WorldWideScience

Sample records for identifying pedagogically effective

  1. EFFECTIVE WAYS OF POSTGRADUATE PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION INSTITUTES TEACHERS’ TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla V. Kalachova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of comparative analysis of training for teachers of postgraduate pedagogical education institutes for various forms of training: full-time, full-time- distance and distance after the author's program "Teacher training of postgraduate pedagogical education institutes for use of audiovisual teaching aids." The comparison was done on such indicators as the number of participants who completed the training, the pace of learning, quality control test mastery of the material of the course, the qualitative and quantitative performance indicators of individual case studies. As a result, the article identifies the main advantages and disadvantages of each form of education and recommended the most effective form of in-service training of the teaching load.

  2. Effective Pedagogical Practices for Online Teaching: Perception of Experienced Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Craig J.; Card, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    Institutions have focused on providing faculty with technological training to enhance their online teaching, but many online instructors would like to learn more effective pedagogical practices. This phenomenological study determines what experienced, award-winning South Dakota e-learning instructors perceive to be effective pedagogical practices.…

  3. Useful Pedagogical Applications of the Classical Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    One of the most known phenomena in physics is the Hall effect. This is mainly due to its simplicity and to the wide range of its theoretical and practical applications. To complete the pedagogical utility of the Hall effect in physics teaching, I will apply it here to determine the Faraday constant as a fundamental physical number and the number…

  4. Effects of a Pedagogical Agent's Emotional Expressiveness on Learner Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Enilda J.; Watson, Ginger S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of animated pedagogical agents or avatars in instruction has lagged behind their use in entertainment. This is due in part to the cost and complexity of development and implementation of agents in educational settings, but also results from a lack of research to understand how emotions from animated agents influence instructional effectiveness. The phenomenological study presented here assesses the perceptions of eight learners interacting with low and high intensity emotionally expressive pedagogical agents in a computer-mediated environment. Research methods include maximum variation and snowball sampling with random assignment to treatment. The resulting themes incorporate perceptions of importance, agent humanness, enjoyment, implementation barriers, and suggested improvements. Design recommendations and implications for future research are presented.

  5. PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF FUTURE TEACHER TRAINING IN THE EFFECTIVE USE OF GEOGRAPHY TEXTBOOK IN THE LESSON

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    Volkhonskaya Anastasiya Andreevna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problems of professional training of future teachers in the use of geography textbook in their classes. The author identifies the reasons for lack of young teachers’ attention to the textbook and the causes of insufficient training of future geography teachers in the effective use of the textbook in the class. Professional training of future teachers in the effective and proper use of the geography textbook in the class is possible only under certain pedagogical conditions. A specific feature of this work is theoretically sound pedagogical conditions of future teacher training in the effective use of geography textbook in the class, which can form and further develop the students’ readiness for effective use of geography textbook in the lessons.

  6. Physiological and Pedagogical Culture as a Basic for Effective Teaching Activity

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    Pirmagambet Z. Ishanov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with new approaches to organization of pedagogical education of a teacher in institutions of higher learning. Here we consider cult urological, personal, multiobjective (dialogic and individual-creative approaches. In this case, pedagogical activity is considered as a form of active correlation to the world, transformation experience of culture into pedagogue’s professional wealth. So, one of the factors determining the university teacher’s effectiveness is his psycho-pedagogical culture.

  7. Comparing Direct versus Indirect Measures of the Pedagogical Effectiveness of Team Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct measures (tests) of the pedagogical effectiveness of team testing and indirect measures (student surveys) of pedagogical effectiveness of team testing were collected in several sections of an undergraduate marketing course with varying levels of the use of team testing. The results indicate that although students perceived team testing to…

  8. Effects of Cueing by a Pedagogical Agent in an Instructional Animation: A Cognitive Load Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a pedagogical agent that cued relevant information in a story-based instructional animation on the cardiovascular system. Based on cognitive load theory, it was expected that the experimental condition with the pedagogical agent would facilitate students to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant…

  9. Psychological theory and pedagogical effectiveness: the learning promotion potential framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Peter

    2008-12-01

    After a century of educational psychology, eminent commentators are still lamenting problems besetting the appropriate relating of psychological insights to teaching design, a situation not helped by the persistence of crude assumptions concerning the nature of pedagogical effectiveness. To propose an analytical or meta-theoretical framework based on the concept of learning promotion potential (LPP) as a basis for understanding the basic relationship between psychological insights and teaching strategies, and to draw out implications for psychology-based pedagogical design, development and research. This is a theoretical and meta-theoretical paper relying mainly on conceptual analysis, though also calling on psychological theory and research. Since teaching consists essentially in activity designed to promote learning, it follows that a teaching strategy has the potential in principle to achieve particular kinds of learning gains (LPP) to the extent that it embodies or stimulates the relevant learning processes on the part of learners and enables the teacher's functions of on-line monitoring and assistance for such learning processes. Whether a teaching strategy actually does realize its LPP by way of achieving its intended learning goals depends also on the quality of its implementation, in conjunction with other factors in the situated interaction that teaching always involves. The core role of psychology is to provide well-grounded indication of the nature of such learning processes and the teaching functions that support them, rather than to directly generate particular ways of teaching. A critically eclectic stance towards potential sources of psychological insight is argued for. Applying this framework, the paper proposes five kinds of issue to be attended to in the design and evaluation of psychology-based pedagogy. Other work proposing comparable ideas is briefly reviewed, with particular attention to similarities and a key difference with the ideas of Oser

  10. Pedagogical approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    questions are: How (much) and what do teachers learn from experience? And how do teachers of adults develop their pedagogical approach? I examine the field of adult learners from the teachers’ perspective. Firstly, I identify some of the commonly described characteristics of adults as learners...... in formal settings, but in most teaching settings, the teachers act alone and develop their pedagogical approaches/- teaching strategies with no synchronous sparring from a colleague. Adult learners have particular needs and characteristics that their teachers must be able to address (cf. Knowles...

  11. [The effects of pedagogical training on university teaching in the field of health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Lozada, María L; Cárdenas-Muñoz, María L; Rojas-Soto, Edgar

    2010-06-01

    Evaluating changes in teaching adopted by teachers after participating in the Pedagogical Health Science Formation extension course taught by the National University of Colombia's Pedagogical Support and Teaching Formation Group from the Medicine Faculty. This was a part-time course; it dealt with topics such as didactics, curriculum, evaluation and the teacher's role. A qualitative, exploratory study was carried out, involving a personal interview formulated by the investigators; this was held in each participant's place of work. Fifty teachers who had taken the course between 2003 and 2004 were interviewed. The questionnaire consisted of ten semi-structured questions. After taking the course, 82 % of the participants considered that the quality of their communication with students was one of their most valued qualities, having understood that learning is a process which must be shared by both teachers and students. 64 % of the participants stated that they had acquired new concepts about evaluation and had increased their use of more participative pedagogical strategies. Teaching training courses had a positive effect on teaching, reflected in the quality of communication, teacher-student relationships and the pedagogic strategies used, all being very important elements in constructivist-orientated pedagogical models. The study's results agreed with other investigators' prior experience. The university must encourage this kind of intervention which will promote its own academic development by improving its teachers' performance.

  12. Effective Pedagogical Strategies for Millennial University Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste; Pieretti, Robert; Haberstock, Keith; Estrada, Jovany

    2016-01-01

    University instructors nationwide have been recognizing the increased importance of updating classroom teaching strategies to accommodate the needs of the millennial student generation. This article shares results of surveys of 323 university students in communication sciences and disorders and what they view as effective pedagogical strategies…

  13. Supporting Multimedia Learning with Visual Signalling and Animated Pedagogical Agent: Moderating Effects of Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. M.; Ozogul, G.; Reisslein, M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment examined the effects of visual signalling to relevant information in multiple external representations and the visual presence of an animated pedagogical agent (APA). Students learned electric circuit analysis using a computer-based learning environment that included Cartesian graphs, equations and electric circuit diagrams. The…

  14. Teaching Business Ethics: The Effectiveness of Common Pedagogical Practices in Developing Students' Moral Judgment Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Susan M.; Melchar, David E.; Beauvais, Laura L.; Desplaces, David E.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of pedagogical practices used to teach business ethics. The business community has greatly increased its demands for better ethics education in business programs. Educators have generally agreed that the ethical principles of business people have declined. It is important, then, to examine how common…

  15. Development of Speech Fluency over a Short Period of Time: Effects of Pedagogic Intervention

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    Tavakoli, Parvaneh; Campbell, Colin; McCormack, Joan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term pedagogic intervention on development of second language (L2) fluency among learners studying English for academic purposes at a UK university. It also examines the interaction between development of fluency and complexity and accuracy. Through a pretest and posttest design, data were collected…

  16. Effects of pedagogical ideology on the perceived loudness and noise levels in preschools.

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    Jonsdottir, Valdis; Rantala, Leena M; Oskarsson, Gudmundur Kr; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    High activity noise levels that result in detrimental effects on speech communication have been measured in preschools. To find out if different pedagogical ideologies affect the perceived loudness and levels of noise, a questionnaire study inquiring about the experience of loudness and voice symptoms was carried out in Iceland in eight private preschools, called "Hjalli model", and in six public preschools. Noise levels were also measured in the preschools. Background variables (stress level, age, length of working career, education, smoking, and number of children per teacher) were also analyzed in order to determine how much they contributed toward voice symptoms and the experience of noisiness. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting noise and its consequences. Teachers in the preschool with tighter pedagogical control of discipline (the "Hjalli model") experienced lower activity noise loudness than teachers in the preschool with a more relaxed control of behavior (public preschool). Lower noise levels were also measured in the "Hjalli model" preschool and fewer "Hjalli model" teachers reported voice symptoms. Public preschool teachers experienced more stress than "Hjalli model" teachers and the stress level was, indeed, the background variable that best explained the voice symptoms and the teacher's perception of a noisy environment. Discipline, structure, and organization in the type of activity predicted the activity noise level better than the number of children in the group. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting self-reported noise and its consequences.

  17. The Globalization of Business Schools: Curriculum and Pedagogical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbird, S. Andrew; Powers, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we explore the connection between learning goals, cognitive skill development, and pedagogical strategies. We identify cognitive skills that are important to students of international business, and link them to the pedagogical strategies that support them. The characteristics that impact the effectiveness of international business…

  18. Effects of pedagogical ideology on the perceived loudness and noise levels in preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Valdis; Rantala, Leena M.; Oskarsson, Gudmundur Kr.; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    High activity noise levels that result in detrimental effects on speech communication have been measured in preschools. To find out if different pedagogical ideologies affect the perceived loudness and levels of noise, a questionnaire study inquiring about the experience of loudness and voice symptoms was carried out in Iceland in eight private preschools, called “Hjalli model”, and in six public preschools. Noise levels were also measured in the preschools. Background variables (stress level, age, length of working career, education, smoking, and number of children per teacher) were also analyzed in order to determine how much they contributed toward voice symptoms and the experience of noisiness. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting noise and its consequences. Teachers in the preschool with tighter pedagogical control of discipline (the “Hjalli model”) experienced lower activity noise loudness than teachers in the preschool with a more relaxed control of behavior (public preschool). Lower noise levels were also measured in the “Hjalli model” preschool and fewer “Hjalli model” teachers reported voice symptoms. Public preschool teachers experienced more stress than “Hjalli model” teachers and the stress level was, indeed, the background variable that best explained the voice symptoms and the teacher's perception of a noisy environment. Discipline, structure, and organization in the type of activity predicted the activity noise level better than the number of children in the group. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting self-reported noise and its consequences. PMID:26356370

  19. EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL QUALITIES OF THE FUTURE BANKING SPECIALISTS

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    N. Benkovska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Today there is an urgent need for reform in education. In particular those educational fields are need to reform that train specialists to build an effective economic system of the country, including the banking system. Thus, there is a need to study the effectiveness of implementation of pedagogical conditions of formation of professional qualities of future specialists of Banking and identify the priority areas of development of relevant education field. Considering on the specificity of training banking specialists, the focus of research is to determine the role of ICT both in future work and in preparing students for future professional activity. Thus, on the efficiency of formation of professional qualities of future banking specialists in the course of their professional training will have a positive impact such educational facilities as updating interdisciplinary integration of professional disciplines, activation of interactive learning tools for students and simulation of special learning situations aimed to awareness of the importance of competencies to carry out the professional activities. The implementation of pedagogical conditions of formation of professional qualities of future banking specialists will provide the stable positive dynamics of formation of professional qualities of future banking.

  20. A mental picture of the greenhouse effect. A pedagogic explanation

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    Benestad, Rasmus E.

    2017-05-01

    The popular picture of the greenhouse effect emphasises the radiation transfer but fails to explain the observed climate change. An old conceptual model for the greenhouse effect is revisited and presented as a useful resource in climate change communication. It is validated against state-of-the-art data, and nontraditional diagnostics show a physically consistent picture. The earth's climate is constrained by well-known and elementary physical principles, such as energy balance, flow, and conservation. Greenhouse gases affect the atmospheric optical depth for infrared radiation, and increased opacity implies higher altitude from which earth's equivalent bulk heat loss takes place. Such an increase is seen in the reanalyses, and the outgoing long-wave radiation has become more diffuse over time, consistent with an increased influence of greenhouse gases on the vertical energy flow from the surface to the top of the atmosphere. The reanalyses further imply increases in the overturning in the troposphere, consistent with a constant and continuous vertical energy flow. The increased overturning can explain a slowdown in the global warming, and the association between these aspects can be interpreted as an entanglement between the greenhouse effect and the hydrological cycle, where reduced energy transfer associated with increased opacity is compensated by tropospheric overturning activity.

  1. Pedagogical issues for effective teaching of biosignal processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandham, William A; Hamilton, David J

    2010-01-01

    Biosignal processing and analysis is generally perceived by many students to be a challenging topic to understand, and to become adept with the necessary analytical skills. This is a direct consequence of the high mathematical content involved, and the many abstract features of the topic. The MATLAB and Mathcad software packages offer an excellent algorithm development environment for teaching biosignal processing and analysis modules, and can also be used effectively in many biosignal, and indeed bioengineering, research areas. In this paper, traditional introductory and advanced biosignal processing (and analysis) syllabi are reviewed, and the use of MATLAB and Mathcad for teaching and research is illustrated with a number of examples.

  2. Blended learning as an effective pedagogical paradigm for biomedical science

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    Perry Hartfield

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning combines face-to-face class based and online teaching and learning delivery in order to increase flexibility in how, when, and where students study and learn. The development, integration, and promotion of blended learning in frameworks of curriculum design can optimize the opportunities afforded by information and communication technologies and, concomitantly, accommodate a broad range of student learning styles. This study critically reviews the potential benefits of blended learning as a progressive educative paradigm for the teaching of biomedical science and evaluates the opportunities that blended learning offers for the delivery of accessible, flexible and sustainable teaching and learning experiences. A central tenet of biomedical science education at the tertiary level is the development of comprehensive hands-on practical competencies and technical skills (many of which require laboratory-based learning environments, and it is advanced that a blended learning model, which combines face-to-face synchronous teaching and learning activities with asynchronous online teaching and learning activities, effectively creates an authentic, enriching, and student-centred learning environment for biomedical science. Lastly, a blending learning design for introductory biochemistry will be described as an effective example of integrating face-to-face and online teaching, learning and assessment activities within the teaching domain of biomedical science.   DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i4.169

  3. Effects of beam-beam collisions on storage-ring performance - a pedagogical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the experimental and theoretical literature on colliding-beam effects in both leptonic and hadronic storage rings. For the most part, this literature is rather technical and, to the novice, both obscurely written and hard to locate. Although there have already been several symposia on the subject, as well as a number of reviews for specialists there has up till now been no unified and pedagogical exposition. The present work represents an attempt to fill this gap. The material is grouped into four major areas: observational phenomenology, computer simulation, mathematical background, and theoretical models. 113 references, 36 figures

  4. Three pedagogical approaches to introductory physics labs and their effects on student learning outcomes

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    Chambers, Timothy

    This dissertation presents the results of an experiment that measured the learning outcomes associated with three different pedagogical approaches to introductory physics labs. These three pedagogical approaches presented students with the same apparatus and covered the same physics content, but used different lab manuals to guide students through distinct cognitive processes in conducting their laboratory investigations. We administered post-tests containing multiple-choice conceptual questions and free-response quantitative problems one week after students completed these laboratory investigations. In addition, we collected data from the laboratory practical exam taken by students at the end of the semester. Using these data sets, we compared the learning outcomes for the three curricula in three dimensions of ability: conceptual understanding, quantitative problem-solving skill, and laboratory skills. Our three pedagogical approaches are as follows. Guided labs lead students through their investigations via a combination of Socratic-style questioning and direct instruction, while students record their data and answers to written questions in the manual during the experiment. Traditional labs provide detailed written instructions, which students follow to complete the lab objectives. Open labs provide students with a set of apparatus and a question to be answered, and leave students to devise and execute an experiment to answer the question. In general, we find that students performing Guided labs perform better on some conceptual assessment items, and that students performing Open labs perform significantly better on experimental tasks. Combining a classical test theory analysis of post-test results with in-lab classroom observations allows us to identify individual components of the laboratory manuals and investigations that are likely to have influenced the observed differences in learning outcomes associated with the different pedagogical approaches. Due to

  5. Strategies for Effecting System-Wide Pedagogical Change: Identifying and Addressing the Gap between Organizational and Pedagogical Implementation

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    Weinberger, Yehudith

    2018-01-01

    The study described here analyses a faculty-wide change designed to foster the communication proficiencies of students in a large teacher education college, gathering data from various sources over three years of the new agenda's implementation. Qualitative and quantitative data analysis revealed that implementation was progressing on two distinct…

  6. Pedagogical Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2011-01-01

    theoretical and practical development. The problem is especially severe within so-called pedagogical lexicography. A short panoramic review shows that especially the terms "pedagogical lexicography/dictionaries", "didactic lexicography/dictionaries", "school dic¬tionaries" and "learners' dictionaries...... to overcome the present confusion, it is therefore urgent to establish a typology that can be used as reference by scholars dealing theoretically with the subfield of pedagogical lexicography. The article will first show the amazing variety of mean¬ings addressed to the various terms in the theoretical...... literature. It will then approach the problem along two different lines: 1) establishing a clear definition of the terms "pedagogical", "didactic", "school" and "learner" in a lexicographical perspective, and 2) referring to the existing practice where the terms are frequently used in a much broader sense...

  7. The Effect of Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge and the Instruction of Middle School Geometry

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    Lenhart, Sara Talley

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between middle school math teacher pedagogical content knowledge as gathered from a teacher assessment and student Standards of Learning scores. Nine middle-school math teachers at two rural schools were assessed for their pedagogical content knowledge in geometry and measurement in the specific area of…

  8. Teaching Competitive Intelligence Skills to North American and Overseas Audiences: A World of Difference in Pedagogical Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkhorn, David L.; Fleisher, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    This article contrasts teaching methodologies and pedagogical effectiveness in executive development programs delivered in North America and three diverse regions of the world. Based on the authors' collective teaching experience exceeding 40 years encompassing over 24 countries, and augmented by a review of the literature, a theoretical model is…

  9. The pedagogical effect of a health education application for deaf and hard of hearing students in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Masoumeh; Eslami, Saeid; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Khajouei, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing children experience difficulties in learning health principles. But technology has significantly improved their ability to learn. The challenge in e-learning is to design attractive applications while having an educational aspect. The aims of this study were to determine the pedagogical effectiveness of a health education application for deaf and hard of hearing students in elementary schools, and to investigate the student's perceptions in different educational grades about the educational effectiveness of the text, graphics, video clips, and animation in the application. The study design was quasi experimental and was conducted in Mashhad in 2016. Study population were deaf or hard-of-hearing students in elementary schools. The intervention included health application training to deaf and hard-of-hearing students in Mashhad. A questionnaire was used for data gathering. The pedagogical effectiveness was determined by measuring the modified Adapted Pedagogical Index. This index was created based on the characteristics of the application and study population. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni adjustment by SPSS 22. Eighty-two students participated in the intervention. The value of modified Adapted Pedagogical Index was 0.669, indicating that the application was effective. The results of Kruskal-Wallis H and Mann-Whitney U test showed significant differences in different educational grades. (pinformation technology can improve the education of deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Modified Adapted Pedagogical Index can be used for evaluation of non-interactive applications for elementary school children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  10. A cross-sectional study of pedagogical strategies in nursing education: opportunities and constraints toward using effective pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnucci, Nicola; Carnevale, Franco A; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Tolotti, Angela; Cadorin, Lucia; Sasso, Loredana

    2015-08-25

    The continuous, rapid evolution of medical technology, the public need for ever more complex health-care services and the stagnant global economic situation have posed difficult new challenges for the nursing profession. The need to integrate knowledge, technical skill and ethical conduct in nursing practice has become ever more evident, particularly in response to the emerging challenges over recent years. Major research studies have highlighted that high-quality responses to health needs is highly dependent on both the education received by health care professionals and the pedagogical strategies employed in such training. The aim of this study was to identify the pedagogical strategies used by teachers in nursing programs in the Italian university system and to classify them according to the didactic architectures that are used. The study sample was recruited from the entire population of nursing instructors teaching in all years of their respective programs, in every Italian university with a nursing program. A three-part questionnaire, based on a Calvani taxonomy, was designed to collect both demographic and cultural information on the sample subjects, as well as the pedagogical strategies that they may have used in their teaching practices, was administered to all nursing instructors. A five-point Likert scale was used to measure the frequency of use of different pedagogical strategies. On the whole, 992 teachers participated in the study (80.1% of the teachers contacted). Experience data suggest a highly-educated overall instructor population. The settings in which the participants carried out their teaching activities were represented mostly by large lecture halls and the number of students in their classes were for the most part rather large; over 60. Frequency of use revealed that the most commonly used method was the traditional lecture. Indeed, 85.7% of the respondents "often" or "always" used pedagogical strategies belonging to a 'receptive

  11. PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICE WAY OF CONNECTING PEDAGOGICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božo Obradović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of linking educational theory to educational practice (educational work with young people is highly topical and important issue for the science of pedagogy. One way of achieving this task is a pedagogical practice (PP students. In paper we deal with identifying, comparing, and analyzing the curricula of vocational (Curriculum for Preschool Teacher (2007 and academic (Curriculum for Educators (2007. Studies Teacher Training in Serbia, as well as educational disciplines and areas of pedagogical science derived from them. The results showed many similarities, but also differences when it comes to educational disciplines that are taught, the name of pedagogical practice, the number of classes to implement, ECTS (European Credit Transfer System, which affect the quality and coherence of educational theory and educational practice. In order to identify similarities and overcome weaknesses that accompany the pedagogical practice analysis, we came to know about the specifics of each of the six pedagogical practice. For each pedagogical practice defined specific goals and tasks arising from the curriculum, and in particular pedagogical disciplines taught at university. Each of these pedagogical practices is the ability to connect educational theory and educational practice and direct way to increase the quality of training and competence of future teachers for direct work with children.

  12. Student teachers' pedagogical content knowledge for teaching systems thinking: effects of different interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkränzer, Frank; Hörsch, Christian; Schuler, Stephan; Riess, Werner

    2017-09-01

    Systems' thinking has become increasingly relevant not only in education for sustainable development but also in everyday life. Even if teachers know the dynamics and complexity of living systems in biology and geography, they might not be able to effectively explain it to students. Teachers need an understanding of systems and their behaviour (content knowledge), and they also need to know how systems thinking can be fostered in students (pedagogical content knowledge (PCK)). But the effective development of teachers' professional knowledge in teaching systems thinking is empirically uncertain. From a larger study (SysThema) that investigated teaching systems thinking, this article reports the effects of the three different interventions (technical course, didactic course and mixed course) in student teachers' PCK for teaching systems thinking. The results show that student teachers' PCK for teaching systems thinking can be promoted in teacher education. The conclusion to be drawn from our findings is that a technically orientated course without didactical aspects seems to be less effective in fostering student teachers' PCK for teaching systems thinking. The results inform educators in enhancing curricula of future academic track and non-academic track teacher education.

  13. Pedagogical integration and regionalisation

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    Jan Gustafsson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this research is concerned with the intentions of pedagogical integration and the notion of an expanded concept of teaching as described in the National School Curriculum of Sweden. In the analysis a theoretical synthesis comprising critical discourse analysis and sociological theories of institutional identities and processes is used through a policy ethnography approach. Purpose has been focus on the relationship between the formal, written curriculum and specific, local, classroom practices. The analysis shows that the Pedagogical dimensions of integration were transformed toward economic interests and control at the local political level. Education work is distinctly regionalising into two so-called safety zones, and a hybrid zone. Four different pedagogical identities are also identified in the analysis. The analysis thus suggests that the creation of safety zones restricts education work to pre-existing patterns. Only the hybrid zone is presently carrying a potential to significantly renew education and encourage and social change.

  14. An embodiment effect in computer-based learning with animated pedagogical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E; DaPra, C Scott

    2012-09-01

    How do social cues such as gesturing, facial expression, eye gaze, and human-like movement affect multimedia learning with onscreen agents? To help address this question, students were asked to twice view a 4-min narrated presentation on how solar cells work in which the screen showed an animated pedagogical agent standing to the left of 11 successive slides. Across three experiments, learners performed better on a transfer test when a human-voiced agent displayed human-like gestures, facial expression, eye gaze, and body movement than when the agent did not, yielding an embodiment effect. In Experiment 2 the embodiment effect was found when the agent spoke in a human voice but not in a machine voice. In Experiment 3, the embodiment effect was found both when students were told the onscreen agent was consistent with their choice of agent characteristics and when inconsistent. Students who viewed a highly embodied agent also rated the social attributes of the agent more positively than did students who viewed a nongesturing agent. The results are explained by social agency theory, in which social cues in a multimedia message prime a feeling of social partnership in the learner, which leads to deeper cognitive processing during learning, and results in a more meaningful learning outcome as reflected in transfer test performance.

  15. Developing the Pedagogical Culture of Parents by Means of Social Partnership with a Supplementary Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Nikitina, Ekaterina L.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the research is due to the current requirements to develop the pedagogical culture of parents, which can help them to be successful parents, to effectively interact with their children avoiding family upbringing mistakes. In this respect, the article aims to identify the conditions for development of the pedagogical culture of…

  16. Pedagogical Content Knowledge-Guided Lesson Study: Effects on Teacher Competence and Students’ Achievement in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lou S. Lucenario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of Pedagogical Content Knowledge-Guided Lesson Study (PCKLS as an intervention to develop PCK competencies among teachers and consequently enhance student achievement in terms of conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. Using quasi-experimental design, teacher competencies and student achievement in the PCKLS group and the conventional group were compared. In the PCKLS group, the intervention involved planning the lesson by the research team, teaching the planned lesson while PCK observations were made by the researcher and another teacher from the group, including a feedback meeting, implementing the improvements in the reteach stage of the lesson study cycle by another teacher from the research team, and, finally, revising lesson plans based on the consolidated suggestions for improvement. Analyses of data showed that there was a significant difference in the science teacher competencies of the PCKLS group teacher respondents compared to those of the conventional group. Also, student respondents showed a significant increase on mean scores in terms of conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. Therefore, it was concluded that PCKLS was an effective method to develop the teachers’ PCK competencies and student achievement in terms of conceptual understanding and problem solving. This study recommends that this intervention be used across chemistry topics and in other science classes such as Biology, Earth and Environmental Science, Physics, and Mathematics.

  17. Effects of Electronic Information Resources Skills Training for Lecturers on Pedagogical Practices and Research Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhukuvhani, Crispen; Chiparausha, Blessing; Zuvalinyenga, Dorcas

    2012-01-01

    Lecturers use various electronic resources at different frequencies. The university library's information literacy skills workshops and seminars are the main sources of knowledge of accessing electronic resources. The use of electronic resources can be said to have positively affected lecturers' pedagogical practices and their work in general. The…

  18. Social Facilitation Effects by Pedagogical Conversational Agent: Lexical Network Analysis in an Online Explanation Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yugo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates web-based learning activities of undergraduate students who generate explanations about a key concept taught in a large-scale classroom. The present study used an online system with Pedagogical Conversational Agent (PCA), asked to explain about the key concept from different points and provided suggestions and…

  19. Animated Pedagogical Agents Effects on Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning in a Science Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students' perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science classrooms, special attention was given to…

  20. Animated pedagogical agents effects on enhancing student motivation and learning in a science inquiry learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students’ perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science

  1. Animated pedagogical agents effects on enhancing student motivation and learning in a science inquiry learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students’ perceptions of task relevance and selfefficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science

  2. Is Twitter an Effective Pedagogical Tool in Higher Education? Perspectives of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the perspectives of education graduate students of using Twitter as a pedagogical tool for 15 weeks as a required social media activity in class. The results indicated that participants in each course reported a positive learning experience of using Twitter. Although this was their first experience with Twitter, participants…

  3. The effect of fifth grade science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge on their decision making and student learning outcomes on the concept of chemical change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Glenda Lee

    This study investigated the science pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) among teachers as they taught the concept of chemical change to fifth grade students. The purpose was to identify teachers' PCK and its impact in middle grade science classrooms. A second purpose was to investigate the possible relationship of teachers' science PCK to teacher actions and student learning outcomes in the classroom. The instruments used to capture PCK were background and demographic information, Content Representations (CoRe), and Professional and Pedagogical experience Repertoire (PaP-eR). The study investigated CoRe and PaP-eR with seven classroom teachers as they planned and taught chemical change to fifth grade students. Four levels of a Pedagogical Content Knowledge rubric were used to describe varying levels of PCK. The four levels were content knowledge of chemical change; knowledge of students' thinking; knowledge of how to represent chemical change to promote student learning; and professional development, collaboration, and leadership roles in science. The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) described and evaluated science teaching performance levels of the teachers. In this study, 176 students were assessed to determine understanding of chemical change. There was a significant correlation between teachers' PCK scores and student achievement. The study also determined that a significant correlation existed between teachers' PCK scores and their RTOP scores revealing that RTOP scores could be predictors of PCK. Through this approach, understandings of PCK emerged that are of interest to university preservice preparation programs, research in understanding effective teachers and teaching, and the planning and implementation of professional development for teachers of science with middle grade students.

  4. Identifying Effectiveness Criteria for Internet Payment Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Tae-Hwan; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines Internet payment systems (IPS): third-party, card, secure Web server, electronic token, financial electronic data interchange (EDI), and micropayment based. Reports the results of a Delphi survey of experts identifying and classifying IPS effectiveness criteria and classifying types of IPS providers. Includes the survey invitation letter…

  5. Pedagogical Culture of Future Teachers of Musical Art: A Methodological Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Pashchenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with modern scholars’ approaches to the definition of the term “pedagogical culture of future teachers of musical art”. The authors give their own definition of future teacher’s pedagogical culture. It is defined as a subjectively conditioned system of values, culture-pedagogical knowledge, norms of behavior, which are practically implemented in the process of the development of a human being. These factors contribute to the realization of students’ abilities, development of moral and philosophical personal qualities by means of implementing certain pedagogical conditions of training in higher educational establishments of Ukraine. They also determine the choice of the correct strategy of specialists-educators’ cultural-pedagogical identity in their future professional activity. The criteria and levels as well as the stages of experimental work on the implementation of these methods have been identified and described. The experimental stages of the implementation of methods of formation of future teachers’ pedagogical culture by means of spiritual music have been identified and described. There are three stages: adaptive, cognitive-corrective, and acmeological. The results of experimental work, that demonstrate positive effects of the implementation of methods of formation of future teachers’ pedagogical culture by means of spiritual music in the educational process of pedagogical universities, have been also presented in the article.

  6. Framework for pedagogical learning analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Heilala, Ville

    2018-01-01

    Learning analytics is an emergent technological practice and a multidisciplinary scientific discipline, which goal is to facilitate effective learning and knowledge of learning. In this design science research, I combine knowledge discovery process, a concept of pedagogical knowledge, ethics of learning analytics and microservice architecture. The result is a framework for pedagogical learning analytics. The framework is applied and evaluated in the context of agency analytics. The framework ...

  7. Influence of motivation upon effectiveness of physical culture and sport profile high educational facilities teachers' proffessional-pedagogical activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivation of teachers for professional-pedagogical activity and levels of forming of their pedagogical skills were determined based on the results of self evaluation and evaluation that was performed by the students. Evaluation of teachers' pedagogical skills and self evaluation were compared to dominating motivation for professional activity of teachers. 42 teachers and 78 students took part in this experiment. To determine proffessional-pedagogical activity motivation the tool of K. Zamfir in modification by A. Rean was used. To determine self evaluation of pedagogical skills "Scale of self evaluation of pedagogical activity" and tool of B. Zelentsov "Students about a teacher" were used. It was shown that it is characteristic for teachers to over estimate their pedagogical skills in comparison to the evaluation made by students: high level of forming of pedagogical skills comprise 40,48 % of respondents, while according to the students evaluation this figure is almost twice lower and comprises - 21,43%; average level evaluation, shows only 14,28 %, when students evaluate that 35,71% of teachers have average level of pedagogical skills forming. It was declared that teachers with the most determined internal motives are more objective in their self evaluation. It was proven that teachers whose pedagogical skills are on high level and who are evaluated by the students on the same level the are lead by domination of internal motivation.

  8. Pedagogical processes in healthcare: an exploratory study of pedagogic work with patients and next of kin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Håkan; Lindblad Fridh, Marianne; Lindh Falk, Annika; Thörne, Karin

    2009-12-01

    Care and education have much in common, and work in the healthcare sector is closely associated with learning and teaching. It is felt that many in the healthcare and medical services are not aware of their pedagogic skills and how they can be developed. FRAME OF REFERENCE: Belonging to a community of practice means that you share perspectives, methods and language. The aim is to describe the pedagogical discourse by identifying pedagogical processes and studying the staff's awareness of such processes or situations in which a pedagogical approach would be useful in their work with patients and next of kin. A qualitative study based on individual and group interviews. The analysis is directed by grounded theory. The pedagogical processes varied in length and quality. Most were unplanned and were usually embedded in treatment. The pedagogical process is linear (planning, goal setting, teaching and evaluating) in an educational setting but we found that the beginning and end can be unclear and the goals can be vague or non-existent. The pedagogical process is best described using the concepts Read, Guide and Provide learning support. The pedagogical discourse in healthcare is almost silent. Data indicate that at the collective level there is very little support for professional development of pedagogical ability. Tacit knowledge may therefore remain silent even though it may be possible to formulate and describe it. There is a strong need to focus on the pedagogical parts of the work and to encourage and support the development of professional pedagogical knowledge.

  9. Public Pedagogical Portfolio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    • formulate my own understanding of fundamental pedagogical view derived from both theoretical and practical education up to now (there might be change in the future) • create my own recipe for a good lecture • recommend a few teaching methods optimized for engineering students • identify my own SWOT...... as tool to analyze teaching practice and thereafter improve teaching outcome. • motivate engineer students, really achieve deep learning, and gain knowledge at high SOLO level. • At the same time, hope colleagues of similar field can find some points useful as well....

  10. Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Indonesian English Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Faisal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available –This paper considers the pedagogical content knowledge (PCKthat Indonesian teachers require to implement the 2013 Curriculum and develop their junior high school learner’s written English effectively, as mandated by the Regulation Number 16/2007. Based on the commonalities of the PCK components in international and Indonesian teaching of English as a foreign language, the components of PCK comprise knowledge of learners, subject matter, general pedagogy, and curriculum. Following manifest-latent content analysis principles, this study identified that this regulation defines and derives the concept of PCK into what it calls teachers’ four competencies, namely pedagogical, professional, personal, and social competencies.

  11. The Effects of a Pedagogical Agent's Smiling Expression on the Learner's Emotions and Motivation in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Tze Wei; Zin, Nor Azan Mat; Sahari, Noraidah; Tan, Su-Mae

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a smiling expression on the face of a talking pedagogical agent could positively affect a learner's emotions, motivation, and learning outcomes in a virtual learning environment. Contrary to the hypothesis, results from Experiment 1 demonstrated that the pedagogical agent's smile induced negative…

  12. THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND EFFECTIVENESS OF A PEDAGOGICAL TREATMENT FOR THE TEACHING AND LEARNING OF CRITICAL THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne R. Reid

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A quasi-experimental study of a pedagogical treatment in critical thinking was undertaken in a college of business. The quantitative results demonstrated significant improvements in 6 of 7 measures of critical thinking using a validated assessment instrument. This treatment was taught in the college of business for four years. A qualitative/quantitative survey was taken of the graduates of the college who had taken this treatment. Quantitative results were validated by the qualitative responses of the graduates. Graduates were confirmed to use the critical thinking knowledge, skills and strategies they had learned in their personal, academic, and professional lives. Graduates were also shown to be highly satisfied with the effects of the treatment in their personal, academic, and professional lives.

  13. Effect of Kolb's Experiential Learning Strategy on Enhancing Pedagogical Skills of Pre-Service Teachers of Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshmad'sa, Laveena; Vijayakumari, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of Kolb's Experiential Learning Strategy on enhancing the pedagogical skills of pre-service teachers of secondary school level. Kolb's Experiential Learning is a method of acquiring knowledge, skills, and experiences by creating situation to gain first hand experiences. According to Kolb optimal…

  14. Redesigning Human Body Systems: Effective Pedagogical Strategy for Promoting Active Learning and STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abour H. Cherif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a remarkable biological machine maintained by interdependent body systems and organized biochemical reactions. Evolution has worked on humans for hundreds of thousands of years, yet the current pace of technological and social change have radically affected our life style and have exposed possible human frailties. This raises the question of whether or not nature’s work could be improved upon. We provide two-sided perspectives as a rationale for the need for the redesign of the human body. Then, we describe pedagogical strategy through which students study morphological and anatomical structures and the physiological functions of the human body systems and their respective organs and parts. The students select their own favorite system or organ to redesign in order to optimize the efficiency of the anatomical structural, physiological function, and/or the aesthetic and functional morphology; a redesign that might lead to, for example, lowering risk of diabetes, heart attack, and/or stroke. Through group work and interaction (student groups compete for a prestigious “in-house” patent award, students actively engage in the learning process in order to understand the role of design in the efficiency and functionality and vulnerability to disease of the human body system.

  15. Locating the difference: A comparison of pedagogic strategies in high and low performing schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaylianne Rialda Aploon-Zokufa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of research studies have suggested that specific pedagogic strategies can have a positive impact on learning, and in turn, have a positive impact on school performance, in particular for children being schooled in disadvantaged contexts. This analysis describes and measures how four of these pedagogic strategies identified in research – the pacing of a lesson, the sequence and coherence of a lesson, cognitive demand and the nature of feedback within a lesson – are displayed in higher and lower performing schools located in lower-income communities in the Western Cape. The analysis forms part of a broader research project, SPADE (Schools Performing Above Demographic Expectation, and is based on fifteen video-recorded Grade 3 numeracy lessons. The analysis suggests a relationship between specific pedagogic strategies and higher performance for individual learners and for schools. The analysis also identifies further effective pedagogic strategies in higher performing schools in lower-income communities.

  16. Pedagogical Approaches to and Effects of Fundamental Movement Skill Interventions on Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompsett, Claire; Sanders, Ross; Taylor, Caitlin; Cobley, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) are assumed to be the basic prerequisite motor movements underpinning coordination of more integrated and advanced movement capabilities. FMS development and interventions have been associated with several beneficial health outcomes in individual studies. The primary aim of this review was to identify FMS intervention characteristics that could be optimised to attain beneficial outcomes in children and adolescents, while the secondary aim was to update the evidence as to the efficacy of FMS interventions on physiological, psychological and behavioural health outcomes. A systematic search [adhering to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines] was conducted in seven databases. Studies were included if they conducted an FMS intervention and targeted at least one physiological, behavioural or psychological outcome in school-aged children (5-18 years). Twenty-nine studies examining the effect of FMS interventions relative to controls were identified. Specialist-led interventions, taught in conjunction with at-home practice and parent involvement, appeared more efficacious in enhancing FMS proficiency than school physical education alone. Intervention environments encouraging psychological autonomy were likely to enhance perceived and actual competence in FMS alongside physical activity. FMS interventions had little influence on overweight/obesity reduction, strength or flexibility. In 93% of studies, evidence indicated interventions improved FMS motor proficiency. Favourable specific physiological, psychological and behavioural outcomes were also identified across a variety of interventions. With reference to clinical and normative school-age populations, future studies should be directed toward determining validated standard FMS assessments to enable accurate effect estimates, permit intervention comparisons and improve the efficacy of FMS development.

  17. Pedagogized Muslimness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    /himself, accepts being made into an object upon which knowledge can be generated. Particularly overexposed are the pupils, whom the teachers identify as ‘Muslim’, something which draws on decades of casting this group of children as special objects of – as well as obstacles to – schooling. By the late 1970s...

  18. PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICE WAY OF CONNECTING PEDAGOGICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Božo Obradović

    2013-01-01

    The issue of linking educational theory to educational practice (educational work with young people) is highly topical and important issue for the science of pedagogy. One way of achieving this task is a pedagogical practice (PP) students. In paper we deal with identifying, comparing, and analyzing the curricula of vocational (Curriculum for Preschool Teacher (2007) and academic (Curriculum for Educators (2007). Studies Teacher Training in Serbia, as well as educational disciplines and areas ...

  19. Pedagogical Considerations for Effectively Teaching Qualitative Research to Students in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Sara; Hill, Karlie

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research aims to understand both individual meaning as well as complex systemic interactions as they apply to social problems or individual experiences. This method of research is both inductive and flexible, allowing for a holistic approach that facilitates a rich understanding of the content examined. Past research identifies a…

  20. Pedagogical practices in VET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with pedagogical practices on the basic carpentry VET programme in Denmark. On the basis of an anthropologically inspired study among carpentry students at two VET schools, the prime objective of analysis is to understand the various pedagogical practices from the students...

  1. Health and pedagogical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to highlight the basic pedagogical knowledge and values in Danish educational daycare institutions (kindergartens). In the book we present a selction of current research and development projects covering central issues of the pedagogical work in Danish early childhood...

  2. Linking Serious Game Narratives with Pedagogical Theories and Pedagogical Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troyer, Olga; Van Broeckhoven, Frederik; Vlieghe, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Narrative-based serious games present pedagogical content and interventions through an interactive narrative. To ensure effective learning in such kind of serious games, designers are not only faced with the challenge of creating a compelling narrative, but also with the additional challenge of incorporating suitable pedagogical strategies.…

  3. THE MODEL OF REALIZATION OF INTEGRATIVE APPROACH TO THE WORK WITH PEDAGOGICALLY GIFTED STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubova Anna Vasilievna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the components and criteria of pedagogical giftedness of students; the levels of formedness and pedagogical conditions of its development are identified. Purpose: to describe the model of realization of integrative approach to the work with pedagogically gifted students in educational space of university. Methodology: theoretical level methods of pedagogical phenomena learning, methods of empirical level (observation, interviewing, questionnaires, conversations, psychological tests etc.. The results of the research proved that phased realization of integrative approach to the work with pedagogically gifted students in educational space of university provides the rising of pedagogically giftedness formation level. The next pedagogical conditions of pedagogically giftedness formation are described: the creation of pedagogically-oriented creative environment; promotion of positive motivational setting for future professional and educational activities; attracting future teachers to the creative professional-oriented learning and cognitive activity. Practical implications: the educational process of higher pedagogical educational institutions.

  4. Effects on the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Early Childhood Teacher Candidates Using Digital Storytelling to Teach Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildan, Abdullah Oguzhan; Incikabi, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present early childhood teacher candidates' experiences preparing digital stories and to reveal the resulting changes, if any, in self-reported technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). This study was quasi-experimental and indicated that teacher candidates' evaluations of digital storytelling were affected by their…

  5. The Effects of Social Cue Principles on Cognitive Load, Situational Interest, Motivation, and Achievement in Pedagogical Agent Multimedia Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Animated pedagogical agents have become popular in multimedia learning with combined delivery of verbal and non-verbal forms of information. In order to reduce unnecessary cognitive load caused by such multiple forms of information and also to foster generative cognitive processing, multimedia design principles with social cues are suggested…

  6. Student Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teaching Systems Thinking: Effects of Different Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkränzer, Frank; Hörsch, Christian; Schuler, Stephan; Riess, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Systems' thinking has become increasingly relevant not only in education for sustainable development but also in everyday life. Even if teachers know the dynamics and complexity of living systems in biology and geography, they might not be able to effectively explain it to students. Teachers need an understanding of systems and their behaviour…

  7. Social Networking and Pedagogical Variations: An Integrated Approach for Effective Interpersonal and Group Communications Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim

    2012-01-01

    Electronic communication and social networking are effective and useful tools in the process of teaching and learning and have increasingly improved the quality of students' learning outcomes in higher education in recent years. The system encourages and supports students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities and…

  8. The Effect of the Metacognitive Support via Pedagogical Agent on Self-Regulation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Olpak, Yusuf Ziya; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2018-01-01

    Flipped Classroom (FC) has become an increasingly popular model in many disciplines in today's educational system. In order for the FC model to be effective, it is important for the student to have self-regulation skills. It is especially important that students have advanced self-regulatory skills so that the online learning process of the FC…

  9. Pedagogical innovation in teacher teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal design-based research project examining how to enable reflection and pedagogical innovation in teacher teams. The article identifies and analyses the teachers’ learning trajectories and innovative strategies when working together in the IT...... learning designs, the research aims to clarify what kind of knowledge is being developed and shared in the teacher teams, and how this contributes to the organisational learning process. The context is Global Classroom, an innovative synchronous hybrid videoconference concept, where adult students can......-pedagogical Think Tank for Teacher Teams (after this: ITP4T) (Weitze, 2014a), a competence development model, which was developed in an earlier phase of the research project. By using theoretical lenses from innovative knowledge development frameworks to examine the teachers’ utterances, interactions and new...

