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Sample records for identifying older diabetic

  1. Identifying non-pharmacological risk factors for falling in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesande, Janelle; Richardson, Julie

    2017-07-01

    To identify the non-pharmacological risk factors for falling in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A systematic review of randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies and before/after studies was conducted. Eligible studies identified non-pharmacological risk factors for falling in older adults with DM2. Medline, Embase, Pubmed and CINAHL were searched for relevant studies published through December 2015. Reference lists were also searched for relevant studies. Search terms were DM2, risk factors, falls and falling, older adults, aging, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, accidental falls and trip. Publication language was restricted to English. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria: four cross-sectional, six prospective cohorts, two randomized controlled trials and one before/after study. These studies included a total of 13,104 participants, ≥50 years. The most common risk factors for falling were impaired balance, reduced walking velocity, peripheral neuropathy and comorbid conditions. However, lower extremity pain, being overweight and comorbid conditions had the greatest impact on fall risk. Interventions to reduce falling in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus should focus on reducing lower extremity pain, reducing body weight and managing comorbid conditions. Implications for Rehabilitation    Diabetes mellitus:   • Older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) have a higher risk for falling than older adults without.   • Older adults with DM2 are more likely to suffer serious injuries when they fall.   • Comprehensive risk factor identification is necessary for rehabilitation professionals to accurately determine whether their clients are at risk for falling.   • Rehabilitation professionals also need to tailor interventions based on the client's risk factors in order to effectively reduce falls and fall-related injuries.

  2. Functional Balance and Its Determinants in Older People with Diabetes.

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    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Lee, Pei-Yun; Lee, I-Ting; Lin, Sang-I

    2016-01-01

    To determine functional balance abilities of older adults with diabetes, and identify determinants of these abilities. Eighty diabetic and 67 healthy non-diabetic community-dwelling older adults completed the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and questionnaires about their medical and fall histories. Participants were also assessed for vision, plantar sensitivity, muscle strength, and functional balance, including Functional Reach (FR), Five Times Sit-to-Stand (FTSTS), and 180° turn (TURN). In addition to between-group comparisons, hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to identify the independent determinants for each of the individual balance tasks for the diabetes and control group separately. The diabetes group had significantly greater body mass index, higher rate of cardiac disease, and poorer plantar sensitivity, mental status, grip and lower limb strength. The diabetes group performed significantly poorer in FTSTS and TURN (both pdeterminants for the balance tasks varied substantially between tasks and groups. For the diabetes group, they included visual and plantar sensitivity and MMSE for FR (R2 = 0.39), ankle dorsiflexion strength for FTSTS (R2 = 0.377), and plantar sensitivity, knee extension strength and MMSE for TURN (R2 = 0.391). For the control group, knee extension strength emerged as the common and only significant determinant and only explained approximately 10% of the variance for FR and TURN. Impairments in functional balance abilities were evident for older adults with diabetes. Their underpinning functional limitations were different for different tasks and were also different from those of the control group. Screening of functional balance and mental status, lower limb strength and sensory function, and interventions to address these impairments may be important to maintain function, independence and safety for older clients with diabetes.

  3. Dietary management of older people with diabetes.

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    McClinchy, Jane

    2018-05-02

    Diabetes UK's revised nutrition guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes, published recently, encourage education in self-management and include additional guidance for older people with diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in older people is increasing. Many older people with diabetes are healthy and mobile, and live in the community, but a number are frail and living in care homes. Those who are frail are at increased risk of malnutrition from a range of causes. Older people with diabetes should be assessed for malnutrition risk and referred to a dietitian if required. Management of these patients focuses on foods that are high in protein and energy foods. A case study gives an example of how a community nurse may be involved.

  4. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Jeffrey B; Musi, Nicolas; McFarland Horne, Frances; Crandall, Jill P; Goldberg, Andrew; Harkless, Lawrence; Hazzard, William R; Huang, Elbert S; Kirkman, M Sue; Plutzky, Jorge; Schmader, Kenneth E; Zieman, Susan; High, Kevin P

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, driven in part by an absolute increase in incidence among adults aged 65 years and older. Individuals with diabetes are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, and age strongly predicts cardiovascular complications. Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play some role in the mechanisms underlying aging, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other complications of diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in risk for diabetes and diabetes-related cardiovascular disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, because of the heterogeneity of the older population, a lack of understanding of the biology of aging, and inadequate study of the effects of treatments on traditional complications and geriatric conditions associated with diabetes, no consensus exists on the optimal interventions for older diabetic adults. The Association of Specialty Professors, along with the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the American Diabetes Association, held a workshop, summarized in this Perspective, to discuss current knowledge regarding diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults, identify gaps, and propose questions to guide future research. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Treatment of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in Older Adults with Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Scheinberg, Nataliya; Salbu, Rebecca L; Goswami, Gayotri; Cohen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, screening and diagnosis, and optimal treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) and its implications in older adults. A search of PubMed using the Mesh terms "diabetes," "type 1," "insulin-dependent," "T1DM," and "diabetic autonomic neuropathy" was performed to find relevant primary literature. Additional search terms "epidemiology," "geriatric," and "risk" were employed. All English-language articles from 2005 to 2015 appearing in these searches were reviewed for relevance. Related articles suggested in the PubMed search and clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists were reviewed. These uncovered further resources for risk stratification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DAN. DAN is highly prevalent in the diabetes population and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in older adults, yet, often goes undiagnosed and untreated. Treatment of DAN is complex in the older adult because of poor tolerability of many pharmacologic treatment options; therefore, great care must be taken when selecting therapy as to avoid unwanted adverse effects. With increasing life-expectancy of patients with diabetes mellitus, awareness of DAN and its implications to older adults is needed in primary care. Consistent screening and appropriate treatment of DAN in older adults with diabetes mellitus is essential in helping to maintain functional status and avoid adverse events.

