of several muscle proteins were also identified. The identified and described proteins of cattle, pig, horse and camel skeletal muscles (including mass spectra of the tryptic peptides) were added to the national free access database “Muscle organ proteomics”. This research has enabled the development of new highly sensitive technologies for meat product quality control against food fraud.

  10. IDENTIFYING CANCER SPECIFIC METABOLIC SIGNATURES USING CONSTRAINT-BASED MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A; Mehta, S; Hu, C W; Hoff, F W; Horton, T M; Kornblau, S M; Qutub, A A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer metabolism differs remarkably from the metabolism of healthy surrounding tissues, and it is extremely heterogeneous across cancer types. While these metabolic differences provide promising avenues for cancer treatments, much work remains to be done in understanding how metabolism is rewired in malignant tissues. To that end, constraint-based models provide a powerful computational tool for the study of metabolism at the genome scale. To generate meaningful predictions, however, these generalized human models must first be tailored for specific cell or tissue sub-types. Here we first present two improved algorithms for (1) the generation of these context-specific metabolic models based on omics data, and (2) Monte-Carlo sampling of the metabolic model ux space. By applying these methods to generate and analyze context-specific metabolic models of diverse solid cancer cell line data, and primary leukemia pediatric patient biopsies, we demonstrate how the methodology presented in this study can generate insights into the rewiring differences across solid tumors and blood cancers.

  11. Identification of a Protein for Prostate-Specific Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2007-01-01

    .... We expect that using this protein to modify various gene therapy vectors, we can specifically deliver cytotoxic genes into prostate cancer cells using systemic treatment, and eventually eradicate...

  12. Growth arrest specific protein (GAS) 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, T N; Rasmussen, Morten; Jaksch, C A M

    2013-01-01

    aimed to identify differentially expressed genes in the pancreas and their potential role in the fetal programming. Methods Wistar rats were given either an LP diet or normal-chow (NC) diet during gestation and differentially expressed genes in the offspring around the time of birth were identified...

  13. Antigenic specificity of serum antibodies in mice fed soy protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Bruun, S.W.; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Soybean protein is used in a number of food products but unfortunately is also a common cause of food allergy. Upon ingestion of soy protein, healthy mice like other animals and humans generate a soy-specific antibody response in the absence of signs of illness. Not much is known about...... the relationship between the immunogenic proteins involved in this nondeleterious antibody response and the pathological response associated with food allergy. The objective of the present study was to characterize the antigenic specificity of the soy protein-specific antibody response generated in healthy mice...... ingesting soy protein. Methods: Blood from mice fed a soy-containing diet was analyzed using ELISA and immunoblot for antibody reactivity towards various soy protein fractions and pure soy proteins/subunits. Mice bred on a soy-free diet were used as controls. Results: The detectable antigenic specificity...

  14. GSHSite: exploiting an iteratively statistical method to identify s-glutathionylation sites with substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available S-glutathionylation, the covalent attachment of a glutathione (GSH to the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-glutathionylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 1783 experimentally identified S-glutathionylation sites from mouse macrophages, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-glutathionylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition and the accessible surface area (ASA. TwoSampleLogo presents that positively charged amino acids flanking the S-glutathionylated cysteine may influence the formation of S-glutathionylation in closed three-dimensional environment. A statistical method is further applied to iteratively detect the conserved substrate motifs with statistical significance. Support vector machine (SVM is then applied to generate predictive model considering the substrate motifs. According to five-fold cross-validation, the SVMs trained with substrate motifs could achieve an enhanced sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by the correct identification of previously reported S-glutathionylation sites of mouse thioredoxin (TXN and human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (PTP1B. Finally, the constructed models are adopted to implement an effective web-based tool, named GSHSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/GSHSite/, for identifying uncharacterized GSH substrate sites on the protein sequences.

  15. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 are...

  16. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; Yang, Lee Lisheng; Choi, Megan; Singer, Mary E.; Geller, Jil T.; Fisher, Susan J.; Hall, Steven C.; Hazen, Terry C.; Brenner, Steven E.; Butland, Gareth; Jin, Jian; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Chandonia, John-Marc; Biggin, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification of endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR. PMID:27099342

  17. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity.

  19. Species specificity in major urinary proteins by parallel evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren W Logan

    Full Text Available Species-specific chemosignals, pheromones, regulate social behaviors such as aggression, mating, pup-suckling, territory establishment, and dominance. The identity of these cues remains mostly undetermined and few mammalian pheromones have been identified. Genetically-encoded pheromones are expected to exhibit several different mechanisms for coding 1 diversity, to enable the signaling of multiple behaviors, 2 dynamic regulation, to indicate age and dominance, and 3 species-specificity. Recently, the major urinary proteins (Mups have been shown to function themselves as genetically-encoded pheromones to regulate species-specific behavior. Mups are multiple highly related proteins expressed in combinatorial patterns that differ between individuals, gender, and age; which are sufficient to fulfill the first two criteria. We have now characterized and fully annotated the mouse Mup gene content in detail. This has enabled us to further analyze the extent of Mup coding diversity and determine their potential to encode species-specific cues.Our results show that the mouse Mup gene cluster is composed of two subgroups: an older, more divergent class of genes and pseudogenes, and a second class with high sequence identity formed by recent sequential duplications of a single gene/pseudogene pair. Previous work suggests that truncated Mup pseudogenes may encode a family of functional hexapeptides with the potential for pheromone activity. Sequence comparison, however, reveals that they have limited coding potential. Similar analyses of nine other completed genomes find Mup gene expansions in divergent lineages, including those of rat, horse and grey mouse lemur, occurring independently from a single ancestral Mup present in other placental mammals. Our findings illustrate that increasing genomic complexity of the Mup gene family is not evolutionarily isolated, but is instead a recurring mechanism of generating coding diversity consistent with a species-specific

  20. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

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    Yuri Pevzner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  1. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  2. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ervin L; Fetter, Richard D; Davis, Graeme W

    2009-09-01

    Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila) or ribbon (vertebrates) are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ) of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc) that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D). This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp) in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  3. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin L Johnson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila or ribbon (vertebrates are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D. This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  4. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël M. Miedema

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell’s cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models, like the paradigmatic, totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP, have been used to predict these crowding effects based on simple exclusion interactions, but verifying them in experiments remains challenging. Here, we introduce a correlation imaging technique to precisely measure the motor density, velocity, and run length along filaments under crowding conditions, enabling us to elucidate the physical nature of crowding and test TASEP model predictions. Using the kinesin motor proteins kinesin-1 and OSM-3, we identify crowding effects in qualitative agreement with TASEP predictions, and we achieve excellent quantitative agreement by extending the model with motor-specific interaction ranges and crowding-dependent detachment probabilities. These results confirm the applicability of basic nonequilibrium models to the intracellular transport and highlight motor-specific strategies to deal with crowding.

  5. Identification of Radiation Response Organ Specific Proteins by Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae June; Lee, Yun Sil [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Mdeical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    Technologies using radiation are continuously developing in industry and medical diagnosis and therapy. We are kept in risk of exposure to radiation through occupational, medical, environmental, accidental, and other sources. We need biological indicators to detect radiation exposure. The effects of ionizing radiation on various tissue has been extensively investigated with respect to changes in histopathological and in vitro alterations. The damaging cellular and molecular effects of radiation exposures such as gene mutation, chromosomal aberration, cellular transformation, cell death and carcinogenesis has been well documented. However, these methods have practical limitations. Several attempts have been made to improve dosimetry using hematological, biochemical, immunologic, and cytogenetic endpoints. In a pervious study, we performed gene profiling using microarray and confirmed gene expressions using RT-PCR in whole body irradiated or locally irradiated organs including the brain, lung, heart, intestine and spleen to identify possible organ specific candidate biomarkers for radiation exposure Proteomics analysis is currently considered to be a powerful tool for global evaluation of protein expression, and proteomics has been widely applied in analysis or investigation. To characterize radiation response proteins in specific organs, we used 2-DE methods to detect difference between the control and irradiated proteome.

  6. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Daniël M.; Kushwaha, Vandana S.; Denisov, Dmitry V.; Acar, Seyda; Nienhuis, Bernard; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell's cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models, like the paradigmatic, totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), have been used to predict these crowding effects based on simple exclusion interactions, but verifying them in experiments remains challenging. Here, we introduce a correlation imaging technique to precisely measure the motor density, velocity, and run length along filaments under crowding conditions, enabling us to elucidate the physical nature of crowding and test TASEP model predictions. Using the kinesin motor proteins kinesin-1 and OSM-3, we identify crowding effects in qualitative agreement with TASEP predictions, and we achieve excellent quantitative agreement by extending the model with motor-specific interaction ranges and crowding-dependent detachment probabilities. These results confirm the applicability of basic nonequilibrium models to the intracellular transport and highlight motor-specific strategies to deal with crowding.

  7. Dissection of the Ascaris Sperm Motility Machinery Identifies Key Proteins Involved in Major Sperm Protein-based Amoeboid Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Shawnna M.; Ekman, Gail C.; Seavy, Margaret; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Although Ascaris sperm motility closely resembles that seen in many other types of crawling cells, the lamellipodial dynamics that drive movement result from modulation of a cytoskeleton based on the major sperm protein (MSP) rather than actin. The dynamics of the Ascaris sperm cytoskeleton can be studied in a cell-free in vitro system based on the movement of plasma membrane vesicles by fibers constructed from bundles of MSP filaments. In addition to ATP, MSP, and a plasma membrane protein, reconstitution of MSP motility in this cell-free extract requires cytosolic proteins that orchestrate the site-specific assembly and bundling of MSP filaments that generates locomotion. Here, we identify a fraction of cytosol that is comprised of a small number of proteins but contains all of the soluble components required to assemble fibers. We have purified two of these proteins, designated MSP fiber proteins (MFPs) 1 and 2 and demonstrated by immunolabeling that both are located in the MSP cytoskeleton in cells and in fibers. These proteins had reciprocal effects on fiber assembly in vitro: MFP1 decreased the rate of fiber growth, whereas MFP2 increased the growth rate. PMID:14565983

  8. Species-specific serine-threonine protein kinase Pkb2 of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum: Genetic environment and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezametdinova, V Z; Mavletova, D A; Alekseeva, M G; Chekalina, M S; Zakharevich, N V; Danilenko, V N

    2018-03-10

    The objective of this study was to determine for phosphorylated substrates of the species-specific serine-threonine protein kinase (STPK) Pkb2 from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum GT15. Two approaches were employed: analyses of phosphorylated membrane vesicles protein spectra following kinase reactions and analyses of the genes surrounding pkb2. A bioinformatics analysis of the genes surrounding pkb2 found a species-specific gene cluster PFNA in the genomes of 34 different bifidobacterial species. The identified cluster consisted of 5-8 genes depending on the species. The first five genes are characteristic for all considered species. These are the following genes encoding serine-threonine protein kinase (pkb2), fibronectin type III domain-containing protein (fn3), AAA-ATPase (aaa-atp), hypothetical protein with DUF58 domain (duf58) and transglutaminase (tgm). The sixth (protein phosphatase, prpC), seventh (hypothetical protein, BLGT_RS02790), and eighth (FHA domain-containing protein, fha) genes are included in this cluster, but they are not found in all species. The operon organization of the PFNA gene cluster was confirmed with transcriptional analysis. AAA-ATPase, which is encoded by a gene of the PFNA gene cluster, was found to be a substrate of the STPK Pkb2. Fourteen AAA-ATPase sites (seven serine, six threonine, and one tyrosine) phosphorylated by STPK Pkb2 were revealed. Analysis of the spectra of phosphorylated membrane vesicles proteins allowed us to identify eleven proteins that were considered as possible Pkb2 substrates. They belong to several functional classes: proteins involved in transcription and translation; proteins of the F1-domain of the FoF1-ATPase; ABC-transporters; molecular chaperone GroEL; and glutamine synthase, GlnA1. All identified proteins were considered moonlighting proteins. Three out of 11 proteins (glutamine synthetase GlnA1 and FoF1-ATPase alpha and beta subunits) were selected for further in vitro phosphorylation assays

  9. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Verrastro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease.

  10. Determinants for Substrate Specificity of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Slupe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A- (PP2A- catalyzed dephosphorylation of target substrate proteins is widespread and critical for cellular function. PP2A is predominantly found as a heterotrimeric complex of a catalytic subunit (C, a scaffolding subunit (A, and one member of 4 families of regulatory subunits (B. Substrate specificity of the holoenzyme complex is determined by the subcellular locale the complex is confined to, selective incorporation of the B subunit, interactions with endogenous inhibitory proteins, and specific intermolecular interactions between PP2A and target substrates. Here, we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the molecular determinants for PP2A substrate specificity.

  11. SNOSite: exploiting maximal dependence decomposition to identify cysteine S-nitrosylation with substrate site specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation, the covalent attachment of a nitric oxide to (NO the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-nitrosylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 586 experimentally identified S-nitrosylation sites from SNAP/L-cysteine-stimulated mouse endothelial cells, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-nitrosylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition, the accessible surface area (ASA and physicochemical properties, i.e. positive charge and side chain interaction parameter. Due to the difficulty to obtain the conserved motifs by conventional motif analysis, maximal dependence decomposition (MDD has been applied to obtain statistically significant conserved motifs. Support vector machine (SVM is applied to generate predictive model for each MDD-clustered motif. According to five-fold cross-validation, the MDD-clustered SVMs could achieve an accuracy of 0.902, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the model was demonstrated on the correct identification of previously reported S-nitrosylation sites of Bos taurus dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1 and human hemoglobin subunit beta (HBB. Finally, the MDD-clustered model was adopted to construct an effective web-based tool, named SNOSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/SNOSite/, for identifying S-nitrosylation sites on the uncharacterized protein sequences.

  12. Developmental-form-specific DNA-binding proteins in Chlamydia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, E A; Stephens, R S

    1988-01-01

    We identified DNA-binding proteins specific to the elementary body (EB) developmental form of Chlamydia spp. Chlamydial proteins from whole lysates were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose, and probed with nick-translated chlamydial DNA. By this method, C. trachomatis serovar L2 EBs had three unique protein bands of 58,000, 25,700, and 17,000 molecular weight not seen in the reticulate bodies. The 17,000-molecular-weight protein and the 25,700-molecular-weight protein were identified in an acid-soluble protein fraction and were resistant to high-salt elution, similar to other procaryotic nucleoproteins. The 17,000-molecular-weight protein was also detected in preparations with isolated chromosomes from EBs. Preliminary characterization indicated that the protein-DNA interaction was principally charge related. Images PMID:3384472

  13. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  14. Identifying bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional

  15. A new scoring function for protein-protein docking that identifies native structures with unprecedented accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Irina S.; da Silva Martins, João Miguel; Coimbra, João T.S.

    2015-01-01

    the most correct one, in particular when a single answer is asked for. With such a low success rate it is difficult to point out one docked structure as being native-like. Here we present a new, high accuracy, scoring method to identify the 3D structure of P-P complexes among a set of trial poses...... the trial structures and identifies the native-like structures with unprecedented accuracy (∼94%), providing the correct P-P 3D structures that biochemists and molecular biologists need to pursue their studies. With such a success rate, the bottleneck of protein-protein docking moves from the scoring....... It incorporates alanine scanning mutagenesis experimental data that need to be obtained a priori. The scoring scheme works by matching the computational and the experimental alanine scanning mutagenesis results. The size of the trial P-P interface area is also taken into account. We show that the method ranks...

  16. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-02

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  17. Global transcriptome sequencing identifies chlamydospore specific markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Palige

    Full Text Available Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2 which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  18. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Chlamydospore Specific Markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palige, Katja

    2013-04-15

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2) which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  19. Supervised multivariate analysis of sequence groups to identify specificity determining residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Desmond G

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that evolve from a common ancestor can change functionality over time, and it is important to be able identify residues that cause this change. In this paper we show how a supervised multivariate statistical method, Between Group Analysis (BGA, can be used to identify these residues from families of proteins with different substrate specifities using multiple sequence alignments. Results We demonstrate the usefulness of this method on three different test cases. Two of these test cases, the Lactate/Malate dehydrogenase family and Nucleotidyl Cyclases, consist of two functional groups. The other family, Serine Proteases consists of three groups. BGA was used to analyse and visualise these three families using two different encoding schemes for the amino acids. Conclusion This overall combination of methods in this paper is powerful and flexible while being computationally very fast and simple. BGA is especially useful because it can be used to analyse any number of functional classes. In the examples we used in this paper, we have only used 2 or 3 classes for demonstration purposes but any number can be used and visualised.

  20. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Heidi A [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  1. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins...

  2. Branch-specific plasticity of a bifunctional dopamine circuit encodes protein hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Liu, Sha; Kodama, Lay; Horiuchi, Wakako; Daniels, Jay; Chiu, Lucinda; Baldoni, Daniel; Wu, Mark N

    2017-05-05

    Free-living animals must not only regulate the amount of food they consume but also choose which types of food to ingest. The shifting of food preference driven by nutrient-specific hunger can be essential for survival, yet little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We identified a dopamine circuit that encodes protein-specific hunger in Drosophila The activity of these neurons increased after substantial protein deprivation. Activation of this circuit simultaneously promoted protein intake and restricted sugar consumption, via signaling to distinct downstream neurons. Protein starvation triggered branch-specific plastic changes in these dopaminergic neurons, thus enabling sustained protein consumption. These studies reveal a crucial circuit mechanism by which animals adjust their dietary strategy to maintain protein homeostasis. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  4. Identify drug repurposing candidates by mining the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriaud, Fabrice; Richard, Stéphane B; Adcock, Stewart A; Chanas-Martin, Laetitia; Surgand, Jean-Sébastien; Ben Jelloul, Marouane; Delfaud, François

    2011-07-01

    Predicting off-targets by computational methods is gaining increasing interest in early-stage drug discovery. Here, we present a computational method based on full 3D comparisons of 3D structures. When a similar binding site is detected in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) (or any protein structure database), it is possible that the corresponding ligand also binds to that similar site. On one hand, this target hopping case is probably rare because it requires a high similarity between the binding sites. On the other hand, it could be a strong rational evidence to highlight possible off-target reactions and possibly a potential undesired side effect. This target-based drug repurposing can be extended a significant step further with the capability of searching the full surface of all proteins in the PDB, and therefore not relying on pocket detection. Using this approach, we describe how MED-SuMo reproduces the repurposing of tadalafil from PDE5A to PDE4A and a structure of PDE4A with tadalafil. Searching for local protein similarities generates more hits than for whole binding site similarities and therefore fragment repurposing is more likely to occur than for drug-sized compounds. In this work, we illustrate that by mining the PDB for proteins sharing similarities with the hinge region of protein kinases. The experimentally validated examples, biotin carboxylase and synapsin, are retrieved. Further to fragment repurposing, this approach can be applied to the detection of druggable sites from 3D structures. This is illustrated with detection of the protein kinase hinge motif in the HIV-RT non-nucleosidic allosteric site.

  5. Cooperativity in RNA-Protein Interactions: Global Analysis of RNA Binding Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T. Campbell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The control and function of RNA are governed by the specificity of RNA binding proteins. Here, we describe a method for global unbiased analysis of RNA-protein interactions that uses in vitro selection, high-throughput sequencing, and sequence-specificity landscapes. The method yields affinities for a vast array of RNAs in a single experiment, including both low- and high-affinity sites. It is reproducible and accurate. Using this approach, we analyzed members of the PUF (Pumilio and FBF family of eukaryotic mRNA regulators. Our data identify effects of a specific protein partner on PUF-RNA interactions, reveal subsets of target sites not previously detected, and demonstrate that designer PUF proteins can precisely alter specificity. The approach described here is, in principle, broadly applicable for analysis of any molecule that binds RNA, including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules.

  6. Practical analysis of specificity-determining residues in protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoyen, Mónica; García-Martín, Juan A; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-03-01

    Determining the residues that are important for the molecular activity of a protein is a topic of broad interest in biomedicine and biotechnology. This knowledge can help understanding the protein's molecular mechanism as well as to fine-tune its natural function eventually with biotechnological or therapeutic implications. Some of the protein residues are essential for the function common to all members of a family of proteins, while others explain the particular specificities of certain subfamilies (like binding on different substrates or cofactors and distinct binding affinities). Owing to the difficulty in experimentally determining them, a number of computational methods were developed to detect these functional residues, generally known as 'specificity-determining positions' (or SDPs), from a collection of homologous protein sequences. These methods are mature enough for being routinely used by molecular biologists in directing experiments aimed at getting insight into the functional specificity of a family of proteins and eventually modifying it. In this review, we summarize some of the recent discoveries achieved through SDP computational identification in a number of relevant protein families, as well as the main approaches and software tools available to perform this type of analysis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca2+-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela; Israelson, Adrian; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca 2+ -dependent proteins. ► FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca 2+ -binding proteins. ► Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca 2+ -binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca 2+ carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca 2+ -dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca 2+ -dependent activities but not the activity of Ca 2+ -independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca 2+ , FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca 2+ -binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca 2+ -binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca 2+ as a key bio-regulator.

  8. Clinical importance of non-specific lipid transfer proteins as food allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, R.

    2002-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) have recently been identified as plant food allergens. They are good examples of true food allergens, in the sense that they are capable of sensitizing, i.e. inducing specific IgE, as well as of eliciting severe symptoms. This is in contrast with most

  9. Site-specific protein labeling by Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Lin, Alison J; Golan, David E; Walsh, Christopher T

    2006-01-01

    Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase covalently attaches small-molecule probes including biotin and various organic fluorophores to a specific serine residue in the peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) or a short 11-residue peptide tag ybbR through a phosphopantetheinyl linker. We describe here a protocol for site-specific protein labeling by Sfp-catalyzed protein post-translational modification that includes (i) expression and purification of Sfp, (ii) synthesis of small-molecule probe-CoA conjugates, (iii) construction of target protein fusions with PCP or the ybbR tag, (iv) labeling PCP- or ybbR-tagged target protein fusions in cell lysates and on live cell surfaces and (v) imaging fluorophore-labeled cell surface receptors by fluorescence microscopy. To follow this protocol, we advise that you allow 3 d for the expression and purification of Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase, 1 d for the synthesis and purification of the small-molecule probe-CoA conjugates as the substrates of Sfp, 3 d for the cloning of target protein genes as fusions to the PCP or the ybbR tag in the appropriate plasmids and another 3 d for transfecting cell lines with the plasmids and the expression of PCP- or ybbR-tagged proteins. Labeling of the PCP- or the ybbR-tagged proteins in cell lysates or on cell surfaces should require only 15-30 min.

  10. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  11. A novel proteogenomics approach identifying key proteins in severe COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, C.A.; Guryev, V.; Timens, W.; Postma, D.S.; Bischoff, R.; Yakovleva, M.; Marko-Varga, G.; Fehniger, T.; Van Den Berge, M.; Horvatovich, P.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale COPD is influenced by many genetic and environmental factors. Genetic studies provided insights in the molecular mechanisms underlying COPD, but did not inform on protein changes. We propose that whichever factor contributes to disease, the final common pathway for disease development lies

  12. Target and identify: triazene linker helps identify azidation sites of labelled proteins via click and cleave strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Jonas; Schindl, Alexandra; Danda, Natasha; Williams, Chris P; Kramer, Karl; Kuster, Bernhard; Witte, Martin D; Médard, Guillaume

    2017-10-31

    A method for identifying probe modification of proteins via tandem mass spectrometry was developed. Azide bearing molecules are immobilized on functionalised sepharose beads via copper catalysed Huisgen-type click chemistry and selectively released under acidic conditions by chemical cleavage of the triazene linkage. We applied this method to identify the modification site of targeted-diazotransfer on BirA.

  13. Specific serology for emerging human coronaviruses by protein microarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusken, C.; Mou, H.; Godeke, G. J.; van der Hoek, L.; Meyer, B.; Müller, M. A.; Haagmans, B.; de Sousa, R.; Schuurman, N.; Dittmer, U.; Rottier, P.; Osterhaus, A.; Drosten, C.; Bosch, B. J.; Koopmans, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a serological assay for the specific detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against the emerging human coronavirus hCoV-EMC and the SARS-CoV based on protein microarray technology. The assay uses the S1 receptor-binding subunit of the spike protein of hCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV as antigens. The

  14. Functionally relevant domains of the prion protein identified in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Baumann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The prion consists essentially of PrP(Sc, a misfolded and aggregated conformer of the cellular protein PrP(C. Whereas PrP(C deficient mice are clinically healthy, expression of PrP(C variants lacking its central domain (PrP(DeltaCD, or of the PrP-related protein Dpl, induces lethal neurodegenerative syndromes which are repressed by full-length PrP. Here we tested the structural basis of these syndromes by grafting the amino terminus of PrP(C (residues 1-134, or its central domain (residues 90-134, onto Dpl. Further, we constructed a soluble variant of the neurotoxic PrP(DeltaCD mutant that lacks its glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI membrane anchor. Each of these modifications abrogated the pathogenicity of Dpl and PrP(DeltaCD in transgenic mice. The PrP-Dpl chimeric molecules, but not anchorless PrP(DeltaCD, ameliorated the disease of mice expressing truncated PrP variants. We conclude that the amino proximal domain of PrP exerts a neurotrophic effect even when grafted onto a distantly related protein, and that GPI-linked membrane anchoring is necessary for both beneficial and deleterious effects of PrP and its variants.

  15. Context-specific protein network miner - an online system for exploring context-specific protein interaction networks from the literature

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2012-04-06

    Background: Protein interaction networks (PINs) specific within a particular context contain crucial information regarding many cellular biological processes. For example, PINs may include information on the type and directionality of interaction (e.g. phosphorylation), location of interaction (i.e. tissues, cells), and related diseases. Currently, very few tools are capable of deriving context-specific PINs for conducting exploratory analysis. Results: We developed a literature-based online system, Context-specific Protein Network Miner (CPNM), which derives context-specific PINs in real-time from the PubMed database based on a set of user-input keywords and enhanced PubMed query system. CPNM reports enriched information on protein interactions (with type and directionality), their network topology with summary statistics (e.g. most densely connected proteins in the network; most densely connected protein-pairs; and proteins connected by most inbound/outbound links) that can be explored via a user-friendly interface. Some of the novel features of the CPNM system include PIN generation, ontology-based PubMed query enhancement, real-time, user-queried, up-to-date PubMed document processing, and prediction of PIN directionality. Conclusions: CPNM provides a tool for biologists to explore PINs. It is freely accessible at http://www.biotextminer.com/CPNM/. © 2012 Chowdhary et al.

  16. Nanodiamond MALDI support for enhancing the credibility of identifying proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li-Ming; Xue, Yan; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Jin, Hong; Shi, Qian; Lu, Hao-Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan

    2008-02-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a standard analytical tool for protein identification and peptide sequencing. High sensitivity and resolution are two critical parameters for recording good peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of low abundance proteins. Here, we report a novel nanodiamond (ND) (normal size 3-10nm) support for MALDI-MS target, over which alpha-cyano-4-hydrocinnamic acid (CCA) crystallizes evenly. Good reproducibility of relative peak intensity (R.S.D. less than 11.8%) among sample spot (from ring to center) is achieved on ND support. Therefore, the search for "hot spots" during the analysis is not necessary, which is supporting for the automatic acquisition of data. Due to high absorbability of energy from the laser, the ND support improves ionization efficiency of samples. In general, the sensitivity of MS obtained on ND support can be enhanced three to four times compared to the conventional MALDI sample preparation technique. Sensitivity obtained on ND support ranges from 62.5 amol of Arg-vasopressin standard peptide to 1.0 fmol of myoglobin tryptic peptide mixture. Reduced spot size and increased sensitivity in MALDI-MS are also accomplished by ND support. With spot size reduced, the signal intensity of cytochrome c (Cyt c) tryptic peptide obtained on ND support is at least seven times greater than it acquired on stainless steel. And ND support has been found better tolerance for salt (up to 500 mM NaCl) to MALDI-MS analysis. All these properties make ND support a valuable tool for MALDI-MS identification of proteins.

  17. Identifying Family-Member-Specific Targets of Mono-ARTDs by Using a Chemical Genetics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-O'Connell, Ian; Jin, Haihong; Morgan, Rory K; Zaja, Roko; David, Larry L; Ahel, Ivan; Cohen, Michael S

    2016-01-26

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTD1-16) have emerged as major downstream effectors of NAD(+) signaling in the cell. Most ARTDs (ARTD7 and 8, 10-12, and 14-17) catalyze the transfer of a single unit of ADP-ribose from NAD(+) to target proteins, a process known as mono-ADP-ribosylation (MARylation). Progress in understanding the cellular functions of MARylation has been limited by the inability to identify the direct targets for individual mono-ARTDs. Here, we engineered mono-ARTDs to use an NAD(+) analog that is orthogonal to wild-type ARTDs. We profiled the MARylomes of ARTD10 and ARTD11 in vitro, identifying isoform-specific targets and revealing a potential role for ARTD11 in nuclear pore complex biology. We found that ARTD11 targeting is dependent on both its regulatory and catalytic domains, which has important implications for how ARTDs recognize their targets. We anticipate that our chemical genetic strategy will be generalizable to all mono-ARTD family members based on the similarity of the mono-ARTD catalytic domains. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identifying Family-Member-Specific Targets of Mono-ARTDs by Using a Chemical Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Carter-O’Connell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTD1–16 have emerged as major downstream effectors of NAD+ signaling in the cell. Most ARTDs (ARTD7 and 8, 10–12, and 14–17 catalyze the transfer of a single unit of ADP-ribose from NAD+ to target proteins, a process known as mono-ADP-ribosylation (MARylation. Progress in understanding the cellular functions of MARylation has been limited by the inability to identify the direct targets for individual mono-ARTDs. Here, we engineered mono-ARTDs to use an NAD+ analog that is orthogonal to wild-type ARTDs. We profiled the MARylomes of ARTD10 and ARTD11 in vitro, identifying isoform-specific targets and revealing a potential role for ARTD11 in nuclear pore complex biology. We found that ARTD11 targeting is dependent on both its regulatory and catalytic domains, which has important implications for how ARTDs recognize their targets. We anticipate that our chemical genetic strategy will be generalizable to all mono-ARTD family members based on the similarity of the mono-ARTD catalytic domains.

  19. Novel snail1 target proteins in human colon cancer identified by proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Larriba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT.We identified by proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF and ESI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry a number of proteins with variable functions whose expression is modulated by Snail1 in SW480-ADH human colon cancer cells. Validation was performed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Snail1 repressed several members of the 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine binding proteins and also the expression of the Proliferation-associated protein 2G4 (PA2G4 that was mainly localized at the nuclear Cajal bodies. In contrast, the expression of two proteins involved in RNA processing, the Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6 and the Splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ, was higher in Snail1-expressing cells than in controls. The regulation of 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3tau, 14-3-3zeta and PA2G4 by Snail1 was reproduced in HT29 colon cancer cells. In addition, we found an inverse correlation between 14-3-3sigma and Snail1 expression in human colorectal tumors.We have identified a set of novel Snail1 target proteins in colon cancer that expand the cellular processes affected by Snail1 and thus its relevance for cell function and phenotype.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Bovine Pregnancy-specific Serum Proteins by 2D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional-fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE is an emerging technique for comparative proteomics, which improves the reproducibility and reliability of differential protein expression analysis between samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate bovine pregnancy-specific proteins in the proteome between bovine pregnant and non-pregnant serum using DIGE technique. Serums of 2 pregnant Holstein dairy cattle at day 21 after artificial insemination and those of 2 non-pregnant were used in this study. The pre-electrophoretic labeling of pregnant and non-pregnant serum proteins were mixed with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescent dyes, respectively, and an internal standard was labeled with Cy2. Labeled proteins with Cy2, Cy3, and Cy5 were separated together in a single gel, and then were detected by fluorescence image analyzer. The 2D DIGE method using fluorescence CyDye DIGE flour had higher sensitivity than conventional 2D gel electrophoresis, and showed reproducible results. Approximately 1,500 protein spots were detected by 2D DIGE. Several proteins showed a more than 1.5-fold up and down regulation between non-pregnant and pregnant serum proteins. The differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. A total 16 protein spots were detected to regulate differentially in the pregnant serum, among which 7 spots were up-regulated proteins such as conglutinin precursor, modified bovine fibrinogen and IgG1, and 6 spots were down-regulated proteins such as hemoglobin, complement component 3, bovine fibrinogen and IgG2a three spots were not identified. The identified proteins demonstrate that early pregnant bovine serum may have several pregnancy-specific proteins, and these could be a valuable information for the development of pregnancy-diagnostic markers in early pregnancy bovine serum.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Bovine Pregnancy-specific Serum Proteins by 2D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Eun; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hong Rye; Shin, Hyun Young; Lin, Tao; Jin, Dong Il

    2015-01-01

    Two dimensional-fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) is an emerging technique for comparative proteomics, which improves the reproducibility and reliability of differential protein expression analysis between samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate bovine pregnancy-specific proteins in the proteome between bovine pregnant and non-pregnant serum using DIGE technique. Serums of 2 pregnant Holstein dairy cattle at day 21 after artificial insemination and those of 2 non-pregnant were used in this study. The pre-electrophoretic labeling of pregnant and non-pregnant serum proteins were mixed with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescent dyes, respectively, and an internal standard was labeled with Cy2. Labeled proteins with Cy2, Cy3, and Cy5 were separated together in a single gel, and then were detected by fluorescence image analyzer. The 2D DIGE method using fluorescence CyDye DIGE flour had higher sensitivity than conventional 2D gel electrophoresis, and showed reproducible results. Approximately 1,500 protein spots were detected by 2D DIGE. Several proteins showed a more than 1.5-fold up and down regulation between non-pregnant and pregnant serum proteins. The differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. A total 16 protein spots were detected to regulate differentially in the pregnant serum, among which 7 spots were up-regulated proteins such as conglutinin precursor, modified bovine fibrinogen and IgG1, and 6 spots were down-regulated proteins such as hemoglobin, complement component 3, bovine fibrinogen and IgG2a three spots were not identified. The identified proteins demonstrate that early pregnant bovine serum may have several pregnancy-specific proteins, and these could be a valuable information for the development of pregnancy-diagnostic markers in early pregnancy bovine serum. PMID:25925056

  2. Identification of Brain-Specific Angiogenesis Inhibitor 2 as an Interaction Partner of Glutaminase Interacting Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80–100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, Glutaminase Interacting Protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signalling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interact with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, β-Catenin, FAS, HTLV Tax, HPV E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified Brain-specific Angiogenesis Inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP. PMID:21787750

  3. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  4. The EXIT Strategy: an Approach for Identifying Bacterial Proteins Exported during Host Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowski, E F; Zulauf, K E; Weerakoon, D; Hayden, J D; Ioerger, T R; Oreper, D; Gomez, S M; Sacchettini, J C; Braunstein, M

    2017-04-25

    Exported proteins of bacterial pathogens function both in essential physiological processes and in virulence. Past efforts to identify exported proteins were limited by the use of bacteria growing under laboratory ( in vitro ) conditions. Thus, exported proteins that are exported only or preferentially in the context of infection may be overlooked. To solve this problem, we developed a genome-wide method, named EXIT ( ex ported i n vivo t echnology), to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during infection and applied it to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during murine infection. Our studies validate the power of EXIT to identify proteins exported during infection on an unprecedented scale (593 proteins) and to reveal in vivo induced exported proteins (i.e., proteins exported significantly more during in vivo infection than in vitro ). Our EXIT data also provide an unmatched resource for mapping the topology of M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. As a new approach for identifying exported proteins, EXIT has potential applicability to other pathogens and experimental conditions. IMPORTANCE There is long-standing interest in identifying exported proteins of bacteria as they play critical roles in physiology and virulence and are commonly immunogenic antigens and targets of antibiotics. While significant effort has been made to identify the bacterial proteins that are exported beyond the cytoplasm to the membrane, cell wall, or host environment, current methods to identify exported proteins are limited by their use of bacteria growing under laboratory ( in vitro ) conditions. Because in vitro conditions do not mimic the complexity of the host environment, critical exported proteins that are preferentially exported in the context of infection may be overlooked. We developed a novel method to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during host infection and applied it to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins exported in a mouse model of tuberculosis

  5. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E.; Trimble, William S.; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  6. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuzaki Daisuke

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  7. Anti-HmuY antibodies specifically recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY protein but not homologous proteins in other periodontopathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Śmiga

    Full Text Available Given the emerging evidence of an association between periodontal infections and systemic conditions, the search for specific methods to detect the presence of P. gingivalis, a principal etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis, is of high importance. The aim of this study was to characterize antibodies raised against purified P. gingivalis HmuY protein and selected epitopes of the HmuY molecule. Since other periodontopathogens produce homologs of HmuY, we also aimed to characterize responses of antibodies raised against the HmuY protein or its epitopes to the closest homologous proteins from Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia. Rabbits were immunized with purified HmuY protein or three synthetic, KLH-conjugated peptides, derived from the P. gingivalis HmuY protein. The reactivity of anti-HmuY antibodies with purified proteins or bacteria was determined using Western blotting and ELISA assay. First, we found homologs of P. gingivalis HmuY in P. intermedia (PinO and PinA proteins and T. forsythia (Tfo protein and identified corrected nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Tfo. All proteins were overexpressed in E. coli and purified using ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filtration. We demonstrated that antibodies raised against P. gingivalis HmuY are highly specific to purified HmuY protein and HmuY attached to P. gingivalis cells. No reactivity between P. intermedia and T. forsythia or between purified HmuY homologs from these bacteria and anti-HmuY antibodies was detected. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that P. gingivalis HmuY protein may serve as an antigen for specific determination of serum antibodies raised against this bacterium.

  8. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  9. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Gentillon, Cynthia A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  10. Pentraxin family of proteins interact specifically with phosphorylcholine and/or phosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, R A; Dahlbäck, B; Coe, J E; Nelsestuen, G L

    1992-05-26

    Pentraxins are a family of serum proteins characterized by five identical subunits that are noncovalently linked. The two major types of pentraxins are C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). CRP proteins are identified by their calcium-dependent interaction with phosphorylcholine. This study showed that SAP also bound to phosphorylated compounds but had a high specificity for phosphorylethanolamine. Thus, human CRP and SAP show high specificity that is complementary for the related compounds, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, respectively. This relationship suggests a complementary and/or related function for the pentraxins. Pentraxins from other species were also examined. Mouse SAP showed binding interactions and specificity similar to human SAP. Female protein (FP) from hamster and rat CRP showed a hybrid specificity and bound to both phosphorylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine. All of the proteins that bound phosphorylethanolamine also associated with human C4b-binding protein (C4BP). With the exception of human and rat CRP, all the proteins also bound to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. All of these binding interactions were calcium-dependent and mutually exclusive, suggesting that they involved the same site on the protein. These findings suggest possible ways to examine the function of the pentraxins.