  10. Pedagogic Effects of Cooperative Learning Assessment in the Chemistry I Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Jennifer

    Over the last 30 years, there has been ongoing research and debate concerning the implementation and effectiveness of cooperative learning in the classroom. The problem is determining the fair assignment of individual grades while using cooperative work. Teachers have limited time to compile, equate, and convert group grades for each student. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the impact of cooperative learning assessment on student achievement. This study aimed to determine the relationship between teacher-assigned/group-elected laboratory positions (independent variable) and academic achievement (dependent variable) while using the cards on the table approach of cooperative learning assessment. Participants consisted of 2 classes of Chemistry I students enrolled in a small rural school system. Alternative assessment practices such as the cards on the table approach of cooperative learning assessment were examined and discussed. Results of ANCOVA analyses indicated no significance difference in the adjusted scores between teacher-assigned versus group-elected laboratory positions within structured laboratory groups on the academic achievement of Chemistry I students as measured by a standardized pretest/posttest while using the cooperative learning assessment. Conducting paired samples t tests revealed the group-assigned students improved significantly from pretest to posttest while the teacher-assigned students had no significant improvements. The study may affect positive social change by helping teachers develop guidelines for fair assessment of individual grades from cooperative learning activities and to enrich the academic repertoire of students, increasing their awareness of accountability and collaboration.

  11. TECHNICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL SERVICE QUALITY OF E-LEARNING: a research framework for the development of a systematic means of identification and adaptation testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Chiran Jayasundara

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a research framework that can be applied to develop and measure technical and pedagogical service quality of e-leaning in Sri Lankan phenomenon. This study is an in-depth empirical investigation which seeks to build up an instrument to predict technical and pedagogical service quality of e-learning in Sri Lanka. The specific objectives are to investigate what comprises technical and pedagogical service quality of e-learning: to establish a deeper understanding of the phenomenon to identify effective technical and pedagogical dimensions of: e-learning on user perspectives and finally to develop a scale: to fill the gap detected in the area of assessing/measuring Technical and pedagogical service quality of e- Leaning which can be used by designers and practitioners in the field of e-learning. A comprehensive methodology will be used to design the instrument.

  12. Systemizing the Pedagogic Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Serikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasizes the necessity of systemizing the pedagogic concepts to complement the pluralism principle dominating in pedagogy over the recent years. The author recommends the person oriented systematic synergetic methodology combining various research data into a holistic scientific approach. The paper regards education as the core pedagogic concept - including training, upbringing, self-education, their respective subcomponents, and generated personal resource. The elements of personal resource combine the acquired knowledge, skills and values, developed subjective attitudes and individual health data. The key pedagogic terms describing the educational process are represented by a three-level system; the first level involves the educational form concepts, the second – generated personal resource, the third – summarized notion system combining the previous levels and reflecting their binary relations. The given construct systemizes the pedagogic conceptual apparatus and clarifies the theoretical notion of personal education. 

  13. Simulation-based medical education: time for a pedagogical shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaniti, Kaarthigeyan; Campbell, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of medical education at all levels is to prepare physicians with the knowledge and comprehensive skills, required to deliver safe and effective patient care. The traditional 'apprentice' learning model in medical education is undergoing a pedagogical shift to a 'simulation-based' learning model. Experiential learning, deliberate practice and the ability to provide immediate feedback are the primary advantages of simulation-based medical education. It is an effective way to develop new skills, identify knowledge gaps, reduce medical errors, and maintain infrequently used clinical skills even among experienced clinical teams, with the overall goal of improving patient care. Although simulation cannot replace clinical exposure as a form of experiential learning, it promotes learning without compromising patient safety. This new paradigm shift is revolutionizing medical education in the Western world. It is time that the developing countries embrace this new pedagogical shift.

  14. THE ROLE OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS FOR THE STANDARD OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENTAL EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL HIGH EDUCATION IN THE PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR THE PSYCHO-PEDAGOGICAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Petrovna Akutina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal: the educational research of educational effectiveness FGOS PVO for the professional preparation.The research method and the methodological approach: to enlighten the goals of the Federal Governmental Education Standard (FGOS of the high professional education (VPO of the psycho-pedagogical field within the education system reforming; to create new didactical materials, programs, plans, training courses; to model the educational effectiveness of a high education institution according to the competence approach.The clue of the educational effectiveness is in the developing an individual educational path for students in the comprehensive phase, and as a result the role of an educator, and a tutor increases; the changes in social cultural sphere of an educational institution, the importance of students self-management are to remodel the formulating personal needs paradigm in professional, private, intellectual, cultural and modal advancing.The research results are to open valuable possibilities of educational effectiveness in FGOS VPO influencing the professional preparation, that is filled with innovative forms, me-thods, technological approaches in cooperation between students and educators; to organize socially oriented process within the educational and extra educational context, to construct an individual educational path to obtain a qualification, to guaranty the realization of a new educational system for educators’ cooperation, for tutors and social partners; all these permit to act in different cultural spheres acquiring positive experience of professional training.The application field: the research results are applied in the pedagogical activity to prepare professional figures in the psycho pedagogical area, in educational projects with students, in cooperating with various social partners.

  15. HISTORICAL-PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE PROBLEM OF DEVELOPING RESEARCH SKILLS IN STUDENTS, AS A FACTOR IN EFFECTIVE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Albertovna Gorodilova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A special form of the process of cognition this study, i.e. targeted and systematic study that uses the tools of science, and which results in the formation of knowledge about the studied objects. In a broad sense, research is the search for new knowledge. On the other hand (in the narrow sense research is a scientific method of studying something. Cognitive abilities of students based on the ability to «explore».The aim of our study is the problem of formation and development of research skills among students. These skills characterize many kinds of activities corresponding to different levels of professionalism. The development of research skills determines the success of the training. Methodical skill of the teacher is manifested, not only in dealing with certain tasks of teaching, but rather in how these tasks are solved. Without knowledge of historical and pedagogical heritage is impossible to solve the problem of development of research skills in the students.The article conducts historical and pedagogical analysis of literary sources on the problem of developing research skills in students. Considered certain periods in the formation process of formation and development of research abilities of students during their education. This idea existed not in isolation, but in the General system of other Sciences, especially mathematics and philosophy and relevant is not a single century. Changing pedagogical approaches to the implementation of this idea, as changing the conditions of teaching and the individual characteristics of students. But to form and develop in students the ability to think independently, implement research – one of methods of successful training.

  16. Researcher sherlockiana pedagogical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Antonio Pineda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The text present the conceptual development about an author denominated pedagogical research. It explains from the reading and interpretation of Sir Arthur Konan Doyle texts and its main character Sherlock Holmes, some clues on order to do the pedagogical researcher: personal passion for the knowledge, curiosity and astonished, diligence and discipline, logical and imaginatively ability. At same time it explains the possibility of free and public discussion in the university and the strength in the writing and the community academic formation as characteristic of pedagogical researcher. The text is development in three parts: first makes references to the characteristics of researcher, second it is about the process of research and performance characteristics of itself and last it explains the institutional conditions which permit its action and implication into society.

  17. Integrating pedagogical content knowledge and pedagogical/psychological knowledge in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Nora; Eichler, Andreas; Renkl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education at universities, general pedagogical and psychological principles are often treated separately from subject matter knowledge and therefore run the risk of not being applied in the teaching subject. In an experimental study (N = 60 mathematics student teachers) we investigated the effects of providing aspects of general pedagogical/psychological knowledge (PPK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in an integrated or separated way. In both conditions (“integrated” vs. “separated”), participants individually worked on computer-based learning environments addressing the same topic: use and handling of multiple external representations, a central issue in mathematics. We experimentally varied whether PPK aspects and PCK aspects were treated integrated or apart from one another. As expected, the integrated condition led to greater application of pedagogical/psychological aspects and an increase in applying both knowledge types simultaneously compared to the separated condition. Overall, our findings indicate beneficial effects of an integrated design in teacher education. PMID:25191300

  18. Challenges in Identifying Effects and Determinants of Corporate Tax Avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Hüsecken, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers worldwide try to hinder tax avoidance. In order to implement effective tax regulations, it is essential to completely understand why corporations avoid taxes and why some appear to be more effective than others. However, various challenges in identifying effects and determinants of corporate tax avoidance cause knowledge gaps. This thesis consists of three essays highlighting the necessity of refined identification strategies. The first essay “The Undersheltering Puzzle and its P...

  19. Institutional and pedagogical criteria for productive open source learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Brian Møller; Ryberg, Thomas; Semey, Ian Peter

    2004-01-01

    In this article we present some institutional and pedagogical criteria for making an informed decision in relation to identifying and choosing a productive open source learning environment. We argue that three concepts (implementation, maintainability and further development) are important when...... considering the sustainability and cost efficiency of an open source system, and we outline a set of key points for evaluating an open source software in terms of cost of system adoption. Furthermore we identify a range of pedagogical concepts and criteria to emphasize the importance of considering...... the relation between the local pedagogical practice and the pedagogical design of the open source learning environment. This we illustrate through an analysis of an open source system and our own pedagogical practice at Aalborg University, Denmark (POPP)....

  20. Teaching virtue: pedagogical implications of moral psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, William J

    2010-09-01

    Moral exemplar studies of computer and engineering professionals have led ethics teachers to expand their pedagogical aims beyond moral reasoning to include the skills of moral expertise. This paper frames this expanded moral curriculum in a psychologically informed virtue ethics. Moral psychology provides a description of character distributed across personality traits, integration of moral value into the self system, and moral skill sets. All of these elements play out on the stage of a social surround called a moral ecology. Expanding the practical and professional curriculum to cover the skills and competencies of moral expertise converts the classroom into a laboratory where students practice moral expertise under the guidance of their teachers. The good news is that this expanded pedagogical approach can be realized without revolutionizing existing methods of teaching ethics. What is required, instead, is a redeployment of existing pedagogical tools such as cases, professional codes, decision-making frameworks, and ethics tests. This essay begins with a summary of virtue ethics and informs this with recent research in moral psychology. After identifying pedagogical means for teaching ethics, it shows how these can be redeployed to meet a broader, skills based agenda. Finally, short module profiles offer concrete examples of the shape this redeployed pedagogical agenda would take in the practical and professional ethics classroom.

  1. Preventing “neurophobia”: Remodeling neurology education for 21st-century medical students through effective pedagogical strategies for “neurophilia”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskara P Shelley

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurology has a reputation, particularly as a complex “head-to-toe” discipline for undergraduate medical students. Neurophobia syndrome, a global phenomenon, fundamentally stems from pedagogical deficiencies during the undergraduate curriculum, the lack of vertical integration between basic neurosciences and clinical bedside neurology, the lack of clinical reasoning exercises, cognitive heuristics, and clinical problem-solving, errors in diagnostic competence, and hyposkilia. This ultimately results in poor clinical competence and proficiency in clinical neurology and causes attrition in nurturing a passion for learning the neurology discipline. This article explores plausible factors that contribute to the genesis of neurophobia and multifaceted strategies to nurture interest in neurosciences and provide possible solutions to demystify neurology education, especially the need for evidence-based educational interventions. Remodeling neurology education through effective pedagogical strategies and remedial measures, and using the Miller's pyramid, would provide a framework for assessing clinical competence in clinical bedside neurology. Technology-enhanced education and digital classrooms would undoubtedly stamp out neurophobia in medical students of the 21st century. It will not frighten off another generation of nonneurologist physicians to empower them to hone expertise in order to tackle the increasing burden of neurological disorders in India. Furthermore, promoting neurophilia would facilitate the next generation of medical students in pursuing career options in neurology which would be quintessential not only in closing India's looming neurologist workforce gap but also in fostering interest in research imperatives in the next generation of medical students.

  2. Brick: Mining Pedagogically Interesting Sequential Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anjewierden, Anjo; Gijlers, Hannie; Saab, Nadira; de Hoog, Robert; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Calders, Toon; Conati, Cristina; Ventura, Sebastian; Romero, Cristobal; Stamper, John

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of the SCY project (www.scy-net.eu) is to make (inquiry) learning environments adaptive. The idea is to develop “pedagogical agents” that monitor learner behaviour through the actions they perform and identify patterns that point to systematic behaviour, or lack thereof. To achieve

  3. The Pedagogic Signature of Special Needs Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Sabine; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Lerche, Thomas; Oubaid, Viktor; Kiel, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the following study is to identify a pedagogic signature, according to LS Shulman, for working with students who have special educational needs. Special educational needs are defined as significant limitations in personal development and learning which require particular educational measures beyond regular education. The development of…

  4. Students' Consent to a Teacher's Pedagogical Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjunen, Elina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper student comments are examined to identify a typology of demands for granting their consent to a teacher's pedagogical authority. The data for this study (136 written responses and 66 interviews) have been collected from students in a Finnish comprehensive school and examined by means of a theory-bounded content analysis. The results…

  5. Masks in Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, David

    2016-01-01

    In Drama Education mask work is undertaken and presented as both a methodology and knowledge base. There are numerous workshops and journal articles available for teachers that offer knowledge or implementation of mask work. However, empirical examination of the context or potential implementation of masks as a pedagogical tool remains…

  6. Analogy as a means of theoretical adoption of pedagogical disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovcova Irina A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an application of analogy in the initial-teacher training as a tool of approaching pedagogical disciplines. The author proposes a classification of pedagogical analogies which provides choices of the most efficient model for a specific didactic situation. The article clarifies the model of the theoretical approach to pedagogical disciplines through active use of analogy, which contributes to a higher efficiency in a teacher and student interaction. The model consists of three stages: training (the stage of acquiring analogy model, the analytical stage (acquisition of pedagogical concepts, phenomena and systems through the application of analogy, and the stage of self-realization (the application of analogy method in students’ scientific-research activities considering external and internal didactic conditions which transform analogy from a teaching method into a tool for the acquisition of pedagogical disciplines. The author demonstrates that the application of analogy has a positive effect not only on the acquisition of pedagogical knowledge (especially methodic and the development of heuristic skills in students, but also on motivation for the study of pedagogical disciplines (cognitive aspect and professional pedagogical activity (formation of an individual-pedagogical attitude. .

  7. Investigating the effect of question-driven pedagogy on the development of physics teacher candidates' pedagogical content knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Egersdorfer, Davor; Vinayagam, Murugan

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the second year of a multi-year study on the implementation of Peer Instruction and PeerWise-inspired pedagogies in a physics methods course in a teacher education program at a large research university in Western Canada. In the first year of this study, Peer Instruction was implemented consistently in the physics methods course and teacher candidates were asked to submit five conceptual multiple-choice questions as a final assignment. In the second year of the study we incorporated PeerWise online tool to facilitate teacher candidates' design of conceptual questions by allowing them to provide and receive feedback from their peers, and consequently improve their questions. We have found that as a result of this collaboration teacher candidates improved their pedagogical content knowledge as measured by the rubric developed for the study.

  8. Investigating the effect of question-driven pedagogy on the development of physics teacher candidates’ pedagogical content knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Milner-Bolotin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the second year of a multi-year study on the implementation of Peer Instruction and PeerWise-inspired pedagogies in a physics methods course in a teacher education program at a large research university in Western Canada. In the first year of this study, Peer Instruction was implemented consistently in the physics methods course and teacher candidates were asked to submit five conceptual multiple-choice questions as a final assignment. In the second year of the study we incorporated PeerWise online tool to facilitate teacher candidates’ design of conceptual questions by allowing them to provide and receive feedback from their peers, and consequently improve their questions. We have found that as a result of this collaboration teacher candidates improved their pedagogical content knowledge as measured by the rubric developed for the study.

  9. CULTURE, CULTURE LEARNING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES: TOWARDS A PEDAGOGICAL FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Levy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to improve approaches to the learning and teaching of culture using new technologies by relating the key qualities and dimensions of the culture concept to elements within a pedagogical framework. In Part One, five facets of the culture concept are developed: culture as elemental; culture as relative; culture as group membership; culture as contested; and culture as individual (variable and multiple. Each perspective aims to provide a focus for thinking about culture, and thereby to provide a valid and useful point of departure for thinking about the practice of culture learning and teaching with new technologies. The referenced literature draws from a broad range of disciplines and definitions of culture. In Part Two, five projects are chosen to represent relevant technologies currently in use for culture learning: e-mail, chat, a discussion forum and a Web-based project. Each project is used to illustrate facets of the culture concept discussed in Part One with a view to identifying key elements within a pedagogical framework that can help us respond effectively to the challenge of culture learning and teaching utilising new technologies. Thus the goal is to align fundamental qualities of the culture concept with specific pedagogical designs, tasks and technologies.

  10. Identifying strategies to improve the effectiveness of booster seat laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this project was to identify strategies to improve the effectiveness of booster seat laws. The project explored the possible factors that relate to the use and nonuse of booster seats, and examined the attitudes of law enforcement of...

  11. POEM: Identifying joint additive effects on regulatory circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eBotzman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL mapping tackles the problem of identifying variation in DNA sequence that have an effect on the transcriptional regulatory network. Major computational efforts are aimed at characterizing the joint effects of several eQTLs acting in concert to govern the expression of the same genes. Yet, progress towards a comprehensive prediction of such joint effects is limited. For example, existing eQTL methods commonly discover interacting loci affecting the expression levels of a module of co-regulated genes. Such ‘modularization’ approaches, however, are focused on epistatic relations and thus have limited utility for the case of additive (non-epistatic effects.Results: Here we present POEM (Pairwise effect On Expression Modules, a methodology for identifying pairwise eQTL effects on gene modules. POEM is specifically designed to achieve high performance in the case of additive joint effects. We applied POEM to transcription profiles measured in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells across a population of genotyped mice. Our study reveals widespread additive, trans-acting pairwise effects on gene modules, characterizes their organizational principles, and highlights high-order interconnections between modules within the immune signaling network. These analyses elucidate the central role of additive pairwise effect in regulatory circuits, and provide computational tools for future investigations into the interplay between eQTLs.Availability: The software described in this article is available at csgi.tau.ac.il/POEM/.

  12. Impacts of Pedagogical Agent Gender in an Accessible Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Noah L.; Adesope, Olusola O.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies have resulted in the use of pedagogical agents to facilitate learning. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the effects of pedagogical agents on learning, little is known about gender stereotypes of agents and how those stereotypes influence student learning and attitudes. This study…

  13. Parameter trajectory analysis to identify treatment effects of pharmacological interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Tiemann

    Full Text Available The field of medical systems biology aims to advance understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive disease progression and to translate this knowledge into therapies to effectively treat diseases. A challenging task is the investigation of long-term effects of a (pharmacological treatment, to establish its applicability and to identify potential side effects. We present a new modeling approach, called Analysis of Dynamic Adaptations in Parameter Trajectories (ADAPT, to analyze the long-term effects of a pharmacological intervention. A concept of time-dependent evolution of model parameters is introduced to study the dynamics of molecular adaptations. The progression of these adaptations is predicted by identifying necessary dynamic changes in the model parameters to describe the transition between experimental data obtained during different stages of the treatment. The trajectories provide insight in the affected underlying biological systems and identify the molecular events that should be studied in more detail to unravel the mechanistic basis of treatment outcome. Modulating effects caused by interactions with the proteome and transcriptome levels, which are often less well understood, can be captured by the time-dependent descriptions of the parameters. ADAPT was employed to identify metabolic adaptations induced upon pharmacological activation of the liver X receptor (LXR, a potential drug target to treat or prevent atherosclerosis. The trajectories were investigated to study the cascade of adaptations. This provided a counter-intuitive insight concerning the function of scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1, a receptor that facilitates the hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Although activation of LXR promotes cholesterol efflux and -excretion, our computational analysis showed that the hepatic capacity to clear cholesterol was reduced upon prolonged treatment. This prediction was confirmed experimentally by immunoblotting measurements of SR-B1

  14. Pedagogical entrepreneurship in learning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Engum Hansen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The action plan "Entrepreneurship in Education – from primary to higher education "(2009-2014, proposed to establish a site for digital learning materials within entrepreneurship in basic education. PedEnt (Pedagogical Entrepreneurship was launched in autumn of 2014, and both the authors have contributed to the professional development of the site. Two of the learning assignments published on PedEnt constitute the research objects of this study. Methods: Based on pedagogical entrepreneurship we present a case study of learning work carried out by students at lower and upper secondary level. Using an analysis of assignment texts and as well as with video recordings we have identified the characteristics of entrepreneurial learning methods as they were expressed through each case. Results: The analysis showed that learning assignments can be characterized as entrepreneurial because they promoted the actor role and creativity of the students. We found that the relationship between the relevance of the assignments and the context in which they are given pose an important prerequisite for the students in order to experience the learning work as meaningful. Conclusions: Entrepreneurial learning methods challenge the traditional view that theory tends to take primacy over practice. To orient learning assignments within relevant contexts gives students opportunities to experience by themselves the need for increased knowledge.

  15. Mediated Effects of Technology Competencies and Experiences on Relations among Attitudes Towards Technology Use, Technology Ownership, and Self Efficacy about Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Boz, Yezdan; Aydın-Günbatar, Sevgi

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relations of preservice science teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences to their self-efficacy beliefs about technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The present study also investigated interrelations among preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences. The participants of study were 665 elementary preservice science teachers (467 females, 198 males) from 7 colleges in Turkey. The proposed model based on educational technology literature was tested using structural equation modeling. The model testing results revealed that preservice teachers' technology competencies and experiences mediated the relation of technology ownership to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs. The direct relation of their possession of technology to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs was insignificant while the indirect relation through their technology competencies and experiences was significant. The results also indicated there were significant direct effects of preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology competencies, and experiences on their TPACK self efficacy beliefs.

  16. Effectively identifying user profiles in network and host metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John P.; Berk, Vincent H.; Gregorio-de Souza, Ian

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a collection of methods that is used to effectively identify users of computers systems based on their particular usage of the software and the network. Not only are we able to identify individual computer users by their behavioral patterns, we are also able to detect significant deviations in their typical computer usage over time, or compared to a group of their peers. For instance, most people have a small, and relatively unique selection of regularly visited websites, certain email services, daily work hours, and typical preferred applications for mandated tasks. We argue that these habitual patterns are sufficiently specific to identify fully anonymized network users. We demonstrate that with only a modest data collection capability, profiles of individual computer users can be constructed so as to uniquely identify a profiled user from among their peers. As time progresses and habits or circumstances change, the methods presented update each profile so that changes in user behavior can be reliably detected over both abrupt and gradual time frames, without losing the ability to identify the profiled user. The primary benefit of our methodology allows one to efficiently detect deviant behaviors, such as subverted user accounts, or organizational policy violations. Thanks to the relative robustness, these techniques can be used in scenarios with very diverse data collection capabilities, and data privacy requirements. In addition to behavioral change detection, the generated profiles can also be compared against pre-defined examples of known adversarial patterns.

  17. Integrative Pedagogical Bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hubenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The state of bioethics in Ukraine, as well as in the world has been analyzed in this article. The author offers a model of integrative pedagogical bioethics and substantiates the necessity of the organization of the bioethics education and confirms the topicality of adoption of the new specialty – educator-bioethicist. The author defines the structure and method of the educational process and the new curriculum «Integrative Bioethics» for preparing educator-bioethicist specialist.

  18. The effects of formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching on psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and motor learning outcomes in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Whipp

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer teaching is recognized as a powerful instructional method; however, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes experienced by peer-teachers and their student recipients in the context of trained, non-reciprocal, high school physical education. Accordingly, the effectiveness of a formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching (T-PT program upon psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical and student learning outcomes within high school physical education classes was investigated. Students from eight intact classes (106 males, 94 females, Mage = 12.46, SD = 0.59 were randomly assigned to either a T-PT intervention group (taught by a volunteer peer-teacher who was trained in line with a tactical games approach or untrained group (U-PT; where volunteer peer-teachers received no formal training, but did receive guidance on the game concepts to teach. Data were collected over 10 lessons in a 5-week soccer unit. Mixed-model ANOVAs/MANOVAs revealed that, in comparison to U-PT, the T-PT program significantly enhanced in-game performance actions and academic learning time among student recipients. Those in the T-PT also provided greater levels of feedback and structured learning time, as well as reporting more positive feelings about peer teaching and fewer perceived barriers to accessing learning outcomes. These findings show that non-reciprocal peer-teachers who receive formalized support through training and tactical games approach-based teaching resources can enhance behavioral, pedagogical, and motor performance outcomes in physical education.

  19. The effects of formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching on psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and motor learning outcomes in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, Peter R; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A; Soh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Peer teaching is recognized as a powerful instructional method; however, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes experienced by peer-teachers and their student recipients in the context of trained, non-reciprocal, high school physical education (PE). Accordingly, the effectiveness of a formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching (T-PT) program upon psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and student learning outcomes within high school PE classes was investigated. Students from eight intact classes (106 males, 94 females, Mage = 12.46, SD = 0.59) were randomly assigned to either a T-PT intervention group (taught by a volunteer peer-teacher who was trained in line with a tactical games approach) or untrained group (U-PT; where volunteer peer-teachers received no formal training, but did receive guidance on the game concepts to teach). Data were collected over 10 lessons in a 5-week soccer unit. Mixed-model ANOVAs/MANOVAs revealed that, in comparison to U-PT, the T-PT program significantly enhanced in-game performance actions and academic learning time among student recipients. Those in the T-PT also provided greater levels of feedback and structured learning time, as well as reporting more positive feelings about peer teaching and fewer perceived barriers to accessing learning outcomes. These findings show that non-reciprocal peer-teachers who receive formalized support through training and tactical games approach-based teaching resources can enhance behavioral, pedagogical, and motor performance outcomes in PE.

  20. The Reaffirmation Professional Pedagogical in the formation of educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Blas Aulet-Álvarez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The work undertakes the problem of the motivation professional pedagogical in the formation of the professional of the education, like one of the primary addresses of work educational that is carried out now. The reflections that socializing forms part of the inquiries carried out by the bus of investigators of the project institutional: The educational orientation in the formation of educators: Systematizing of results. Intentional the formative work through the strategy curricular of reaffirmation professional pedagogical like an alternating methodological that introduction in her practices. It is purpose of the authors, socialize the experiences reached in the educational practice that facilitate the motivation professional pedagogical stated explicitly in a group of strategic actions whose execution and effective control for the several buses pedagogical of the university, you contributed to perfect the process of the initial formation of students in the races pedagogical and with it elevate the quality of egression.

  1. An Investigation of Turkish Middle School Science Teachers' Pedagogical Orientations towards Direct and Inquiry Instructional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingoz, Selcuk

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important goals of science education is preparing effective science teachers which includes the development of a science pedagogical orientation. Helping in-service science teachers improve their orientations toward science teaching begins with identifying their current orientations. While there are many aspects of an effective…

  2. Pedagogical Principles in Online Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Suzanne C.; Uth Thomsen, Thyra; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    of the seven pedagogical principles that govern the teaching at our university. We also present a case study that illustrates how both opportunities and challenges were met in two “first-mover” fully online courses during Fall 2014. The experiences from this case study are discussed in terms of to what extent...... they met the pedagogical principles and observations unrelated to the pedagogical principle are shared....

  3. Developing Nordic Pedagogical Best Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Kelly, Hélène; Wonsyld, Merete

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a Nordic educational project that supported dialogue and cooperation between nursing students and educators from eight Nordic educational institutions. An intensive course concept was developed. The course focus of prevention and health promotion among nordic youth not only...... illuminated the benefits of student exchange with respect to student learning but also how pedagogical cooperation can contribute to institutional, pedagogical innovation. Keywords Cooperation, pedagogcial development, comparative nursing, pedagogical best practice....

  4. Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O' Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a “team player.” Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

  5. The role of pedagogical historiography in forming pedagogical knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisić-Živković Nataša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuses the role of pedagogical historiography in forming pedagogical knowledge, both from the aspect of history and from the aspect of the present status of this discipline. Our aim is to observe the problems of pedagogical historiography, as a scientific and teaching discipline, in the context of forming of pedagogical knowledge. The process of transformation of heuristic function of the history of pedagogy is analyzed - from the traditional approach which emphasizes its role in forming pedagogical culture to the orientation of historical research and education in pedagogy towards theoretical and professional knowledge. The development of history of pedagogy as a scientific discipline is mostly observed through three phases: the first, focused on research of the development of pedagogical ideas and/or school system, lasted until the 1960s, when it was replaced by social history of education, while today it is mostly spoken about the 'cultural history of education'. The evolution of pedagogical historiography is also followed by the changes in its relation towards theory and practice of education, which is especially dealt with in this paper. In the conditions of radical changes in epistemology of social sciences and university reform, pedagogical historiography faces the question of its own relevance.

  6. Shifting the Focus to Student Learning: Characteristics of Effective Teaching Practice As Identified by Experienced Pre-service Faculty Advisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Maynes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cochrane-Smith and Power identify trends in teacher education programs with some relating to heightened teacher accountability for students’ learning. In this paper we provide a model that identifies characteristics believed to be critical elements related to a teacher’s conceptual focus shifting from an emphasis on their teaching to their students’ learning and we have grounded these characteristics in current educational research. Through focus group inquiry, we have identified those teacher characteristics thought to account for effective teaching practice. These characteristics include: a professional growth perspective, passion and enthusiasm for the  content, pedagogical content knowledge, a rich instructional repertoire of strategies, awareness of assessment for, as, and of learning, ability to read the body language  of the learner, caring classroom management strategies, and instructional efforts (e.g., social justice. Our research data provide a conceptual framework for further study.

  7. EXPERIENCE OF NORMATIVE-LEGAL TRAINING OF PEDAGOGICAL STAFF IN THE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND INCREASE QUALIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andzhela Muharbievna Shekhmirzova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of normative and legal training of pedagogical personnel in the sphere of higher and additional professional education. The results of the analysis of the actual state of the system of normative and legal training of teachers are shown. The problems of forming normative-legal competence are analyzed. The relationship between the improvement of the system of normative-legal training of pedagogical cadres and the solution of a number of problems of a methodological nature is determined. At the same time, the problem of conceptual modeling of an effective pedagogical system of normative-legal training of pedagogical cadres is considered as a core, around which others group in a certain subordination. From the system positions it is shown the need to create an effective system of training teachers for the proper use of regulatory and legal acts in pedagogical activity, to solve complex problems, taking into account dynamically updated legislation. Based on the revealed methodological problems of normative-legal training of teachers, the need for a holistic view of the formation of regulatory-legal competence in the context of continuous teacher education. The purpose of research – presentation of a model of continuous regulatory education of teachers in the field of higher and additional professional education on the basis of identified methodological problems. Method or methodology of work: In the article a set of various methods of pedagogical research is presented: theoretical - analysis of scientific and pedagogical literature on the research problem, study and analysis of normative and legal documentation on the topic under consideration, theoretical generalization of research results; empirical - a survey, an analysis of the content of pedagogical documentation and performance, expert evaluation, modeling. Results: The model of continuous normative-legal training of pedagogical personnel in the sphere of

  8. Problems of Pedagogical Creativity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimkyzy, Shynar; Slambekova, Tolkyn S.; Saylaubay, Yerlan E.; Albytova, Nazymgul

    2016-01-01

    This article provides analysis of research papers by different scholars, dedicated to topical issues of pedagogical creativity development in the educational process. The authors determined that pedagogical creativity could be considered at five levels: information-reproducing, adaptive-prognostic, innovative, research and creative-prognostic. In…

  9. New experiences in pedagogical lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The Santiago-based Centro de Lingüística Aplicada has produced two school dictionaries, the Diccionario Escolar Ilustrado and the Diccionario Básico Escolar, which together cover the 12 grades from Primary School over Secondary Basic School to High School. They are in various ways innovating in t......, the Internet and the Cuban national Intranet (soon). The article analyses the two dictionaries in terms of their methodology, functions, content, structure, and layout and presents some suggestions for future editions as well as for pedagogical lexicography in general...... in terms of the solid preparatory work, the design and content of the articles, the cheap production methods, and the work that has been carried out with a view to effectively reaching the target user group with an output of until now more than 100 000 printed copies as well as their accessibility on CD...

  10. Identifying research priorities for effective retention strategies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Anna; Daykin, Anne; Shaw, Alison R G; Lane, Athene J; Blazeby, Jane M; Clarke, Mike; Williamson, Paula; Gamble, Carrol

    2017-08-31

    The failure to retain patients or collect primary-outcome data is a common challenge for trials and reduces the statistical power and potentially introduces bias into the analysis. Identifying strategies to minimise missing data was the second highest methodological research priority in a Delphi survey of the Directors of UK Clinical Trial Units (CTUs) and is important to minimise waste in research. Our aim was to assess the current retention practices within the UK and priorities for future research to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies to reduce attrition. Seventy-five chief investigators of NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-funded trials starting between 2009 and 2012 were surveyed to elicit their awareness about causes of missing data within their trial and recommended practices for improving retention. Forty-seven CTUs registered within the UKCRC network were surveyed separately to identify approaches and strategies being used to mitigate missing data across trials. Responses from the current practice surveys were used to inform a subsequent two-round Delphi survey with registered CTUs. A consensus list of retention research strategies was produced and ranked by priority. Fifty out of seventy-five (67%) chief investigators and 33/47 (70%) registered CTUs completed the current practice surveys. Seventy-eight percent of trialists were aware of retention challenges and implemented strategies at trial design. Patient-initiated withdrawal was the most common cause of missing data. Registered CTUs routinely used newsletters, timeline of participant visits, and telephone reminders to mitigate missing data. Whilst 36 out of 59 strategies presented had been formally or informally evaluated, some frequently used strategies, such as site initiation training, have had no research to inform practice. Thirty-five registered CTUs (74%) participated in the Delphi survey. Research into the effectiveness of site initiation training, frequency of patient contact

  11. Tools for monitoring aquatic environments to identify anthropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Monyque Palagano; Dourado, Priscila Leocadia Rosa; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Cândido, Liliam Silva; Pereira, Joelson Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires; Grisolia, Alexeia Barufatti

    2018-01-05

    Anthropic activities are directly related to the contamination of aquatic ecosystems owing to the release of numerous chemicals from agricultural and urban waste. These contaminants cause environmental degradation and a decrease in the availability of water quality. The objective of this search was to evaluate the efficiency of physicochemical, chemical, and microbiological tests; extraction of chlorophyll a; and genetic parameters to identify anthropic activities and weather condition effects on the stream water quality and the consequences of its use by the population. The physicochemical parameters were within the limits allowed by the Brazilian law. However, contamination by metals (Cd 0.510 mg L -1 , Co 0.405 mg L -1 , and Ni 0.316 mg L -1 ) has been found at various collection points to be more than the allowable values. The antibiotic oxytetracycline was detected in stream water in quantities of up to 89 μg L -1 . In relation to microbiological contamination, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas spp. have been isolated. The averages of chlorophyll a were up to 0.15558 mg cm -2 . Genetic tools identified greater number of micronuclei and DNA damage in periods that showed lower rainfall rates and lower amounts of metals. The analysis used for monitoring was efficient to verify the interference that animal breeding and planting of different cultures have caused on that stream. Thus, the continued use of this water for drinking, irrigation of vegetables, and recreational activities makes the population susceptible to contamination by bacteria and creates conditions for the development of genetic alterations in the long run.

  12. Improving Student Readiness to Overcome IT-Related Obstacles During Pedagogical Interaction in Post-Soviet Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Luchaninov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study deals with the importance of improvement of student readiness to overcome IT-related obstacles in post-Soviet social studies education. In this regard, this paper aims at identifying the concept of pedagogical interaction in the information and educational environment and revealing the effective use of pedagogical interaction to improve student readiness to overcome IT-related obstacles. The leading research method used to solve the problem is teaching project, which allows an integrated treatment of methodology in developing student readiness to overcome IT-related obstacles. The paper presents such methods as creating positive motivation, arranging interactive educational cognitive and practical student activities and boosting the personal educational environment; it is shown that a distinctive feature of pedagogical interaction is the acquaintance of students with various elements of the information and educational environment, leading to the development of student readiness to overcome IT-related obstacles; it is found out that the use of pedagogical interaction in the information and educational environment ensures the purposefulness and efficiency of educational process; it is justified that using interactive means of information and educational environment in the context of arrangement of pedagogical interaction can enrich educational process, develop specific student skill that will definitely help them in future professional activities. The research materials are of practical value to the further expansion of functional and methodical aspects of using interactive media in the information and educational environment.

  13. Categorizing Pedagogical Patterns by Teaching Activities and Pedagogical Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is a proposal for a universal pedagogical pattern categorization based on teaching values and activities. This categorization would be more sustainable than the arbitrary categorization implied by pedagogical pattern language themes. Pedagogical patterns from two...... central patterns languages are analyzed and categorized, and the result is a catalogue theoretically founded and practical in its application. The teaching values are derived from learning theories, implying the theoretical foundation of the catalogue. In order to increase the usability of the value...

  14. Strategies for Mentoring Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental for mentoring a preservice teacher is the mentor's articulation of pedagogical knowledge, which in this research draws upon specific practices, viz.: planning, timetabling lessons, preparation, teaching strategies, content knowledge, problem solving, questioning, classroom management, implementation, assessment and viewpoints for…

  15. The Effects of Arousal Presented by a Pedagogical Agent on English Language Learners' Situational Interest, Cognitive Load and Reading Comprehension in Online Reading Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobisz, Jack

    2017-01-01

    This research examined how four different animated pedagogical agent implementations, which focus on perceptual and inquiry arousal conditions of attention as defined in Keller's ARCS model of motivational design (Keller, 2009), impact English language learners' situational interest, cognitive load, and reading comprehension in online readings…

  16. Identifying demand effects in a large network of product categories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelper, S.E.C.; Wilms, I.; Croux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Planning marketing mix strategies requires retailers to understand within- as well as cross-category demand effects. Most retailers carry products in a large variety of categories, leading to a high number of such demand effects to be estimated. At the same time, we do not expect cross-category

  17. Identifying the effects of Enterprise System implementation and use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    This paper reports the results of an explorative study of six large Danish companies regarding the effects of ERP implementation and use. The study is part of a larger ERP study programme at the Aarhus School of Business. The data collection approach applied was based on interviews and management...

  18. CURRENT DIRECTIONS OF RESEARCH IN INFORMATION- COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE FIELD OF PEDAGOGICAL SCIENCE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.N. Spirin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the publication modern research areas of information-communication technologies in pedagogical science are identified. The basic requirements of the new passport for the specialty 13.00.10 - Information and Communication Technologies in Education are described. On this specialty the defence of the degree of doctor and candidate of pedagogical science may be carried out.

  19. Learning as Researchers and Teachers: The Development of a Pedagogical Culture for Social Science Research Methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Nind, Melanie; Wiles, Rose

    2014-01-01

    In light of calls to improve the capacity for social science research within UK higher education, this article explores the possibilities for an emerging pedagogy for research methods. A lack of pedagogical culture in this field has been identified by previous studies. In response, we examine pedagogical literature surrounding approaches for…

  20. Investigation of historical evolution stages of the term "pedagogical innovation" in modern scientific discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Миколаївна Ефендієва

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the basic concepts of innovation. The formation of pedagogical innovations was analyzed and factors of effective management of innovative development were theoretically grounded. The essence of the concepts of scientific and pedagogical discourse was highlighted. The historical stages of the evolution of the term «pedagogical innovation» were investigated. The main draft laws about innovation activity in education were characterized

  1. Identifying the effects of microsaccades in tripolar EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, Rachel; Steele, Preston; Bartels, Rachel; Lei Ding; Sunderam, Sridhar; Besio, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Microsaccades are tiny, involuntary eye movements that occur during fixation, and they are necessary to human sight to maintain a sharp image and correct the effects of other fixational movements. Researchers have theorized and studied the effects of microsaccades on electroencephalography (EEG) signals to understand and eliminate the unwanted artifacts from EEG. The tripolar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) sensors are used to acquire TCRE EEG (tEEG). The tEEG detects extremely focal signals from directly below the TCRE sensor. We have noticed a slow wave frequency found in some tEEG recordings. Therefore, we conducted the current work to determine if there was a correlation between the slow wave in the tEEG and the microsaccades. This was done by analyzing the coherence of the frequency spectrums of both tEEG and eye movement in recordings where microsaccades are present. Our preliminary findings show that there is a correlation between the two.

  2. Towards Measurements of Chiral Effects Using Identified Particles from STAR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wen, Lw.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 756-759 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * chiral magnetic effect * chiral magnetic wave * gamma correlation * k(K) parameter Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  3. Newer Approaches to Identify Potential Untoward Effects in Functional Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Palma Ann; Birkenbach, Victoria L; Hayes, A Wallace

    2016-01-01

    Globalization has greatly accelerated the numbers and variety of food and beverage products available worldwide. The exchange among greater numbers of countries, manufacturers, and products in the United States and worldwide has necessitated enhanced quality measures for nutritional products for larger populations increasingly reliant on functionality. These functional foods, those that provide benefit beyond basic nutrition, are increasingly being used for their potential to alleviate food insufficiency while enhancing quality and longevity of life. In the United States alone, a steady import increase of greater than 15% per year or 24 million shipments, over 70% products of which are food related, is regulated under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This unparalleled growth has resulted in the need for faster, cheaper, and better safety and efficacy screening methods in the form of harmonized guidelines and recommendations for product standardization. In an effort to meet this need, the in vitro toxicology testing market has similarly grown with an anticipatory 15% increase between 2010 and 2015 of US$1.3 to US$2.7 billion. Although traditionally occupying a small fraction of the market behind pharmaceuticals and cosmetic/household products, the scope of functional food testing, including additives/supplements, ingredients, residues, contact/processing, and contaminants, is potentially expansive. Similarly, as functional food testing has progressed, so has the need to identify potential adverse factors that threaten the safety and quality of these products. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerholm, Tove; Hörberg, Thomas; Tonér, Signe; Kallioinen, Petter; Frankenberg, Sofia; Kjällander, Susanne; Palmer, Anna; Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz

    2018-06-19

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children. The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children's language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3. If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of

  5. WHY GRADUATES OF PEDAGOGICAL INSTITUTES BECOME MANAGERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid I. Lourie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of future graduates’ motivation increase to their occupational work is investigated. The features of the educational process organization in schools and universities of the country on the basis of the cultural orientation of training and the author’s style of teaching are observed. In modern society, it is important to create new standards of moral and ethical rights as an essential component of the educational process and a new image of a man that should focus on pedagogical science. The system of continuous education «school – pedagogical university» should be expanded, the mode of university life should be changed and combined with the development and introduction if innovative processes in educational establishments. Practical steps of reform in higher pedagogical education are pointed out.The purpose of the paper is to identify the causes of the crisis in pedagogy science and in the system of teacher working up.Methods. Cultural, philosophical approaches are used to investigate the crisis of teacher education and teacher training.Results. Theoretical and practical activities of teaching activity methodology are considered under the conditions of economic and spiritual crisis. Being at a stable condition of a society, the teacher follows traditions and represents self as the compiler of memory of generations. Cultural and historical influence of pedagogical events of previous years ceases to be a significant; the teacher needs to have non-standard decisions, real affairs and the acts are required, helping to avoid repeatability and stability of professional failures. Also it’s important to possess a high level of education, culture, emotions and relationships that would provide live and emotionally rich communication of participants of the educational process; the aim of such communication is to establish the authenticity of the moral and spiritual values.Scientific novelty. Cultural bases of activity of the teaching

  6. Constructing Pedagogical Models For E-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Alejandra Behar

    2011-01-01

    This article brings forth an overview of the paradigmatic crisis and the introduction of new pedagogical practices. It also discusses the relationship between paradigm and pedagogical model, presenting a theoretical discussion on the concepts of pedagogical model for E-learning and its pedagogical architecture. To do so, the elements that are part of it such as organizational aspects, content, methodological and technological aspects are discussed. This theoretical discussion underlies the co...

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS OF STYLISTIC FEATURES MANIFESTATION IN PEDAGOGICAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Arendachuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the contemporary theoretical approaches to defining such concepts as “pedagogical communication” and “the style of pedagogical communication”, the substantial features of pedagogical communication in the system of the teachers’ attitude to their students, their professional work and themselves are revealed. The results of the empirical research conducted on a sample of Saratov secondary school teachers ( n = 67; average age of 42 years old; average length of service of 18 years, intended to identify the relationships between the style of pedagogical communication and its psychological factors (personal and practical are demonstrated in the article. We used the methods of determining the style of interpersonal interaction (S.V. Maksimov, Yu.A. Lobeiko, diagnostics of dominant emotional modality in teachers (L.A. Rabinovich in T.G. Syritso’s modification, satisfaction evaluation of the profession of a teacher and identification of crisis factors and factors of overcoming the professional crisis of teachers (O.M. Chorosova, R.E. Gerasimova; the method of “psychological portrait of a teacher” (Z.V. Rezapkina, G.V. Rezapkina. The article demonstrates that the more constructive the style of pedagogical communication is, the larger number of psychological factors it has, and the system of these factors is dominated by the factors that characterize the individual features of the teacher’s personality.