  6. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Soo Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the near future, the majority of patients with diabetes will be adults aged 65 or older. Unlike young adults with diabetes, elderly diabetic people may be affected by a variety of comorbid conditions such as depression, cognitive impairment, muscle weakness (sarcopenia, falls and fractures, and physical frailty. These geriatric syndromes should be considered in the establishment of treatment goals in older adults with diabetes. Although there are several guidelines for the management of diabetes, only a few are specifically designed for the elderly with diabetes. In this review, we present specific conditions of elderly diabetes which should be taken into account in the management of diabetes in older adults. We also present advantages and disadvantages of various glucose-lowering agents that should be considered when choosing a proper regimen for older adults with diabetes.

  7. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  8. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diabetes self-care. Depression is also more common among the elderly and may lead to deterioration in self-care behaviors. Because of concerns about cognitive deficits and multiple comorbidities, adults older than 65 years are often excluded from research trials. Thus, little clinical evidence is available and the most appropriate treatment approaches and how to best support older patients’ self-care efforts are unclear. This review summarizes the current literature, research findings, and expert and consensus recommendations with their rationales. PMID:24510969

  9. Mobile application for diabetes self-management in China: Do they fit for older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chenchen; Zhou, Lanshu; Liu, Zhihui; Wang, Haocen; Bowers, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Despite the exponential proliferation of Chinese diabetes applications, none are designed to meet the needs of the largest potential user population. The purpose of this study is to examine the features and contents of Chinese diabetes mobile applications in terms of their suitability for use by older adults with diabetes. A search of the Apple application store and the 360 Mobile Assistant was conducted to identify Chinese diabetes applications. Next, we compared the features and contents of all the included and most popular diabetes applications with both the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) clinical guideline and recommended usability criteria for older adults respectively. Seventy-one diabetes apps were randomly selected (from a pool of 552 diabetes apps) and reviewed. The features of most apps failed to include content areas of known importance for managing diabetes in older adults. Usability of all tested applications was rated moderate to good. Designing maximally effective medical applications would benefit from attention to both usability and content guidelines targeted for the largest potential user population. Despite the preponderance of older adults in the potential user group, failing to consider the relevance of content, in addition to usability for the specific population will ultimately limit the usefulness of the app. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Validity and Relative Ability of 4 Balance Tests to Identify Fall Status of Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alda; Silva, Alexandre; Oliveira, Ana; Cruz, Joana; Machado, Ana; Jácome, Cristina

    The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), the Mini-BESTest, and the Brief-BESTest are useful tests to assess balance; however, their clinimetric properties have not been studied well in older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study compared the validity and relative ability of the BBS, BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest to identify fall status in older adults with T2D. This study involved a cross-sectional design. Sixty-six older adults with T2D (75 ± 7.6 years) were included and asked to report the number of falls during the previous 12 months and to complete the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. The BBS and the BESTest were administered, and the Mini-BESTest and Brief-BESTest scores were computed based on the BESTest performance. Receiver operating characteristics were used to assess the ability of each balance test to differentiate between participants with and without a history of falls. The 4 balance tests were able to identify fall status (areas under the curve = 0.74-0.76), with similar sensitivity (60%-67%) and specificity (71%-76%). The 4 balance tests were able to differentiate between older adults with T2D with and without a history of falls. As the BBS and the BESTest require longer application time, the Brief-BESTest may be an appropriate choice to use in clinical practice to detect fall risk.

  11. Diabetes and risk of hospitalized fall injury among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Rebecca K; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Resnick, Helaine E; Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Feingold, Kenneth R; Cauley, Jane A; Vittinghoff, Eric; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B; Nevitt, Michael C; Cummings, Steven R; Shorr, Ronald I; Schwartz, Ann V

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether older adults with diabetes are at increased risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. The longitudinal Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study included 3,075 adults aged 70-79 years at baseline. Hospitalizations that included ICD-9-Clinical Modification codes for a fall and an injury were identified. The effect of diabetes with and without insulin use on the rate of first fall-related injury hospitalization was assessed using proportional hazards models. At baseline, 719 participants had diabetes, and 117 of them were using insulin. Of the 293 participants who were hospitalized for a fall-related injury, 71 had diabetes, and 16 were using insulin. Diabetes was associated with a higher rate of injurious fall requiring hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.48 [95% CI 1.12-1.95]) in models adjusted for age, race, sex, BMI, and education. In those participants using insulin, compared with participants without diabetes, the HR was 3.00 (1.78-5.07). Additional adjustment for potential intermediaries, such as fainting in the past year, standing balance score, cystatin C level, and number of prescription medications, accounted for some of the increased risk associated with diabetes (1.41 [1.05-1.88]) and insulin-treated diabetes (2.24 [1.24-4.03]). Among participants with diabetes, a history of falling, poor standing balance score, and A1C level ≥8% were risk factors for an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. Older adults with diabetes, in particular those using insulin, are at greater risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, poor glycemic control may increase the risk of an injurious fall.