  11. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  12. Engineering nanoparticles surface for biosensing: "Chemical noses" to detect and identify proteins, bacteria and cancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Sanchez, Oscar Ramon

    Rapid and sensitive detection of biomolecules is an important issue in nanomedicine. Many disorders are manifested by changes in protein levels of serum and other biofluids. Rapid and effective differentiation between normal and cancerous cells is an important challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of tumor. Likewise, rapid and effective identification of pathogens is a key target in both biomedical and environmental monitoring. Most biological recognition processes occur via specific interactions. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP s) feature sizes commensurate with biomacromolecules, coupled with useful physical and optical properties. A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling the interfacial interactions of these complex systems. Modulation of these physicochemical properties can be readily achieved by engineering nanoparticles surface. Inspired by the idea of mimicking nature, a convenient, precise and rapid method for sensing proteins, cancerous cells and bacteria has been developed by overtaking the superb performance of biological olfactory systems in odor detection, identification, tracking, and location. On the fundamental side, an array-based/'chemical nose' sensor composed of cationic functionalized AuNPs as receptors and anionic fluorescent conjugated polymers or green fluorescent proteins or enzyme/substrates as transducers that can properly detect and identify proteins, bacteria, and cancerous cells has been successfully fabricated.

  13. Identifying the Location of a Single Protein along the DNA Strand Using Solid-State Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae-Seok; Lim, Min-Cheol; Huynh, Duyen Thi Ngoc; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2015-05-26

    Solid-state nanopore has been widely studied as an effective tool to detect and analyze small biomolecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins, at a single molecule level. In this study, we demonstrate a rapid identification of the location of zinc finger protein (ZFP), which is bound to a specific locus along the length of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to a single protein resolution using a low noise solid-state nanopore. When ZFP labeled DNAs were driven through a nanopore by an externally applied electric field, characteristic ionic current signals arising from the passage of the DNA/ZFP complex and bare DNA were detected, which enabled us to identify the locations of ZFP binding site. We examined two DNAs with ZFP binding sites at different positions and found that the location of the additional current drop derived from the DNA/ZFP complex is well-matched with a theoretical one along the length of the DNA molecule. These results suggest that the protein binding site on DNA can be mapped or that genetic information can be read at a single molecule level using solid-state nanopores.

  14. A genome-wide association study identifies protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Melzer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that human genetic variation influences gene expression. Genome-wide studies have revealed that mRNA levels are associated with genetic variation in or close to the gene coding for those mRNA transcripts - cis effects, and elsewhere in the genome - trans effects. The role of genetic variation in determining protein levels has not been systematically assessed. Using a genome-wide association approach we show that common genetic variation influences levels of clinically relevant proteins in human serum and plasma. We evaluated the role of 496,032 polymorphisms on levels of 42 proteins measured in 1200 fasting individuals from the population based InCHIANTI study. Proteins included insulin, several interleukins, adipokines, chemokines, and liver function markers that are implicated in many common diseases including metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious conditions. We identified eight Cis effects, including variants in or near the IL6R (p = 1.8x10(-57, CCL4L1 (p = 3.9x10(-21, IL18 (p = 6.8x10(-13, LPA (p = 4.4x10(-10, GGT1 (p = 1.5x10(-7, SHBG (p = 3.1x10(-7, CRP (p = 6.4x10(-6 and IL1RN (p = 7.3x10(-6 genes, all associated with their respective protein products with effect sizes ranging from 0.19 to 0.69 standard deviations per allele. Mechanisms implicated include altered rates of cleavage of bound to unbound soluble receptor (IL6R, altered secretion rates of different sized proteins (LPA, variation in gene copy number (CCL4L1 and altered transcription (GGT1. We identified one novel trans effect that was an association between ABO blood group and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha levels (p = 6.8x10(-40, but this finding was not present when TNF-alpha was measured using a different assay , or in a second study, suggesting an assay-specific association. Our results show that protein levels share some of the features of the genetics of gene expression. These include the presence of strong genetic effects in cis

  15. Prioritizing Disease Candidate Proteins in Cardiomyopathy-Specific Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Based on “Guilt by Association” Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on “guilt by association” analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on “guilt by association” analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way. PMID:23940716

  16. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A Multicenter Reference Intervals Study for Specific Proteins in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xuzhen; Tang, Guodong; Qiu, Ling; Li, Peng Chang; Xia, Liangyu; Chen, Ming; Tao, Zhihua; Li, Shijun; Liu, Min; Wang, Liang; Gao, Shang; Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Han, Jianhua; Hou, Li’an; Kawano, Reo; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A multicenter study conducted in healthy population of 6 cities from the 4 corners and central China for 7 serum-specific proteins to identify the sources of variation and establish the reference intervals on 2 automation platforms. A total of 3148 subjects aged 19 to 64 years old were enrolled in this study to ensure at least 120 participants in each 10-year age group and each city. The majority of samples were transported to central laboratory and measured on both Beckman AU5800 and Immage 800 analytical systems. Three-level nested ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, and the scatter plot were used to explore the variations from sex, age, region, BMI, cigarette smoking, and so on. The latent abnormal value exclusion (LAVE) method was applied at the time of computing RIs as a method for secondary exclusion. Regionality was not observed in any of the immunoassay in China. Variations for sex were significant for IgM among the immune analytes. For CRP and hsCRP results with turbidimetry method (Beckman Coulter AU5800) were lower than the nephelometry method (Beckman Immage). The LAVE method did not affect the RIs computed for the majority of analytes except C4, CRP, and hsCRP. In the scatter plot at the age of 45 years old C3, C4, and IgM reached an inflection point, accordingly RIs were separated by the age group. With the lack of regional differences and the well-standardized status of test results, the RIs of C3, IgG, IgA, IgM derived from this nationwide study can be used for the entire Chinese population. C4, CRP, and hsCRP were affected by different platforms and gender was a significant source of variation for IgM, so they had separated RIs. PMID:26656356

  18. Development of antifertility vaccine using sperm specific proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A H Bandivdekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm proteins are known to be associated with normal fertilization as auto- or iso-antibodies to these proteins may cause infertility. Therefore, sperm proteins have been considered to be the potential candidate for the development of antifertility vaccine. Some of the sperm proteins proved to be promising antigens for contraceptive vaccine includes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4, protein hyaluronidase (PH-20, and Eppin. Immunization with LDH-C4 reduced fertility in female baboons but not in female cynomolgus macaques. Active immunization with PH-20 resulted in 100 per cent inhibition of fertility in male guinea pigs but it induced autoimmune orchitis. Immunization with Eppin elicited high antibody titres in 78 per cent of immunized monkeys and induced infertility but the immunopathological effect of immunization was not examined. Human sperm antigen (80kDa HSA is a sperm specific, highly immunogenic and conserved sperm protein. Active immunization with 80kDa HSA induced immunological infertility in male and female rats. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of 80kDa HSA (Peptide NT and its peptides (Peptides 1, 2, 3 and 4 obtained by enzymatic digestion did not show homology with any of the known proteins in gene bank. Peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 were found to mimic immunobiological activity of native protein. Passive administration of antibodies to peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 induced infertility in male and female rats and peptide 1 was found to be most effective in suppressing fertility. Active immunization with keyhole limpet haemocynin (KLH conjugated synthetic peptide 1 impaired fertility in all the male rabbits and six of the seven male marmosets. The fertility was restored following decline in antibody titre. All these findings on 80kDA HAS suggest that the synthetic Peptide-1 of 80kDa HSA is the promising candidate for development of male contraceptive vaccine.

  19. Identification of the Specific Interactors of the Human Lariat RNA Debranching Enzyme 1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Masaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step for gene expression. We have been analyzing post-splicing intron turnover steps in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report protein interaction between human Debranching enzyme 1 (hDbr1 and several factors found in the Intron Large (IL complex, which is an intermediate complex of the intron degradation pathway. The hDbr1 protein specifically interacts with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementeation group A (XPA-binding protein 2 (Xab2. We also attempted to identify specific interactors of hDbr1. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis identified a novel protein as one of the specific interactors of hDbr1. This protein is well conserved among many species and shows the highest similarity to yeast Drn1, so it is designated as human Dbr1 associated ribonuclease 1 (hDrn1. hDrn1 directly interacts with hDbr1 through protein–protein interaction. Furthermore, hDrn1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, as hDbr1 protein does. These findings suggest that hDrn1 has roles in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which are highly likely to involve hDbr1.

  20. An integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of sea star epidermal secretions identifies proteins involved in defense and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Elise; Leroy, Baptiste; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ladurner, Peter

    2015-10-14

    Sea stars rely on epidermal secretions to cope with their benthic life. Their integument produces a mucus, which represents the first barrier against invaders; and their tube feet produce adhesive secretions to pry open mussels and attach strongly but temporarily to rocks. In this study, we combined high-throughput sequencing of expressed mRNA and mass-spectrometry-based identification of proteins to establish the first proteome of mucous and adhesive secretions from the sea star Asterias rubens. We show that the two secretions differ significantly, the major adhesive proteins being only present in trace amounts in the mucus secretion. Except for 41 proteins which were present in both secretions, a total of 34 and 244 proteins were identified as specific of adhesive secretions and mucus, respectively. We discuss the role of some of these proteins in the adhesion of sea stars as well as in their protection against oxygen reactive species and microorganisms. In addition, 58% of the proteins identified in adhesive secretions did not present significant similarity to other known proteins, revealing a list of potential novel sea star adhesive proteins uncharacterized so far. The panel of proteins identified in this study offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of sea star-inspired biomimetic materials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. FindPept, a tool to identify unmatched masses in peptide mass fingerprinting protein identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattiker, Alexandre; Bienvenut, Willy V; Bairoch, Amos; Gasteiger, Elisabeth

    2002-10-01

    FindPept (http://www.expasy.org/tools/findpept.html) is a software tool designed to identify the origin of peptide masses obtained by peptide mass fingerprinting which are not matched by existing protein identification tools. It identifies masses resulting from unspecific proteolytic cleavage, missed cleavage, protease autolysis or keratin contaminants. It also takes into account post-translational modifications derived from the annotation of the SWISS-PROT database or supplied by the user, and chemical modifications of peptides. Based on a number of experimental examples, we show that the commonly held rules for the specificity of tryptic cleavage are an oversimplification, mainly because of effects of neighboring residues, experimental conditions, and contaminants present in the enzyme sample.

  2. Functional genomics identifies specific vulnerabilities in PTEN-deficient breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yew Chung; Ho, Szu-Chi; Tan, Elisabeth; Ng, Alvin Wei Tian; McPherson, John R; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Teh, Bin Tean; Bard, Frederic; Rozen, Steven G

    2018-03-22

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is one of the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressors in breast cancer. While PTEN itself is not considered a druggable target, PTEN synthetic-sick or synthetic-lethal (PTEN-SSL) genes are potential drug targets in PTEN-deficient breast cancers. Therefore, with the aim of identifying potential targets for precision breast cancer therapy, we sought to discover PTEN-SSL genes present in a broad spectrum of breast cancers. To discover broad-spectrum PTEN-SSL genes in breast cancer, we used a multi-step approach that started with (1) a genome-wide short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of ~ 21,000 genes in a pair of isogenic human mammary epithelial cell lines, followed by (2) a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen of ~ 1200 genes focused on hits from the first screen in a panel of 11 breast cancer cell lines; we then determined reproducibility of hits by (3) identification of overlaps between our results and reanalyzed data from 3 independent gene-essentiality screens, and finally, for selected candidate PTEN-SSL genes we (4) confirmed PTEN-SSL activity using either drug sensitivity experiments in a panel of 19 cell lines or mutual exclusivity analysis of publicly available pan-cancer somatic mutation data. The screens (steps 1 and 2) and the reproducibility analysis (step 3) identified six candidate broad-spectrum PTEN-SSL genes (PIK3CB, ADAMTS20, AP1M2, HMMR, STK11, and NUAK1). PIK3CB was previously identified as PTEN-SSL, while the other five genes represent novel PTEN-SSL candidates. Confirmation studies (step 4) provided additional evidence that NUAK1 and STK11 have PTEN-SSL patterns of activity. Consistent with PTEN-SSL status, inhibition of the NUAK1 protein kinase by the small molecule drug HTH-01-015 selectively impaired viability in multiple PTEN-deficient breast cancer cell lines, while mutations affecting STK11 and PTEN were largely mutually exclusive across large pan-cancer data sets. Six genes showed PTEN

  3. REEPs are membrane shaping adapter proteins that modulate specific g protein-coupled receptor trafficking by affecting ER cargo capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Björk

    Full Text Available Receptor expression enhancing proteins (REEPs were identified by their ability to enhance cell surface expression of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, specifically GPCRs that have proven difficult to express in heterologous cell systems. Further analysis revealed that they belong to the Yip (Ypt-interacting protein family and that some REEP subtypes affect ER structure. Yip family comparisons have established other potential roles for REEPs, including regulation of ER-Golgi transport and processing/neuronal localization of cargo proteins. However, these other potential REEP functions and the mechanism by which they selectively enhance GPCR cell surface expression have not been clarified. By utilizing several REEP family members (REEP1, REEP2, and REEP6 and model GPCRs (α2A and α2C adrenergic receptors, we examined REEP regulation of GPCR plasma membrane expression, intracellular processing, and trafficking. Using a combination of immunolocalization and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that this REEP subset is localized primarily to ER, but not plasma membranes. Single cell analysis demonstrated that these REEPs do not specifically enhance surface expression of all GPCRs, but affect ER cargo capacity of specific GPCRs and thus their surface expression. REEP co-expression with α2 adrenergic receptors (ARs revealed that this REEP subset interacts with and alter glycosidic processing of α2C, but not α2A ARs, demonstrating selective interaction with cargo proteins. Specifically, these REEPs enhanced expression of and interacted with minimally/non-glycosylated forms of α2C ARs. Most importantly, expression of a mutant REEP1 allele (hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG31 lacking the carboxyl terminus led to loss of this interaction. Thus specific REEP isoforms have additional intracellular functions besides altering ER structure, such as enhancing ER cargo capacity, regulating ER-Golgi processing, and interacting with select cargo

  4. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  5. Specific inhibition of GPCR-independent G protein signaling by a rationally engineered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyme, Anthony; Marivin, Arthur; Maziarz, Marcin; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Papakonstantinou, Maria P; Patel, Prachi P; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Walawalkar, Isha A; Rodriguez-Davila, Gonzalo; Dominguez, Isabel; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-11-28

    Activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by cytoplasmic nonreceptor proteins is an alternative to the classical mechanism via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). A subset of nonreceptor G protein activators is characterized by a conserved sequence named the Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif, which confers guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity in vitro and promotes G protein-dependent signaling in cells. GBA proteins have important roles in physiology and disease but remain greatly understudied. This is due, in part, to the lack of efficient tools that specifically disrupt GBA motif function in the context of the large multifunctional proteins in which they are embedded. This hindrance to the study of alternative mechanisms of G protein activation contrasts with the wealth of convenient chemical and genetic tools to manipulate GPCR-dependent activation. Here, we describe the rational design and implementation of a genetically encoded protein that specifically inhibits GBA motifs: GBA inhibitor (GBAi). GBAi was engineered by introducing modifications in Gαi that preclude coupling to every known major binding partner [GPCRs, Gβγ, effectors, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), or the chaperone/GEF Ric-8A], while favoring high-affinity binding to all known GBA motifs. We demonstrate that GBAi does not interfere with canonical GPCR-G protein signaling but blocks GBA-dependent signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, by implementing GBAi in vivo, we show that GBA-dependent signaling modulates phenotypes during Xenopus laevis embryonic development. In summary, GBAi is a selective, efficient, and convenient tool to dissect the biological processes controlled by a GPCR-independent mechanism of G protein activation mediated by cytoplasmic factors.

  6. Secretomics identifies Fusarium graminearum proteins involved in the interaction with barley and wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fen; Jensen, Jens D.; Svensson, Birte

    2012-01-01

    or wheat flour as the sole nutrient source to mimic the host–pathogen interaction. A gel‐based proteomics approach was employed to identify the proteins secreted into the culture medium. Sixty‐nine unique fungal proteins were identified in 154 protein spots, including enzymes involved in the degradation......Fusarium graminearum is a phytopathogenic fungus primarily infecting small grain cereals, including barley and wheat. Secreted enzymes play important roles in the pathogenicity of many fungi. In order to access the secretome of F. graminearum, the fungus was grown in liquid culture with barley...... of cell walls, starch and proteins. Of these proteins, 35% had not been identified in previous in planta or in vitro studies, 70% were predicted to contain signal peptides and a further 16% may be secreted in a nonclassical manner. Proteins identified in the 72 spots showing differential appearance...

  7. A Topology Potential-Based Method for Identifying Essential Proteins from PPI Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lu, Yu; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable for cellular life. It is of great significance to identify essential proteins that can help us understand the minimal requirements for cellular life and is also very important for drug design. However, identification of essential proteins based on experimental approaches are typically time-consuming and expensive. With the development of high-throughput technology in the post-genomic era, more and more protein-protein interaction data can be obtained, which make it possible to study essential proteins from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. Most of these topology based essential protein discovery methods were to use network centralities. In this paper, we investigate the essential proteins' topological characters from a completely new perspective. To our knowledge it is the first time that topology potential is used to identify essential proteins from a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The basic idea is that each protein in the network can be viewed as a material particle which creates a potential field around itself and the interaction of all proteins forms a topological field over the network. By defining and computing the value of each protein's topology potential, we can obtain a more precise ranking which reflects the importance of proteins from the PPI network. The experimental results show that topology potential-based methods TP and TP-NC outperform traditional topology measures: degree centrality (DC), betweenness centrality (BC), closeness centrality (CC), subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), information centrality (IC), and network centrality (NC) for predicting essential proteins. In addition, these centrality measures are improved on their performance for identifying essential proteins in biological network when controlled by topology potential.

  8. Study on Fusion Protein and Its gene in Baculovirus Specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemr, W.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Baculoviruses are subdivided into two groups depending on the type of budded virus envelop fusion protein; group I utilized gp64 which include the most of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), group II utilized F protein which include the remnants of NPVs and all Granuloviruses (GVs). Recent studies reported the viral F protein coding gene as a host cellular sourced gene and may evolutionary acquired from the host genome referring to phylogeny analysis of fusion proteins. Thus, it was deduced that F protein coding gene is species- specific nucleotide sequence related to the type of the specific host and if virus could infect an unexpected host, the resulted virus may encode a vary F gene. In this regard, the present study utilized the mentioned properties of F gene in an attempt to produce a model of specific and more economic wider range granulovirus bio- pesticide able to infect both Spodoptera littoralis and Phthorimaea operculella larvae. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis were performed on six members of group II baculovirus, novel universal PCR primers were manually designed from the conserved regions in the alignment graph, targeted to amplify species- specific sequence entire F gene open reading frame (ORF) which is useful in molecular identification of baculovirus in unknown samples. So, the PCR product of SpliGV used to prepare a specific probe for the F gene of this type of virus. Results reflected that it is possible to infect S. littoralis larvae by PhopGV if injected into larval haemocoel, the resulted virus of this infection showed by using DNA hybridization technique to be encode to F gene homologous with the F gene of Spli GV, which is revealed that the resulted virus acquired this F gene sequence from the host genome after infection. Consequently, these results may infer that if genetic aberrations occur in the host genome, this may affect in baculoviral infectivity. So, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma radiation at

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    form of COMP, which is present in cartilage and synovium. Passive transfer of COMP-specific mAbs enhanced arthritis when co-administrated with a sub-arthritogenic dose of a mAb specific to collagen type II. Interestingly, we found that a combination of 5 COMP mAbs was capable of inducing arthritis...... in naive mice. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified the specificities of mAbs to COMP and their contribution to the development of arthritis. These findings will further improve our understanding of the autoantibody mediated immunopathologies occurring widely in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as in other...... autoimmune disorders....

  10. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work

  11. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  12. General and specific lipid-protein interactions in Na,K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, F; Habeck, M; Kanai, R; Toyoshima, C; Karlish, S J D

    2015-09-01

    The molecular activity of Na,K-ATPase and other P2 ATPases like Ca(2+)-ATPase is influenced by the lipid environment via both general (physical) and specific (chemical) interactions. Whereas the general effects of bilayer structure on membrane protein function are fairly well described and understood, the importance of the specific interactions has only been realized within the last decade due particularly to the growing field of membrane protein crystallization, which has shed new light on the molecular details of specific lipid-protein interactions. It is a remarkable observation that specific lipid-protein interactions seem to be evolutionarily conserved, and conformations of specifically bound lipids at the lipid-protein surface within the membrane are similar in crystal structures determined with different techniques and sources of the protein, despite the rather weak lipid-protein interaction energy. Studies of purified detergent-soluble recombinant αβ or αβFXYD Na,K-ATPase complexes reveal three separate functional effects of phospholipids and cholesterol with characteristic structural selectivity. The observations suggest that these three effects are exerted at separate binding sites for phophatidylserine/cholesterol (stabilizing), polyunsaturated phosphatidylethanolamine (stimulatory), and saturated PC or sphingomyelin/cholesterol (inhibitory), which may be located within three lipid-binding pockets identified in recent crystal structures of Na,K-ATPase. The findings point to a central role of direct and specific interactions of different phospholipids and cholesterol in determining both stability and molecular activity of Na,K-ATPase and possible implications for physiological regulation by membrane lipid composition. This article is part of a special issue titled "Lipid-Protein Interactions." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic analysis reveals new cardiac-specific dystrophin-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Johnson

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the expression of dystrophin result in progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and cardiomyopathy leading to early mortality. Interestingly, clinical studies revealed no correlation in disease severity or age of onset between cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting that dystrophin may play overlapping yet different roles in these two striated muscles. Since dystrophin serves as a structural and signaling scaffold, functional differences likely arise from tissue-specific protein interactions. To test this, we optimized a proteomics-based approach to purify, identify and compare the interactome of dystrophin between cardiac and skeletal muscles from as little as 50 mg of starting material. We found selective tissue-specific differences in the protein associations of cardiac and skeletal muscle full length dystrophin to syntrophins and dystrobrevins that couple dystrophin to signaling pathways. Importantly, we identified novel cardiac-specific interactions of dystrophin with proteins known to regulate cardiac contraction and to be involved in cardiac disease. Our approach overcomes a major challenge in the muscular dystrophy field of rapidly and consistently identifying bona fide dystrophin-interacting proteins in tissues. In addition, our findings support the existence of cardiac-specific functions of dystrophin and may guide studies into early triggers of cardiac disease in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies.

  14. Proteomic Analysis Reveals New Cardiac-Specific Dystrophin-Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric K.; Zhang, Liwen; Adams, Marvin E.; Phillips, Alistair; Freitas, Michael A.; Froehner, Stanley C.; Green-Church, Kari B.; Montanaro, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Mutations affecting the expression of dystrophin result in progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and cardiomyopathy leading to early mortality. Interestingly, clinical studies revealed no correlation in disease severity or age of onset between cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting that dystrophin may play overlapping yet different roles in these two striated muscles. Since dystrophin serves as a structural and signaling scaffold, functional differences likely arise from tissue-specific protein interactions. To test this, we optimized a proteomics-based approach to purify, identify and compare the interactome of dystrophin between cardiac and skeletal muscles from as little as 50 mg of starting material. We found selective tissue-specific differences in the protein associations of cardiac and skeletal muscle full length dystrophin to syntrophins and dystrobrevins that couple dystrophin to signaling pathways. Importantly, we identified novel cardiac-specific interactions of dystrophin with proteins known to regulate cardiac contraction and to be involved in cardiac disease. Our approach overcomes a major challenge in the muscular dystrophy field of rapidly and consistently identifying bona fide dystrophin-interacting proteins in tissues. In addition, our findings support the existence of cardiac-specific functions of dystrophin and may guide studies into early triggers of cardiac disease in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. PMID:22937058

  15. Computational mapping identifies the binding sites of organic solvents on proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Sheldon; Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Vajda, Sandor

    2002-01-01

    Computational mapping places molecular probes—small molecules or functional groups—on a protein surface to identify the most favorable binding positions. Although x-ray crystallography and NMR show that organic solvents bind to a limited number of sites on a protein, current mapping methods result in hundreds of energy minima and do not reveal why some sites bind molecules with different sizes and polarities. We describe a mapping algorithm that explains the origin of this phenomenon. The algorithm has been applied to hen egg-white lysozyme and to thermolysin, interacting with eight and four different ligands, respectively. In both cases the search finds the consensus site to which all molecules bind, whereas other positions that bind only certain ligands are not necessarily found. The consensus sites are pockets of the active site, lined with partially exposed hydrophobic residues and with a number of polar residues toward the edge. These sites can accommodate each ligand in a number of rotational states, some with a hydrogen bond to one of the nearby donor/acceptor groups. Specific substrates and/or inhibitors of hen egg-white lysozyme and thermolysin interact with the same side chains identified by the mapping, but form several hydrogen bonds and bind in unique orientations. PMID:11904374

  16. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Development of a novel DDS for site-specific PEGylated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the shifted focus in life science research from genome analyses to genetic and protein function analyses, we now know functions of numerous proteins. These analyses, including those of newly identified proteins, are expected to contribute to the identification of proteins of therapeutic value in various diseases. Consequently, pharmacoproteomic-based drug discovery and development of protein therapies attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. Clinical applications of most of these proteins are, however, limited because of their unexpectedly low therapeutic effects, resulting from the proteolytic degradation in vivo followed by rapid removal from the circulatory system. Therefore, frequent administration of excessively high dose of a protein is required to observe its therapeutic effect in vivo. This often results in impaired homeostasis in vivo and leads to severe adverse effects. To overcome these problems, we have devised a method for chemical modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol (PEGylation and other water-soluble polymers. In addition, we have established a method for creating functional mutant proteins (muteins with desired properties, and developed a site-specific polymer-conjugation method to further improve their therapeutic potency. In this review, we are introducing our original protein-drug innovation system mentioned above.

  18. Identification of a conserved cluster of skin-specific genes encoding secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Pierre; Salois, Patrick; St-Amant, Natalie; Gaumond, Marie-Hélène; Lanctôt, Christian

    2004-06-09

    Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes results in the formation of a cornified layer composed of cross-linked intracellular and extracellular material. Using a signal trap expression screening strategy, we have identified four cDNAs encoding secreted proteins potentially involved in this process. One of the cDNAs is identical to the short isoform of suprabasin, a recently described epidermis-specific protein, which is shown here to contain a functional secretory signal. The second cDNA, sk89, encodes a protein of 493 amino acids, rich in glycine and serine residues. The third cDNA encodes a C-terminal fragment of SK89 (amino acids 410-493). It comprises exons 13 to 18 of the sk89 locus but transcription starts at an isoform-specific exon encoding a distinct secretory signal. The fourth cDNA encodes keratinocyte differentiation-associated protein (KDAP), a precursor protein of 102 amino acids. Subcellular localization by immunofluorescence and detection of the tagged proteins by Western blotting confirmed that the four proteins are secreted. Northern analysis and in situ hybridization revealed that expression of the corresponding genes was restricted to the suprabasal keratinocytes of the epidermis. These genes encoding epidermis-specific secreted products are found in a conserved cluster on human chromosome 19q13.12 and on mouse chromosome 7A3.

  19. Fat-specific protein 27 regulates storage of triacylglycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, P.; Petrie, J.T.; Rose, P. De

    2008-01-01

    FSP27 (fat-specific protein 27) is a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector (CIDE) family. Although Cidea and Cideb were initially characterized as activators of apoptosis, recent studies have demonstrated important metabolic roles for these proteins....... In this study, we investigated the function of another member of this family, FSP27 (Cidec), in apoptosis and adipocyte metabolism. Although overexpression of FSP27 is sufficient to increase apoptosis of 293T and 3T3-L1 cells, more physiological levels of expression stimulate spontaneous lipid accumulation...... in several cell types without induction of adipocyte genes. Increased triacylglycerol is likely due to decreased beta-oxidation of nonesterified fatty acids. Altered flux of fatty acids into triacylglycerol may be a direct effect of FSP27 function, which is localized to lipid droplets in 293T cells and 3T3-L...

  20. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E; Trimble, William S; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  1. The EXIT Strategy: an Approach for Identifying Bacterial Proteins Exported during Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowski, E. F.; Zulauf, K. E.; Weerakoon, D.; Hayden, J. D.; Ioerger, T. R.; Oreper, D.; Gomez, S. M.; Sacchettini, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exported proteins of bacterial pathogens function both in essential physiological processes and in virulence. Past efforts to identify exported proteins were limited by the use of bacteria growing under laboratory (in vitro) conditions. Thus, exported proteins that are exported only or preferentially in the context of infection may be overlooked. To solve this problem, we developed a genome-wide method, named EXIT (exported in vivo technology), to identify proteins that are exported by bacteria during infection and applied it to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during murine infection. Our studies validate the power of EXIT to identify proteins exported during infection on an unprecedented scale (593 proteins) and to reveal in vivo induced exported proteins (i.e., proteins exported significantly more during in vivo infection than in vitro). Our EXIT data also provide an unmatched resource for mapping the topology of M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. As a new approach for identifying exported proteins, EXIT has potential applicability to other pathogens and experimental conditions. PMID:28442606

  2. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several heteroge......In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several...... heterogeneous proteins of yeast and nematode. The EH domain spans about 70 amino acids and shows approximately 60% overall amino acid conservation. We demonstrated the ability of the EH domain to specifically bind cytosolic proteins in normal and malignant cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and hematopoietic...

  3. Determinants of antigenicity and specificity in immune response for protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target specific antibodies are pivotal for the design of vaccines, immunodiagnostic tests, studies on proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery, identification of protein-DNA and other interactions, and small and large biochemical assays. Therefore, it is important to understand the properties of protein sequences that are important for antigenicity and to identify small peptide epitopes and large regions in the linear sequence of the proteins whose utilization result in specific antibodies. Results Our analysis using protein properties suggested that sequence composition combined with evolutionary information and predicted secondary structure, as well as solvent accessibility is sufficient to predict successful peptide epitopes. The antigenicity and the specificity in immune response were also found to depend on the epitope length. We trained the B-Cell Epitope Oracle (BEOracle, a support vector machine (SVM classifier, for the identification of continuous B-Cell epitopes with these protein properties as learning features. The BEOracle achieved an F1-measure of 81.37% on a large validation set. The BEOracle classifier outperformed the classical methods based on propensity and sophisticated methods like BCPred and Bepipred for B-Cell epitope prediction. The BEOracle classifier also identified peptides for the ChIP-grade antibodies from the modENCODE/ENCODE projects with 96.88% accuracy. High BEOracle score for peptides showed some correlation with the antibody intensity on Immunofluorescence studies done on fly embryos. Finally, a second SVM classifier, the B-Cell Region Oracle (BROracle was trained with the BEOracle scores as features to predict the performance of antibodies generated with large protein regions with high accuracy. The BROracle classifier achieved accuracies of 75.26-63.88% on a validation set with immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, protein arrays and western blot results from Protein Atlas database

  4. SPEER-SERVER: a web server for prediction of protein specificity determining sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mandloi, Sapan; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Panchenko, Anna R; Chakrabarti, Saikat

    2012-07-01

    Sites that show specific conservation patterns within subsets of proteins in a protein family are likely to be involved in the development of functional specificity. These sites, generally termed specificity determining sites (SDS), might play a crucial role in binding to a specific substrate or proteins. Identification of SDS through experimental techniques is a slow, difficult and tedious job. Hence, it is very important to develop efficient computational methods that can more expediently identify SDS. Herein, we present Specificity prediction using amino acids' Properties, Entropy and Evolution Rate (SPEER)-SERVER, a web server that predicts SDS by analyzing quantitative measures of the conservation patterns of protein sites based on their physico-chemical properties and the heterogeneity of evolutionary changes between and within the protein subfamilies. This web server provides an improved representation of results, adds useful input and output options and integrates a wide range of analysis and data visualization tools when compared with the original standalone version of the SPEER algorithm. Extensive benchmarking finds that SPEER-SERVER exhibits sensitivity and precision performance that, on average, meets or exceeds that of other currently available methods. SPEER-SERVER is available at http://www.hpppi.iicb.res.in/ss/.

  5. New proteins identified in epididymal fluid from the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Francoise; Labas, Valerie; Ecroyd, Heath; Nixon, Brett; Jones, Russell C

    2009-01-01

    The platypus epididymal proteome is being studied because epididymal proteins are essential for male fertility in mammals and it is considered that knowledge of the epididymal proteome in an early mammal would be informative in assessing the convergence and divergence of proteins that are important in the function of the mammalian epididymis. Few of the epididymal proteins that have been identified in eutherian mammals were found in platypus caudal epididymal fluid, and the major epididymal proteins in the platypus (PXN-FBPL, SPARC and E-OR20) have never been identified in the epididymis of any other mammal.

  6. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  7. Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other γ- or β-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

  8. Cell-Surface Proteomics Identifies Lineage-Specific Markers of Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rugg-Gunn, Peter J.; Cox, Brian J.; Lanner, Fredrik; Sharma, Parveen; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; McDonald, Angela C.H.; Garner, Jodi; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Rossant, Janet; Kislinger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary The advent of reprogramming and its impact on stem cell biology has renewed interest in lineage restriction in mammalian embryos, the source of embryonic (ES), epiblast (EpiSC), trophoblast (TS), and extraembryonic endoderm (XEN) stem cell lineages. Isolation of specific cell types during stem cell differentiation and reprogramming, and also directly from embryos, is a major technical challenge because few cell-surface proteins are known that can distinguish each cell type. We provide...

  9. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins\\/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and\\/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i) homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii) targets of known drugs, but are (iii) not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under \\'change-of-application\\' patents.

  10. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii targets of known drugs, but are (iii not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under 'change-of-application' patents.

  11. Identifying and engineering promoters for high level and sustainable therapeutic recombinant protein production in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven C L; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-08-01

    Promoters are essential on plasmid vectors to initiate transcription of the transgenes when generating therapeutic recombinant proteins expressing mammalian cell lines. High and sustained levels of gene expression are desired during therapeutic protein production while gene expression is useful for cell engineering. As many finely controlled promoters exhibit cell and product specificity, new promoters need to be identified, optimized and carefully evaluated before use. Suitable promoters can be identified using techniques ranging from simple molecular biology methods to modern high-throughput omics screenings. Promoter engineering is often required after identification to either obtain high and sustained expression or to provide a wider range of gene expression. This review discusses some of the available methods to identify and engineer promoters for therapeutic recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

  12. Gene-expression Analysis Identifies Specific Patterns of Dysregulated Molecular Pathways and Genetic Subgroups of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Holger G; Vogel, Ulrich; Scheurlen, Michael; Jobst, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma comprises of a group of heterogeneous tumors of different etiologies. The multistep process of liver carcinogenesis involves various genetic and phenotypic alterations. The molecular pathways and driver mutations involved are still under investigation. DNA micorarray technology was used to identify differentially expressed genes between human hepatocarcinoma and non-tumorous liver tissues to establish a unique specific gene-expression profile independent of the underlying liver disease. The validity of this global gene-expression profile was tested for its robustness against biopsies from other liver entities (cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver) by diagnosing HCC in blinded samples. Most of the consistently and strongly overexpressed genes were related to cell-cycle regulation and DNA replication [27 genes, e.g. cyclin B1, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDC2)], G-protein depending signaling [e.g. Rac GTPase activating protein 1 (RACGAP1), Rab GTPase YPT1 homolog (RAB1), and ADP-ribosylation factor-like 2 (ARL2)] and extracellular matrix re-modelling or cytoskeleton structure [22 genes, e.g. serine proteinase inhibitor 1 kazal-type (SPINK1), osteopontin (OPN), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), collagen type 1 alpha2 (COL1A2), integrin alpha6 (ITGA6), and metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12)]. Furthermore, significantly differentially expressed genes (e.g. calcium-binding proteins, G-proteins, oncofetal proteins) in relation to tumor differentiation were detected using gene-expression analysis. It is suggested that these significantly dysregulated genes are highly specific and potentially utilizable as prognostic markers and may lead to a better understanding of human hepatocarcinogenesis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  14. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with a cellular membrane [3,4]. The initial binding of dengue virus to target cells is mediated by binding of the envelope protein to a specific and unidentified cell surface receptor(s) [5]. Viral interaction with its targets observed by electron microscopy has been already reported. [6]. The structure of the ectodomain of DEN-2E.

  15. Coexpression networks identify brain region-specific enhancer RNAs in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pu; Lin, Peijie; Gokoolparsadh, Akira; Assareh, Amelia; Thang, Mike W C; Voineagu, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Despite major progress in identifying enhancer regions on a genome-wide scale, the majority of available data are limited to model organisms and human transformed cell lines. We have identified a robust set of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) expressed in the human brain and constructed networks assessing eRNA-gene coexpression interactions across human fetal brain and multiple adult brain regions. Our data identify brain region-specific eRNAs and show that enhancer regions expressing eRNAs are enriched for genetic variants associated with autism spectrum disorders.