  8. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher…

  9. Towards a Pedagogical Framework for Global Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Chloe

    2016-01-01

    Amidst growing recognition of the importance of the learning process within global citizenship education, this paper develops a pedagogical framework including dimensions of critical thinking, dialogue, reflection, and responsible being/action. It draws on a variety of critical literatures to identify characteristics of each of these dimensions.…

  10. Epistemological and Pedagogical Challenges of Teaching International Business Ethics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Michel

    2015-01-01

    International business ethics courses imply four basic epistemological and pedagogical challenges: (a) understanding various perceptions of ethics and values/virtues; (b) identifying ethical maxims among religious/spiritual traditions; (c) designing international business ethics courses as dialogical experiences; and (d) deepening our personal…

  11. Trampling the Sacred: Multicultural Education as Pedagogical Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovern, Lavonna Lea

    2012-01-01

    The following paper is a critical examination involving the misuse of sacred cultural tools and practices in the name of multicultural education. Native American practices are identified to illustrate how such inappropriate usages promote pedagogical racism. The misuse continues the hegemonic distribution of social capital. Through the…

  12. Middle school teachers' familiarity with, interest in, performance on, and conceptual and pedagogical knowledge of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbewe, Simeon

    The purpose of this study was threefold: Examine middle school teachers' familiarity with, interest in, conceptual knowledge of and performance on light; Examine their ability to identify misconceptions on light and their suggested pedagogical ideas to address the identified misconceptions; and Establish the relationship between the middle school teachers' interest, familiarity, conceptual understanding, performance, misconception identification, and pedagogical ideas for light. Sixty six (66) middle school science teachers enrolled in three math and science teacher professional development projects at Southern Illinois University Carbondale participated in this study. This study used mixed-methods approach to collect and analyze data. The participants responded in writing to four different instruments: Familiarity and Interest Questionnaire, Conceptual Knowledge Test, Two-tier Performance Test, and Misconceptions Identification Questionnaire. Data was analyzed quantitatively by conducting non-parametric (Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis) and parametric (paired samples, independent samples, and One-Way ANOVA) tests. Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis and open coding to identify emerging themes and categories. The results showed that the teachers reported high levels of familiarity with and interest in learning more about light concepts. However, they had low conceptual knowledge and performance on light concepts. As such, middle school teachers' perceived knowledge of light concepts was not consistent with their actual knowledge of light. To some extent, the teachers identified students' misconceptions expressed in some scenarios on light and also suggested pedagogical ideas for addressing such misconceptions in middle school science classrooms. However, most teachers did not provide details on their pedagogical ideas for light. Correlations among the four constructs (familiarity, interest, conceptual understanding, and performance

  13. Satisfying pedagogical practices using ICT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Law, N.; Pelgrum, W.J.; Plomp, T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the results of the international option that was included in SITES 2006. The international option, which was part of the teacher questionnaire, solicited responses from teachers on satisfying experiences in their pedagogical use of ICT. Twenty-one of the participating

  14. Eliciting teachers' technological pedagogical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitink, M.; Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Verplanken, L.; Braak, J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper starts from the understanding that teachers' knowledge is situated, grounded in knowledge derived from formal training and from experiences in practice. Based on this understanding we examine teachers' reasoning in relation to the pedagogical choices teachers make while using ICT in

  15. Unteachable Moments and Pedagogical Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Julia Kristeva's theory can inform our understanding of unteachable moments. It proposes a pedagogical relationship that can contain breakdowns of meanings and work toward breakthroughs to new awareness, particularly related to social justice pedagogy in teacher education. First, one example from the author's own teaching…

  16. Making Pedagogical Adaptability Less Obvious

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagle, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I try to make pedagogical adaptability a bit less obvious. In particular, I use some post-structural philosophical ideas and some concepts at the intersections of social class and race to re-interpret Dylan Wiliam's conception of formative assessment. I suggest that this interpretation can provide opportunities to resist the urge…

  17. Pedagogical Cues to an Artist's Intention in Young Children's Understanding of Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsa, Analía M.; Vivaldi, Romina A.

    2016-01-01

    Three studies investigated the effects of pedagogical cues to an artist's referential intention on 2- and 2.5-year-old children's understanding of drawings in a matching task without verbal labels support. Results showed that pedagogical cues, the combination of the artist's eye gaze while she was creating the drawings (nonlinguistic cues), and…

  18. Doing Feminist Difference Differently: Intersectional Pedagogical Practices in the Context of the Neoliberal Diversity Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smele, Sandra; Siew-Sarju, Rehanna; Chou, Elena; Breton, Patricia; Bernhardt, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    At present there is a small, albeit growing, body of literature on pedagogical strategies and reflections which addresses the ways educators attempt to challenge the effects of neoliberalism on higher education. In this article, we reflect upon our pedagogical practices in higher education in this moment of neoliberal transformation wherein, as…

  19. Development of Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin-Dindar, Ayla; Boz, Yezdan; Sonmez, Demet Yildiran; Celep, Nilgun Demirci

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a mixed-method design was employed to investigate pre-service chemistry teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) development. For effective technology integration in instruction, knowledge about technology is not enough; teachers should have different knowledge types which are content, pedagogical, and…

  20. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability in dicates qualitative stages through which the pedagogic phenomenon passes; nonlinearity explains the crisis character of pedagogic processes and reveals inner factors of self-development; situationality requires a selection of pedagogic conditions in accordance with the inner factors, which would enable steering the pedagogic process. Offered are two steps for singling out a particular stage and the algorithm for developing an integrative model for it. The suggested conclusions might be of use for further theoretic research, analyses of educational practices and for realistic predicting of pedagogical phenomena. .

  1. DESIGNING EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF FORMING SOCIAL AND PEDAGOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN INCLUSIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoia Shevtsiv

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issue of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary schools. The aim of the article is to define the concept “design” and “pedagogical design”; to disclose methodological approaches and main features of pedagogical design of forming of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary schools; to identify structural elements of social and pedagogical competence. The article analyzes the essence of the concept “design”. The process of designing educational system of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary school is based on several interrelated methodological approaches, including systematic, axiological, active, person-centered, contextual acmeological, and competential ones. Important factors and theoretical starting positions are designing general principles of education: humanism and democracy; principles of teaching, scientific, professional orientation, integrity, communication theory and practice, consistency and systematic, variability, pedagogical creativity. The special principles are the following: problematic, technologizing, dialogization, and competence ones. Social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teachers in inclusive secondary school is structured by the cognitive, active, professional and personal components. Structure components are defined as a synthesis of social and pedagogical competences, educational and developmental, communicative, diagnostic, organizational, predictive, preventive, security and defense, correctional and rehabilitation, adaptation items. Established continuity of the educational process of forming social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary school takes place during the period of study in higher education establishments. The following conclusions are drawn that

  2. FUTURE TEACHERS TRAINING TO INNOVATIVE PEDAGOGICAL ACTIVITY: CONTEXT APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko L.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The innovative processes in education arose in different historical periods and determined its development. The analysis of theoretical and experimental studies showed that now the teachers have difficulty in developing and implementing innovative technologies, choosing the most appropriate pedagogical methods and assets. The widespread innovations lead to changes in future teachers’ training to the professional activity. The leading objective of higher pedagogical education is to train teacher who has the developed personal and professional skills, able to perform innovative teaching activity. The achievement of this strategic objective requires the organization of targeted training of future teachers to innovative pedagogical activity in terms of higher education system, promoting their professional and personal growth, the formation of innovative capacity and innovative culture. In this regard, there is a need to find approaches to education that are focused on the future content of professional activity. In our opinion, these requirements fully meet the contextual approach that provides consistent, continuous and systematic formation of future teachers’ readiness to innovative pedagogical activity. The this article we analyzed the features of the training of future teachers to innovative pedagogical activity; identified the possibilities of contextual education application in pedagogical institutions; considered the survey results of the beginning teachers of secondary and vocational schools; defined a number of innovative forms, methods and technologies for implementing the contextual education system thet allow combining educational, quasi professional and educational-professional activity, such as: design and usage of electronic educational resources, electronic teaching methods; engaging students into self-educational activity by means of Web services; fulfillment of individual and group projects based on Web and Blog-quests in which

  3. Editorial: Pedagogical Media Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee M. Meister

    2014-07-01

    learning and media ecologies with the material, global and ecological challenges that have become a part of the anthropocene. They do so by examining the mediation of a physical, architectural environment, their own departmental environment at Simon Fraser University. De Castell, Droumeva and Jenson uncover a range of practical and theoretical challenges, and explore the implications for both body and mind. Markus Deimann takes the reader back into the history of continental educational theory, to Humboldt’s (and others‘ expansive understanding of Bildung, to suggest a conceptual ecology germane to the manifold possibilities that are now on offer through open education. Deimann sees the «open paradigm» as changing education utterly – and for the better. It will do so, Deimann predicts, by «unbundling» resource and service provision, and assessment and accreditation functions that have for too long been monopolized by the educational monoliths known as «universities». Theo Hug’s contribution, «Media Form School – A Plea for Expanded Action Orientations and Reflective Perspectives» similarly looks to the past to envision possibilities for the future. Hug’s concern is with the narrow confines in which media are conceptualized and operationalized in many K-12 educational ecologies, and in the corresponding policy and curricular documents that further constrain and direct this action. Hug suggests looking to the recent past, the 1970s and 1960s, in which alternatives were envisioned not only by figures like McLuhan and Illich, but also intimated in the works of Austrian poets and artists. Norm Friesen provides the third «rearview mirror» perspective in his examination of the lecture as a trans-medial pedagogical form. From the late medieval university through to today’s IGNITE and TED talks, the lecture has accommodated and reflected a wide range of media ecologies, technical conditions and epistemological patterns. New media technologies –from the

  4. Pedagogical Education: Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, I. I.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the teaching profession in Russia shows that its prestige and effectiveness are becoming weaker. The research on the influence of the teaching and upbringing process on the state of students' health has shown that negative deviations in respiratory and cardiovascular systems, ability to work, and fatigue are not connected with…

  5. PEDAGOGICAL RESEARCH: IN SEARCH FOR MEANS OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V. Serikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to disclose lacks of dissertational works on pedagogics and to show possible ways of improvement of their quality.Results. It is stated that despite high volume and a variety of dissertational researches on pedagogical sciences, efficiency of their influence on education practice still remains rather low. The reason is low degree of quality of researches as many researches do not stimulate occurrence of innovations and growth of quality of education. As shown in the article the basic lacks that obstruct practical application are the following: a triviality and the unsubstantiated character, and insufficient novelty and excessive « scientificity». The author finds out the process and result of the most widespread type of the pedagogical research devoted to process of formation of personal quality, a kind of cultural experience or any pupils’ competence. The result of pedagogical research should contain criteria characteristic: the purposes of this process; maintenances of «transferred» experience; psychological conditions of its mastering; the description of system of pedagogical means and the receptions providing actualisation of these conditions; criteria and indicators of productivity of process; requirements to the teachers who are carrying out this process, and characteristics of pupils for which the offered technique is the most effective. The typical errors made by authors of researches are listed: psychological conditions (common factors, mechanisms of expected innovations are not revealed; as a result the choice of means has no sufficient bases and reached effect can be a simple accident; authors do not provide evidence of changes that have resulted from application of any stated technique; the role of personal and professional qualities of the researcher are not pointed out, though it always takes a considerable place n pedagogical systems.cientific novelty. The paper is rather useful as the author

  6. Astrobites as a Pedagogical Tool in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Gourav; Tsang, Benny Tsz Ho; Sanders, Nathan; Kohler, Susanna; Shipp, Nora; Astrobites Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    Astrobites is a graduate-student organization that publishes an online astrophysical literature blog (astrobites.org), and has published brief and accessible summaries of more than 1600 articles from the astrophysical literature since its founding in 2010. Our graduate-student generated content is widely being utilised as a pedagogical tool to bring current research into the classroom of higher education. We aim to study the effectiveness of Astrobites in teaching of current research, via the AAS Education & Professional Development Mini-Grant funded in Fall 2017. This talk gives an overview of the functioning of Astrobites, our past pedagogical initiatives, as well as a brief description of the grant proposal. We describe the workings of our teaching workshop at the 231st AAS Meeting in January 2018, as well as a 10-educator focus group that has been assembled to conduct a post-workshop follow-up that serves as a dataset for our research study. We present here a brief analysis of the workshop, the focus group and preliminary inferences.

  7. Sociopsychological and Pedagogic Considerations in L2 Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Cem

    1981-01-01

    Criticizes Brown's (TESOL Quarterly, 1980) optimal distance model of target language acquisition for having neglected the issue of possibly harmful effects of sociocultural factors upon learners. A distinction is made between second and foreign language learners' motivations. Pedagogic implications are drawn. (Author/AMH)

  8. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge - a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Fisser, Petra; Pareja Roblin, N.N.; Tondeur, J.; van Braak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) has been introduced as a conceptual framework for the knowledge base teachers need to effectively teach with technology. The framework stems from the notion that technology integration in a specific educational context benefits from a careful

  9. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge -- A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Roblin, N. Pareja; Tondeur, J.; van Braak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) has been introduced as a conceptual framework for the knowledge base teachers need to effectively teach with technology. The framework stems from the notion that technology integration in a specific educational context benefits from a careful alignment of content, pedagogy and the potential of…

  10. Pedagogical Synergy: Linking Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caro Rolheiser

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the evolution of attempts to build coherence and capacity in an Ontario school district, focusing on the development of literacy strategies in all of the district’s elementary and secondary schools. In reviewing case studies in four elementary schools, the authors have identified three key elements (instruction, curriculum, and assessment as the key dimensions which have the greatest influence on student achievement. The authors of this paper present a new construct, pedagogical synergy, in which those three elements are combined. Improvements can occur at both the district and school levels when there are horizontal and reciprocal strategies for building capacity and increasing coherence. It is the mutual support between district and schools that provides the power in this new concept.

  11. The concept of the pedagogical system of the higher technical educational establishment: essential characteristics of its components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Петрівна Лучанінова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the essential characteristics of the components of the concept of modern educational system of higher technical educational institutions.We believe that the important role in organization of pedagogical system of the modern higher technical educational establishment belongs to qualitatively new approaches: humanistic and ideological, andragogical, facilitating, personal, cultural, diversificational, cordocentrism, systematic and activity approach, interactive.The concept of pedagogical system will be effective, if the main fundamentals of the Concept are included into the plans of pedagogical work of the higher educational establishments and their structural subdivisions; if the organizational and methodological facilities and studying and generalizing of the experience in organization of the pedagogical activities in the other higher educational establishments are prepared; if the scientific and methodological conferences, seminars, round-table discussion meetings, trainings and so on are organized and held; if we  promote active exchange of the theoretical and methodological aspects of the pedagogical system, of new approaches, forms and methods of the pedagogical activities; if we consider the questions of the Concept implementation at the meetings of the pedagogical work councils, educational and methodological commissions and the like.The offered authors Concept of the pedagogical system of the higher technical educational establishment should help the educators modulate the pedagogical process, involve various institutions and the society to the active participation in the educational and pedagogical process.

  12. [Pedagogical training in stricto sensu graduate programs in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Guilherme Torres; Ribeiro, Victoria Maria Brant

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this research is to discuss the relevance and need for pedagogical training of university lecturers in the Public Health field. The contention is that college teaching is a practice that requires specific training, since it is characterized by complex elements that transcend the mastery of given content. Considering stricto sensu graduate studies as an important stage in the training of future university lecturers, an attempt was made to identify and analyze the subjects and practices of pedagogical training in academic masters and doctorate programs in Public Health. To achieve the research aim, this work was based on Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and on Tomaz Tadeu da Silva's curriculum theory. Results indicate that the programs do not consider the aspect of teacher training as a major issue. With regard to the Public Health field approximately 61% of masters and 38% of doctorate programs have pedagogical training subjects/practices. Furthermore, there is a tendency for technical-instrumental training, which is in line with the history of the Public Health field. The conclusion is that there is a need to develop a culture that values college and graduate Public Health teaching, considering the complexity of pedagogical practice in all its dimensions.

  13. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  14. Modeling units of study from a pedagogical perspective: the pedagogical meta-model behind EML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This text is a short summary of the work on pedagogical analysis carried out when EML (Educational Modelling Language) was being developed. Because we address pedagogical meta-models the consequence is that I must justify the underlying pedagogical models it describes. I have included a (far from

  15. An Investigation of Turkish Middle School Science Teachers' Pedagogical Orientations Towards Direct and Inquiry Instructional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingoz, Selcuk

    One of the most important goals of science education is preparing effective science teachers which includes the development of a science pedagogical orientation. Helping in-service science teachers improve their orientations toward science teaching begins with identifying their current orientations. While there are many aspects of an effective science teaching orientation, this study specifically focuses on effective pedagogy. The interest of this study is to clarify pedagogical orientations of middle school science teachers in Turkey toward the teaching of science conceptual knowledge. It focuses on what instructional preferences Turkish middle school science teachers have in theory and practice. The purpose of this study is twofold: 1) to elucidate teacher pedagogical profiles toward direct and inquiry instructional approaches. For this purpose, quantitative profile data, using a Turkish version of the Pedagogy of Science Teaching Test (POSTT-TR) assessment instrument, was collected from 533 Turkish middle school science teachers; 2) to identify teaching orientations of middle school science teachers and to identify their reasons for preferring specific instructional practices. For this purpose, descriptive qualitative, interview data was collected from 23 teachers attending a middle school science teacher workshop in addition to quantitative data using the POSTT-TR. These teachers sat for interviews structured by items from the POSTT-TR. Thus, the research design is mixed-method. The design provides a background profile on teacher orientations along with insights on reasons for pedagogical choices. The findings indicate that instructional preference distributions for the large group and smaller group are similar; however, the smaller workshop group is more in favor of inquiry instructional approaches. The findings also indicate that Turkish middle school science teachers appear to have variety of teaching orientations and they have varied reasons. Moreover, the

  16. "Kalosara" Revitalization as an Ethno-Pedagogical Media in the Development of Character of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar; Suardika, I. Ketut; Mursidin, T.; Suleiman, Abdul Rauf; Syukur, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the research are (1) to identify types of character through "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in social sciences (IPS) learning at junior high school (SMP), (2) to develop strategy of "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in the development of characters of students, and (3)…

  17. Pedagogical Catalysts of Civic Competence: The Development of a Critical Epistemological Model for Community-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokamer, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Democratic problem-solving necessitates an active and informed citizenry, but existing research on service-learning has shed little light on the relationship between pedagogical practices and civic competence outcomes. This study developed and tested a model to represent that relationship and identified pedagogical catalysts of civic competence…

  18. Cooperation of pedagogical assistant during integration of a child with behavioural disturbances in a normal class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kolařík

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article looks into the problem which is really topical nowadays. There are more and more requests for the assignments of pedagogical assistants to children with behavioural disturbances in a normal class. Nevertheless there is no provement that this assignment of pedagogical assistant is really effective and if the given wherewithal suits the purpose. The article describes the influence of pedagogical assistant´s cooperation upon a child integrated because of his behavioural disturbances in a normal class. For data acquisition the semistructured interviews and focused groups were used. Those data were obtained from responsible employee from county council Olomouc region, from Pedagogical - psychological counselling employees Bruntál and from Pedagogical - psychological counselling employees from Olomouc and also from so-called "families" made out of intergrated child´s parents, integrated child because of his behavioural disturbances, class master and pedagogical assistant. For a selection of research sample the simple intended selection was used. As good things of pedagogical assistant allotment can be considered for example improving of child´s school evaluations, behaviour or the possition of intergrated child in the class. There is also a problem of the raising the teaching effectiveness in the whole class, active support of pedagogical assistents from the school director´s side as well as great relationships between pedagogical assistents and class children. As weaker sides of this we can consider the disunity of the way of pedagogical assistant allotment in different regions in the Czech Republic, the not participating of class master in the process of choosing pedagogical assistant, the pedagogical assistant ´s child teaching out of the class, poly-duties by a plenty of pedagogical assistant and the different demands from the parent´s and class master´s side. Very important is also the fact that there is still confusion about

  19. Declared Pedagogical Values of Coaches at Hungarian Football Academies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Dániel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on empirical research that was carried out in the total population of the coaches employed at Hungarian football academies (N=196. The main objectives of the investigation were to reveal the coaches’ opinions about some major pedagogical views and to discover whether they realize their declared pedagogical values or not. The methods for collecting the data were a self-administered questionnaire, analysis of documents, and semi-structured interviews. The results are presented according to the following sub-topics: The content and the structure of the coaches’ pedagogical values and the place of education in coaching effectiveness. Based on the findings, it is concluded that the disregard of pedagogical values can cause continuous harm to both the athletes and the coaches. The personality of young players suffering from educational and emotional neglect might develop in a one-sided manner. The effect of dysfunctional consequences with the coaches might prevent them from achieving their goals. In the worst case scenario, ignoring the young players’ education can hinder the realization of the coaches’ intended objectives and can result in unintended and adverse outcomes.

  20. PEDAGOGICAL ASPECTS OF CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Morze

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in computer science in the field of redundancy and protection has led to the sharing of data in many different repositories. Modern infrastructure has made cloud computing safe and reliable, and advancement of such computations radically changes the understanding of the use of resources and services. The materials in this article are connected with the definition of pedagogical possibilities of using cloud computing to provide education on the basis of competence-based approach and monitoring of learners (students.

  1. A pedagogical design pattern framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anne Chresteria; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    ”Design patterns” were originally proposed in architecture and later in software engineering as a methodology to sketch and share solutions to recurring design problems. In recent years ”pedagogical design patterns” have been introduced as a way to sketch and share good practices in teaching...... framework is applied to describe the learning design in four online and blended learning courses within different academic disciplines: Classical Greek, Biostatistics, Environmental Management in Europe, and Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation. Future perspectives for using the framework...

  2. Pedagogical Support Components of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Vera K.; Simonova, Galina I.; Soleymani, Nassim

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem stated in the article is caused by the need of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation on the basis of systematicity, which is achieved if we correctly define the components of the process. The aim of the article is to determine the pedagogical support components of students' social adaptation. The leading…

  3. Art's Pedagogical Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Nadine M.

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to conversations concerning art education futures through engaging alternative relations between art, education, and democracy that mobilize education as art projects associated with the "pedagogical turn" as sites of liminality and paradox. An analysis of the art project, Pedagogical Factory, is used to outline…

  4. The Pedagogic Signature of the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Ewald; Lerche, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Oubaid, Viktor; Weiss, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lee S. Shulman deplores that the field of education as a profession does not have a pedagogic signature, which he characterizes as a synthesis of cognitive, practical and moral apprenticeship. In this context, the following study has three goals: 1) In the first theoretical part, the basic problems of constructing a pedagogic signature are…

  5. Collaborative Art Practices in HE: Mapping and Developing Pedagogical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wilsmore, R; Alix, C; Dobson, E; University of Huddersfield; University of Hull; University of York St John; The Higher Education Academy; Palatine

    2010-01-01

    This project asks ‘How is interdisciplinary collaboration "taught" in HE institutions?’ and ‘What pedagogical models can be identified and developed?’\\ud Performing and Creative Arts departments in HE institutions engage students in collaborative practice within a singular discipline or across disciplines, through interdisciplinary or hybridised art forms, as curricula or extra-curricula activity. Where students are engaged with interdisciplinary collaboration within the curriculum, tuition m...

  6. PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION IN RUSSIA: CHALLENGES, PROSPECTS, AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kulikovskaya; Anna Andrienko

    2015-01-01

    The development of education and science is a priority for Russian state policy. Global trends define the main goals of the Russian higher school modernization. However, these also identify the need to overcome a number of contradictions in Russia’s national higher-education system. Pedagogical, or teacher-training, education is of special importance in the development of the entire educational system in the country. Quality education at all steps – preschool, primary, secondary (general and ...

  7. Clinical teachers' tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T; Steinert, Y; Schuwirth, L; McLeod, A H

    2004-02-01

    Academic faculty members in medical schools rarely receive formal instruction in basic pedagogic principles; nevertheless many develop into competent teachers. Perhaps they acquire tacit knowledge of these principles with teaching experience. This study was designed to assess clinical teachers' tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles and concepts. The authors developed a multiple-choice question (MCQ) exam based on 20 pedagogic principles judged by a panel of education experts to be important for clinical teaching. Three groups of clinician-educators sat the test: (1) clinicians with advanced education training and experience; (2) internal medicine specialists; (3) surgical specialists. All four groups of clinicians-educators passed the test, indicating that they possess a reasonable tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles. Those with advanced education training performed much better than members of the other two groups while specialists and residents working in teaching hospitals outperformed specialists from non-teaching hospitals. It is possible that converting this tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge may improve individual teaching effectiveness.

  8. USING A PEDAGOGICAL TOOL TO IMPROVE LEARNING:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Taylor Kelly, Hélène; Hørdam, Britta

    at University College Zealand of nursing students’ bachelor projects highlighted students’ difficulties when categorizing and evaluating research literature. Students relied upon introductory textbooks as a major source of information and used proportionately few researched based resources. In 2011 a pilot......Abstract Content: Nurses work in complex organizations and solve multifaceted problems in an ever changing society when meeting patient needs. Therefore there is a need to develop students´ skills in the use of evidence based literature in clinical decision making. A retrospective study...... project aimed at raising students’ awareness with respect to the choice and assessment of literature was initiated and students were introduced to a new pedagogical tool. Effects of the educational intervention were measured via quantitative and qualitative data and a follow-up clinical intervention...

  9. Determination of Self Efficacy Perception Levels of Teachers' Attending an Online Course toward Web Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskay, Özge Özyalçin; Odabasi, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    The effects of technological developments occurred new requirements in educational area. Today's teachers should know the content knowledge they teach, have pedagogical knowledge about teaching and learning methods and besides should use the technological tools effectively. Depending on these, new concepts such as Technological Pedagogical Content…

  10. A Pedagogical Perspective on Online Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette; Uth Thomsen, Thyra

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss if and how pedagogical principles, originally developed for on-campus courses, can be equally applicable to online courses. The authors present and argue for six pedagogical principles that guide the development of current and future courses at a large Scandinavian...... business school; academic challenge, interaction and collaboration, engagement and motivation, diversity and flexibility, academic socialization, and personal development and integrity. The authors describe how these pedagogical principles guided a recent online initiative in which three fully online...... courses were developed. Based on post-course indepth interviews with 19 students, the authors discuss to which degree the pedagogical principles were met in the online setting. They conclude that online courses are largely able to support existing pedagogical principles and thereby become an integrated...

  11. A Pedagogical Perspective on Online Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette; Uth Thomsen, Thyra

    2015-01-01

    business school; academic challenge, interaction and collaboration, engagement and motivation, diversity and flexibility, academic socialization, and personal development and integrity. The authors describe how these pedagogical principles guided a recent online initiative in which three fully online......In this paper the authors discuss if and how pedagogical principles, originally developed for on-campus courses, can be equally applicable to online courses. The authors present and argue for six pedagogical principles that guide the development of current and future courses at a large Scandinavian...... courses were developed. Based on post-course in-depth interviews with 19 students, the authors discuss to which degree the pedagogical principles were met in the online setting. They conclude that online courses are largely able to support existing pedagogical principles and thereby become an integrated...

  12. Technological pedagogical content knowledge in South African mathematics classrooms: A secondary analysis of SITES 2006 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verona Leendertz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a secondary data analysis conducted on the South African mathematics teachers’ dataset of the Second Information Technology in Education Study (SITES 2006. The sample consisted of a stratified sample of 640 mathematics teachers from 504 randomly selected computer-using and non–computer-using schools that completed the SITES 2006 teachers’ questionnaire, which investigated their pedagogical use of Information Communication Technology (ICT. The purpose of the current investigation was to investigate the level of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK of mathematics teachers, and how TPACK attributes contribute towards more effective Grade 8 mathematics teaching in South African schools, using the TPACK conceptual framework. The findings are presented according to the three clusters identified through the association between the main variables of the TPACK model and other variables on the SITES 2006 teachers’ questionnaire: (1 impact of ICT use, (2 teacher practices and (3 barriers. A Cramér V of between 0.3 and 0.4 was considered to signal a medium effect that tended towards practically significant association, and a Cramér V of 0.4 or larger was considered to signal a large effect with practically significant association. The results indicate that the TPACK of mathematics teachers contributes towards more effective Grade 8 mathematics teaching in South African schools.

  13. Under What Assumptions Do Site-by-Treatment Instruments Identify Average Causal Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Sean F.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of data from multi-site randomized trials provides a potential opportunity to use instrumental variables methods to study the effects of multiple hypothesized mediators of the effect of a treatment. We derive nine assumptions needed to identify the effects of multiple mediators when using site-by-treatment interactions…

  14. Pedagogical innovation for science teachers training in the information age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horta, L.M.P.

    2009-01-01

    It urges to improve internet skills on the people, for dealing with lots of different global important issues such as health, education, economy, environment, food chemistry, Portuguese Cultural Heritage, sustainable development. The available information in the internet and the interactive resources is immense, but we have to elaborate education strategies for the enriching, discerning and pedagogic use of the internet. We are in the information age, being crucial to get to transform the information in knowledge and to transform knowledge produced in to information, effectively and efficiently. The introduction of new ideas, theories, methodologies, contexts, technological innovations as in students of the basis and secondary education (the new generations), as in science teachers through new practices and knowledge using the science, technology, society and environment perspective present in the Portuguese curricula for motivating students and with strategies that allow them to identify, to observe of to scrutiny on science, technology and society applications, being the internet the privileged vehicle of that whole new knowledge. Can be targeted and developed to Physics and Chemistry teachers; Biology and Geology teachers; Mathematics and Nature Sciences Teachers; Physical Education Teachers. Science teachers training courses design in the information age challenges us to rethink global environment, and many factors (quick examples are how close the interactive virtual lab model is to the real world or the psychological effect of color) present in the web for the human learning must be subject of consideration. (author)

  15. Three novel approaches to structural identifiability analysis in mixed-effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzén, David L I; Jirstrand, Mats; Chappell, Michael J; Evans, Neil D

    2016-05-06

    Structural identifiability is a concept that considers whether the structure of a model together with a set of input-output relations uniquely determines the model parameters. In the mathematical modelling of biological systems, structural identifiability is an important concept since biological interpretations are typically made from the parameter estimates. For a system defined by ordinary differential equations, several methods have been developed to analyse whether the model is structurally identifiable or otherwise. Another well-used modelling framework, which is particularly useful when the experimental data are sparsely sampled and the population variance is of interest, is mixed-effects modelling. However, established identifiability analysis techniques for ordinary differential equations are not directly applicable to such models. In this paper, we present and apply three different methods that can be used to study structural identifiability in mixed-effects models. The first method, called the repeated measurement approach, is based on applying a set of previously established statistical theorems. The second method, called the augmented system approach, is based on augmenting the mixed-effects model to an extended state-space form. The third method, called the Laplace transform mixed-effects extension, is based on considering the moment invariants of the systems transfer function as functions of random variables. To illustrate, compare and contrast the application of the three methods, they are applied to a set of mixed-effects models. Three structural identifiability analysis methods applicable to mixed-effects models have been presented in this paper. As method development of structural identifiability techniques for mixed-effects models has been given very little attention, despite mixed-effects models being widely used, the methods presented in this paper provides a way of handling structural identifiability in mixed-effects models previously not

  16. VOCATIONAL-PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION IN RUSSIA: HISTORICAL AND LOGICAL PERIODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Fedorov

    2017-01-01

    reflection concerning the accumulated positive and negative experience: promotes more exact diagnostics of tendencies in this area; helps to avoid former mistakes and to level the existing contradictions; enables to choose the most effective strategy of development of VPE.Practical significance. The materials of the publication can be useful for scientific and practical workers who are taking part in training of teachers of vocational education and engaged in forecasting and design of development of the system of vocational pedagogical education. 

  17. Teaching Management and Implementation of Pedagogical Classroom Projects in Basic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Antonio Guerrero Matos

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article diffuses the results of the oriented study to determine the relationship between the administration of the educational one and the execution of the pedagogic projects of classroom in Basic Education. Theoretically it was based on the constructivismo and the contributions of the National Basic Curriculum. The investigation type was descriptive. The results allowed to corroborate in the teachers, weaknesses in the execution of the Pedagogic Projects of Classroom, evidencing difficulties to the moment to apply the pedagogic abilities. Therefore it is recommended to carry out courses of upgrade to manage with effectiveness this strategy of planning constructivist.

  18. Pedagogical Posters in Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Hélène; Bagger, Bettan

    2009-01-01

    education away from focusing upon formal qualifications towards the concept of developing nurse competences. These recommendations have resulted in challenges to traditional pedagogical approaches away from the teacher’s role as the disseminator of knowledge towards the role of facilitator of learning....... Working with posters forces students to organize, evaluate and reflect upon information and develops their abilities to communicate health knowledge. Students have learned to present their ideas in an A4 poster format that resembles the types of posters one normally sees at professional conferences...... was integrated in a Nordic network’s intensive course held in the autumn of 2008. The network received funding for a research project with the goal of making recommendations with respect to best practice curriculum guidelines in prevention and health promotion education for students of nursing in the Nordic...

  19. Neural underpinnings of the identifiable victim effect: affect shifts preferences for giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevsky, Alexander; Västfjäll, Daniel; Slovic, Paul; Knutson, Brian

    2013-10-23

    The "identifiable victim effect" refers to peoples' tendency to preferentially give to identified versus anonymous victims of misfortune, and has been proposed to partly depend on affect. By soliciting charitable donations from human subjects during behavioral and neural (i.e., functional magnetic resonance imaging) experiments, we sought to determine whether and how affect might promote the identifiable victim effect. Behaviorally, subjects gave more to orphans depicted by photographs versus silhouettes, and their shift in preferences was mediated by photograph-induced feelings of positive arousal, but not negative arousal. Neurally, while photographs versus silhouettes elicited activity in widespread circuits associated with facial and affective processing, only nucleus accumbens activity predicted and could statistically account for increased donations. Together, these findings suggest that presenting evaluable identifiable information can recruit positive arousal, which then promotes giving. We propose that affect elicited by identifiable stimuli can compel people to give more to strangers, even despite costs to the self.

  20. Extending existing structural identifiability analysis methods to mixed-effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzén, David L I; Jirstrand, Mats; Chappell, Michael J; Evans, Neil D

    2018-01-01

    The concept of structural identifiability for state-space models is expanded to cover mixed-effects state-space models. Two methods applicable for the analytical study of the structural identifiability of mixed-effects models are presented. The two methods are based on previously established techniques for non-mixed-effects models; namely the Taylor series expansion and the input-output form approach. By generating an exhaustive summary, and by assuming an infinite number of subjects, functions of random variables can be derived which in turn determine the distribution of the system's observation function(s). By considering the uniqueness of the analytical statistical moments of the derived functions of the random variables, the structural identifiability of the corresponding mixed-effects model can be determined. The two methods are applied to a set of examples of mixed-effects models to illustrate how they work in practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The pedagogical practices in inclusive context: strategies, actions and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Melo Franco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to go beyond the theoretical debate on the integration and inclusion of children with disability. It addresses pedagogical work in the classroom, with the disabled child, in this case, the child with cerebral palsy. This is a qualitative approach and action research that aims to understand the reality investigated and it intervene. Participates in the research a public school that has students with cerebral palsy. The classes were followed weekly during the school year, in order to understand and analyze the process of teaching and learning. In addition, we attempted to intervene and build new teaching practices with teachers. As a result we identified the adoption of pedagogical strategies that consider the individuality of the subjects and their participation in the school community. Strategies were adopted as written economy, reorganization of spaces, change in the form of participation, curriculum adaptation, and adaptation activities, among others.

  2. Understanding Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge: Report on an International Pilot Study. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 159

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmark, Kristina; Révai, Nóra; Gottschalk, Francesca; Deligiannidi, Karolina; Burns, Tracey

    2017-01-01

    What is the nature of teachers' pedagogical knowledge? The Innovative Teaching for Effective Learning Teacher Knowledge Survey (ITEL TKS) set out to answer this question in a pilot study that ran in five countries: Estonia, Greece, Hungary Israel, and the Slovak Republic. Using convenience samples, the pilot assessed the pedagogical knowledge base…

  3. H.A. Welker and Pedagogical Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2010-01-01

    The lexicographer Herbert Andreas Welker's book of more than 500 pages about pedagogical lexicography provides a panoramic overview of the various types of pedagogical dic¬tionaries as well as the corresponding theoretical literature. Welker's method is descriptive, with himself mainly an observer...... of lexicographical practice and a "collector" of — frequently opposed — opinions and ideas expressed by a large number of scholars. This method allows the reader to become acquainted with an important part of the most relevant literature on pedagogical lexico¬graphy which is presented in a systematic and condensed...

  4. Identifying potentially cost effective chronic care programs for people with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.G. Steuten (Lotte); K.M.M. Lemmens (Karin); A.P. Nieboer (Anna); H.J.M. Vrijhoef (Hubertus)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To review published evidence regarding the cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs and to illustrate how potentially cost effective programs can be identified. Methods: Systematic search of Medline and Cochrane databases for evaluations of multicomponent disease

  5. SOCIAL AND PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION OF THE OLD SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Plotnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The change in the conditions of the person's life activity and its innovative mentality intensified the problems of personal and professional self-determination. The senior school age is a period of primary, ambivalent options. At this age, the foundations of the moral attitude to different kinds of work are laid, the formation of a system of personal values that determine the selectivity of the attitude of high school students to various professions. The purpose of the study was to study the socio-pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students. The object of research is the professional orientation of high school students. The subject of the study is the design of the socio-pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students. The article analyzes the following social and pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students: the development of individual abilities of schoolchildren, the expansion of differentiated education in accordance with their inclinations and educational needs, the development of a network of specialized classes with in-depth study of various subjects, ensuring the level of secondary education meets the requirements of scientific and technological progress. The authors emphasize that vocational guidance is one of the key functions of a basic school in modern conditions. It is the activities of vocational guidance that contribute to the adequate professional choice of schoolchildren, which gives them further success in life, and the labor market - specialists of the required quality and in the required quantity. Consequently, the effectiveness of this work requires regular evaluation through interviews with high-school students aimed at identifying their vocational and educational orientations and assessing the quality of career counseling services. Such studies are necessary to improve the quality of vocational guidance work carried out by schools.

  6. Lived Relationality as Fulcrum for Pedagogical-Ethical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saevi, Tone

    2011-01-01

    What is the core of pedagogical practice? Which qualities are primary to the student-teacher relationship? What is a suitable language for pedagogical practice? What might be the significance of an everyday presentational pedagogical act like for example the glance of a teacher? The pedagogical relation as lived relationality experientially…

  7. Pedagogic Approach to the Mechanisms of Personality Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakurova, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    The article addresses the problem of defining and attributing pedagogic essence to the mechanisms of personality identity development. It is based on the general mechanism of social interaction. Its structure contains, on the one hand, pedagogic interaction, including the forms of pedagogic assistance and pedagogic support; on the other hand, it…

  8. Teaching Methods in Mathematics and the Current Pedagogical Point of View in School Education.

    OpenAIRE

    岩崎, 潔; Kiyosi, Iwasaki

    1995-01-01

    It should be a basic principal that studies in teaching profession in universities should take into consideration the current pedagogical points of view in education and the future prospects of that education. This paper discusses the findings of a survey on the degree of recognition that students in our Math courses have about the currents pedagogical understading of teacher trainig. In this paper I will consider how to teach effectively teaching methods in Mathematics.

  9. A pedagogical look at Jeans' density scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, K-H W

    2007-01-01

    We illustrate the derivations of Jeans' criteria for the gravitational instabilities in a static homogeneous Newtonian system for pedagogical objectives. The critical Jeans density surface is presented in terms of dimensionless sound speeds and (characteristic) length scales

  10. Bringing University Pedagogical Approach into Companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses how the university pedagogical approach used in engineering education can be applied in a corporate setting. Problem Based and Project Organised Learning (PBL) pedagogical approach has been used in engineering education at Aalborg University for 30 years...... and this PBL structure was implemented in a Danish company which wanted to establish a learning environment, so that their employees would share their knowledge and understanding of the work processes across different departments. The pedagogical approach is described and two workshops are used as examples...... a project and found solutions for for problems related to their work. Several of the problem solutions were implemented. The participants evaluated the process and the outcome of the workshops very as very good. Furthermore the results show that the pedagogical method which has been used within engineering...

  11. Bearding the Capability Deprivation Machine: The Pedagogical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bearding the Capability Deprivation Machine: The Pedagogical Deal for ... Africa are managing the task of higher education in an environment marked by poverty. ... are valuable in the full range of social spaces young South Africans inhabit.

  12. The pedagogical implications of information and communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pedagogical implications of information and communication technology on adult education: a case study of the osun state colleges of ... Finally, the department should give individual students access to the use of 1C1 equipment.

  13. Application of the technological, pedagogical, and content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of the technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge framework in a positivist study on the use of ICT in pedagogy by teachers of mathematical disciplines at Makerere University: a conceptual paper.

  14. An Efficient, Noniterative Method of Identifying the Cost-Effectiveness Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Sze-chuan; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D

    2016-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis aims to identify treatments and policies that maximize benefits subject to resource constraints. However, the conventional process of identifying the efficient frontier (i.e., the set of potentially cost-effective options) can be algorithmically inefficient, especially when considering a policy problem with many alternative options or when performing an extensive suite of sensitivity analyses for which the efficient frontier must be found for each. Here, we describe an alternative one-pass algorithm that is conceptually simple, easier to implement, and potentially faster for situations that challenge the conventional approach. Our algorithm accomplishes this by exploiting the relationship between the net monetary benefit and the cost-effectiveness plane. To facilitate further evaluation and use of this approach, we also provide scripts in R and Matlab that implement our method and can be used to identify efficient frontiers for any decision problem. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. An Efficient, Non-iterative Method of Identifying the Cost-Effectiveness Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Sze-chuan; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis aims to identify treatments and policies that maximize benefits subject to resource constraints. However, the conventional process of identifying the efficient frontier (i.e., the set of potentially cost-effective options) can be algorithmically inefficient, especially when considering a policy problem with many alternative options or when performing an extensive suite of sensitivity analyses for which the efficient frontier must be found for each. Here, we describe an alternative one-pass algorithm that is conceptually simple, easier to implement, and potentially faster for situations that challenge the conventional approach. Our algorithm accomplishes this by exploiting the relationship between the net monetary benefit and the cost-effectiveness plane. To facilitate further evaluation and use of this approach, we additionally provide scripts in R and Matlab that implement our method and can be used to identify efficient frontiers for any decision problem. PMID:25926282

  16. A Pedagogical Perspective on Online Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette; Uth Thomsen, Thyra

    2016-01-01

    business school; academic challenge, interaction and collaboration, engagement and motivation, diversity and flexibility, academic socialization, and personal development and integrity. The authors describe how these pedagogical principles guided a recent online initiative in which three fully online...... rather than independent form of teaching and learning. Finally, the challenges and dilemmas that surfaced as a consequence of the alignment of the online format and the pedagogical principles are discussed...

  17. Interoperability in pedagogical e-learning services

    OpenAIRE

    Queirós, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research plan is to improve the learning experience of students through the combination of pedagogical eLearning services. Service oriented architectures are already being used in eLearning but in this work the focus is on services of pedagogical value, rather then on generic services adapted from other business systems. This approach to the architecture of eLearning platforms raises challenges addressed by this work, namely: conceptual modeling of the pedagogica...

  18. Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Kearney; Sandra Schuck; Kevin Burden; Peter Aubusson

    2012-01-01

    Mobile learning is a relatively new phenomenon and the theoretical basis is currently under development. The paper presents a pedagogical perspective of mobile learning which highlights three central features of mobile learning: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation, embedded in the unique timespace contexts of mobile learning. A pedagogical framework was developed and tested through activities in two mobile learning projects located in teacher education communities: Mobagogy, a pro...

  19. Domain knowledge patterns in pedagogical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarka, Rostislav

    2017-07-01

    This paper shows a proposal of representation of knowledge patterns in RDF(S) language. Knowledge patterns are used for reuse of knowledge. They can be divided into two groups - Top-level knowledge patterns and Domain knowledge patterns. Pedagogical diagnostics is aimed at testing of knowledge of students at primary and secondary school. An example of domain knowledge pattern from pedagogical diagnostics is part of this paper.

  20. Adult literacy, learning identities and pedagogic practice

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther, Jim; Maclachlan, Kathy; Tett, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between persistence in adult literacy and numeracy\\ud programs, changes in the participants’ attitudes to engaging in learning and pedagogic practices\\ud using data from eight Scottish literacy education organizations. It argues that literacy learning can act as a resource that enables vulnerable adults to change their dispositions to learning, achieve their goals and make a transition towards their imagined futures. Pedagogic practices that operate fro...

  1. Reading log: pedagogical device accompanying training university paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of the research on teacher training in Physical Education, developed in Bariloche Regional University Center of the National University of Comahue (CRUB-UNCo. Due to the steady increase in the number of students who drop out of course of study on the first two years, projects thatfollow this line of investigation are seeking to question university teaching practices in this field, unravel their particular ways of production and to analyse their impact on the constitution of the formative stages of the students. In the research we have found evidence of a systematic teaching work to improve the learning and teaching conditions and have identified pedagogical devices, both at institutional and classroom levels, as resources for scaffolding student paths and different modes of reception of the students doing the introductory course. Here, we describe and analyse one of these devices, called "reading log" generated in Subject Pedagogy for the 1st year of the School of Physical Education of abovementioned University. This instrument is part of a series of pedagogical practices deliberately planned in connection with the entrance, continuity and graduation stages of undergraduate students; it aims to promote better contexts for the development of the educational processes. This device, created as a way of scaffolding the reading practices of the students, is thought to contribute to the promotion of democratic formative paths and attempts to provide new explanations, which would anchor the transformation and construction of new knowledge and would achieve better pedagogical interventions.