  12. Salivary function and glycemic control in older persons with diabetes.

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    Chavez, E M; Taylor, G W; Borrell, L N; Ship, J A

    2000-03-01

    There is no consensus on the possible association between diabetes and salivary dysfunction in older persons with diabetes. This study's purpose was to investigate the effect of diabetes and glycemic control on salivary function in an older population. Twenty nine persons with type 2 diabetes and 23 nondiabetic control subjects participated (age range, 54-90 years). Diabetic status was determined by a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) test and a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) >9%. Unstimulated whole saliva, unstimulated parotid, and stimulated parotid flow rates were measured, and subjects completed a standardized xerostomia questionnaire. Persons with poorly controlled diabetes had lower (P =.01) stimulated parotid flow rates than persons with well-controlled diabetes and nondiabetic control subjects. There were no significant differences in xerostomic complaints based on diabetic or glycemic control status or salivary flow rates. These results provide some evidence that poorly controlled diabetes may be associated with salivary dysfunction in older adults who have no concomitant complaints of xerostomia.

  13. Metabolic parameters and cognitive function in a cohort of older diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herghelegiu, Anna Marie; Nacu, Raluca Mihaela; Prada, Gabriel Ioan

    2016-12-01

    Dementia is one of the most disabling conditions associated with old age. With increasing life expectancy, prevalence of both dementia and diabetes is rising. The complex pathological relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and dementia has been studied, but is not yet fully understood. The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic parameters and the cognitive function in older diabetics. A total number of 360 diabetic subjects, age 65 years and over, and 300 older people controls were included. Clinical and biological parameters, together with the cognitive function, were assessed every 6 months over a 18-month period, for each study participant. By employing a multivariate linear regression analysis, several significant relationships have been identified: between Clock Drawing Test (CDT) scores and HbA1c (R 2  = 0.68); between CDT scores (R 2  = 0.51) and overall MMSE scores (R 2  = 0.43) on one hand, and DM duration in years, on the other hand; also between CDT scores and BMI (R 2  = 0.59). There was no significant association between fasting serum glucose (FSG), total serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol or triglycerides levels and cognitive function scores (p > 0.05). The close detailed monitoring of the cognitive function and a rigorous metabolic control are important, especially in the very early stages of DM. Addressing factors such as weight control in older diabetic patients could contribute to better cognitive outcomes.

  14. Understanding the Relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Falls in Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Roman de Mettelinge, Tine; Cambier, Dirk; Calders, Patrick; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Delbaere, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background Older adults with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are at increased risk of falling. The current study aims to identify risk factors that mediate the relationship between diabetes and falls. Methods 199 older adults (104 with diabetes and 95 healthy controls) underwent a medical screening. Gait (GAITRite®), balance (AccuGait® force plate), grip strength (Jamar®), and cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination and Clock Drawing Test) were assessed. Falls were prospectively recorded during a 12-month follow-up period using monthly calendars. Results Compared to controls, diabetes participants scored worse on all physical and cognitive measures. Sixty-four participants (42 diabetes vs. 22 controls) reported at least one injurious fall or two non-injurious falls (“fallers”). Univariate logistic regression identified diabetes as a risk factor for future falls (Odds Ratio 2.25, 95%CI 1.21–4.15, p = 0.010). Stepwise multiple regressions defined diabetes and poor balance as independent risk factors for falling. Taking more medications, slower walking speed, shorter stride length and poor cognitive performance were mediators that reduced the Odds Ratio of the relationship between diabetes and faller status relationship the most followed by reduced grip strength and increased stride length variability. Conclusions Diabetes is a major risk factor for falling, even after controlling for poor balance. Taking more medications, poorer walking performance and reduced cognitive functioning were mediators of the relationship between diabetes and falls. Tailored preventive programs including systematic medication reviews, specific balance exercises and cognitive training might be beneficial in reducing fall risk in older adults suffering from diabetes. PMID:23825617

  15. Predictors of diabetes in older people in urban China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoling Chen

    Full Text Available China has the largest number of people with diabetes in the world. Over the last 30 years China has experienced rapid economic growth and a growing income gap between rich and poor. The population is ageing, however diabetes in older people has not been well studied to date. In this study we determined incidence and predictors of diabetes in older Chinese people.During 2001, using a standard interview method, we examined 1,317 adults aged ≥65 years who did not have diabetes in the city of Hefei, and characterized baseline risk factors. Over 7.5 years of follow up, we documented incident diabetes using self-reported doctor diagnosis and the cause of death in the whole cohort, and HbA(1C ≥48 mmol/mol in a nested case-control sample. A multivariate Cox regression model was employed to investigate risk of diabetes in relation to baseline risk factors.During follow up, 119 persons had newly diagnosed diabetes. World age-standardised incidence of diabetes was 24.5 (95% CI 19.5-29.5 per 1,000 person-years. Risk of diabetes was significantly and positively associated with income, waist circumference and body mass index, smoking and uncontrolled hypertension, but negatively associated with having a hobby of walking and frequency of visiting children/other relatives and contacting neighbours/friends. Higher income was significantly associated with increased diabetes risk regardless of cardiovascular and psychosocial risk factors. Compared to those with middle income and no psychosocial risk factors, the hazard ratio for incident diabetes among participants with high income and psychosocial risk was 2.13 (95% CI 1.02-4.45.Increasing incidence of diabetes in relation to high income has become an important public health issue in China. Maintaining social networks and gentle physical activities and reducing psychosocial factors may be integrated into current multi-faceted preventive strategies for curbing the epidemic of diabetes in the older population.