  16. Tantalus, a novel ASX-interacting protein with tissue-specific functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, B H; Moore, J; Kyba, M; dosSantos, G; McCloskey, F; Milne, T A; Brock, H W; Krause, H M

    2001-06-15

    The Drosophila trithorax- and Polycomb-group (trxG and PcG) proteins maintain activated and repressed transcriptional states at specific target gene loci. The Additional sex combs (Asx) gene is of particular interest as it appears to function in both protein complexes and yet its effects on target genes are more restricted. A novel protein, Tantalus (TAN), was identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen for ASX-interacting proteins that might confer tissue-specific ASX functions. TAN contains consensus nuclear localization sites and binds DNA in vitro. However, its subcellular localization varies in a tissue-specific fashion. In salivary glands, TAN is predominantly nuclear and associates with 66 euchromatic sites on polytene chromosomes, more than half of which overlap with ASX. These loci do not include the homeotic genes of the ANT and BX complexes bound by other PcG and trxG proteins. Rather, tan mutant defects are restricted to sensory organs. We show that one of these defects, shared by Asx, is genetically enhanced by Asx. Taken together, the data suggest that TAN is a tissue-specific cofactor for ASX, and that its activity may be partially controlled by subcellular trafficking. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPARγ as an exosome-associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPARγ as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  18. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R F; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; Van Gassen, Koen L I; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; De Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia,

  19. B56delta-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houge, G.; Haesen, D.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Mehta, S.; Parker, M.J.; Wright, M.; Vogt, J.; McKee, S.; Tolmie, J.L.; Cordeiro, N.; Kleefstra, T.; Willemsen, M.H.; Reijnders, M.R.F.; Berland, S.; Hayman, E.; Lahat, E.; Brilstra, E.H.; Gassen, K.L. van; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, E.; Bie, C.I. De; Hoischen, A.; Eichler, E.E.; Holdhus, R.; Steen, V.M.; Doskeland, S.O.; Hurles, M.E.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Janssens, V.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia,

  20. Identifying Neurofibromin-Specific Regulatory Nodes for Therapeutic Targeting in NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    analysis and electron microscopy, as shown in Figure 9. Figure 9. Biophysical characterization of recombinant , full length neurofibromin. Left panel...libraries targeting cancer specific genetic alterations; ii) Identify recurrently mutated genes that regulate oncogenic pathways and drug responses...iii) Produce genetic interaction maps to uncover pathway relationships between candidate drivers. Overlap: None Funding Number: N/A PI

  1. Saporin-conjugated tetramers identify efficacious anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitman, Ellen M.; Palmer, Christine D.; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-cells are highly variable, spanning potent antiviral efficacy and damaging auto-reactivity. In virus infections, identifying the most efficacious responses is critical to vaccine design. However, current methods depend on indirect measures or on ex vivo expanded CTL clones. We...

  2. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  3. Evolutionary and molecular analysis of Dof transcription factors identified a conserved motif for intercellular protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Ahmad, Munawar; Rim, Yeonggil; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2013-06-01

    · Cell-to-cell trafficking of transcription factors (TFs) has been shown to play an important role in the regulation of plant developmental events, but the evolutionary relationship between cell-autonomous and noncell-autonomous (NCA) TFs remains elusive. · AtDof4.1, named INTERCELLULAR TRAFFICKING DOF 1 (ITD1), was chosen as a representative NCA member to explore this evolutionary relationship. Using domain structure-function analyses and swapping studies, we examined the cell-to-cell trafficking of plant-specific Dof TF family members across Arabidopsis and other species. · We identified a conserved intercellular trafficking motif (ITM) that is necessary and sufficient for selective cell-to-cell trafficking and can impart gain-of-function cell-to-cell movement capacity to an otherwise cell-autonomous TF. The functionality of related motifs from Dof members across the plant kingdom extended, surprisingly, to a unicellular alga that lacked plasmodesmata. By contrast, the algal homeodomain related to the NCA KNOX homeodomain was either inefficient or unable to impart such cell-to-cell movement function. · The Dof ITM appears to predate the evolution of selective plasmodesmal trafficking in the plant kingdom, which may well have acted as a molecular template for the evolution of Dof proteins as NCA TFs. However, the ability to efficiently traffic for KNOX homeodomain (HD) proteins may have been acquired during the evolution of early nonvascular plants. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  5. Are men difficult to find? Identifying male-specific studies in MEDLINE and Embase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Fiona; Fraser, Cynthia; Robertson, Clare; Avenell, Alison; Archibald, Daryll; Douglas, Flora; Hoddinott, Pat; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Boyers, Dwayne

    2014-07-18

    Systematic reviews often investigate the effectiveness of interventions for one sex. However, identifying interventions with data presented according to the sex of study participants can be challenging due to suboptimal indexing in bibliographic databases and poor reporting in titles and abstracts. The purposes of this study were to develop a highly sensitive search filter to identify literature relevant to men's health and to assess the performance of a range of sex-specific search terms used individually and in various combinations. Comprehensive electronic searches were undertaken across a range of databases to inform a series of systematic reviews investigating obesity management for men. The included studies formed a reference standard set. A set of sex-specific search terms, identified from database-specific controlled vocabularies and from natural language used in the titles and abstracts of relevant papers, was investigated in MEDLINE and Embase. Sensitivity, precision, number needed to read (NNR) and percent reduction in results compared to searching without sex-specific terms were calculated. The reference standard set comprised 57 papers in MEDLINE and 63 in Embase. Seven sex-specific search terms were identified. Searching without sex-specific terms returned 31,897 results in MEDLINE and 37,351 in Embase and identified 84% (MEDLINE) and 83% (Embase) of the reference standard sets. The best performing individual sex-specific term achieved 100%/98% sensitivity (MEDLINE/Embase), NNR 544/609 (MEDLINE/Embase) and reduced the number of results by 18%/17% (MEDLINE/Embase), relative to searching without sex-specific terms. The best performing filter, compromising different combinations of controlled vocabulary terms and natural language, achieved higher sensitivity (MEDLINE and Embase 100%), greater reduction in number of results (MEDLINE/Embase 24%/20%) and greater reduction in NNR (MEDLINE/Embase 506/578) than the best performing individual sex-specific term

  6. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  7. Telomere capping proteins are structurally related to RPA with an additional telomere-specific domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, Amy D; Paschini, Margherita; Reyes, Francis E; Héroux, Annie; Batey, Robert T; Lundblad, Victoria; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2009-11-17

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  8. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  9. Rapid identification of novel immunodominant proteins and characterization of a specific linear epitope of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hoppe

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium's pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is

  10. Mem-ADSVM: A two-layer multi-label predictor for identifying multi-functional types of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shibiao; Mak, Man-Wai; Kung, Sun-Yuan

    2016-06-07

    Identifying membrane proteins and their multi-functional types is an indispensable yet challenging topic in proteomics and bioinformatics. However, most of the existing membrane-protein predictors have the following problems: (1) they do not predict whether a given protein is a membrane protein or not; (2) they are limited to predicting membrane proteins with single-label functional types but ignore those with multi-functional types; and (3) there is still much room for improvement for their performance. To address these problems, this paper proposes a two-layer multi-label predictor, namely Mem-ADSVM, which can identify membrane proteins (Layer I) and their multi-functional types (Layer II). Specifically, given a query protein, its associated gene ontology (GO) information is retrieved by searching a compact GO-term database with its homologous accession number. Subsequently, the GO information is classified by a binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier to determine whether it is a membrane protein or not. If yes, it will be further classified by a multi-label multi-class SVM classifier equipped with an adaptive-decision (AD) scheme to determine to which functional type(s) it belongs. Experimental results show that Mem-ADSVM significantly outperforms state-of-the-art predictors in terms of identifying both membrane proteins and their multi-functional types. This paper also suggests that the two-layer prediction architecture is better than the one-layer for prediction performance. For reader׳s convenience, the Mem-ADSVM server is available online at http://bioinfo.eie.polyu.edu.hk/MemADSVMServer/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissue specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins isolated from rat liver, heart muscle, and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Steffen; León, Ileana R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS on isolated mitochondria to investigate the tissue-specific mitochondrial phosphoproteomes of rat liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. In total, we identified 899 phosphorylation sites in 354 different mitochondrial proteins including......Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in a variety of biological processes is increasingly being recognized and may contribute to the differences in function and energy demands observed in mitochondria from different tissues such as liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. Here, we used a combination...

  12. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of PR-1-Like Proteins Identified from the Wheat Head Blight Fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Edwards, Michael C

    2018-04-01

    The group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins originally identified from plants and their homologs are also found in other eukaryotic kingdoms. Studies on nonplant PR-1-like (PR-1L) proteins have been pursued widely in humans and animals but rarely in filamentous ascomycetes. Here, we report the characterization of four PR-1L proteins identified from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight of wheat and barley (designated FgPR-1L). Molecular cloning revealed that the four FgPR-1L proteins are all encoded by small open reading frames (612 to 909 bp) that are often interrupted by introns, in contrast to plant PR-1 genes that lack introns. Sequence analysis indicated that all FgPR-1L proteins contain the PR-1-specific three-dimensional structure, and one of them features a C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain that has not been reported for any stand-alone PR-1 proteins. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the four FgPR-1L genes are expressed in axenic cultures and in planta with different spatial or temporal expression patterns. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that fungal PR-1L proteins fall into three major groups, one of which harbors FgPR-1L-2-related TM-containing proteins from both phytopathogenic and human-pathogenic ascomycetes. Low-temperature sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and proteolytic assays indicated that the recombinant FgPR-1L-4 protein exists as a monomer and is resistant to subtilisin of the serine protease family. Functional analysis confirmed that deletion of the FgPR-1L-4 gene from the fungal genome results in significantly reduced virulence on susceptible wheat. This study provides the first example that the F. graminearum-wheat interaction involves a pathogen-derived PR-1L protein that affects fungal virulence on the host.

  13. A Novel Feature Extraction Method with Feature Selection to Identify Golgi-Resident Protein Types from Imbalanced Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2016-02-06

    The Golgi Apparatus (GA) is a major collection and dispatch station for numerous proteins destined for secretion, plasma membranes and lysosomes. The dysfunction of GA proteins can result in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, accurate identification of protein subGolgi localizations may assist in drug development and understanding the mechanisms of the GA involved in various cellular processes. In this paper, a new computational method is proposed for identifying cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Based on the concept of Common Spatial Patterns (CSP), a novel feature extraction technique is developed to extract evolutionary information from protein sequences. To deal with the imbalanced benchmark dataset, the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique (SMOTE) is adopted. A feature selection method called Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) is employed to search the optimal features from the CSP based features and g-gap dipeptide composition. Based on the optimal features, a Random Forest (RF) module is used to distinguish cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Through the jackknife cross-validation, the proposed method achieves a promising performance with a sensitivity of 0.889, a specificity of 0.880, an accuracy of 0.885, and a Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.765, which remarkably outperforms previous methods. Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves a significantly improved performance. These results highlight the promising performance of the proposed method to identify Golgi-resident protein types. Furthermore, the CSP based feature extraction method may provide guidelines for protein function predictions.

  14. The germ cell nuclear proteins hnRNP G-T and RBMY activate a testis-specific exon.

    OpenAIRE

    Yilei Liu; Cyril F Bourgeois; Shaochen Pang; Marek Kudla; Natacha Dreumont; Liliane Kister; Yong-Hua Sun; James Stevenin; David J Elliott

    2009-01-01

    The human testis has almost as high a frequency of alternative splicing events as brain. While not as extensively studied as brain, a few candidate testis-specific splicing regulator proteins have been identified, including the nuclear RNA binding proteins RBMY and hnRNP G-T, which are germ cell-specific versions of the somatically expressed hnRNP G protein and are highly conserved in mammals. The splicing activator protein Tra2beta is also highly expressed in the testis and physically intera...

  15. Strong seed-specific protein expression from the Vigna radiata storage protein 8SGα promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo-Xian; Zheng, Shu-Xiao; Yang, Yue-Ning; Xu, Chao; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong; Chye, Mee-Len; Li, Hong-Ye

    2014-03-20

    Vigna radiata (mung bean) is an important crop plant and is a major protein source in developing countries. Mung bean 8S globulins constitute nearly 90% of total seed storage protein and consist of three subunits designated as 8SGα, 8SGα' and 8SGβ. The 5'-flanking sequences of 8SGα' has been reported to confer high expression in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. In this study, a 472-bp 5'-flanking sequence of 8SGα was identified by genome walking. Computational analysis subsequently revealed the presence of numerous putative seed-specific cis-elements within. The 8SGα promoter was then fused to the gene encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) to create a reporter construct for Arabidopsis thaliana transformation. The spatial and temporal expression of 8SGα∷GUS, as investigated using GUS histochemical assays, showed GUS expression exclusively in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Quantitative GUS assays revealed that the 8SGα promoter showed 2- to 4-fold higher activity than the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. This study has identified a seed-specific promoter of high promoter strength, which is potentially useful for directing foreign protein expression in seed bioreactors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel data mining method to identify assay-specific signatures in functional genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidarelli Jack W

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The highly dimensional data produced by functional genomic (FG studies makes it difficult to visualize relationships between gene products and experimental conditions (i.e., assays. Although dimensionality reduction methods such as principal component analysis (PCA have been very useful, their application to identify assay-specific signatures has been limited by the lack of appropriate methodologies. This article proposes a new and powerful PCA-based method for the identification of assay-specific gene signatures in FG studies. Results: The proposed method (PM is unique for several reasons. First, it is the only one, to our knowledge, that uses gene contribution, a product of the loading and expression level, to obtain assay signatures. The PM develops and exploits two types of assay-specific contribution plots, which are new to the application of PCA in the FG area. The first type plots the assay-specific gene contribution against the given order of the genes and reveals variations in distribution between assay-specific gene signatures as well as outliers within assay groups indicating the degree of importance of the most dominant genes. The second type plots the contribution of each gene in ascending or descending order against a constantly increasing index. This type of plots reveals assay-specific gene signatures defined by the inflection points in the curve. In addition, sharp regions within the signature define the genes that contribute the most to the signature. We proposed and used the curvature as an appropriate metric to characterize these sharp regions, thus identifying the subset of genes contributing the most to the signature. Finally, the PM uses the full dataset to determine the final gene signature, thus eliminating the chance of gene exclusion by poor screening in earlier steps. The strengths of the PM are demonstrated using a simulation study, and two studies of real DNA microarray data – a study of

  17. A rapid and specific derivatization procedure to identify acyl-glucuronides by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Alfin D N; Wang, Wei Wei; Bessire, Andrew J; Sharma, Raman; Hagen, Anne E

    2010-07-30

    A simple procedure is described to identify acyl-glucuronides by coupled liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry after derivatization to a hydroxamic acid with hydroxylamine. The reaction specificity obviates the need for isolation of the acyl-glucuronide from an extract. Glucuronides derived from carbamic acids, and alkyl- and aromatic amines, are inert to the derivatization reaction conditions, making the hydroxamic acid derivative a fingerprint for acyl-glucuronides. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoashi, Toshihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Passeron, Thierry; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are organelles specialized for the production of melanin pigment and are specifically produced by melanocytic cells. More than 150 pigmentation-related genes have been identified, including glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB). A recent proteomics analysis revealed that GPNMB is localized in melanosomes, and GPNMB is a membrane-bound glycoprotein that shows high homology with a well-known melanosomal structural protein, Pmel17/gp100. In this study, we show that GPNMB is expressed in melanocytes of normal human skin, as well as in human melanoma cells. GPNMB is heavily glycosylated and is enriched in mature (stage III and IV) melanosomes in contrast to MART-1 and Pmel17, which are abundant in early (stage I and II) melanosomes. MART-1 and Pmel17 play critical roles in the maturation of early melanosomes; thus, we speculate that GPNMB might be important in the functions of late melanosomes, possibly their transport and/or transfer to keratinocytes. We also demonstrate that a secreted form of GPNMB is released by ectodomain shedding from the largely Golgi-modified form of GPNMB and that the PKC and Ca2+ intracellular signaling pathways regulate that shedding. We conclude that GPNMB is a melanosomal protein that is released by proteolytic ectodomain shedding and might be a useful and specific histological marker of melanocytic cells.—Hoashi, T., Sato, S., Yamaguchi, Y., Passeron, T., Tamaki, K., Hearing, V. J. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein. PMID:20056711

  19. Specificity of ATP-dependent and GTP-dependent protein kinases with respect to ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Kiefer, M C; Traut, R R

    1975-01-01

    Two protein kinases differing in substrate specificity were used to phosphorylate the 30-S and the 50-S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli. The catalytic subunit from the rabbit skeletal muscle protein kinase phosphorylates proteins S1, S4, S9, S13 and S18 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2,...

  20. Proteomics strategy for identifying candidate bioactive proteins in complex mixtures: application to the platelet releasate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Roisin

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic approaches have proven powerful at identifying large numbers of proteins, but there are fewer reports of functional characterization of proteins in biological tissues. Here, we describe an experimental approach that fractionates proteins released from human platelets, linking bioassay activity to identity. We used consecutive orthogonal separation platforms to ensure sensitive detection: (a) ion-exchange of intact proteins, (b) SDS-PAGE separation of ion-exchange fractions and (c) HPLC separation of tryptic digests coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Migration of THP-1 monocytes in response to complete or fractionated platelet releasate was assessed and located to just one of the forty-nine ion-exchange fractions. Over 300 proteins were identified in the releasate, with a wide range of annotated biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular platelet activation, adhesion, and wound healing. The presence of PEDF and involucrin, two proteins not previously reported in platelet releasate, was confirmed by western blotting. Proteins identified within the fraction with monocyte promigratory activity and not in other inactive fractions included vimentin, PEDF, and TIMP-1. We conclude that this analytical platform is effective for the characterization of complex bioactive samples.

  1. A set of descriptors for identifying the protein-drug interaction in cellular networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra; Brahnam, Sheryl

    2014-10-21

    The study of protein-drug interactions is a significant issue for drug development. Unfortunately, it is both expensive and time-consuming to perform physical experiments to determine whether a drug and a protein are interacting with each other. Some previous attempts to design an automated system to perform this task were based on the knowledge of the 3D structure of a protein, which is not always available in practice. With the availability of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, however, a sequence-based solution to deal with this problem is necessary. Following other works in this area, we propose a new machine learning system based on several protein descriptors extracted from several protein representations, such as, variants of the position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) of proteins, the amino-acid sequence, and a matrix representation of a protein. The prediction engine is operated by an ensemble of support vector machines (SVMs), with each SVM trained on a specific descriptor and the results of each SVM combined by sum rule. The overall success rate achieved by our final ensemble is notably higher than previous results obtained on the same datasets using the same testing protocols reported in the literature. MATLAB code and the datasets used in our experiments are freely available for future comparison at http://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Integrated Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Approach Identifies New BH3-Only Protein Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Robert G; Chen, Yuzhong; Riz, Irene; Zeng, Chen

    2012-05-04

    In this study, we utilized an integrated bioinformatics and computational biology approach in search of new BH3-only proteins belonging to the BCL2 family of apoptotic regulators. The BH3 (BCL2 homology 3) domain mediates specific binding interactions among various BCL2 family members. It is composed of an amphipathic α-helical region of approximately 13 residues that has only a few amino acids that are highly conserved across all members. Using a generalized motif, we performed a genome-wide search for novel BH3-containing proteins in the NCBI Consensus Coding Sequence (CCDS) database. In addition to known pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins, 197 proteins were recovered that satisfied the search criteria. These were categorized according to α-helical content and predictive binding to BCL-xL (encoded by BCL2L1) and MCL-1, two representative anti-apoptotic BCL2 family members, using position-specific scoring matrix models. Notably, the list is enriched for proteins associated with autophagy as well as a broad spectrum of cellular stress responses such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, antiviral defense, and the DNA damage response. Several potential novel BH3-containing proteins are highlighted. In particular, the analysis strongly suggests that the apoptosis inhibitor and DNA damage response regulator, AVEN, which was originally isolated as a BCL-xL-interacting protein, is a functional BH3-only protein representing a distinct subclass of BCL2 family members.

  3. Comparative transcriptional profiling of the axolotl limb identifies a tripartite regeneration-specific gene program.

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    Dunja Knapp

    Full Text Available Understanding how the limb blastema is established after the initial wound healing response is an important aspect of regeneration research. Here we performed parallel expression profile time courses of healing lateral wounds versus amputated limbs in axolotl. This comparison between wound healing and regeneration allowed us to identify amputation-specific genes. By clustering the expression profiles of these samples, we could detect three distinguishable phases of gene expression - early wound healing followed by a transition-phase leading to establishment of the limb development program, which correspond to the three phases of limb regeneration that had been defined by morphological criteria. By focusing on the transition-phase, we identified 93 strictly amputation-associated genes many of which are implicated in oxidative-stress response, chromatin modification, epithelial development or limb development. We further classified the genes based on whether they were or were not significantly expressed in the developing limb bud. The specific localization of 53 selected candidates within the blastema was investigated by in situ hybridization. In summary, we identified a set of genes that are expressed specifically during regeneration and are therefore, likely candidates for the regulation of blastema formation.

  4. Serum proteomic analysis identifies sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism and inflammation profiles in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome.

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    Steeb, Hannah; Ramsey, Jordan M; Guest, Paul C; Stocki, Pawel; Cooper, Jason D; Rahmoune, Hassan; Ingudomnukul, Erin; Auyeung, Bonnie; Ruta, Liliana; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Bahn, Sabine

    2014-01-27

    The higher prevalence of Asperger Syndrome (AS) and other autism spectrum conditions in males has been known for many years. However, recent multiplex immunoassay profiling studies have shown that males and females with AS have distinct proteomic changes in serum. Here, we analysed sera from adults diagnosed with AS (males = 14, females = 16) and controls (males = 13, females = 16) not on medication at the time of sample collection, using a combination of multiplex immunoassay and shotgun label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MSE). The main objective was to identify sex-specific serum protein changes associated with AS. Multiplex immunoassay profiling led to identification of 16 proteins that were significantly altered in AS individuals in a sex-specific manner. Three of these proteins were altered in females (ADIPO, IgA, APOA1), seven were changed in males (BMP6, CTGF, ICAM1, IL-12p70, IL-16, TF, TNF-alpha) and six were changed in both sexes but in opposite directions (CHGA, EPO, IL-3, TENA, PAP, SHBG). Shotgun LC-MSE profiling led to identification of 13 serum proteins which had significant sex-specific changes in the AS group and, of these, 12 were altered in females (APOC2, APOE, ARMC3, CLC4K, FETUB, GLCE, MRRP1, PTPA, RN149, TLE1, TRIPB, ZC3HE) and one protein was altered in males (RGPD4). The free androgen index in females with AS showed an increased ratio of 1.63 compared to controls. Taken together, the serum multiplex immunoassay and shotgun LC-MSE profiling results indicate that adult females with AS had alterations in proteins involved mostly in lipid transport and metabolism pathways, while adult males with AS showed changes predominantly in inflammation signalling. These results provide further evidence that the search for biomarkers or novel drug targets in AS may require stratification into male and female subgroups, and could lead to the development of novel targeted treatment approaches.

  5. Serum proteomic analysis identifies sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism and inflammation profiles in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The higher prevalence of Asperger Syndrome (AS) and other autism spectrum conditions in males has been known for many years. However, recent multiplex immunoassay profiling studies have shown that males and females with AS have distinct proteomic changes in serum. Methods Here, we analysed sera from adults diagnosed with AS (males = 14, females = 16) and controls (males = 13, females = 16) not on medication at the time of sample collection, using a combination of multiplex immunoassay and shotgun label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MSE). The main objective was to identify sex-specific serum protein changes associated with AS. Results Multiplex immunoassay profiling led to identification of 16 proteins that were significantly altered in AS individuals in a sex-specific manner. Three of these proteins were altered in females (ADIPO, IgA, APOA1), seven were changed in males (BMP6, CTGF, ICAM1, IL-12p70, IL-16, TF, TNF-alpha) and six were changed in both sexes but in opposite directions (CHGA, EPO, IL-3, TENA, PAP, SHBG). Shotgun LC-MSE profiling led to identification of 13 serum proteins which had significant sex-specific changes in the AS group and, of these, 12 were altered in females (APOC2, APOE, ARMC3, CLC4K, FETUB, GLCE, MRRP1, PTPA, RN149, TLE1, TRIPB, ZC3HE) and one protein was altered in males (RGPD4). The free androgen index in females with AS showed an increased ratio of 1.63 compared to controls. Conclusion Taken together, the serum multiplex immunoassay and shotgun LC-MSE profiling results indicate that adult females with AS had alterations in proteins involved mostly in lipid transport and metabolism pathways, while adult males with AS showed changes predominantly in inflammation signalling. These results provide further evidence that the search for biomarkers or novel drug targets in AS may require stratification into male and female subgroups, and could lead to the development of novel targeted treatment

  6. msiDBN: A Method of Identifying Critical Proteins in Dynamic PPI Networks

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    Yuan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of protein-protein interactions (PPIs reveals the recondite principles of biological processes inside a cell. Shown in a wealth of study, just a small group of proteins, rather than the majority, play more essential roles at crucial points of biological processes. This present work focuses on identifying these critical proteins exhibiting dramatic structural changes in dynamic PPI networks. First, a comprehensive way of modeling the dynamic PPIs is presented which simultaneously analyzes the activity of proteins and assembles the dynamic coregulation correlation between proteins at each time point. Second, a novel method is proposed, named msiDBN, which models a common representation of multiple PPI networks using a deep belief network framework and analyzes the reconstruction errors and the variabilities across the time courses in the biological process. Experiments were implemented on data of yeast cell cycles. We evaluated our network construction method by comparing the functional representations of the derived networks with two other traditional construction methods. The ranking results of critical proteins in msiDBN were compared with the results from the baseline methods. The results of comparison showed that msiDBN had better reconstruction rate and identified more proteins of critical value to yeast cell cycle process.

  7. Identifying protein complex by integrating characteristic of core-attachment into dynamic PPI network.

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    Xianjun Shen

    Full Text Available How to identify protein complex is an important and challenging task in proteomics. It would make great contribution to our knowledge of molecular mechanism in cell life activities. However, the inherent organization and dynamic characteristic of cell system have rarely been incorporated into the existing algorithms for detecting protein complexes because of the limitation of protein-protein interaction (PPI data produced by high throughput techniques. The availability of time course gene expression profile enables us to uncover the dynamics of molecular networks and improve the detection of protein complexes. In order to achieve this goal, this paper proposes a novel algorithm DCA (Dynamic Core-Attachment. It detects protein-complex core comprising of continually expressed and highly connected proteins in dynamic PPI network, and then the protein complex is formed by including the attachments with high adhesion into the core. The integration of core-attachment feature into the dynamic PPI network is responsible for the superiority of our algorithm. DCA has been applied on two different yeast dynamic PPI networks and the experimental results show that it performs significantly better than the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of prediction accuracy, hF-measure and statistical significance in biology. In addition, the identified complexes with strong biological significance provide potential candidate complexes for biologists to validate.

  8. "Identify-to-reject": a specific strategy to avoid false memories in the DRM paradigm.

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    Carneiro, Paula; Fernandez, Angel; Diez, Emiliano; Garcia-Marques, Leonel; Ramos, Tânia; Ferreira, Mário B

    2012-02-01

    Previous research using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm has shown that lists of associates in which the critical words were easily identified as the themes of the lists produce lower levels of false memories in adults. In an attempt to analyze whether this effect is due to the application of a specific memory-editing process (the identify-to-reject strategy), two experiments manipulated variables that are likely to disrupt this strategy either at encoding or at retrieval. In Experiment 1, lists were presented at a very fast presentation rate to reduce the possibility of identifying the missing critical word as the theme of the list, and in Experiment 2, participants were pressed to give yes/no recognition answers within a very short time. The results showed that both of these manipulations disrupted the identifiability effect, indicating that the identify-to-reject strategy and theme identifiability play a major role in the rejection of false memories in the DRM paradigm.

  9. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-10-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron-specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron-specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a(-/-)) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep.

  10. A systems biology strategy to identify molecular mechanisms of action and protein indicators of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chenggang; Boutté, Angela; Yu, Xueping; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feala, Jacob D; Schmid, Kara; Dave, Jitendra; Tawa, Gregory J; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2015-02-01

    The multifactorial nature of traumatic brain injury (TBI), especially the complex secondary tissue injury involving intertwined networks of molecular pathways that mediate cellular behavior, has confounded attempts to elucidate the pathology underlying the progression of TBI. Here, systems biology strategies are exploited to identify novel molecular mechanisms and protein indicators of brain injury. To this end, we performed a meta-analysis of four distinct high-throughput gene expression studies involving different animal models of TBI. By using canonical pathways and a large human protein-interaction network as a scaffold, we separately overlaid the gene expression data from each study to identify molecular signatures that were conserved across the different studies. At 24 hr after injury, the significantly activated molecular signatures were nonspecific to TBI, whereas the significantly suppressed molecular signatures were specific to the nervous system. In particular, we identified a suppressed subnetwork consisting of 58 highly interacting, coregulated proteins associated with synaptic function. We selected three proteins from this subnetwork, postsynaptic density protein 95, nitric oxide synthase 1, and disrupted in schizophrenia 1, and hypothesized that their abundance would be significantly reduced after TBI. In a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury rat model of severe TBI, Western blot analysis confirmed our hypothesis. In addition, our analysis recovered 12 previously identified protein biomarkers of TBI. The results suggest that systems biology may provide an efficient, high-yield approach to generate testable hypotheses that can be experimentally validated to identify novel mechanisms of action and molecular indicators of TBI. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

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    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  12. ApoE4-specific Misfolded Intermediate Identified by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

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    Benfeard Williams

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD is associated with the APOE gene, which encodes for three variants of Apolipoprotein E, namely E2, E3, E4, differing only by two amino acids at positions 112 and 158. ApoE4 is known to be the strongest risk factor for AD onset, while ApoE3 and ApoE2 are considered to be the AD-neutral and AD-protective isoforms, respectively. It has been hypothesized that the ApoE isoforms may contribute to the development of AD by modifying the homeostasis of ApoE physiological partners and AD-related proteins in an isoform-specific fashion. Here we find that, despite the high sequence similarity among the three ApoE variants, only ApoE4 exhibits a misfolded intermediate state characterized by isoform-specific domain-domain interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. The existence of an ApoE4-specific intermediate state can contribute to the onset of AD by altering multiple cellular pathways involved in ApoE-dependent lipid transport efficiency or in AD-related protein aggregation and clearance. We present what we believe to be the first structural model of an ApoE4 misfolded intermediate state, which may serve to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ApoE4 in AD pathogenesis. The knowledge of the structure for the ApoE4 folding intermediate provides a new platform for the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies to fight AD.

  13. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

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    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  14. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

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    Qi Liao

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  15. Protein substrates of the arginine methyltransferase Hmt1 identified by proteome arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jason K K; Im, Hogune; Erce, Melissa A; Hart-Smith, Gene; Snyder, Michael P; Wilkins, Marc R

    2016-02-01

    Arginine methylation on nonhistone proteins is associated with a number of cellular processes including RNA splicing, protein localization, and the formation of protein complexes. In this manuscript, Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome arrays carrying 4228 proteins were used with an antimethylarginine antibody to first identify 88 putatively arginine-methylated proteins. By treating the arrays with recombinant arginine methyltransferase Hmt1, 42 proteins were found to be possible substrates of this enzyme. Analysis of the putative arginine-methylated proteins revealed that they were predominantly nuclear or nucleolar in localization, consistent with the localization of Hmt1. Many are involved in known methylarginine-associated functions, such as RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, yet others are of newer classes, namely RNA/DNA helicases and tRNA-associated proteins. Using ex vivo methylation and MS/MS, a set of 12 proteins (Brr1, Dia4, Hts1, Mpp10, Mrd1, Nug1, Prp43, Rpa43, Rrp43, Spp381, Utp4, and Npl3), including the RNA helicase Prp43 and tRNA ligases Dia4 and Hts1, were all validated as Hmt1 substrates. Interestingly, the majority of these also had human orthologs, or family members, that have been documented elsewhere to carry arginine methylation. These results confirm arginine methylation as a widespread modification and Hmt1 as the major arginine methyltransferase in the S. cerevisiae cell. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Trypanosoma equiperdum Low Molecular Weight Proteins As Candidates for Specific Serological Diagnosis of Dourine

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    Mirella Luciani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of dourine can be difficult because the clinical signs of this disease in horses are similar to those of surra, caused by Trypanosoma evansi. Moreover, T. equiperdum and T. evansi are closely related and, so far, they cannot be distinguished using serological tests. In a previous work, the T. equiperdum protein pattern recognized by antibodies from dourine-infected horses and the humoral immune response kinetics were investigated by immunoblotting assay; a total of 20 sera from naturally and experimentally infected horses and from healthy animals were tested. Immunoblotting analysis showed that antibodies from infected horses specifically bind T. equiperdum low molecular weight proteins (from 16 to 35 kDa, which are not recognized by antibodies from uninfected horses. In this work, we tested other 615 sera (7 from naturally infected horses and 608 sera from healthy horses and donkeys: results confirmed the data obtained previously. In addition, six SDS-PAGE bands with molecular weight ranging from 10 to 37 kDa were analyzed by mass spectrometry, in order to identify immunogenic proteins that could be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of dourine. A total of 167 proteins were identified. Among them, 37 were found unique for T. equiperdum. Twenty-four of them could represent possible candidate diagnostic antigens for the development of serological tests specific for T. equiperdum.

  17. Comparative analysis of the heat stable proteome of radicles of Medicago truncatula seeds during germination identifies late embryogenesis abundant proteins associated with desiccation tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudet, J.; Buitink, J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Rogniaux, H.; Larré, C.; Satour, P.; Leprince, O.

    2006-01-01

    A proteomic analysis was performed on the heat stable protein fraction of imbibed radicles of Medicago truncatula seeds to investigate whether proteins can be identified that are specifically linked to desiccation tolerance (DT). Radicles were compared before and after emergence (2.8 mm long) in

  18. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  19. Phage Selection Assisted by Sfp Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Catalyzed Site-Specific Protein Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Zhou, Han; Zhang, Mengnan; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTase) Sfp and AcpS catalyze a highly efficient reaction that conjugates chemical probes of diverse structures to proteins. PPTases have been widely used for site-specific protein labeling and live cell imaging of the target proteins. Here we describe the use of PPTase catalyzed protein labeling in protein engineering by facilitating high throughput phage selection. PMID:25560074

  20. Phage selection assisted by Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase-catalyzed site-specific protein labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Zhou, Han; Zhang, Mengnan; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTase) Sfp and AcpS catalyze a highly efficient reaction that conjugates chemical probes of diverse structures to proteins. PPTases have been widely used for site-specific protein labeling and live cell imaging of the target proteins. Here we describe the use of PPTase-catalyzed protein labeling in protein engineering by facilitating high-throughput phage selection.

  1. Nonnatural amino acids for site-specific protein conjugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Albert J. de; Kooijman, M.; Hennink, W.E.; Mastrobattista, E.

    2009-01-01

    Over the years, several chemical reactions have been developed that enable the covalent conjugation of synthetic molecules to natural proteins. The resulting bioconjugates have become important tools in the study of natural proteins. Furthermore, they form a new class of protein-based

  2. A tissue-specific atlas of mouse protein phosphorylation and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttlin, Edward L; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Elias, Joshua E; Goswami, Tapasree; Rad, Ramin; Beausoleil, Sean A; Villén, Judit; Haas, Wilhelm; Sowa, Mathew E; Gygi, Steven P

    2010-12-23

    Although most tissues in an organism are genetically identical, the biochemistry of each is optimized to fulfill its unique physiological roles, with important consequences for human health and disease. Each tissue's unique physiology requires tightly regulated gene and protein expression coordinated by specialized, phosphorylation-dependent intracellular signaling. To better understand the role of phosphorylation in maintenance of physiological differences among tissues, we performed proteomic and phosphoproteomic characterizations of nine mouse tissues. We identified 12,039 proteins, including 6296 phosphoproteins harboring nearly 36,000 phosphorylation sites. Comparing protein abundances and phosphorylation levels revealed specialized, interconnected phosphorylation networks within each tissue while suggesting that many proteins are regulated by phosphorylation independently of their expression. Our data suggest that the "typical" phosphoprotein is widely expressed yet displays variable, often tissue-specific phosphorylation that tunes protein activity to the specific needs of each tissue. We offer this dataset as an online resource for the biological research community. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

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    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  4. Investigations regarding the lowering of specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process

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    Pakocs Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to decrease the emergence of specific intellectual property risks within the production process as well as increasing risk management performance of IP by preventing them. In order to achieve this, previous studies regarding the main specific intellectual property risks from industrial companies were analyzed together with their managerial methods as well as the possibility of reducing their emergence. As a result of the research conducted were identified five types of intellectual property risks that have a high potential of emergence in the production process, namely: the risk of production of goods in violation of IP rights; the know-how, production knowledge and trade secret disclosure risk; the technological risk of unprotected utility models; the technological risk of unprotected integrated circuits topographies and finally the risk of product counterfeit. In order to achieve the main purpose of our investigation, we have proposed new formulas for estimating the specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process. Their purpose was to minimalize the risk’s negative effects on industrial companies and to increase the managerial performance from the intellectual property domain through a new type of management appropriately named: intellectual property management. The research is finalized with a case study regarding the lapse of rights of a patented invention. Based on a case analysis, it was proved that the exploitation of an invention without a contract represents a counterfeit.

  5. Identifying tagging SNPs for African specific genetic variation from the African Diaspora Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Henry Richard; Hu, Yi-Juan; Gao, Jingjing; O'Connor, Timothy D; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Wojcik, Genevieve L; Gignoux, Christopher R; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Lizee, Antoine; Hansen, Mark; Genuario, Rob; Bullis, Dave; Lawley, Cindy; Kenny, Eimear E; Bustamante, Carlos; Beaty, Terri H; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen C; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2017-04-21

    A primary goal of The Consortium on Asthma among African-ancestry Populations in the Americas (CAAPA) is to develop an 'African Diaspora Power Chip' (ADPC), a genotyping array consisting of tagging SNPs, useful in comprehensively identifying African specific genetic variation. This array is designed based on the novel variation identified in 642 CAAPA samples of African ancestry with high coverage whole genome sequence data (~30× depth). This novel variation extends the pattern of variation catalogued in the 1000 Genomes and Exome Sequencing Projects to a spectrum of populations representing the wide range of West African genomic diversity. These individuals from CAAPA also comprise a large swath of the African Diaspora population and incorporate historical genetic diversity covering nearly the entire Atlantic coast of the Americas. Here we show the results of designing and producing such a microchip array. This novel array covers African specific variation far better than other commercially available arrays, and will enable better GWAS analyses for researchers with individuals of African descent in their study populations. A recent study cataloging variation in continental African populations suggests this type of African-specific genotyping array is both necessary and valuable for facilitating large-scale GWAS in populations of African ancestry.