  2. Proposal of a pedagogical model for mathematics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Jiménez Espinosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research-based article reflects on mathematics teacher education, and proposes a pedagogical model for this purpose, called Gradual Research Pedagogical Model (MPGI. This model considers the central curricular elements of any academic education process: student, teacher and contents, with evaluation as transversal element for analysis and feedback. The training of future teachers is constituted by three moments, each with its specific emphasis: the first is “contextualization”, which aims at having the student understand his or her new academic role, and identify and overcome his or her academic weak points, the second is “knowledge foundation”, which offers basic education in the fields of mathematics and pedagogy, as well as sensibilization towards social issues, opening up the student’s possibilities as leader and agent of change, and lastly, “knowledge immersion”, which is centered on research and the identification and study of topics and problems of the mathematical discipline as well as the pedagogical field.

  3. Identifying transposon insertions and their effects from RNA-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Julian R; Kas, Sjors M; Schut, Eva; Adams, David J; Koudijs, Marco J; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jonkers, Jos

    2017-07-07

    Insertional mutagenesis using engineered transposons is a potent forward genetic screening technique used to identify cancer genes in mouse model systems. In the analysis of these screens, transposon insertion sites are typically identified by targeted DNA-sequencing and subsequently assigned to predicted target genes using heuristics. As such, these approaches provide no direct evidence that insertions actually affect their predicted targets or how transcripts of these genes are affected. To address this, we developed IM-Fusion, an approach that identifies insertion sites from gene-transposon fusions in standard single- and paired-end RNA-sequencing data. We demonstrate IM-Fusion on two separate transposon screens of 123 mammary tumors and 20 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, respectively. We show that IM-Fusion accurately identifies transposon insertions and their true target genes. Furthermore, by combining the identified insertion sites with expression quantification, we show that we can determine the effect of a transposon insertion on its target gene(s) and prioritize insertions that have a significant effect on expression. We expect that IM-Fusion will significantly enhance the accuracy of cancer gene discovery in forward genetic screens and provide initial insight into the biological effects of insertions on candidate cancer genes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The identifiable victim effect in charitable giving: evidence from a natural field experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesner, Tine; Rasmussen, O. D.

    2014-01-01

    or a statistical victim. Unlike much previous research, which has used only laboratory experiments, we find that the campaign letter focusing on one identifiable victim did not result in significantly larger donations than the campaign letter focusing on the statistical victim. In addition to the role......We design a natural field experiment to enhance our understanding of the role of the identifiable victim effect in charitable giving. Using direct mail solicitations to 25797 prior donors of a nonprofit charity, we tested the responsiveness of donors to make a contribution to either an identifiable...... campaigns. We find some evidence of crowding out, indicating that charitable giving could be a zero-sum game; however, the treatment letters did not have different effects on other payments....

  5. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-05-12

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents.

  6. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  7. Bridging the Gap: Identifying Perceptions of Effective Teaching Methods for Age 50+ Baby Boomer Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify effective teaching methods for age 50+ baby boomer learners. The study used a mixed methods research design. The qualitative paradigm used focus group sessions and the quantitative paradigm was completed through surveys. Fifteen age 50+ baby boomer learners and 11 faculty who teach them comprised the two…

  8. The Use of a Performance Assessment for Identifying Gifted Lebanese Students: Is DISCOVER Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance- based assessment in identifying gifted Lebanese students. The sample consisted of 248 students (121 boys, 127 girls) from Grades 3-5 at two private schools in Beirut, Lebanon. Students were administered DISCOVER and the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices…

  9. The Promise of Virtual Teams: Identifying Key Factors in Effectiveness and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Frank M.; Bravington, Desmond; Silvis, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the investigation is to identify enabling and disenabling factors in the development and operation of virtual teams; to evaluate the importance of factors such as team development, cross-cultural variables, leadership, communication and social cohesion as contributors to virtual team effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach:…

  10. A side-effect free method for identifying cancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Md Izhar; Ong, Seng-Kai; Mujawar, Shama; Pawar, Shrikant; More, Pallavi; Paul, Somnath; Lahiri, Chandrajit

    2018-04-27

    Identifying effective drug targets, with little or no side effects, remains an ever challenging task. A potential pitfall of failing to uncover the correct drug targets, due to side effect of pleiotropic genes, might lead the potential drugs to be illicit and withdrawn. Simplifying disease complexity, for the investigation of the mechanistic aspects and identification of effective drug targets, have been done through several approaches of protein interactome analysis. Of these, centrality measures have always gained importance in identifying candidate drug targets. Here, we put forward an integrated method of analysing a complex network of cancer and depict the importance of k-core, functional connectivity and centrality (KFC) for identifying effective drug targets. Essentially, we have extracted the proteins involved in the pathways leading to cancer from the pathway databases which enlist real experimental datasets. The interactions between these proteins were mapped to build an interactome. Integrative analyses of the interactome enabled us to unearth plausible reasons for drugs being rendered withdrawn, thereby giving future scope to pharmaceutical industries to potentially avoid them (e.g. ESR1, HDAC2, F2, PLG, PPARA, RXRA, etc). Based upon our KFC criteria, we have shortlisted ten proteins (GRB2, FYN, PIK3R1, CBL, JAK2, LCK, LYN, SYK, JAK1 and SOCS3) as effective candidates for drug development.

  11. Pedagogical Interaction in High School, the Structural and Functional Model of Pedagogical Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Larissa A.; Kazantseva, Anastassiya I.; Sergeyeva, Valeriya V.; Raklova, Yekaterina M.; Baiseitova, Zhanar B.

    2016-01-01

    The study covers the problems of pedagogical technologies and their experimental implementation in the learning process. The theoretical aspects of the "student-teacher" interaction are investigated. A structural and functional model of pedagogical interaction is offered, which determines the conditions for improving pedagogical…

  12. Primary School Teachers' Interviews Regarding Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and General Pedagogical Knowledge (GPK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothayapetch, Pavinee; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and General Pedagogical Knowledge (GPK) are fundamental types of knowledge for a teacher that he or she must use in order to plan, teach in the classroom, and assess students' learning outcomes. This paper investigates experienced primary school teachers' PCK and GPK while teaching science in Finland and in…

  13. Children’s Sensitivity to the Knowledge Expressed in Pedagogical and Non-Pedagogical Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A.; Ware, Elizabeth A.; Manczak, Erika M.; Graham, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    The present studies test two hypotheses: (1) that pedagogical contexts especially convey generic information (Csibra & Gergely, 2009), and (2) that young children are sensitive to this aspect of pedagogy. We examined generic language (e.g., “Elephants live in Africa”) in three studies, focusing on: informational versus narrative children’s books (Study 1), the language of 6-year-old children and adults assuming either a pedagogical (teacher) or non-pedagogical (friend) role (Study 2), and the language of 5-year-old children and adults speaking to either an ignorant alien (pedagogical context) or a peer (non-pedagogical context; Study 3). Results suggest that generics are more frequent in informational than narrative texts. Furthermore, both adults and young children provide more generic language in pedagogical contexts and when assuming a pedagogical role. Together, the studies demonstrate that pedagogical contexts are distinctive in conveying generic information, and that children are sensitive to this aspect of the language input. We suggest that generic knowledge is more useful in making predictions about the future, and thus more highly valued during instruction. PMID:22468565

  14. Pedagogical Conditions of Multilevel Foreign Languages Teaching in Pedagogical Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakin, Vasily V.; Shukshina, Tatiana I.; Piskunova, Svetlana I.; Babushkina, Larisa E.; Falileev, Alexander E.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to pedagogical conditions of multilevel foreign languages teaching in pedagogical higher education. The purpose of the study is to form the students' skills in foreign language mastering, to form the ability to operate independently and autonomously in this activity, both in the specific learning situation, and in the…

  15. Identifying Key Features of Effective Active Learning: The Effects of Writing and Peer Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangle, Wiline M.; Wyatt, Kevin H.; Powell, Karli N.; Sherwood, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated some of the key features of effective active learning by comparing the outcomes of three different methods of implementing active-learning exercises in a majors introductory biology course. Students completed activities in one of three treatments: discussion, writing, and discussion + writing. Treatments were rotated weekly between three sections taught by three different instructors in a full factorial design. The data set was analyzed by generalized linear mixed-effect models with three independent variables: student aptitude, treatment, and instructor, and three dependent (assessment) variables: change in score on pre- and postactivity clicker questions, and coding scores on in-class writing and exam essays. All independent variables had significant effects on student performance for at least one of the dependent variables. Students with higher aptitude scored higher on all assessments. Student scores were higher on exam essay questions when the activity was implemented with a writing component compared with peer discussion only. There was a significant effect of instructor, with instructors showing different degrees of effectiveness with active-learning techniques. We suggest that individual writing should be implemented as part of active learning whenever possible and that instructors may need training and practice to become effective with active learning. PMID:25185230

  16. Normative study of theme identifiability: Instructions with and without explanation of the false memory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, Maria Soledad; Cadavid, Sara

    2016-12-01

    False-memory illusions have been widely studied using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm (DRM). In this paradigm, words semantically related to a single nonpresented critical word are studied. In a later memory test, critical words are often falsely recalled and recognized. The present normative study was conducted to measure the theme identifiability of 60 associative word lists in Spanish that include six words (e.g., stove, coat, blanket, scarf, chill, and bonnet) that are simultaneously associated with three critical words (e.g., HEAT, COLD, and WINTER; Beato & Díez, Psicothema, 26, 457-463, 2011). Different levels of backward associative strength were used in the construction of the DRM lists. In addition, we used two types of instructions to obtain theme identifiability. In the without-explanation condition, traditional instructions were used, requesting participants to write the theme list. In the with-explanation condition, the false-memory effect and how the lists were built were explained, and an example of a DRM list and critical words was shown. Participants then had to discover the critical words. The results showed that all lists produced theme identifiability. Moreover, some lists had a higher theme identifiability rate (e.g., 61 % for the critical words LOVE, BOYFRIEND, COUPLE) than others (e.g., 24 % for CITY, PLACE, VILLAGE). After comparing the theme identifiabilities in the different conditions, the results indicated higher theme identifiability when the false-memory effect was explained than without such an explanation. Overall, these new normative data provide a useful tool for those experiments that, for example, aim to analyze the wide differences observed in false memory with DRM lists and the role of theme identifiability.

  17. Identifying determinants of effective complementary feeding behaviour change interventions in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Cecilia S; van Liere, Marti; Pelto, Gretel

    2014-01-01

    As stunting moves to the forefront of the global agenda, there is substantial evidence that behaviour change interventions (BCI) can improve infant feeding practices and growth. However, this evidence has not been translated into improved outcomes on a national level because we do not know enough about what makes these interventions work, for whom, when, why, at what cost and for how long. Our objective was to examine the design and implementation of complementary feeding BCI, from the peer-reviewed literature, to identify generalisable key determinants. We identified 29 studies that evaluated BCI efficacy or effectiveness, were conducted in developing countries, and reported outcomes on infant and young children aged 6–24 months. Two potential determinants emerged: (1) effective studies used formative research to identify cultural barriers and enablers to optimal feeding practices, to shape the intervention strategy, and to formulate appropriate messages and mediums for delivery; (2) effective studies delineated the programme impact pathway to the target behaviour change and assessed intermediary behaviour changes to learn what worked. We found that BCI that used these developmental and implementation processes could be effective despite heterogeneous approaches and design components. Our analysis was constrained, however, by the limited published data on how design and implementation were carried out, perhaps because of publishing space limits. Information on cost-effectiveness, sustainability and scalability was also very limited. We suggest a more comprehensive reporting process and a more strategic research agenda to enable generalisable evidence to accumulate. PMID:24798264

  18. Cost-effectiveness of identifying aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arterial disease with angiography or duplex scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffi, S.B.; Ubbink, D.Th.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.W.; Reekers, J.A.; Legemate, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Cost-effectiveness analysis of three diagnostic imaging strategies for the assessment of aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The strategies were: angiography as the reference strategy, duplex scanning (DS) plus supplementary angiography (S1) and DS plus confirmative angiography (S2). Design, materials and methods: A decision model was built with sensitivity and specificity data from literature, supplemented with prospective hospital cost data in Euro ( Euro ). The probability of correctly identifying the status of a lesion was taken as the primary outcome. We compared strategies by assessing the extra costs per additional correctly identified case. Results: Assuming no false positive or false negative results, angiography is the most effective strategy if the prevalence of significant obstructive lesions in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal tract exceeds 70%, or if the sensitivity of duplex scanning is lower than 83%. In case of lower prevalence, strategy S1 becomes equally or even more effective than angiography. At a prevalence of 75%, performing angiography costs Euro 8443 per extra correctly identified case compared with strategy S1. Conclusions: In most situations angiography is more effective than diagnostic strategy S1. However, if society is unwilling to pay more than Euro 8443 for knowing a patient's disease status, diagnostic strategy S1 is a cost-effective alternative to angiography, especially at lower prevalence values

  19. Identifying Effective Components of Child Maltreatment Interventions: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Put, Claudia E; Assink, Mark; Gubbels, Jeanne; Boekhout van Solinge, Noëlle F

    2018-06-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about specific components that make interventions effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to increase this knowledge by summarizing findings on effects of interventions for child maltreatment and by examining potential moderators of this effect, such as intervention components and study characteristics. Identifying effective components is essential for developing or improving child maltreatment interventions. A literature search yielded 121 independent studies (N = 39,044) examining the effects of interventions for preventing or reducing child maltreatment. From these studies, 352 effect sizes were extracted. The overall effect size was significant and small in magnitude for both preventive interventions (d = 0.26, p child maltreatment. For preventive interventions, larger effect sizes were found for short-term interventions (0-6 months), interventions focusing on increasing self-confidence of parents, and interventions delivered by professionals only. Further, effect sizes of preventive interventions increased as follow-up duration increased, which may indicate a sleeper effect of preventive interventions. For curative interventions, larger effect sizes were found for interventions focusing on improving parenting skills and interventions providing social and/or emotional support. Interventions can be effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  20. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Prospective Mathematics Teacher in Three Dimensional Material Based on Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqib, M. A.; Budiarto, M. T.; Wijayanti, P.

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of learning in this era can be seen from 3 factors such as: technology, content, and pedagogy that covered in Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK). This research was a qualitative research which aimed to describe each domain from TPCK include Content Knowledge, Pedagogical Knowledge, Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Technological Knowledge, Technological Content Knowledge, Technological Pedagogical Knowledge and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge. The subjects of this research were male and female mathematics college students at least 5th semester who has almost the same ability for some course like innovative learning, innovative learning II, school mathematics I, school mathematics II, computer applications and instructional media. Research began by spreading the questionnaire of subject then continued with the assignment and interview. The obtained data was validated by time triangulation.This research has result that male and female prospective teacher was relatively same for Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Knowledge domain. While it was difference in the Technological Knowledge domain. The difference in this domain certainly has an impact on other domains that has technology components on it. Although it can be minimized by familiarizing the technology.

  1. Identifying key features of effective active learning: the effects of writing and peer discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Debra L; Pangle, Wiline M; Wyatt, Kevin H; Powell, Karli N; Sherwood, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    We investigated some of the key features of effective active learning by comparing the outcomes of three different methods of implementing active-learning exercises in a majors introductory biology course. Students completed activities in one of three treatments: discussion, writing, and discussion + writing. Treatments were rotated weekly between three sections taught by three different instructors in a full factorial design. The data set was analyzed by generalized linear mixed-effect models with three independent variables: student aptitude, treatment, and instructor, and three dependent (assessment) variables: change in score on pre- and postactivity clicker questions, and coding scores on in-class writing and exam essays. All independent variables had significant effects on student performance for at least one of the dependent variables. Students with higher aptitude scored higher on all assessments. Student scores were higher on exam essay questions when the activity was implemented with a writing component compared with peer discussion only. There was a significant effect of instructor, with instructors showing different degrees of effectiveness with active-learning techniques. We suggest that individual writing should be implemented as part of active learning whenever possible and that instructors may need training and practice to become effective with active learning. © 2014 D. L. Linton et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Identifying Facial Emotions: Valence Specific Effects and an Exploration of the Effects of Viewer Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansari, Ashok; Rodway, Paul; Goncalves, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The valence hypothesis suggests that the right hemisphere is specialised for negative emotions and the left hemisphere is specialised for positive emotions (Silberman & Weingartner, 1986). It is unclear to what extent valence-specific effects in facial emotion perception depend upon the gender of the perceiver. To explore this question 46…

  3. Identifying configurations of behavior change techniques in effective medication adherence interventions: a qualitative comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahwati, Leila; Viswanathan, Meera; Golin, Carol E; Kane, Heather; Lewis, Megan; Jacobs, Sara

    2016-05-04

    Interventions to improve medication adherence are diverse and complex. Consequently, synthesizing this evidence is challenging. We aimed to extend the results from an existing systematic review of interventions to improve medication adherence by using qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to identify necessary or sufficient configurations of behavior change techniques among effective interventions. We used data from 60 studies in a completed systematic review to examine the combinations of nine behavior change techniques (increasing knowledge, increasing awareness, changing attitude, increasing self-efficacy, increasing intention formation, increasing action control, facilitation, increasing maintenance support, and motivational interviewing) among studies demonstrating improvements in adherence. Among the 60 studies, 34 demonstrated improved medication adherence. Among effective studies, increasing patient knowledge was a necessary but not sufficient technique. We identified seven configurations of behavior change techniques sufficient for improving adherence, which together accounted for 26 (76 %) of the effective studies. The intervention configuration that included increasing knowledge and self-efficacy was the most empirically relevant, accounting for 17 studies (50 %) and uniquely accounting for 15 (44 %). This analysis extends the completed review findings by identifying multiple combinations of behavior change techniques that improve adherence. Our findings offer direction for policy makers, practitioners, and future comparative effectiveness research on improving adherence.

  4. Pedagogical Beliefs and Attitudes toward Information and Communication Technology: A Survey of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixia; Lin, Chin-Hsi; Zhang, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Though pedagogical beliefs have been identified as critical factors in the success of technology integration, very few studies have included them in technology-adoption models. The present study revises the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by adding teachers' pedagogical beliefs, and tests the revised model among university-level…

  5. IDENTIFYING MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS METRICS (Case study: East Azerbaijan`s industrial units)

    OpenAIRE

    Faridyahyaie, Reza; Faryabi, Mohammad; Bodaghi Khajeh Noubar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The Paper attempts to identify marketing eff ectiveness metrics in industrial units. The metrics investigated in this study are completely applicable and comprehensive, and consequently they can evaluate marketing eff ectiveness in various industries. The metrics studied include: Market Share, Profitability, Sales Growth, Customer Numbers, Customer Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty. The findings indicate that these six metrics are impressive when measuring marketing effectiveness. Data was ge...

  6. Identifying Treatment Effect Modifiers in the STarT Back Trial: A Secondary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M; Hill, Jonathan C; Campbell, Paul; Afolabi, Ebenezer; George, Steven Z; Dunn, Kate M; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-01-01

    Identification of patient characteristics influencing treatment outcomes is a top low back pain (LBP) research priority. Results from the STarT Back trial support the effectiveness of prognostic stratified care for LBP compared with current best care, however, patient characteristics associated with treatment response have not yet been explored. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to identify treatment effect modifiers within the STarT Back trial at 4-month follow-up (n = 688). Treatment response was dichotomized using back-specific physical disability measured using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (≥7). Candidate modifiers were identified using previous literature and evaluated using logistic regression with statistical interaction terms to provide preliminary evidence of treatment effect modification. Socioeconomic status (SES) was identified as an effect modifier for disability outcomes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71, P = .028). High SES patients receiving prognostic stratified care were 2.5 times less likely to have a poor outcome compared with low SES patients receiving best current care (OR = .40, P = .006). Education level (OR = 1.33, P = .109) and number of pain medications (OR = .64, P = .140) met our criteria for effect modification with weaker evidence (.20 > P ≥ .05). These findings provide preliminary evidence for SES, education, and number of pain medications as treatment effect modifiers of prognostic stratified care delivered in the STarT Back Trial. This analysis provides preliminary exploratory findings about the characteristics of patients who might least likely benefit from targeted treatment using prognostic stratified care for LBP. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying the Average Causal Mediation Effects with Multiple Mediators in the Presence of Treatment Non-Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soojin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the causal mechanisms is becoming more essential in social and medical sciences. In the presence of treatment non-compliance, the Intent-To-Treated effect (hereafter, ITT effect) is identified as long as the treatment is randomized (Angrist et al., 1996). However, the mediated portion of effect is not identified without additional…

  8. of students pedagogical skills to physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Bezverkhnya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to describe the motivation to physical education of pedagogical skills girls in the context of motivation to learn and motivation to succeed. Material and Methods: 90 second-year students of pedagogical specialties were researched (30 girls from pre-school education, philological and economic faculties Pavlo Tychyna Uman State Pedagogical University. Results: described the motivation of students in physical education by the analysis of involvement of subject and the target set. Student's motivation to learning activities and their level to success motivation were additionally investigated. Conclusions: is outlined reason of not formed internal motivation of students’ physical training in general psychological orientation of the girls that sufficiently shown in context of motivation to learn and progress.

  9. Narrative intelligence and pedagogical success in english

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishghadam, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study intends to investigate the relationship between English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers’ narrative intelligence and their pedagogical success. Eighty EFL teachers along with 673 EFL learners participated in this study. Narrative Intelligence Scale (NIS and the Characteristics of the Successful Teachers Questionnaire (CSTQ were utilized to gather data in this study. The results revealed that there exists a significant association between EFL teachers’ pedagogical success and their narrative intelligence. Moreover, Genre-ation, among the subscales of narrative intelligence, was found to be the best predictor of teacher success. Finally, the results were discussed and pedagogical implications were provided in the context of language learning and teaching

  10. The Success Criteria of Scientific Pedagogic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ovchinnikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of scientific pedagogic activity assessment of the higher school academic staff. The existing options of quality estimation are listed along with their deficiencies; the most acceptable in the authors’ opinion being the systematic approach. The latter allows considering almost every aspect of scientific-pedagogic activity. On that ground, the authors recommend the following success estimation criteria: gnostic, projecting, communicative, informational, and organizational. The criteria of work satisfaction and its results are taken into consideration as additional ones. The indicators of each criterion are given demonstrating that the as- sessment can be both internal (subjective and external (objective, denoted in the normative acts. The problem of complex and just quality assessment of scientific- pedagogic activity is quite relevant as it affects the academic staff motivation. The authors believe that the research findings can improve the objectivity of teachers’ work assessment and give way to differentiated approaches to their motivation and stimulation. 

  11. Effective use of forensic science in volume crime investigations: identifying recurring themes in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Anika; Fraser, Jim

    2014-01-01

    New scientific, technological and legal developments, particularly the introduction of national databases for DNA and fingerprints, have led to increased use of forensic science in the investigation of crime. There is an assumption, and in some instances specific assertions, that such developments bring improvements either in broad criminal justice terms or more narrowly in terms of economic or practical efficiencies. The underlying presumption is that the new technological opportunities will be understood and effectively implemented. This research investigates whether such increases in activity have also been accompanied by improvements in the effective use of forensic science. A systematic review of thirty-six reports published (predominantly in England and Wales) since the 1980s, which have considered the use of forensic science in the investigation of volume crimes, was carried out. These reports have identified a number of recurrent themes that influenced how effectively forensic science was used in investigations. The themes identified included forensic knowledge and training of investigators, communication and information exchange between specialists and investigators, timeliness of forensic results, interagency relationships and deployment of crime scene examiner resources. The research findings suggest that these factors continue to hinder the effective use of forensic science despite technological advances and this paper considers their potential causes. © 2013.

  12. Ex vivo analysis identifies effective HIV-1 latency–reversing drug combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Gregory M.; Bullen, C. Korin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Martin, Alyssa R.; Hill, Alison L.; Durand, Christine M.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Reversal of HIV-1 latency by small molecules is a potential cure strategy. This approach will likely require effective drug combinations to achieve high levels of latency reversal. Using resting CD4+ T cells (rCD4s) from infected individuals, we developed an experimental and theoretical framework to identify effective latency-reversing agent (LRA) combinations. Utilizing ex vivo assays for intracellular HIV-1 mRNA and virion production, we compared 2-drug combinations of leading candidate LRAs and identified multiple combinations that effectively reverse latency. We showed that protein kinase C agonists in combination with bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 or histone deacetylase inhibitors robustly induce HIV-1 transcription and virus production when directly compared with maximum reactivation by T cell activation. Using the Bliss independence model to quantitate combined drug effects, we demonstrated that these combinations synergize to induce HIV-1 transcription. This robust latency reversal occurred without release of proinflammatory cytokines by rCD4s. To extend the clinical utility of our findings, we applied a mathematical model that estimates in vivo changes in plasma HIV-1 RNA from ex vivo measurements of virus production. Our study reconciles diverse findings from previous studies, establishes a quantitative experimental approach to evaluate combinatorial LRA efficacy, and presents a model to predict in vivo responses to LRAs. PMID:25822022

  13. Identifying influential spreaders in complex networks through local effective spreading paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Xue; Yi, Dongyun; Zhao, Chengli

    2017-05-01

    How to effectively identify a set of influential spreaders in complex networks is of great theoretical and practical value, which can help to inhibit the rapid spread of epidemics, promote the sales of products by word-of-mouth advertising, and so on. A naive strategy is to select the top ranked nodes as identified by some centrality indices, and other strategies are mainly based on greedy methods and heuristic methods. However, most of those approaches did not concern the connections between nodes. Usually, the distances between the selected spreaders are very close, leading to a serious overlapping of their influence. As a consequence, the global influence of the spreaders in networks will be greatly reduced, which largely restricts the performance of those methods. In this paper, a simple and efficient method is proposed to identify a set of discrete yet influential spreaders. By analyzing the spreading paths in the network, we present the concept of effective spreading paths and measure the influence of nodes via expectation calculation. The numerical analysis in undirected and directed networks all show that our proposed method outperforms many other centrality-based and heuristic benchmarks, especially in large-scale networks. Besides, experimental results on different spreading models and parameters demonstrates the stability and wide applicability of our method.

  14. Pedagogical quality in e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The article is concerned with design and use of e-learning technology to develop education qualitatively. The purpose is to develop a framework for a pedagogical evaluation of e-learning technology. The approach is that evaluation and design must be grounded in a learning theoretical approach....... Finally, on the basis of the frameworks, the article discusses e-learning technology and, more specifically, design of virtual learning environments and learning objects. It is argued that e-learning technology is not pedagogically neutral, and that it is therefore necessary to focus on design...

  15. Teacher - the central figure of the pedagogical process (the historical and pedagogical aspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnik I.A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article based on the study of historical and educational literature and creative heritage of teachers of classic grounded theory of the formation and development of the individual teacher in accordance with the social ideals are summarized psycho-pedagogical model of Ukrainian teachers, defined its characteristics and requirements for the implementation of their professional duties. It is defined that psychological pedagogical model of Ukrainian teacher demand a high level of national consciousness, basic knowledge of the history of Ukraine and Ukrainian psycho-pedagogical thought.

  16. PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT OF FORMATION OF MORAL AWARENESS OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksana F. Hodko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to consider the features of pedagogical support of the formation of moral awareness of students, its main components and principles, to describe the components of the professional culture of the teacher, to determine the pedagogical conditions of development of moral awareness of students on the basis of the realization of the principle of the educative training of modern specialists.Methods. Methods involve comparative analysis of literary sources, analysis of documents, systematization and generalization of theoretical material, logicaland-historical analysis, causal analysis, functional analysis, system-andstructural analysis.Results. It is shown that the global goal of modern high school is the formation of a constructive, creative personality, embodying a highly qualified specialist, a good family man, a conscious citizen and patriot of his/her homeland, responsible for its present and future. The importance of ideological and educational functions of the teacher significantly increases and is aimed at updating the ideological position of student, his professional, civic, and spiritual-and-moral formation. Moral development of personality is a process of the formation and changing of the individual as the subject of morality, involving the development of individual systems of moral values on the basis of the adoption of moral experience of mankind, which is the evidence of moral self-affirmation and personal integrity. Modern social-and-cultural conditions require updating the content, forms and methods of education in an establishment of higher education with the reorientation from the traditional educational work to personal-oriented educational process based on the use of active (interactive pedagogical tools. An important requirement for effective organization of educational process of students is the realization of proved organizational and psycho-pedagogical conditions. Wellorganized process of education

  17. Effects of Changing the Pedagogical Concept of a Part-time BSc in Accounting from Traditional Lectures into an IT-supported Asyncronous and Flexible Learning Concept - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tage; Holm, Claus; Dalgas, Annemarie

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a change of the pedagogical concept in the second part of a four-year BSc program in Accounting. The program started September 1 1999 when 82 students were enrolled. The change involves a move from traditional lectures to a concept partly based on asynchronous...

  18. PhD Research Proposal: How can effective Self-Directed-Learning be designed in an educational-pedagogic perspective for the Faculty of Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jong

    2005-01-01

    The research methodology will be developmental research, defined as ‘The systematic study of designing, developing and evaluating instructional programs, processes and products that must meet the criteria of internal consistency and effectiveness.’ (Richey and Nelson, 1996, p. 1213). Using this kind

  19. A Study of Principals' Instructional Leadership Behaviors and Beliefs of Good Pedagogical Practice among Effective California High Schools Serving Socioeconomically Disadvantaged and English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peariso, Jamon Frederick

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods descriptive and causal-comparative study investigates what instructional leadership behaviors effective California high school principals have and what their beliefs are in regards to pedagogy, related issues, and professional issues, either constructivist or instructivist in nature, in the environment of the current NCLB…

  20. Identifying potentially cost effective chronic care programs for people with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M G Steuten

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available L M G Steuten1, K M M Lemmens2, A P Nieboer2, H JM Vrijhoef31Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Health, Organisation, Policy and Economics, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Institute of Health Policy and Management, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Integrated Care, Maastricht, The NetherlandsObjective: To review published evidence regarding the cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs and to illustrate how potentially cost effective programs can be identified.Methods: Systematic search of Medline and Cochrane databases for evaluations of multi-component disease management or chronic care programs for adults with COPD, describing process, intermediate, and end results of care. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers and descriptively summarized.Results: Twenty articles describing 17 unique COPD programs were included. There is little evidence for significant improvements in process and intermediate outcomes, except for increased provision of patient self-management education and improved disease-specific knowledge. Overall, the COPD programs generate end results equivalent to usual care, but programs containing ≥3 components show lower relative risks for hospitalization. There is limited scope for programs to break-even or save money.Conclusion: Identifying cost effective multi-component COPD programs remains a challenge due to scarce methodologically sound studies that demonstrate significant improvements on process, intermediate and end results of care. Estimations of potential cost effectiveness of specific programs illustrated in this paper can, in the absence of ‘perfect data’, support timely decision-making regarding these programs. Nevertheless, well-designed health economic studies are needed to decrease the current decision

  1. Effectively identifying regulatory hotspots while capturing expression heterogeneity in gene expression studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping is a tool that can systematically identify genetic variation affecting gene expression. eQTL mapping studies have shown that certain genomic locations, referred to as regulatory hotspots, may affect the expression levels of many genes. Recently, studies have shown that various confounding factors may induce spurious regulatory hotspots. Here, we introduce a novel statistical method that effectively eliminates spurious hotspots while retaining genuine hotspots. Applied to simulated and real datasets, we validate that our method achieves greater sensitivity while retaining low false discovery rates compared to previous methods. PMID:24708878

  2. Pedagogical Beliefs and Attitudes of Computer Science Teachers in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessakis, Georgios; Karakiza, Tsampika

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogical beliefs and attitudes significantly determine the professional skills and practice of teachers. Many professional development programs for teachers aim to the elaboration of the pedagogical knowledge in order to improve teaching quality. This paper presents the study of pedagogical beliefs of computer science teachers in Greece. The…

  3. Didactical And Ethics Demands For Automated Pedagogical Diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kolgatin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Didactical demands for pedagogical diagnostics and its realisation specific characters under conditions of active using of ICT in instruction process of universities are analysed. The ethics questions of pedagogical diagnostics are considered. Ethic aspects, connected with using of the automated pedagogical diagnostic systems, are underlined.

  4. Calibrated photostimulated luminescence is an effective approach to identify irradiated orange during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yunhee; Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chung, Namhyeok; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Park, Yunji; Park, Hae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) has been employed as a fast screening method for various irradiated foods. In this study the potential use of PSL was evaluated to identify oranges irradiated with gamma ray, electron beam and X-ray (0–2 kGy) and stored under different conditions for 6 weeks. The effects of light conditions (natural light, artificial light, and dark) and storage temperatures (4 and 20 °C) on PSL photon counts (PCs) during post-irradiation periods were studied. Non-irradiated samples always showed negative values of PCs, while irradiated oranges exhibited intermediate results after first PSL measurements. However, the irradiated samples had much higher PCs. The PCs of all the samples declined as the storage time increased. Calibrated second PSL measurements showed PSL ratio <10 for the irradiated samples after 3 weeks of irradiation confirming their irradiation status in all the storage conditions. Calibrated PSL and sample storage in dark at 4 °C were found out to be most suitable approaches to identify irradiated oranges during storage. - Highlights: • Photostimulatedluminescence (PSL) was studied to identify irradiated orange for quarantine application. • PSL detection efficiency was compared amonggamma,electron, and X irradiation during shelf-life of oranges • PSL properties of samples were characterized by standard samples • Calibrated PSL gave a clear verdict on irradiation extending potential of PSL technique

  5. Enhancing regulatory effectiveness by improving the process for identifying and resolving generic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vander Molen, Harold J.

    2001-01-01

    The Generic Issues Program first began formally in response to a Commission directive in October of 1976. In 1983, it became one of the first programs to make successful use of probabilistic risk information to aid in regulatory decision-making. In the 16 years since the program became quantitative, 836 issues have been processed. Of these, 106 reactor safety issues were prioritized as requiring further evaluation to determine the final resolution. Approximately a dozen generic issues remain unresolved. Although there is far less reactor licensing activity than in the 1970s, new issues continue to be identified from research and operational experience. These issues often involve complex and controversial questions of safety and regulation, and an efficient and effective means of addressing these issues is essential for regulatory effectiveness. Issues that involve a significant safety question require swift, effective, enforceable, and cost-effective regulatory actions. Issues that are of little safety significance must be quickly shown to be so and dismissed in an expeditious manner so as to avoid unnecessary expenditure of limited resources and to reduce regulatory uncertainty. Additionally, in the time since the generic issue program began, probabilistic risk assessment techniques have advanced significantly while agency resources have continued to diminish. Accordingly, the paper discusses the steps that have been taken to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the generic issue resolution process. Additionally, four resolved issues are discussed, along with key elements of a proposed new procedure for resolving potential generic issues

  6. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Impact of Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Motivation on Students' Achievement and Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Melanie M.; Neumann, Knut; Fischer, Hans E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines students' achievement and interest and the extent to which they are predicted by teacher knowledge and motivation. Student achievement and interest are both considered desirable outcomes of school instruction. Teacher pedagogical content knowledge has been identified a major predictor of student achievement in previous…

  8. A Review of Modeling Pedagogies: Pedagogical Functions, Discursive Acts, and Technology in Modeling Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok; Maughn, Milo; Kiriazis, Nick; Zuwallack, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The current review examined modeling literature in top science education journals to better understand the pedagogical functions of modeling instruction reported over the last decade. Additionally, the review sought to understand the extent to which different modeling pedagogies were employed, the discursive acts that were identified as important,…

  9. Understanding Teachers' Pedagogical Choice: A Sociological Framework Combining the Work of Bourdieu and Giddens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding teachers' pedagogical choice provides a new insight into the influences on student achievement. This paper presents a sociological framework developed from the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Anthony Giddens that identify the complex social interactions which surround teacher's work. The framework examines teachers' potential to act…

  10. Flexible Pedagogies: New Pedagogical Ideas. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alex; Tilbury, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    This publication is part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future". It identifies six "new pedagogical ideas" offering new pathways for learning. These include: (1) actively involving students in learning development and processes of "co-creation" thereby challenging existing…

  11. Psychological and Pedagogical Support of the Formation of Professional World Outlook of the University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillova, Olga V.; Kirillova, Tatyana V.; Abramova, Lyudmila A.; Gavrilova, Irina V.; Vaibert, Margarita I.

    2017-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by necessity of the accumulation of human capital as the main factor of economic growth. The purpose of this article is to identify methods of psychological and pedagogical support of formation of professional outlook of the university students. Methodological basis of the research was the principle of acmeology,…

  12. A Pedagogical Alliance for Trust, Wellbeing and the Identification of Errors for Learning and Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bustos Gómez, María Clara

    2018-01-01

    Formative assessments and feedback are vital to enhancing learning outcomes but require that learners feel at ease identifying their errors, and receiving feedback from a trusted source--teachers. An experimental test of a new theoretical framework was conducted to cultivate a pedagogical alliance to enhance students' (a) trust in the teacher, (b)…

  13. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis is an update to the 2005 Energy Efficiency Potential Study completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kauai (KEMA 2005). The Total Resource Cost (TRC) test is used to determine which of the energy efficiency measures analyzed in the KEMA report are cost effective for KIUC to include in a residential energy efficiency program. This report finds that there remains potential energy efficiency savings that could be cost-effectively incentivized through a utility residential demand-side management program on Kauai if implemented in such a way that the program costs per measure are consistent with the current residential program costs.

  14. Teaching social justice: Reframing some common pedagogical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on scholarship in Critical Pedagogy, this article speaks to the debate about pedagogical approaches within social justice education (SJE). The article addresses itself to privileged positionality within the context of university-based SJE, with a specific focus on race and whiteness. As a conceptual piece, it addresses ...

  15. Pedagogical discourses in Bhutanese upper secondary schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer; Utha, Karma

    2017-01-01

    two pedagogical discourses in our analysis of the Bhutanese school system: The traditional cognitive learning discourse and an alternative, experience-based discourse. The theoretical framework is then used in our analysis of empirical data from classroom observations and semi-structured interviews...

  16. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Industrial Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kenneth R.; De Miranda, Michael A.; Shin, Jinseup

    2009-01-01

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been embraced by many of the recent educational reform documents as a way of describing the knowledge possessed by expert teachers. These reform documents have also served as guides for educators to develop models of teacher development. However, in the United States, few if any of the current models…

  17. Visual Stereotypes and Virtual Pedagogical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, Magnus; Gulz, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of visual stereotypes in virtual pedagogical agents and its potential impact in digital learning environments. An analysis of the concept of visual stereotypes is followed by a discussion of affordances and drawbacks as to their use in the context of traditional media. Next, the paper explores whether virtual…

  18. A Pedagogical Approach to Detective Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    One of the main concerns when teaching a foreign language is how to encourage students to read and become interested in its literature. This article presents detective fiction as a pedagogical tool that provides the key elements to make it appealing for young readers. In this way, the mystery, the action and the suspense in the story; the figure…

  19. Critical Revolutionary Pedagogy Spiced by Pedagogical Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzSimmons, Robert; Uusiautti, Satu

    2013-01-01

    The latest incidents demonstrating human beings' inhumanity to their fellow human beings have given impetus to dissect the connection between critical revolutionary pedagogy and the idea of pedagogical love. In this essay we attempt to answer the following questions: How do these two pedagogies complement each other? What can they offer for…

  20. [The room of errors, fun and pedagogical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Pascale; Fortier, Élise; Grenier, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Simulation in health care opens the way for innovative pedagogical developments particularly well suited to the training of nursing teams. It is ideal for acquiring or reinforcing knowledge, without any risk to patients, in a climate which facilitates exchanges. In this article, users share their experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Pedagogical Pleasures: Augustine in the Feminist Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinksi, Maggie A.

    2017-01-01

    Many feminist philosophers of education have argued that the teacher's pleasure plays an important role in the classroom. However, accessing such pleasure is often easier said than done. Given our current academic climate, how might teachers develop pedagogical practices that cultivate these delights? This article investigates the (rather…

  2. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  3. Online Instructors: Andragogical or Pedagogical Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Kania-Gosche, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the andragogical and pedagogical teaching philosophies of online instructors at the California State University, Long Beach in the Spring Semester of 2010. Drawing from reflective adult education theory, this article proposes a new model for this reflective adult education theory. It is either the helping relationship…

  4. Pedagogical Relationship in Secondary Social Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Brian James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates two high school social science classrooms in order to better understand the pedagogical relationships among teachers, students, and disciplinary content, and how teachers can influence students' opportunities to learn disciplinary literacy. Drawing on conceptual resources from sociocultural theories of learning and…

  5. The Three Pedagogical Dimensions of Nietzsche's Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloni, Nimrod

    1989-01-01

    Nietzche is presented as a counternihilistic philosopher-educator who explored cultural conditions and ways of life that could lift man to higher modes of existence. Three pedagogical dimensions of Nietzsche's work are explored: recovery of health and worth as education's aim, endorsement of holistic education, harmonious combination of themes and…

  6. Exploring pedagogical possibilities for transformative approaches to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How can research on academic literacies throw light on the challenge to widen access to undergraduate science studies? This article explores what an academic literacies approach might mean in the context of undergraduate physics. The study examines the pedagogical practices and student learning in two ...

  7. CRISIS OF PEDAGOGICAL CULTURE AND SOME PROBLEMS OF THE MODERN PEDAGOGICAL THOUGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Asadullin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of content and forms of the dominating social relations caused the crisis of education; one of negative consequences of that crisis has become a gradual loss of the spiritual and moral bases of pedagogical culture. The possibilities of formation and realization of standards of behavior and work of teachers are discussed in the present publication based on culturological and axiological approaches to a phenomenon of this type of culture.The aim of the article is to determine the nature of the changes in the pedagogical culture of the teacher, reflected on the content of the theoretical and practical pedagogy.Methodology and research methods. The study is based on the philosophical-cultural analysis of the problems of formation and realization of pedagogical culture of norms in the context of the destabilization of modern axiological standards of professional teaching. We used the methods of theoretical research, including interdisciplinary analysis and synthesis of information from the philosophical, sociological, psychological and educational literature; empirical methods: the study of the experience of professional educational activities in a cultural context, questioning, interview.Results. The pedagogical culture of the teacher is characterized as the anthropomorphous practice which is putting forward a Person as the leading carrier of content of education and the main value. Research thesis on the declared range of problems of the Russian and foreign authors are presented. The changes in cultural practice and discursive formations in education are established; the difference of classical and modern understanding of pedagogical culture is stated. The role and value of pedagogical science in formation of a new view on essence of professional culture of the teacher in the conditions of crisis of the anthropocentric absolutes are considered.The authors set changes in cultural practices and discursive formations that distinguish the

  8. Exploring the effects of spatial autocorrelation when identifying key drivers of wildlife crop-raiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songhurst, Anna; Coulson, Tim

    2014-03-01

    Few universal trends in spatial patterns of wildlife crop-raiding have been found. Variations in wildlife ecology and movements, and human spatial use have been identified as causes of this apparent unpredictability. However, varying spatial patterns of spatial autocorrelation (SA) in human-wildlife conflict (HWC) data could also contribute. We explicitly explore the effects of SA on wildlife crop-raiding data in order to facilitate the design of future HWC studies. We conducted a comparative survey of raided and nonraided fields to determine key drivers of crop-raiding. Data were subsampled at different spatial scales to select independent raiding data points. The model derived from all data was fitted to subsample data sets. Model parameters from these models were compared to determine the effect of SA. Most methods used to account for SA in data attempt to correct for the change in P-values; yet, by subsampling data at broader spatial scales, we identified changes in regression estimates. We consequently advocate reporting both model parameters across a range of spatial scales to help biological interpretation. Patterns of SA vary spatially in our crop-raiding data. Spatial distribution of fields should therefore be considered when choosing the spatial scale for analyses of HWC studies. Robust key drivers of elephant crop-raiding included raiding history of a field and distance of field to a main elephant pathway. Understanding spatial patterns and determining reliable socio-ecological drivers of wildlife crop-raiding is paramount for designing mitigation and land-use planning strategies to reduce HWC. Spatial patterns of HWC are complex, determined by multiple factors acting at more than one scale; therefore, studies need to be designed with an understanding of the effects of SA. Our methods are accessible to a variety of practitioners to assess the effects of SA, thereby improving the reliability of conservation management actions.

  9. Pedagogical Practice and Postmodernist Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Cynthia; Palmer, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Identifies four postmodern themes: complicated identities, the demise of the individual as expert, constraints on individual actions, and postmodern organizations as dream and nightmare. Outlines management-class exercises that illustrate ambiguities and paradoxes in the themes. (SK)

  10. EDUCATIONAL EVENT AS THE PEDAGOGICAL CATEGORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor V. Lobanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to reveal the essence of the educational event as a pedagogical category. The reason to study the issue is the methodological generality of the term that came into pedagogical everyday life, but which semantic content is still not clear enough. Methods. The methods involve a theoretical analysis of the philosophical and pedagogical literature on the study, the categorical analysis, surveys of students and teachers. Results. The concept content of «event» is looked upon in both historical scholarship and pedagogy, «educational event» is analyzed in unity with the «educational situation» and «educational process». The attitude of students and teachers to educational events was clarified through the surveys; emotional and rational responses of the respondents were differentiated and the peculiarities of events organization in the education system were classified. While teachers and students are considered as subjects of educational events, their goals are delineated. Scientific novelty. The author's own definition of is given. Educational event is defined as a specially organized and unique pedagogical fact limited, but not rigidly determined by the educational situation, and capable of changing the educational process going beyond the boundaries of its conformism. The formulation above is the result of analysis how the concepts of «event», «situation» and «process» may interact in pedagogical discourse. Practical significance. The results can be used while designing the educational programs and projects, as well as in the development of academic courses of innovative pedagogy. 