  16. Self-reported diabetes in older people: comparison of prevalences and control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rizzato Stopa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of diabetes in older people and the adopted control measures. METHODS Data regarding older diabetic individuals who participated in the Health Surveys conducted in the Municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, ISA-Capital, in 2003 and 2008, which were cross-sectional studies, were analyzed. Prevalences and confidence intervals were compared between 2003 and 2008, according to sociodemographic variables. The combination of the databases was performed when the confidence intervals overlapped. The Chi-square (level of significance of 5% and the Pearson’s Chi-square (Rao-Scott tests were performed. The variables without overlap between the confidence intervals were not tested. RESULTS The age of the older adults was 60-69 years. The majority were women, Caucasian, with an income of between > 0.5 and 2.5 times the minimum salary and low levels of schooling. The prevalence of diabetes was 17.6% (95%CI 14.9;20.6 in 2003 and 20.1% (95%CI 17.3;23.1 in 2008, which indicates a growth over this period (p at the limit of significance. The most prevalent measure adopted by the older adults to control diabetes was hypoglycemic agents, followed by diet. Physical activity was not frequent, despite the significant differences observed between 2003 and 2008 results. The use of public health services to control diabetes was significantly higher in older individuals with lower income and lower levels of education. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is a complex and challenging disease for patients and the health systems. Measures that encourage health promotion practices are necessary because they presented a smaller proportion than the use of hypoglycemic agents. Public health policies should be implemented, and aimed mainly at older individuals with low income and schooling levels. These changes are essential to improve the health condition of older diabetic patients.

  17. Balance training reduces falls risk in older individuals with type 2 diabetes.

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    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R; Mariano, Mira; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Arthur I

    2010-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of balance/strength training on falls risk and posture in older individuals with type 2 diabetes. Sixteen individuals with type 2 diabetes and 21 age-matched control subjects (aged 50-75 years) participated. Postural stability and falls risk was assessed before and after a 6-week exercise program. Diabetic individuals had significantly higher falls risk score compared with control subjects. The diabetic group also exhibited evidence of mild-to-moderate neuropathy, slower reaction times, and increased postural sway. Following exercise, the diabetic group showed significant improvements in leg strength, faster reaction times, decreased sway, and, consequently, reduced falls risk. Older individuals with diabetes had impaired balance, slower reactions, and consequently a higher falls risk than age-matched control subjects. However, all these variables improved after resistance/balance training. Together these results demonstrate that structured exercise has wide-spread positive effects on physiological function for older individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills for self-management behavior changes: a qualitative study of diabetes care for older adults in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suyoung; Song, Misoon; Chang, Sun Ju; Kim, Se-An

    2014-01-01

    To describe strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills related to changes in diabetes self-management behavior among community-dwelling older adults in Korea. A total of five focus group interviews (three separate focus groups) were conducted with 12 older adults with type 2 diabetes and five diabetes educators. Qualitative content analysis was used. "One's own willingness and ability" emerged as a fundamental belief about the strategies for diabetes self-management. Six major themes under three categories were identified. Under the information category, the recurrent themes were: 1) repeatedly offering detailed knowledge regarding self-management, 2) providing information about current health status, and 3) identifying experiential knowledge of blood glucose control. The recurrent themes in the motivation category were: 1) ensuring a positive attitude regarding self-management, and 2) encouragement or feedback from significant others. Furthermore, in the skills category, we found that the following theme emerged: hands-on skills training with numerical standards. This study identified six tailored strategies for enhancing information, motivation, and skills for diabetes self-management behavior changes. These strategies can be used in the development of a culturally sensitive diabetes self-management program for older adults.

  19. Orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, and falling in older patients : a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Blanker, Marco H.; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Houweling, Sebastiaan; Kemper, Adriaan M.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although orthostatic hypotension (OH) is more prevalent in old age, and in patients with diabetes, the prevalence of OH in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is unknown. Aim: To establish the prevalence of OH, and its association with falling, in home-dwelling older

  20. Drug treatment of hypertension in older patients with diabetes mellitus.

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    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Pal, Suman; Nabors, Christopher; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2018-05-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent in the elderly (age>65 years) diabetic population than in the general population and shows an increasing prevalence with advancing age. Both diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are independent risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) related morbidity and mortality. Optimal BP targets were not identified in elderly patients with DM and hypertension. Areas covered: In this review article, the authors briefly discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension in elderly diabetics, present evidence with various antihypertensive drug classes supporting the treatment of hypertension to reduce CV events in older diabetics, and then discuss the optimal target BP goals in these patients. Expert opinion: Clinicians should have a BP goal of less than 130/80 mm in all elderly patients with hypertension and DM, especially in those with high CV-risk. When medications are required for optimal BP control in addition to lifestyle measures, either thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, or calcium channel blockers should be considered as initial therapy. Combinations of medications are usually required in these patients because BP control is more difficult to achieve in diabetics than those without DM.

  1. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Carneiro, Sandro Dias Rocha Mendes; Barbosa, Fladia Taciana de Sousa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Moizan, Jean Andr? Herv?; Doucet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its association with xerostomia. Methods Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Cear? (CIHD) in the city of Fortaleza, Cear?, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT). ...

  2. Identifying the causes of the changes in the prevalence patterns of diabetes in older U.S. adults: A new trend partitioning approach.