  6. CRISPRseek: a bioconductor package to identify target-specific guide RNAs for CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua J Zhu

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are a diverse family of RNA-protein complexes in bacteria that target foreign DNA sequences for cleavage. Derivatives of these complexes have been engineered to cleave specific target sequences depending on the sequence of a CRISPR-derived guide RNA (gRNA and the source of the Cas9 protein. Important considerations for the design of gRNAs are to maximize aimed activity at the desired target site while minimizing off-target cleavage. Because of the rapid advances in the understanding of existing CRISPR-Cas9-derived RNA-guided nucleases and the development of novel RNA-guided nuclease systems, it is critical to have computational tools that can accommodate a wide range of different parameters for the design of target-specific RNA-guided nuclease systems. We have developed CRISPRseek, a highly flexible, open source software package to identify gRNAs that target a given input sequence while minimizing off-target cleavage at other sites within any selected genome. CRISPRseek will identify potential gRNAs that target a sequence of interest for CRISPR-Cas9 systems from different bacterial species and generate a cleavage score for potential off-target sequences utilizing published or user-supplied weight matrices with position-specific mismatch penalty scores. Identified gRNAs may be further filtered to only include those that occur in paired orientations for increased specificity and/or those that overlap restriction enzyme sites. For applications where gRNAs are desired to discriminate between two related sequences, CRISPRseek can rank gRNAs based on the difference between predicted cleavage scores in each input sequence. CRISPRseek is implemented as a Bioconductor package within the R statistical programming environment, allowing it to be incorporated into computational pipelines to automate the design of gRNAs for target sequences identified in a wide variety of genome-wide analyses. CRISPRseek is available under the GNU General

  7. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  8. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Wojdyla, Katarzyna Iwona; Davies, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    preparation and chromatography. For the first time MS/MS data analysis utilising diagnostic biotin fragment ions is used to pinpoint sites of biotin labelling and improve the confidence of carbonyl peptide assignments. We identified a total of 125 carbonylated residues in bovine serum albumin after extensive...... at the protein level and help to understand how carbonylation affects protein structure and function. The challenge for future research is to identify the type and nature of oxidised residues to gain a deeper understanding of the mechanism(s) governing carbonylation in cells and organisms and assess their role...

  9. Differentially expressed RNA from public microarray data identifies serum protein biomarkers for cross-organ transplant rejection and other conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Serum proteins are routinely used to diagnose diseases, but are hard to find due to low sensitivity in screening the serum proteome. Public repositories of microarray data, such as the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, contain RNA expression profiles for more than 16,000 biological conditions, covering more than 30% of United States mortality. We hypothesized that genes coding for serum- and urine-detectable proteins, and showing differential expression of RNA in disease-damaged tissues would make ideal diagnostic protein biomarkers for those diseases. We showed that predicted protein biomarkers are significantly enriched for known diagnostic protein biomarkers in 22 diseases, with enrichment significantly higher in diseases for which at least three datasets are available. We then used this strategy to search for new biomarkers indicating acute rejection (AR across different types of transplanted solid organs. We integrated three biopsy-based microarray studies of AR from pediatric renal, adult renal and adult cardiac transplantation and identified 45 genes upregulated in all three. From this set, we chose 10 proteins for serum ELISA assays in 39 renal transplant patients, and discovered three that were significantly higher in AR. Interestingly, all three proteins were also significantly higher during AR in the 63 cardiac transplant recipients studied. Our best marker, serum PECAM1, identified renal AR with 89% sensitivity and 75% specificity, and also showed increased expression in AR by immunohistochemistry in renal, hepatic and cardiac transplant biopsies. Our results demonstrate that integrating gene expression microarray measurements from disease samples and even publicly-available data sets can be a powerful, fast, and cost-effective strategy for the discovery of new diagnostic serum protein biomarkers.

  10. Characterization of the CLASP2 Protein Interaction Network Identifies SOGA1 as a Microtubule-Associated Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Kruse; Krantz, James; Barker, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    and built a CLASP2 protein network in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Using two different commercially available antibodies for CLASP2 and an antibody for epitope-tagged, overexpressed CLASP2, we performed multiple affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments in combination with label-free......, glycogen synthase, and glycogenin. Investigating the SOGA1 interactome confirmed SOGA1 can reciprocal co-IP both CLASP2 and MARK2 as well as glycogen synthase and glycogenin. SOGA1 was confirmed to colocalize with CLASP2 and also with tubulin, which identifies SOGA1 as a new microtubule-associated protein...

  11. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  12. A feedback framework for protein inference with peptides identified from tandem mass spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jinhong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein inference is an important computational step in proteomics. There exists a natural nest relationship between protein inference and peptide identification, but these two steps are usually performed separately in existing methods. We believe that both peptide identification and protein inference can be improved by exploring such nest relationship. Results In this study, a feedback framework is proposed to process peptide identification reports from search engines, and an iterative method is implemented to exemplify the processing of Sequest peptide identification reports according to the framework. The iterative method is verified on two datasets with known validity of proteins and peptides, and compared with ProteinProphet and PeptideProphet. The results have shown that not only can the iterative method infer more true positive and less false positive proteins than ProteinProphet, but also identify more true positive and less false positive peptides than PeptideProphet. Conclusions The proposed iterative method implemented according to the feedback framework can unify and improve the results of peptide identification and protein inference.

  13. WMAXC: a weighted maximum clique method for identifying condition-specific sub-network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayarbaatar Amgalan

    Full Text Available Sub-networks can expose complex patterns in an entire bio-molecular network by extracting interactions that depend on temporal or condition-specific contexts. When genes interact with each other during cellular processes, they may form differential co-expression patterns with other genes across different cell states. The identification of condition-specific sub-networks is of great importance in investigating how a living cell adapts to environmental changes. In this work, we propose the weighted MAXimum clique (WMAXC method to identify a condition-specific sub-network. WMAXC first proposes scoring functions that jointly measure condition-specific changes to both individual genes and gene-gene co-expressions. It then employs a weaker formula of a general maximum clique problem and relates the maximum scored clique of a weighted graph to the optimization of a quadratic objective function under sparsity constraints. We combine a continuous genetic algorithm and a projection procedure to obtain a single optimal sub-network that maximizes the objective function (scoring function over the standard simplex (sparsity constraints. We applied the WMAXC method to both simulated data and real data sets of ovarian and prostate cancer. Compared with previous methods, WMAXC selected a large fraction of cancer-related genes, which were enriched in cancer-related pathways. The results demonstrated that our method efficiently captured a subset of genes relevant under the investigated condition.

  14. Characterization of an aphid-specific, cysteine-rich protein enriched in salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Chen, Jun; Guo, Ya; Cui, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Aphids secrete saliva into the phloem during their infestation of plants. Previous studies have identified numerous saliva proteins, but little is known about the characteristics (physical and chemical) and functions of these proteins in aphid-plant interactions. This study characterized an unknown protein (ACYPI39568) that was predicted to be enriched in the salivary glands of pea aphid. This protein belongs to an aphid-specific, cysteine-rich protein family that contains 14 conserved cysteines. ACYPI39568 is a monomeric globular protein with a high beta strand extent. The binding stoichiometric ratios for Zn(2+) and ACYPI39568 were approximately 3:1 and 1:1 at two binding sites. ACYPI39568 was predominantly expressed in the first instar stage and in the salivary glands. Aphids required more ACYPI39568 when feeding on plants than when feeding on an artificial diet. However, the interference of ACYPI39568 expression did not affect the survival rate of aphids on plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The multi-protein family of sulfotransferases in plants: composition, occurrence, substrate specificity, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Felix; Krause, Florian; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    All members of the sulfotransferase (SOT, EC 2.8.2.-) protein family transfer a sulfuryl group from the donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to an appropriate hydroxyl group of several classes of substrates. The primary structure of these enzymes is characterized by a histidine residue in the active site, defined PAPS binding sites and a longer SOT domain. Proteins with this SOT domain occur in all organisms from all three domains, usually as a multi-protein family. Arabidopsis thaliana SOTs, the best characterized SOT multi-protein family, contains 21 members. The substrates for several plant enzymes have already been identified, such as glucosinolates, brassinosteroids, jasmonates, flavonoids, and salicylic acid. Much information has been gathered on desulfo-glucosinolate (dsGl) SOTs in A. thaliana. The three cytosolic dsGl SOTs show slightly different expression patterns. The recombinant proteins reveal differences in their affinity to indolic and aliphatic dsGls. Also the respective recombinant dsGl SOTs from different A. thaliana ecotypes differ in their kinetic properties. However, determinants of substrate specificity and the exact reaction mechanism still need to be clarified. Probably, the three-dimensional structures of more plant proteins need to be solved to analyze the mode of action and the responsible amino acids for substrate binding. In addition to A. thaliana, more plant species from several families need to be investigated to fully elucidate the diversity of sulfated molecules and the way of biosynthesis catalyzed by SOT enzymes.

  16. vProtein: identifying optimal amino acid complements from plant-based foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Woolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indispensible amino acids (IAAs are used by the body in different proportions. Most animal-based foods provide these IAAs in roughly the needed proportions, but many plant-based foods provide different proportions of IAAs. To explore how these plant-based foods can be better used in human nutrition, we have created the computational tool vProtein to identify optimal food complements to satisfy human protein needs. METHODS: vProtein uses 1251 plant-based foods listed in the United States Department of Agriculture standard release 22 database to determine the quantity of each food or pair of foods required to satisfy human IAA needs as determined by the 2005 daily recommended intake. The quantity of food in a pair is found using a linear programming approach that minimizes total calories, total excess IAAs, or the total weight of the combination. RESULTS: For single foods, vProtein identifies foods with particularly balanced IAA patterns such as wheat germ, quinoa, and cauliflower. vProtein also identifies foods with particularly unbalanced IAA patterns such as macadamia nuts, degermed corn products, and wakame seaweed. Although less useful alone, some unbalanced foods provide unusually good complements, such as Brazil nuts to legumes. Interestingly, vProtein finds no statistically significant bias toward grain/legume pairings for protein complementation. These analyses suggest that pairings of plant-based foods should be based on the individual foods themselves instead of based on broader food group-food group pairings. Overall, the most efficient pairings include sweet corn/tomatoes, apple/coconut, and sweet corn/cherry. The top pairings also highlight the utility of less common protein sources such as the seaweeds laver and spirulina, pumpkin leaves, and lambsquarters. From a public health perspective, many of the food pairings represent novel, low cost food sources to combat malnutrition. Full analysis results are available online

  17. vProtein: identifying optimal amino acid complements from plant-based foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Peter J; Fu, Leeann L; Basu, Avik

    2011-04-22

    Indispensible amino acids (IAAs) are used by the body in different proportions. Most animal-based foods provide these IAAs in roughly the needed proportions, but many plant-based foods provide different proportions of IAAs. To explore how these plant-based foods can be better used in human nutrition, we have created the computational tool vProtein to identify optimal food complements to satisfy human protein needs. vProtein uses 1251 plant-based foods listed in the United States Department of Agriculture standard release 22 database to determine the quantity of each food or pair of foods required to satisfy human IAA needs as determined by the 2005 daily recommended intake. The quantity of food in a pair is found using a linear programming approach that minimizes total calories, total excess IAAs, or the total weight of the combination. For single foods, vProtein identifies foods with particularly balanced IAA patterns such as wheat germ, quinoa, and cauliflower. vProtein also identifies foods with particularly unbalanced IAA patterns such as macadamia nuts, degermed corn products, and wakame seaweed. Although less useful alone, some unbalanced foods provide unusually good complements, such as Brazil nuts to legumes. Interestingly, vProtein finds no statistically significant bias toward grain/legume pairings for protein complementation. These analyses suggest that pairings of plant-based foods should be based on the individual foods themselves instead of based on broader food group-food group pairings. Overall, the most efficient pairings include sweet corn/tomatoes, apple/coconut, and sweet corn/cherry. The top pairings also highlight the utility of less common protein sources such as the seaweeds laver and spirulina, pumpkin leaves, and lambsquarters. From a public health perspective, many of the food pairings represent novel, low cost food sources to combat malnutrition. Full analysis results are available online at http://www.foodwiki.com/vprotein.

  18. Assessment of the Sensitivity, Specificity, and Accuracy of Thermography in Identifying Patients with TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana; Trybek, Grzegorz; Piątkowska, Dagmara

    2015-05-23

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of thermography in identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). The study sample consisted of 50 patients (27 women and 23 men) ages 19.2 to 24.5 years (mean age 22.43±1.04) with subjective symptoms of TMD (Ai II-III) and 50 patients (25 women and 25 men) ages 19.3 to 25.1 years (mean age 22.21±1.18) with no subjective symptoms of TMD (Ai I). The anamnestic interviews were conducted according to the three-point anamnestic index of temporomandibular dysfunction (Ai). The thermography was performed using a ThermaCAM TMSC500 (FLIR Systems AB, Sweden) independent thermal vision system. Thermography was closely combined with a 10-min chewing test. The results of our study indicated that the absolute difference in temperature between the right and left side (ΔT) has the highest diagnostic value. The diagnostic effectiveness of this parameter increased after the chewing test. The cut-off points for values of temperature differences between the right and left side and identifying 95.5% of subjects with no functional disorders according to the temporomandibular dysfunction index Di (specificity 95.5%) were 0.26°C (AUC=0.7422, sensitivity 44.3%, accuracy 52.4%) before the chewing test and 0.52°C (AUC=0.7920, sensitivity 46.4%, accuracy 56.3%) after it. The evaluation of thermography demonstrated its diagnostic usefulness in identifying patients with TMD with limited effectiveness. The chewing test helped in increasing the diagnostic efficiency of thermography in identifying patients with TMD.

  19. Identification of a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematically identified possible TKs across the fungal kingdom by using the profile hidden Markov Models searches and phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed that fungi lack the orthologs of animal TKs. We identified a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases (FslK) that appears to be a sister group closely related to TKs. Sequence analysis revealed that members of the FslK clade contain all the conserved protein kinase sub-domains and thus are likely enzymatically active. However, they lack key amino acid residues that determine TK-specific activities, indicating that they are not true TKs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the last common ancestor of fungi may have possessed numerous members of FslK. The ancestral FslK genes were lost in Ascomycota and Ustilaginomycotina and Pucciniomycotina of Basidiomycota during evolution. Most of these ancestral genes, however, were retained and expanded in Agaricomycetes. The discovery of the fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to TKs helps shed light on the origin and evolution of TKs and also has potential implications for the importance of these kinases in mushroom fungi.

  20. Quantitative Profiling Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Development from Dauer Stage to L4 Stage in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunhee; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Don-Ha; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2016-02-05

    When Caenorhabditis elegans encounters unfavorable growth conditions, it enters the dauer stage, an alternative L3 developmental period. A dauer larva resumes larval development to the normal L4 stage by uncharacterized postdauer reprogramming (PDR) when growth conditions become more favorable. During this transition period, certain heterochronic genes involved in controlling the proper sequence of developmental events are known to act, with their mutations suppressing the Muv (multivulva) phenotype in C. elegans. To identify the specific proteins in which the Muv phenotype is highly suppressed, quantitative proteomic analysis with iTRAQ labeling of samples obtained from worms at L1 + 30 h (for continuous development [CD]) and dauer recovery +3 h (for postdauer development [PD]) was carried out to detect changes in protein abundance in the CD and PD states of both N2 and lin-28(n719). Of the 1661 unique proteins identified with a proteomic approach identifies and quantitates the regulatory proteins potentially involved in PDR in C. elegans, which safeguards the overall lifecycle in response to environmental changes.

  1. Autoimmunity to specific citrullinated proteins gives the first clues to the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Natalia; Lundberg, Karin; Kinloch, Andrew; Fisher, Benjamin; Malmström, Vivianne; Feldmann, Marc; Venables, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is now clearly a true autoimmune disease with accumulating evidence of pathogenic disease-specific autoimmunity to citrullinated proteins. Citrullination, also termed deimination, is a modification of arginine side chains catalyzed by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes. This post-translational modification has the potential to alter the structure, antigenicity, and function of proteins. In RA, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides are now well established for clinical diagnosis, though we argue that the identification of specific citrullinated antigens, as whole proteins, is necessary for exploring pathogenic mechanisms. Four citrullinated antigens, fibrinogen, vimentin, collagen type II, and alpha-enolase, are now well established, with others awaiting further characterization. All four proteins are expressed in the joint, and there is evidence that antibodies to citrullinated fibrinogen and collagen type II mediate inflammation by the formation of immune complexes, both in humans and animal models. Antibodies to citrullinated proteins are associated with HLA 'shared epitope' alleles, and autoimmunity to at least one antigenic sequence, the CEP-1 peptide from citrullinated alpha-enolase (KIHAcitEIFDScitGNPTVE), shows a specific association with HLA-DRB1*0401, *0404, 620W PTPN22, and smoking. Periodontitis, in which Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogenic bacterium, has been linked to RA in epidemiological studies and also shares similar gene/environment associations. This is also the only bacterium identified that expresses endogenous citrullinated proteins and its own bacterial PAD enzyme, though the precise molecular mechanisms of bacterial citrullination have yet to be explored. Thus, both smoking and Porphyromonas gingivalis are attractive etiological agents for further investigation into the gene/environment/autoimmunity triad of RA.

  2. Using amino acid correlation and community detection algorithms to identify functional determinants in protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Bleicher

    Full Text Available Correlated mutation analysis has a long history of interesting applications, mostly in the detection of contact pairs in protein structures. Based on previous observations that, if properly assessed, amino acid correlation data can also provide insights about functional sub-classes in a protein family, we provide a complete framework devoted to this purpose. An amino acid specific correlation measure is proposed, which can be used to build networks summarizing all correlation and anti-correlation patterns in a protein family. These networks can be submitted to community structure detection algorithms, resulting in subsets of correlated amino acids which can be further assessed by specific parameters and procedures that provide insight into the relationship between different communities, the individual importance of community members and the adherence of a given amino acid sequence to a given community. By applying this framework to three protein families with contrasting characteristics (the Fe/Mn-superoxide dismutases, the peroxidase-catalase family and the C-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family, we show how our method and the proposed parameters and procedures are related to biological characteristics observed in these protein families, highlighting their potential use in protein characterization and gene annotation.

  3. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  4. Classification and purification of proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by RNA-binding specificities.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, M S; Dreyfuss, G

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles display very high binding affinities for different ribonucleotide homopolymers. The specificity of some of these proteins at high salt concentrations and in the presence of heparin allows for their rapid one-step purification from HeLa nucleoplasm. We show that the hnRNP C proteins are poly(U)-binding proteins and compare their specificity to that of the previously described cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein. Thes...

  5. Nanobody-Directed Specific Degradation of Proteins by the 26S-Proteasome in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Baudisch, Bianca; Pfort, Ingrid; Sorge, Eberhard; Conrad, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present data showing the directed degradation of target proteins recognized by a specific nanobody in transgenic plants. Green fluorescent protein was depleted by a chimeric nanobody fused to a distinct F-box domain, which enables protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. This technique could thus be used to knock out other proteins of interest in planta using specific, high-affinity binding proteins.

  6. Nanobody-Directed Specific Degradation of Proteins by the 26S-Proteasome in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Baudisch

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present data showing the directed degradation of target proteins recognized by a specific nanobody in transgenic plants. Green fluorescent protein was depleted by a chimeric nanobody fused to a distinct F-box domain, which enables protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. This technique could thus be used to knock out other proteins of interest in planta using specific, high-affinity binding proteins.

  7. Nanobody-Directed Specific Degradation of Proteins by the 26S-Proteasome in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudisch, Bianca; Pfort, Ingrid; Sorge, Eberhard; Conrad, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present data showing the directed degradation of target proteins recognized by a specific nanobody in transgenic plants. Green fluorescent protein was depleted by a chimeric nanobody fused to a distinct F-box domain, which enables protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. This technique could thus be used to knock out other proteins of interest in planta using specific, high-affinity binding proteins.

  8. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.R.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W.; Shi, H.Y.; Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes

  9. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.R. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wu, B. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, H.Y. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X. [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xie, P. [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-09-08

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes.

  10. Redox Proteomic Profiling of Specifically Carbonylated Proteins in the Serum of Triple Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liming; Chen, Youjiao; Yang, Aochu; Chen, Cheng; Liao, Liping; Li, Shuiming; Ying, Ming; Tian, Jing; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jiazuan

    2016-04-12

    Oxidative stress is a key event in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the role of oxidative stress in AD and to search for potential biomarkers in peripheral blood, serums were collected in this study from the 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old triple transgenic AD mice (3×Tg-AD mice) and the age- and sex-matched non-transgenic (non-Tg) littermates. The serum oxidized proteins were quantified by slot-blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the total levels of serum protein carbonyl groups. Western blotting, in conjunction with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-Oxyblot), was employed to identify and quantify the specifically-carbonylated proteins in the serum of 3×Tg-AD mice. The results showed that the levels of serum protein carbonyls were increased in the three month old 3×Tg-AD mice compared with the non-Tg control mice, whereas no significant differences were observed in the six and 12 months old AD mice, suggesting that oxidative stress is an early event in AD progression. With the application of 2D-Oxyblot analysis, (immunoglobin) Ig gamma-2B chain C region (IGH-3), Ig lambda-2 chain C region (IGLC2), Ig kappa chain C region (IGKC), and Ig kappa chain V-V region HP R16.7 were identified as significantly oxidized proteins compared with the control. Among them IGH-3 and IGKC were validated via immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. Identification of oxidized proteins in the serums of 3×Tg-AD mice can not only reveal potential roles of those proteins in the pathogenesis of AD but also provide potential biomarkers of AD at the early stage.

  11. Using distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations from full-text scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wu; Blake, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Databases of curated biomedical knowledge, such as the protein-locations reflected in the UniProtKB database, provide an accurate and useful resource to researchers and decision makers. Our goal is to augment the manual efforts currently used to curate knowledge bases with automated approaches that leverage the increased availability of full-text scientific articles. This paper describes experiments that use distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations, which are important to understand protein function and to identify candidate drug targets. Experiments consider Swiss-Prot, the manually annotated subset of the UniProtKB protein knowledge base, and 43,000 full-text articles from the Journal of Biological Chemistry that contain just under 11.5 million sentences. The system achieves 0.81 precision and 0.49 recall at sentence level and an accuracy of 57% on held-out instances in a test set. Moreover, the approach identifies 8210 instances that are not in the UniProtKB knowledge base. Manual inspection of the 50 most likely relations showed that 41 (82%) were valid. These results have immediate benefit to researchers interested in protein function, and suggest that distant supervision should be explored to complement other manual data curation efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of mass spectrometry fingerprinting to identify urinary metabolites after consumption of specific foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Amanda J; Favé, Gaëlle; Beckmann, Manfred; Lin, Wanchang; Tailliart, Kathleen; Xie, Long; Mathers, John C; Draper, John

    2011-10-01

    The lack of robust biological markers of dietary exposure hinders the quantitative understanding of causal relations between diet and health. We aimed to develop an efficient procedure to discover metabolites in urine that may have future potential as biomarkers of acute exposure to foods of high public health importance. Twenty-four participants were provided with a test breakfast in which the cereal component of a standardized breakfast was replaced by 1 of 4 foods of high public health importance; 1.5-, 3-, and 4.5-h postprandial urine samples were collected. Flow infusion electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry followed by supervised multivariate data analysis was used to discover signals resulting from consumption of each test food. Fasted-state urine samples provided a universal comparator for food biomarker lead discovery in postprandial urine. The filtering of data features associated with consumption of the common components of the standardized breakfast improved discrimination models and readily identified metabolites that showed consumption of specific test foods. A combination of trimethylamine-N-oxide and 1-methylhistidine was associated with salmon consumption. Novel ascorbate derivatives were discovered in urine after consumption of either broccoli or raspberries. Sulphonated caffeic acid and sulphonated methyl-epicatechin concentrations increased dramatically after consumption of raspberries. This biomarker lead discovery strategy can identify urinary metabolites associated with acute exposure to individual foods. Future studies are required to validate the specificity and utility of potential biomarkers in an epidemiologic context.

  13. Use of Moraxella catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide mutants to identify specific oligosaccharide epitopes recognized by human serum antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingel, Johanna M; Edwards, Katie J; Cox, Andrew D; Masoud, Hussein; Richards, James C; St Michael, Frank; Tekwe, Carmen D; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2009-10-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a causative agent of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This strict human pathogen continues to be a significant cause of disease in this broad spectrum of patients because there is no available vaccine. Although numerous putative vaccine antigens have been described, little is known about the human immune response to M. catarrhalis infection in vivo. Human serum antibodies are directed at a number of surface proteins, and lipooligosaccharides (LOS) and detoxified LOS may be an effective immunogen in mice. In this study, we used a specific LOS-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), containing the three major M. catarrhalis serotypes together with a complete series of truncated LOS mutants, to detect the development of new antibodies to specific regions of the oligosaccharide molecule. We compared serum samples from COPD patients who had recently cleared an M. catarrhalis infection to serum samples collected prior to their infection. Variability in the antibody response to LOS was observed, as some patients developed serotype-specific antibodies, others developed antibodies to the LOS of each serotype, others developed broadly cross-reactive antibodies, and some did not develop new antibodies. These newly developed human antibodies are directed at both side chains and core structures in the LOS molecule. This LOS-based ELISA can be used to dissect the human antibody response to both internal and external carbohydrate epitopes, thus providing a better understanding of the humoral immune response to M. catarrhalis LOS epitopes developed during natural infection.

  14. A machine learning approach to identify hydrogenosomal proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, David; Gould, Sven B; Zimorski, Verena; Kloesges, Thorsten; Kiosse, Fuat; Major, Peter; Martin, William F; Pupko, Tal; Dagan, Tal

    2012-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, the most widespread nonviral sexually transmitted disease in humans. It possesses hydrogenosomes-anaerobic mitochondria that generate H(2), CO(2), and acetate from pyruvate while converting ADP to ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. T. vaginalis hydrogenosomes lack a genome and translation machinery; hence, they import all their proteins from the cytosol. To date, however, only 30 imported proteins have been shown to localize to the organelle. A total of 226 nuclear-encoded proteins inferred from the genome sequence harbor a characteristic short N-terminal presequence, reminiscent of mitochondrial targeting peptides, which is thought to mediate hydrogenosomal targeting. Recent studies suggest, however, that the presequences might be less important than previously thought. We sought to identify new hydrogenosomal proteins within the 59,672 annotated open reading frames (ORFs) of T. vaginalis, independent of the N-terminal targeting signal, using a machine learning approach. Our training set included 57 gene and protein features determined for all 30 known hydrogenosomal proteins and 576 nonhydrogenosomal proteins. Several classifiers were trained on this set to yield an import score for all proteins encoded by T. vaginalis ORFs, predicting the likelihood of hydrogenosomal localization. The machine learning results were tested through immunofluorescence assay and immunodetection in isolated cell fractions of 14 protein predictions using hemagglutinin constructs expressed under the homologous SCSα promoter in transiently transformed T. vaginalis cells. Localization of 6 of the 10 top predicted hydrogenosome-localized proteins was confirmed, and two of these were found to lack an obvious N-terminal targeting signal.

  15. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts

  16. Proteomic profiling of Plasmodium sporozoite maturation identifies new proteins essential for parasite development and infectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasonder, Edwin; Janse, Chris J; van Gemert, Geert-Jan

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites that develop and mature inside an Anopheles mosquito initiate a malaria infection in humans. Here we report the first proteomic comparison of different parasite stages from the mosquito -- early and late oocysts containing midgut sporozoites, and the mature...... whose annotation suggest an involvement in sporozoite maturation, motility, infection of the human host and associated metabolic adjustments. Analyses of proteins identified in the P. falciparum sporozoite proteomes by orthologous gene disruption in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, revealed...... three previously uncharacterized Plasmodium proteins that appear to be essential for sporozoite development at distinct points of maturation in the mosquito. This study sheds light on the development and maturation of the malaria parasite in an Anopheles mosquito and also identifies proteins that may...

  17. Identifying protein biomarkers in predicting disease severity of dengue virus infection using immune-related protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Hui Jen; Yong, Yean K; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M Jamil; Raju, Chandramathi Samudi; Gudimella, Ranganath; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2018-02-01

    Dengue virus is one of the most widespread flaviviruses that re-emerged throughout recent decades. The progression from mild dengue to severe dengue (SD) with the complications such as vascular leakage and hemorrhage increases the fatality rate of dengue. The pathophysiology of SD is not entirely clear. To investigate potential biomarkers that are suggestive of pathogenesis of SD, a small panel of serum samples selected from 1 healthy individual, 2 dengue patients without warning signs (DWS-), 2 dengue patients with warning signs (DWS+), and 5 patients with SD were subjected to a pilot analysis using Sengenics Immunome protein array. The overall fold changes of protein expressions and clustering heat map revealed that PFKFB4, TPM1, PDCL3, and PTPN20A were elevated among patients with SD. Differential expression analysis identified that 29 proteins were differentially elevated greater than 2-fold in SD groups than DWS- and DWS+. From the 29 candidate proteins, pathways enrichment analysis also identified insulin signaling and cytoskeleton pathways were involved in SD, suggesting that the insulin pathway may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SD.

  18. Distinct Host Tropism Protein Signatures to Identify Possible Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Christine L P; Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses constantly pose a health threat to humans as novel strains occasionally emerge from the avian population to cause human infections. Many past epidemic as well as pandemic strains have originated from avian species. While most viruses are restricted to their primary hosts, zoonotic strains can sometimes arise from mutations or reassortment, leading them to acquire the capability to escape host species barrier and successfully infect a new host. Phylogenetic analyses and genetic markers are useful in tracing the origins of zoonotic infections, but there are still no effective means to identify high risk strains prior to an outbreak. Here we show that distinct host tropism protein signatures can be used to identify possible zoonotic strains in avian species which have the potential to cause human infections. We have discovered that influenza A viruses can now be classified into avian, human, or zoonotic strains based on their host tropism protein signatures. Analysis of all influenza A viruses with complete proteome using the host tropism prediction system, based on machine learning classifications of avian and human viral proteins has uncovered distinct signatures of zoonotic strains as mosaics of avian and human viral proteins. This is in contrast with typical avian or human strains where they show mostly avian or human viral proteins in their signatures respectively. Moreover, we have found that zoonotic strains from the same influenza outbreaks carry similar host tropism protein signatures characteristic of a common ancestry. Our results demonstrate that the distinct host tropism protein signature in zoonotic strains may prove useful in influenza surveillance to rapidly identify potential high risk strains circulating in avian species, which may grant us the foresight in anticipating an impending influenza outbreak.

  19. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. A cohort of new adhesive proteins identified from transcriptomic analysis of mussel foot glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Daniel G; Errico, John M; Sjoestroem, Sebastian; Fenster, April; Waite, J Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The adaptive attachment of marine mussels to a wide range of substrates in a high-energy, saline environment has been explored for decades and is a significant driver of bioinspired wet adhesion research. Mussel attachment relies on a fibrous holdfast known as the byssus, which is made by a specialized appendage called the foot. Multiple adhesive and structural proteins are rapidly synthesized, secreted and moulded by the foot into holdfast threads. About 10 well-characterized proteins, namely the mussel foot proteins (Mfps), the preCols and the thread matrix proteins, are reported as representing the bulk of these structures. To explore how robust this proposition is, we sequenced the transcriptome of the glandular tissues that produce and secrete the various holdfast components using next-generation sequencing methods. Surprisingly, we found around 15 highly expressed genes that have not previously been characterized, but bear key similarities to the previously defined mussel foot proteins, suggesting additional contribution to byssal function. We verified the validity of these transcripts by polymerase chain reaction, cloning and Sanger sequencing as well as confirming their presence as proteins in the byssus. These newly identified proteins greatly expand the palette of mussel holdfast biochemistry and provide new targets for investigation into bioinspired wet adhesion. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  2. Identification of a mitochondrial target of thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (mTOT--relationship to newly identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R Colca

    Full Text Available Thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers have the potential to effectively treat a number of human diseases, however the currently available agents have dose-limiting side effects that are mediated via activation of the transcription factor PPARγ. We have recently shown PPARγ-independent actions of TZD insulin sensitizers, but the molecular target of these molecules remained to be identified. Here we use a photo-catalyzable drug analog probe and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial complex that specifically recognizes TZDs. These studies identify two well-conserved proteins previously known as brain protein 44 (BRP44 and BRP44 Like (BRP44L, which recently have been renamed Mpc2 and Mpc1 to signify their function as a mitochondrial pyruvate carrier complex. Knockdown of Mpc1 or Mpc2 in Drosophila melanogaster or pre-incubation with UK5099, an inhibitor of pyruvate transport, blocks the crosslinking of mitochondrial membranes by the TZD probe. Knockdown of these proteins in Drosophila also led to increased hemolymph glucose and blocked drug action. In isolated brown adipose tissue (BAT cells, MSDC-0602, a PPARγ-sparing TZD, altered the incorporation of (13C-labeled carbon from glucose into acetyl CoA. These results identify Mpc1 and Mpc2 as components of the mitochondrial target of TZDs (mTOT and suggest that understanding the modulation of this complex, which appears to regulate pyruvate entry into the mitochondria, may provide a viable target for insulin sensitizing pharmacology.

  3. Circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein for identifying patients with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. A comparative study with C-terminal (109-141)- and N-terminal (1-86)-region-specific PTHrP radioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suehiro, Mitsuko; Murakami, Minoru; Fukuchi, Minoru (Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan))

    1994-11-01

    We evaluated the circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP) in 115 healthy subjects and 122 patients with malignant diseases by using radioassay systems (RAS) specific for the C-terminal (109-141) fragment of PTHrP (C-RAS) and for the N-terminal(1-86) (N-RAS). PTHrP levels in healthy controls ranged from 1.5 to 38.2 (mean: 24.5) pmol/L with the C-RAS and from 0.9 to 2.5 (mean: 1.7) pmol/L with the N-RAS. The ratio of circulating N-terminal fragment (N) to C-terminal fragment (C) of PTHrP was calculated to be about 1 : 14.4 in the healthy subjects. Of the 122 patients with malignant diseases, 40 (32.8%) had circulating PTHrP levels undetectable with the N-RAS, but only 11 (9.0%) patients had levels undetectable with the C-RAS. Of the former 122 patients, 41 (33.6%) had high PTHrP as determined with the C-RAS, and 10 (8.2%) had high PTHrP as determined with the N-RAS. The former of these included only 8 (19.5%) humoral hypercalcemia malignancy(HHM) patients, while the latter included 8 (80.0%) HHM patients. The circulating N to C ratio was about 1 : 70.7 in the HHM patients. The N and C obtained with the different RASs showed a close correlation (r=0.86). The values also showed a close correlation with serum Ca; r=0.75 for C-RAS and r=0.81 for N-RAS. In addition, the correlation between the PTHrP reading obtained with the different RASs and serum Cr were: r=0.42 with C-RAS and r=0.26 with N-RAS. The circulating form of immunoreactive PTHrP fragments is therefore comprised mainly of PTHrP (109-141). In contrast, circulating concentrations of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment are very low, but detection of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment with the N-RAS is a more useful indicator of HHM with fewer false positive results and is less likely to be influenced by renal function than the detection of the PHPrP (109-141) fragment with C-RAS. (author).

  4. Circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein for identifying patients with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. A comparative study with C-terminal (109-141)- and N-terminal (1-86)-region-specific PTHrP radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Mitsuko; Murakami, Minoru; Fukuchi, Minoru

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP) in 115 healthy subjects and 122 patients with malignant diseases by using radioassay systems (RAS) specific for the C-terminal (109-141) fragment of PTHrP (C-RAS) and for the N-terminal(1-86) (N-RAS). PTHrP levels in healthy controls ranged from 1.5 to 38.2 (mean: 24.5) pmol/L with the C-RAS and from 0.9 to 2.5 (mean: 1.7) pmol/L with the N-RAS. The ratio of circulating N-terminal fragment (N) to C-terminal fragment (C) of PTHrP was calculated to be about 1 : 14.4 in the healthy subjects. Of the 122 patients with malignant diseases, 40 (32.8%) had circulating PTHrP levels undetectable with the N-RAS, but only 11 (9.0%) patients had levels undetectable with the C-RAS. Of the former 122 patients, 41 (33.6%) had high PTHrP as determined with the C-RAS, and 10 (8.2%) had high PTHrP as determined with the N-RAS. The former of these included only 8 (19.5%) humoral hypercalcemia malignancy(HHM) patients, while the latter included 8 (80.0%) HHM patients. The circulating N to C ratio was about 1 : 70.7 in the HHM patients. The N and C obtained with the different RASs showed a close correlation (r=0.86). The values also showed a close correlation with serum Ca; r=0.75 for C-RAS and r=0.81 for N-RAS. In addition, the correlation between the PTHrP reading obtained with the different RASs and serum Cr were: r=0.42 with C-RAS and r=0.26 with N-RAS. The circulating form of immunoreactive PTHrP fragments is therefore comprised mainly of PTHrP (109-141). In contrast, circulating concentrations of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment are very low, but detection of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment with the N-RAS is a more useful indicator of HHM with fewer false positive results and is less likely to be influenced by renal function than the detection of the PHPrP (109-141) fragment with C-RAS. (author)

  5. Protein-protein interactions in paralogues: Electrostatics modulates specificity on a conserved steric scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Stefan M; Cawley, Andrew; Huber, Roland G; Bond, Peter J; Warwicker, Jim

    2017-01-01

    An improved knowledge of protein-protein interactions is essential for better understanding of metabolic and signaling networks, and cellular function. Progress tends to be based on structure determination and predictions using known structures, along with computational methods based on evolutionary information or detailed atomistic descriptions. We hypothesized that for the case of interactions across a common interface, between proteins from a pair of paralogue families or within a family of paralogues, a relatively simple interface description could distinguish between binding and non-binding pairs. Using binding data for several systems, and large-scale comparative modeling based on known template complex structures, it is found that charge-charge interactions (for groups bearing net charge) are generally a better discriminant than buried non-polar surface. This is particularly the case for paralogue families that are less divergent, with more reliable comparative modeling. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are major determinants of specificity in such systems, an observation that could be used to predict binding partners.