  11. A qualitative case study to identify possible barriers that limit effective elementary science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Donald Carey

    The purpose of this case study was to identify barriers that limit the effectiveness of elementary teachers in the teaching of science. It is of the utmost urgency that barriers be first identified, so that possible solutions can be explored to bring about the improvement of elementary science education. This urgency has been imposed by the scheduled national testing of students in science by 2007, as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Using qualitative case study methods, the researcher conducted interviews with 8 elementary teachers from two schools within one school district who taught 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade. These interviews were designed to gain insight into barriers these elementary teachers perceived as factors limiting their effectiveness in teaching science and preparing students for high-stakes testing. Barriers in the areas of teacher background, typical teaching day, curriculum, inservices, and legislative influences were explored. This study concluded that the barriers explored do have a substantial negative affect on the teaching and learning of science in the elementary grades. Specifically, the barriers revealed in this study include the limited science background of elementary teachers, inadequate class time devoted to science, non-comprehensive curriculum, ineffective or lack of inservice training, and pressures from legislated mandates. But it is also clear that these barriers are so intertwined that one cannot remove these barriers one at a time. It will take a collective effort from all involved, including legislators, administrators, teachers, parents, and students, to alleviate these barriers and discover effective solutions to improve elementary science education.

  12. A systematic review of serious games in medical education: quality of evidence and pedagogical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Agudelo-Londoño, Sandra; González, Rafael A; Cortes, Ariel; Pomares, Alexandra; Delgadillo, Vivian; Yepes, Francisco J; Muñoz, Óscar

    2018-12-01

    The literature shows an optimistic landscape for the effectiveness of games in medical education. Nevertheless, games are not considered mainstream material in medical teaching. Two research questions that arise are the following: What pedagogical strategies do developers use when creating games for medical education? And what is the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of games? A systematic review was made by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers following the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. We included peer-reviewed journal articles which described or assessed the use of serious games or gamified apps in medical education. We used the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) to assess the quality of evidence in the use of games. We also evaluated the pedagogical perspectives of such articles. Even though game developers claim that games are useful pedagogical tools, the evidence on their effectiveness is moderate, as assessed by the MERSQI score. Behaviourism and cognitivism continue to be the predominant pedagogical strategies, and games are complementary devices that do not replace traditional medical teaching tools. Medical educators prefer simulations and quizzes focused on knowledge retention and skill development through repetition and do not demand the use of sophisticated games in their classrooms. Moreover, public access to medical games is limited. Our aim was to put the pedagogical strategy into dialogue with the evidence on the effectiveness of the use of medical games. This makes sense since the practical use of games depends on the quality of the evidence about their effectiveness. Moreover, recognition of said pedagogical strategy would allow game developers to design more robust games which would greatly contribute to the learning process.

  13. A systematic review of serious games in medical education: quality of evidence and pedagogical strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Agudelo-Londoño, Sandra; González, Rafael A.; Cortes, Ariel; Pomares, Alexandra; Delgadillo, Vivian; Yepes, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Óscar

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The literature shows an optimistic landscape for the effectiveness of games in medical education. Nevertheless, games are not considered mainstream material in medical teaching. Two research questions that arise are the following: What pedagogical strategies do developers use when creating games for medical education? And what is the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of games? Methods: A systematic review was made by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers following the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. We included peer-reviewed journal articles which described or assessed the use of serious games or gamified apps in medical education. We used the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) to assess the quality of evidence in the use of games. We also evaluated the pedagogical perspectives of such articles. Results: Even though game developers claim that games are useful pedagogical tools, the evidence on their effectiveness is moderate, as assessed by the MERSQI score. Behaviourism and cognitivism continue to be the predominant pedagogical strategies, and games are complementary devices that do not replace traditional medical teaching tools. Medical educators prefer simulations and quizzes focused on knowledge retention and skill development through repetition and do not demand the use of sophisticated games in their classrooms. Moreover, public access to medical games is limited. Discussion: Our aim was to put the pedagogical strategy into dialogue with the evidence on the effectiveness of the use of medical games. This makes sense since the practical use of games depends on the quality of the evidence about their effectiveness. Moreover, recognition of said pedagogical strategy would allow game developers to design more robust games which would greatly contribute to the learning process. PMID:29457760

  14. Children’s Books as Pedagogical Tools to Minimize Latrophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motz Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Latrophobia, defined as the morbid and irrational fear of doctors or hospitals, makes medical or hospital visits extremely challenging for those who suffer from it. For many people, the cause of Latrophobia or its milder forms, including dislike and anxiety, is often rooted in childhood. Therefore, a large number of children's books deal with and illustrate the topic of a “doctor’s visit”, in order to reduce the anxiety through pedagogical methods combined in the narrative. The aim of the study is to investigate the extent to which selected children's books highlight latrophobia and try to reduce it by educational means. One focus is an analysis and an evaluation of the individual works combined with a comparison of the different methods of individual books. The main aim is to prove that children’s books can have the capability to reduce latrophobia. Materials and methods. The research examines 10 international children’s books dealing with doctor (dental visits. A field test covering 63 children (21 with potential latrophobia provides information for pedagogical values within these books. Furthermore, a subjective assessment combined with the ongoing survey filters (unvaluable methods and approaches. Results. More than half of the 21 children showed improved results concerning their feeling of being afraid before and after reading the book(s. Nevertheless, the assessment of the books showed that there are strong differences concerning the approach of “anxiety”. The methods used in the stories to reduce anxiety are numerous, debatable (in terms of success, and even frightening (from the perspective of child readers. The pictures and the atmosphere of the story can be pointed out as major factors for pedagogically valuable content. Conclusions. Although a major part of the examined books leveraged to reduce latrophobia, there are also some books which showed no or even worse effect. Due to the depicted representations of anxiety in

  15. Identifying treatment effect heterogeneity in clinical trials using subpopulations of events: STEPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Ann A; Bonetti, Marco; Cole, Bernard F; Yip, Wai-Ki; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    Investigators conducting randomized clinical trials often explore treatment effect heterogeneity to assess whether treatment efficacy varies according to patient characteristics. Identifying heterogeneity is central to making informed personalized healthcare decisions. Treatment effect heterogeneity can be investigated using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP), a non-parametric graphical approach that constructs overlapping patient subpopulations with varying values of a characteristic. Procedures for statistical testing using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot when the endpoint of interest is survival remain an area of active investigation. A STEPP analysis was used to explore patterns of absolute and relative treatment effects for varying levels of a breast cancer biomarker, Ki-67, in the phase III Breast International Group 1-98 randomized clinical trial, comparing letrozole to tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Absolute treatment effects were measured by differences in 4-year cumulative incidence of breast cancer recurrence, while relative effects were measured by the subdistribution hazard ratio in the presence of competing risks using O-E (observed-minus-expected) methodology, an intuitive non-parametric method. While estimation of hazard ratio values based on O-E methodology has been shown, a similar development for the subdistribution hazard ratio has not. Furthermore, we observed that the subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot analysis may not produce results, even with 100 patients within each subpopulation. After further investigation through simulation studies, we observed inflation of the type I error rate of the traditional test statistic and sometimes singular variance-covariance matrix estimates that may lead to results not being produced. This is due to the lack of sufficient number of events within the subpopulations, which we refer to as instability of

  16. The Essence of the Concept “Ethno-Pedagogical Competence”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botakoz A. Zhekibaeva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discloses the nature and content of the notion “ethno-pedagogical competence”, based on a study of scientific works of Russian and foreign researchers. The analysis of these works shows that ethno-pedagogical competence as a scientific and pedagogical problem is disclosed in the ethno-pedagogical concept and is associated with the development of ethno-pedagogical science. The article presents an analysis of the definitions of “ethno-pedagogical competence” by several scientists; it discloses the driving conditions of the development of ethno-pedagogical competence in modern pedagogical science. The necessity of forming ethno-pedagogical competences as part of the training process of the future teachers at the university has been proven. The article defines more precisely the notion of “ethno-pedagogical competence of future teachers”, which is considered to be a set of integrative professionally significant personal qualities, contributing to the implementation of ethno-pedagogical knowledge, skills and professional experience in the conditions of a multi-ethnic educational environment.

  17. Identifying Effective and Sustainable Measures for Community-Based Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Ariana J.; Johnson, Chris J.

    2017-09-01

    Resource development projects typically result in monitoring programs that fail to fully consider the values and participation of surrounding communities. Also, monitoring protocols for single environmental values can be insufficient for addressing the cumulative impacts of resource development. Community-based environmental monitoring (CBEM) has emerged as a way to meaningfully include local citizens in the decision-making process and assessment of the development of natural resources. Our research explored how to develop effective and sustainable CBEM. Interviews were conducted with staff from 15 CBEM programs established across Canada to identify criteria of what constitutes effective CBEM. Results demonstrate that CBEM offers an effective, locally adapted, and culturally applicable approach to facilitate community participation in natural resource management and to track environmental change. Benefits of CBEM include: locally relevant monitoring protocols, inclusion of cumulative impacts, better informed decision-making, and increased awareness and collaboration amongst community, governments, and proponents. Challenges associated with CBEM are cost, capacity, longevity, distribution of results, and establishing credibility. This research validates the use of CBEM for improving resource management.

  18. High-speed kymography identifies the immediate effects of voiced vibration in healthy vocal folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenta, Regina Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of voiced vibration technique can be assessed by laryngeal imaging. Kymographic images derived from high-speed videoendoscopy allow actual visualization of vocal folds vibration. Purpose: The aim of this study is to identify the immediate effects of the voiced vibration technique in healthy vocal folds using high-speed digital laryngeal imaging. Methods: Samples were obtained from 15 healthy subjects with no history of voice disorders (6 men and 9 women aged 21 to 43 years. High-speed videoendoscopy recordings were performed before and after the voiced vibration technique. Kymographic images were obtained using high-speed videoendoscopy. The vocal folds were examined in their open and closed positions and the characteristics of the opening and closing phases were determined. A customize computational routine was used quantify these parameters. The closing, opening, and speed quotients were also calculated. Results: In this study, women displayed statistically significant differences in opened phase (P= 0.05*, closed phase (P= 0.046*, and closing phase (P= 0.026* phase characteristics. Men displayed the highest difference rate in opening time characteristics (P= 0.06. The closing and opening quotients for the female group showed significant differences (P= 0.029* and P= 0.049*, respectively. The speed quotient exhibited statistically significant differences in the male group (P= 0.048*. Conclusion: The kymographic images indicated that the immediate effect of the voiced vibration technique was smooth contact in healthy vocal fold vibration.

  19. Comparing spatially explicit ecological and social values for natural areas to identify effective conservation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Brett Anthony; Raymond, Christopher Mark; Crossman, Neville David; King, Darran

    2011-02-01

    Consideration of the social values people assign to relatively undisturbed native ecosystems is critical for the success of science-based conservation plans. We used an interview process to identify and map social values assigned to 31 ecosystem services provided by natural areas in an agricultural landscape in southern Australia. We then modeled the spatial distribution of 12 components of ecological value commonly used in setting spatial conservation priorities. We used the analytical hierarchy process to weight these components and used multiattribute utility theory to combine them into a single spatial layer of ecological value. Social values assigned to natural areas were negatively correlated with ecological values overall, but were positively correlated with some components of ecological value. In terms of the spatial distribution of values, people valued protected areas, whereas those natural areas underrepresented in the reserve system were of higher ecological value. The habitats of threatened animal species were assigned both high ecological value and high social value. Only small areas were assigned both high ecological value and high social value in the study area, whereas large areas of high ecological value were of low social value, and vice versa. We used the assigned ecological and social values to identify different conservation strategies (e.g., information sharing, community engagement, incentive payments) that may be effective for specific areas. We suggest that consideration of both ecological and social values in selection of conservation strategies can enhance the success of science-based conservation planning. ©2010 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. Calibrated photostimulated luminescence is an effective approach to identify irradiated orange during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yunhee; Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chung, Namhyeok; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Park, Yunji; Park, Hae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) has been employed as a fast screening method for various irradiated foods. In this study the potential use of PSL was evaluated to identify oranges irradiated with gamma ray, electron beam and X-ray (0-2 kGy) and stored under different conditions for 6 weeks. The effects of light conditions (natural light, artificial light, and dark) and storage temperatures (4 and 20 °C) on PSL photon counts (PCs) during post-irradiation periods were studied. Non-irradiated samples always showed negative values of PCs, while irradiated oranges exhibited intermediate results after first PSL measurements. However, the irradiated samples had much higher PCs. The PCs of all the samples declined as the storage time increased. Calibrated second PSL measurements showed PSL ratio <10 for the irradiated samples after 3 weeks of irradiation confirming their irradiation status in all the storage conditions. Calibrated PSL and sample storage in dark at 4 °C were found out to be most suitable approaches to identify irradiated oranges during storage.

  1. Functional and effective whole brain connectivity using magnetoencephalography to identify monozygotic twin pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuru, M; Gouw, A A; Hillebrand, A; Stam, C J; van Dijk, B W; Scheltens, P; Tijms, B M; Konijnenberg, E; Ten Kate, M; den Braber, A; Smit, D J A; Boomsma, D I; Visser, P J

    2017-08-29

    Resting-state functional connectivity patterns are highly stable over time within subjects. This suggests that such 'functional fingerprints' may have strong genetic component. We investigated whether the functional (FC) or effective (EC) connectivity patterns of one monozygotic twin could be used to identify the co-twin among a larger sample and determined the overlap in functional fingerprints within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs using resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG). We included 32 cognitively normal MZ twin pairs from the Netherlands Twin Register who participate in the EMIF-AD preclinAD study (average age 68 years). Combining EC information across multiple frequency bands we obtained an identification rate over 75%. Since MZ twin pairs are genetically identical these results suggest a high genetic contribution to MEG-based EC patterns, leading to large similarities in brain connectivity patterns between two individuals even after 60 years of life or more.

  2. Effect of Friction-Induced Nonlinearity on OMA-Identified Dynamic Characteristics of Offshore Platform Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Tobias; Orfanos, Antonios; Katsanos, Evangelos

    The identification of the modal characteristics of engineering systems under operational conditions is commonly conducted with the use of the Operational Modal Analysis (OMA), being a class of useful tools employed within various fields of structural, mechanical as well as marine and naval...... engineering. The current OMA methods have been advanced on the basis of two fundamental, though, restrictive assumptions: (i) linearity and (ii) stationarity. Nevertheless, there are several applications that are inherently related to various nonlinear mechanisms, which, in turn, violate the two cornerstones...... of OMA and hence, question its robustness and efficiency. Along these lines, the current study addresses the effect of friction-induced nonlinearity on OMA-identified dynamic characteristics of an experimental set up consisting of a pair of reduced scale offshore platform models that are connected...

  3. Effect of the size of an artificial neural network used as pattern identifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynoso V, M.R.; Vega C, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    A novel way to extract relevant parameters associated with the outgoing ions from nuclear reactions, obtained by digitizing the signals provided by a Bragg curve spectrometer (BCS) is presented. This allowed the implementation of a more thorough pulse-shape analysis. Due to the complexity of this task, it was required to take advantage of new and more powerful computational paradigms. This was fulfilled using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) as a pattern identifier. Over training of ANNs is a common problem during the training stage. In the performance of the ANN there is a compromise between its size and the size of the training set. Here, this effect will be illustrated in relation to the problem of Bragg Curve (BC) identification. (Author)

  4. Effect of the size of an artificial neural network used as pattern identifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoso V, M.R.; Vega C, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A novel way to extract relevant parameters associated with the outgoing ions from nuclear reactions, obtained by digitizing the signals provided by a Bragg curve spectrometer (BCS) is presented. This allowed the implementation of a more thorough pulse-shape analysis. Due to the complexity of this task, it was required to take advantage of new and more powerful computational paradigms. This was fulfilled using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) as a pattern identifier. Over training of ANNs is a common problem during the training stage. In the performance of the ANN there is a compromise between its size and the size of the training set. Here, this effect will be illustrated in relation to the problem of Bragg Curve (BC) identification. (Author)

  5. Identifying the effects of parameter uncertainty on the reliability of riverbank stability modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, A.; Amiri-Tokaldany, E.; Darby, S. E.

    2009-05-01

    Bank retreat is a key process in fluvial dynamics affecting a wide range of physical, ecological and socioeconomic issues in the fluvial environment. To predict the undesirable effects of bank retreat and to inform effective measures to prevent it, a wide range of bank stability models have been presented in the literature. These models typically express bank stability by defining a factor of safety as the ratio of driving and resisting forces acting on the incipient failure block. These forces are affected by a range of controlling factors that include such aspects as the bank profile (bank height and angle), the geotechnical properties of the bank materials, as well as the hydrological status of the riverbanks. In this paper we evaluate the extent to which uncertainties in the parameterization of these controlling factors feed through to influence the reliability of the resulting bank stability estimate. This is achieved by employing a simple model of riverbank stability with respect to planar failure (which is the most common type of bank stability model) in a series of sensitivity tests and Monte Carlo analyses to identify, for each model parameter, the range of values that induce significant changes in the simulated factor of safety. These identified parameter value ranges are compared to empirically derived parameter uncertainties to determine whether they are likely to confound the reliability of the resulting bank stability calculations. Our results show that parameter uncertainties are typically high enough that the likelihood of generating unreliable predictions is typically very high (> ˜ 80% for predictions requiring a precision of < ± 15%). Because parameter uncertainties are derived primarily from the natural variability of the parameters, rather than measurement errors, much more careful attention should be paid to field sampling strategies, such that the parameter uncertainties and consequent prediction unreliabilities can be quantified more

  6. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Ashley J.; Drozda, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several compounds with significant antiparasitic activities. Among these were pimozide and tamoxifen, which are well-characterized drugs prescribed to treat patients with psychiatric disorders and breast cancer

  7. Identifying and prioritizing the factors effective in customer satisfaction using the TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Forougozar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Customer satisfaction has been suggested as one of the interesting and challenging issues of management in the new millennium. In addition, oral and dental health and the quality of the services the health centers delivered to the patients directly affect the customer satisfaction. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify, investigate, and rank the factors affecting the customer satisfaction in the department of dentistry of Shiraz Farhangiyan health center. Method: The present descriptive study was conducted on the specialists and patients of the department of dentistry of Shiraz Farhangiyan health center. The validity of the questionnaire utilized in the study was confirmed by expert professors and its reliability was approved using the Cronbach’s alpha formula. Finally, the study data were analyzed in SPSS statistical software (v. 16, using inferential statistics. Results: All the hypotheses were confirmed by the results of the statistical analyses and quality, services, and expenditures revealed to affect the customer satisfaction in the department of dentistry of Shiraz Farhangiyan health center. Moreover, these factors were ranked using the TOPSIS method and the results showed quality and expenditures as the most and the least effective factors in customer satisfaction, respectively. Conclusion: Since restoring and arranging the organization based on the customer needs is among the main priorities of designing an organization, managers are suggested to take measures for organizational reformation based on the customers’ priorities. Of course, conducting such programs is of utmost importance in health and treatment environments, leading to provision of better services and facilitation of learning, education, and research. Thus, identifying the effective factors in customer satisfaction and ranking them are highly important.

  8. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

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    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  9. Improving healthcare practice behaviors: an exploratory study identifying effective and ineffective behaviors in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fleet, David D; Peterson, Tim O

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of exploratory research designed to develop an awareness of healthcare behaviors, with a view toward improving the customer satisfaction with healthcare services. It examines the relationship between healthcare providers and their consumers/patients/clients. The study uses a critical incident methodology, with both effective and ineffective behavioral specimens examined across different provider groups. The effects of these different behaviors on what Berry (1999) identified as the common core values of service organizations are examined, as those values are required to build a lasting service relationship. Also examined are categories of healthcare practice based on the National Quality Strategy priorities. The most obvious is the retrospective nature of the method used. How accurate are patient or consumer memories? Are they capable of making valid judgments of healthcare experiences (Berry and Bendapudi, 2003)? While an obvious limitation, such recollections are clearly important as they may be paramount in following the healthcare practitioners' instructions, loyalty for repeat business, making recommendations to others and the like. Further, studies have shown retrospective reports to be accurate and useful (Miller et al., 1997). With this information, healthcare educators should be in a better position to improve the training offered in their programs and practitioners to better serve their customers. The findings would indicate that the human values of excellence, innovation, joy, respect and integrity play a significant role in building a strong service relationship between consumer and healthcare provider. Berry (1999) has argued that the overriding importance in building a lasting service business is human values. This exploratory study has shown how critical incident analysis can be used to determine both effective and ineffective practices of different medical providers. It also provides guidelines as

  10. Identifying effective pathways in a successful continuous quality improvement programme: the GEDAPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Mundet, Xavier; Gray, Laura J; Cos, Xavier; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Cano, Juan-Franciso

    2014-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement programmes often target several aspects of care, some of which may be more effective meaning that resources could be focussed on these. The objective was to identify the effective and ineffective aspects of a successful continuous quality improvement programme for individuals with type 2 diabetes in primary care. Data were from a series of cross-sectional studies (GEDAPS) in primary care, Catalonia, Spain, in 55 centres (2239 participants) in 1993, and 92 centres (5819 participants) in 2002. A structural equation modelling approach was used. The intervention was associated with improved microvascular outcomes through microalbuminuria and funduscopy screening, which had a direct effect on microvascular outcomes, and through attending 2-4 nurse visits and having ≥1 blood pressure measurement, which acted through reducing systolic blood pressure. The intervention was associated with improved macrovascular outcomes through blood pressure measurement and attending 2-4 nurse visits (through systolic blood pressure) and having ≥3 education topics, ≥1 HbA1c measurement and adequate medication (through HbA1c). Cholesterol measurement, weight measurement and foot examination did not contribute towards the effectiveness of the intervention. The pathways through which a continuous quality improvement programme appeared to act to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications were driven by reductions in systolic blood pressure and HbA1c, which were attained through changes in nurse and education visits, measurement and medication. This suggests that these factors are potential areas on which future quality improvement programmes should focus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and Students’ Reasoning and Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes findings of a study on efforts to improve teachers Pedagogical Content Knowledge and how it affects students’ reasoning and wellbeing. It was found that improvement of teachers’ PCK was not very strong but we managed to develop strategies to facilitate their developments. In the second year, the research was focused on identifying students’ reasoning skills both informal reasoning and formal reasoning. Data showed that students reasoning is relatively low (level 2 of five levels) and they could not construct highly coherence arguments. In addition alternative strategies to promote students’ reasoning were explored. Attempts to support teachers to conduct lessons that facilitate students’ reasoning found that teachers need intensive and continuous support. The study also identifies students’ wellbeing as the impact of improvement of lessons and other activities designed to improve students’ wellbeing. Research on students’ wellbeing is not yet given attention in Indonesian schools although it plays very important roles in students’ academic and nonacademic achievements.

  12. The rupture in the physics teacher’s pedagogical sequence

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    Anne Louise Scarinci

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the result of an observational research, carried out with a group of high school physics teachers in professional development. We departed from the recognition of the incipient learning in courses, as identified from the few changes resultant in teachers’ practices. While studying their attempts to take into classroom the proposals learned in the courses, we’ve observed that such attempts frequently originated a rupture in the pedagogical sequence. This caused a great distress and a tendency to return to the “old” practice. Of what does this rupture consist? Which obstacles may be causing them? This question lead us to study the characteristics of teachers’ practices and their evolution/oscillation, motivated by the professional development course. We’ve related the ruptures in their pedagogical sequence with the incoherence in teachers' strategies and attitudes when applying the teaching theory being learned, whereas still maintaining aspects of their practice founded into the old theory. We’ve concluded that the learning of a new teaching theory requires a ground attitudinal change, more fundamental than possible changes in the teaching strategies, these ones capable of planning.

  13. The Pedagogical Effect: On Foucault and Sloterdijk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Ramírez, Carlos Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Although Foucault did not produce any particular work devoted to teaching or education, following authors like Hoskin this text aims to show the importance that teaching practices and discourses have in Foucault's analysis, particularly in the analysis of what he called governmentality. If we associate these analyses with the concept of…

  14. DEVELOPING FUTURE TEACHERS-PHILOLOGISTS’ COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS: PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL ASPECT

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    Ellina Panasenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article contemporary scientists’ psychological and pedagogical researches on the issue of a personality’s communicative skills and pedagogue’s communicative abilities are analyzed; this issue is determined by the trends in humanitarian policy and new requirements for language education, which is defined as the main function of the language – being a means of communication, cognition, understanding, and public order – to form a socially active Ukrainian-speaking language identity. Based on the materials of psychological and pedagogical literary sources, the authors present the definition of the concepts “communicative abilities”, “communication”, “person’s communicative qualities”, “communicative knowledge”, “communicative skills”, “communication attainments”. It is reported that communication skills are the skills and attainments of communicating with people on whom their success depends. The teacher-philologists’ communicative abilities is a complex of individual psychological features that ensure the teacher’s ability to active and effective (optimal communication, transmission and adequate perception of information, organization of interaction with students, their parents and teachers, correct understanding of themselves and their behavior, as well as understanding partners and their behavior, are necessary conditions for the successful fulfilment of professional activities. The authors present a typology of communicative abilities. Scientists classify communicative abilities into: general and special; verbal and non-verbal; especially important and universally important; strategic and tactical. In the article the following main approaches to determining the person’s communicative abilities are revealed: a psychological approach, according to which communicative abilities are considered to be a system of person’s individual, psychological and physiological resources which provides optimal

  15. Topic-Specific Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TSPCK) in Redox and Electrochemistry of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephanie

    Topic specific pedagogical content knowledge (TSPCK) is the basis by which knowledge of subject matter of a particular topic is conveyed to students. This includes students' prior knowledge, curricular saliency, what makes a topic easy or difficult to teach, representations, and teaching strategies. The goal of this study is to assess the pedagogical content knowledge of chemistry teachers in a professional learning community in the areas of redox and electrochemistry, as this has been regarded in previous literature as conceptually challenging for students to learn. By acquiring information regarding the PCK development of experienced chemistry teachers, the education and practice of all science teachers can be advanced. This study builds upon previous research that developed validated instruments to evaluate TSPCK. The research questions sought to determine which components of TSPCK were evidenced by the instructional design decisions teachers made, what shared patterns and trends were evident, and how TSPCK related to student learning outcomes. To answer the research questions subjects completed a background questionnaire, a TSPCK assessment, and interview tasks to elicit information about pedagogical decision making and processes that influenced student learning in their classrooms. The TSPCK exam and interview responses were coded to align with thematic constructs. To determine the effect of TSPCK on student learning gains, pre/post-assessment data on redox and electrochemistry were compared to teachers' TSPCK. The chemistry teachers displayed varying levels of TSPCK in redox and electrochemistry, as evidenced by their knowledge of student learning obstacles, curricular saliency, and teaching methodologies. There was evidence of experienced teachers lacking in certain areas of TSPCK, such as the ability to identify student misconceptions, suggesting the need for programmatic improvements in pre-service and in-service training to address the needs of current

  16. Identifying the Components of Effective Learning Environments Based on Health Students\\' Perception

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    Yousefi Afrashteh M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Effective learning environment can lead to establish and strengthen the appropriate conditions of learning in higher education. This study aimed to identify and define the factors associated with effective learning environment in the field of health education. Participants & Methods: This qualitative study with content analysis approach was conducted in 2013. Participants were 9 graduate and 7 undergraduate students of health majors that were selected using purposive sampling method. Data were recorded by interview and were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: Analysis of the data revealed 4 themes and 13 classes active and interactive teaching (participating viewpoints of students in educational planning, engaging students in class discussions, providing practical examples to understand the content, relaxing about expressed thoughts, the possibility of constructive criticism master plan of activities and according to the conditions and individual differences between students, Joyful atmosphere (academic motivation, the joy of learning and attendance, a sense of acceptance and respect from teachers and classroom dynamics and vitality and fatigue, relation of courses with professional needs (knowledge of the needs of the job in training course content and related training to the needs of job opportunities and professors’ scientific and power and expert (expertise and scientific capabilities in the field of teaching. Conclusion: 4 major themes and their characteristics can help to organize the learning environment in medical education.

  17. Isolating social influences on vulnerability to earthquake shaking: identifying cost-effective mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic; McCloskey, John; Pelling, Mark; Naylor, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Until expensive engineering solutions become more universally available, the objective targeting of resources at demonstrably effective, low-cost interventions might help reverse the trend of increasing mortality in earthquakes. Death tolls in earthquakes are the result of complex interactions between physical effects, such as the exposure of the population to strong shaking, and the resilience of the exposed population along with supporting critical infrastructures and institutions. The identification of socio-economic factors that contribute to earthquake mortality is crucial to identifying and developing successful risk management strategies. Here we develop a quantitative methodology more objectively to assess the ability of communities to withstand earthquake shaking, focusing on, in particular, those cases where risk management performance appears to exceed or fall below expectations based on economic status. Using only published estimates of the shaking intensity and population exposure for each earthquake, data that is available for earthquakes in countries irrespective of their level of economic development, we develop a model for mortality based on the contribution of population exposure to shaking only. This represents an attempt to remove, as far as possible, the physical causes of mortality from our analysis (where we consider earthquake engineering to reduce building collapse among the socio-economic influences). The systematic part of the variance with respect to this model can therefore be expected to be dominated by socio-economic factors. We find, as expected, that this purely physical analysis partitions countries in terms of basic socio-economic measures, for example GDP, focusing analytical attention on the power of economic measures to explain variance in observed distributions of earthquake risk. The model allows the definition of a vulnerability index which, although broadly it demonstrates the expected income-dependence of vulnerability to

  18. Identify the Effective Wells in Determination of Groundwater Depth in Urmia Plain Using Principle Component Analysis

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    Sahar Babaei Hessar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Groundwater is the most important resource of providing sanitary water for potable and household consumption. So continuous monitoring of groundwater level will play an important role in water resource management. But because of the large amount of information, evaluation of water table is a costly and time consuming process. Therefore, in many studies, the data and information aren’t suitable and useful and so, must be neglected. The PCA technique is an optimized mathematical method that reserve data with the highest share in affirming variance with recognizing less important data and limits the original variables into to a few components. In this technique, variation factors called principle components are identified with considering data structures. Thus, variables those have the highest correlation coefficient with principal components are extracted as a result of identifying the components that create the greatest variance. Materials and Methods: The study region has an area of approximately 962 Km2 and area located between 37º 21´ N to 37º 49´ N and 44º 57´ E to 45º 16´ E in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. This area placed along the mountainous north-west of the country, which ends with the plane Urmia Lake and has vast groundwater resources. However, recently the water table has been reduced considerably because of the exceeded exploitation as a result of urbanization and increased agricultural and horticultural land uses. In the present study, the annual water table datasets in 51wells monitored by Ministry of Energy during statistical periods of 2002-2011 were used to data analysis. In order to identify the effective wells in determination of groundwater level, the PCA technique was used. In this research to compute the relative importance of each well, 10 wells were identified with the nearest neighbor for each one. The number of wells (p as a general rule must be less or equal to the maximum number of

  19. [Different configurations of violence in pedagogical relationships between teachers and students of higher education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gênesis Vivianne; Pereira, Wilza Rocha

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the different settings of violence in pedagogical relations between teachers and students in a higher education from the theory of violence symbolic power. Twelve interviews were conducted with students from six courses of graduation from a higher educational institution; it was used the content analysis to interpret the data. It was found that violence is configured from the most subtle to the most noticeable way and that, although violence was present in the pedagogical processes of the context studied, this was not fully realized, probably because of the reproduction of the symbolic order, socially constructed and internalized by teachers and students. It is considered that the teaching practice needs to be improved in order to make the classroom democratic spaces and to make the students share responsibility for the pursuit of knowledge. We conclude that violence in relationships pedagogical produces certain effects, changes and consequences both, immediate and delayed, which can be minimized.

  20. Assessing urban potential flooding risk and identifying effective risk-reduction measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherqui, Frédéric; Belmeziti, Ali; Granger, Damien; Sourdril, Antoine; Le Gauffre, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Flood protection is one of the traditional functions of any drainage system, and it remains a major issue in many cities because of economic and health impact. Heavy rain flooding has been well studied and existing simulation software can be used to predict and improve level of protection. However, simulating minor flooding remains highly complex, due to the numerous possible causes related to operational deficiencies or negligent behaviour. According to the literature, causes of blockages vary widely from one case to another: it is impossible to provide utility managers with effective recommendations on how to improve the level of protection. It is therefore vital to analyse each context in order to define an appropriate strategy. Here we propose a method to represent and assess the flooding risk, using GIS and data gathered during operation and maintenance. Our method also identifies potential management responses. The approach proposed aims to provide decision makers with clear and comprehensible information. Our method has been successfully applied to the Urban Community of Bordeaux (France) on 4895 interventions related to flooding recorded during the 2009-2011 period. Results have shown the relative importance of different issues, such as human behaviour (grease, etc.) or operational deficiencies (roots, etc.), and lead to identify corrective and proactive. This study also confirms that blockages are not always directly due to the network itself and its deterioration. Many causes depend on environmental and operating conditions on the network and often require collaboration between municipal departments in charge of roads, green spaces, etc. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characteristics of Effective Simulation (Preclinical) Teachers as Identified by Dental Students: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen; Mucciolo, Thomas W; Jahangiri, Leila

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this qualitative research study was to identify and categorize criteria for simulation teacher quality preferences as reported by dental students. Second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry in 2015 were given a two-question, open-ended survey asking what qualities they liked most and least in a simulation or preclinical teacher. Responses were collected until data saturation was reached. Key words in the responses were identified and coded based on similar relationships and then were grouped into defined categories. A total of 168 respondents out of the target group of 363 students (46.3%) provided 1,062 written comments. Three core themes-character, competence, and communication-emerged from 16 defined categories, which were validated using references from the educational literature. The theme of character encompassed eight of the defined categories (motivation, available, caring, patience, professionalism, empathy, fairness, and happiness) and accounted for 50% of the total student responses. The theme of competence comprised five categories (expertise, knowledgeable, efficient, skillful, and effective) and represented 34% of all responses. The communication theme covered the remaining three categories (feedback, approachable, and interpersonal communication) and contained 17% of the responses. Positive and negative comments in the category of motivation accounted for 11.2% of all student responses. Expertise was the next highest category with 9.3% of the responses, followed closely by 9.1% in the category of available. Among these students, the top five attributes of simulation teachers were motivation, expertise, available, caring, and feedback. While the study did not attempt to correlate these findings with improved student performance, the results can be used in the development of assessment tools for faculty and targeted faculty development programs.

  2. Experimentally Identify the Effective Plume Chimney over a Natural Draft Chimney Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Chu, C. M.; Tahir, A. M.; Ismail, M. A. bin; Misran, M. S. bin; Ling, L. S.

    2017-07-01

    The demands of energy are in increasing order due to rapid industrialization and urbanization. The researchers and scientists are working hard to improve the performance of the industry so that the energy consumption can be reduced significantly. Industries like power plant, timber processing plant, oil refinery, etc. performance mainly depend on the cooling tower chimney’s performance, either natural draft or forced draft. Chimney is used to create sufficient draft, so that air can flow through it. Cold inflow or flow reversal at chimney exit is one of the main identified problems that may alter the overall plant performance. The presence Effective Plume Chimney (EPC) is an indication of cold inflow free operation of natural draft chimney. Different mathematical model equations are used to estimate the EPC height over the heat exchanger or hot surface. In this paper, it is aim to identify the EPC experimentally. In order to do that, horizontal temperature profiling is done at the exit of the chimneys of face area 0.56m2, 1.00m2 and 2.25m2. A wire mesh screen is installed at chimneys exit to ensure cold inflow chimney operation. It is found that EPC exists in all modified chimney models and the heights of EPC varied from 1 cm to 9 cm. The mathematical models indicate that the estimated heights of EPC varied from 1 cm to 2.3 cm. Smoke test is also conducted to ensure the existence of EPC and cold inflow free option of chimney. Smoke test results confirmed the presence of EPC and cold inflow free operation of chimney. The performance of the cold inflow free chimney is increased by 50% to 90% than normal chimney.

  3. Pedagogical Merit Review of Animal Use for Education in Canada.

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    Marc T Avey

    Full Text Available There are two components to the review of animal based protocols in Canada: review for the merit of the study itself, and review of the ethical acceptability of the work. Despite the perceived importance for the quality assurance these reviews provide; there are few studies of the peer-based merit review system for animal-based protocols for research and education. Institutional animal care committees (ACCs generally rely on the external peer review of scientific merit for animal-based research. In contrast, peer review for animal based teaching/training is dependent on the review of pedagogical merit carried out by the ACC itself or another committee within the institution. The objective of this study was to evaluate the views of ACC members about current practices and policies as well as alternate policies for the review of animal based teaching/training. We conducted a national web-based survey of ACC members with both quantitative and qualitative response options. Responses from 167 ACC members indicated broad concerns about administrative burden despite strong support for both the current and alternate policies. Participants' comments focused mostly on the merit review process (54% relative to the efficiency (21%, impact (13%, and other (12% aspects of evaluation. Approximately half (49% of the comments were classified into emergent themes that focused on some type of burden: burden from additional pedagogical merit review (16%, a limited need for the review (12%, and a lack of resources (expertise 11%; people/money 10%. Participants indicated that the current system for pedagogical merit review is effective (60%; but most also indicated that there was at least some challenge (86% with the current peer review process. There was broad support for additional guidance on the justification, criteria, types of animal use, and objectives of pedagogical merit review. Participants also supported the ethical review and application of the Three Rs in

  4. Using concept mapping for faculty development in the context of pedagogic frailty

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    Bárbara de Benito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of teaching does not depend exclusively on the knowledge and experience of teachers, but also on the contextual variables that go along with the teaching (attitude, objectives, students, resources, etc. or dimensions of pedagogic frailty (regulative and instructional discourse, pedagogy and discipline, research teaching nexus and locus of control. Identifying these variables may help to enhance teaching. A procedure for the capture, representation and transfer of knowledge between peers regarding active didactic methodologies supported by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT was applied in a case study research. The data were represented by concept maps. The aim was to identify variables that affect Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK, the use of technology in teaching and pedagogic frailty, through the analysis of the interrelations among the concept maps.The analysis of the maps shows the implementation of many innovations with ICT (project-based learning, service-learning, collaborative learning, their positive aspects and the difficulties in carrying them out. The teachers involved pointed out some factors that contribute to the development of pedagogic frailty, including the number of students in each class, the organization of teaching, the motivation, among others, and as conditions for a greater progress in innovative educational experiments using ICT.

  5. Unimodular theory: A little pedagogical vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández Cristóbal, Jose Ma

    2014-01-01

    Under the generic designation of unimodular theory, two theoretical models of gravity are considered: the unimodular gravity and the TDiff theory. Our approach is primarily pedagogical. We aim to describe these models both from a geometric and a field-theoretical point of view. In addition, we explore connections with the cosmological-constant problem and outline some applications. We do not discuss the application of this theory to the quantization of gravity

  6. Exploring one aspect of pedagogical content knowledge of teaching assistants using the test of understanding graphs in kinematics

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    Alexandru Maries

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K is a multiple-choice test developed by Beichner in 1994 to assess students’ understanding of kinematics graphs. Many of the items on the TUG-K have strong distractor choices which correspond to students’ common difficulties with kinematics graphs. Instruction is unlikely to be effective if instructors do not know the common difficulties of introductory physics students and explicitly take them into account in their instructional design. We evaluate one aspect of the pedagogical content knowledge of first-year physics graduate students enrolled in a teaching assistant training course related to topics covered in the TUG-K. In particular, for each item on the TUG-K, the graduate students were asked to identify which incorrect answer choice they thought would be most commonly selected by introductory physics students if they did not know the correct answer after instruction in relevant concepts. We used the graduate student data and the data from Beichner’s original paper for introductory physics students (which was collected from over 500 college and high school students to assess this aspect of the pedagogical content knowledge of the graduate students, i.e., knowledge of student difficulties related to kinematics graphs as they are revealed by the TUG-K. We find that, although the graduate students, on average, performed better than random guessing at identifying introductory student difficulties on the TUG-K, they did not identify many common difficulties that introductory students have with graphs in kinematics. In addition, we find that the ability of graduate students to identify the difficulties of introductory students is context dependent and that discussions among the graduate students improved their understanding of student difficulties related to kinematics graphs. Moreover, we find that the ability of American graduate students in identifying common student difficulties is

  7. Pedagogical discourses in Bhutanese school system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer; Utha, Karma

    2013-01-01

    In this article we distinguish between three pedagogical discourses in our analysis of the Bhutanese school system. The results point to the dominance of the traditional cognitive discourse, but occasionally the teacher's unilateral control of the teaching-learning process is shared with the stud......In this article we distinguish between three pedagogical discourses in our analysis of the Bhutanese school system. The results point to the dominance of the traditional cognitive discourse, but occasionally the teacher's unilateral control of the teaching-learning process is shared...... with the students. On a value basis the teachers agree with the pedagogical ideal of student centered learning which is in line with an experiential learning discourse. In addition students tell about how they go to the better students, rather than to the teacher, for help. This behavior, where peers are used...... as ‘teachers’, points to a third understanding of how learning is undertaken, which builds on the social ressources of the local community of practice. Despite these smaller variations, the overall picture is that the underlying discourse of the Bhutaneese school system is in accordance with a traditional...

  8. Pharmacy Educator Motives to Pursue Pedagogical Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baia, Patricia; Strang, Aimee F

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To investigate motives of pharmacy educators who pursue pedagogical knowledge through professional development programs and to develop a model of motivation to inform future development. Methods. A mixed-methods approach was used to study both qualitative and quantitative data. Written narratives, postmodule quizzes, and survey data were collected during a 5-year period (2010-2014) from pharmacy educators who participated in an online professional development program titled Helping Educators Learn Pedagogy (HELP). Grounded theory was used to create a model of motivation for why pharmacy educators might pursue pedagogical knowledge. Results. Participants reported being driven intrinsically by a passion for their own learning (self-centered motivation) and by the need to improve student learning (student-centered motivation) and extrinsically by program design, funding, and administrator encouragement. Conclusion. A new model of pharmacy educator motivation to pursue pedagogy knowledge, Pedagogical Knowledge Acquisition Theory (PKAT), emerged as a blended intrinsic and extrinsic model, which may have value in developing future professional development programs.

  9. Liquid pedagogy: Pedagogical imaginary or Educational Theory?

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    Xavier LAUDO CASTILLO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a specific problem within the broader research on liquid pedagogy. The article displays the meaning of the liquid metaphor applied to pedagogy and two possible uses of the signifier «liquid pedagogy»: a as a pedagogical imaginary, and b as a theory of education. I discuss the liquid pedagogy as a theory that can be useful for articulating the idea of what education is and what should be. Two possible variants of the liquid pedagogy are described: a with solid methods to convey tradition b with liquid methods to yield new possibilities. Taking into account that the pedagogical imaginary is the general framework of any theory of education –liquid or solid–, I claim, on the one hand, the use of the term «postmodern pedagogical imaginary». On the other hand, I propose the use of the term «liquid pedagogy» as a theory of education in which the key element is the unexpected character of the educational results.

  10. Pedagogical professional training in Cuban educative context

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    Mayre Acosta Calderón

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The conception of the pedagogical professional training has evolved alongside with the educative changes that have taken place in the history of Cuban education. This research was intended to examine the evolution of professional training from the foundation of colleges of Education to the present. The study takes into account the relation of the instructive, educative and developing aspects; the development of the professional needs and their influence on cognitive and formative activity of learners and their professional performance; the components of contents included in the evaluation of the professional competence; and the comprehensive disciplinary approach of the formation process. Thus, this investigation is aimed at providing a historical analysis of the development of the pedagogical professional training, illustrating the continuity of the formative process in Cuban context. This study revealed the main trends of the pedagogical professional training for the General Senior High Education, It shows the movement from a former segmentation of instructive and educative components and emotional and intellectual educations to a and interconnected approach of both processes.

  11. Expressiveness in musical performance: Pedagogic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Natalija R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of our research relates to pedagogic aspects of expressive vocal-instrumental musical performance. We intended to examine: (1 how undergraduate students see/conceptualize and evaluate expressiveness in musical performance; (2 whether and how they were trained in the skill of expressive musical performance during their musical training; (3 whether and in which way they rehearse the expressive component of musical performance and interpretation and (4 whether there are any differences regarding gender, age, instrument, department, year of study and years of instrument playing in relation to the group of dependant variables related to expressiveness, tuition and practice. The sample for the research included 82 students of instrumental and theory departments at the Faculty of Music in Belgrade. Psychological and pedagogical aspects of musical expressiveness during vocal-instrumental performance were analyzed. The results show that students highly evaluate expressiveness but its place is secondary compared to mastering technical and tonal requirements. Statistically significant differences were shown regarding gender, age and departments. It can be concluded that there is a potential for the development and enhancement of expressiveness of students if we abandon the traditional view that expressiveness is linked exclusively to talent. The findings indicate that pedagogical work should be directed towards finding purposeful strategies for training individual expressiveness.