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    Akushevich, Igor; Yashkin, Arseniy P; Kravchenko, Julia; Fang, Fang; Arbeev, Konstantin; Sloan, Frank; Yashin, Anatoliy I

    2018-04-01

    To identify how efforts to control the diabetes epidemic and the resulting changes in diabetes mellitus, type II (T2D) incidence and survival have affected the time-trend of T2D prevalence. A newly developed method of trend decomposition was applied to a 5% sample of Medicare administrative claims filed between 1991 and 2012. Age-adjusted prevalence of T2D for adults age 65+ increased at an average annual percentage change of 2.31% between 1992 and 2012. Primary contributors to this trend were (in order of magnitude): improved survival at all ages, increased prevalence of T2D prior to age of Medicare eligibility, decreased incidence of T2D after age of Medicare eligibility. Health services supported by the Medicare system, coupled with improvements in medical technology and T2D awareness efforts provide effective care for individuals age 65 and older. However, policy maker attention should be shifted to the prevention of T2D in younger age groups to control the increase in prevalence observed prior to Medicare eligibility. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Diabetes and Depression in Older Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the association between diabetes and depression in older women and the importance of getting help when feeling depressed.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  4. Diabetes and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: The Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Priya; Carlson, Michelle C; Crum, Rosa M; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Sharrett, A Richey; Yasar, Sevil; Nahin, Richard L; DeKosky, Steven T; Snitz, Beth; Lopez, Oscar; Williamson, Jeff D; Furberg, Curt D; Rapp, Stephen R; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2017-12-12

    Previous studies have shown that individuals with diabetes exhibit accelerated cognitive decline. However, methodological limitations have limited the quality of this evidence. Heterogeneity in study design, cognitive test administration, and methods of analysis of cognitive data have made it difficult to synthesize and translate findings to practice. We analyzed longitudinal data from the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study to test our hypothesis that older adults with diabetes have greater test-specific and domain-specific cognitive declines compared to older adults without diabetes. Tests of memory, visuo-spatial construction, language, psychomotor speed, and executive function were administered. Test scores were standardized to z-scores and averaged to yield domain scores. Linear random effects models were used to compare baseline differences and changes over time in test and domain scores among individuals with and without diabetes. Among the 3,069 adults, aged 72-96 years, 9.3% reported diabetes. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years, participants with diabetes exhibited greater baseline differences in a test of executive function (trail making test, Part B) and greater declines in a test of language (phonemic verbal fluency). For the composite cognitive domain scores, participants with diabetes exhibited lower baseline executive function and global cognition domain scores, but no significant differences in the rate of decline. Identifying cognitive domains most affected by diabetes can lead to targeted risk modification, possibly in the form of lifestyle interventions such as diet and physical activity, which we know to be beneficial for improving vascular risk factors, such as diabetes, and therefore may reduce the risk of executive dysfunction and possible dementia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Pioglitazone is equally effective for diabetes prevention in older versus younger adults with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Sara E; Wang, Chen-Pin; Tripathy, Devjit; Clement, Stephen C; Schwenke, Dawn C; Banerji, Mary Ann; Bray, George A; Buchanan, Thomas A; Henry, Robert R; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Mudaliar, Sunder; Stentz, Frankie B; Reaven, Peter D; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    To determine the efficacy of pioglitazone to prevent type 2 diabetes in older compared to younger adults with pre-diabetes. Six hundred two participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were randomized in double blind fashion to placebo or pioglitazone for diabetes prevention in the ACT NOW study (NEJM 364:1104-1115, 2011). Cox proportional hazard regression was used to compare time to development of diabetes over a mean of 2 years between older (≥61 years) and younger participants. We compared effects of pioglitazone versus placebo on metabolic profiles, inflammatory markers, adipokines, β cell function (disposition index), insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index), and body composition by ANOVA. Diabetes incidence was reduced by 85 % in older and 69 % in younger subjects (p = 0.41). β cell function (disposition index) increased by 35.0 % in the older and 26.7 % in younger subjects (p = 0.83). Insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) increased by 3.07 (5.2-fold) in older and by 2.54 (3.8-fold) in younger participants (p = 0.58). Pioglitazone more effectively increased adiponectin in older versus younger subjects (22.9 ± 3.2 μg/mL [2.7-fold] vs. 12.7 ± 1.4 μg/mL [2.2-fold], respectively; p = 0.04). Younger subjects tended to have a greater increase in whole body fat mass compared to older subjects (3.6 vs. 3.1 kg; p = 0.061). Younger and older subjects had similar decreases in bone mineral density (0.018 ± 0.0071 vs. 0.0138 ± 0.021 g/cm 2 ). Younger and older pre-diabetic adults taking pioglitazone had similar reductions in conversion to diabetes and older adults had similar or greater improvements in metabolic risk factors, demonstrating that pioglitazone is useful in preventing diabetes in older adults.

  6. Effect of Behavioral Intervention on Dilated Fundus Examination Rates in Older African American Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David M; Casten, Robin J; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A; Murchison, Ann P; Johnson, Deiana; Stratford, Shayla; Henderer, Jeffrey; Rovner, Barry W; Haller, Julia A

    2015-09-01

    African American individuals are at high risk of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy but have suboptimal rates of dilated fundus examinations (DFEs). Early intervention is crucial for the prevention of diabetic retinopathy in this high-risk population. To test the efficacy of behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention on rates of DFEs in older African American individuals with diabetes mellitus. Masked randomized clinical trial at 2 urban medical centers from October 1, 2010, to May 31, 2014. Participants included 206 African American individuals 65 years and older with diabetes mellitus who had not obtained a DFE in the preceding 12 months. Participants were randomized to either behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention, a behavioral intervention designed to provide education, facilitate identifying and addressing health care barriers, and promote goal setting to improve rates of DFEs, or supportive therapy, a control condition. The primary outcome was medical documentation of a DFE at 6 months' follow-up. Secondary outcomes included the Risk Perceptions and Risk Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Self-Care Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire 9, and National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire 25 scores and hemoglobin A1c levels. More participants in the behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy prevention group (87.9%) obtained a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (34.1%) by the 6-month follow-up assessment (P diabetic retinopathy prevention group were 2.5 times more likely to obtain a DFE compared with those in the supportive therapy group (risk ratio = 2.58; 95% CI, 1.91-3.48; P Knowledge Survey of Diabetes Mellitus or National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire 25 composite scores; however, both groups had improved adherence to diabetes mellitus self-care behaviors from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Behavioral activation for diabetic retinopathy