  6. Protein-protein interactions in paralogues: Electrostatics modulates specificity on a conserved steric scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Ivanov

    Full Text Available An improved knowledge of protein-protein interactions is essential for better understanding of metabolic and signaling networks, and cellular function. Progress tends to be based on structure determination and predictions using known structures, along with computational methods based on evolutionary information or detailed atomistic descriptions. We hypothesized that for the case of interactions across a common interface, between proteins from a pair of paralogue families or within a family of paralogues, a relatively simple interface description could distinguish between binding and non-binding pairs. Using binding data for several systems, and large-scale comparative modeling based on known template complex structures, it is found that charge-charge interactions (for groups bearing net charge are generally a better discriminant than buried non-polar surface. This is particularly the case for paralogue families that are less divergent, with more reliable comparative modeling. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are major determinants of specificity in such systems, an observation that could be used to predict binding partners.

  7. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Feng; Ji, Jiabing; El-Kasmi, Farid; Dangl, Jeffery L; Johal, Guri; Balint-Kurti, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR). Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC), a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC) and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. We report systematic structural and functional analyses of Rp1 proteins in maize and N. benthamiana to characterize the molecular mechanism of NLR activation/auto-inhibition. We derive a model comprising the following three main features: Rp1 proteins appear to self-associate to become competent for activity. The CC domain is signaling-competent and is sufficient to induce HR. This can be suppressed by the NB-ARC domain through direct interaction. In autoactive proteins, the interaction of the LRR domain with the NB-ARC domain causes de-repression and thus disrupts the inhibition of HR. Further, we identify specific amino acids and combinations thereof that are important for the auto-inhibition/activity of Rp1 proteins. We also provide evidence for the function of MHD2, a previously uncharacterized, though widely conserved NLR motif. This work reports several novel insights into the precise structural requirement for NLR function and informs efforts towards utilizing these proteins for engineering disease resistance.

  8. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Feng Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR. Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC, a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC and a leucine rich repeat (LRR domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. We report systematic structural and functional analyses of Rp1 proteins in maize and N. benthamiana to characterize the molecular mechanism of NLR activation/auto-inhibition. We derive a model comprising the following three main features: Rp1 proteins appear to self-associate to become competent for activity. The CC domain is signaling-competent and is sufficient to induce HR. This can be suppressed by the NB-ARC domain through direct interaction. In autoactive proteins, the interaction of the LRR domain with the NB-ARC domain causes de-repression and thus disrupts the inhibition of HR. Further, we identify specific amino acids and combinations thereof that are important for the auto-inhibition/activity of Rp1 proteins. We also provide evidence for the function of MHD2, a previously uncharacterized, though widely conserved NLR motif. This work reports several novel insights into the precise structural requirement for NLR function and informs efforts towards utilizing these proteins for engineering disease resistance.

  9. Inflammatory and fibrotic proteins proteomically identified as key protein constituents in urine and stone matrix of patients with kidney calculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonla, Chanchai; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Spittau, Björn; Schlosser, Andreas; Pimratana, Chaowat; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2014-02-15

    To uncover whether urinary proteins are incorporated into stones, the proteomic profiles of kidney stones and urine collected from the same patients have to be explored. We employed 1D-PAGE and nanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS to analyze the proteomes of kidney stone matrix (n=16), nephrolithiatic urine (n=14) and healthy urine (n=3). We identified 62, 66 and 22 proteins in stone matrix, nephrolithiatic urine and healthy urine, respectively. Inflammation- and fibrosis-associated proteins were frequently detected in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine. Eighteen proteins were exclusively found in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine, considered as candidate biomarkers for kidney stone formation. S100A8 and fibronectin, representatives of inflammation and fibrosis, respectively, were up-regulated in nephrolithiasis renal tissues. S100A8 was strongly expressed in infiltrated leukocytes. Fibronectin was over-expressed in renal tubular cells. S100A8 and fibronectin were immunologically confirmed to exist in nephrolithiatic urine and stone matrix, but in healthy urine they were undetectable. Conclusion, both kidney stones and urine obtained from the same patients greatly contained inflammatory and fibrotic proteins. S100A8 and fibronectin were up-regulated in stone-baring kidneys and nephrolithiatic urine. Therefore, inflammation and fibrosis are suggested to be involved in the formation of kidney calculi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Profiling G protein-coupled receptors of Fasciola hepatica identifies orphan rhodopsins unique to phylum Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; McCammick, Erin; McCusker, Paul; Wells, Duncan; Hodgkinson, Jane; Paterson, Steve; Mousley, Angela; Marks, Nikki J; Maule, Aaron G

    2018-02-05

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are established drug targets. Despite their considerable appeal as targets for next-generation anthelmintics, poor understanding of their diversity and function in parasitic helminths has thwarted progress towards GPCR-targeted anti-parasite drugs. This study facilitates GPCR research in the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, by generating the first profile of GPCRs from the F. hepatica genome. Our dataset describes 147 high confidence GPCRs, representing the largest cohort of GPCRs, and the largest set of in silico ligand-receptor predictions, yet reported in any parasitic helminth. All GPCRs fall within the established GRAFS nomenclature; comprising three glutamate, 135 rhodopsin, two adhesion, five frizzled, one smoothened, and one secretin GPCR. Stringent annotation pipelines identified 18 highly diverged rhodopsins in F. hepatica that maintained core rhodopsin signatures, but lacked significant similarity with non-flatworm sequences, providing a new sub-group of potential flukicide targets. These facilitated identification of a larger cohort of 76 related sequences from available flatworm genomes, representing new members of existing groups (PROF1/Srfb, Rho-L, Rho-R, Srfa, Srfc) of flatworm-specific rhodopsins. These receptors imply flatworm specific GPCR functions, and/or co-evolution with unique flatworm ligands, and could facilitate the development of exquisitely selective anthelmintics. Ligand binding domain sequence conservation relative to deorphanised rhodopsins enabled high confidence ligand-receptor matching of seventeen receptors activated by acetylcholine, neuropeptide F/Y, octopamine or serotonin. RNA-Seq analyses showed expression of 101 GPCRs across various developmental stages, with the majority expressed most highly in the pathogenic intra-mammalian juvenile parasites. These data identify a broad complement of GPCRs in F. hepatica, including rhodopsins likely to have key functions in neuromuscular control and

  11. Profiling G protein-coupled receptors of Fasciola hepatica identifies orphan rhodopsins unique to phylum Platyhelminthes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul McVeigh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are established drug targets. Despite their considerable appeal as targets for next-generation anthelmintics, poor understanding of their diversity and function in parasitic helminths has thwarted progress towards GPCR-targeted anti-parasite drugs. This study facilitates GPCR research in the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, by generating the first profile of GPCRs from the F. hepatica genome. Our dataset describes 147 high confidence GPCRs, representing the largest cohort of GPCRs, and the largest set of in silico ligand-receptor predictions, yet reported in any parasitic helminth. All GPCRs fall within the established GRAFS nomenclature; comprising three glutamate, 135 rhodopsin, two adhesion, five frizzled, one smoothened, and one secretin GPCR. Stringent annotation pipelines identified 18 highly diverged rhodopsins in F. hepatica that maintained core rhodopsin signatures, but lacked significant similarity with non-flatworm sequences, providing a new sub-group of potential flukicide targets. These facilitated identification of a larger cohort of 76 related sequences from available flatworm genomes, representing new members of existing groups (PROF1/Srfb, Rho-L, Rho-R, Srfa, Srfc of flatworm-specific rhodopsins. These receptors imply flatworm specific GPCR functions, and/or co-evolution with unique flatworm ligands, and could facilitate the development of exquisitely selective anthelmintics. Ligand binding domain sequence conservation relative to deorphanised rhodopsins enabled high confidence ligand-receptor matching of seventeen receptors activated by acetylcholine, neuropeptide F/Y, octopamine or serotonin. RNA-Seq analyses showed expression of 101 GPCRs across various developmental stages, with the majority expressed most highly in the pathogenic intra-mammalian juvenile parasites. These data identify a broad complement of GPCRs in F. hepatica, including rhodopsins likely to have key functions in

  12. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-11-25

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell-cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated.

  13. Evaluation of Cocktails with Recombinant Proteins of Mycobacterium bovis for a Specific Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Mon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Delayed type hypersensitivity skin test (DTH and interferon-gamma assay are used for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (TBB. The specificity of these diagnoses, however, is compromised because both are based on the response against purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium bovis (PPD-B. In this study, we assessed the potential of two cocktails containing M. bovis recombinant proteins: cocktail 1 (C1: ESAT-6, CFP-10 and MPB83 and cocktail 2 (C2: ESAT-6, CFP-10, MPB83, HspX, TB10.3, and MPB70. C1, C2, and PPD-B showed similar response by DTH in M. bovis-sensitized guinea pigs. Importantly, C1 induced a lower response than PPD-B in M. avium-sensitized guinea pigs. In cattle, C1 displayed better performance than PPD-B and C2; indeed, C1 showed the least detection of animals either vaccinated or Map-infected. To optimize the composition of the cocktails, we obtained protein fractions from PPD-B and tested their immunogenicity in experimentally M. bovis-infected cattle. In one highly reactive fraction, seven proteins were identified. The inclusion of FixB in C1 enhanced the recognition of M. bovis-infected cattle without compromising specificity. Our data provide a promising basis for the future development of a cocktail for TBB detection without interference by the presence of sensitized or infected animals with other mycobacteria.

  14. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  15. Identifying reliable predictors of protein-energy malnutrition in hospitalized frail older adults. A prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Gianfranco; Bertocchi, Luca; Dal Bo, Eugenia; Di Pasquale, Carmen Luisa; Zanetti, Michela

    2018-03-07

    Decreased food intake is a risk factor for relevant complications (e.g. infections, pressure ulcers), longer hospital stays, higher readmission rates, greater health care costs and increased patient mortality, particularly in frail hospitalized older adults who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Nurses are called to improve this criticality, starting from accurately identify patients for malnutrition at hospital admission and effectively monitoring their food intake. The primary aim was to identify reliable predictive indicators of reduced food intake at hospital admission. The secondary aims were to assess the adequacy of daily energy and protein intake and the impact of nutrient intake on patient outcomes. Prospective observational longitudinal study. Internal Medicine Ward of an Academic Teaching University Hospital. Acute older adults who were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (Nutritional Risk Score-2002 ≥ 3, middle-upper arm circumference energy and protein intake was monitored during the first 5 days of hospital stay by a photographic method and compared to the daily energy and protein requirement calculated by specific equations. Data on anthropometry, inflammation/malnutrition laboratory data and body composition (phase angle calculated using bioelectrical impedance analysis) were collected. Eighty-one subjects (age 81.5 ± 11.5 years) were enrolled. Mean energy intake was 669.0 ± 573.9 kcal/day, and mean protein intake was 30.7 ± 25.8 g/day. Over 60% of patients ingested ≤50% of their calculated energy and protein requirements: these patients were older (p = 0.026), had a lower middle-upper arm circumference (p = 0.022) and total arm area (p = 0.038), a higher C-reactive protein/albumin ratio and Instant Nutritional Assessment score (p protein/albumin ratio, and impaired self-feeding at admission were independently associated with critically reduced energy and protein intake. Middle

  16. Multi-genome identification and characterization of chlamydiae-specific type III secretion substrates: the Inc proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Guangming

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that multiply in a vacuolar compartment, the inclusion. Several chlamydial proteins containing a bilobal hydrophobic domain are translocated by a type III secretion (TTS mechanism into the inclusion membrane. They form the family of Inc proteins, which is specific to this phylum. Based on their localization, Inc proteins likely play important roles in the interactions between the microbe and the host. In this paper we sought to identify and analyze, using bioinformatics tools, all putative Inc proteins in published chlamydial genomes, including an environmental species. Results Inc proteins contain at least one bilobal hydrophobic domain made of two transmembrane helices separated by a loop of less than 30 amino acids. Using bioinformatics tools we identified 537 putative Inc proteins across seven chlamydial proteomes. The amino-terminal segment of the putative Inc proteins was recognized as a functional TTS signal in 90% of the C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae sequences tested, validating the data obtained in silico. We identified a macro domain in several putative Inc proteins, and observed that Inc proteins are enriched in segments predicted to form coiled coils. A surprisingly large proportion of the putative Inc proteins are not constitutively translocated to the inclusion membrane in culture conditions. Conclusions The Inc proteins represent 7 to 10% of each proteome and show a great degree of sequence diversity between species. The abundance of segments with a high probability for coiled coil conformation in Inc proteins support the hypothesis that they interact with host proteins. While the large majority of Inc proteins possess a functional TTS signal, less than half may be constitutively translocated to the inclusion surface in some species. This suggests the novel finding that translocation of Inc proteins may be regulated by as-yet undetermined mechanisms.

  17. A specific antimicrobial protein CAP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Manman; Liu, Dan; Xu, Feng; Xiao, Liang; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Beilei; Chang, Yinlong; Zheng, Jiemin; Tao, Xia; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A bacterium strain, designated as CMF-2, was isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and its culture supernatant exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity. The strain CMF-2 was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics as well as 16S rRNA sequence analysis. In this study, an antimicrobial protein, named as CAP-1, was isolated from the culture of CMF-2 through ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography. According to the result of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), a major band indicated that the antimicrobial protein had a molecular mass of about 15 kDa, and it was identified as a hypothetical protein by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis and Mascot searching. CAP-1 displayed a broad antimicrobial spectrum against the indicator bacteria and fungus, including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans, especially some marine-derived microorganisms such as Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, and Vibrio anguillarum, but showed little impact on tumor cells and normal human cells. The protein CAP-1 remained a stable antimicrobial activity in a wide range of temperature (20-80°C) and pH (2-10) conditions. These results suggested that CAP-1 might have a specific antimicrobial function not due to cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  19. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt eGeisler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactomes are genome-wide roadmaps of protein-protein interactions. They have been produced for humans, yeast, the fruit fly, and Arabidopsis thaliana and have become invaluable tools for generating and testing hypotheses. A predicted interactome for Zea mays (PiZeaM is presented here as an aid to the research community for this valuable crop species. PiZeaM was built using a proven method of interologs (interacting orthologs that were identified using both one-to-one and many-to-many orthology between genomes of maize and reference species. Where both maize orthologs occurred for an experimentally determined interaction in the reference species, we predicted a likely interaction in maize. A total of 49,026 unique interactions for 6,004 maize proteins were predicted. These interactions are enriched for processes that are evolutionarily conserved, but include many otherwise poorly annotated proteins in maize. The predicted maize interactions were further analyzed by comparing annotation of interacting proteins, including different layers of ontology. A map of pairwise gene co-expression was also generated and compared to predicted interactions. Two global subnetworks were constructed for highly conserved interactions. These subnetworks showed clear clustering of proteins by function. Another subnetwork was created for disease response using a bait and prey strategy to capture interacting partners for proteins that respond to other organisms. Closer examination of this subnetwork revealed the connectivity between biotic and abiotic hormone stress pathways. We believe PiZeaM will provide a useful tool for the prediction of protein function and analysis of pathways for Z. mays researchers and is presented in this paper as a reference tool for the exploration of protein interactions in maize.

  20. A Simple Method for Discovering Druggable, Specific Glycosaminoglycan-Protein Systems. Elucidation of Key Principles from Heparin/Heparan Sulfate-Binding Proteins.

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    Aurijit Sarkar

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs affect human physiology and pathology by modulating more than 500 proteins. GAG-protein interactions are generally assumed to be ionic and nonspecific, but specific interactions do exist. Here, we present a simple method to identify the GAG-binding site (GBS on proteins that in turn helps predict high specific GAG-protein systems. Contrary to contemporary thinking, we found that the electrostatic potential at basic arginine and lysine residues neither identifies the GBS consistently, nor its specificity. GBSs are better identified by considering the potential at neutral hydrogen bond donors such as asparagine or glutamine sidechains. Our studies also reveal that an unusual constellation of ionic and non-ionic residues in the binding site leads to specificity. Nature engineers the local environment of Asn45 of antithrombin, Gln255 of 3-O-sulfotransferase 3, Gln163 and Asn167 of 3-O-sulfotransferase 1 and Asn27 of basic fibroblast growth factor in the respective GBSs to induce specificity. Such residues are distinct from other uncharged residues on the same protein structure in possessing a significantly higher electrostatic potential, resultant from the local topology. In contrast, uncharged residues on nonspecific GBSs such as thrombin and serum albumin possess a diffuse spread of electrostatic potential. Our findings also contradict the paradigm that GAG-binding sites are simply a collection of contiguous Arg/Lys residues. Our work demonstrates the basis for discovering specifically interacting and druggable GAG-protein systems based on the structure of protein alone, without requiring access to any structure-function relationship data.

  1. Chagas disease vector blood meal sources identified by protein mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith I Keller

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a complex vector borne parasitic disease involving blood feeding Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae insects, also known as kissing bugs, and the vertebrates they feed on. This disease has tremendous impacts on millions of people and is a global health problem. The etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae, is deposited on the mammalian host in the insect's feces during a blood meal, and enters the host's blood stream through mucous membranes or a break in the skin. Identifying the blood meal sources of triatomine vectors is critical in understanding Chagas disease transmission dynamics, can lead to identification of other vertebrates important in the transmission cycle, and aids management decisions. The latter is particularly important as there is little in the way of effective therapeutics for Chagas disease. Several techniques, mostly DNA-based, are available for blood meal identification. However, further methods are needed, particularly when sample conditions lead to low-quality DNA or to assess the risk of human cross-contamination. We demonstrate a proteomics-based approach, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to identify host-specific hemoglobin peptides for blood meal identification in mouse blood control samples and apply LC-MS/MS for the first time to Triatoma dimidiata insect vectors, tracing blood sources to species. In contrast to most proteins, hemoglobin, stabilized by iron, is incredibly stable even being preserved through geologic time. We compared blood stored with and without an anticoagulant and examined field-collected insect specimens stored in suboptimal conditions such as at room temperature for long periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first study using LC-MS/MS on field-collected arthropod disease vectors to identify blood meal composition, and where blood meal identification was confirmed with more

  2. Chagas disease vector blood meal sources identified by protein mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Judith I; Ballif, Bryan A; St Clair, Riley M; Vincent, James J; Monroy, M Carlota; Stevens, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a complex vector borne parasitic disease involving blood feeding Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) insects, also known as kissing bugs, and the vertebrates they feed on. This disease has tremendous impacts on millions of people and is a global health problem. The etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae), is deposited on the mammalian host in the insect's feces during a blood meal, and enters the host's blood stream through mucous membranes or a break in the skin. Identifying the blood meal sources of triatomine vectors is critical in understanding Chagas disease transmission dynamics, can lead to identification of other vertebrates important in the transmission cycle, and aids management decisions. The latter is particularly important as there is little in the way of effective therapeutics for Chagas disease. Several techniques, mostly DNA-based, are available for blood meal identification. However, further methods are needed, particularly when sample conditions lead to low-quality DNA or to assess the risk of human cross-contamination. We demonstrate a proteomics-based approach, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify host-specific hemoglobin peptides for blood meal identification in mouse blood control samples and apply LC-MS/MS for the first time to Triatoma dimidiata insect vectors, tracing blood sources to species. In contrast to most proteins, hemoglobin, stabilized by iron, is incredibly stable even being preserved through geologic time. We compared blood stored with and without an anticoagulant and examined field-collected insect specimens stored in suboptimal conditions such as at room temperature for long periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first study using LC-MS/MS on field-collected arthropod disease vectors to identify blood meal composition, and where blood meal identification was confirmed with more traditional DNA

  3. Extreme sequence divergence but conserved ligand-binding specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic microorganisms evade host immunity through extensive sequence variability in a protein region targeted by protective antibodies. In spite of the sequence variability, a variable region commonly retains an important ligand-binding function, reflected in the presence of a highly conserved sequence motif. Here, we analyze the limits of sequence divergence in a ligand-binding region by characterizing the hypervariable region (HVR of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein. Our studies were focused on HVRs that bind the human complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP, a ligand that confers phagocytosis resistance. A previous comparison of C4BP-binding HVRs identified residue identities that could be part of a binding motif, but the extended analysis reported here shows that no residue identities remain when additional C4BP-binding HVRs are included. Characterization of the HVR in the M22 protein indicated that two relatively conserved Leu residues are essential for C4BP binding, but these residues are probably core residues in a coiled-coil, implying that they do not directly contribute to binding. In contrast, substitution of either of two relatively conserved Glu residues, predicted to be solvent-exposed, had no effect on C4BP binding, although each of these changes had a major effect on the antigenic properties of the HVR. Together, these findings show that HVRs of M proteins have an extraordinary capacity for sequence divergence and antigenic variability while retaining a specific ligand-binding function.

  4. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  5. Sex-specific and blood meal-induced proteins of Anopheles gambiae midguts: analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent-Winter C

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae is the main vector of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa. The mosquito midgut constitutes a barrier that the parasite must cross if it is to develop and be transmitted. Despite the central role of the mosquito midgut in the host/parasite interaction, little is known about its protein composition. Characterisation of An. gambiae midgut proteins may identify the proteins that render An. gambiae receptive to the malaria parasite. Methods We carried out two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of An. gambiae midgut proteins and compared protein profiles for midguts from males, sugar-fed females and females fed on human blood. Results Very few differences were detected between male and female mosquitoes for the approximately 375 silver-stained proteins. Male midguts contained ten proteins not detected in sugar-fed or blood-fed females, which are therefore probably involved in male-specific functions; conversely, female midguts contained twenty-three proteins absent from male midguts. Eight of these proteins were specific to sugar-fed females, and another ten, to blood-fed females. Conclusion Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins found only in blood-fed female midguts, together with data from the recent sequencing of the An. gambiae genome, should make it possible to determine the role of these proteins in blood digestion or parasite receptivity.

  6. Sex-specific and blood meal-induced proteins of Anopheles gambiae midguts: analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, GI; Laurent-Winter, C; Rodhain, F; Bourgouin, C

    2003-01-01

    Background Anopheles gambiae is the main vector of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa. The mosquito midgut constitutes a barrier that the parasite must cross if it is to develop and be transmitted. Despite the central role of the mosquito midgut in the host/parasite interaction, little is known about its protein composition. Characterisation of An. gambiae midgut proteins may identify the proteins that render An. gambiae receptive to the malaria parasite. Methods We carried out two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of An. gambiae midgut proteins and compared protein profiles for midguts from males, sugar-fed females and females fed on human blood. Results Very few differences were detected between male and female mosquitoes for the approximately 375 silver-stained proteins. Male midguts contained ten proteins not detected in sugar-fed or blood-fed females, which are therefore probably involved in male-specific functions; conversely, female midguts contained twenty-three proteins absent from male midguts. Eight of these proteins were specific to sugar-fed females, and another ten, to blood-fed females. Conclusion Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins found only in blood-fed female midguts, together with data from the recent sequencing of the An. gambiae genome, should make it possible to determine the role of these proteins in blood digestion or parasite receptivity. PMID:12605724

  7. Huntingtin-Associated Protein 1 (HAP1) is a cGMP-dependent Kinase Anchoring Protein (GKAP) specific for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ isoform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corradini, Eleonora; Burgers, Pepijn P.; Plank, Michael; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important in providing compartmentalization and specificity in cellular signal transduction. Many studies have hallmarked the well designed compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) through its anchoring proteins. Much less data are available on

  8. Discovery of a microbial transglutaminase enabling highly site-specific labeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Wojtek; Ko, Fu Chong; Patel, Jigar; Lyamichev, Victor; Albert, Thomas J; Benz, Jörg; Rudolph, Markus G; Bergmann, Frank; Streidl, Thomas; Kratzsch, Peter; Boenitz-Dulat, Mara; Oelschlaegel, Tobias; Schraeml, Michael

    2017-09-22

    Microbial transglutaminases (MTGs) catalyze the formation of Gln-Lys isopeptide bonds and are widely used for the cross-linking of proteins and peptides in food and biotechnological applications ( e.g. to improve the texture of protein-rich foods or in generating antibody-drug conjugates). Currently used MTGs have low substrate specificity, impeding their biotechnological use as enzymes that do not cross-react with nontarget substrates ( i.e. as bio-orthogonal labeling systems). Here, we report the discovery of an MTG from Kutzneria albida (KalbTG), which exhibited no cross-reactivity with known MTG substrates or commonly used target proteins, such as antibodies. KalbTG was produced in Escherichia coli as soluble and active enzyme in the presence of its natural inhibitor ammonium to prevent potentially toxic cross-linking activity. The crystal structure of KalbTG revealed a conserved core similar to other MTGs but very short surface loops, making it the smallest MTG characterized to date. Ultra-dense peptide array technology involving a pool of 1.4 million unique peptides identified specific recognition motifs for KalbTG in these peptides. We determined that the motifs YRYRQ and RYESK are the best Gln and Lys substrates of KalbTG, respectively. By first reacting a bifunctionalized peptide with the more specific KalbTG and in a second step with the less specific MTG from Streptomyces mobaraensis , a successful bio-orthogonal labeling system was demonstrated. Fusing the KalbTG recognition motif to an antibody allowed for site-specific and ratio-controlled labeling using low label excess. Its site specificity, favorable kinetics, ease of use, and cost-effective production render KalbTG an attractive tool for a broad range of applications, including production of therapeutic antibody-drug conjugates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase and use in identifying Streptococcus agalactiae secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Nittayajarn, A; Ross, R P; Rothschild, C B; Parsonage, D; Claiborne, A; Rubens, C E

    1999-09-01

    We have identified and characterized an Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase (AP, encoded by phoZ). The predicted gene product shows homology with alkaline phosphatases from a variety of species; it has especially high similarity with two alkaline phosphatases from Bacillus subtilis. Expression of phoZ in Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), or Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) produces a blue-colony phenotype on plates containing a chromogenic substrate, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate (XP or BCIP). Two tests were made to determine if the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon the enzyme's subcellular location. First, elimination of the signal sequence reduced AP activity to 3% of the wild-type activity (or less) in three species of gram-positive bacteria. Restoration of export, using the signal sequence from C5a peptidase, restored AP activity to at least 50% of that of the wild type. Second, we engineered two chimeric proteins in which AP was fused to either a periplasmic domain or a cytoplasmic domain of lactose permease (a membrane protein). In E. coli, the periplasmic fusion had 17-fold-higher AP activity than the cytoplasmic fusion. We concluded that AP activity is export dependent. The signal sequence deletion mutant, phoZDeltass, was used to identify random genomic fragments from GBS that encode exported proteins or integral membrane proteins. Included in this set of fragments were genes that exhibited homology with the Rib protein (a cell wall protein from GBS) or with DppB (an integral membrane protein from GAS). AP acts as a reporter enzyme in GBS, GAS, and E. faecalis and is expected to be useful in a variety of gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arehart Eric

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194. We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database (n = 29967 and a control set of sequences (coding region not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967. We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in

  11. CloudNeo: a cloud pipeline for identifying patient-specific tumor neoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bais, Preeti; Namburi, Sandeep; Gatti, Daniel M; Zhang, Xinyu; Chuang, Jeffrey H

    2017-10-01

    We present CloudNeo, a cloud-based computational workflow for identifying patient-specific tumor neoantigens from next generation sequencing data. Tumor-specific mutant peptides can be detected by the immune system through their interactions with the human leukocyte antigen complex, and neoantigen presence has recently been shown to correlate with anti T-cell immunity and efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor therapy. However computing capabilities to identify neoantigens from genomic sequencing data are a limiting factor for understanding their role. This challenge has grown as cancer datasets become increasingly abundant, making them cumbersome to store and analyze on local servers. Our cloud-based pipeline provides scalable computation capabilities for neoantigen identification while eliminating the need to invest in local infrastructure for data transfer, storage or compute. The pipeline is a Common Workflow Language (CWL) implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing using Polysolver or HLAminer combined with custom scripts for mutant peptide identification and NetMHCpan for neoantigen prediction. We have demonstrated the efficacy of these pipelines on Amazon cloud instances through the Seven Bridges Genomics implementation of the NCI Cancer Genomics Cloud, which provides graphical interfaces for running and editing, infrastructure for workflow sharing and version tracking, and access to TCGA data. The CWL implementation is at: https://github.com/TheJacksonLaboratory/CloudNeo. For users who have obtained licenses for all internal software, integrated versions in CWL and on the Seven Bridges Cancer Genomics Cloud platform (https://cgc.sbgenomics.com/, recommended version) can be obtained by contacting the authors. jeff.chuang@jax.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Identifying Industry-Specific Components of Product Liability Response System Using Delphi-AHP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo JunHyeok

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available PL (product liability response system is an enterprise-wide system that prevents company’s financial loss due to PL-related accidents. Existing researches on PL response system are mainly focused on preventive and/or defense strategies for the companies. Also, it is obvious that each industry has their original characteristics related on PL issues. It means industry-specific characteristics should be considered to adopt PL response strategies. Thus, this paper aims to discuss industry-specific PL response system and their components. Based on prior researches, we tried to reveal the possibility of its application to manufacturing companies of existing PL response strategies using Delphi method with PL experts. Based on first round results, we tried to classify existing PL strategies of manufacturing companies into several categories. To validate our suggestion for essential components of PL response system, second round Delphi method are applied. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP technique will be applied to identify a prioritized list of each components and strategies. Existing PL response strategies could be categorized with six components – strategy, technology, investment, training, awareness, and organization. Among six components, Technology – it represents the technology needed for improving the safety of all products – is the most important components to prepare PL accidents. The limitation of this paper is on the size of survey and variety of examples. However, the future study will enhance the potential of the proposed method. Regardless of rich research efforts to identify PL response strategies, there is no effort to categorize these strategies and prioritized them. Well-coordinated and actionable PL response strategies and their priorities could help small-and-medium sized enterprise (SME to develop their own PL response system with their limited resources.

  13. Combination of Classifiers Identifies Fungal-Specific Activation of Lysosome Genes in Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. Leonor Fernandes Saraiva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood stream infections can be caused by several pathogens such as viruses, fungi and bacteria and can cause severe clinical complications including sepsis. Delivery of appropriate and quick treatment is mandatory. However, it requires a rapid identification of the invading pathogen. The current gold standard for pathogen identification relies on blood cultures and these methods require a long time to gain the needed diagnosis. The use of in situ experiments attempts to identify pathogen specific immune responses but these often lead to heterogeneous biomarkers due to the high variability in methods and materials used. Using gene expression profiles for machine learning is a developing approach to discriminate between types of infection, but also shows a high degree of inconsistency. To produce consistent gene signatures, capable of discriminating fungal from bacterial infection, we have employed Support Vector Machines (SVMs based on Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP. Combining classifiers by joint optimization constraining them to the same set of discriminating features increased the consistency of our biomarker list independently of leukocyte-type or experimental setup. Our gene signature showed an enrichment of genes of the lysosome pathway which was not uncovered by the use of independent classifiers. Moreover, our results suggest that the lysosome genes are specifically induced in monocytes. Real time qPCR of the identified lysosome-related genes confirmed the distinct gene expression increase in monocytes during fungal infections. Concluding, our combined classifier approach presented increased consistency and was able to “unmask” signaling pathways of less-present immune cells in the used datasets.

  14. Identifying neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors in Drosophila melanogaster by exploiting genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    insect genome, that of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, was sequenced in 2000, and about 200 GPCRs have been annnotated in this model insect. About 50 of these receptors were predicted to have neuropeptides or protein hormones as their ligands. Since 2000, the cDNAs of most of these candidate...... receptors have been cloned and for many receptors the endogenous ligand has been identified. In this review, we will give an update about the current knowledge of all Drosophila neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors, and discuss their phylogenetic relationships. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Feb...

  15. Engineering Environmentally-Stable Proteases to Specifically Neutralize Protein Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    synthesized as a fusion protein on the surface of M13 phage . The random library of subtilisin phage is mixed with the GA- PLFRAL-S-GB substrate...factor (LF), representing four functionally distinct families of toxins. The centerpiece of our design effort is a phage -display selection method for...hour assay. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Enterotoxin, protease, directed evolution, subtilisin, protein engineering, phage -display, enzymology 16. SECURITY

  16. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michel J.; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of

  17. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michel J.; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of

  18. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    contribution of these sites to SNP genesis. Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in this study, it may become possible to scan genomic databases for such clustering of nucleotides in order to predict likely sites of future SNPs, and even the type of polymorphism most likely to occur. PMID:19331672

  19. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-03-30

    sites to SNP genesis. The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in this study, it may become possible to scan genomic databases for such clustering of nucleotides in order to predict likely sites of future SNPs, and even the type of polymorphism most likely to occur.

  20. In vivo FRET-FLIM reveals cell-type-specific protein interactions in Arabidopsis roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Yuchen; Stahl, Yvonne; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Postma, Marten; Zhou, Wenkun; Goedhart, Joachim; Sánchez-Pérez, María Isabel; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Simon, Rüdiger; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2017-01-01

    During multicellular development, specification of distinct cell fates is often regulated by the same transcription factors operating differently in distinct cis-regulatory modules, either through different protein complexes, conformational modification of protein complexes, or combinations of both.

  1. Site-specific functionalization of proteins and their applications to therapeutic antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vught, Remko; Pieters, Roland J.; Breukink, Eefjan

    2014-01-01

    Protein modifications are often required to study structure and function relationships. Instead of the random labeling of lysine residues, methods have been developed to (sequence) specific label proteins. Next to chemical modifications, tools to integrate new chemical groups for bioorthogonal

  2. Site-specific covalent attachment of DNA to proteins using a photoactivatable Tus-Ter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdah, Dahdah B; Morin, Isabelle; Moreau, Morgane J J; Dixon, Nicholas E; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2009-06-07

    Investigations into the photocrosslinking kinetics of the protein Tus with various bromodeoxyuridine-substituted Ter DNA variants highlight the potential use of this complex as a photoactivatable connector between proteins of interest and specific DNA sequences.

  3. Combining RNA-seq and proteomic profiling to identify seminal fluid proteins in the migratory grasshopper Melanoplus sanguinipes (F).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Martha L; Todd, Christopher; Erlandson, Martin; Andres, Jose

    2015-12-22

    Seminal fluid proteins control many aspects of fertilization and in turn, they play a key role in post-mating sexual selection and possibly reproductive isolation. Because effective proteome profiling relies on the availability of high-quality DNA reference databases, our knowledge of these proteins is still largely limited to model organisms with ample genetic resources. New advances in sequencing technology allow for the rapid characterization of transcriptomes at low cost. By combining high throughput RNA-seq and shotgun proteomic profiling, we have characterized the seminal fluid proteins secreted by the primary male accessory gland of the migratory grasshopper (Melanoplus sanguinipes), one of the main agricultural pests in central North America. Using RNA sequencing, we characterized the transcripts of ~ 8,100 genes expressed in the long hyaline tubules (LHT) of the accessory glands. Proteomic profiling identified 353 proteins expressed in the long hyaline tubules (LHT). Of special interest are seminal fluid proteins (SFPs), such as EJAC-SP, ACE and prostaglandin synthetases, which are known to regulate female oviposition in insects. Our study provides new insights into the proteomic components of male ejaculate in Orthopterans, and highlights several important patterns. First, the presence of proteins that lack predicted classical secretory tags in accessory gland proteomes is common in male accessory glands. Second, the products of a few highly expressed genes dominate the accessory gland secretions. Third, accessory gland transcriptomes are enriched for novel transcripts. Fourth, there is conservation of SFPs' functional classes across distantly related taxonomic groups with very different life histories, mating systems and sperm transferring mechanisms. The identified SFPs may serve as targets of future efforts to develop species- specific genetic control strategies.

  4. SPECTRUS: A Dimensionality Reduction Approach for Identifying Dynamical Domains in Protein Complexes from Limited Structural Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Luca; Polles, Guido; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Micheletti, Cristian

    2015-08-04

    Identifying dynamical, quasi-rigid domains in proteins provides a powerful means for characterizing functionally oriented structural changes via a parsimonious set of degrees of freedom. In fact, the relative displacements of few dynamical domains usually suffice to rationalize the mechanics underpinning biological functionality in proteins and can even be exploited for structure determination or refinement purposes. Here we present SPECTRUS, a general scheme that, by solely using amino acid distance fluctuations, can pinpoint the innate quasi-rigid domains of single proteins or large complexes in a robust way. Consistent domains are usually obtained by using either a pair of representative structures or thousands of conformers. The functional insights offered by the approach are illustrated for biomolecular systems of very different size and complexity such as kinases, ion channels, and viral capsids. The decomposition tool is available as a software package and web server at spectrus.sissa.it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies for specifically directing metal functionalization of protein nanotubes: constructing protein coated silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Ascencio, Jorge A; Medina, Ariosto; Aguila, Sergio; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2013-06-14

    Biological molecules that self-assemble in the nanoscale range are useful multifunctional materials. Rotavirus VP6 protein self-assembles into tubular structures in the absence of other rotavirus proteins. Here, we present strategies for selectively directing metal functionalization to the lumen of VP6 nanotubes. The specific in situ metal reduction in the inner surface of nanotube walls was achieved by the simple modification of a method previously reported to functionalize the nanotube outer surface. Silver nanorods and nanowires as long as 1.5 μm were formed inside the nanotubes by coalescence of nanoparticles. Such one-dimensional structures were longer than others previously obtained using bioscaffolds. The interactions between silver ions and the nanotube were simulated to understand the conditions that allowed nanowire formation. Molecular docking showed that a naturally occurring arrangement of aspartate residues enabled the stabilization of silver ions on the internal surface of the VP6 nanotubes. This is the first time that such a spatial arrangement has been proposed for the nucleation of silver nanoparticles, opening the possibility of using such an array to direct functionalization of other biomolecules. These results demonstrate the natural capabilities of VP6 nanotubes to function as a versatile biotemplate for nanomaterials.

  6. Cooperation between transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) structural proteins in the in vitro induction of virus-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, I M; González, S; Bullido, M J; Corsín, M; Risco, C; Langeveld, J P; Enjuanes, L

    1996-12-01

    Following infection of haplotype defined NIH-miniswine with virulent transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV), isolated mesenteric lymph node CD4+ T-cells mounted a specific proliferative response against infectious or inactivated purified virus in secondary in vitro stimulation. A specific, dose-dependent response to the three major recombinant viral proteins: spike (S), membrane (M), and nucleoprotein (N), purified by affinity chromatography, was characterized. Induction of in vitro antibody synthesis was analyzed. The purified recombinant viral proteins induced the in vitro synthesis of neutralizing TGEV-specific antibodies when porcine TGEV-immune cells were stimulated with each of the combinations made with two of the major structural proteins: S + N, S + M, and to a minor extent with M + N, but not by the individual proteins. S-protein was dissociated from purified virus using NP-40 detergent and then micellar S-protein oligomers (S-rosettes) were formed by removing the detergent. These occurred preferentially by the association of more than 10 S-protein trimmers. These S-rosettes in collaboration with either N or M-proteins elicited TGEV-specific antibodies with titers up to 84 and 60%, respectively, of those induced by the whole virus. N-protein could be partially substituted by a 15-mer peptide that represents a T helper epitope previously identified in N-protein (Antón et al. (1995)). These results indicate that the induction of high levels of TGEV-specific antibodies requires stimulation by at least two viral proteins, and that optimum responses are induced by a combination of S-rosettes and the nucleoprotein.