  12. Identifying the quality of life effects of urinary incontinence with depression in an Australian population

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    Avery Jodie C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the additive effect of urinary incontinence, in people with comorbid depression, on health related quality of life. Methods Males and females, 15 to 95 years (n = 3010, response rate 70.2% were interviewed face to face in the 1998 Autumn South Australian Health Omnibus Survey. Results Self-reported urinary incontinence was found in 20.3% (n=610, and depression as defined by the PRIME-MD in 15.2% (n=459 of the survey population. Urinary incontinence with comorbid depression was found in 4.3% of the overall population. Univariate analysis showed that respondents with urinary incontinence and comorbid depression were more likely to be aged between 15 and 34 years and never married when compared to those with incontinence only. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that in people with incontinence, the risk of having comorbid depression was increased by an overall health status of Fair or Poor, or the perception that their incontinence was moderately or very serious. Respondents reporting that they experienced incontinence with comorbid depression scored significantly lower than those experiencing incontinence without depression on all dimensions of the SF-36. The interaction of the presence of incontinence and the presence of depression was significantly associated with the dimensions of physical functioning. Conclusions Depression and incontinence both reduce QOL. When they occur together there appears to be an additive effect which affects both physical and mental health, perhaps by increasing a person’s negative perceptions of their illness. Clinicians should identify and manage comorbid depression when treating patients who have incontinence to improve their overall QOL.

  13. Concept mapping-An effective method for identifying diversity and congruity in cognitive style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Jablokow, Kathryn; Rosas, Scott R; Wopereis, Iwan G J H; Kirschner, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of cognitive style for decision making on the behaviour of participants in different phases of the group concept mapping process (GCM). It is argued that cognitive style should be included directly in the coordination of the GCM process and not simply considered as yet another demographic variable. The cognitive styles were identified using the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory, which locates each person's style on a continuum ranging from very adaptive to very innovative. Cognitive style could explain diversity in the participants' behaviour in different phases of the GCM process. At the same time, the concept map as a group's common cognitive construct can consolidate individual differences and serves as a tool for managing diversity in groups of participants. Some of the results were that: (a) the more adaptive participants generated ideas that fit to a particular, well-established and consensually agreed paradigm, frame of reference, theory or practice; (b) the more innovative participants produced ideas that were more general in scope and required changing a settled structure (paradigm, frame of reference, theory or practice); and (c) the empirical comparison of the map configurations through Procrustes analysis indicated a strong dissimilarity between cognitive styles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using the Delphi Technique to Identify Key Elements for Effective and Sustainable Visitor Use Planning Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P. Fefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas around the world receive nearly 800 billion visits/year, with international tourism continuing to increase. While protected areas provide necessary benefits to communities and visitors, the increased visitation may negatively impact the resource and the recreational experience, hence the need to manage visitor use in protected areas around the world. This research focused on obtaining information from experts to document their experiences utilizing one visitor use planning framework: Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP. Using the Delphi Technique, 31 experts from seven regions around the world were asked to identify elements necessary for effective visitor management, as well as elements that facilitated or limited success when using VERP. Elements were categorized and rated in terms of importance. Scoring of the final categories was analyzed using Wilcoxon and Median non-parametric statistical tests. Results suggest that planning challenges stem from limitations in organizational capacity to support a long-term, adaptive management process, inferring that VERP may be sufficiently developed, but implementation capacity may not. The results can be used to refine existing frameworks, and to aid in the development of new recreation frameworks.

  15. Identifying and analyzing the construction and effectiveness of offensive plays in basketball by using systematic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jordi; Camerino, Oleguer; Anguera, M Teresa; Jonsson, Gudberg K

    2009-08-01

    In the field of sports research, there is a growing need for the rigorous collection of data that provide empirical evidence about the complex reality they refer to. Although sports psychology research has advanced considerably in recent years, in both extent and quality, one area of research that remains relatively unexplored is the dynamics of the sports group and the influence of the group on its members (George & Feltz, 1995; Widmeyer, Brawley, & Carron, 1992). Key aspects in this regard include the presence of regularities that are not detectable through visual inference or traditional methods of data analysis, the lack of standard observation instruments, and, assuming priority, the need to develop powerful, computerized coding systems, all of which must form part of an approach that is suitable for natural and habitual contexts. The present study is part of a broader research project concerning ACB teams (first Spanish basketball division) and considers the interaction context before teams try to score (where this is understood as how teams create scoring opportunities) as the core aspect that links team play. This investigation proposes a new model of analysis for studying the effectiveness and construction of offensive basketball plays in order to identify their outcomes, thus providing coaches with an important device for improving or consolidating them.

  16. Renegotiating the pedagogic contract: Teaching in digitally enhanced secondary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Ajibola Oluneye

    This qualitative case study explores the effects of emerging digital technology as a teaching and learning tool in secondary school science classrooms. The study examines three teachers' perspectives on how the use of technology affects the teacher-student pedagogic relationship. The "pedagogic contract" is used as a construct to analyze the changes that took place in these teachers' classrooms amid the use of this new technology. The overarching question for this research is: How was the pedagogic contract renegotiated in three secondary science teachers' classrooms through the use of digitally enhanced science instruction. To answer this question, data was collected via semi-structured teacher interviews, classroom observations, and analysis of classroom documents such as student assignments, tests and Study Guides. This study reveals that the everyday use of digital technologies in these classrooms resulted in a re-negotiated pedagogic contract across three major dimensions: content of learning, method and management of learning activities, and assessment of learning. The extent to which the pedagogic contract was renegotiated varied with each of the teachers studied. Yet in each case, the content of learning was extended to include new topics, and greater depth of learning within the mandated curriculum. The management of learning was reshaped around metacognitive strategies, personal goal-setting, individual pacing, and small-group learning activities. With the assessment of learning, there was increased emphasis on self-directed interactive testing as a formative assessment tool. This study highlights the aspects of science classrooms that are most directly affected by the introduction of digital technologies and demonstrates how those changes are best understood as a renegotiation of the teacher-student pedagogic contract.

  17. Pedagogical Affordances of Multiple External Representations in Scientific Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Puntambekar, Sadhana

    2012-12-01

    Multiple external representations (MERs) have been widely used in science teaching and learning. Theories such as dual coding theory and cognitive flexibility theory have been developed to explain why the use of MERs is beneficial to learning, but they do not provide much information on pedagogical issues such as how and in what conditions MERs could be introduced and used to support students' engagement in scientific processes and develop competent scientific practices (e.g., asking questions, planning investigations, and analyzing data). Additionally, little is understood about complex interactions among scientific processes and affordances of MERs. Therefore, this article focuses on pedagogical affordances of MERs in learning environments that engage students in various scientific processes. By reviewing literature in science education and cognitive psychology and integrating multiple perspectives, this article aims at exploring (1) how MERs can be integrated with science processes due to their different affordances, and (2) how student learning with MERs can be scaffolded, especially in a classroom situation. We argue that pairing representations and scientific processes in a principled way based on the affordances of the representations and the goals of the activities is a powerful way to use MERs in science education. Finally, we outline types of scaffolding that could help effective use of MERs including dynamic linking, model progression, support in instructional materials, teacher support, and active engagement.

  18. Pedagogical competence and value clarification among health educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2009-09-01

    Individual and social values are increasingly important in health education. This article examines how health educators in Greenland and Denmark engage in value clarification as part of their educational practices. It presents the results of a study of health professionals in a variety of settings, focusing in particular on how development work and experimentation can strengthen their pedagogical competences. The study focuses on belief, reasoning, interpretation and reflection, rather than routines, skills, or ethical rules, and takes a participatory approach that oscillates between dialogical and qualitative empirical methodologies. It observes pedagogical practice in selected settings in Greenland and the municipality of Copenhagen. Within the framework provided by four discourses that appear to organize communication about health, it shows how values became important to the progress of two research-based development projects. On this basis, the article argues that health education can be effectively grounded in the values, perceptions, and experiences of a given population, while being guided by the health educators' biomedical knowledge and educational values.

  19. Understanding Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge In ESL Vocabulary Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizatulliza Muhamad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In communicative language teaching classrooms, one of the main emphases is on students’ ability to use the target language for real life purposes. To achieve this goal, teachers may have to ensure that students have adequate vocabulary to express their feelings and ideas. Previous research on vocabulary teaching and learning tends to be quantitative in nature focusing on testing the effectiveness of some techniques. This research study however, is an attempt to understand teachers’ pedagogical systems that influence their practice in actual classroom interactions during vocabulary teaching and learning. In-depth interviews and classroom observations with two experienced Malaysian ESL teachers were conducted. The interviews highlighted the teachers’ beliefs as well as challenges they faced with regards to vocabulary teaching and learning. The classroom observations revealed that their practice was very much a reflection of their own beliefs, based on their own experience as students as well as teachers. The results of this study showcased the fact that teachers operate within the spectrum of their pedagogical knowledge.

  20. Pedagogical and Design Aspects of a Blended Learning Course

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    Karen Precel, Yoram Eshet-Alkalai, Yael Alberton

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on recent research reports, the blended learning model, which combines face-to-face and online learning, is now the preferred model for online course design. Its superiority over online learning, which lacks face-to-face interaction, is evident from studies that examined both student achievement and satisfaction. Nevertheless, there is ambiguity in the literature and in the field regarding the proper implementation of blended learning and the optimal proportions between online and F2F components in various learning scenarios. The range of contradictory reports in recent literature on the potential of different blended learning models shows the need for more research on specific blended learning courses in order to establish proper standards for effective course design and implementation. The present evaluation study focuses on students’ perceptions of pedagogical and design issues related to a new model for blended learning used in a graduate-level course at the Open University of Israel. Fifty-eight of the course’s 91 students participated in the study and completed a questionnaire regarding three major aspects of the course design: (1 pedagogy, (2 textbook format (print vs. digital, and (3 learning environment usability. The results illustrate the importance of completing the pedagogical and visual design of online learning in advance. Also, the course model suggests ways to bridge the gaps between students and instructors and students and their peers, which are typical of online learning in general and of open universities in particular.

  1. Pedagogical design for knowledge creating inquiry in customer projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni Muukkonen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two higher education courses involving students, teachers, and customers in multifaceted experiences of knowledge creation are described. The Trialogical Learning Approach (TLA provides a theoretical framework to address learning and teaching organized around authentic problems and the development of shared knowledge objects, such as reports, products, and new practices. The approach directs attention to those aspects of social interaction and artifact-mediated activities, which focus on the development of shared objects and the pursuit of novel knowledge and understanding. The roles of technology-mediation, customer involvement, and guidance in developing effective pedagogical practices for knowledge creation were addressed. It appears necessary to design sufficient open-endedness and complexity for students’ teamwork to generate unpredictable, practical, and epistemologically challenging situations. Pedagogical design for such a process has different foci in the four central phases: planning, project initiation, project execution, and presentation and evaluation. Planning and initiation are central to establishing relevance and project awareness for the collaboration of student teams with a customer. Guidance and expert modeling during project initiation and execution is needed to overcome feelings of uncertainty during a challenging and complex assignment. Mediation provided by collaboration tools facilitates reflection on collective practices, iterative development of knowledge objects, and documentation of the learning outcomes of customer projects.

  2. Pedagogical Leadership in the 21st Century: Evidence from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Trevor; Palaiologou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Literature examining effective leadership in education describe a number of models such as Transformational, Learner-Centred, Distributed and Situational. A similar example is "pedagogical leadership", a phrase that frequently appears in literature and one referring to forms of practice that shape and form teaching and learning to be…

  3. Instructional Supervision and the Pedagogical Practices of Secondary School Teachers in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malunda, Paul; Onen, David; Musaazi, John C. S.; Oonyu, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the effect of instructional supervision by school authorities on the pedagogical practices of teachers in public secondary schools in Uganda. To date, research into this field in the country has focused more on the technicalities of supervision rather than on how the teachers have been responding to it. The study employed a…

  4. Pedagogical Practices of NetNZ Teachers for Supporting Online Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kwok-Wing

    2017-01-01

    A supportive online learning environment entails teachers using effective pedagogical practices to meet the needs of their students and developing a positive teacher-student relationship to foster learner motivation and engagement. This paper reports a study investigating how 32 secondary teachers in New Zealand taught their online distance…

  5. Influence of Content Knowledge on Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Case of Teaching Photosynthesis and Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapyla, Markku; Heikkinen, Jussi-Pekka; Asunta, Tuula

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effect of the amount and quality of content knowledge on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The biological content photosynthesis and plant growth was used as an example. The research sample consisted of 10 primary and 10 secondary (biology) teacher students. Questionnaires, lesson preparation task…

  6. Pedagogical Agents as Learning Companions: The Role of Agent Competency and Type of Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee; Baylor, Amy L.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of the competency (low vs. high) and interaction type (proactive vs. responsive) of pedagogical agents as learning companions (PALs) on learning, self-efficacy, and attitudes. Participants were 72 undergraduates in an introductory computer-literacy course who were randomly assigned to one of four…

  7. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  8. Game-Based Approaches, Pedagogical Principles and Tactical Constraints: Examining Games Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Olivares, Jaime; García-López, Luis M.; Calderón, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of modification strategies based on the pedagogical principles of the Teaching Games for Understanding approach on tactical constraints of four 3v3 soccer small-sided games. The Game performance of 21 U-10 players was analyzed in a game similar to the adult game; one based on keeping-the-ball;…

  9. Bullying in School: Case Study of Prevention and Psycho-Pedagogical Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribakova, Laysan A.; Valeeva, Roza A.; Merker, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was the theoretical justification and experimental verification of content, complex forms and methods to ensure effective prevention and psycho-pedagogical correction of bullying in school. 53 teenage students from Kazan took part in the experiment. A complex of diagnostic techniques for the detection of violence and…

  10. Using Debate as a Pedagogical Tool in Enhancing Pre-Service Teachers' Learning and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chien-Hui; Rusli, Enniati

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that using debate in higher education as a pedagogical tool has effect on promoting higher order and critical thinking (Camp & Schnader, 2010; Ng et al., 2004; Roy & Macchiette, 2005; Ryan & College, 2006). Debate has been implemented in various disciplines with adult learners, such as psychology (Budesheim &…

  11. The Efficacy of Educative Curriculum Materials to Support Geospatial Science Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec; Peffer, Tamara; Kulo, Violet

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and learning about geospatial aspects of energy resource issues requires that science teachers apply effective science pedagogical approaches to implement geospatial technologies into classroom instruction. To address this need, we designed educative curriculum materials as an integral part of a comprehensive middle school energy…

  12. Identifying the Essential Elements of Effective Science Communication: What Do the Experts Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Belinda; France, Bev; Gilbert, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Experts in science communication were asked to identify the essential elements of a science communication course for post-graduate students. A Delphi methodology provided a framework for a research design that accessed their opinions and allowed them to contribute to, reflect on and identify 10 essential elements. There was a high level of…

  13. An effective automatic procedure for testing parameter identifiability of HIV/AIDS models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomani, Maria Pia

    2011-08-01

    Realistic HIV models tend to be rather complex and many recent models proposed in the literature could not yet be analyzed by traditional identifiability testing techniques. In this paper, we check a priori global identifiability of some of these nonlinear HIV models taken from the recent literature, by using a differential algebra algorithm based on previous work of the author. The algorithm is implemented in a software tool, called DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems), which has been recently released (DAISY is freely available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/~pia/ ). The software can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear models described by polynomial or rational differential equations, thus providing a general and reliable tool to test global identifiability of several HIV models proposed in the literature. It can be used by researchers with a minimum of mathematical background.

  14. Leadership development in UK medical training: pedagogical theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: The central role of clinical leadership in achieving the vision of quality and productivity could be attained by investing in its development in postgraduate medical education. A critical review of selected literature is presented. The author identifies some of the main theoretical constructs related to leadership; the pedagogical underpinning of medical leadership programs; their learning objectives; and the mixture of methods, individual and collective, to achieve them. INSIGHTS: How to best develop leadership through medical education remains an open debate. Experiential learning, reflective practice, action learning, and mentoring could provide the foundations of leadership development. Application of the aforementioned should be cautious due to limitations of the concept of leadership as currently promoted and lack of robust evaluation methodologies.

  15. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION PEDAGOGICAL ENVIRONMENT AS MEANS OF FORMING OF MOTIVATION TO PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Onishchenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In terms of education informatization the formation of motivation to professional activity of the future primary school teacher most effectively takes place in information and communication pedagogical environment that provides new ways of presenting information, promotes the development of needs and readiness of students to perform professional activities with application of information and communication technologies. Information and communication pedagogical environment is a complex, multi-element pedagogical system, which accumulates information, organizational, intellectual, methodological, technical, program resources and promotes information and educational interaction in the model «teacher – student – environment». This environment creates favorable terms for forming of the expressed interest in the profession of primary school teacher, motivational-valued attitude toward pedagogical activity, promotes the education of students in information and pedagogical culture and creative activity in the independent capture of professional disciplines. Forming of interest in the profession of primary school teacher is assisted by bringing in of future specialist to the creative searches by the decision of the research tasks, creative nature, creation of own electronic products, creative projects. Information and communication pedagogical environment provides the realization of the potential of students by bringing them to self-education, which in terms of the environment acquires creative and research direction and promotes for non-standard decision of professional tasks on innovative bases.

  16. PREPARING FUTURE TEACHERS TO RISK WARNING IN PEDAGOGICAL ACTIVITIES

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    Maryna Butyrina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to identify the peculiarities of professional activities for teachers’ physical and mental health; to implement comprehensive analysis of the negative impact on teaching profession; to disclose accidents and mental destruction of future teachers’ individuals. The professional health is an integral characteristic of functional state of human mental and physical indicators to assess his/her abilities to a certain professional activities and practice of a given duration over a period of life and endurance to adverse factors that accompany this activity. Violation of a teacher’s mental and physical health, signs of combustion syndrome affect the students’ health. So the problem of preserving and strengthening teachers’ health should be a priority in his/her life and among professional problems; the main object of study is future teachers’ training in the course “Health in the field (of education”. Distinctive features of the teaching profession reflect the state of his/her health: working as a teacher is both mental and physical activity, which combines creative, organizational and research ones; high density of interpersonal contacts; a lot of stress, high nervous and emotional tension; periodic need for the scheduled amount of work in a tightly regulated period; special responsibility for students and colleagues; the need to make operational decisions; significant mobilization of analyzers, attention, and memory functions. In educational activities along with common risk factors for mental health (such as neuro-emotional stress, information overload, hypokinesia there are specific risk factors such as a significant voice load, prevalence static load, a large amount of visual work, violation of work regime and rest points. The unfavorable effects of teaching profession, such as neuro-psychiatric and physical (static overloading teachers, in addition to occupational diseases can also lead to accidents due to

  17. Improving pedagogic competence using an e-learning approach for pre-service mathematics teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnowati, E.; Murdiyani, N. M.; Marsigit; Sugiman; Mahmudi, A.

    2018-03-01

    This article reported a classroom action research that was aimed to improve student’s pedagogic competence during a course namely Methods of Mathematics Instruction. An asynchronous e-learning approach was provided as supplementary material to the main lecture. This e-learning consisted of selected references and educational website addresses and also facilitated online discussions about various methods of mathematics instructions. The subject was twenty-six pre-service teachers in the Department of Mathematics Education, Yogyakarta State University, Indonesia, conducted by the researchers. The research completed three cycles, where each cycle consisted of plan-action-reflection. Through observation, documentation, and interview, it was concluded that asynchronous e-learning might be used to improve pedagogic competence when direct instruction is also applied in the classroom. Direct instruction in this study provided review, explanation, scheme, and examples which could be used by students to select relevant resources in the e-learning portal. Moreover, the pedagogic competence improved after students accomplished assignments to identify aspects of pedagogic instruction either from analyzing videos in e-learning course or simulating in the classroom with direct commentaries. Supporting factors were enthusiasm, discipline, and interactions among students and lecturer that were built throughout the lectures.

  18. Peculiarities of pedagogical practice in professional training of preschool teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Kodirova Zokhida Sobirovna

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the preparation of the future educators for their professional activities. Pedagogical practice is an important stage of educators’ training for their further professional activities.

  19. Pedagogical Conditions of Future Philologists’ Research Culture Formation

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    Marina Trufkina

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of - the pedagogical conditions- and it discloses the give phenomenon. In the following work there are outlined three kinds of pedagogical conditions that determine the formation of the future philologist's research culture and it also gives their detailed analysis. The urgency of the paper is determined by progressive methods of contemporary higher education. The aim of the work is to analyse pedagogical conditions that contribute to the research culture formation. The outlook of our investigations is connected with the detailed analysis of the Ŗresearch cultureŗ phenomenon, its components and pedagogical conditions contributing to its development.

  20. Evaluation of quality of pedagogic model for blended learning on course “Life safety”

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    M. V. Legan

    2016-01-01

    effective questionnaire method was used for self-analysis of pedagogical activity. Some indicators for monitoring of opinions on the quality of the learning process for the blended model, designed in the form of a questionnaire, were identified.The pedagogical model of the blended learning course «Health and Safety» shows the structure of the pedagogical process: target, informative, organizational and activity, analytical and productive components.A choice of the used technologies, forms, active and interactive methods in the learning process, learning tools is made; a new generation of multi-media resources is developed; the quality of education according to the process approach is made; the results of the mastering of the course «Health and Safety» in the two groups of students are demonstrated.It is shown that the results of mastering of the course «Health and Safety» at different structural models of the blended learning are virtually identical. The successful mastering of the topic «Electrical Safety» requires the use of laboratory settings and simulators, as well as further study during the session in the classrooms. It is shown that a process approach, revealing the area for improvement, is applicable for making the self-assessment of the blended learning. We have received the high indicators of the quality training satisfaction for the blended model in both groups.The high level of satisfaction with the quality of e-learning environment and placed in its electronic resources promotes organizing of education in the remote access.

  1. FEATURES OF FORMATION AND TRENDS OF USING OF COMPUTER-ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF AN INSTITUTE OF POSTGRADUATE PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION IN UKRAINE

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    Kateryna Kolos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, characterized quick reforms makes identifying promising new educational trends in the training of teaching staff, which take account of the organization and implementation of teaching and educational process in institutions of postgraduate education will intensify the development of pre-school, secondary, higher and non-formal education systems. Research findings of Ukrainian scientists point to the reasonability of ICT and e-learning resources during the training courses and the need for up to date ICT training of teaching staff as an important part of their professional competence. System effective implementation of this is the implementation of computer-oriented learning environment of an Institute of Postgraduate Pedagogical Education and building effective methods of its use in courses of teaching staff training. As a result of the analysis of practices on the use of advanced information and communication technologies in the institutions of postgraduate education in Ukraine article highlighted the features of formation and development trends of computer-oriented learning environment of an Institute of Postgraduate Pedagogical Education, for example: publication on official websites of institutions of information of the results of their activities; establishing electronic communication via email and forum; implementation of electronic registration and diagnosing students before the courses begin; construction and implementation of practical realization of individual educational trajectories of training teaching staff; publication of electronic timetable; accumulation of professional experience teaching staff in the region by means of web-technologies; publication of the results of applied research on problems of education in educational electronic media or duplicate free publications in electronic versions and more. According to this in the design contributes to the formulation of advanced theoretical and methodological principles

  2. Pedagogical actions under pressure? Primary school teachers’ perceptions of their pedagogical actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemmink, Michelle; Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Pauw, Ietje; van Veen, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    In Dutch primary schools, pedagogical actions seem to receive much less attention than content knowledge. This is the consequence of several developments and innovations that aimed at enhancing pupils’ learning outcomes and at improving teachers’ content knowledge and didactic actions. This results

  3. Mental health among students of pedagogical universities

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    Malinauskas R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

  4. Jane Austen on love and pedagogical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessenbecker, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This essay notes initially recent prominence of theories of pedagogy that attempt to "de-mystify" it and reveal troubling power relations, and their subsequent contention that love is impossible in the student-teacher relationship. "Pedagogical" interpretations of Jane Austen's fiction, however, see pedagogy as essential to love. I argue that this is so precisely because of the power dynamics involved; drawing on Jessica Benjamin's psychoanalytic interpretation of G. W. F. Hegel's analysis of the "Lord-Bondsman," I suggest that Austen portrays the loving relationship as inherently involving the occupation and subsequent exchange of roles as superior and inferior, incarnated as "teacher" and "student."

  5. A network analysis of the Chinese medicine Lianhua-Qingwen formula to identify its main effective components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yue-Fei; Jia, Wei-Na; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Chinese medicine is known to treat complex diseases with multiple components and multiple targets. However, the main effective components and their related key targets and functions remain to be identified. Herein, a network analysis method was developed to identify the main effective components and key targets of a Chinese medicine, Lianhua-Qingwen Formula (LQF). The LQF is commonly used for the prevention and treatment of viral influenza in China. It is composed of 11 herbs, gypsum and menthol with 61 compounds being identified in our previous work. In this paper, these 61 candidate compounds were used to find their related targets and construct the predicted-target (PT) network. An influenza-related protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and integrated with the PT network. Then the compound-effective target (CET) network and compound-ineffective target network (CIT) were extracted, respectively. A novel approach was developed to identify effective components by comparing CET and CIT networks. As a result, 15 main effective components were identified along with 61 corresponding targets. 7 of these main effective components were further experimentally validated to have antivirus efficacy in vitro. The main effective component-target (MECT) network was further constructed with main effective components and their key targets. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the MECT network predicted key functions such as NO production being modulated by the LQF. Interestingly, five effective components were experimentally tested and exhibited inhibitory effects on NO production in the LPS induced RAW 264.7 cell. In summary, we have developed a novel approach to identify the main effective components in a Chinese medicine LQF and experimentally validated some of the predictions.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis and Bounding of Causal Effects with Alternative Identifying Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Booil; Vinokur, Amiram D.

    2011-01-01

    When identification of causal effects relies on untestable assumptions regarding nonidentified parameters, sensitivity of causal effect estimates is often questioned. For proper interpretation of causal effect estimates in this situation, deriving bounds on causal parameters or exploring the sensitivity of estimates to scientifically plausible…

  7. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  8. Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Webcast Introduction: Identifying, Recognizing, and Learning From Effective Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ray; Jung, Britt; Johnson, Joseph; Wallinger, Linda; Bamberg, Wanda

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this series of webcasts is to communicate directly with state educational agency (SEA) and local educational agency (LEA) staff - those who guide and support the work of schools - on issues related to the implementation of NCLB. The goal of this webcast is to prompt SEAs and LEAs to think about how to identify the qualities of…

  9. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data : A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, John D.; Price, David B.; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A.; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Josephs, Lynn K.; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    BACKGROUND: Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent

  10. Combined and interactive effects of environmental and GWAS-identified risk factors in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Rossing, Mary Anne; Lee, Alice W

    2013-01-01

    There are several well-established environmental risk factors for ovarian cancer, and recent genome-wide association studies have also identified six variants that influence disease risk. However, the interplay between such risk factors and susceptibility loci has not been studied....

  11. E-Coaching, E-Mentoring for Lifelong Professional Development of Teachers within the System of Post-Graduate Pedagogical Education

    OpenAIRE

    KOVALCHUCK, Vasyl; VOROTNYKOVA, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    The research considers the readiness of teachers and postgraduate pedagogical educational establishments to use e-coaching and e-mentoring which can provide continuous professional development of teachers. The use of theoretical methods of systematization and comparison of scientific statements, experience in implementing e-coaching, e-mentoring has identified the possibility of using e-coaching and e-mentoring in postgraduate pedagogical education in continuous professional development of te...

  12. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC......). We specifically addressed anticipation in phenotypic HNPCC families without disease-predisposing mismatch repair (MMR) defects since risk estimates and age at onset are particularly difficult to determine in this cohort. The national Danish HNPCC register was used to identify families who fulfilled...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  13. Pedagogical Management of University Students' Communication Ability Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatolievna, Spirchagova Tatiana; Munirovna, Nasyrova Albina; Kasimovna, Vakhitova Dilyara; Mirzayanovna, Sadrieva Liliya; Anatolievna, Brodskaya Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The development of social interaction forms emphasizes urgency and importance of the topic. The purpose of the study is to find out peculiarities of pedagogical management of university students' communication ability development. The leading approach to the research was the narrative approach which allows considering pedagogical management of…

  14. Refracting Schoolgirls: Pedagogical Intra-Actions Producing Shame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Melissa Joy

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the discussion of gender inequality in schools with the central theme tracing ways that pedagogical affect im/mobilises agency. I argue that what I call "the schoolgirl affect," as distinctly gendered pedagogical practices in schools, constitute a schoolgirl body that refracts capacity for action in particular…

  15. Pedagogical Decision Making through the Lens of Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachagool, Veena; Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Subramaniam, Ganakumaran; Dostal, Jirí

    2016-01-01

    Pedagogical decision making is very important for professional teachers, it concerns belief, self-efficacy, and actions that teachers expose to classroom. This paper employed theoretical lens and education policy in Thailand to examine the preservice teachers' views about pedagogical decision making. Discussion helps school mentors understand…

  16. The Lecture as a Transmedial Pedagogical Form: A Historical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm

    2011-01-01

    The lecture has been much maligned as a pedagogical form, yet it persists and even flourishes today in the form of the podcast, the TED talk, and the "smart" lecture hall. This article examines the lecture as a pedagogical genre, as "a site where differences between media are negotiated" (Franzel) as these media coevolve. This examination shows…

  17. Are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Pedagogically Innovative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellini, Alejandro; Padilla Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    While claims about pedagogic innovation in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are common, most reports provide no evidence to justify those claims. This paper reports on a survey aimed at exploring how different stakeholders describe MOOCs, focusing on whether they would consider them pedagogically innovative, and if so, why. Respondents (n =…

  18. Teachers' Pedagogical Mathematical Awareness in Swedish Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Camilla; Barendregt, Wolmet

    2016-01-01

    Revised guidelines for Swedish early childhood education that emphasize mathematics content and competencies in more detail than before raise the question of the status of pedagogical mathematical awareness among Swedish early childhood teachers. The purpose of this study is to give an overview of teachers' current pedagogical mathematical…

  19. Constructivism and Pedagogical Reform in China: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    This article critically discusses the constructivist ideas, assumptions and practices that undergird the current pedagogical reform in China. The pedagogical reform is part of a comprehensive curriculum reform that has been introduced across schools in Mainland China. Although the official documents did not specify the underpinning theories for…

  20. Pedagogical System of Future Teachers' Professional Thinking Culture Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildina, Saltanat K.; Sarsekeyeva, Zhanar Y.; Aidarbekova, Kulzhan A.; Asetova, Zhannur B.; Adanov, Kuanysbek B.

    2016-01-01

    Research objective is to theoretically justify and to develop a pedagogical system of development of future teachers' professional thinking culture. In the research there are used a set of theoretical methods: systematic analysis of the philosophical, psychological and pedagogical literature on the researched topic; compilation and classification…

  1. Adapting Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Framework to Teach Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getenet, Seyum Tekeher

    2017-01-01

    The technological pedagogical content knowledge framework is increasingly in use by educational technology researcher as a generic description of the knowledge requirements for teachers using technology in all subjects. This study describes the development of a mathematics specific variety of the technological pedagogical content knowledge…

  2. A comparison of two pedagogical systems of sentence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes, compares, and analyzes the slashes-and-vertical-lines model of sentence analysis and the SPOAC model, both of which were designed with pedagogical purposes in mind.......This paper describes, compares, and analyzes the slashes-and-vertical-lines model of sentence analysis and the SPOAC model, both of which were designed with pedagogical purposes in mind....

  3. Safety and Security at School: A Pedagogical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Elda; Grosser, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Education law and policy currently focus on broader physical aspects of safety and security at schools, as well as, for example, on pedagogical insecurity such as is caused by discriminatory teaching, but law and policy have yet to pay attention to the overall and far-reaching pedagogical safety and security of learners. By means of a descriptive…

  4. Science Teachers' Pedagogical Discontentment: Its Sources and Potential for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, Sherry A.; Sowell, Scott; Enderle, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This research explored science teachers' pedagogical discontentment and described its role in teachers' consideration of new teaching practices. Pedagogical discontentment is an expression of the degree to which one is discontented because one's teaching practices do not achieve one's teaching goals. Through a series of structured interviews…

  5. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge--PCK). The program has been in place…

  6. Pedagogical Practices to Support Classroom Cultures of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert; Tasker, Tammy; White, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the pedagogical practices of two science inquiry teachers and their students using a Web-based system called Web of Inquiry (WOI). There is a need to build a collective repertoire of pedagogical practices that can assist elementary and middle school teachers as they support students to develop a complex model of inquiry based…

  7. Working with Gender Pedagogics at 14 Swedish Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Margareta; Stier, Jonas; Sandberg, Anette

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden, gender pedagogics has been on the political agenda the last decade. Consequently, gender matters have been given much attention in Swedish preschools, and specialized pedagogues have also been trained to counteract socially constructed gender distinctions. Therefore, we have explored the enactment of gender pedagogics. We asked 17…

  8. Pedagogical Framing of OER--The Case of Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Linda; Vigmo, Sylvi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates what characterises teachers' pedagogical design of OER [Open Educational Resources], and potential affordances and constraints in pedagogical design in an open education practice, when contributing to a Swedish repository Lektion.se. The teachers' framing of the OER shared on the repository included the analyses of a…

  9. Self-Development of Pedagogical Competence of Future Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzagitova, Alsu Linarovna; Akhmetov, Linar Gimazetdinovich

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of a considered problem is caused by that situation, in which appeared pedagogical education of Russia at present. Absence of clear understanding of prospect of school, of requirements to the modern teacher, of the purposes of students training in the conditions of continuous reformed education brought in pedagogical universities to loss…

  10. Diagnostics of communication and information environment of pedagogical program means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Вадимовна Журавлёва

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of pedagogical program means is considered through the correctness of a communication and information environment organization. The totality of pedagogical conditions is adduced; the communication and information environment answers these conditions. The main directions (didactic, psychological, ergonomic of analysis are determined and the methods choice for their diagnostics is grounded.

  11. Between Body and Spirit: The Liminality of Pedagogical Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the pedagogical, transformative aspects of education as a relation, viewing such transformation as occurring in the liminal space between body and spirit. In order to explore this liminal space more thoroughly, the article first outlines a case for why liminality is of educational and not only of pedagogical concern, building…

  12. Determining suitable pedagogical approaches to the application of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this pilot action research study was to document the process of choosing a suitable pedagogical approach that best fits a participant. Three pedagogical approaches as described by Ware were chosen: mechanistic, holistic and eclectic (a combination of mechanistic and holistic). Results indicated that each ...

  13. Pedagogical Lexicography: Towards a New and Strict Typology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem is especially severe within so-called pedagogical lexicography. A short panoramic review shows that especially the terms "pedagogical lexicography/dictionaries", "didactic lexicography/dictionaries", "school dictionaries" and "learners' dictionaries" are used with a lot of different meanings that vary from author ...

  14. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I.; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A.; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E. Lucile; Nitiss, John L.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2017-01-01

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates...

  15. Teachers' interaction with children in the school meal situation: the example of pedagogic meals in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Osowski, Christine; Göranzon, Helen; Fjellström, Christina

    2013-01-01

    School meals are also a teaching occasion in which children learn about food and meals, which is referred to as "pedagogic meals" in Sweden. The aim of the present article was to study how the pedagogic meal is practiced in preschool and school settings, with focus on how teachers acted when interacting with the children. Observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. School canteens. Three schools. Teaching in the school meal situation. Social constructionism, new social studies of childhood. The teachers took on 3 different roles. The sociable teacher role entailed turning the school lunch into a social occasion, the educating teacher role involved educating the children, and the evasive teacher role was not associated with the definition of a pedagogic meal. The teacher roles, which ranged from adult-oriented to child-oriented, and which varied in the level of interaction with the children, were summarized in a framework named the Adult- to Child-oriented Teacher Role Framework for School Meals (ACTS). To realize the potential of pedagogic meals, teachers must be educated and become aware of the effects of their behaviors. In this situation, the ACTS framework can constitute a useful tool. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying the Structure and Effect of Drinking-Related Self-Schemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, Lisa H; Strobbe, Stephen; Stein, Karen Farchaus; Giordani, Bruno J; Hagerty, Bonnie M; Pressler, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Self-schemas have received increased attention as favorable targets for therapeutic intervention because of their central role in self-perception and behavior. The purpose of this integrative review was to identify, evaluate, and synthesize existing research pertaining to drinking-related self-schemas. Russell's integrative review strategy guided the search. Sixteen published works were identified, meeting criteria for evaluation ( n = 12 data-based publications and n = 4 models). The retrieved data-based publications rated fair-good using Polit and Beck's criteria; the overall body of literature rated "B" using Grimes and Schulz criteria. Retrieved models rated 4 to 7 using Fitzpatrick and Whall's criteria. The existing literature strongly supports the availability of a drinking-related self-schema among moderate-to-heavy drinking samples, and suggests a positive relationship between elaboration and drinking behavior. The relationship between valenced content of the schema and drinking behavior remains unexplored. Identifying variation in the structural properties of drinking-related self-schemas could lay the foundation for future interventions.

  17. A Proposed Pedagogical Mobile Application for Learning Sign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Abou El-Seoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A handheld device system, such as cellular phone or a PDA, can be used in acquiring Sign Language (SL. The developed system uses graphic applications. The user uses the graphical system to view and to acquire knowledge about sign grammar and syntax based on the local vernacular particular to the country. This paper explores and exploits the possibility of the development of a mobile system to help the deaf and other people to communicate and learn using handheld devices. The pedagogical assessment of the prototype application that uses a recognition-based interface e.g., images and videos, gave evidence that the mobile application is memorable and learnable. Additionally, considering primary and recency effects in the interface design will improve memorability and learnability.

  18. Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Lessons Learned from Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Evens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK is generally accepted as positively impacting teaching quality and student learning. Therefore, research on PCK development in (prospective teachers is highly relevant. Based on a search in three databases (ERIC, PsycInfo, and Web of Science, a systematic review is conducted on intervention studies aiming at PCK development. The research questions are threefold: (1 How are the studies designed? (2 How are the interventions designed? and (3 What elements of interventions contribute to PCK development? The results show that most intervention studies are conducted in math and science education and use a qualitative methodology. Reflection, PCK courses, contact with other teachers, and experiences in educational practice are typically part of effective interventions. The review enables the identification of clear guidelines that may strengthen future research on stimulating PCK.

  19. INTEGRATION OF FRACTAL AND NEURAL NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES IN PEDAGOGICAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE OF TRAINEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana N Dvoryatkina

    2017-12-01

    monitoring of knowledge the fact that individual evaluation test of tutoring of students is carried out on the basis of two parameters depths of assimilation of a concept, its interrelation with other concepts and assessment of size of the synergetic effect of integration of knowledge and activity of trainees is new. Experience of introduction and operation of the automated system of pedagogical monitoring and assessment of the level of knowledge on the basis of integration of fractal model operation and neural network technologies allowed to increase the level of objectivity of estimation of trainees, quality of management of the educational process, its effectiveness in general.

  20. Identifying effective components of child maltreatment interventions: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.; Assink, M.; Gubbels, J.; Boekhout van Solinge, N.F.

    There is a lack of knowledge about specific components that make interventions effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to increase this knowledge by summarizing findings on effects of interventions for child maltreatment and by examining

  1. Developing the Simulator Instructor’s Pedagogical Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøstedt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The full benefits of investment in simulator-based training are achieved only when development of the simulator instructor’s pedagogical competence accompanies the acquisition of advanced technology. In spite of this, the instructor’s pedagogical competence often is not well developed. Courses...... for simulator instructors that address their experiential instructional skills and their understanding of adult participants' learning processes are rare. Lessons learned about the instructor’s role that focus on the relationship between instruction and learning are seldom reported. Simulator instructors......’ pedagogical competence appears to be an area afforded insufficient attention from the simulation community. Based on lessons learned from our four-day pedagogical course for naval simulator instructors in the Danish armed forces, this paper presents a framework for instructors’ pedagogical competence...

  2. Identifying With a Stereotype: The Divergent Effects of Exposure to Homosexual Television Characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Bryan; Rodriguez, Nathian S

    2017-01-01

    Scholars examining homosexual television characters have typically come to one of two conclusions: either exposure to homosexual characters can lead to increased acceptance, or homosexual characters serve to reaffirm negative stereotypes. We seek to bridge these two bodies of research by introducing the concept of stereotyped identification-the idea that cognitively and emotionally identifying with fictional characters can increase acceptance of minorities, while reinforcing implicit stereotypes about how they look, act, and talk. Results from our national survey (N = 972) offer support for this hypothesis.

  3. A hierarchy of unhealthy food promotion effects: identifying methodological approaches and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; King MPsy, Lesley; Chapman Mnd, Kathy; Boyland, Emma; Bauman, Adrian E; Baur, Louise A

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the evidence for a conceptual "hierarchy of effects" of marketing, to guide understanding of the relationship between children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing and poor diets and overweight, and drive the research agenda. We reviewed studies assessing the impact of food promotions on children from MEDLINE, Web of Science, ABI Inform, World Health Organization library database, and The Gray Literature Report. We included articles published in English from 2009 to 2013, with earlier articles from a 2009 systematic review. We grouped articles by outcome of exposure and assessed outcomes within a framework depicting a hierarchy of effects of marketing exposures. Evidence supports a logical sequence of effects linking food promotions to individual-level weight outcomes. Future studies should demonstrate the sustained effects of marketing exposure, and exploit variations in exposures to assess differences in outcomes longitudinally.

  4. Effects of aging on identifying emotions conveyed by point-light walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Justine M Y; Sekuler, Allison B; Bennett, Patrick J; Giese, Martin A; Pilz, Karin S

    2016-02-01

    The visual system is able to recognize human motion simply from point lights attached to the major joints of an actor. Moreover, it has been shown that younger adults are able to recognize emotions from such dynamic point-light displays. Previous research has suggested that the ability to perceive emotional stimuli changes with age. For example, it has been shown that older adults are impaired in recognizing emotional expressions from static faces. In addition, it has been shown that older adults have difficulties perceiving visual motion, which might be helpful to recognize emotions from point-light displays. In the current study, 4 experiments were completed in which older and younger adults were asked to identify 3 emotions (happy, sad, and angry) displayed by 4 types of point-light walkers: upright and inverted normal walkers, which contained both local motion and global form information; upright scrambled walkers, which contained only local motion information; and upright random-position walkers, which contained only global form information. Overall, emotion discrimination accuracy was lower in older participants compared with younger participants, specifically when identifying sad and angry point-light walkers. In addition, observers in both age groups were able to recognize emotions from all types of point-light walkers, suggesting that both older and younger adults are able to recognize emotions from point-light walkers on the basis of local motion or global form. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Identifying key components for an effective case report poster: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Lisa L; Paranjape, Anuradha; Estrada, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Residents demonstrate scholarly activity by presenting posters at academic meetings. Although recommendations from national organizations are available, evidence identifying which components are most important is not. To develop and test an evaluation tool to measure the quality of case report posters and identify the specific components most in need of improvement. Faculty evaluators reviewed case report posters and provided on-site feedback to presenters at poster sessions of four annual academic general internal medicine meetings. A newly developed ten-item evaluation form measured poster quality for specific components of content, discussion, and format (5-point Likert scale, 1 = lowest, 5 = highest). Evaluation tool performance, including Cronbach alpha and inter-rater reliability, overall poster scores, differences across meetings and evaluators and specific components of the posters most in need of improvement. Forty-five evaluators from 20 medical institutions reviewed 347 posters. Cronbach's alpha of the evaluation form was 0.84 and inter-rater reliability, Spearman's rho 0.49 (p words. Our evaluation tool provides empirical data to guide trainees as they prepare posters for presentation which may improve poster quality and enhance their scholarly productivity.

  6. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E Lucile; Nitiss, John L; Goldfarb, David S

    2017-01-05

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates aging without affecting proliferative growth or viability. Genetic and biochemical criteria reveal LS1 to be a weak Top2 poison. Top2 poisons induce the accumulation of covalent Top2-linked DNA double strand breaks that, if left unrepaired, lead to genome instability and death. LS1 is toxic to cells deficient in homologous recombination, suggesting that the damage it induces is normally mitigated by genome maintenance systems. The essential roles of yTop2 in proliferating cells may come with a fitness trade-off in older cells that are less able to sense or repair yTop2-mediated DNA damage. Consistent with this idea, cells live longer when yTop2 expression levels are reduced. These results identify intrinsic yTop2-mediated DNA damage as potentially manageable cause of aging.