  7. Alcohol consumption and risk type 2 diabetes among older women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Stolk, R.P.; Schouw, van der Y.T.; Grobbee, D.E.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Bots, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—This study aimed to investigate the relation between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes among older women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Between 1993 and 1997, 16,330 women aged 49–70 years and free from diabetes were enrolled in one of the Dutch Prospect-EPIC (European Prospective

  8. Comparison of body composition and physical and cognitive function between older Japanese adults with no diabetes, prediabetes and diabetes: A cross-sectional study in community-dwelling Japanese older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kera, Takeshi; Kawai, Hisashi; Hirano, Hirohiko; Kojima, Motonaga; Watanabe, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ihara, Kazushige; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2018-03-26

    Diabetes is associated with not only cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, but also reductions in physical and cognitive function. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether muscle strength, walking ability and balance declined in Japanese community-dwelling older adults with diabetes or prediabetes. We analyzed data from comprehensive health checkups carried out for 1689 individuals (710 men, 979 women; mean age 71.4 ± 5.6 years) between 2011 and 2016. Participants were divided into three groups: no diabetes (non-history of diabetes and glycated hemoglobin level 6.4%). Physical and cognitive function were compared between groups after adjusting for covariates. Participants with diabetes showed higher levels of obesity, comorbidity, gonarthrosis, and body fat, and lower levels of physical function relative to those observed in participants with prediabetes or no diabetes. After adjusting covariates, participants with diabetes showed significantly lower grip strength (P functional decline was observed in community-dwelling older adults with diabetes, but not in those with prediabetes. Prevention of the progression of prediabetes to diabetes is important in avoiding reductions in physical function. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management: perspectives of older community dwellers and health professionals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huixia; Edwards, Helen; Courtney, Mary; McDowell, Jan; Wei, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about self-management among people with Type 2 diabetes living in mainland China. Understanding the experiences of this target population is needed to provide socioculturally relevant education to effectively promote self-management. The aim of this study was to explore perceived barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management for both older community dwellers and health professionals in China. Four focus groups, two for older people with diabetes and two for health professionals, were conducted. All participants were purposively sampled from two communities in Shanghai, China. Six barriers were identified: overdependence on but dislike of western medicine, family role expectations, cuisine culture, lack of trustworthy information sources, deficits in communication between clients and health professionals, and restriction of reimbursement regulations. Facilitators included family and peer support, good relationships with health professionals, simple and practical instruction and a favourable community environment. The findings provide valuable information for diabetes self-management intervention development in China, and have implications for programmes tailored to populations in similar sociocultural circumstances. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Associations of Total and Domain-Specific Sedentary Time With Type 2 Diabetes in Taiwanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chun Hsueh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in older adults has become a public health concern. We investigated the associations of total and domain-specific sedentary time with risk of type 2 diabetes in older adults. Methods: The sample comprised 1046 older people (aged ≥65 years. Analyses were performed using crosssectional data collected via computer-assisted telephone-based interviews in 2014. Data on six self-reported domains of sedentary time (Measure of Older Adults’ Sedentary Time, type 2 diabetes status, and sociodemographic variables were included in the study. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for total and individual sedentary behavior components and likelihood of type 2 diabetes. Results: A total of 17.5% of the participants reported type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were found between total sitting time and risk of type 2 diabetes, after controlling for confounding factors. After total sedentary behavior was stratified into six domains, only watching television for more than 2 hours per day was associated with higher odds of type 2 diabetes (OR 1.56; 95% CI, 1.10–2.21, but no significant associations were found between other domains of sedentary behavior (computer use, reading, socializing, transport, and hobbies and risk of type 2 diabetes. Conclusions: These findings suggest that, among domain-specific sedentary behavior, excessive television viewing might increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among older adults more than other forms of sedentary behavior.

  11. The association between cognitive decline and incident depressive symptoms in a sample of older Puerto Rican adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Tyler; Dávila, Ana Luisa; Clay, Olivio; Markides, Kyriakos S; Andel, Ross; Crowe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Older Puerto Rican adults have particularly high risk of diabetes compared to the general US population. Diabetes is associated with both higher depressive symptoms and cognitive decline, but less is known about the longitudinal relationship between cognitive decline and incident depressive symptoms in those with diabetes. This study investigated the association between cognitive decline and incident depressive symptoms in older Puerto Rican adults with diabetes over a four-year period. Households across Puerto Rico were visited to identify a population-based sample of adults aged 60 years and over for the Puerto Rican Elderly: Health Conditions study (PREHCO); 680 participants with diabetes at baseline and no baseline cognitive impairment were included in analyses. Cognitive decline and depressive symptoms were measured using the Mini-Mental Cabán (MMC) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), respectively. We examined predictors of incident depressive symptoms (GDS ≥ 5 at follow-up but not baseline) and cognitive decline using regression modeling. In a covariate-adjusted logistic regression model, cognitive decline, female gender, and greater diabetes-related complications were each significantly associated with increased odds of incident depressive symptoms (p Puerto Ricans with diabetes who also experienced cognitive decline. Efforts are needed to optimize diabetes management and monitor for depression and cognitive decline in this population.