  7. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basset, C.; Dedieu, A.; Guerin, P.; Quemeneur, E.; Meyer, D.; Vidaud, C. [CEA Valrho, DSV, IBEB, Serv Biochim et Toxicol Nucl, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of amino-phosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. (authors)

  8. Identify High-Quality Protein Structural Models by Enhanced K-Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiou; Chen, Cheng; Lv, Qiang; Wu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    Background. One critical issue in protein three-dimensional structure prediction using either ab initio or comparative modeling involves identification of high-quality protein structural models from generated decoys. Currently, clustering algorithms are widely used to identify near-native models; however, their performance is dependent upon different conformational decoys, and, for some algorithms, the accuracy declines when the decoy population increases. Results. Here, we proposed two enhanced K-means clustering algorithms capable of robustly identifying high-quality protein structural models. The first one employs the clustering algorithm SPICKER to determine the initial centroids for basic K-means clustering (SK-means), whereas the other employs squared distance to optimize the initial centroids (K-means++). Our results showed that SK-means and K-means++ were more robust as compared with SPICKER alone, detecting 33 (59%) and 42 (75%) of 56 targets, respectively, with template modeling scores better than or equal to those of SPICKER. Conclusions. We observed that the classic K-means algorithm showed a similar performance to that of SPICKER, which is a widely used algorithm for protein-structure identification. Both SK-means and K-means++ demonstrated substantial improvements relative to results from SPICKER and classical K-means. PMID:28421198

  9. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Miller, Susan M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Wall, Judy [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  10. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elizabeth A; Ziliani, María; Agüero, Fernán; Bernabó, Guillermo; Sánchez, Daniel O; Tekiel, Valeria

    2010-10-05

    The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E). More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem) located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of many different open reading frames (ORFs) was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins). All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II). Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II) and Dm28 (lineage I) T. cruzi strains respectively. Detailed

  11. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A García

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E. More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of many different open reading frames (ORFs was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins. All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II. Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II and Dm28

  12. SDR: a database of predicted specificity-determining residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Jason E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2009-01-01

    The specificity-determining residue database (SDR database) presents residue positions where mutations are predicted to have changed protein function in large protein families. Because the database pre-calculates predictions on existing protein sequence alignments, users can quickly find the predictions by selecting the appropriate protein family or searching by protein sequence. Predictions can be used to guide mutagenesis or to gain a better understanding of specificity changes in a protein family. The database is available on the web at http://paradox.harvard.edu/sdr.

  13. Identifying technical aliases in SELDI mass spectra of complex mixtures of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery datasets created using mass spectrum protein profiling of complex mixtures of proteins contain many peaks that represent the same protein with different charge states. Correlated variables such as these can confound the statistical analyses of proteomic data. Previously we developed an algorithm that clustered mass spectrum peaks that were biologically or technically correlated. Here we demonstrate an algorithm that clusters correlated technical aliases only. Results In this paper, we propose a preprocessing algorithm that can be used for grouping technical aliases in mass spectrometry protein profiling data. The stringency of the variance allowed for clustering is customizable, thereby affecting the number of peaks that are clustered. Subsequent analysis of the clusters, instead of individual peaks, helps reduce difficulties associated with technically-correlated data, and can aid more efficient biomarker identification. Conclusions This software can be used to pre-process and thereby decrease the complexity of protein profiling proteomics data, thus simplifying the subsequent analysis of biomarkers by decreasing the number of tests. The software is also a practical tool for identifying which features to investigate further by purification, identification and confirmation. PMID:24010718

  14. Regulation of Polysaccharide- and Protein- Specific Antibody Responses to Intact Extracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    1 | P a g e “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” By Swagata Kar...the thesis manuscript entitled: “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Is...polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Author: Swagata Kar, Ph.D., 2016. Uniformed Services University

  15. Methods for Identifying Specific Language Impairment in Bilingual Populations in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Hamann

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the performance of 22 monolingual and 54 bilingual children with and without specific language impairment (SLI, in a non-word repetition task (NWRT and a sentence repetition task (SRT. Both tasks were constructed according to the principles for LITMUS tools (Language Impairment Testing in Multilingual Settings developed within COST Action IS0804 and incorporated phonological or syntactic structures that are linguistically complex and have been shown to be difficult for children with SLI across languages. For phonology these are in particular (nonwords containing consonant clusters. In morphosyntax, complexity has been attributed to factors such as embedding and/or syntactic movement. Tasks focusing on such structures are expected to identify SLI in bilinguals across language combinations. This is notoriously difficult because structures that are problematic for typically developing bilinguals (BiTDs and monolingual children with SLI (MoSLI often overlap. We show that the NWRT and the SRT are reliable tools for identification of SLI in bilingual contexts. However, interpretation of the performance of bilingual children depends on background information as provided by parental questionnaires. To evaluate the accuracy of our tasks, we recruited children in ordinary kindergartens or schools and in speech language therapy centers and verified their status with a battery of standardized language tests, assessing bilingual children in both their languages. We consider a bilingual child language impaired if she shows impairments in two language domains in both her languages. For assessment, we used tests normed for monolinguals (with one exception and adjusted the norms for bilingualism and for language dominance. This procedure established the following groups: 10 typical monolinguals (MoTD, 12 MoSLI, 46 BiTD, and 8 bilingual children with SLI (BiSLI. Our results show that both tasks target relevant structures: monolingual

  16. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Daniel M.; Kushwaha, Vandana S.; Denisov, Dmitry V.; Acar, Seyda; Nienhuis, Bernard; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell’s cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models,

  17. Correlation imaging reveals specific crowding dynamics of kinesin motor proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, D.M.; Kushwaha, V.S.; Denisov, D.V.; Acar, S.; Nienhuis, B.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Schall, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell's cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models,

  18. Ion specific protein assembly and hydrophobic surface forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lund, Mikael; Jungwirth, Pavel; Woodward, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 25 (2008), 258105/1-258105/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/07/1006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : lysozyme * water * protein association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  19. Optimizing scoring function of protein-nucleic acid interactions with both affinity and specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Yan

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions.

  20. Shotgun proteomics of Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2 reveals proteins specific to growth on propylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Christopher A; Clark, Daniel D

    2010-11-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM, 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate), once thought to be exclusively produced by methanogens, is now known to be the central cofactor in the metabolism of short-chain alkenes by a variety of aerobic bacteria. There is little evidence to suggest how, and under what conditions, CoM is biosynthesized by these organisms. A shotgun proteomics approach was used to investigate CoM-dependent propylene metabolism in the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2. Cells were grown on either glucose or propylene, and the soluble proteomes were analyzed. An average of 395 proteins was identified from glucose-grown replicates, with an average of 419 identified from propylene-grown replicates. A number of linear megaplasmid (pXAUT01)-encoded proteins were found to be specifically produced by growth on propylene. These included all known to be crucial to propylene metabolism, in addition to an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a DNA-binding protein, and five putative CoM biosynthetic enzymes. This work has provided fresh insight into bacterial alkene metabolism and has generated new targets for future studies in X. autotrophicus Py2 and related CoM-dependent alkene-oxidizing bacteria.

  1. Identifying the role of Wilms tumor 1 associated protein in cancer prediction using integrative genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Sheng; Qian, Jia-Yi; Wang, Minghai; Yang, Haiwei

    2016-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor, WT1 was first identified due to its essential role in the normal development of the human genitourinary system. Wilms tumor 1 associated protein (WTAP) was subsequently revealed to interact with WT1 using yeast two-hybrid screening. The present study identified 44 complete WTAP genes in the genomes of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. The vertebrate WTAP proteins clustered into the primate, rodent and teleost lineages using phylogenetic tree analysis. From 1,347 available SNPs in the human WTAP gene, 19 were identified to cause missense mutations. WTAP was expressed in bladder, blood, brain, breast, colorectal, esophagus, eye, head and neck, lung, ovarian, prostate, skin and soft tissue cancers. A total of 17 out of 328 microarrays demonstrated an association between WTAP gene expression and cancer prognosis. However, the association between WTAP gene expression and prognosis varied in distinct types of cancer, and even in identical types of cancer from separate microarray databases. By searching the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database, 65 somatic mutations were identified in the human WTAP gene from the cancer tissue samples. These results suggest that the function of WTAP in tumor formation may be multidimensional. Furthermore, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, forkhead box protein O1, interferon regulatory factor 1, glucocorticoid receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ transcription factor binding sites were identified in the upstream (promoter) region of the human WTAP gene, suggesting that these transcription factors may be involved in WTAP functions in tumor formation.

  2. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  3. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van't; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Berg, David Van Den; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.

  4. Specific-ion effects on the aggregation mechanisms and protein-protein interactions for anti-streptavidin immunoglobulin gamma-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gregory V; Razinkov, Vladimir I; Kerwin, Bruce A; Laue, Thomas M; Woodka, Andrea H; Butler, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-05-07

    Non-native protein aggregation is common in the biopharmaceutical industry and potentially jeopardizes product shelf life, therapeutic efficacy, and patient safety. The present article focuses on the relationship(s) among protein-protein interactions, aggregate growth mechanisms, aggregate morphologies, and specific-ion effects for an anti-streptavidin (AS) immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG1). Aggregation mechanisms of AS-IgG1 were determined as a function of pH and NaCl concentration with sodium acetate buffer and compared to previous work with sodium citrate. Aggregate size and shape were determined using a combination of laser light scattering and small-angle neutron or X-ray scattering. Protein-protein interactions were quantified in terms of the protein-protein Kirkwood-Buff integral (G22) determined from static light scattering and in terms of the protein effective charge (Zeff) measured using electrophoretic light scattering. Changing from citrate to acetate resulted in significantly different protein-protein interactions as a function of pH for low NaCl concentrations when the protein displayed positive Zeff. Overall, the results suggest that electrostatic repulsions between proteins were lessened because of preferential accumulation of citrate anions, compared to acetate anions, at the protein surface. The predominant aggregation mechanisms correlated well with G22, indicating that ion-specific effects beyond traditional mean-field descriptions of electrostatic protein-protein interactions are important for predicting qualitative shifts in protein aggregation state diagrams. Interestingly, while solution conditions dictated which mechanisms predominated, aggregate average molecular weight and size displayed a common scaling behavior across both citrate- and acetate-based systems.

  5. Adenosine-uridine-rich element is one of the required cis-elements for epimastigote form stage-specific gene expression of the congolense epimastigote specific protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Mochabo, Kennedy Miyoro; Hakimi, Hassan; Yamasaki, Shino; Yamagishi, Junya; Asada, Masahito; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2013-09-01

    It is known that gene expression in kinetoplastida is regulated post-transcriptionally. Several previous studies have shown that stage-specific gene expression in trypanosomes is regulated by cis-elements located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of each mRNA and also by RNA binding proteins. Our previous study revealed that gene expression of congolense epimastigote specific protein (cesp) was regulated by cis-elements located in the 3'UTR. In the present study, we identified the adenosine and uridine rich region in the cesp 3'UTR. Using transgenic trypanosome cell lines with different egfp expression cassettes, we showed that this adenosine and uridine rich region is one of the regulatory elements for epimastigote form (EMF) stage-specific gene expression via the regulatory cis-element of the eukaryotic AU rich element (ARE). Therefore this required element within the cesp 3'UTR was designated as T. congolense ARE. This required cis-element might selectively stabilize mRNA in the EMF stage and destabilize mRNA in other stages. By RNA electro mobility shift assay, unknown stage-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) whose sequences specifically interacted with the required cis-element were found. These results indicate that EMF stage specific cis-element and RBP complexes might specifically stabilize cesp mRNA in EMF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the specific CD4+ T cell response against the F protein during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Yong Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hepatitis C virus (HCV Alternate Reading Frame Protein (ARFP or F protein presents a double-frame shift product of the HCV core gene. We and others have previously reported that the specific antibodies against the F protein could be raised in the sera of HCV chronically infected patients. However, the specific CD4(+ T cell responses against the F protein during HCV infection and the pathological implications remained unclear. In the current study, we screened the MHC class II-presenting epitopes of the F protein through HLA-transgenic mouse models and eventually validated the specific CD4(+ T cell responses in HCV chronically infected patients. METHODOLOGY: DNA vaccination in HLA-DR1 and-DP4 transgenic mouse models, proliferation assay to test the F protein specific T cell response, genotyping of Chronic HCV patients and testing the F-peptide stimulated T cell response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC by in vitro expansion and interferon (IFN- γ intracellular staining. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At least three peptides within HCV F protein were identified as HLA-DR or HLA-DP4 presenting epitopes by the proliferation assays in mouse models. Further study with human PBMCs evidenced the specific CD4(+ T cell responses against HCV F protein as well in patients chronically infected with HCV. CONCLUSION: The current study provided the evidence for the first time that HCV F protein could elicit specific CD4(+ T cell response, which may provide an insight into the immunopathogenesis during HCV chronic infection.

  7. Identifying biological concepts from a protein-related corpus with a probabilistic topic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xinghua

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomedical literature, e.g., MEDLINE, contains a wealth of knowledge regarding functions of proteins. Major recurring biological concepts within such text corpora represent the domains of this body of knowledge. The goal of this research is to identify the major biological topics/concepts from a corpus of protein-related MEDLINE© titles and abstracts by applying a probabilistic topic model. Results The latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA model was applied to the corpus. Based on the Bayesian model selection, 300 major topics were extracted from the corpus. The majority of identified topics/concepts was found to be semantically coherent and most represented biological objects or concepts. The identified topics/concepts were further mapped to the controlled vocabulary of the Gene Ontology (GO terms based on mutual information. Conclusion The major and recurring biological concepts within a collection of MEDLINE documents can be extracted by the LDA model. The identified topics/concepts provide parsimonious and semantically-enriched representation of the texts in a semantic space with reduced dimensionality and can be used to index text.

  8. The systematic functional analysis of plasmodium protein kinases identifies essential regulators of mosquito transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Tewari, Rita

    2010-10-21

    Although eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) contribute to many cellular processes, only three Plasmodium falciparum ePKs have thus far been identified as essential for parasite asexual blood stage development. To identify pathways essential for parasite transmission between their mammalian host and mosquito vector, we undertook a systematic functional analysis of ePKs in the genetically tractable rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei. Modeling domain signatures of conventional ePKs identified 66 putative Plasmodium ePKs. Kinomes are highly conserved between Plasmodium species. Using reverse genetics, we show that 23 ePKs are redundant for asexual erythrocytic parasite development in mice. Phenotyping mutants at four life cycle stages in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes revealed functional clusters of kinases required for sexual development and sporogony. Roles for a putative SR protein kinase (SRPK) in microgamete formation, a conserved regulator of clathrin uncoating (GAK) in ookinete formation, and a likely regulator of energy metabolism (SNF1/KIN) in sporozoite development were identified. 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  10. Brugia malayi excreted/secreted proteins at the host/parasite interface: stage- and gender-specific proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf, L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 "hypothetical" proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274 of these "hypothetical" proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase, MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host-parasite interaction.

  11. Kinase-specific prediction of protein phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Blom, Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    As extensive mass spectrometry-based mapping of the phosphoproteome progresses, computational analysis of phosphorylation-dependent signaling becomes increasingly important. The linear sequence motifs that surround phosphorylated residues have successfully been used to characterize kinase......-substrate specificity. Here, we briefly describe the available resources for predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation from sequence properties. We address the strengths and weaknesses of these resources, which are based on methods ranging from simple consensus patterns to more advanced machine-learning algorithms...

  12. Epitope Sequences in Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Barboza Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is a multi-functional glycoprotein with essential functions both in viral replication and modulation of host innate immune responses. NS1 has been established as a good surrogate marker for infection. In the present study, we generated four anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies against recombinant NS1 protein from dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2, which were used to map three NS1 epitopes. The sequence 193AVHADMGYWIESALNDT209 was recognized by monoclonal antibodies 2H5 and 4H1BC, which also cross-reacted with Zika virus (ZIKV protein. On the other hand, the sequence 25VHTWTEQYKFQPES38 was recognized by mAb 4F6 that did not cross react with ZIKV. Lastly, a previously unidentified DENV2 NS1-specific epitope, represented by the sequence 127ELHNQTFLIDGPETAEC143, is described in the present study after reaction with mAb 4H2, which also did not cross react with ZIKV. The selection and characterization of the epitope, specificity of anti-NS1 mAbs, may contribute to the development of diagnostic tools able to differentiate DENV and ZIKV infections.

  13. Plasma membrane proteome analysis identifies a role of barley Membrane Steroid Binding Protein in root architecture response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Katja; Matros, Andrea; Møller, Anders L B; Ramireddy, Eswarrayya; Finnie, Christine; Peukert, Manuela; Rutten, Twan; Herzog, Andreas; Kunze, Gotthard; Melzer, Michael; Kaspar-Schoenefeld, Stephanie; Schmülling, Thomas; Svensson, Birte; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2018-01-31

    Although physiological consequences of plant growth under saline conditions have been well described, understanding the core mechanisms conferring plant salt adaptation has only started. We target the root plasma membrane (PM) proteomes of two barley varieties, cvs. Steptoe and Morex, with contrasting salinity tolerance. In total, 588 PM proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, of which 182 were either cultivar- or salinity stress-responsive. Three candidate proteins with increased abundance in the tolerant cv. Morex were involved either in sterol-binding (a GTPase-activating protein for the ADP ribosylation factor, ZIGA2, and a membrane steroid binding protein, MSBP) or in phospholipid synthesis (phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, PEAMT). Overexpression of barley MSBP conferred salinity tolerance to yeast cells, while knock-out of the heterologous AtMSBP1 increased salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis. Atmsbp1 plants showed a reduced number of lateral roots under salinity and root tip-specific expression of barley MSBP in Atmsbp1 complemented this phenotype. In barley, an increased abundance of MSBP correlates with reduced root length and lateral root formation as well as increased levels of auxin under salinity being stronger in the tolerant cv. Morex. Hence, we concluded the involvement of MSBP in phytohormone-directed adaptation of root architecture in response to salinity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Features of two new proteins with OmpA-like domains identified in the genome sequences of Leptospira interrogans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline F Teixeira

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an acute febrile disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It is considered an important re-emerging infectious disease that affects humans worldwide. The knowledge about the mechanisms by which pathogenic leptospires invade and colonize the host remains limited since very few virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease have been identified. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two new leptospiral proteins with OmpA-like domains. The recombinant proteins, which exhibit extracellular matrix-binding properties, are called Lsa46 - LIC13479 and Lsa77 - LIC10050 (Leptospiral surface adhesins of 46 and 77 kDa, respectively. Attachment of Lsa46 and Lsa77 to laminin was specific, dose dependent and saturable, with KD values of 24.3 ± 17.0 and 53.0 ± 17.5 nM, respectively. Lsa46 and Lsa77 also bind plasma fibronectin, and both adhesins are plasminogen (PLG-interacting proteins, capable of generating plasmin (PLA and as such, increase the proteolytic ability of leptospires. The proteins corresponding to Lsa46 and Lsa77 are present in virulent L. interrogans L1-130 and in saprophyte L. biflexa Patoc 1 strains, as detected by immunofluorescence. The adhesins are recognized by human leptospirosis serum samples at the onset and convalescent phases of the disease, suggesting that they are expressed during infection. Taken together, our data could offer valuable information to the understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis.

  15. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  16. Identification of Vibrio harveyi proteins involved in the specific immune response of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, A; Mancera, J M; Martínez-Manzanares, E; Moriñigo, M A; Arijo, S

    2015-11-01

    Senegalese sole cultures are frequently affected by Vibrio harveyi disease outbreaks. Vaccines in aquaculture are one of the most successful methods of preventing fish pathologies; however, these vaccines are usually composed of inactivated whole cells containing a wide pool of antigens, and some do not induce any protection against pathogens. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify immunogenic proteins of V. harveyi involved in the specific antibody production by Senegalese sole. S. senegalensis specimens were immunized, by intraperitoneal injection, with V. harveyi bacterin supplemented with inactivated extracellular polymeric substances (ECP) and Freund incomplete adjuvant to obtain polyclonal antiserum. One month later, specimens were re-inoculated with the same antigens. Sera from immunized fish were collected two months post first immunization. Strong specific immune response to V. harveyi antigens was detected by ELISA using bacterin (limit dilutions of sera were 1:64000), ECP (1:4000) and outer membrane proteins (OMP) (1:4000) as antigens. Presence of immunogenic proteins in V. harveyi ECP and OMP were determined by 2D-PAGE. For Western Blot analysis some gels were transferred onto nitrocellulose membranes and incubated with sera from S. senegalensis specimens immunized against V. harveyi. 2D-PAGE and Western Blot showed at least five reactive proteins in the ECP and two in the OMP fraction. The spots that clearly reacted with the sole antiserum were excised from stained gel, and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOFTOF). A database search was then performed, using MASCOT as the search method. According to the results, the five ECP spots were identified as Maltoporine, protein homologous to Metal dependent phosphohydrolase, two porins isoforms of V. harveyi and a protein homologous to the cell division protein FtsH. Reactive proteins in the OMP fraction were identified as the protein 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase and a protein homologous to acid

  17. Site-specific O-Glycosylation Analysis of Human Blood Plasma Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marcus; Marx, Kristina; Reichl, Udo; Wuhrer, Manfred; Rapp, Erdmann

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific glycosylation analysis is key to investigate structure-function relationships of glycoproteins, e.g. in the context of antigenicity and disease progression. The analysis, though, is quite challenging and time consuming, in particular for O-glycosylated proteins. In consequence, despite their clinical and biopharmaceutical importance, many human blood plasma glycoproteins have not been characterized comprehensively with respect to their O-glycosylation. Here, we report on the site-specific O-glycosylation analysis of human blood plasma glycoproteins. To this end pooled human blood plasma of healthy donors was proteolytically digested using a broad-specific enzyme (Proteinase K), followed by a precipitation step, as well as a glycopeptide enrichment and fractionation step via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, the latter being optimized for intact O-glycopeptides carrying short mucin-type core-1 and -2 O-glycans, which represent the vast majority of O-glycans on human blood plasma proteins. Enriched O-glycopeptide fractions were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in positive-ion mode. Peptide identity and glycan composition were derived from low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragment spectra acquired in multistage mode. To pinpoint the O-glycosylation sites glycopeptides were fragmented using electron transfer dissociation. Spectra were annotated by database searches as well as manually. Overall, 31 O-glycosylation sites and regions belonging to 22 proteins were identified, the majority being acute-phase proteins. Strikingly, also 11 novel O-glycosylation sites and regions were identified. In total 23 O-glycosylation sites could be pinpointed. Interestingly, the use of Proteinase K proved to be particularly beneficial in this context. The identified O-glycan compositions most probably correspond to mono- and disialylated core-1

  18. Bet v 1 homologues in strawberry identified as IgE-binding proteins and presumptive allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, A L; Alm, R; Ekstrand, B; Fjelkner-Modig, S; Schiött, A; Bengtsson, U; Björk, L; Hjernø, K; Roepstorff, P; Emanuelsson, C S

    2004-12-01

    No strawberry allergen has so far been identified and characterized. Serum samples were collected from patients with a suggestive case history of adverse reactions to strawberry and other fruits. Extracts from fresh and frozen strawberries were analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and mass spectrometry. Patient blood samples were analysed for inhibition of IgE binding and basophil degranulation. Several IgE-binding proteins could be detected. In more than half of the patient sera, a 20/18-kDa doublet band was observed in Western blotting. These two bands were excised and analysed by mass spectrometry showing the presence of proteins belonging to the Bet v 1 family of allergens. Inhibition of the IgE binding to the 20/18-kDa doublet was obtained by addition of two recombinantly expressed allergens belonging to the Bet v 1 family (Bet v 1 and Mal d 1) and strawberry protein extract. In a cell-based assay of patient blood samples, basophil degranulation could be induced by strawberry protein extract and by Bet v 1 and Mal d 1. We conclude that strawberry homologues to Bet v 1 may be allergens of importance for adverse reactions to strawberry.

  19. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  20. Genome of the Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Deelen, Joris; Isaacs, Aaron; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mbarek, Hamdi; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Verweij, Niek; Van Enckevort, David J.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; White, Charles C.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Bartz, Traci M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Joshi, Peter K.; Peloso, Gina M.; Deelen, Patrick; Van Dijk, Freerk; Willemsen, Gonneke; De Geus, Eco J.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Francioli, Laurent C.; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Beekman, Marian; De Craen, Anton J M; Uh, Hae Won; Trochet, Holly; Hocking, Lynne J.; Porteous, David J.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Bis, Joshua C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Campbell, Harry; Duan, Qing; Lange, Leslie A.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Stott, David J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Jukema, J. Wouter; Van Der Harst, Pim; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Swertz, Morris A.; Van Ommen, Gert Jan B; De Bakker, Paul I W; Eline Slagboom, P.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Neerincx, Pieter B T; Elbers, Clara C.; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Peer, Itsik; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Van Oven, Mannis; Vermaat, Martijn; Li, Mingkun; Laros, Jeroen F J; Stoneking, Mark; De Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Veldink, Jan H.; Van Den Berg, Leonard H.; Byelas, Heorhiy; Den Dunnen, Johan T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Amin, Najaf; Van Der Velde, K. Joeri; Van Setten, Jessica; Kattenberg, Mathijs; Van Schaik, Barbera D C; Bot, Jan; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Mei, Hailiang; Koval, Vyacheslav; Ye, Kai; Lameijer, Eric Wubbo; Moed, Matthijs H.; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Sohail, Mashaal; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Marschall, Tobias; Schönhuth, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Suchiman, H. Eka D; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Platteel, Mathieu; Pitts, Steven J.; Potluri, Shobha; Cox, David R.; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; Wang, Jun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (∼35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel created

  1. The germ cell nuclear proteins hnRNP G-T and RBMY activate a testis-specific exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilei; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Pang, Shaochen; Kudla, Marek; Dreumont, Natacha; Kister, Liliane; Sun, Yong-Hua; Stevenin, James; Elliott, David J

    2009-11-01

    The human testis has almost as high a frequency of alternative splicing events as brain. While not as extensively studied as brain, a few candidate testis-specific splicing regulator proteins have been identified, including the nuclear RNA binding proteins RBMY and hnRNP G-T, which are germ cell-specific versions of the somatically expressed hnRNP G protein and are highly conserved in mammals. The splicing activator protein Tra2beta is also highly expressed in the testis and physically interacts with these hnRNP G family proteins. In this study, we identified a novel testis-specific cassette exon TLE4-T within intron 6 of the human transducing-like enhancer of split 4 (TLE4) gene which makes a more transcriptionally repressive TLE4 protein isoform. TLE4-T splicing is normally repressed in somatic cells because of a weak 5' splice site and surrounding splicing-repressive intronic regions. TLE4-T RNA pulls down Tra2beta and hnRNP G proteins which activate its inclusion. The germ cell-specific RBMY and hnRNP G-T proteins were more efficient in stimulating TLE4-T incorporation than somatically expressed hnRNP G protein. Tra2b bound moderately to TLE4-T RNA, but more strongly to upstream sites to potently activate an alternative 3' splice site normally weakly selected in the testis. Co-expression of Tra2beta with either hnRNP G-T or RBMY re-established the normal testis physiological splicing pattern of this exon. Although they can directly bind pre-mRNA sequences around the TLE4-T exon, RBMY and hnRNP G-T function as efficient germ cell-specific splicing co-activators of TLE4-T. Our study indicates a delicate balance between the activity of positive and negative splicing regulators combinatorially controls physiological splicing inclusion of exon TLE4-T and leads to modulation of signalling pathways in the testis. In addition, we identified a high-affinity binding site for hnRNP G-T protein, showing it is also a sequence-specific RNA binding protein.

  2. Coevolution analysis of Hepatitis C virus genome to identify the structural and functional dependency network of viral proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champeimont, Raphaël; Laine, Elodie; Hu, Shuang-Wei; Penin, Francois; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-05-01

    A novel computational approach of coevolution analysis allowed us to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) at the residue resolution. For the first time, coevolution analysis of an entire viral genome was realized, based on a limited set of protein sequences with high sequence identity within genotypes. The identified coevolving residues constitute highly relevant predictions of protein-protein interactions for further experimental identification of HCV protein complexes. The method can be used to analyse other viral genomes and to predict the associated protein interaction networks.

  3. Deep Sequencing in Microdissected Renal Tubules Identifies Nephron Segment-Specific Transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Chou, Chung-Lin; Knepper, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    The function of each renal tubule segment depends on the genes expressed therein. High-throughput methods used for global profiling of gene expression in unique cell types have shown low sensitivity and high false positivity, thereby limiting the usefulness of these methods in transcriptomic research. However, deep sequencing of RNA species (RNA-seq) achieves highly sensitive and quantitative transcriptomic profiling by sequencing RNAs in a massive, parallel manner. Here, we used RNA-seq coupled with classic renal tubule microdissection to comprehensively profile gene expression in each of 14 renal tubule segments from the proximal tubule through the inner medullary collecting duct of rat kidneys. Polyadenylated mRNAs were captured by oligo-dT primers and processed into adapter-ligated cDNA libraries that were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Transcriptomes were identified to a median depth of 8261 genes in microdissected renal tubule samples (105 replicates in total) and glomeruli (5 replicates). Manual microdissection allowed a high degree of sample purity, which was evidenced by the observed distributions of well established cell-specific markers. The main product of this work is an extensive database of gene expression along the nephron provided as a publicly accessible webpage (https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/NephronRNAseq/index.html). The data also provide genome-wide maps of alternative exon usage and polyadenylation sites in the kidney. We illustrate the use of the data by profiling transcription factor expression along the renal tubule and mapping metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Identifying Country-Specific Cultures of Physics Education: A differential item functioning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesic, Vanes

    2012-11-01

    In international large-scale assessments of educational outcomes, student achievement is often represented by unidimensional constructs. This approach allows for drawing general conclusions about country rankings with respect to the given achievement measure, but it typically does not provide specific diagnostic information which is necessary for systematic comparisons and improvements of educational systems. Useful information could be obtained by exploring the differences in national profiles of student achievement between low-achieving and high-achieving countries. In this study, we aimed to identify the relative weaknesses and strengths of eighth graders' physics achievement in Bosnia and Herzegovina in comparison to the achievement of their peers from Slovenia. For this purpose, we ran a secondary analysis of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 data. The student sample consisted of 4,220 students from Bosnia and Herzegovina and 4,043 students from Slovenia. After analysing the cognitive demands of TIMSS 2007 physics items, the correspondent differential item functioning (DIF)/differential group functioning contrasts were estimated. Approximately 40% of items exhibited large DIF contrasts, indicating significant differences between cultures of physics education in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovenia. The relative strength of students from Bosnia and Herzegovina showed to be mainly associated with the topic area 'Electricity and magnetism'. Classes of items which required the knowledge of experimental method, counterintuitive thinking, proportional reasoning and/or the use of complex knowledge structures proved to be differentially easier for students from Slovenia. In the light of the presented results, the common practice of ranking countries with respect to universally established cognitive categories seems to be potentially misleading.

  5. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  6. MHC class I-presented lung cancer-associated tumor antigens identified by immunoproteomics analysis are targets for cancer-specific T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vivekananda; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Nickens, Zacharie; Shah, Punit; Hafner, Julie; Mariello, Lisa; Kamal, Shivali; Vlahović, Gordana; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A; Philip, Ramila

    2011-05-01

    The development of potent cancer vaccines for common malignancies such as lung cancer requires identification of suitable target antigens. We hypothesized that peptide epitopes naturally presented by MHC class I molecules on the surface of cancer cells would be the most relevant targets. We used LC/MS/MS analysis and identified 68 MHC class I-presented peptides from lung cancer cells. Using the criteria of strong consensus for HLA-A2 binding and relevance of the source proteins to malignant phenotype, we selected 8 peptides for functional characterization. These peptides, with a range of binding affinities, were confirmed to stabilize HLA-A2 molecules and were used to activate peptide-specific CTLs that efficiently recognized lung tumor cells. No correlation between the transcript levels of the source proteins and the extent of peptide-specific T cell recognition of lung cancer cells was observed. Furthermore, the peptide specific CTLs failed to recognize HLA-A2+ normal lung cells despite expression of the mRNA encoding the source proteins from which the peptides were derived. We conclude that MHC class I associated peptide epitopes are a more relevant source of authentic tumor antigens than over-expressed proteins and the identified peptides may be used as antigens for therapeutic vaccine strategies to treat lung cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  8. Human antibody responses of patients living in endemic areas for schistosomiasis to the tegumental protein Sm29 identified through genomic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, F. C.; Pacifico, RNA; Mortara, Renato Arruda [UNIFESP; Oliveira, S. C.

    2006-01-01

    Surface proteins of schistosomes are exposed to host tissues and thus present as potential candidate molecules for the development of new intervention strategies. Herein, we have identified a new tegumental protein of Schistosoma mansoni, termed Sm29. in silico analysis revealed a signal peptide, three glycosylation sites and a transmembrane region on Sm29 amino acid sequence. Sm29 transcription in mammalian developmental stages cDNA libraries of S. mansoni was verified by PCR using specific ...

  9. Comparative Genomics Identifies Epidermal Proteins Associated with the Evolution of the Turtle Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Strasser, Bettina; Sipos, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Heiko A; Mlitz, Veronika; Sukseree, Supawadee; Weissenbacher, Anton; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of reptiles, birds, and mammals was associated with the origin of unique integumentary structures. Studies on lizards, chicken, and humans have suggested that the evolution of major structural proteins of the outermost, cornified layers of the epidermis was driven by the diversification of a gene cluster called Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC). Turtles have evolved unique defense mechanisms that depend on mechanically resilient modifications of the epidermis. To investigate whether the evolution of the integument in these reptiles was associated with specific adaptations of the sequences and expression patterns of EDC-related genes, we utilized newly available genome sequences to determine the epidermal differentiation gene complement of turtles. The EDC of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) comprises more than 100 genes, including at least 48 genes that encode proteins referred to as beta-keratins or corneous beta-proteins. Several EDC proteins have evolved cysteine/proline contents beyond 50% of total amino acid residues. Comparative genomics suggests that distinct subfamilies of EDC genes have been expanded and partly translocated to loci outside of the EDC in turtles. Gene expression analysis in the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) showed that EDC genes are differentially expressed in the skin of the various body sites and that a subset of beta-keratin genes within the EDC as well as those located outside of the EDC are expressed predominantly in the shell. Our findings give strong support to the hypothesis that the evolutionary innovation of the turtle shell involved specific molecular adaptations of epidermal differentiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-10-10

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  11. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of Homologous Proteins for Specific Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A drug is a chemical substance used in the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of disease or as a component of a medication, should be specific and freedom from side affect. Many issues should be addressed while designing a new drug or improving existing compound. The increase in the interdisciplinary nature of science ...

  13. Effects of UVB-induced oxidative stress on protein expression and specific protein oxidation in normal human epithelial keratinocytes: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Federico

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UVB component of solar ultraviolet irradiation is one of the major risk factors for the development of skin cancer in humans. UVB exposure elicits an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, RNA and lipids. In order to examine the biological impact of UVB irradiation on skin cells, we used a parallel proteomics approach to analyze the protein expression profile and to identify oxidatively modified proteins in normal human epithelial keratinocytes. Results The expression levels of fifteen proteins - involved in maintaining the cytoskeleton integrity, removal of damaged proteins and heat shock response - were differentially regulated in UVB-exposed cells, indicating that an appropriate response is developed in order to counteract/neutralize the toxic effects of UVB-raised ROS. On the other side, the redox proteomics approach revealed that seven proteins - involved in cellular adhesion, cell-cell interaction and protein folding - were selectively oxidized. Conclusions Despite a wide and well orchestrated cellular response, a relevant oxidation of specific proteins concomitantly occurs in UVB-irradiated human epithelial Keratinocytes. These modified (i.e. likely dysfunctional proteins might result in cell homeostasis impairment and therefore eventually promote cellular degeneration, senescence or carcinogenesis.

  14. The Ebola virus VP35 protein binds viral immunostimulatory and host RNAs identified through deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A Dilley

    Full Text Available Ebola virus and Marburg virus are members of the Filovirdae family and causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates in humans. Filovirus virulence is partially attributed to the VP35 protein, a well-characterized inhibitor of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway that triggers the antiviral interferon (IFN response. Prior work demonstrates the ability of VP35 to block potent RIG-I activators, such as Sendai virus (SeV, and this IFN-antagonist activity is directly correlated with its ability to bind RNA. Several structural studies demonstrate that VP35 binds short synthetic dsRNAs; yet, there are no data that identify viral immunostimulatory RNAs (isRNA or host RNAs bound to VP35 in cells. Utilizing a SeV infection model, we demonstrate that both viral isRNA and host RNAs are bound to Ebola and Marburg VP35s in cells. By deep sequencing the purified VP35-bound RNA, we identified the SeV copy-back defective interfering (DI RNA, previously identified as a robust RIG-I activator, as the isRNA bound by multiple filovirus VP35 proteins, including the VP35 protein from the West African outbreak strain (Makona EBOV. Moreover, RNAs isolated from a VP35 RNA-binding mutant were not immunostimulatory and did not include the SeV DI RNA. Strikingly, an analysis of host RNAs bound by wild-type, but not mutant, VP35 revealed that select host RNAs are preferentially bound by VP35 in cell culture. Taken together, these data support a model in which VP35 sequesters isRNA in virus-infected cells to avert RIG-I like receptor (RLR activation.