  7. Pedagogical Approaches to Diagnostic Imaging Education: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linaker, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine literature on how radiology is taught and learned by both radiology residents and undergraduates in the health professions. Methods A review of the literature was performed using relevant key words. Articles were retrieved through December 2012 using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ERIC, Proquest, and ICL databases along with a manual review of references. Results Of the 4716 unique abstracts reviewed by the author, 91 were found to be relevant to the purpose of this study. The literature retrieved reported pedagogical approaches to teaching radiology including the following: problem solving, technology as teacher, independent learning tools, visiting lectureships, case based teaching, and conferences. There was some exploration of the relative effectiveness of educational formats. Suggestions for future research identify 7 areas of relative consistency. Conclusion Radiology is a clinical skill that requires integration science, clinical information, clinical experiences, and information recorded on diagnostic imaging studies. The research in this area focuses on problem solving, the use of algorithm/scripts, introducing uncertainty in clinical scenarios, incorporating technology in learning environments, active learning techniques, and methods of independent learning. Although the literature in this area is still in its infancy, the research examining the relative effectiveness of these various educational formats is often contradictory, suggesting that this is a complex area of study with numerous factors influencing student learning. PMID:26770173

  8. A review of creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Kaufman, Diane; Schoenherr, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    The act of writing offers an opportunity to foster self-expression and organisational abilities, along with observation and descriptive skills. These soft skills are relevant to clinical thinking and medical practice. Medical school curricula employ pedagogical approaches suitable for assessing medical and clinical knowledge, but teaching methods for soft skills in critical thinking, listening and verbal expression, which are important in patient communication and engagement, may be less formal. Creative and expressive writing that is incorporated into medical school courses or clerkships offers a vehicle for medical students to develop soft skills. The aim of this review was to explore creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical schools in relation to outcomes of medical education. This project employed a scoping review approach to gather, evaluate and synthesise reports on the use of creative and expressive writing in US medical education. Ten databases were searched for scholarly articles reporting on creative or expressive writing during medical school. Limitation of the results to activities associated with US medical schools, produced 91 articles. A thematic analysis of the articles was conducted to identify how writing was incorporated into the curriculum. Enthusiasm for writing as a pedagogical tool was identified in 28 editorials and overviews. Quasi-experimental, mixed methods and qualitative studies, primarily writing activities, were aimed at helping students cognitively or emotionally process difficult challenges in medical education, develop a personal identity or reflect on interpersonal skills. The programmes and interventions using creative or expressive writing were largely associated with elective courses or clerkships, and not required courses. Writing was identified as a potentially relevant pedagogical tool, but not included as an essential component of medical school curricula. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Results of experimental testing of system of future physical culture teachers’ training for art pedagogic means’ application in pedagogic functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Nizhevska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the research is devoted to seeking of ways to rising of quality of future physical culture teachers. Material: in experiment 436 students and 29 teachers participated. Results: it was found that readiness of future physical culture teachers for application of art pedagogic means in professional functioning is achieved through realization of appropriate block system. Such system ensures mastering by students of the following: theoretical principles of art pedagogic; mastering of art pedagogic skills in teaching and quasi professional functioning; acquiring of practical experience of art means’ application in period of pedagogic practice at schools. It was also determined that training system of future teachers includes the following three blocks: conceptual-target, knowledge-procedural; control-correcting. Conclusions: it is recommended to use such criteria of students’ readiness for application of art means in pedagogic functioning: motivation-axiological, cognitive-active, personality’s-reflexive.

  10. Developing and Enacting Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teaching History: An Exploration of Two Novice Teachers' Growth over Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Sano, Chauncey; Budano, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Using artifacts of teachers' practices, classroom observations, and teacher interviews, we explore the development and enactment of 2 novices' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for teaching history. We identify and track 4 components of PCK that are relevant to teaching history: representing history, transforming history, attending to students'…

  11. Mapping Trends in Pedagogical Approaches and Learning Technologies: Perspectives from the Canadian, International, and Military Education Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppio, Grazia; Covell, Leigha

    2016-01-01

    Increased technological advances, coupled with new learners' needs, have created new realities for higher education contexts. This study explored and mapped trends in pedagogical approaches and learning technologies in postsecondary education and identified how these innovations are affecting teaching and learning practices in higher education…

  12. Improving Science Pedagogic Quality in Elementary School Using Process Skill Approach Can Motivate Student to Be Active in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukiniarti

    2016-01-01

    On global era todays, as the professional teacher should be improving their pedagogic competency, including to improve their science pedagogy quality. This study is aimed to identify: (1) Process skill approach which has been used by Elementary School Teacher in science learning; (2) Teacher's opinion that process skill can motivate the student to…

  13. Is Teacher Knowledge Associated with Performance? On the Relationship between Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Instructional Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Pflanzl, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have identified general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) as a relevant category of teacher knowledge. However, hardly any study has examined the relationship between GPK of teachers and the instructional quality delivered to their students. This article therefore investigates the relationship between teachers' GPK assessed via a…

  14. The State of the Art of Teaching Research Methods in the Social Sciences: Towards a Pedagogical Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claire; Garner, Mark; Kawulich, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    No formal pedagogical culture for research methods in the social sciences seems to exist and, as part of the authors' endeavour to establish such a culture, this article reviews current literature about teaching research methods and identifies the gaps in the research. Articles in academic journals spanning a 10-year period were collected by…

  15. The Vocal Improviser-Educator: An Analysis of Selected American and Australian Educators' Influences and Pedagogical Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Steinman, Patrice Madura

    2014-01-01

    Thirty vocal improviser-educators from Australia (n = 15) and the United States (n = 15) were surveyed for musical background, influences and pedagogical views, and assessed for personality type using the "Myers-Briggs Type Indicator" ("MBTI"). The purpose was to both combine and compare the two groups to identify overall…

  16. Effective spreading from multiple leaders identified by percolation in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shenggong; Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho; Hu, Yanqing

    2017-07-01

    Social networks constitute a new platform for information propagation, but its success is crucially dependent on the choice of spreaders who initiate the spreading of information. In this paper, we remove edges in a network at random and the network segments into isolated clusters. The most important nodes in each cluster then form a set of influential spreaders, such that news propagating from them would lead to extensive coverage and minimal redundancy. The method utilizes the similarities between the segmented networks before percolation and the coverage of information propagation in each social cluster to obtain a set of distributed and coordinated spreaders. Our tests of implementing the susceptible-infected-recovered model on Facebook and Enron email networks show that this method outperforms conventional centrality-based methods in terms of spreadability and coverage redundancy. The suggested way of identifying influential spreaders thus sheds light on a new paradigm of information propagation in social networks.

  17. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants' effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage

  18. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data: A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, John D; Price, David B; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Postma, Dirkje S; Josephs, Lynn K; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent attacks. We analyzed anonymized, longitudinal medical records of 118,981 patients with actively treated asthma (ages 12-80 years) and 3 or more years of data. Potential risk factors during 1 baseline year were evaluated using univariable (simple) logistic regression for outcomes of 2 or more and 4 or more attacks during the following 2-year period. Predictors with significant univariable association (P attacks included baseline-year markers of attacks (acute oral corticosteroid courses, emergency visits), more frequent reliever use and health care utilization, worse lung function, current smoking, blood eosinophilia, rhinitis, nasal polyps, eczema, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, older age, and being female. The number of oral corticosteroid courses had the strongest association. The final cross-validated models incorporated 19 and 16 risk factors for 2 or more and 4 or more attacks over 2 years, respectively, with areas under the curve of 0.785 (95% CI, 0.780-0.789) and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.860-0.873), respectively. Routinely collected data could be used proactively via automated searches to identify individuals at risk of recurrent asthma attacks. Further research is needed to assess the impact of such knowledge on clinical prognosis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional and effective whole brain connectivity using magnetoencephalography to identify monozygotic twin pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuru, M.; Gouw, A.; Hillebrand, A.; Stam, C J; van Dijk, B W; Scheltens, P.; Tijms, B.M.; Konijnenberg, E.; ten Kate-Booij, M.J.; den Braber, A; Smit, D J A; Boomsma, D I; Visser, P J

    2017-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity patterns are highly stable over time within subjects. This suggests that such 'functional fingerprints' may have strong genetic component. We investigated whether the functional (FC) or effective (EC) connectivity patterns of one monozygotic twin could be used

  20. Identifying Effective Spelling Interventions Using a Brief Experimental Analysis and Extended Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Merilee; Clure, Lynne F.; Bleck, Amanda A.; Schmitz, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Spelling is an important skill that is crucial to effective written communication. In this study, brief experimental analysis procedures were used to examine spelling instruction strategies (e.g., whole word correction; word study strategy; positive practice; and cover, copy, and compare) for four students. In addition, an extended analysis was…

  1. Identifying the effects of Enterprise System implementation and use: Examples from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    case writing. The main results show that the effects of ERP implementation and use are seldom fully predictable by management. The ERP system can be seen as an organisational actor in its own right as it to a large extent influences values, culture, behaviour, processes and procedures of other actors...

  2. Identifying Riparian Buffer Effects on Stream 1 Nitrogen in Southeastern Coastal Plain Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian areas have long demonstrated their ability to attenuate nutrients and sediments from agricultural runoff at the field scale; however, to inform effective nutrient management choices, the impact of riparian buffers on water quality services must be assessed at watershed s...

  3. Identifying and Clarifying Values and Reason Statements that Promote Effective Food Parenting Practices, Using Intensive Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; Hingle, Melanie D.; Knesek, Jessica; O'Connor, Teresia; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Generate and test parents' understanding of values and associated reason statements to encourage effective food parenting practices. Methods: This study was cross-sectional. Sixteen parents from different ethnic groups (African American, white, and Hispanic) living with their 3- to 5-year-old child were recruited. Interested parents…

  4. Pedagogical Agents as Learning Companions: The Role of Agent Competency and Type of Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yanghee; Baylor, Amy L.; PALS Group,

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of the competency (low vs. high) and interaction type (proactive vs. responsive) of pedagogical agents as learning companions (PALs) on learning, self-efficacy, and attitudes. Participants were 72 undergraduates in an introductory computer-literacy course who were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: Low-Proactive, Low-Responsive, High-Proactive, and High-Responsive. Results indicated a main effect for PAL competency. Students who worked ...

  5. The effectiveness of direct instruction for teaching language to children with autism spectrum disorders: identifying materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B; Flores, Margaret M

    2009-01-01

    Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently demonstrate language delays (American Psychiatric Association 2000). This study investigated the effects of a Direct Instruction (DI) language program implemented with elementary students with ASD. There is little research in the area of DI as a language intervention for students with ASD. This study examined the effectiveness of DI with regard to students' oral language skills, specifically the identification of materials of which objects were made. A single-subject changing criterion design was employed. A functional relation between DI and oral language skills was demonstrated through replication of skill increase over three criterion changes and across three students. The results and their implications are discussed further.

  6. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Identifying Cost Effective Tank Waste Characterization Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-12

    This report documents the activities that were performed during the second year of a project undertaken to improve the cost effectiveness and timeliness of SRNL’s tank closure characterization practices. The activities performed during the first year of the project were previously reported in SRNL-STI-2015-00144. The scope of the second year activities was divided into the following three primary tasks: 1) develop a technical basis and strategy for improving the cost effectiveness and schedule of SRNL’s tank closure characterization program; 2) initiate the design and assembly of a new waste removal system for improving the throughput and reducing the personnel dose associated with extraction chromatography radiochemical separations; and 3) develop and perform feasibility testing of three alternative radiochemical separation protocols holding promise for improving high resource demand/time consuming tank closure sample analysis methods.

  7. Opening up education - some pedagogical considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Christian; Kjær, Arne

    2016-01-01

    would we need universities? Libraries could do the job!” In order to open up education, we need to develop a pedagogical framework for knowledge building to supplement the tradition for knowledge acquisition in higher education. In this article we present our strategic considerations for organising......In the “Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions” from September 25, 2013 the Commission advocated strongly to ‘Opening up Education’ through ‘Innovative teaching and learning for all...... through new Technologies and Open Educational Resources’. We strongly support this vision for the future and aim at realising it within a Danish context with a population of five million. However, we also retain a certain scepticism and remember the saying of David Wiley: “If content is all we need, why...

  8. Teachers’ Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching with Minecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild; Hautopp, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The aim of this paper is to explore teachers’ different pedagogical approaches to teaching the “sandbox” digital game Minecraft as a part of L1 primary education. The empirical data for the paper is based on a series of design interventions with a Minecraft curriculum in three different...... classes (two 1st grades and one 2nd grade) at three different Danish schools, which involved video observations of the teaching and interviews with the participating teachers. The project is financed by The Danish Ministry of Education (2013-2015) and is part of a larger project on “ICT in the Innovative...... School”, which aims to develop students’ 21st century skills. Drawing on theoretical work on professional practice (Schön, 1983), frame theory (Goffman, 1974), and Dialogic Self Theory (Ligorio, 2010), the paper aims to describe and understand how the teachers’ positioned themselves through redesign...

  9. Hacia una pedagogía pacicultora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDER LUIS ORTIZ OCAÑA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se demuestra científicamente que el Bachillerato Pacicultor1 es un modelo didáctico innovador y pertinente dentro del contexto de las políticas de atención educativa a la población vulnerable y desplazada, sustentado en los modelos educativos de la Escuela Nueva y la Escuela del Desarrollo Integral, basado en enfoques constructivistas, tendencias humanistas, teorías sociocríticas o histórico – culturales y corrientes cognitivas de aprendizajes significativos. Este enfoque sistémico y configuracional del bachillerato aporta elementos esenciales que permitirán configurar una Pedagogía Pacicultora.   

  10. Audio Description as a Pedagogical Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Kleege

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Audio description is the process of translating visual information into words for people who are blind or have low vision. Typically such description has focused on films, museum exhibitions, images and video on the internet, and live theater. Because it allows people with visual impairments to experience a variety of cultural and educational texts that would otherwise be inaccessible, audio description is a mandated aspect of disability inclusion, although it remains markedly underdeveloped and underutilized in our classrooms and in society in general. Along with increasing awareness of disability, audio description pushes students to practice close reading of visual material, deepen their analysis, and engage in critical discussions around the methodology, standards and values, language, and role of interpretation in a variety of academic disciplines. We outline a few pedagogical interventions that can be customized to different contexts to develop students' writing and critical thinking skills through guided description of visual material.

  11. Pedagogía de la metamorfosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Hernando Gómez-Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo presenta los fundamentos teóricos de la pedagogía de la metamorfosis. Esta perspectiva retoma los cambios paradigmáticos de la ciencia en función de una ética planetaria, unos procesos de conocimiento que incluyen el entorno, el cuerpo y la conciencia, y una idea del devenir humano que, sin oponerse a sus nuevas formas de expresión y realización, se resiste a cualquier forma de invasión y colonización del cuerpo, de nuestra condición animal biológica, y de nuestra dignidad y espiritualidad. Como estrategia metodológica, propone el relato de formación, la implementación de la transdisciplinariedad y el papel de la espiritualidad.

  12. Pedagogical Experience of Teaching Financial Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Delgadillo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the pedagogical experience of teaching a financial coaching course to personal and family finance undergraduate students at XXXX State University. The paper describes the conceptualization of the class, including theoretical frameworks, ethical considerations, practitioner’s models, learning objectives, and competencies. The assessment of the course provided data used by the instructor to refine and adjust future course content and assignments. Quantitative data was collected in pre- and post-tests assessments. The quantitative assessment shows statistically significant gains in specific coaching skills and competencies. The qualitative assessment indicates that, at the end of the course, students had better understanding of the coaching code of ethics and better communication and listening skills. The peer-to-peer coaching exercise was apparently very fear-provoking but valuable for the students. Challenges for teaching financial coaching by future instructors are discussed in the last section

  13. Social-pedagogical aspects of trainer's activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramskoy S.I.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysed social-pedagogical aspect of activity of trainer-teacher on preparation of sporting reserve of different level. Activity of trainer is studied on forming socially-active personalities of sportsman. The personal long-term experience is presented to trainer-teaching works of child's trainer, trainer of student command, trainer of command of major league on a handball. It is shown that multilateral activity of trainer is estimated not only the sporting results of his pupils but also has considerably more wide circle of influence on the ward. Influence of employments is represented sport on forming socially-meaningful qualities of personality. It is marked that to the basic personal qualities of trainer behave: creative activity, flexibility of mind, industriousness, honesty, disinterestedness, of principle, self-control, demand, modesty, culture.

  14. Does pedagogical documentation support maternal reminiscing conversations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Fleck

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available When parents talk with their children about lessons learned in school, they are participating in reminiscing of an unshared event. This study sought to understand if pedagogical documentation, from the Reggio Approach to early childhood education, would support and enhance the conversation. Mother–child dyads reminisced two separate times about preschool lessons, one time with documentation available to them and one time without. Transcripts were coded extracting variables indicative of high and low maternal reminiscing styles. Results indicate that mother and child conversation characteristics were more highly elaborative when documentation was present than when it was not. In addition, children added more information to the conversation supporting the notion that such conversations enhanced memory for lessons. Documentation could be used as a support tool for conversations and children’s memory about lessons learned in school.

  15. Cognitive component of Tolerance in Pedagogic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Akimova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at one of the urgent educational problems of tolerance development by teachers and students; tolerance being viewed as the openness to the new knowledge acquisition, willingness to understand other people and cooperate with them, and therefore the opportunity for self- development.The paper outlines the ways of tolerant attitudes formation by all the human subjects of educational process; the concept of person oriented teaching is considered to be the basic one for tolerance development. To optimize the specialists’ training for communication at any level of professional environment, the cognitive activity educational model is suggested, providing the ways out of any complicated pedagogical situation. The cognitive psychology concepts give the background for the above model. The education in question promotes the intellectual level of the prospective teachers, intensifies their creative potential, methodological thinking and practical experience, as well as tolerance development in professional communication process. 

  16. Town mouse or country mouse: identifying a town dislocation effect in Chinese urbanization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available Understanding urbanization and evaluating its impact are vital for formulating global sustainable development. The results obtained from evaluating the impact of urbanization, however, depend on the kind of measurement used. With the goal of increasing our understanding of the impact of urbanization, we developed direct and indirect subjective indicators to measure how people assess their living situation. The survey revealed that the projected endorsements and perceived social ambiance of people toward living in different types of settlements did not improve along with the urbanization level in China. The assessment scores from the city dwellers were not significantly different from those from the country areas and, more surprisingly, both were significantly higher than the assessment scores of the town dwellers, which we had expected to fall between the assessment scores of the country and city dwellers. Instead their scores were the lowest. We dubbed this V-shaped relationship the "town dislocation effect." When searching for a potential explanation for this effect, we found additional town dislocation effects in social support, loss aversion, and receptivity toward genetically modified food. Further analysis showed that only social support mediated the relationship between the three tiers of settlements (cities, country areas, and towns and the subjective indicator. The projected endorsements yielded significant subjective assessments that could enhance our understanding of Chinese urbanization. Towns posed specific problems that require special attention.

  17. Identifying the environmental factors that effect within canopy BVOC loss using a multilevel canopy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, W. S.; Fuentes, J. D.; Lerdau, M.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will provide research findings to evaluate the hypothesis that the loss of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) within plant canopies is dynamic and depends on factors such as plant canopy architecture (height and leaf area distribution), atmospheric turbulence, concentration of oxidants (OH, O3, NO3), and the reactivity of BVOC species. Results will be presented from a new one dimensional, multilevel canopy model that couples algorithms for canopy microclimate, leaf physiology, BVOC emission, turbulent transport, and atmospheric chemistry to investigate the relative importance of factors that impact BVOC loss within a forest canopy. Model sensitivity tests will be presented and discussed to identify factors driving canopy loss. Results show isoprene and monoterpene canopy losses as high as 9 and 18%, respectively, for tall canopies during the daytime. We hypothesize that canopy height and wind speed (i.e. canopy residence time) may be the most important in dictating within-canopy loss. This work will reduce the error in bottom-up flux estimates of BVOCs and ultimately improve parameterizations of BVOC sources in air quality models by accounting for within canopy processes.

  18. Identifying The Effective Factors for Cost Overrun and Time Delay in Water Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mirzai Matin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Water construction projects in Iran frequently face problems which cause cost overrun and time delay, the two most common issues in construction projects in general. The objective of this survey is to identify and quantify these problems and thus help in avoiding them. This survey represents a collection of the most significant problems found in the literature, classified into 11 groups according to their source. The questionnaire form used contains 84 questions which were answered by random engineers who work in water construction projects. The Relative Importance Weight (RIW method is used to weight the importance of each one of the 84 problems. The focus of this survey is on overall top ten issues which are: bureaucracy in bidding method, inflation, economical condition of the government, not enough information gathered and surveys done before design, monthly payment difficulties, material cost changes, law changes by the government, financial difficulties, mode of financing and payment for completed work and changes made by the owner. A section for each of these issues provides additional information about them. In the full text of this survey the same weighting method is used to classify the main groups, and the results show that issues related to the groups of government, owner and consultant has the most significant impact. The last part of this survey describes the point of view of the engineers who took part in this survey and the recommendations they made.

  19. Modern uses of proteome to identify the biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology, genetics, and clinical research are transforming the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and in particular of endocrine disorders. It is now clear, more than ever, that disease is a function of genes, whether they are involved directly or indirectly through the environment. The significant advances have occurred through the completion of the sequencing of human genome. Proteomics have gained much attention as a drug development platform because disease processes and treatments are often manifested at the protein level. Protein expression profiles are used in cancer research to identify tumor subtypes and to achieve a more reliable and objective classification. Molecular analysis allows for subgrouping based on genomic or proteomic profiles together with histopathology evaluation in colorectal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, lymphomas and others. The identification of markers for bladder cancer was reported that defines the degree of differentiation. It could be a new field for studying and detecting irradiation induced physiological changes on protein expressions rather than on the chromosome as a whole. (author)

  20. [Key effect genes responding to nerve injury identified by gene ontology and computer pattern recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qian; Peng, Jin; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2012-07-01

    In order to screen out important genes from large gene data of gene microarray after nerve injury, we combine gene ontology (GO) method and computer pattern recognition technology to find key genes responding to nerve injury, and then verify one of these screened-out genes. Data mining and gene ontology analysis of gene chip data GSE26350 was carried out through MATLAB software. Cd44 was selected from screened-out key gene molecular spectrum by comparing genes' different GO terms and positions on score map of principal component. Function interferences were employed to influence the normal binding of Cd44 and one of its ligands, chondroitin sulfate C (CSC), to observe neurite extension. Gene ontology analysis showed that the first genes on score map (marked by red *) mainly distributed in molecular transducer activity, receptor activity, protein binding et al molecular function GO terms. Cd44 is one of six effector protein genes, and attracted us with its function diversity. After adding different reagents into the medium to interfere the normal binding of CSC and Cd44, varying-degree remissions of CSC's inhibition on neurite extension were observed. CSC can inhibit neurite extension through binding Cd44 on the neuron membrane. This verifies that important genes in given physiological processes can be identified by gene ontology analysis of gene chip data.

  1. Pedagogía de los medios y pedagogía Freinet: puntos de encuentro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Gabriela Silva Piovani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue abordar los principales aportes de la pedagogía Freinet, así como de los estudios de pedagogía de los medios, mídia-educação y media literacy, a fin de reflexionar cómo las contribuciones de cada propuesta pueden complementarse y perfeccionar entre sí. El texto surge del análisis bibliográfico, desarrollado como parte de una propuesta de disertación de maestría en Educación Física Escolar. Como síntesis, puede considerarse qué aspectos relacionados con la propuesta de Freinet, como la escucha de los alumnos, estímulo de la comunicación, la práctica de correspondencia interescolar, entre otros, están vinculados y pueden ser considerados antecesores de los estudios de pedagogía de los medios, mídia-educação y media literacy.

  2. Pedagogical Conditions of Shaping Motor Competence in Physical Education of Students of Special Medical Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Корягін

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Study objective. To define the pedagogical conditions of shaping motor competence in students of special medical groups during physical education at higher educational institutions. Study methods: theoretical analysis, systematization, comparison of different views on the issue under study, methodological and special literature collation, general scientific methods of theoretical level: analogy, analysis, synthesis, abstraction, induction. Study results. The study addresses the issues of indicating the pedagogical conditions necessary for the effective shaping of the motor competence in students of special medical groups during their physical education at higher educational institutions. The data analysis and collation of the data collected from the scientific, methodological and special literature helped outline and organize their index, which is a pre-requisite for ensuring the process effectiveness. We recommend using the study results as a major foundation for re-organization of the scientific and methodological aspects of physical education of students with health problems to ensure their motor competence effectively shaped.

  3. Teaching geography and information technology: The use of GIS in innovative pedagogical experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Zappettini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper accounts for an innovative pedagogical experience carried out within the terms of the DINIECE, MECYT - FAHCE, UNLP agreement, which calls for the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS with pedagogical purposes. Such experience took place in the course called "Urban Itineraries Seminar" at the Colegio Nacional Rafael Hernández, UNLP. From a geographical and didactic critical belief, the students were encouraged to understand the socio-environmental reality they live in. In order to do this, environmental issues were identified in the area of La Plata by means of a territorial and spatial analysis. The students lived and experienced a new line of work in which innovation was signated by the use of new technologies (GIS together with the didactic methodology which encourages meaningful learning.

  4. COGNITIVE ARPOACH TO MOTIVATION AND ITS PEDAGOGICAL IMPLICATION IN EFL LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanto Ardi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explore university students’ motivation from the perspectives of cognitive approach and discuss its pedagogical implication in EFL learning. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 Likert-scale items was distributed to 192 students. The questionnaire was adapted from Language Learning Orientation Scale, which was developed by Noels, Pelletier, Clément, and Vallerand (2000. The language learning orientation scale was developed based on self-determination theory. The items of the instrument sought to explore students’ level of cognitive motivation, which were originally grouped into six aspects, such as external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, intrinsic motivation-accomplishment, intrinsic motivation-knowledge and intrinsic motivation-stimulation. The results of the research suggested that the students were identified with a high degree of both extrinsic and intrinsic motivation. The pedagogical implications EFL teachersmay provide include authentic materials and communication, students’ engagement and collaboration, as well as feedback and reward. The pedagogical implications are expected to increase students’ current state of motivation.

  5. Identifying effective healthy weight and lifestyle advertisements: Focus groups with Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Helen; Murphy, Michael; Scully, Maree; Rose, Mischa; Cotter, Trish

    2016-08-01

    This study explored adult's attitudes and reactions to a range of television advertisements (ads) promoting healthy weight, physical activity and healthy eating. Twenty-four focus groups (N = 179) were conducted in metropolitan and regional areas of the Australian states of Victoria, New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland, with participants segmented by sex, education (no tertiary, at least some tertiary) and life stage (young adults, parents). Each group was assigned to one of the three advertising streams - Weight, Activity, or Nutrition - where responses to five different ads were explored using semi-structured, moderator-led discussions. Discussion transcripts were qualitatively content analysed using a conventional approach. Four main themes were identified in participants' discussions about the ads' main messages - (i) Why is it a problem? (ii) Who is it a problem for? (iii) What should I do about it? (iv) How do I make the changes? Reactions varied by demographic factors and current weight and lifestyle status. Participants furthest from achieving public health recommendations for weight, diet and activity were motivated by 'what' and 'how' ads involving gentle persuasion and helpful hints. Participants who were closer to meeting these recommendations were motivated by 'why' ads featuring more graphic and emotive content and new information. Findings suggest a strategic approach is important for the development of public health ads promoting healthy weight and lifestyle, with consideration given to the specific communication goals and who the target audience is. This should help ensure an appropriate message is delivered to priority population subgroups in the most informative and motivating manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of active conductance distribution over dendrites on the synaptic integration in an identified nonspiking interneuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Takashima

    Full Text Available The synaptic integration in individual central neuron is critically affected by how active conductances are distributed over dendrites. It has been well known that the dendrites of central neurons are richly endowed with voltage- and ligand-regulated ion conductances. Nonspiking interneurons (NSIs, almost exclusively characteristic to arthropod central nervous systems, do not generate action potentials and hence lack voltage-regulated sodium channels, yet having a variety of voltage-regulated potassium conductances on their dendritic membrane including the one similar to the delayed-rectifier type potassium conductance. It remains unknown, however, how the active conductances are distributed over dendrites and how the synaptic integration is affected by those conductances in NSIs and other invertebrate neurons where the cell body is not included in the signal pathway from input synapses to output sites. In the present study, we quantitatively investigated the functional significance of active conductance distribution pattern in the spatio-temporal spread of synaptic potentials over dendrites of an identified NSI in the crayfish central nervous system by computer simulation. We systematically changed the distribution pattern of active conductances in the neuron's multicompartment model and examined how the synaptic potential waveform was affected by each distribution pattern. It was revealed that specific patterns of nonuniform distribution of potassium conductances were consistent, while other patterns were not, with the waveform of compound synaptic potentials recorded physiologically in the major input-output pathway of the cell, suggesting that the possibility of nonuniform distribution of potassium conductances over the dendrite cannot be excluded as well as the possibility of uniform distribution. Local synaptic circuits involving input and output synapses on the same branch or on the same side were found to be potentially affected under

  7. A study looking at the effectiveness of developmental screening in identifying learning disabilities in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, O; Nualláin, S O

    2001-05-01

    This is a retrospective study of children under six years of age referred to the Brothers of Charity Early Intervention Services in County Galway, a service that caters for children under 6 years with learning disabilities. The aim in doing this study was to assess the value of routine developmental screening in identifying children with learning difficulties. This study also investigates the patterns and sources of referral to the remedial services provided by the Brothers of Charity and highlights possible avoidable delays in referral. The results showed that many children were referred for remedial services late. The reasons for late referral included late identification of some children with problems, insufficient co-ordination of community-based services and a lack of awareness of the importance of early intervention in some cases. As some communication disorders such as autism, autistic spectrum disorders and specific language delay may not express themselves until the later part of the second year of life, the 18-24 month developmental assessment is of vital importance. However identification of these disorders can present difficulties and may call for additional training for professionals involved in the developmental screening of children in that age group. The interval between initial identification and referral for remedial care in many cases was more than twelve months. We propose that, in order to minimize this time, children requiring a more in-depth assessment should be assessed by a community-based multidisciplinary team, enabling integrated assessment by the different disciplines and thus speedier referral to remedial services.

  8. How close are we to definitively identifying the respiratory health effects of e-cigarettes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Alexsandra; Feleszko, Wojciech; Smith, Danielle M; Goniewicz, Maciej

    2018-07-01

    Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is frequently promoted as a less harmful alternative to cigarette smoking. The impact of repeated inhalation of e-cigarette aerosols on respiratory health is not well understood. Areas covered: Using results from laboratory, observational, and clinical studies, we synthesize evidence relevant to potential respiratory health effects that may result from inhalation of e-cigarette aerosols. Expert commentary: Chemical analyses reveal that e-cigarette aerosols contain numerous respiratory irritants and toxicants. There are documented cytotoxic effects of e-cigarette constituents on lung tissue. Studies among ex-smokers who switched to e-cigarettes note reduced exposure to numerous respiratory toxicants, reduced asthma exacerbations, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptoms. Regular exposure to e-cigarette aerosols is associated with impaired respiratory functioning. Potential respiratory health risks resulting from secondhand e-cigarette aerosol exposure have not been sufficiently evaluated. Current evidence indicates that although e-cigarettes are not without risk, these products seemingly pose fewer respiratory health harms issues compared to tobacco cigarettes. Data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials examining the impact of e-cigarette use on lung health are needed to better understand respiratory health risks tied to use of these products.

  9. City-scale analysis of water-related energy identifies more cost-effective solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ka Leung; Kenway, Steven J; Lant, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    Energy and greenhouse gas management in urban water systems typically focus on optimising within the direct system boundary of water utilities that covers the centralised water supply and wastewater treatment systems, despite a greater energy influence by the water end use. This work develops a cost curve of water-related energy management options from a city perspective for a hypothetical Australian city. It is compared with that from the water utility perspective. The curves are based on 18 water-related energy management options that have been implemented or evaluated in Australia. In the studied scenario, the cost-effective energy saving potential from a city perspective (292 GWh/year) is far more significant than that from a utility perspective (65 GWh/year). In some cases, for similar capital cost, if regional water planners invested in end use options instead of utility options, a greater energy saving potential at a greater cost-effectiveness could be achieved in urban water systems. For example, upgrading a wastewater treatment plant for biogas recovery at a capital cost of $27.2 million would save 31 GWh/year with a marginal cost saving of $63/MWh, while solar hot water system rebates at a cost of $28.6 million would save 67 GWh/year with a marginal cost saving of $111/MWh. Options related to hot water use such as water-efficient shower heads, water-efficient clothes washers and solar hot water system rebates are among the most cost-effective city-scale opportunities. This study demonstrates the use of cost curves to compare both utility and end use options in a consistent framework. It also illustrates that focusing solely on managing the energy use within the utility would miss substantial non-utility water-related energy saving opportunities. There is a need to broaden the conventional scope of cost curve analysis to include water-related energy and greenhouse gas at the water end use, and to value their management from a city perspective. This

  10. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  11. Identifying the effective concentration for spatial repellency of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achee, Nicole; Masuoka, Penny; Smith, Philip; Martin, Nicholas; Chareonviryiphap, Theeraphap; Polsomboon, Suppaluck; Hendarto, Joko; Grieco, John

    2012-12-28

    Current efforts are underway to quantify the chemical concentration in a treated air space that elicits a spatial repellent (deterrent) response in a vector population. Such information will facilitate identifying the optimum active ingredient (AI) dosage and intervention coverage important for the development of spatial repellent tools--one of several novel strategies being evaluated for vector-borne disease control. This study reports initial findings from air sampling experiments conducted under field conditions to describe the relationship between air concentrations of repellent AIs and deterrent behavior in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Air samples were taken inside and outdoors of experimental huts located in Pu Tuey Village, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand in conjunction with mosquito behavioral evaluations. A mark-release-recapture study design using interception traps was used to measure deterrency of Ae. aegypti against 0.00625% metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric (2g/m2) within separate experimental trials. Sentinel mosquito cohorts were positioned adjacent to air sampling locations to monitor knock down responses to AI within the treated air space. Air samples were analyzed using two techniques: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Compendium Method TO-10A and thermal desorption (TD). Both the USEPA TO-10A and TD air sampling methods were able to detect and quantify volatized AIs under field conditions. Air samples indicated concentrations of both repellent chemicals below thresholds required for toxic responses (mortality) in mosquitoes. These concentrations elicited up to a 58% and 70% reduction in Ae. aegypti entry (i.e., deterrency) into treated experimental huts using metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric, respectively. Minimal knock down was observed in sentinel mosquito cohorts positioned adjacent to air sampling locations during both chemical evaluations. This study is the first to describe two air sampling

  12. Identifying the effective concentration for spatial repellency of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achee Nicole

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current efforts are underway to quantify the chemical concentration in a treated air space that elicits a spatial repellent (deterrent response in a vector population. Such information will facilitate identifying the optimum active ingredient (AI dosage and intervention coverage important for the development of spatial repellent tools – one of several novel strategies being evaluated for vector-borne disease control. This study reports initial findings from air sampling experiments conducted under field conditions to describe the relationship between air concentrations of repellent AIs and deterrent behavior in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Methods Air samples were taken inside and outdoors of experimental huts located in Pu Tuey Village, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand in conjunction with mosquito behavioral evaluations. A mark-release-recapture study design using interception traps was used to measure deterrency of Ae. aegypti against 0.00625% metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric (2g/m2 within separate experimental trials. Sentinel mosquito cohorts were positioned adjacent to air sampling locations to monitor knock down responses to AI within the treated air space. Air samples were analyzed using two techniques: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA Compendium Method TO-10A and thermal desorption (TD. Results Both the USEPA TO-10A and TD air sampling methods were able to detect and quantify volatized AIs under field conditions. Air samples indicated concentrations of both repellent chemicals below thresholds required for toxic responses (mortality in mosquitoes. These concentrations elicited up to a 58% and 70% reduction in Ae. aegypti entry (i.e., deterrency into treated experimental huts using metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric, respectively. Minimal knock down was observed in sentinel mosquito cohorts positioned adjacent to air sampling locations during both chemical evaluations. Conclusions

  13. Identifying Effective Education Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Meta-Analysis of Rigorous Impact Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to identify effective educational interventions in Sub-Saharan African with an impact on student learning. This is the first meta-analysis in the field of education conducted for Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper takes an in-depth look at twelve different types of education interventions or programs and attempts to not…

  14. Goodbye or Identify: Detrimental Effects of Downsizing on Identification and Survivor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dick, Rolf; Drzensky, Frank; Heinz, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that after layoffs, employees often report decreased commitment and performance which has been coined the survivor syndrome. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain underexplored. The purpose of the paper is to show that reduced organizational identification can serve as an explanation for the survivor syndrome. We conducted a laboratory experiment, in which participants work as a group of employees for another participant who acts as employer. In the course of the experiment, the employer decides whether one of his or her employees should be laid off or not. Mediation analysis supports a social identity-based explanation for the emergence of the survivor syndrome: downsizing causes lower identification with the employer which in turn relates to lower performance of employees. PMID:27252674

  15. Does taxonomic diversity in indicator groups influence their effectiveness in identifying priority areas for species conservation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Jesper Stentoft; Larsen, Frank Wugt; Rahbek, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The identification of priority areas for biodiversity conservation is a cornerstone of systematic conservation planning. However, biodiversity, or even the distribution of all species, cannot be directly quantified, due to the inherent complexity of natural systems. Species indicator groups may...... serve as important tools for the identification of priority areas for conservation. Yet, it is unclear which factors make certain indicator groups perform better than others. In this study, using data on the Danish distribution of 847 species of plants, vertebrates and insects, we assessed whether...... the taxonomic diversity in species indicator groups influence their effectiveness in the identification of priority areas for species conservation. We tested whether indicator groups comprising a higher taxonomic diversity (i.e. indicator groups consisting of species from many different taxonomic groups...

  16. Pedagogical principles underpinning undergraduate Nurse Education in the UK: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh-Franklin, Carolyn

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a contextual report of the current use of pedagogy in undergraduate nursing programmes run by Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in the United Kingdom (UK). Pedagogy provides the framework for educators to add shape and structure to the educational process, and to support student learning and programme development. Traditionally nurse education has used a behaviourist approach focusing on learning outcomes and competency based education, although there is also increasing support for the cognitive/student learning focused pedagogic approach. The keywords andragogy, pedagogy and student centred learning were used in a systematic stepwise descriptive content analysis of the programme specifications and programme handbooks of 40 current undergraduate programme documents, leading to an undergraduate award and professional registration as a nurse. 42% (17) of documents contained reference to the words, pedagogy and student centred learning, whilst no documents used the word andragogy. Where identified, pedagogy was used in a superficial manner, with only three documents identifying a specific pedagogical philosophy: one HEI citing a value based curriculum and two HEIs referencing social constructionism. Nine HEIs made reference to student centred learning but with no additional pedagogic information. A review of teaching, learning and assessment strategies indicated no difference between the documented strategies used by HEIs when comparing those with an espoused pedagogy and those without. Although educational literature supports the use of pedagogic principles in curriculum design, this is not explicit in undergraduate nursing programme documentation, and suggests that nurse educators do not view pedagogy as important to their programmes. Instead programmes appear to be developed based on operational and functional requirements with a focus on acquisition of knowledge and skills, and the fitness to practice of graduates entering the nursing

  17. Social psychological-pedagogical support of singleparent family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Kazhuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the definition of the concept of "incomplete family", describes the typology of single-parent families, the necessity of special social psychological and pedagogical support for children from such families and their parents has been proved. The analysis of various concepts of ―support‖has been made. The idea of psychological and pedagogical support of modern incomplete families has been determined. Key words: incomplete family, types of single-parent families, support, social support, psychological and pedagogical support of single-parent families.

  18. Personal Narratives: A Pedagogical Proposal to Stimulate Language Students’ Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Orlando Salamanca González

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a public university in Tunja (Colombia, undergraduate language students mentioned that writing was important and yet, they kept at a distance from it due to its requirements. The aim of this pedagogical intervention was to find a strategy to encourage students to write and, more importantly, to feel an identity with their texts. For this pedagogical intervention, students were required to write narratives that allowed them to portray their experiences using the target language and to look for the most accurate words and descriptions. From a pedagogical perspective, writing the narratives provided the teacher with the possibility of knowing his students better and to feel an affiliation towards them.

  19. [The pedagogical evaluation of the pre-school children with cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, T V

    The objective of the present work was to elaborate the content of comprehensive psycho-pedagogical examination for the assessment of the overall intelligence level in the children presenting with hearing impairments. The complex of studies to be carried out to achieve this purpose encompasses evaluation of the social, physical, and cognitive development of the children as well as peculiarities of their play activities, their speech and hearing abilities. This approach is believed to enable a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing to identify the individual characteristics of each child and determine those of special importance for the elaboration of educational programs on an individual basis taking into consideration variants of children's development (harmonic, uneven, retarded, etc.). To facilitate the implementation of the proposed method, a special electronic tool (a virtual practice for a teacher of deaf) has been created. The virtual practice is believed to be instrumental in the training of the teachers of deaf for the comprehensive evaluation of the children with cochlear implants. In this way, the effectiveness of the development of personalized rehabilitation programs can be substantially increased.

  20. Effect of context on respiratory rate measurement in identifying non-severe pneumonia in African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Florida; Mtove, George; Mosha, Neema; Wangai, Hannah; Harrison, Nicole; Hildenwall, Helena; Schellenberg, David; Todd, Jim; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh

    2015-06-01

    Cough or difficult breathing and an increased respiratory rate for their age are the commonest indications for outpatient antibiotic treatment in African children. We aimed to determine whether respiratory rate was likely to be transiently raised by a number of contextual factors in a busy clinic leading to inaccurate diagnosis. Respiratory rates were recorded in children aged 2-59 months presenting with cough or difficulty breathing to one of the two busy outpatient clinics and then repeated at 10-min intervals over 1 h in a quiet setting. One hundred and sixty-seven children were enrolled with a mean age of 7.1 (SD ± 2.9) months in infants and 27.6 (SD ± 12.8) months in children aged 12-59 months. The mean respiratory rate declined from 42.3 and 33.6 breaths per minute (bpm) in the clinic to 39.1 and 32.6 bpm after 10 min in a quiet room and to 39.2 and 30.7 bpm (P pneumonia. In a random effects linear regression model, the variability in respiratory rate within children (42%) was almost as much as the variability between children (58%). Changing the respiratory rates cut-offs to higher thresholds resulted in a small reduction in the proportion of non-severe pneumonia mis-classifications in infants. Noise and other contextual factors may cause a transient increase in respiratory rate and consequently misclassification of non-severe pneumonia. However, this effect is less pronounced in older children than infants. Respiratory rate is a difficult sign to measure as the variation is large between and within children. More studies of the accuracy and utility of respiratory rate as a proxy for non-severe pneumonia diagnosis in a busy clinic are needed. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. TEENAGE SCHOOLCHILDREN’S TIME PERSPECTIVE AS A PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL ISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Vasyura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article deals with human psychological time. Though there are observational studies focused on this topic, the psychological, pedagogical, and age-related aspects of this issue require more attention. The development of the human time perspective during the teenage period is in the authors’ field of view. The aim of the study is to identify main characteristics of teenagers’ time perspective depending on their generalized anxiety level and use them as a basis for working out a psychological and pedagogical support model for teenagers’ time perspective development. Materials and Methods: to study specific aspects of the time perspective formed by teenagers having various generalised anxiety levels, the psychodiagnostic methods were used: a trait anxiety scale for 10–16 years old students by A. M. Prikhozhan; anxiety research methods by C. D. Spielberger and Yu. L. Khanina; and the methods enabling diagnostics of the attitude to past, present, and future by A. M. Prikhozhan. The mathematical statistics methods were applied: Mann-Whitney U Test, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient and Fisher’s angular transformation φ-index. Results: the specific aspects of the time perspective have been revealed; its interrelation with the various levels of the teenage schoolchildren’s generalised anxiety levels has been established. Based on the obtained research results, a psychological and pedagogical support model of teenage schoolchildren’s time perspective development was elaborated. The main components of this model have been introduced. Discussion and Conclusions: the time perspective of the teenagers having a higher anxiety level is inconsistent. It is characterised by a negative attitude to past, present and future. The psychological and pedagogical support to teenage schoolchildren in terms of their time perspective development will provide: psychological and pedagogical support to reduce teenagers’ personal

  2. The impact of an intensive yearlong staff development program on science teachers' perceptions of pedagogical change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueni, Joneen A. Stone

    a series of factors that a literature search identified as facilitating the implementation of pedagogical change. An unexpected finding in this study was the participants' strong science content backgrounds. Many science staff development programs provide content in an attempt to improve science education; providing staff development in pedagogy may be a more appropriate use of staff development monies.

  3. Using the Artistic Pedagogical Technology of Photovoice to Promote Interaction in the Online Post-Secondary Classroom: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Margaret; Perry, Beth; Janzen, Katherine; Menzies, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effect of the artistic pedagogical technology (APT) called photovoice (PV) on interaction in the online post-secondary classroom. More specifically, this paper focuses on students' perspectives regarding the effect of PV on student to student and student to instructor interactions in online courses. Artistic pedagogical…

  4. The Interaction of Pedagogical Approach, Gender, Self-Regulation, and Goal Orientation Using Student Response System Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Kellah M.

    2008-01-01

    This research compares a behaviorally based approach for using electronic student response system (SRS) technology with a metacognitive-oriented approach to determine effects on attendance, preparation for class, and achievement. Also examined are the interaction effects of pedagogical approach with self-regulatory and motivational characteristics…

  5. Differential effects of cocaine on histone posttranslational modifications in identified populations of striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi, Emmanuelle; Heiman, Myriam; Marion-Poll, Lucile; Guermonprez, Pierre; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2013-06-04

    Drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, induce changes in gene expression and epigenetic marks including alterations in histone posttranslational modifications in striatal neurons. These changes are thought to participate in physiological memory mechanisms and to be critical for long-term behavioral alterations. However, the striatum is composed of multiple cell types, including two distinct populations of medium-sized spiny neurons, and little is known concerning the cell-type specificity of epigenetic modifications. To address this question we used bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice, which express EGFP fused to the N-terminus of the large subunit ribosomal protein L10a driven by the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor (D1R, D2R) promoter, respectively. Fluorescence in nucleoli was used to sort nuclei from D1R- or D2R-expressing neurons and to quantify by flow cytometry the cocaine-induced changes in histone acetylation and methylation specifically in these two types of nuclei. The two populations of medium-sized spiny neurons displayed different patterns of histone modifications 15 min or 24 h after a single injection of cocaine or 24 h after seven daily injections. In particular, acetylation of histone 3 on Lys 14 and of histone 4 on Lys 5 and 12, and methylation of histone 3 on Lys 9 exhibited distinct and persistent changes in the two cell types. Our data provide insights into the differential epigenetic responses to cocaine in D1R- and D2R-positive neurons and their potential regulation, which may participate in the persistent effects of cocaine in these neurons. The method described should have general utility for studying nuclear modifications in different types of neuronal or nonneuronal cell types.