  12. Elevated HbA1c and Fasting Plasma Glucose in Predicting Diabetes Incidence Among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Gill, Thomas M.; Kanaya, Alka; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Koster, Annemarie; Johnson, Karen C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Harris, Tamara; De Rekeneire, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine which measures—impaired fasting glucose (IFG), elevated HbA1c, or both—best predict incident diabetes in older adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS From the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study, we selected individuals without diabetes, and we defined IFG (100–125 mg/dL) and elevated HbA1c (5.7–6.4%) per American Diabetes Association guidelines. Incident diabetes was based on self-report, use of antihyperglycemic medicines, or HbA1c ≥6.5% during 7 years of follow-up. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, site, BMI, smoking, blood pressure, and physical activity. Discrimination and calibration were assessed for models with IFG and with both IFG and elevated HbA1c. RESULTS Among 1,690 adults (mean age 76.5, 46% men, 32% black), 183 (10.8%) developed diabetes over 7 years. Adjusted odds ratios of diabetes were 6.2 (95% CI 4.4–8.8) in those with IFG (versus those with fasting plasma glucose [FPG] HbA1c (versus those with HbA1c HbA1c were considered together, odds ratios were 3.5 (1.9–6.3) in those with IFG only, 8.0 (4.8–13.2) in those with elevated HbA1c only, and 26.2 (16.3–42.1) in those with both IFG and elevated HbA1c (versus those with normal FPG and HbA1c). Addition of elevated HbA1c to the model with IFG resulted in improved discrimination and calibration. CONCLUSIONS Older adults with both IFG and elevated HbA1c have a substantially increased odds of developing diabetes over 7 years. Combined screening with FPG and HbA1c may identify older adults at very high risk for diabetes. PMID:24135387

  13. Alcohol consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes among older women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Stolk, R.P.; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Grobbee, D.E.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Bots, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to investigate the relation between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes among older women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Between 1993 and 1997, 16,330 women aged 49-70 years and free from diabetes were enrolled in one of the Dutch Prospect-EPIC (European Prospective

  14. Alcohol consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes among older women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, JWJ; Stolk, RP; Van der Schouw, YT; Grobbee, DE; Hendriks, HFJ; Bots, ML

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to investigate the relation between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes among older women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- Between 1993 and 1997, 16,330 women aged 49-70 years and free from diabetes were enrolled in one of the Dutch Prospect-EPIC ( European Prospective

  15. Predictors of cognitive decline in older adult type 2 diabetes from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Zimering

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cognitive decline disproportionately affects older adult type 2 diabetes. We tested whether randomized intensive glucose-lowering reduces the rate(s of cognitive decline in adults with advanced type 2 diabetes (mean: age, 60 years; diabetes duration, 11 years from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Methods: A battery of neuropsychological tests (digit span, digit symbol substitution (DSym, and Trails-making Part B (TMT-B was administered at baseline in ~1700 participants and repeated at year 5. Thirty-six risk factors were evaluated as predictors of cognitive decline in multivariable regression analyses.Results: The mean age-adjusted, DSym or TMT-B declined significantly in all study participants (P < 0.001. Randomized intensive glucose-lowering did not significantly alter the rate of cognitive decline. The final model of risk factors associated with 5-year decline in age-adjusted TMT-B included as significant predictors: longer baseline diabetes duration (beta = -0.028; P = 0.0057, lower baseline diastolic blood pressure (beta = 0.028; P < 0.001, and baseline calcium channel blocker medication use (beta = -0.639; P < 0.001. Higher baseline pulse pressure was significantly associated with decline in age-adjusted TMT-B suggesting a role for both higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressure. Baseline thiazide diuretic use (beta= -0.549; P =0.015 was an additional significant predictor of 5-year decline in age-adjusted digit symbol score. Post-baseline systolic blood pressure-lowering was significantly associated (P < 0.001 with decline in TMT-B performance. There was a significant inverse association between post-baseline plasma triglyceride- lowering (P = 0.045 and decline in digit symbol substitution task performance.Conclusions: A five-year period of randomized intensive glucose-lowering did not significantly reduce the rate of cognitive decline in older-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure as

  16. Multiple diabetic complications, as well as impaired physical and mental function, are associated with declining balance function in older persons with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong XF

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiufang Hong,1,2 Xujiao Chen,2 Jiaojiao Chu,2 Shanshan Shen,2 Qichen Chai,2 Gaobo Lou,2 Lingyan Chen2 1Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 2Department of Geriatrics, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate whether there is a difference in balance function between older persons with and without diabetes mellitus (DM, and to identify whether mediating factors, such as diabetic complications, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL score, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score, as well as hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, are associated with balance function in older persons with DM.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 208 older persons were divided into a DM group (n=80 and a control group who did not have DM (n=128. Balance function was evaluated with the Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment (POMA, which includes balance and gait subscales. Activities of daily living (ADL, IADL, and the MMSE were also measured. Fall incidents in last 12 months, the use of walking aids, fear of falling, comorbidities, and polypharmacy were recorded. Diabetic complications were recorded, and HbA1c, FPG, TC, TG, and LDL were measured in the patients of the DM group.Results: Fall incidents in last 12 months were higher in the DM group than in the control group (P<0.01. POMA score as well as ADL and IADL scores were lower in the diabetic group than the control group (P<0.05. Within the diabetic group, the POMA score was positively related to the ADL score (odds ratio [OR], 11.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.076–44.497; P<0.01, IADL score (OR, 16.286; 95% CI, 4.793–55.333; P<0.01, and MMSE score (OR, 10.524; 95% CI, 2.764–40.074; P<0.01, but was negatively related to age (OR, 7.707; 95% CI, 2.035–29.185; P<0.01 and diabetic complication (OR, 6.667; 95% CI, 2.279–19