  15. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  16. HIV-specific probabilistic models of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Nickle

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative sequence analyses, including such fundamental bioinformatics techniques as similarity searching, sequence alignment and phylogenetic inference, have become a mainstay for researchers studying type 1 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 genome structure and evolution. Implicit in comparative analyses is an underlying model of evolution, and the chosen model can significantly affect the results. In general, evolutionary models describe the probabilities of replacing one amino acid character with another over a period of time. Most widely used evolutionary models for protein sequences have been derived from curated alignments of hundreds of proteins, usually based on mammalian genomes. It is unclear to what extent these empirical models are generalizable to a very different organism, such as HIV-1-the most extensively sequenced organism in existence. We developed a maximum likelihood model fitting procedure to a collection of HIV-1 alignments sampled from different viral genes, and inferred two empirical substitution models, suitable for describing between-and within-host evolution. Our procedure pools the information from multiple sequence alignments, and provided software implementation can be run efficiently in parallel on a computer cluster. We describe how the inferred substitution models can be used to generate scoring matrices suitable for alignment and similarity searches. Our models had a consistently superior fit relative to the best existing models and to parameter-rich data-driven models when benchmarked on independent HIV-1 alignments, demonstrating evolutionary biases in amino-acid substitution that are unique to HIV, and that are not captured by the existing models. The scoring matrices derived from the models showed a marked difference from common amino-acid scoring matrices. The use of an appropriate evolutionary model recovered a known viral transmission history, whereas a poorly chosen model introduced phylogenetic

  17. Specificity of Protein Covalent Modification by the Electrophilic Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspiel, Joel D.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Goyal, Sandeep; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Lowe, Eric; Teague, Juli; Wong, Hansen; Guengerich, F. Peter; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Carfilzomib (CFZ) is a second-generation proteasome inhibitor that is Food and Drug Administration and European Commission approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. CFZ is an epoxomicin derivative with an epoxyketone electrophilic warhead that irreversibly adducts the catalytic threonine residue of the β5 subunit of the proteasome. Although CFZ produces a highly potent, sustained inactivation of the proteasome, the electrophilic nature of the drug could potentially produce off-target protein adduction. To address this possibility, we synthesized an alkynyl analog of CFZ and investigated protein adduction by this analog in HepG2 cells. Using click chemistry coupled with streptavidin based IP and shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), we identified two off-target proteins, cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), as targets of the alkynyl CFZ probe. We confirmed the adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 by streptavidin capture and immunoblotting methodology and then site-specifically mapped the adducts with targeted MS/MS methods. Although CFZ adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 in vitro decreased the activities of these enzymes, the small fraction of these proteins modified by CFZ in intact cells should limit the impact of these off-target modifications. The data support the high selectivity of CFZ for covalent modification of its therapeutic targets, despite the presence of a reactive electrophile. The approach we describe offers a generalizable method to evaluate the safety profile of covalent protein-modifying therapeutics. PMID:27503896

  18. The BridgeDb framework: standardized access to gene, protein and metabolite identifier mapping services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanspers Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many complementary solutions are available for the identifier mapping problem. This creates an opportunity for bioinformatics tool developers. Tools can be made to flexibly support multiple mapping services or mapping services could be combined to get broader coverage. This approach requires an interface layer between tools and mapping services. Results Here we present BridgeDb, a software framework for gene, protein and metabolite identifier mapping. This framework provides a standardized interface layer through which bioinformatics tools can be connected to different identifier mapping services. This approach makes it easier for tool developers to support identifier mapping. Mapping services can be combined or merged to support multi-omics experiments or to integrate custom microarray annotations. BridgeDb provides its own ready-to-go mapping services, both in webservice and local database forms. However, the framework is intended for customization and adaptation to any identifier mapping service. BridgeDb has already been integrated into several bioinformatics applications. Conclusion By uncoupling bioinformatics tools from mapping services, BridgeDb improves capability and flexibility of those tools. All described software is open source and available at http://www.bridgedb.org.

  19. Sperm-egg recognition in the mouse: characterization of sp56, a sperm protein having specific affinity for ZP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A; Le, T; Palacios, M; Bookbinder, L H; Wassarman, P M; Suzuki, F; Bleil, J D

    1994-05-01

    Recognition between mammalian gametes occurs when the plasma membrane of the sperm head binds to the zona pellucida (ZP), an extracellular coat surrounding eggs. ZP3, one of three glycoproteins in the ZP, is the egg protein recognized by sperm. A mouse sperm surface protein, sp56 (M(r) = 56,000), has been identified on the basis of its specific affinity for ZP3 (Bleil, J. D., and P. M. Wassarman. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:5563-5567). Studies presented here were designed to characterize mouse sperm sp56 and to further test whether or not this protein specifically recognizes ZP3. sp56 was purified by both ZP3 affinity chromatography and by ion exchange chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified native protein eluted from size-exclusion columns as a homomultimer (M(r) approximately 110,000). Each monomer of the protein contains intramolecular disulfide bonds, consistent with its extracellular location. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting studies, using monoclonal antibodies, demonstrated that sp56 is a peripheral membrane protein located on the outer surface of the sperm head plasma membrane, precisely where sperm bind ZP3. Results of crosslinking experiments demonstrated that the ZP3 oligosaccharide recognized by sperm has specific affinity for sp56. Collectively, these results suggest that sp56 may be the sperm protein responsible for sperm-egg recognition in the mouse.

  20. Specific Ion Effects on Protein Thermal Aggregation from Dilute Solutions to Crowded Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuling; Ye, Shuji; Liu, Guangming

    2018-03-29

    We have investigated specific ion effects on protein thermal aggregation from dilute solutions to crowded environments. Ovalbumin and poly(ethylene glycol) have been employed as the model protein and crowding agent, respectively. Our studies demonstrate that the rate-limiting step of ovalbumin thermal aggregation is changed from the aggregation of unfolded protein molecules to the unfolding of the protein molecules, when the solution conditions are varied from a dilute solution to a crowded environment. The specific ion effects acting on the thermal aggregation of ovalbumin generated by kosmotropic and chaotropic ions are different. The thermal aggregation of ovalbumin molecules is promoted by kosmotropic anions in dilute solutions via an increase in protein hydrophobic interactions. In contrast, ovalbumin thermal aggregation is facilitated by chaotropic ions in crowded environments through accelerated unfolding of protein molecules. Therefore, there are distinct mechanisms causing the ion specificities of protein thermal aggregation between dilute solutions and crowded environments. The ion specificities are dominated by ion-specific hydrophobic interactions between protein molecules and ion-specific unfolding of protein molecules in dilute solutions and crowded environments, respectively.

  1. Profiling of gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Won; Liu, Hao; Choi, Duk Kwon; Oh, Tae Seok; Mukherjee, Rajib; Yun, Jong Won

    2012-02-02

    Obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats with different responses to development of obesity in spite of the same genetic background are useful animal models for searching for markers during the development of obesity. Here, we investigated whether plasma proteins of OP and OR rats may behave in a different way in males and females. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF/MS on proteins from OP and OR male and female rats to discover gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity. A total of 29 proteins showing differential expression between the groups were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS and database searches. These proteins were classified into 4 groups according to their regulation patterns in response to diet and gender. 22 proteins showed significant differences between OP and OR rats in males and/or females (Group I, II, and III) and 7 proteins exhibited only a high fat diet (HFD)-responsive difference in male or female rats (Group IV). In conclusion, the proteins negatively (ITIH3, FGG, TUBB5, and ZAG) or positively (Hp, ITIH4, and RBP) correlated with obesity found in this study could be used for selection of new targets for gender specific-medical treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Peptidomics of Peptic Digest of Selected Potato Tuber Proteins: Post-Translational Modifications and Limited Cleavage Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C K Rajendran, Subin R; Mason, Beth; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-03-23

    Bioinformatic tools are useful in predicting bioactive peptides from food proteins. This study was focused on using bioinformatics and peptidomics to evaluate the specificity of peptide release and post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a peptic digest of potato protein isolate. Peptides in the protein hydrolysate were identified by LC-MS/MS and subsequently aligned to their parent potato tuber proteins. Five major proteins were selected for further analysis, namely, lipoxygenase, α-1,4-glucan phosphorylase, annexin, patatin, and polyubiquitin, based on protein coverage, abundance, confidence levels, and function. Comparison of the in silico peptide profile generated with ExPASy PeptideCutter and experimental peptidomics data revealed several differences. The experimental peptic cleavage sites were found to vary in number and specificity from PeptideCutter predictions. Average peptide chain length was also found to be higher than predicted with hexapeptides as the smallest detected peptides. Moreover, PTMs, particularly Met oxidation and Glu/Asp deamidation, were observed in some peptides, and these were unaccounted for during in silico analysis. PTMs can be formed during aging of potato tubers, or as a result of processing conditions during protein isolation and hydrolysis. The findings provide insights on the limitations of current bioinformatics tools for predicting bioactive peptide release from proteins, and on the existence of structural modifications that can alter the peptide bioactivity and functionality.

  3. Characterization of a spore-specific protein of the Bacillus cereus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    From, Cecilie; van der Voort, Menno; Abee, Tjakko; Granum, Per Einar

    2012-06-01

    Bc1245 is a monocistronic chromosomal gene of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 encoding a putative protein of 143 amino acids identified in this study to have a spore-related function in B. cereus. Bc1245 is highly conserved in the genome of members of the B. cereus group, indicating an important function of the gene in this group of bacteria. Quantitative PCR revealed that bc1245 is transcribed late in sporulation (upon formation of phase-bright spores) and at the same time as the mother cell-specific transcription factor σ(K) . The σ(K) regulon includes structural components of the spore (such as coat proteins), and it is therefore plausible that bc1245 might encode a structural outer spore protein. This was confirmed by detection of BC1245 in exosporium extracts from B. cereus by immunoblotting against BC1245 antiserum. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glycoproteomics: identifying the glycosylation of prostate specific antigen at normal and high isoelectric points by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ehwang; Mayampurath, Anoop; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Tang, Haixu; Mechref, Yehia

    2014-12-05

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker to diagnose prostate cancer. PSA testing has been widely used to detect and screen prostate cancer. However, in the diagnostic gray zone, the PSA test does not clearly distinguish between benign prostate hypertrophy and prostate cancer due to their overlap. To develop more specific and sensitive candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer, an in-depth understanding of the biochemical characteristics of PSA (such as glycosylation) is needed. PSA has a single glycosylation site at Asn69, with glycans constituting approximately 8% of the protein by weight. Here, we report the comprehensive identification and quantitation of N-glycans from two PSA isoforms using LC-MS/MS. There were 56 N-glycans associated with PSA, whereas 57 N-glycans were observed in the case of the PSA-high isoelectric point (pI) isoform (PSAH). Three sulfated/phosphorylated glycopeptides were detected, the identification of which was supported by tandem MS data. One of these sulfated/phosphorylated N-glycans, HexNAc5Hex4dHex1s/p1 was identified in both PSA and PSAH at relative intensities of 0.52 and 0.28%, respectively. Quantitatively, the variations were monitored between these two isoforms. Because we were one of the laboratories participating in the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group (gPRG) study, those results were compared to that presented in this study. Our qualitative and quantitative results summarized here were comparable to those that were summarized in the interlaboratory study.

  5. Glycoproteomics: Identifying the Glycosylation of Prostate Specific Antigen at Normal and High Isoelectric Points by LC–MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker to diagnose prostate cancer. PSA testing has been widely used to detect and screen prostate cancer. However, in the diagnostic gray zone, the PSA test does not clearly distinguish between benign prostate hypertrophy and prostate cancer due to their overlap. To develop more specific and sensitive candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer, an in-depth understanding of the biochemical characteristics of PSA (such as glycosylation) is needed. PSA has a single glycosylation site at Asn69, with glycans constituting approximately 8% of the protein by weight. Here, we report the comprehensive identification and quantitation of N-glycans from two PSA isoforms using LC–MS/MS. There were 56 N-glycans associated with PSA, whereas 57 N-glycans were observed in the case of the PSA-high isoelectric point (pI) isoform (PSAH). Three sulfated/phosphorylated glycopeptides were detected, the identification of which was supported by tandem MS data. One of these sulfated/phosphorylated N-glycans, HexNAc5Hex4dHex1s/p1 was identified in both PSA and PSAH at relative intensities of 0.52 and 0.28%, respectively. Quantitatively, the variations were monitored between these two isoforms. Because we were one of the laboratories participating in the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group (gPRG) study, those results were compared to that presented in this study. Our qualitative and quantitative results summarized here were comparable to those that were summarized in the interlaboratory study. PMID:25327667

  6. Endogenous ribosomal protein L29 (RPL29: a newly identified regulator of angiogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T. Jones

    2013-01-01

    Cellular ribosomal protein L29 (RPL29 is known to be important in protein synthesis, but its function during angiogenesis has never been described before. We have shown previously that mice lacking β3-integrins support enhanced tumour angiogenesis and, therefore, deletion of endothelial αvβ3 can provide a method for discovery of novel regulators of tumour angiogenesis. Here, we describe significant upregulation of RPL29 in β3-null endothelial cells at both the mRNA and protein level. Ex vivo, we show that VEGF-stimulated microvessel sprouting was reduced significantly in Rpl29-heterozygous and Rpl29-null aortic ring assays compared with wild-type controls. Moreover, we provide in vivo evidence that RPL29 can regulate tumour angiogenesis. Tumour blood vessel density in subcutaneously grown Lewis lung carcinomas was reduced significantly in Rpl29-mutant mice. Additionally, depletion of Rpl29 using RNA interference inhibited VEGF-induced aortic ring sprouting, suggesting that anti-RPL29 strategies might have anti-angiogenic potential. Overall, our results identify that loss or depletion of RPL29 can reduce angiogenesis in vivo and ex vivo.

  7. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Restelli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions.Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells.These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  8. Negative Regulation of Active Zone Assembly by a Newly Identified SR Protein Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Ervin L.; Fetter, Richard D.; Davis, Graeme W.

    2009-01-01

    Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila) or ribbon (vertebrates) are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ) of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic cont...

  9. Specific protein changes contribute to the differential muscle mass loss during ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; De Palma, Sara; Fania, Chiara; Torretta, Enrica; Cammarata, Francesco P; Magnaghi, Valerio; Procacci, Patrizia; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    In the skeletal muscle, the ageing process is characterized by a loss of muscle mass and strength, coupled with a decline of mitochondrial function and a decrease of satellite cells. This profile is more pronounced in hindlimb than in forelimb muscles, both in humans and in rodents. Utilizing light and electron microscopy, myosin heavy chain isoform distribution, proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, MALDI-TOF MS and quantitative immunoblotting, this study analyzes the protein levels and the nuclear localization of specific molecules, which can contribute to a preferential muscle loss. Our results identify the molecular changes in the hindlimb (gastrocnemius) and forelimb (triceps) muscles during ageing in rats (3- and 22-month-old). Specifically, the oxidative metabolism contributes to tissue homeostasis in triceps, whereas respiratory chain disruption and oxidative-stress-induced damage imbalance the homeostasis in gastrocnemius muscle. High levels of dihydrolipoyllysine-residue acetyltransferase (Dlat) and ATP synthase subunit alpha (Atp5a1) are detected in triceps and gastrocnemius, respectively. Interestingly, in triceps, both molecules are increased in the nucleus in aged rats and are associated to an increased protein acetylation and myoglobin availability. Furthermore, autophagy is retained in triceps whereas an enhanced fusion, decrement of mitophagy and of regenerative potential is observed in aged gastrocnemius muscle. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Ali Gadahi

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis.

  11. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  12. Proteomic screen in the simple metazoan Hydra identifies 14-3-3 binding proteins implicated in cellular metabolism, cytoskeletal organisation and Ca2+ signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imhof Axel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins have been implicated in many signalling mechanisms due to their interaction with Ser/Thr phosphorylated target proteins. They are evolutionarily well conserved in eukaryotic organisms from single celled protozoans and unicellular algae to plants and humans. A diverse array of target proteins has been found in higher plants and in human cell lines including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organisation, secretion and Ca2+ signalling. Results We found that the simple metazoan Hydra has four 14-3-3 isoforms. In order to investigate whether the diversity of 14-3-3 target proteins is also conserved over the whole animal kingdom we isolated 14-3-3 binding proteins from Hydra vulgaris using a 14-3-3-affinity column. We identified 23 proteins that covered most of the above-mentioned groups. We also isolated several novel 14-3-3 binding proteins and the Hydra specific secreted fascin-domain-containing protein PPOD. In addition, we demonstrated that one of the 14-3-3 isoforms, 14-3-3 HyA, interacts with one Hydra-Bcl-2 like protein in vitro. Conclusion Our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins have been ubiquitous signalling components since the start of metazoan evolution. We also discuss the possibility that they are involved in the regulation of cell numbers in response to food supply in Hydra.

  13. The antibacterial protein lysozyme identified as the termite egg recognition pheromone.

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    Kenji Matsuura

    Full Text Available Social insects rely heavily on pheromone communication to maintain their sociality. Egg protection is one of the most fundamental social behaviours in social insects. The recent discovery of the termite-egg mimicking fungus 'termite-ball' and subsequent studies on termite egg protection behaviour have shown that termites can be manipulated by using the termite egg recognition pheromone (TERP, which strongly evokes the egg-carrying and -grooming behaviours of workers. Despite the great scientific and economic importance, TERP has not been identified because of practical difficulties. Herein we identified the antibacterial protein lysozyme as the TERP. We isolated the target protein using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and the MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed a molecular size of 14.5 kDa. We found that the TERP provided antibacterial activity against a gram-positive bacterium. Among the currently known antimicrobial proteins, the molecular size of 14.5 kDa limits the target to lysozyme. Termite lysozymes obtained from eggs and salivary glands, and even hen egg lysozyme, showed a strong termite egg recognition activity. Besides eggs themselves, workers also supply lysozyme to eggs through frequent egg-grooming, by which egg surfaces are coated with saliva containing lysozyme. Reverse transcript PCR analysis showed that mRNA of termite lysozyme was expressed in both salivary glands and eggs. Western blot analysis confirmed that lysozyme production begins in immature eggs in queen ovaries. This is the first identification of proteinaceous pheromone in social insects. Researchers have focused almost exclusively on hydrocarbons when searching for recognition pheromones in social insects. The present finding of a proteinaceous pheromone represents a major step forward in, and result in the broadening of, the search for recognition pheromones. This novel function of lysozyme as a termite pheromone illuminates the profound influence

  14. Polymerase specific error rates and profiles identified by single molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestand, Matthew S; Van Houdt, Jeroen; Cristofoli, Francesca; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases have an innate error rate which is polymerase and DNA context specific. Historically the mutational rate and profiles have been measured using a variety of methods, each with their own technical limitations. Here we used the unique properties of single molecule sequencing to evaluate the mutational rate and profiles of six DNA polymerases at the sequence level. In addition to accurately determining mutations in double strands, single molecule sequencing also captures direction specific transversions and transitions through the analysis of heteroduplexes. Not only did the error rates vary, but also the direction specific transitions differed among polymerases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins.

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    Antonella Antignani

    Full Text Available The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE, potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as 'enhancers' and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided.

  16. A novel protein tyrosine kinase Tec identified in lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ranran; Su, Peng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Ting; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-08-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase Tec, a kind of non-receptor tyrosine kinase, is primarily found to be expressed in T cells, B cells, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells as a cytoplasmic protein. Tec has been proved to be a critical modulator of T cell receptor signaling pathway. In the present study, a homolog of Tec was identified in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. The full-length Tec cDNA of L. japonica (Lja-Tec) contains a 1923 bp open reading frame that encodes a 641-amino acid protein. The multi-alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Lja-Tec with typical vertebrate Tecs showed that it possesses all conserved domains of the Tec family proteins, indicating that an ortholog of Tec exists in the extant jawless vertebrate. In the phylogenetic tree that was reconstructed with 24 homologs of jawless and jawed vertebrates, the Tecs from lampreys and hagfish were clustered as a single clade. The genetic distance between the outgroup and agnathan Tecs' group is closer than that between outgroup and gnathostome Tecs' group, indicating that its origin was far earlier than any of the jawed vertebrates. The mRNA levels of Lja-Tec in lymphocyte-like cells and gills were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that it was significantly upregulated under stimulation with mixed pathogens. This result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. All these results indicated that Lja-Tec plays an important role in immune response. Our data will provide a reference for the further study of lamprey Tec and its immunological function in jawless vertebrates. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Mining the Immune Cell Proteome to Identify Ovarian Cancer-Specific Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    pressures of at least 90 mmHg two times measured 6 hr apart. The definition of proteinuria is the excretion of 300 mg of protein or greater in a 24- hr urine...relies MU C1 6 Sig lec 9 Do ub le po sit ive MU C1 6 Sig lec 9 Do ub le po sit ive 0 50 100 150 % P os iti ve Preeclamptic monocytes Healthy pregnant

  18. Viral proteins originated de novo by overprinting can be identified by codon usage: application to the "gene nursery" of Deltaretroviruses.

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    Angelo Pavesi

    Full Text Available A well-known mechanism through which new protein-coding genes originate is by modification of pre-existing genes, e.g. by duplication or horizontal transfer. In contrast, many viruses generate protein-coding genes de novo, via the overprinting of a new reading frame onto an existing ("ancestral" frame. This mechanism is thought to play an important role in viral pathogenicity, but has been poorly explored, perhaps because identifying the de novo frames is very challenging. Therefore, a new approach to detect them was needed. We assembled a reference set of overlapping genes for which we could reliably determine the ancestral frames, and found that their codon usage was significantly closer to that of the rest of the viral genome than the codon usage of de novo frames. Based on this observation, we designed a method that allowed the identification of de novo frames based on their codon usage with a very good specificity, but intermediate sensitivity. Using our method, we predicted that the Rex gene of deltaretroviruses has originated de novo by overprinting the Tax gene. Intriguingly, several genes in the same genomic region have also originated de novo and encode proteins that regulate the functions of Tax. Such "gene nurseries" may be common in viral genomes. Finally, our results confirm that the genomic GC content is not the only determinant of codon usage in viruses and suggest that a constraint linked to translation must influence codon usage.

  19. Different Cells Make Different Proteins: A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Tissue-Specific Protein Expression in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    All the cells of higher organisms have the same DNA but not the same proteins. Each type of specialised cell that forms a tissue has its own pattern of gene expression and, consequently, it contains a particular set of proteins that determine its function. Here, we describe a laboratory exercise addressed to undergraduate students that aims to…

  20. Extracellular vesicles from parasitic helminths contain specific excretory/secretory proteins and are internalized in intestinal host cells.

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    Antonio Marcilla

    Full Text Available The study of host-parasite interactions has increased considerably in the last decades, with many studies focusing on the identification of parasite molecules (i.e. surface or excretory/secretory proteins (ESP as potential targets for new specific treatments and/or diagnostic tools. In parallel, in the last few years there have been significant advances in the field of extracellular vesicles research. Among these vesicles, exosomes of endocytic origin, with a characteristic size ranging from 30-100 nm, carry several atypical secreted proteins in different organisms, including parasitic protozoa. Here, we present experimental evidence for the existence of exosome-like vesicles in parasitic helminths, specifically the trematodes Echinostoma caproni and Fasciola hepatica. These microvesicles are actively released by the parasites and are taken up by host cells. Trematode extracellular vesicles contain most of the proteins previously identified as components of ESP, as confirmed by proteomic, immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies. In addition to parasitic proteins, we also identify host proteins in these structures. The existence of extracellular vesicles explains the secretion of atypical proteins in trematodes, and the demonstration of their uptake by host cells suggests an important role for these structures in host-parasite communication, as described for other infectious agents.

  1. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

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    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  2. The use of functional chemical-protein associations to identify multi-pathway renoprotectants.

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    Jia Xu

    Full Text Available Typically, most nephropathies can be categorized as complex human diseases in which the cumulative effect of multiple minor genes, combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, determines the disease phenotype. Thus, multi-target drugs would be more likely to facilitate comprehensive renoprotection than single-target agents. In this study, functional chemical-protein association analysis was performed to retrieve multi-target drugs of high pathway wideness from the STITCH 3.1 database. Pathway wideness of a drug evaluated the efficiency of regulation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways in quantity. We identified nine experimentally validated renoprotectants that exerted remarkable impact on KEGG pathways by targeting a limited number of proteins. We selected curcumin as an illustrative compound to display the advantage of multi-pathway drugs on renoprotection. We compared curcumin with hemin, an agonist of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, which significantly affects only one KEGG pathway, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism (adjusted p = 1.5×10-5. At the same concentration (10 µM, both curcumin and hemin equivalently mitigated oxidative stress in H2O2-treated glomerular mesangial cells. The benefit of using hemin was derived from its agonistic effect on HO-1, providing relief from oxidative stress. Selective inhibition of HO-1 completely blocked the action of hemin but not that of curcumin, suggesting simultaneous multi-pathway intervention by curcumin. Curcumin also increased cellular autophagy levels, enhancing its protective effect; however, hemin had no effects. Based on the fact that the dysregulation of multiple pathways is implicated in the etiology of complex diseases, we proposed a feasible method for identifying multi-pathway drugs from compounds with validated targets. Our efforts will help identify multi-pathway agents capable of providing comprehensive protection against renal injuries.

  3. High throughput sequencing and proteomics to identify immunogenic proteins of a new pathogen: the dirty genome approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Bertelli, Claire; Collyn, François; Riederer, Beat M; Yersin, Camille; Croxatto, Antony; Raoult, Didier

    2009-12-23

    With the availability of new generation sequencing technologies, bacterial genome projects have undergone a major boost. Still, chromosome completion needs a costly and time-consuming gap closure, especially when containing highly repetitive elements. However, incomplete genome data may be sufficiently informative to derive the pursued information. For emerging pathogens, i.e. newly identified pathogens, lack of release of genome data during gap closure stage is clearly medically counterproductive. We thus investigated the feasibility of a dirty genome approach, i.e. the release of unfinished genome sequences to develop serological diagnostic tools. We showed that almost the whole genome sequence of the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae was retrieved even with relatively short reads from Genome Sequencer 20 and Solexa. The bacterial proteome was analyzed to select immunogenic proteins, which were then expressed and used to elaborate the first steps of an ELISA. This work constitutes the proof of principle for a dirty genome approach, i.e. the use of unfinished genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria, coupled with proteomics to rapidly identify new immunogenic proteins useful to develop in the future specific diagnostic tests such as ELISA, immunohistochemistry and direct antigen detection. Although applied here to an emerging pathogen, this combined dirty genome sequencing/proteomic approach may be used for any pathogen for which better diagnostics are needed. These genome sequences may also be very useful to develop DNA based diagnostic tests. All these diagnostic tools will allow further evaluations of the pathogenic potential of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  4. Tissue-wide expression profiling using cDNA subtraction and microarrays to identify tumor-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatschek, Stefan; Koenig, Ulrich; Auer, Herbert; Steinlein, Peter; Pacher, Margit; Gruenfelder, Agnes; Dekan, Gerhard; Vogl, Sonja; Kubista, Ernst; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Stratowa, Christian; Schreiber, Martin; Sommergruber, Wolfgang

    2004-02-01

    With the objective of discovering novel putative intervention sites for anticancer therapy, we compared transcriptional profiles of breast cancer, lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC), lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and renal cell cancer (RCC). Each of these tumor types still needs improvement in medical treatment. Our intention was to search for genes not only highly expressed in the majority of patient samples but which also exhibit very low or even absence of expression in a comprehensive panel of 16 critical (vital) normal tissues. To achieve this goal, we combined two powerful technologies, PCR-based cDNA subtraction and cDNA microarrays. Seven subtractive libraries consisting of approximately 9250 clones were established and enriched for tumor-specific transcripts. These clones, together with approximately 1750 additional tumor-relevant genes, were used for cDNA microarray preparation. Hybridizations were performed using a pool of 16 critical normal tissues as a reference in all experiments. In total, we analyzed 20 samples of breast cancer, 11 of LSCC, 11 of LAC, and 8 of RCC. To select for genes with low or even no expression in normal tissues, expression profiles of 22 different normal tissues were additionally analyzed. Importantly, this tissue-wide expression profiling allowed us to eliminate genes, which exhibit also high expression in normal tissues. Similarly, expression signatures of genes, which are derived from infiltrating cells of the immune system, were eliminated as well. Cluster analysis resulted in the identification of 527 expressed sequence tags specifically up-regulated in these tumors. Gene-wise hierarchical clustering of these clones clearly separated the different tumor types with RCC exhibiting the most homogeneous and LAC the most diverse expression profile. In addition to already known tumor-associated genes, the majority of identified genes have not yet been brought into context with tumorigenesis such as genes involved in bone matrix

  5. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakes Leighcraft A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription

  6. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakes, Leighcraft A; Du, Hansen; Wolf, Hope M; Hatcher, Charles; Norford, Derek C; Precht, Patricia; Sen, Ranjan; Chatterjee, Pradeep K

    2012-09-04

    Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28-31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at -31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at -31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. The results suggest that the clock

  7. A sex-specific metabolite identified in a marine invertebrate utilizing phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Kleps

    Full Text Available Hormone level differences are generally accepted as the primary cause for sexual dimorphism in animal and human development. Levels of low molecular weight metabolites also differ between men and women in circulating amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates and within brain tissue. While investigating the metabolism of blue crab tissues using Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, we discovered that only the male blue crab (Callinectes sapidus contained a phosphorus compound with a chemical shift well separated from the expected phosphate compounds. Spectra obtained from male gills were readily differentiated from female gill spectra. Analysis from six years of data from male and female crabs documented that the sex-specificity of this metabolite was normal for this species. Microscopic analysis of male and female gills found no differences in their gill anatomy or the presence of parasites or bacteria that might produce this phosphorus compound. Analysis of a rare gynandromorph blue crab (laterally, half male and half female proved that this sex-specificity was an intrinsic biochemical process and was not caused by any variations in the diet or habitat of male versus female crabs. The existence of a sex-specific metabolite is a previously unrecognized, but potentially significant biochemical phenomenon. An entire enzyme system has been synthesized and activated only in one sex. Unless blue crabs are a unique species, sex-specific metabolites are likely to be present in other animals. Would the presence or absence of a sex-specific metabolite affect an animal's development, anatomy and biochemistry?

  8. A glutamate/aspartate switch controls product specificity in a protein arginine methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debler, Erik W.; Jain, Kanishk; Warmack, Rebeccah A.; Feng, You; Clarke, Steven G.; Blobel, Günter; Stavropoulos, Pete

    2016-02-08

    Trypanosoma brucei PRMT7 (TbPRMT7) is a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) that strictly monomethylates various substrates, thus classifying it as a type III PRMT. However, the molecular basis of its unique product specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of TbPRMT7 in complex with its cofactor product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.8 Å resolution and identify a glutamate residue critical for its monomethylation behavior. TbPRMT7 comprises the conserved methyltransferase and β-barrel domains, an N-terminal extension, and a dimerization arm. The active site at the interface of the N-terminal extension, methyltransferase, and β-barrel domains is stabilized by the dimerization arm of the neighboring protomer, providing a structural basis for dimerization as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. Mutagenesis of active-site residues highlights the importance of Glu181, the second of the two invariant glutamate residues of the double E loop that coordinate the target arginine in substrate peptides/proteins and that increase its nucleophilicity. Strikingly, mutation of Glu181 to aspartate converts TbPRMT7 into a type I PRMT, producing asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using a histone H4 peptide showed that the Glu181Asp mutant has markedly increased affinity for monomethylated peptide with respect to the WT, suggesting that the enlarged active site can favorably accommodate monomethylated peptide and provide sufficient space for ADMA formation. In conclusion, these findings yield valuable insights into the product specificity and the catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferases and have important implications for the rational (re)design of PRMTs.

  9. A nodule-specific protein secretory pathway required for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Griffitts, Joel; Starker, Colby; Fedorova, Elena; Limpens, Erik; Ivanov, Sergey; Bisseling, Ton; Long, Sharon

    2010-02-26

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous host plant Medicago truncatula occurs in a specialized root organ called the nodule. Bacteria that are released into plant cells are surrounded by a unique plant membrane compartment termed a symbiosome. We found that in the symbiosis-defective dnf1 mutant of M. truncatula, bacteroid and symbiosome development are blocked. We identified the DNF1 gene as encoding a subunit of a signal peptidase complex that is highly expressed in nodules. By analyzing data from whole-genome expression analysis, we propose that correct symbiosome development in M. truncatula requires the orderly secretion of protein constituents through coordinated up-regulation of a nodule-specific pathway exemplified by DNF1.

  10. A Novel Benzodiazepine Compound Inhibits Yellow Fever Virus Infection by Specifically Targeting NS4B Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Wu, Shuo; Julander, Justin; Ma, Julia; Zhang, Xuexiang; Kulp, John; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Du, Yanming; Guo, Ju-Tao; Chang, Jinhong

    2016-09-21

    -risk regions. It has been estimated that up to 1.7 million YFV infections occur in Africa each year, resulting in 29,000 to 60,000 death. Thus far, there is no specific antiviral treatment for yellow fever. To cope with this medical challenge, we identified a benzodiazepine compound that selectively inhibits YFV by targeting the viral NS4B protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating in vivo safety and antiviral efficacy of an YFV NS4B inhibitor in an animal model. We have thus reached a critical milestone toward the development of specific antiviral therapeutics for clinical management of yellow fever. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

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    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported.To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures.Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  12. Gametogenesis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a microarrays-based analysis identifies sex and stage specific genes.

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    Nolwenn M Dheilly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011 representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters

  13. Training School Psychologists to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities: A Content Analysis of Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Courtenay A.; Cottrell, Joseph M.; Newman, Daniel S.; Pierce, Benjamin G.; Anderson, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 2.4 million children receive special education services for specific learning disabilities (SLDs), and school psychologists are key contributors to the SLD eligibility decision-making process. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) enabled local education agencies to use response to intervention (RTI) instead of the…

  14. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania

    2012-01-01

    T-cell clones and functionality persists through out expansion among an oligoclonal composition of T-cells. Our findings mirror prior results on the oligoclonal composition of TIL cultures, further indicating a potential for a broader repertoire of specific effector cells recognizing...

  15. Identifying Facial Emotions: Valence Specific Effects and an Exploration of the Effects of Viewer Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansari, Ashok; Rodway, Paul; Goncalves, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The valence hypothesis suggests that the right hemisphere is specialised for negative emotions and the left hemisphere is specialised for positive emotions (Silberman & Weingartner, 1986). It is unclear to what extent valence-specific effects in facial emotion perception depend upon the gender of the perceiver. To explore this question 46…

  16. Identifying Learning Patterns of Children at Risk for Specific Reading Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Baptiste; Krivulskaya, Suzanna; Hein, Sascha; Reich, Jodi; Thuma, Philip E.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Differences in learning patterns of vocabulary acquisition in children at risk (+SRD) and not at risk (-SRD) for Specific Reading Disability (SRD) were examined using a microdevelopmental paradigm applied to the multi-trial Foreign Language Learning Task (FLLT; Baddeley et al., 1995). The FLLT was administered to 905 children from rural…

  17. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus {alpha}-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasera, Ana Claudia [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas; Iulek, Jorge [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Delboni, Luis Fernando; Barbosa, Valma Martins Barbosa [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Structural similarity is observed in all members of {alpha}-amylase family but different products are generated during hydrolysis of starch due to different affinities for intermediate dextrins. In order to understand the structural determinants for this property and to introduce different specificity to {alpha}-amylase of Bacillus stearothermophilus we intend to solve the three dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography of the native protein by using synchrotron radiation at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Protein was over expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallization experiments were carried out by using sparse matrix Crystal Screen and Crystal Screen II from Hampton Research (Laguna Hills, CA, USA). Several condition have produced crystals with some defined characteristic: MDP seems to be important to the crystallization: the preferential pH is around 7.5 with organic buffer (HEPES); organic solvent as 2-propanol seems to be also important for the crystallization. On those condition crystals appeared as cluster of needles or small crystals with high number of nucleation. New conditions are being prepared to improve the site and quality of crystals. Data collection of native of Bacillus stearothermophilus {alpha}-amylase will e done at Protein Crystallography Station at LNLS. Crystal structure of mutated {alpha}-amylase bu site direct mutagenesis of residues suggested by the native crystal structure will be obtained. Co-crystallization of Bacillus stearothermophilus {alpha}-amylase and oligosaccharide will be carried out to identify residues involved in the binding site to plan new mutation. In another series of mutation the putative binding site residues, once identified, will be mutated to residues observed in TAKA amylase to confer different specificity to {alpha}-amylase. Based on the available TAKA amylase structure, in the primary sequence homology and in the three dimensional model of Bacillus stearothermophilus

  18. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasera, Ana Claudia; Iulek, Jorge; Delboni, Luis Fernando; Barbosa, Valma Martins Barbosa

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Structural similarity is observed in all members of α-amylase family but different products are generated during hydrolysis of starch due to different affinities for intermediate dextrins. In order to understand the structural determinants for this property and to introduce different specificity to α-amylase of Bacillus stearothermophilus we intend to solve the three dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography of the native protein by using synchrotron radiation at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Protein was over expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallization experiments were carried out by using sparse matrix Crystal Screen and Crystal Screen II from Hampton Research (Laguna Hills, CA, USA). Several condition have produced crystals with some defined characteristic: MDP seems to be important to the crystallization: the preferential pH is around 7.5 with organic buffer (HEPES); organic solvent as 2-propanol seems to be also important for the crystallization. On those condition crystals appeared as cluster of needles or small crystals with high number of nucleation. New conditions are being prepared to improve the site and quality of crystals. Data collection of native of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase will e done at Protein Crystallography Station at LNLS. Crystal structure of mutated α-amylase bu site direct mutagenesis of residues suggested by the native crystal structure will be obtained. Co-crystallization of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase and oligosaccharide will be carried out to identify residues involved in the binding site to plan new mutation. In another series of mutation the putative binding site residues, once identified, will be mutated to residues observed in TAKA amylase to confer different specificity to α-amylase. Based on the available TAKA amylase structure, in the primary sequence homology and in the three dimensional model of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase (using Bacillus

  19. Novel Approaches to the Characterization of Specific Protein-Protein Interactions Important in Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somerville, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Through the application of a range of techniques in the areas of biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology, we have purified and characterized the TyrR protein of Haemophilus influenzae...