  6. Using transcription of six Puccinia triticina races to identify the effective secretome during infection of wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron eBruce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat leaf rust, caused by the basidiomycete Puccinia triticina, can cause yield losses of up to 20% in wheat producing regions. During infection, the fungus forms haustoria that secrete proteins into the plant cell and effect changes in plant transcription, metabolism and defense. It is hypothesized that new races emerge as a result of overcoming plant resistance via changes in the secreted effector proteins. To understand gene expression during infection and find genetic differences associated with races, RNA from wheat leaves infected with six different rust races, at six days post inoculation, was sequenced using Illumina. As P. triticina is an obligate biotroph, RNA from both the host and fungi were present and separated by alignment to the P. triticina genome and a wheat EST reference. A total of 222,571 rust contigs were assembled from 165 million reads. An examination of the resulting contigs revealed 532 predicted secreted proteins among the transcripts. Of these, 456 were found in all races. Fifteen genes were found with amino acid changes, corresponding to putative avirulence effectors potentially recognized by 11 different leaf rust resistance (Lr genes. Thirteen of the potential avirulence effectors have no homology to known genes. One gene had significant similarity to cerato-platanin, a known fungal elicitor, and another showed similarity to fungal tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in melanin synthesis. Temporal expression profiles were developed for these genes by qRT-PCR and show that the 15 genes share similar expression patterns from infection initiation to just prior to spore eruption.

  7. Developing a pedagogical problem solving view for mathematics teachers with two reflection programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracha KRAMARSKI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effects of two reflection support programs on elementary school mathematics teachers’ pedagogical problem solving view. Sixty-two teachers participated in a professional development program. Thirty teachers were assigned to the self-questioning (S_Q training and thirty two teachers were assigned to the reflection discourse (R_D training. The S_Q program was based on the IMPROVE self-questioning approach which emphasizes systematic discussion along the phases of mathematical or pedagogical problem solving as student and teacher. The R_D program emphasized discussion of standard based teaching and learning principles. Findings indicated that systematic reflection support (S_Q is effective for developing mathematics PCK, and strengthening metacognitive knowledge of mathematics teachers, more than reflection discourse (R_D. No differences were found between the groups in developing beliefs about teaching mathematics in using problem solving view.

  8. Effects of presentation format and instructions on the ability of people with intellectual disability to identify faces

    OpenAIRE

    Manzanero, Antonio L.; Contreras, María José; Recio, María; Alemany, Alberto; Martorell, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of presentation format and instructions on the ability of people with intellectual disability to identify individuals they did not know and had seen only briefly. With this objective in mind, 2 groups of subjects with mild to moderate intellectual disability were shown a photograph of a person and, after a distracting task, were asked to identify that person in 2 line-ups (target-absent and target-present) with 6 photographs each, where 2 types o...

  9. Pedagogías emergentes en contextos cambiantes: pedagogías en red en la sociedad del conocimiento

    OpenAIRE

    Binod Gurung; Amparo Clavijo Olarte

    2015-01-01

    La noción de pedagogías es un concepto multidimensional emergente construido a partir de la relación entre los componentes pedagógicos (como la tecnología, la pedagogía y el contenido) y los contextos pedagógicos cambiantes de la sociedad, la economía, la educación y la ciencia y tecnología para mencionar algunos. Desafortunadamente, para los marcos teóricos tradicionales existentes no es importante la relación entre los componentes y los contextos pedagógicos cambiantes. Las pedagogías tradi...

  10. Actual and Potential Pedagogical Use of Tablets in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Rikala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the potential of tablet technology for teaching and learning. In autumn 2012, we conducted a focused survey comprising quantitative and qualitative questions with Finnish teachers (N = 171, from 54 schools. We focused on perceived pedagogical opportunities and the actualized pedagogical potential of tablets at schools. The survey results indicate that the actual usefulness of tablets in schools was significantly less than what teachers perceived as the pedagogical potential. However, the results demonstrate the positive impact these devices are having on teaching and learning, as well as prompting changes in pedagogical perspectives. Teachers stated that tablets can diversify and enhance teaching and learning in many ways, particularly in supporting learners’ motivation and independent learning, and promoting engaging teaching methods. Nevertheless, teachers voiced concern that the student-to-device ratio at the moment is too low, thus serving as a barrier to widespread use of tablets.

  11. Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Kelle, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Schmitz, B., & Kelle, S. (2010, 1-6 February). Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games. Presentation at JTEL Winter School 2010 on Advanced Learning Technologies, Innsbruck, Austria.

  12. Reference models for forming organisational or collaborative pedagogical best practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Chien-Sing; Koper, Rob; Kommers, Piet; Hedberg, John

    2008-01-01

    Lee, Chien-Sing, Koper, R., Kommers, P., & Hedberg, John (Eds.) (2008). Reference models for forming organisational or collaborative pedagogical best practices [special issue]. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, 18(1).

  13. Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia; Arnó Macà, Elisabet

    Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments is a critical scholarly resource that examines experiences with virtual networks and their advantages for universities and students in the domains of writing, translation, and usability testing. Featuring coverage o...

  14. Pedagogic Knowledge and the Victorian Era Anglo-American Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Marianne A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the expected knowledge base of British Victorian elementary teachers in the rational and scientific study of pedagogy and didactics. Concludes comparative research has revealed prevalence of similar pedagogic discourse in Great Britain and North American schools. (KDR)

  15. Developing Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Animal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusparini, F.; Riandi, R.; Sriyati, S.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe preservice teacher’s learning during lecturing Animal Physiology and investigate it’s impact on preservice teacher’s technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). How was the lecturing process can improve TPACK of preservice teacher on Biology education espescially in Animal Physiology. There are four experiment classes using Solomon four group design, there are pedagogic treatment, content treatment and technological treatment, the last class without any treatment. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Quantitative data were collected through a questionaire of TPACK. Qualitative data were collected through a lesson plan and teaching simulation. Findings has revealed that participants experienced significant gains in all TPACK constructs. Both of pedagogic and technology treatment is better than others, but pedagogical treatment didn’t also increase PCK most of participants. Findings has implications for teacher education programs to be a professional teachers and for researchers interested.

  16. Using Large Scale Test Results for Pedagogical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The use and influence of large scale tests (LST), both national and international, has increased dramatically within the last decade. This process has revealed a tension between the legitimate need for information about the performance of the educational system and teachers to inform policy......, and the teachers’ and students’ use of this information for pedagogical purposes in the classroom. We know well how the policy makers interpret and use the outcomes of such tests, but we know less about how teachers make use of LSTs to inform their pedagogical practice. An important question is whether...... there is a contradiction between the political system’s use of LST and teachers’ (possible) pedagogical use of LST. And if yes: What is a contradiction based on? This presentation will give some results from a systematic review on how tests have influenced the pedagogical practice. The research revealed many of the fatal...

  17. Natural Interaction With Pedagogical Agents in Virtual Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, W

    2002-01-01

    .... ISI's main contribution to this project was the development of the Steve pedagogical agent, an embodied agent that can participate in training simulations, as a virtual coach or a virtual team member...

  18. Media-safety of children as important social-pedagogical problem of modern times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia Semeniako

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article the relevance of media-safety as a socio-pedagogical problems. The introduction of media education in the practice of work of preschool educational institutions, the author identified as one of the strategies for overcoming negative influences of media on the younger generation. The concept of “information security”, “pre-school media education”, “media informational security” and identified the main tasks of media education  at the present stage in Ukraine. Determined main problems, the overcoming of which may provide media-safety of preschoolers.Key words: media education, media-safety media, information and communication technology, information security.

  19. ECONOMY COMPETITIVENESS AND MODERN PEDAGOGICS DEFINITIONS CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Tolochko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to understand and explain economy competitiveness and modern pedagogic definition correlation. Education for entrepreneurship or economic development, and education for environmental sustainability, or sustainable development are seen as arguing goals in education reforms. Teachers today also encounter a number of other and equally important challenges in their work, such as educating youth for insecurity, tolerance, new technologies, peace and active citizenship, to mention but a few. National economic competitiveness is linked to intellectual and capital and is driven by knowledge, and innovation. Sustainable development requires an understanding of the complexity of the global ecosystem and of creative problem-solving the solutions searching to ‘wicked problems’ such as that of reconciling economic activity with a sustainable environment. Methodology. It is used the data from publications and reports of the European Commission, OECD, World Bank, World Economic Forum, UNESCO, International Journals in Economics and Pedagogic: American Economic Review, Journal of Education Policy, Journal of Education Change, European Journal of Education. In the article the descriptive analysis, supported by the quantitative analysis is applied. Results. It was defined that national economic competitiveness is linked to capital driven by knowledge and innovation. It was analysed the formation of Global Competitiveness Index (GCI which is made up of over 110 variables. According to the GCI Switzerland is the most competitive economy in the world in 2015. It is highlighted the following overarching needs to: give a higher profile to the notion of interdependence: how closely one part of an ecosystem is linked to and depends upon another; making humanity more aware of its own fragility on this planet; highlight the role of cooperation: problems faced will only be resolved by international cooperation; develop the notion of a global

  20. E-Coaching, E-Mentoring for Lifelong Professional Development of Teachers within the System of Post-Graduate Pedagogical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl KOVALCHUCK

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The research considers the readiness of teachers and postgraduate pedagogical educational establishments to use e-coaching and e-mentoring which can provide continuous professional development of teachers. The use of theoretical methods of systematization and comparison of scientific statements, experience in implementing e-coaching, e-mentoring has identified the possibility of using e-coaching and e-mentoring in postgraduate pedagogical education in continuous professional development of teachers. Monitoring and questioning have proved the idea that teachers require the new content of postgraduate education for their own professional development. They are interested in mastering new technologies, delivering master-classes and demonstration lessons. The results of the discussion in focus groups including representatives of the administration of educational establishments, teachers and lecturers of postgraduate pedagogical educational establishments are shown in the SWOT-analysis. The experts confirmed the need and possibility of the e-coaching and e-mentoring implementation in postgraduate pedagogical education. The major risks of e-coaching and e-mentoring implementation in postgraduate pedagogical education are e-coaches’ and e-mentors’ training and ICT competence. The Internet services, e-coaching and e-mentoring applications and programs are able to provide continuous professional development of teachers. The educational and professional e-coaching and e-mentoring programs require further studying in postgraduate pedagogical education.

  1. The ways of improvement of content and pedagogical conditions of preparation of master of preschool education in the context of development of creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra Iemchyk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of changes in the process of professional preparation of master of preschool education, which is caused by insufficient preparation of graduates to solve problems in this field, low level of creative potential and, as the consequence, unavailability to realization creative pedagogical activity is outlined in the article. The main ways of improvement of content and pedagogical conditions of development of creative potential of master of preschool education in the process of professional preparation are presented: the improvement of content of scientific theoretical preparation of master, studying of progressive pedagogical experience; learning of professional pedagogical disciplines with the reliance to creative tasks with problem search nature; implementation to the educational process of magistracy of institution of higher education on the specialty “Preschool education” of special course “The foundations of development of creative potential of pedagogue”; attraction of students to the creative pedagogical practice; organization and management of students creative process from the side of teachers. There are also identified the perspectives of solution of the problem of development of creative abilities of personality of pedagogue during the professional preparation in the institution of higher education. The implementation of these ways to the educational process will contribute the increasing the readiness of graduates of institutions of higher education to realize pedagogical activity on the creative level, selfdevelopment and self-improvement of their personality.Key words: creative potential of master of preschool education, the professional preparation, the ways of improvement of content of professional preparation.

  2. PLACE OF RESIDENCE: THE SPACE OF SOCIO-PEDAGOGICAL TRANSFORMATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Guriyanova

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. In modern society Pedagogics is no longer the domain only of tutors, school teachers and teachers of educational institutions of general and vocational training of various levels. Pedagogics, being in integration with Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology, and Cultural Science, has an impact on sociocultural life of both all society and local communities, along with well-being of children and families, and population’s quality of life. In some regions ofRussia, state bodies responsi...

  3. Critical analysis of the pedagogical practice of the teachers trainnees

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica Ruiz Quiroga; Cristian Camilo Ortiz Castiblanco; Jhider Soler Mejía

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of a research project supported by the Research Center of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional, whose purpose was the redefinition of the training process of the students, in the frame of the pedagogical practice, in one of the research lines for the Degree in Elementary Education with emphasis on Social Sciences. On a theoretical level, analysis and discussion were developed from critical pedagogy, particularly the concepts of pedagogical practice, training an...

  4. The socializing workshop and the scientific appraisal in pedagogical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos, Eneida Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The systematization of the authors' experiences as agents of the process of Ph. D. formative process in Pedagogical Sciences leads them to propose The Socialization Workshop, as a valid alternative for scientific valuation of pedagogical investigations, supported in the epistemic nature of this science, as well as the author’s previous contributions about epistemic communication. The definition of The Socialization Workshop, its rationale and corresponding methodological stages are presented.

  5. Pedagogical and conflict situations of teacher of physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pechko O.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the essence of pedagogical and conflict situations between teacher and student. Considered ways of solving and preventing pedagogical and conflict situations in school. Principal reasons of conflict situations are selected, situations of activity, conduct and relations. The receptions of influence of teacher of physical culture are separated on personality of schoolchildren. It is well-proven that the profession of teacher of physical culture supposes possibility of conflict situations.

  6. Beyond individualised teaching : a relational construction of pedagogical attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Aspelin, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Teaching is today often described as a matter of adjusting to the individual lives of students. Building on the premises of three educational theories, mainly Martin Buber’s concept of ‘inclusion’, the article aims to confront this idea and show how pedagogical attitude can be perceived from a relational perspective. A model is constructed in which pedagogical attitude is understood as three different types of teacher-student relationships: a) an asymmetric inter-subjective relationship; b) a...

  7. CEPIAH, a method for Evaluation and Design of Pedagogical Hypermedia

    OpenAIRE

    Trigano , Philippe; Pacurar Giacomini , Ecaterina

    2004-01-01

    We are working on a method, called CEPIAH. We propose a web based system used to help teachers to design multimedia documents and to evaluate their prototypes. Our tool integrates two modules such as EMPI (Evaluation of Multimedia Pedagogical and Interactive software), and SP/UL/FC, a method for designing pedagogical hypermedia. The EMPI module is used to evaluate multimedia software used in educational context. We structured a knowledge base composed of a list of evaluation criteria, grouped...

  8. Development formalization of the e-learning pedagogical scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Іванович Пушкар

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The place of the pedagogical scenario in development of the e-learning support system has been defined. The process of student's interaction with the system of e-learning in the form of a proper dialogue has been proposed. Peculiarities of constructing typical models of scenarios of academic disciplines have been analyzed. A technique for quantitative assessment of the relationships between the objects of study in the model of a pedagogical scenario has been offered

  9. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenia Etkina

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK). The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is t...

  10. Understanding partnership practice in primary health as pedagogic work: what can Vygotsky's theory of learning offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Primary health policy in Australia has followed international trends in promoting models of care based on partnership between professionals and health service users. This reform agenda has significant practice implications, and has been widely adopted in areas of primary health that involve supporting families with children. Existing research shows that achieving partnership in practice is associated with three specific challenges: uncertainty regarding the role of professional expertise, tension between immediate needs and longer-term capacity development in families, and the need for challenge while maintaining relationships based on trust. Recently, pedagogic or learning-focussed elements of partnership practice have been identified, but there have been no systematic attempts to link theories of learning with the practices and challenges of primary health-care professionals working with families in a pedagogic role. This paper explores key concepts of Vygotsky's theory of learning (including mediation, the zone of proximal development, internalisation, and double stimulation), showing how pedagogic concepts can provide a bridge between the policy rhetoric of partnership and primary health practice. The use of this theory to address the three key challenges is explicitly discussed.

  11. Characterizing pedagogical practices of university physics students in informal learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen A.; Madigan, Peter; Miller, Eric; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] University educators (UEs) have a long history of teaching physics not only in formal classroom settings but also in informal outreach environments. The pedagogical practices of UEs in informal physics teaching have not been widely studied, and they may provide insight into formal practices and preparation. We investigate the interactions between UEs and children in an afterschool physics program facilitated by university physics students from the University of Colorado Boulder. In this program, physics undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers work with K-8 children on hands-on physics activities on a weekly basis over the course of a semester. We use an activity theoretic framework as a tool to examine situational aspects of individuals' behavior in the complex structure of the afterschool program. Using this framework, we analyze video of UE-child interactions and identify three main pedagogical modalities that UEs display during activities: instruction, consultation, and participation modes. These modes are characterized by certain language, physical location, and objectives that establish differences in UE-child roles and division of labor. Based on this analysis, we discuss implications for promoting pedagogical strategies through purposeful curriculum development and university educator preparation.

  12. Pedagogical Studies in Teacher Education: Reintroducing methodology as the core of pedagogical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Vinje

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Den historiske utviklingen til pedagogikkfaget i norsk lærerutdanning kan studeres på mange måter. Gjennom dokumentanalyse av de nasjonale planene fra 1837 til de differensierte utdanningene i 2010, forsøker denne studien å forklare fagets opplevde mangel på relevans for lærerprofesjonen. Resultatene viser at det ikke er noen konsistent bruk av begreper i faget, og begrep som anvendes på didaktiske kategorier i klasserommet har variert. Ulike disipliner har dominert til ulike tider, selv om psykologien totalt sett har vært mest fremtredende. Pedagogikkens rolle har variert fra å være utdanningens viktigste fag til å være et refleksjonsfag og, fra å være et redskapsfag til å ha danning og personlighetsutvikling av lærerstudenten som hovedmål. På bakgrunn av dokumentanalysen og tidligere studier foreslås en lærerutdanningspedagogikk der grunnleggende begreper hentet fra sentrale aktiviteter i klasserommet utgjør fundamentet og rammeverket. På denne måten re-introdu­seres metodikken i pedagogikkfaget, og undervisningshåndverket får en sentral plass. Overbygningen dannes i kombinasjon med pedagogikken som vitenskap, og slik skapes et område der pedagogikkfaget i lærerutdanningen kan konstituere seg. Ved at undervisnings­læren og metodikken får tilbake sin sentrale plass, kan profesjonsnærheten sikres. Da er vi tilbake til den egentlige pedagogikken i lærerutdanningen, pedagogikken fra de nasjonale planene i perioden 1837–1939.Nøkkelord: lærerstudenter, pedagogikk, metodikk, læreplan, refleksjon, lærerutdannings­pedagogikkAbstractOne way to study the historical development of pedagogical studies in Norwegian teacher education is to examine the national curricula. Through documentary analyses of the national curricula for general teacher education from 1837 until the arrival of the differentiated programmes in 2010, this study tries to explain the pedagogical studies’ perceived lack of relevance to the

  13. Failure mode effects and criticality analysis: innovative risk assessment to identify critical areas for improvement in emergency department sepsis resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; O'Connor, Lanty M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Barker, Lisa T; Khare, Rahul K; Seivert, Nicholas P; Holl, Jane L; Vozenilek, John A

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is an increasing problem in the practice of emergency medicine as the prevalence is increasing and optimal care to reduce mortality requires significant resources and time. Evidence-based septic shock resuscitation strategies exist, and rely on appropriate recognition and diagnosis, but variation in adherence to the recommendations and therefore outcomes remains. Our objective was to perform a multi-institutional prospective risk-assessment, using failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), to identify high-risk failures in ED sepsis resuscitation. We conducted a FMECA, which prospectively identifies critical areas for improvement in systems and processes of care, across three diverse hospitals. A multidisciplinary group of participants described the process of emergency department (ED) sepsis resuscitation to then create a comprehensive map and table listing all process steps and identified process failures. High-risk failures in sepsis resuscitation from each of the institutions were compiled to identify common high-risk failures. Common high-risk failures included limited availability of equipment to place the central venous catheter and conduct invasive monitoring, and cognitive overload leading to errors in decision-making. Additionally, we identified great variability in care processes across institutions. Several common high-risk failures in sepsis care exist: a disparity in resources available across hospitals, a lack of adherence to the invasive components of care, and cognitive barriers that affect expert clinicians' decision-making capabilities. Future work may concentrate on dissemination of non-invasive alternatives and overcoming cognitive barriers in diagnosis and knowledge translation.

  14. Triglyceride glucose-body mass index is effective in identifying nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in nonobese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujun; Du, Tingting; Li, Mengni; Jia, Jing; Lu, Huiming; Lin, Xuan; Yu, Xuefeng

    2017-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly common condition that is highly correlated with obesity; however, it is not uncommon among nonobese individuals. Triglyceride (TG) and glucose index combined with body mass index (TyG-BMI) has been proposed as a favorable marker of insulin resistance. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of TyG-BMI in identifying NAFLD in nonobese subjects.We conducted a cross-sectional study in a nonobese (BMI glucose, for identifying nonobese subjects at risk for NAFLD.In this study, the prevalence of NAFLD was over one-fifth in the nonobese population. TyG-BMI was an effective marker to detect NAFLD in nonobese subjects.

  15. CONCERNING THE NETWORKING INTERACTION EXPERIENCE OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Dmitrieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify the possibilities for the formation knowledge and practical skills related to the use of the professional activity of software and network resource of teaching communities in the pedagogical sphere.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of the literary sources, regulatory documents, Internet resources within the researched problem; an analysis of the practical experience of teachers of secondary schools, work of high school teachers and establishment of training teachers on the research problem; the experimental work and monitoring the learning process.Results. The process of teachers’ training inYaroslavl, in particular preparation of students-biologists at theYaroslavlStatePedagogicalUniversityis reflected. Activity of network pedagogical community of Yaroslavl is considered as a platform for network interaction; the analysis of such platform, use of its resources, and also conversations with subject teachers and students have shown that the given electronic and communication resources cause a great interest for practicing teachers and future experts, however, they not always possess necessary knowledge and abilities concerning its operation.Scientific novelty. The author describes in detail the process of forming a competence of networking of professional interaction in terms of its methodological support that is relevant to the educational process, both in the high school, and post-graduate education.Practical significance. The research implementations can be useful while developing specific guidelines to explain the content and methodology of the training network of professional interaction with examples of practicing teachers and students ofPedagogicalUniversity– future teachers of biology.The article is addressed to researchers, dealing with networking, specialists of teaching service centers (institutions of educational development, the practicing subject teachers and teachers of high

  16. Supported accommodation of young people with psychophysical disorders as a condition for social and pedagogical inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Furyaeva,

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is due to the need to overcome social exclusion of adolescents and young people caused by their health condition and restrictions on life in the context of inclusion trends in the worldwide social policy and practice. In this connection, the article aims to justify and search for hospital-substitute format of social and pedagogical support for young people with psychophysical behavior disorders of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD type. The leading approach in the research of this issue is an integrative activity-based approach that allows comprehensive consideration of socio-political, organizational-pedagogical and technological opportunities for active inclusion of families with children and adolescents with ASD into joint activities in a social settlement. In the article, results of sociological, and psychological-pedagogical studies of the issue of social inclusion of individuals at risks of their exclusion from society are presented; various types of social integration practices are typologically disclosed; the author’s structural-functional model of a supported living arrangement is substantiated; conditions and possibilities for its implementation by a public organization of parents having children with autism in the regional context as exemplified by a rural settlement are identified and shown. The information presented in the article is of practical value for specialists in social pedagogy and work, as well as for those who are trained for concrete competences of social support of families having children with disabilities. The results of the given socio-pedagogical project may be useful for the development of the social movement of parents.

  17. Identifying effective actions to guide volunteer-based and nationwide conservation efforts for a ground-nesting farmland bird

    OpenAIRE

    Santangeli, Andrea; Arroyo, Beatriz; Millon, Alexandre; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Modern farming practices threaten wildlife in different ways, and failure to identify the complexity of multiple threats acting in synergy may result in ineffective management. To protect ground-nesting birds in farmland, monitoring and mitigating impacts of mechanical harvesting is crucial. Here, we use 6 years of data from a nationwide volunteer-based monitoring scheme of the Montagu's harrier, a ground-nesting raptor, in French farmlands. We assess the effectiveness of alternative nest pro...

  18. Medical professionalism on television: student perceptions and pedagogical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Wilson, Ian; Langendyk, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Qualitative data from surveys of Australian undergraduate medical students showed that students perceived professionalism in dichotomous ways, with three main themes: cure-care, where a doctor's skill is either technical or interpersonal; work-leisure, where a doctor is either dedicated to work or personal life; and clinical-administration, where work is either direct patient care or administration. There continue to be imagined divisions between curing and caring for students, who express concerns about balancing work and leisure, and expectations that doctors should have little administrative work. Given students were able to identify these important contemporary issues around professionalism on television, there is pedagogical value in using popular images of the medical world in medical education. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Pedagogical Strategy for the professional training of technicians in Accountability and Auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ximena Jaramillo-Lema

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The professionals in the specialty of Accounting and Auditing have an important role in the founding of mid and small enterprises (PYMES, therefore, there is need of forming technicians of high quality. However, after the application of different methods of research, it has been proven that there are insufficiencies in their work, which has brought about that the hirers reject to employ them. They support their decision saying that these technicians lack professional preparation in the processes of accounting and auditing. The present article has as main purpose, to propose a pedagogical strategy for the development of updating and upbringing courses based on the development in the spheres of accounting and auditing , thus it has been designed a system of actions of marked pedagogical effect that allows the achievement of this objective.

  20. Critically Reflective Pedagogical Model: a Pragmatic Blueprint for Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Construction Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available University lecturers who aspire to provide an improved learning experience for their students continually, and be recognised for high quality teaching should embrace a critically reflective practice. Nonetheless, developing as a reflective lecturer is challenging, although there are pedagogical literatures as general guidelines. This study introduces a new pedagogical model of critically reflective practice to simplify the efforts for lecturers and to shorten their journey to becoming effective teachers. A two-phased action research strategy was adopted for the development and validation of the new model. The first phase operationalised the Brookfield’s four-lens framework to create a reflective teaching practice model, which was then validated with a case study in the second phase. The model offers a pragmatic blueprint for lecturers to build a career with sustained quality of teaching, which in turn translates into improved learning experiences for students.

  1. A Pedagogical Experiment Using Bubble Chamber Pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We have taken, in October 1981, 20.000 pictures of proton-proton interactions at 5 GeV/c in order to get some clean elastic events which can be easily studied by high school students. The purpose is to illustrate, by actual measurements of these real events, some basic concepts of relativistic mechanisms. This experiment will be an extension of our previous one, performed with HBC 2m events taken at 2 GeV/c. In 1980, all french lycees were provided with large size reproduction of HBC 2m events. Before distribution they were carefully selected and severe kinematical cuts were made. The students measured track curvatures by template, and checked the necessity and the validity of relativistic mechanics by computing the energy balance using non-relativistic and relativistic formulae. No practical problems have been encountered during this experiment and the pedagogical results are encouraging. This new sample of events will be interesting because they are relativistic than the old ones although with the same curv...

  2. Humor: a pedagogical tool to promote learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabeli, M

    2008-09-01

    It has become critical that learners are exposed to varied methods of teaching and assessment that will promote critical thinking of learners. Humor creates a relaxed atmosphere where learning can be enhanced and appreciated. When learners are relaxed, thinking becomes eminent. Authoritative and tense environment hinders thinking. This paper seeks to explore the perceptions of nurse teacher learners regarding the use of humor as a pedagogical tool to promote learning. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was employed (Burns & Grove, 2001:61; Mouton, 1996:103). 130 naive sketches were collected from nurse teacher learners who volunteered to take part in the study (Giorgi in_Omery, 1983:52) Follow up interviews were conducted to verify the findings. A qualitative, open-coding method of content analysis was done Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:155). Measures to ensure trustworthiness of the study were taken in accordance with the protocol of (Lincoln & Guba, 1985:290-326). The findings of the study will assist the nurse educators to create a positive, affective, psychological and social learning environment through the use of humor in a positive manner. Nurse educators will appreciate the fact that integration of humor to the learning content will promote the learners' critical thinking and emotional intelligence. Negative humor has a negative impact on learning. Learner nurses who become critical thinkers will be able to be analytical and solve problems amicably in practice.

  3. Defining science literacy: A pedagogical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilakis, Kathryn

    A functional knowledge of science is required to capably evaluate the validity of conflicting positions on topics such as fracking, climate change, and the safety of genetically modified food. Scientifically illiterate individuals are at risk of favoring the persuasive arguments of those championing partisan, anti-science agendas. In an effort to enhance the scientific literacy of community college students and equip them with the skill set necessary to make informed decisions, this study generated a pedagogical definition of science literacy using survey methodology and then utilized the definition to construct an accessible, comprehensive, and pragmatic web-based science literacy program. In response to an email solicitation, college and university science educators submitted lists of topics within their specialty they considered essential when assessing science literacy. Their responses were tabulated and those topics cited most frequently by the participating physicists, biologists, chemists and geoscientists were assembled into a definition of science literacy. This definition was translated into a modular, web-based course suitable for both online and classroom learning published as: www.scienceliteracyforum.com.

  4. On the Issue of Pedagogical Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobkin V.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on Mikhail Kondratyev’s contributions to the exploration of pedagogical authority. Basing on the survey of 3056 students of 5—9 classes of Moscow schools the paper analyzes adolescents’ attitudes towards teacher as a referent adult: evaluations of his/her significance as a role model, descriptions of his/her social status with regard to the usefulness of the information received by the adolescent. It also reviews some features of interpersonal relationships within the teacher-student interaction: the adolescents’ reactions to criticisms, their evaluations of the significance of various reasons underlying conflicts with the teacher. The attitude of the students toward their teacher is analyzed through the lens of the educational process, including such parameters as the students’ physical and mental state during the lesson (authori- tarian/democratic style of the teacher’s behavior; the students’ trust in the teacher as the source of credible evaluations of their learning success; the impact of the teacher on the students’ interest in the school subject. The outcomes of the survey are reviewed in the context of the influence of certain demographic and social stratification factors. Special attention is drawn to the impact of academic achievements and the adolescent’s status in the group on his/her attitudes towards the teacher as the authoritative adult.

  5. Identifying experimental methods to determine the effect of pain on attention: a review of pain, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    To review published studies of the effects that pain and common psychopharmacological substances have on the attentional performance of healthy adults. To identify which attentional tasks have the greatest potential to investigate the effect of pain on attention and provide recommendations for future research. A search was conducted for reports of experimental studies of attention in the context of pain. This was supplemented with studies on attention and caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Studies were included if they used a healthy adult sample, used experimental or quasi-experimental methods, were relevant to the study of attention or interruption of pain and/or examined the acute effects of a substance on attention. Thirty-two papers, with 49 different experimental studies were identified (12 pain, 21 nicotine, 7 caffeine, 9 alcohol). Fourteen different tasks were reviewed across six domains of attention. The most promising measures of attention were the continuous performance task, flanker task, endogenous pre-cuing task, n-back task, inhibition task and dual task. There are reliable tasks that could be used to determine the effects of pain on attention. Future research is required that develops the utility of these tasks to improve our understanding of the effects pain and analgesia have on attentional performance. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Decision of pedagogical tasks as mean of forming of pedagogical position of students of higher education physical establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article one of terms of forming of pedagogical position for the students of higher education physical establishments - decision of educational-pedagogical situations (EPS is examined. Monitoring of progress from pedagogical disciplines confronted with the results of experiment on determination of levels of decision of EPS by students is conducted. It is set that the traditional model of studies provides the high level of capture students theoretical knowledge, but does not influence on forming of them pedagogical position. Most students were shown by the medium-and-low levels of formed of abilities to decide EPS. It is set that the traditional model of teaching provides the high level of capture students theoretical knowledge's, but substantially does not influence on forming of their pedagogical position. Basic difficulties are certain at a decision the students of EPS, which allow to define the basic going near development of methodical accompaniment of EPS, which must include: educational material which is based on integration of pedagogical and sporting preparation with support on context approach; algorithm of decision of tasks; questions of cognitive character.

  7. Supporting teachers’ collaboration in design teams to develop Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: the case of science teachers in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub; Fisser, Petra; Voogt, Joke; McBride, R.; Searson, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of support on the teachers’ collaboration in design teams and development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK). The study was carried out in two secondary schools in Tanzania: Chang’ombe and Jitegemee secondary schools. From each school 10 teachers

  8. A new statistic for identifying batch effects in high-throughput genomic data that uses guided principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sarah E; Archer, Kellie J; Therneau, Terry M; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Vachon, Celine M; de Andrade, Mariza; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E

    2013-11-15

    Batch effects are due to probe-specific systematic variation between groups of samples (batches) resulting from experimental features that are not of biological interest. Principal component analysis (PCA) is commonly used as a visual tool to determine whether batch effects exist after applying a global normalization method. However, PCA yields linear combinations of the variables that contribute maximum variance and thus will not necessarily detect batch effects if they are not the largest source of variability in the data. We present an extension of PCA to quantify the existence of batch effects, called guided PCA (gPCA). We describe a test statistic that uses gPCA to test whether a batch effect exists. We apply our proposed test statistic derived using gPCA to simulated data and to two copy number variation case studies: the first study consisted of 614 samples from a breast cancer family study using Illumina Human 660 bead-chip arrays, whereas the second case study consisted of 703 samples from a family blood pressure study that used Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0. We demonstrate that our statistic has good statistical properties and is able to identify significant batch effects in two copy number variation case studies. We developed a new statistic that uses gPCA to identify whether batch effects exist in high-throughput genomic data. Although our examples pertain to copy number data, gPCA is general and can be used on other data types as well. The gPCA R package (Available via CRAN) provides functionality and data to perform the methods in this article. reesese@vcu.edu

  9. How to succeed in the digital age? Monitor the organizational context, identify risks and opportunities, and manage change effectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Luis Miguel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the dynamic and inter-connected internal and external environments of the present digital age, organizations are faced with increased challenges to achieve enduring success. After reviewing the major management theories with an organizational focus, and the changes brought with the new ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management Systems International Standard Edition, the hypotheses that to succeed in the digital age organizations must monitor the organizational context, identify risks and opportunities, and manage change effectively, are presented. A worldwide survey was carried out among IRCA registered auditors concerning ISO 9001:2015 certified organizations, and by using a quantitative methodology (sample normality was confirmed through Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the hypothesis were tested by using Pearson correlation coefficient. The results of this research highlight the need to properly monitor the organizational (internal and external context and identify the key issues that affect the organizations ability to deliver quality products and satisfy their customers and key stakeholders, and to plan, design, implement and control change in an effective and timely manner. These results support the notion that organizations should adopt appropriate organizational models for the present digital age, with emphasis on knowledge management and horizontal customer perspectives, willing to scan the environment, identify risk and opportunities and take timely and suitable actions.

  10. The health Oriented pedagogical project (HOPP) - a controlled longitudinal school-based physical activity intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksen, Per Morten; Hjelle, Ole Petter; Mamen, Asgeir; Meza, Trine J; Westerberg, Ane C

    2017-04-28

    The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing worldwide, also among children. Information about primary prevention of NCD's is increasing; however, convincing strategies among children is needed. The present paper describes the design and methods in the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP) study. The main objective is to evaluate the effects of a school-based physical activity intervention program on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Secondary objectives include assessment of physical, psychological and academic performance variables. The HOPP study is a 7 years longitudinal large-scale controlled intervention in seven elementary schools (n = 1545) with two control schools (n = 752); all aged 6-11 years at baseline. The school-based physical activity intervention program includes an increase in physical activity (PA) of 225 min/week as an integrated part of theoretical learning, in addition to the curriculum based 90 min/week of ordinary PA. Primary outcomes include cardio-metabolic risk factors measured as PA level, BMI status, waist circumference, muscle mass, percent fat, endurance test performance, total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), non-HDL, micro C-reactive protein (mCRP) and long-term blood sugar (HbA1c). In addition, secondary outcomes include anthropometric growth measures, physical fitness, quality of life (QoL), mental health, executive functions, diet and academic performance. HOPP will provide evidence of effects on cardio-metabolic risk factors after a long-term PA intervention program in elementary schoolchildren. School-based PA intervention programs may be an effective arena for health promotion and disease prevention. The study is registered in Clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02495714 ) as of June 20 th - 2015, retrospectively registered. The collection of baseline values was initiated in mid-January 2015.

  11. The health Oriented pedagogical project (HOPP - a controlled longitudinal school-based physical activity intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Morten Fredriksen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs is increasing worldwide, also among children. Information about primary prevention of NCD’s is increasing; however, convincing strategies among children is needed. The present paper describes the design and methods in the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP study. The main objective is to evaluate the effects of a school-based physical activity intervention program on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Secondary objectives include assessment of physical, psychological and academic performance variables. Methods The HOPP study is a 7 years longitudinal large-scale controlled intervention in seven elementary schools (n = 1545 with two control schools (n = 752; all aged 6–11 years at baseline. The school-based physical activity intervention program includes an increase in physical activity (PA of 225 min/week as an integrated part of theoretical learning, in addition to the curriculum based 90 min/week of ordinary PA. Primary outcomes include cardio-metabolic risk factors measured as PA level, BMI status, waist circumference, muscle mass, percent fat, endurance test performance, total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, non-HDL, micro C-reactive protein (mCRP and long-term blood sugar (HbA1c. In addition, secondary outcomes include anthropometric growth measures, physical fitness, quality of life (QoL, mental health, executive functions, diet and academic performance. Discussion HOPP will provide evidence of effects on cardio-metabolic risk factors after a long-term PA intervention program in elementary schoolchildren. School-based PA intervention programs may be an effective arena for health promotion and disease prevention. Trial registration The study is registered in Clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02495714 as of June 20th – 2015, retrospectively registered. The collection of baseline values was initiated in mid-January 2015.

  12. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Wu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (~26%-27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n¿=¿880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta......-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ~2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome......Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic...

  13. Identifying effective components of alcohol abuse prevention programs: effects of fear appeals, message style, and source expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, R D; Rogers, R W

    1983-04-01

    Despite the importance of alcohol abuse prevention programs, the effectiveness of many components of these programs has not been demonstrated empirically. An experiment tested the efficacy of three components of many prevention programs: fear appeals, one- versus two-sided message style, and the expertise of the source. The persuasive impact of this information was examined on 113 ninth-grade students' intentions to abstain from drinking alcohol while they are teenagers. The results reveal that fear appeals are successful in strengthening students' intentions to refrain from drinking. Implications are discussed for implementing these principles and for designing future investigations of alcohol abuse prevention programs.

  14. La pedagogía del poder

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    Caludia MÖLLER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: La propuesta que presento tiene un gran objetivo general: estudiar y evaluar una pedagogía del poder —o múltiples—, unas técnicas del poder, unas prácticas. Para ello, propongo al lector poner a funcionar un grupo de presupuestos teóricos y metodológicos, provinientes del campo de la historia para ser aplicados también en el espacio de la historia de la educación en un estudio de caso concreto, Castilla en la época del emperador Carlos I, en función del análisis de dos grandes macrorrealidades que aún hoy perviven: la estructura del Estado y el espacio creado en sus relaciones con la universidad. Para la época seleccionada (la primera mitad del siglo XVI, estaríamos en presencia de un Estado monárquico con un poder «casi» incuestionable, y una universidad como la de Salamanca, referente indiscutible de la república de las letras del momento, tanto si la observamos en la península Ibérica como fuera de ella. Estas relaciones, estudiadas por ejemplo desde la historia de las familias de poder, o desde la microhistoria, pueden darnos como resultados nuevas perspectivas que nos encaminen hacia una nueva historia de la educación, hacia una historia cultural de la universidad y hacia una reflexión sobre un concepto interesante como el de pedagogía del poder. ABSTRACT: The proposal made in this paper has a great goal: to study and evaluate a pedagogy of power —or many—, it's techniques and it's practices. In order to achive this goal it makes the following proposal for the reader: putting to work a set of theorycal and metodological proposals taken from the field of history in order to apply them in a concrete case: the Castilla at the times of emperor Carlos I. This study will be made trough the analysis of two macrorealites still present in our times: the structure of the State and the space created trough it's relationship with the university. This set us in the first half of the XVI century with a monarchic

  15. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  16. Perceived Effectiveness of Identified Methods and Techniques Teachers Adopt in Prose Literature Lessons in some Secondary Schools in Owerri

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    F. O. Ezeokoli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study determined the methods adopted by teachers in prose literature-in-English classrooms, activities of teachers and students, teachers’ perceived effectiveness of techniques used. It also examined the objectives of teaching prose literature that teachers should address and the extent teachers believe in student-identified difficulties of studying prose literature. The study adopted the descriptive survey research design. Purposive sampling technique was used to select 85 schools in Owerri metropolis and in each school, all literature teachers of senior secondary I and II were involved. In all, 246 literature teachers participated out of which 15 were purposively selected for observation. The two instruments were: Teachers’ Questionnaire (r = 0.87 and Classroom Observation Schedule (r = 0.73. Data were analysed using frequency counts and percentages. Results revealed that teachers adopted lecture (28.4%, reading (10.9% and discussion (7.3% methods. Teacher’s activities during the lesson include: giving background information, summarizing, dictating notes, reading aloud and explaining and asking questions. The adopted techniques include: questioning, oral reading, silent reading and discussion. Teachers’ perceived questioning as the most effective technique followed by debating and summarizing. Teachers identified development of students’ critical faculties and analytical skills, literary appreciation and language skills to be of utmost concern. It was concluded that the methods adopted by teachers are not diverse enough to cater for the needs and backgrounds of students. Keywords: Methods, Techniques, Perceived Effectiveness, Objectives, Literature-in-English

  17. Pedagogical Conditions for Coordination Development in Girls of Primary School Age through Rhythmic Gymnastics

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    С. І. Марченко

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to experimentally verify the effectiveness of the use of rhythmic gymnastics means that have been systematized to develop coordination abilities in girls of primary school age. Research methods: method of theoretical analysis and generalization of literary sources, method of control studies, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics. Research results. The coordination readiness level evaluation demonstrated that at the beginning of the pedagogical experiment the level of the majority of the second-grade girls was low (22.85%, below average (39.97%, and average (11.42%; that of the third-grade girls was below average (57.1%, average (34.26%; and that of the fourth-grade — below average (29.3%, and average (62.06%. After the pedagogical experiment the number of the second-, third- and fourth-grade girls with the low level decreased by 19%, 13.4%, 10.4% in the experimental groups and by 16.3%, 11.8%, 9.8% in the control groups respectively; the number of the girls with the below-average level decreased by 14.7%, 32.7%, 23.1% in the experimental groups and by 12.4%, 21%, 19.1% in the control groups. The positive changes in the level of coordination abilities occurred both in the control and the experimental groups, with the results improved in favor of the experimental groups.

  18. A Comparison of Organizational Structure and Pedagogical Approach: Online versus Face-to-face

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    Donovan A. McFarlane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines online versus face-to-face organizational structure and pedagogy in terms of education and the teaching and learning process. The author distinguishes several important terms related to distance/online/e-learning, virtual learning and brick-and-mortar learning interactions and concepts such as asynchronous and synchronous interactions, etc, before deliberating on perceived differences in organizational structure and pedagogical approaches of virtual and brick-and-mortar schools by examining organizational structure, knowledge and pedagogical theories, ideas, and constructs. The roles of mission, vision, and other considerations that contribute to differences between virtual and brick-and-mortar schools are examined. The appropriateness of structure and pedagogy as related to variables such as class size, span of control, and several other factors is discussed. The benefits and drawbacks of both virtual and brick-and-mortar schools are assessed in terms of perceived effectiveness and relation to perceived organizational structural and pedagogical differences before the author presents an informed response to the major thesis of this paper based on pertinent literature and the foregone discussion. After recognizing prevailing practices with regard to organizational structure and pedagogy, and given the pertinent role of technology and several influencing factors such as leadership, and curriculum, among other factors in virtual and brick-and-mortar schools, several recommendations are presented for improving the teaching-learning process.

  19. ADAPTATIONAL STAGE OF THE PROFESSIONAL SOCIALIZATION OF STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITIES

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    Z. I. Tyumaseva

    2018-01-01

    , creative-activity; the criteria characteristics and compliance indicators are given. The pilot testing on approbation of the authors’ methodology was carried out at the Chelyabinsk State Pedagogical University (today the Southern Ural State Humanitarian and Pedagogical University in the period 2013–2016; the results of the work are presented in this publication.Practical significance. Developed diagnostic toolkit enables to assess on a timely basis the level of social adaptation of future teachers, to identify the ways of increasing the quality of vocational training. The materials of the research could be useful for specialists who are engaged in the process of students’ adaptation to university environment; for leaders and managers of educational institutions; for teachers, lecturers and students themselves.

  20. What School Teachers Expect from Conversational Pedagogic Agents?

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    Silvia TAMAYO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conversational Pedagogical Agents are interactive systems that teach students by assuming the role of teacher, student or companion through a natural language dialogue. If has been investigated a lot on the domains in which the agents can be used, the results in terms of educational effectiveness and level of satisfaction and motivation of the students. However, in the literature, there are not many examples of studies that reveal the opinion of school teachers on this type of educational technology. In this paper, we provide the results of a survey of 82 teachers to know what they expect from the agents. The following research questions will be answered: Q1 Do you know this educational technology? Q2 If so, are teachers used to integrate this type of technology in the classroom? and, P3 If teachers could design the agent, what characteristics do they consider to be the most appropriate? How should the agent react to different situations? From the results gathered, it is expected to provide information to all researchers, designers and teachers who want to integrate this type of educational technology in their classroom..