  20. Characterization and specificity of the linear epitope of the enterovirus 71 VP2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiener Tanja K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Asia-Pacific region over the last decade. Hand, foot and mouth disease can be caused by different etiological agents from the enterovirus family, mainly EV71 and coxsackieviruses, which are genetically closely related. Nevertheless, infection with EV71 may occasionally lead to high fever, neurologic complications and the emergence of a rapidly fatal syndrome of pulmonary edema associated with brainstem encephalitis. The rapid progression and high mortality of severe EV71 infection has highlighted the need for EV71-specific diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Monoclonal antibodies are urgently needed to specifically detect EV71 antigens from patient specimens early in the infection process. Furthermore, the elucidation of viral epitopes will contribute to the development of targeted therapeutics and vaccines. Results We have identified the monoclonal antibody 7C7 from a screen of hybridoma cells derived from mice immunized with the EV71-B5 strain. The linear epitope of 7C7 was mapped to amino acids 142-146 (EDSHP of the VP2 capsid protein and was characterized in detail. Mutational analysis of the epitope showed that the aspartic acid to asparagine mutation of the EV71 subgenogroup A (BrCr strain did not interfere with antibody recognition. In contrast, the serine to threonine mutation at position 144 of VP2, present in recently emerged EV71-C4 China strains, abolished antigenicity. Mice injected with this virus strain did not produce any antibodies against the VP2 protein. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting confirmed that 7C7 specifically recognized EV71 subgenogroups and did not cross-react to Coxsackieviruses 4, 6, 10, and 16. 7C7 was successfully used as a detection antibody in an antigen-capture ELISA assay. Conclusions Detailed mapping showed that the VP2 protein of Enterovirus 71 contains a single, linear, non

  1. Using Discrete Trial Training to Identify Specific Learning Impairments in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S.; Hustyi, Kristin M.; Hammond, Jennifer L.; Hirt, Melissa; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether "discrete trial training" (DTT) could be used to identify learning impairments in mathematical reasoning in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Boys with FXS, aged 10-23 years, and age and IQ-matched controls, were trained to match fractions to pie-charts and pie-charts to decimals either on a computer or with a…

  2. Diagnostic utility of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio for identifying proteinuria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Molly J; Scifres, Christina M; Stamilio, David M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC) alone and with uric acid and clinical factors to predict or exclude significant proteinuria in preeclampsia evaluations. Retrospective cohort study patients undergoing evaluation for preeclampsia. Greater than 300 mg of protein in a 24-h collection was the gold standard defining proteinuria against which UPC performance was measured. Bivariable, multivariable, and Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) analyses were performed. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios were calculated for multiple cut-points of UPC alone and with uric acid. In a cohort of 356 patients, the area under the curve for UPC in the diagnosis of proteinuria was 0.81. No single cut-point of UPC was diagnostic of preeclampsia. UPC values ≤0.08 or ≥1.19 have useful negative or positive predictive values of 86% and 96%. Uric acid and clinical factors did not improve the detection of significant proteinuria. Extreme values of UPC ratio ≤0.08 or ≥1.19 have favorable predictive values, which could enable the rapid diagnosis of preeclampsia without a 24-h urine collection.

  3. Are suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins recently identified in atherosclerosis possible therapeutic targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingjing; Raines, Elaine W

    2005-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a slowly progressing chronic inflammatory disease characterized by focal arterial lesions that can ultimately occlude the entire blood vessel and lead to sudden death. Lesions associated with cardiovascular events are those enriched in macrophages and other inflammatory cells. Activation of inflammatory cells within lesions induces the release of cytokines which promotes more inflammation and associated tissue damage if cytokine signaling pathways remain unregulated. Thus, pathways capable of suppressing proinflammatory cytokine signaling hold the potential to limit life-threatening cardiovascular events caused by atherogenesis. This review focuses on suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins recently identified in the atherosclerosis-prone ApoE(-/-) mouse and provides perspectives of their potential for intervention in atherosclerotic lesion progression.

  4. A whole-genome approach to identifying protein binding sites: promoters in Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enhu; Reich, Claudia I; Olsen, Gary J

    2008-12-01

    We have adapted an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to isolate genomic DNA fragments that bind the archaeal transcription initiation factors TATA-binding protein (TBP) and transcription factor B (TFB) to perform a genome-wide search for promoters. Mobility-shifted fragments were cloned, tested for their ability to compete with known promoter-containing fragments for a limited concentration of transcription factors, and sequenced. We applied the method to search for promoters in the genome of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Selection was most efficient for promoters of tRNA genes and genes for several presumed small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA). Protein-coding gene promoters were dramatically underrepresented relative to their frequency in the genome. The repeated isolation of these genomic regions was partially rectified by including a hybridization-based screening. Sequence alignment of the affinity-selected promoters revealed previously identified TATA box, BRE, and the putative initiator element. In addition, the conserved bases immediately upstream and downstream of the BRE and TATA box suggest that the composition and structure of archaeal natural promoters are more complicated.

  5. Sex- and Tissue-Specific Expression Profiles of Odorant Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes in Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bradysia odoriphaga is an agricultural pest insect affecting the production of Chinese chive and other liliaceous vegetables in China, and it is significantly attracted by sex pheromones and the volatiles derived from host plants. Despite verification of this chemosensory behavior, however, it is still unknown how B. odoriphaga recognizes these volatile compounds on the molecular level. Many of odorant binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs play crucial roles in olfactory perception. Here, we identified 49 OBP and 5 CSP genes from the antennae and body transcriptomes of female and male adults of B. odoriphaga, respectively. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis among Dipteran OBPs and CSPs were analyzed. The sex- and tissue-specific expression profiles of 54 putative chemosensory genes among different tissues were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. qRT-PCR analysis results suggested that 22 OBP and 3 CSP genes were enriched in the antennae, indicating they might be essential for detection of general odorants and pheromones. Among these antennae-enriched genes, nine OBPs (BodoOBP2/4/6/8/12/13/20/28/33 were enriched in the male antennae and may play crucial roles in the detection of sex pheromones. Moreover, some OBP and CSP genes were enriched in non-antennae tissues, such as in the legs (BodoOBP3/9/19/21/34/35/38/39/45 and BodoCSP1, wings (BodoOBP17/30/32/37/44, abdomens and thoraxes (BodoOBP29/36, and heads (BodoOBP14/23/31 and BodoCSP2, suggesting that these genes might be involved in olfactory, gustatory, or other physiological processes. Our findings provide a starting point to facilitate functional research of these chemosensory genes in B. odoriphaga at the molecular level.

  6. The Small Protein SgrT Controls Transport Activity of the Glucose-Specific Phosphotransferase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Chelsea R; Park, Seongjin; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2017-06-01

    The bacterial small RNA (sRNA) SgrS has been a fruitful model for discovery of novel RNA-based regulatory mechanisms and new facets of bacterial physiology and metabolism. SgrS is one of only a few characterized dual-function sRNAs. SgrS can control gene expression posttranscriptionally via sRNA-mRNA base-pairing interactions. Its second function is coding for the small protein SgrT. Previous work demonstrated that both functions contribute to relief of growth inhibition caused by glucose-phosphate stress, a condition characterized by disrupted glycolytic flux and accumulation of sugar phosphates. The base-pairing activity of SgrS has been the subject of numerous studies, but the activity of SgrT is less well characterized. Here, we provide evidence that SgrT acts to specifically inhibit the transport activity of the major glucose permease PtsG. Superresolution microscopy demonstrated that SgrT localizes to the cell membrane in a PtsG-dependent manner. Mutational analysis determined that residues in the N-terminal domain of PtsG are important for conferring sensitivity to SgrT-mediated inhibition of transport activity. Growth assays support a model in which SgrT-mediated inhibition of PtsG transport activity reduces accumulation of nonmetabolizable sugar phosphates and promotes utilization of alternative carbon sources by modulating carbon catabolite repression. The results of this study expand our understanding of a basic and well-studied biological problem, namely, how cells coordinate carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Further, this work highlights the complex activities that can be carried out by sRNAs and small proteins in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Sequencing, annotation and investigation of hundreds of bacterial genomes have identified vast numbers of small RNAs and small proteins, the majority of which have no known function. In this study, we explore the function of a small protein that acts in tandem with a well-characterized small RNA during metabolic

  7. Identifying specific prefrontal neurons that contribute to autism-associated abnormalities in physiology and social behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brumback, A C; Ellwood, I T; Kjaerby, C

    2017-01-01

    Functional imaging and gene expression studies both implicate the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), particularly deep-layer projection neurons, as a potential locus for autism pathology. Here, we explored how specific deep-layer prefrontal neurons contribute to abnormal physiology and behavior...... in mouse models of autism. First, we find that across three etiologically distinct models-in utero valproic acid (VPA) exposure, CNTNAP2 knockout and FMR1 knockout-layer 5 subcortically projecting (SC) neurons consistently exhibit reduced input resistance and action potential firing. To explore how altered...... mPFC neurons in VPA-exposed mice, or by inhibiting D2R+ neurons in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that multiple forms of autism may alter the physiology of specific deep-layer prefrontal neurons that project to subcortical targets. Furthermore, a highly overlapping population-prefrontal D2R...

  8. A 3-D Mathematical Model to Identify Organ-Specific Risks in Rats During Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A...variation in metabolic heat generation (dimensionless) aper Amplitude of circadian variation in blood per- fusion (dimensionless) cp Specific heat...by implementing the following sinusoidal function: Cpert aper sin2t per (2) where aper denotes the amplitude of circadian variation in blood

  9. Culture, threat, and mental illness stigma: identifying culture-specific threat among Chinese-American groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Kotabe, Hiroki; Link, Bruce G; Saw, Anne; Wong, Gloria; Phelan, Jo C

    2013-07-01

    We incorporate anthropological insights into a stigma framework to elucidate the role of culture in threat perception and stigma among Chinese groups. Prior work suggests that genetic contamination that jeopardizes the extension of one's family lineage may comprise a culture-specific threat among Chinese groups. In Study 1, a national survey conducted from 2002 to 2003 assessed cultural differences in mental illness stigma and perceptions of threat in 56 Chinese-Americans and 589 European-Americans. Study 2 sought to empirically test this culture-specific threat of genetic contamination to lineage via a memory paradigm. Conducted from June to August 2010, 48 Chinese-American and 37 European-American university students in New York City read vignettes containing content referring to lineage or non-lineage concerns. Half the participants in each ethnic group were assigned to a condition in which the illness was likely to be inherited (genetic condition) and the rest read that the illness was unlikely to be inherited (non-genetic condition). Findings from Study 1 and 2 were convergent. In Study 1, culture-specific threat to lineage predicted cultural variation in stigma independently and after accounting for other forms of threat. In Study 2, Chinese-Americans in the genetic condition were more likely to accurately recall and recognize lineage content than the Chinese-Americans in the non-genetic condition, but that memorial pattern was not found for non-lineage content. The identification of this culture-specific threat among Chinese groups has direct implications for culturally-tailored anti-stigma interventions. Further, this framework might be implemented across other conditions and cultural groups to reduce stigma across cultures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alkaline-stress response in Glycine soja leaf identifies specific transcription factors and ABA-mediated signaling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying; Li, Yong; Lv, De-Kang; Bai, Xi; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ao-Xue; Zhu, Yan-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Transcriptome of Glycine soja leaf tissue during a detailed time course formed a foundation for examining transcriptional processes during NaHCO(3) stress treatment. Of a total of 2,310 detected differentially expressed genes, 1,664 genes were upregulated and 1,704 genes were downregulated at various time points. The number of stress-regulated genes increased dramatically after a 6-h stress treatment. GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in cell structure, protein synthesis, energy, and secondary metabolism. Another enrichment test revealed that the response of G. soja to NaHCO(3) highlights specific transcription factors, such as the C2C2-CO-like, MYB-related, WRKY, GARP-G2-like, and ZIM families. Co-expressed genes were clustered into ten classes (P < 0.001). Intriguingly, one cluster of 188 genes displayed a unique expression pattern that increases at an early stage (0.5 and 3 h), followed by a decrease from 6 to 12 h. This group was enriched in regulation of transcription components, including AP2-EREBP, bHLH, MYB/MYB-related, C2C2-CO-like, C2C2-DOF, C2C2, C3H, and GARP-G2-like transcription factors. Analysis of the 1-kb upstream regions of transcripts displaying similar changes in abundance identified 19 conserved motifs, potential binding sites for transcription factors. The appearance of ABA-responsive elements in the upstream of co-expression genes reveals that ABA-mediated signaling participates in the signal transduction in alkaline response.

  11. Specific, sensitive, high-resolution detection of protein molecules in eukaryotic cells using metal-tagging transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina; Sanmartín-Conesa, Eva; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.; Seybold, Volker; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary More than any other methodology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has contributed to our understanding of the architecture and organization of cells. With current detection limits approaching atomic resolution, it will ultimately become possible to ultrastructurally image intracellular macromolecular assemblies in situ. Presently, however, methods to unambiguously identify proteins within the crowded environment of the cell’s interior are lagging behind. We describe a novel approach, metal-tagging TEM (METTEM) that allows detection of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells with high specificity, exceptional sensitivity and at molecular scale resolution. In live cells treated with gold salts, proteins bearing a small metal-binding tag will form 1-nm gold nanoclusters, readily detectable in electron micrographs. The applicability and strength of METTEM is demonstrated by a study of Rubella virus replicase and capsid proteins, which revealed virus-induced cell structures not seen before. PMID:22579245

  12. Adenovirus structural protein IIIa is involved in the serotype specificity of viral DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Hearing, Patrick

    2011-08-01

    The packaging of the adenovirus (Ad) genome into a capsid displays serotype specificity. This specificity has been attributed to viral packaging proteins, the IVa2 protein and the L1-52/55K protein. We previously found that the Ad17 L1-52/55K protein was not able to complement the growth of an Ad5 L1-52/55K mutant virus, whereas two other Ad17 packaging proteins, IVa2 and L4-22K, could complement the growth of Ad5 viruses with mutations in the respective genes. In this report, we investigated why the Ad17 L1-52/55K protein was not able to complement the Ad5 L1-52/55K mutant virus. We demonstrate that the Ad17 L1-52/55K protein binds to the Ad5 IVa2 protein in vitro and the Ad5 packaging domain in vivo, activities previously associated with packaging function. The Ad17 L1-52/55K protein also associates with empty Ad5 capsids. Interestingly, we find that the Ad17 L1-52/55K protein is able to complement the growth of an Ad5 L1-52/55K mutant virus in conjunction with the Ad17 structural protein IIIa. The same result was found with the L1-52/55K and IIIa proteins of several other Ad serotypes, including Ad3 and Ad4. The Ad17 IIIa protein associates with empty Ad5 capsids. Consistent with the complementation results, we find that the IIIa protein interacts with the L1-52/55K protein in vitro and associates with the viral packaging domain in vivo. These results underscore the complex nature of virus assembly and genome encapsidation and provide a new model for how the viral genome may tether to the empty capsid during the encapsidation process.

  13. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  14. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Platyhelminth Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins: revealing structural diversity, class-specific features and biological associations across the phylum

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHALMERS, IAIN W.; HOFFMANN, KARL F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During platyhelminth infection, a cocktail of proteins is released by the parasite to aid invasion, initiate feeding, facilitate adaptation and mediate modulation of the host immune response. Included amongst these proteins is the Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) family, part of the larger sperm coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) superfamily. To explore the significance of this protein family during Platyhelminthes development and host interactions, we systematically summarize all published proteomic, genomic and immunological investigations of the VAL protein family to date. By conducting new genomic and transcriptomic interrogations to identify over 200 VAL proteins (228) from species in all 4 traditional taxonomic classes (Trematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Turbellaria), we further expand our knowledge related to platyhelminth VAL diversity across the phylum. Subsequent phylogenetic and tertiary structural analyses reveal several class-specific VAL features, which likely indicate a range of roles mediated by this protein family. Our comprehensive analysis of platyhelminth VALs represents a unifying synopsis for understanding diversity within this protein family and a firm context in which to initiate future functional characterization of these enigmatic members. PMID:22717097

  16. Y-box protein-1/p18 fragment identifies malignancies in patients with chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, Frank; Kanig, Nicolas; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Kaehne, Thilo; Eberhardt, Christiane S; Shpacovitch, Victoria; Trautwein, Christian; Mertens, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Immunohistochemical detection of cold shock proteins is predictive for deleterious outcome in various malignant diseases. We recently described active secretion of a family member, denoted Y-box (YB) protein-1. We tested the clinical and diagnostic value of YB-1 protein fragment p18 (YB-1/p18) detection in blood for malignant diseases. We used a novel monoclonal anti-YB-1 antibody to detect YB-1/p18 by immunoblotting in plasma samples of healthy volunteers (n = 33), patients with non-cancerous, mostly inflammatory diseases (n = 60), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; n = 25) and advanced solid tumors (n = 20). YB-1/p18 was then tested in 111 patients with chronic liver diseases, alongside established tumor markers and various diagnostic measures, during evaluation for potential liver transplantation. We developed a novel immunoblot to detect the 18 kD fragment of secreted YB-1 in human plasma (YB-1/p18) that contains the cold-shock domains (CSD) 1-3 of the full-length protein. YB-1/p18 was detected in 11/25 HCC and 16/20 advanced carcinomas compared to 0/33 healthy volunteers and 10/60 patients with non-cancerous diseases. In 111 patients with chronic liver disease, YB-1/p18 was detected in 20 samples. Its occurrence was not associated with advanced Child stages of liver cirrhosis or liver function. In this cohort, YB-1/p18 was not a good marker for HCC, but proved most powerful in detecting malignancies other than HCC (60% positive) with a lower rate of false-positive results compared to established tumor markers. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was most sensitive in detecting HCC, but simultaneous assessment of AFP, CA19-9 and YB-1/p18 improved overall identification of HCC patients. Plasma YB-1/p18 can identify patients with malignancies, independent of acute inflammation, renal impairment or liver dysfunction. The detection of YB-1/p18 in human plasma may have potential as a tumor marker for screening of high-risk populations, e.g. before organ transplantation, and should

  17. Proteoform-specific protein binding of small molecules in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the specific binding between protein targets and small molecules is critically important for drug discovery. Conventional assays require isolation and purification of small molecules from complex matrices through multistep chromatographic fractionation, which may alter their original ...

  18. Electrostatic contributions to residue-specific protonation equilibria and proton binding capacitance for a small protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindman, Stina; Linse, Sara; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Andre, Ingemar

    2006-01-01

    Charge-charge interactions in proteins are important in a host of biological processes. Here we use C-13 NMR chemical shift data for individual aspartate and glutamate side chain carboxylate groups to accurately detect site-specific protonation equilibria in a variant of the B1 domain of protein G

  19. Direct site-specific immobilization of protein A via aldehyde-hydrazide conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Berlin; Ren, Jun; Xu, Li; Jia, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization of affinity ligands on supporting matrices is a key step for the preparation of affinity chromatography resins, and an efficient coupling strategy can significantly improve the validity and cost of the affinity system, especially for systems that employ expensive recombinant proteins or antibodies as affinity ligands. This study described a simple method for obtaining site-specific immobilization of protein A (the ligand) via aldehyde-hydrazide conjugation and its application in antibody purification via protein A chromatography. An aldehyde group was generated at the N-terminus of protein A in vivo by co-expressing a formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) and recombinant protein A containing a FGE recognizing sequence (aldehyde tag) in Escherichia coli. The resulting aldehyde allowed direct immobilization of protein A onto the hydrazide-modified agarose matrices under mild condition. We found that 100mM aniline was most effective for catalyzing the coupling reaction, and the recombinant protein A could be coupled with high selectivity, directly from a crude cell extract. The site-specific immobilized protein A showed good capacity for antibody purification. The specificity of the aldehyde-hydrazide reaction not only allowed site-specific immobilization of affinity ligands, but also improved the cost of the process by employing unpurified ligands, a method that might be of great use to industrial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization [version 1; referees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldal, Morten Peter; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control...

  1. Computational design, construction, and characterization of a set of specificity determining residues in protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Chioko; Izako, Nozomi; Soga, Shinji; Khan, Samia Haseeb; Kawabata, Shigeki; Shirai, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Proteins interact with different partners to perform different functions and it is important to elucidate the determinants of partner specificity in protein complex formation. Although methods for detecting specificity determining positions have been developed previously, direct experimental evidence for these amino acid residues is scarce, and the lack of information has prevented further computational studies. In this article, we constructed a dataset that is likely to exhibit specificity in protein complex formation, based on available crystal structures and several intuitive ideas about interaction profiles and functional subclasses. We then defined a "structure-based specificity determining position (sbSDP)" as a set of equivalent residues in a protein family showing a large variation in their interaction energy with different partners. We investigated sequence and structural features of sbSDPs and demonstrated that their amino acid propensities significantly differed from those of other interacting residues and that the importance of many of these residues for determining specificity had been verified experimentally. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Opposing effects of cancer type-specific SPOP mutations on BET protein degradation and sensitivity to BET inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Elisa; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Rinaldi, Anna; Ulbricht, Anna; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Civenni, Gianluca; Losa, Marco; Svinkina, Tanya; Bielski, Craig M.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Cascione, Luciano; Napoli, Sara; Enchev, Radoslav I.; Mutch, David G.; Carney, Michael E.; Berchuck, Andrew; Winterhoff, Boris J.N.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Bertoni, Francesco; Catapano, Carlo V.; Peter, Matthias; Carr, Steven A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Wild, Peter J.; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe P.

    2017-01-01

    It is generally assumed that recurrent mutations within a given cancer driver gene elicit similar drug responses. Cancer genome studies have identified recurrent but divergent missense mutations in the substrate recognition domain of the ubiquitin ligase adaptor SPOP in endometrial and prostate cancer. Their therapeutic implications remain incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed changes in the ubiquitin landscape induced by endometrial cancer-associated SPOP mutations and identified BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 proteins (BETs) as SPOP-CUL3 substrates that are preferentially degraded by endometrial SPOP mutants. The resulting reduction of BET protein levels sensitized cancer cells to BET inhibitors. Conversely, prostate cancer-specific SPOP mutants impaired degradation of BETs, promoting resistance against their pharmacologic inhibition. These results uncover an oncogenomics paradox, whereby mutations within the same domain evoke opposing drug susceptibilities. Specifically, we provide a molecular rationale for the use of BET inhibitors to treat endometrial but not prostate cancer patients with SPOP mutations. PMID:28805821

  3. Identifying Neurofibromin Specific Regulatory Nodes for Therapeutic Targeting in NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    leads to up-regulation of specific receptors. We hope that we will be able to find news of up-regulating neurofibromin in cells in which one allele is...generated using CRISPR/Cas9 with a sgRNA targeting exon 2 of NF1 and exon 1 of Spred1. Following antibiotic selection clones were screened by Western blot...2016. 18 Impact Nothing to report Changes/Problems While the Aims of the project remain unchanged, we will use new technologies to

  4. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the non...

  5. Identifying sex-specific risk factors for stress fractures in adolescent runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Sayres, Lauren C; McCurdy, Mary Liz; Sainani, Kristin L; Fredericson, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Adolescent females and males participating in running represent a population at high risk of stress fracture. Few investigators have evaluated risk factors for prospective stress fracture in this population. To better characterize risk factors for and incidence of stress fractures in this population, we collected baseline risk factor data on 748 competitive high school runners (442 girls and 306 boys) using an online survey. We then followed them prospectively for the development of stress fractures for a mean ± SD of 2.3 ± 1.2 total seasons of cross-country and track and field; follow-up data were available for 428 girls and 273 boys. We identified prospective stress fractures in 5.4% of girls (n = 23) and 4.0% of boys (n = 11). Tibial stress fractures were most common in girls, and the metatarsus was most frequently fractured in boys. Multivariate regression identified four independent risk factors for stress fractures in girls: prior fracture, body mass index dance. For boys, prior fracture and increased number of seasons were associated with an increased rate of stress fractures, whereas prior participation in basketball was associated with a decreased risk of stress fractures. Prior fracture represents the most robust predictor of stress fractures in both sexes. Low body mass index, late menarche, and prior participation in gymnastics and dance are identifiable risk factors for stress fractures in girls. Participation in basketball appears protective in boys and may represent a modifiable risk factor for stress fractures. These findings may help guide future translational research and clinical care in the management and prevention of stress fractures in young runners.

  6. Dengue serotype cross-reactive, anti-E protein antibodies confound specific immune memory for one year after infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xiu eToh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus has four serotypes and is endemic globally in tropical countries. Neither a specific treatment nor an approved vaccine is available, and correlates of protection are not established. The standard neutralization assay cannot differentiate between serotype-specific and serotype cross-reactive antibodies in patients early after infection, leading to an overestimation of the long-term serotype-specific protection of an antibody response. It is known that the cross-reactive response in patients is temporary but few studies have assessed kinetics and potential changes in serum antibody specificity over time. To better define the specificity of polyclonal antibodies during disease and after recovery, longitudinal samples from patients with primary or secondary DENV-2 infection were collected over a period of one year. We found that serotype cross-reactive antibodies peaked three weeks after infection and subsided within one year. Since secondary patients rapidly produced antibodies specific for the virus envelope (E protein, an E-specific ELISA was superior compared to a virus particle-specific ELISA to identify patients with secondary infections. Dengue infection triggered a massive activation and mobilization of both naïve and memory B cells possibly from lymphoid organs into the blood, providing an explanation for the surge of circulating plasmablasts and the increase in cross-reactive E protein-specific antibodies.

  7. Towards a better understanding of the specificity of protein-protein interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kysilka, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2012), s. 604-615 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0725; GA ČR GAP302/10/0427; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : protein-protein interaction * molecular recognition * x-ray structure analysis * empirical potentials * side chain-side chain interaction * interaction energy * bioinformatics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.006, year: 2012

  8. ChIP-PaM: an algorithm to identify protein-DNA interaction using ChIP-Seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pounds Stanley

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChIP-Seq is a powerful tool for identifying the interaction between genomic regulators and their bound DNAs, especially for locating transcription factor binding sites. However, high cost and high rate of false discovery of transcription factor binding sites identified from ChIP-Seq data significantly limit its application. Results Here we report a new algorithm, ChIP-PaM, for identifying transcription factor target regions in ChIP-Seq datasets. This algorithm makes full use of a protein-DNA binding pattern by capitalizing on three lines of evidence: 1 the tag count modelling at the peak position, 2 pattern matching of a specific tag count distribution, and 3 motif searching along the genome. A novel data-based two-step eFDR procedure is proposed to integrate the three lines of evidence to determine significantly enriched regions. Our algorithm requires no technical controls and efficiently discriminates falsely enriched regions from regions enriched by true transcription factor (TF binding on the basis of ChIP-Seq data only. An analysis of real genomic data is presented to demonstrate our method. Conclusions In a comparison with other existing methods, we found that our algorithm provides more accurate binding site discovery while maintaining comparable statistical power.

  9. Deep Coverage Proteomics Identifies More Low-Abundance Missing Proteins in Human Testis Tissue with Q-Exactive HF Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Luo, Weijia; Wu, Feilin; Peng, Xuehui; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Manli; Zhao, Yan; Su, Na; Qi, YingZi; Chen, Lingsheng; Zhang, Yangjun; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping

    2016-11-04

    Since 2012, missing proteins (MPs) investigation has been one of the critical missions of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) through various biochemical strategies. On the basis of our previous testis MPs study, faster scanning and higher resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomics might be conducive to MPs exploration, especially for low-abundance proteins. In this study, Q-Exactive HF (HF) was used to survey proteins from the same testis tissues separated by two separating methods (tricine- and glycine-SDS-PAGE), as previously described. A total of 8526 proteins were identified, of which more low-abundance proteins were uniquely detected in HF data but not in our previous LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Velos) reanalysis data. Further transcriptomics analysis showed that these uniquely identified proteins by HF also had lower expression at the mRNA level. Of the 81 total identified MPs, 74 and 39 proteins were listed as MPs in HF and Velos data sets, respectively. Among the above MPs, 47 proteins (43 neXtProt PE2 and 4 PE3) were ranked as confirmed MPs after verifying with the stringent spectra match and isobaric and single amino acid variants filtering. Functional investigation of these 47 MPs revealed that 11 MPs were testis-specific proteins and 7 MPs were involved in spermatogenesis process. Therefore, we concluded that higher scanning speed and resolution of HF might be factors for improving the low-abundance MP identification in future C-HPP studies. All mass-spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004092.

  10. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  11. Citation searches are more sensitive than keyword searches to identify studies using specific measurement instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Suzanne K; Kamath, Geetanjali R; Pratt, Gregory F; Saraykar, Smita S; Volk, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two search methods in identifying studies that used the Control Preferences Scale (CPS), a health care decision-making instrument commonly used in clinical settings. We searched the literature using two methods: (1) keyword searching using variations of "Control Preferences Scale" and (2) cited reference searching using two seminal CPS publications. We searched three bibliographic databases [PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS)] and one full-text database (Google Scholar). We report precision and sensitivity as measures of effectiveness. Keyword searches in bibliographic databases yielded high average precision (90%) but low average sensitivity (16%). PubMed was the most precise, followed closely by Scopus and WOS. The Google Scholar keyword search had low precision (54%) but provided the highest sensitivity (70%). Cited reference searches in all databases yielded moderate sensitivity (45-54%), but precision ranged from 35% to 75% with Scopus being the most precise. Cited reference searches were more sensitive than keyword searches, making it a more comprehensive strategy to identify all studies that use a particular instrument. Keyword searches provide a quick way of finding some but not all relevant articles. Goals, time, and resources should dictate the combination of which methods and databases are used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK) family proteins contain an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain, whose function has been elusive. Here, this domain is revealed as a new type of phospho-peptide-binding module, in which the GMP-binding site has evolved to accommodate phospho-serines or -threonines.

  13. Release of Tissue-specific Proteins into Coronary Perfusate as a Model for Biomarker Discovery in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordwell, Stuart; Edwards, Alistair; Liddy, Kiersten

    2012-01-01

    of 60 min reperfusion following brief, reversible ischemia (15 min; 15I/60R) for comparison with irreversible I/R (60I/60R). Perfusate proteins were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified by mass spectrometry (MS), revealing 26 tissue-specific proteins released during...... reperfusion post-15I. Proteins released during irreversible I/R (60I/60R) were profiled using gel-based (2-DE and one-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; geLC–MS) and gel-free (LC–MS/MS) methods. A total of 192 tissue-specific proteins were identified......Diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes is based on protein biomarkers, such as the cardiac troponins (cTnI/cTnT) and creatine kinase (CK-MB) that are released into the circulation. Biomarker discovery is focused on identifying very low abundance tissue-derived analytes from within albumin...

  14. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. → HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. → Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H 2 O 2 . → Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  15. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Mutsuo [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. {yields} HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. {yields} Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. {yields} Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger family identifies tissue specific and stress responsive candidates in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Seema; Kant, Chandra; Verma, Subodh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2017-01-01

    The CCCH zinc finger is a group of proteins characterised by a typical motif consisting of three cysteine residues and one histidine residue. These proteins have been reported to play important roles in regulation of plant growth, developmental processes and environmental responses. In the present study, genome wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger gene family was carried out in the available chickpea genome. Various bioinformatics tools were employed to predict 58 CCCH zinc finger genes in chickpea (designated CarC3H1-58), which were analysed for their physio-chemical properties. Phylogenetic analysis classified the proteins into 12 groups in which members of a particular group had similar structural organization. Further, the numbers as well as the types of CCCH motifs present in the CarC3H proteins were compared with those from Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula. Synteny analysis revealed valuable information regarding the evolution of this gene family. Tandem and segmental duplication events were identified and their Ka/Ks values revealed that the CarC3H gene family in chickpea had undergone purifying selection. Digital, as well as real time qRT-PCR expression analysis was performed which helped in identification of several CarC3H members that expressed preferentially in specific chickpea tissues as well as during abiotic stresses (desiccation, cold, salinity). Moreover, molecular characterization of an important member CarC3H45 was carried out. This study provides comprehensive genomic information about the important CCCH zinc finger gene family in chickpea. The identified tissue specific and abiotic stress specific CCCH genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in development and stress.

  17. Specific subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins play important roles during nodulation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling.

  18. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Mattsson

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3 exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  19. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  20. Proteolytic Activity of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) towards Protein Substrates and Effect of Peptides Stimulating PSA Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M.; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA. PMID:25237904

  1. IL-1beta induced protein changes in diabetes prone BB rat islets of Langerhans identified by proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, T; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Mose Larsen, P

    2002-01-01

    of 82 out of 1 815 protein spots detected by two dimensional gel electrophoresis in IL-1beta exposed diabetes prone Bio Breeding (BB-DP) rat islets of Langerhans in vitro. The aim of this study was to identify the proteins in these 82 spots by mass spectrometry and compare these changes with those seen...

  2. PuF, an antimetastatic and developmental signaling protein, interacts with the Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein via a tissue-specific proximal regulatory element (PRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Maloney, Bryan; Rogers, Jack T; Ge, Yuan-Wen

    2013-01-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is intimately tied to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Aβ aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Aβ subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP) may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or "proximal regulatory element" (PRE), at -76/-47, from the +1 transcription start site that confers cell type specificity. This PRE contains sequences that make it vulnerable to epigenetic modification and may present a viable target for drug studies. We examined PRE-nuclear protein interaction by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and PRE mutant EMSA. This was followed by functional studies of PRE mutant/reporter gene fusion clones. EMSA probed with the PRE showed DNA-protein interaction in multiple nuclear extracts and in human brain tissue nuclear extract in a tissue-type specific manner. We identified transcription factors that are likely to bind the PRE, using competition gel shift and gel supershift: Activator protein 2 (AP2), nm23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase/metastatic inhibitory protein (PuF), and specificity protein 1 (SP1). These sites crossed a known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). EMSA with PRE mutants and promoter/reporter clone transfection analysis further implicated PuF in cells and extracts. Functional assays of mutant/reporter clone transfections were evaluated by ELISA of reporter protein levels. EMSA and ELISA results correlated by meta-analysis. We propose that PuF may regulate the APP gene promoter and that AD risk may be increased by interference with PuF regulation at the PRE. PuF is targeted by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor 1, which also interacts with the integrins. These proteins are connected

  3. A multiplexed analysis approach identifies new association of inflammatory proteins in patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Emily; Vetter, Joel; Bliss, Laura; Lai, H Henry; Mysorekar, Indira U; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common debilitating bladder condition with unknown etiology and limited diagnostic modalities. Here, we explored a novel high-throughput and unbiased multiplex approach with cellular and molecular components in a well-characterized patient cohort to identify biomarkers that could be reliably used to distinguish OAB from controls or provide insights into underlying etiology. As a secondary analysis, we determined whether this method could discriminate between OAB and other chronic bladder conditions. We analyzed plasma samples from healthy volunteers (n = 19) and patients diagnosed with OAB, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), or urinary tract infections (UTI; n = 51) for proinflammatory, chemokine, cytokine, angiogenesis, and vascular injury factors using Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) analysis and urinary cytological analysis. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to perform univariate and multivariate comparisons between patient groups (controls, OAB, IC/BPS, and UTI). Multivariate logistic regression models were fit for each MSD analyte on 1) OAB patients and controls, 2) OAB and IC/BPS patients, and 3) OAB and UTI patients. Age, race, and sex were included as independent variables in all multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the diagnostic potential of a given analyte. Our findings demonstrate that five analytes, i.e., interleukin 4, TNF-α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, serum amyloid A, and Tie2 can reliably differentiate OAB relative to controls and can be used to distinguish OAB from the other conditions. Together, our pilot study suggests a molecular imbalance in inflammatory proteins may contribute to OAB pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Breast cancer resistance protein identifies clonogenic keratinocytes in human interfollicular epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongrui; Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Yang, Ennan; Teo, Peiyun; Ting, Yixin; Song, Colin; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Lee, Seng Teik

    2015-03-24

    There is a practical need for the identification of robust cell-surface markers that can be used to enrich for living keratinocyte progenitor cells. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, is known to be a marker for stem/progenitor cells in many tissues and organs. We investigated the expression of ABCG2 protein in normal human epidermis to evaluate its potential as a cell surface marker for identifying and enriching for clonogenic epidermal keratinocytes outside the pilosebaceous tract. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies of human skin showed that ABCG2 is expressed in a subset of basal layer cells in the epidermis. Flow cytometry analysis showed approximately 2-3% of keratinocytes in non-hair-bearing epidermis expressing ABCG2; this population also expresses p63, β1 and α6 integrins and keratin 14, but not CD34, CD71, C-kit or involucrin. The ABCG2-positive keratinocytes showed significantly higher colony forming efficiency when co-cultured with mouse 3T3 feeder cells, and more extensive long-term proliferation capacity in vitro, than did ABCG2-negative keratinocytes. Upon clonal analysis, most of the freshly isolated ABCG2-positive keratinocytes formed holoclones and were capable of generating a stratified differentiating epidermis in organotypic culture models. These data indicate that in skin, expression of the ABCG2 transporter is a characteristic of interfollicular keratinocyte progentior cells and suggest that ABCG2 may be useful for enriching keratinocyte stem cells in human interfollicular epidermis.

  5. Specific and reversible immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins on functionalized silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Iversen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    recognition motif attached to the Si NWs. In this study, we show that SiNWs can be chemically functionalized with Ni:NTA motifs, suitable for the specific immobilization of proteins via a short polyhistidine tag (His-tag) at close proximity to the SiNW surface. We demonstrate that the proteins preserve...... their function upon immobilization onto SiNWs. Importantly, the protein immobilization on the Si NWs is shown to be reversible after addition of EDTA or imidazole, thus allowing the regeneration of the bioFET when needed, such as in the case of proteins having a limited lifetime. We anticipate that our...

  6. Extracellular Vesicle Subtypes Released From Activated or Apoptotic T-Lymphocytes Carry a Specific and Stimulus-Dependent Protein Cargo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tucher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are released from nearly all mammalian cells and different EV populations have been described. Microvesicles represent large EVs (LEVs released from the cellular surface, while exosomes are small EVs (SEVs released from an intracellular compartment. As it is likely that different stimuli promote the release of distinct EV populations, we analyzed EVs from human lymphocytes considering the respective release stimuli (activation Vs. apoptosis induction. We could clearly separate two EV populations, namely SEVs (average diameter <200 nm and LEVs (diameter range between 200 and 1000 nm. Morphology and size were analyzed by electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Apoptosis induction caused a massive release of LEVs, while activated T-cells released SEVs and LEVs in considerably lower amounts. The release of SEVs from apoptotic T-cells was comparable with LEV release from activated ones. LEVs contained signaling proteins and proteins of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton. SEVs carried cytoplasmic/endosomal proteins like the 70-kDa heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 or tumor susceptibility 101 (TSG101, microtubule-associated proteins, and ubiquitinated proteins. The protein expression profile of SEVs and LEVs changed s