  17. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Carneiro, Sandro Dias Rocha Mendes; Barbosa, Fladia Taciana de Sousa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Moizan, Jean André Hervé; Doucet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its association with xerostomia. Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Ceará (CIHD) in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT). Perception of the presence of xerostomia/dry mouth was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and samples were obtained using an extra-soft silicone device. 120 older patients with diabetes (60 insulin-dependent and 60 non-insulin-dependent) aged 65-91 years, with a mean age of 72.26 ± 6.53 years, were assessed. Of these, 111 (92.5%) presented a decrease in salivary flow while 59 (49.2%) reported moderate to severe xerostomia/dry mouth. The DMFT Index presented a mean of 27.53 ± 4.86 teeth. Reduced salivary flow was found in the group assessed in the present research; however, this finding is not in accordance with the perception of xerostomia/dry mouth reported by the patients.

  18. Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Lopes Ferreira Lima

    Full Text Available To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 and its association with xerostomia.Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Ceará (CIHD in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT. Perception of the presence of xerostomia/dry mouth was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and samples were obtained using an extra-soft silicone device.120 older patients with diabetes (60 insulin-dependent and 60 non-insulin-dependent aged 65-91 years, with a mean age of 72.26 ± 6.53 years, were assessed. Of these, 111 (92.5% presented a decrease in salivary flow while 59 (49.2% reported moderate to severe xerostomia/dry mouth. The DMFT Index presented a mean of 27.53 ± 4.86 teeth.Reduced salivary flow was found in the group assessed in the present research; however, this finding is not in accordance with the perception of xerostomia/dry mouth reported by the patients.

  19. Balance Training Reduces Falls Risk in Older Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R.; Mariano, Mira; Parson, Henri K.; Vinik, Arthur I.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study assessed the effects of balance/strength training on falls risk and posture in older individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen individuals with type 2 diabetes and 21 age-matched control subjects (aged 50–75 years) participated. Postural stability and falls risk was assessed before and after a 6-week exercise program. RESULTS Diabetic individuals had significantly higher falls risk score compared with control subjects. The diabetic group also e...

  20. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlin A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ali Tomlin, Alan Sinclair Institute of Diabetes for Older People, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK Abstract: Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline, and Psychological Information (PsychInfo databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by

  1. Diabetes mellitus in older people: position statement on behalf of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG), the European Diabetes Working Party for Older People (EDWPOP), and the International Task Force of Experts in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Alan; Morley, John E; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leo; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Bayer, Tony; Zeyfang, Andrej; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Vischer, Ulrich; Woo, Jean; Chapman, Ian; Dunning, Trisha; Meneilly, Graydon; Rodriguez-Saldana, Joel; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gadsby, Roger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Lorig, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic condition in ageing societies associated with high levels of morbidity, multiple therapies, and functional deterioration that challenges even the best of health care systems to deliver high-quality, individualized care. Most international clinical guidelines have ignored the often-unique issues of frailty, functional limitation, changes in mental health, and increasing dependency that characterize many aged patients with diabetes. A collaborative Expert Group of the IAGG and EDWPOP and an International Task Force have explored the key issues that affect diabetes in older people using a robust method comprising a Delphi process and an evidence-based review of the literature. Eight domains of interest were initially agreed and discussed: hypoglycemia, therapy, care home diabetes, influence of comorbidities, glucose targets, family/carer perspectives, diabetes education, and patient safety. A set of "consensus" statements was produced in each domain of interest. These form a foundation for future policy development in this area and should influence the clinical behavior and approach of all health professionals engaged in delivering diabetes care to older people. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Developing Culturally Targeted Diabetes Educational Materials for Older Russian-Speaking Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Son, Catherine R

    2014-07-01

    Older adults who immigrate late in life face many challenges adapting to a new country. Immigrants bring their cultural beliefs and behaviors with them, which can influence their ability to make dietary changes required when they have type 2 diabetes. Culturally targeted patient education materials are needed to improve immigrants' health literacy and abilities to self-manage diabetes. Currently, there is a scarcity of diabetes patient education materials to meet the educational needs of the Russian-speaking immigrant group. The purpose of this article is to describe a project in which culturally targeted diabetes education materials for older Russian-speaking immigrants were designed and developed. Culturally targeted patient education materials are essential if they are to be accepted and used by clients from different ethnic minority populations. The creation of culturally relevant materials requires a team effort and community stakeholder input. The availability of materials on the internet facilitates access and use by health care providers. Culturally targeted education materials are an important component in addressing health literacy in ethnic minority populations. Next steps require that these materials be evaluated to test their impact on diabetes self-management behaviors and clinical outcomes such as adherence, amount of physical activity, and blood glucose levels. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Younger people with Type 2 diabetes have poorer self-care practices compared with older people: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, N; Pease, A J; Ranasinha, S; Wischer, N; Andrikopoulos, S; de Courten, B; Zoungas, S

    2018-05-05

    This cross-sectional study compares the self-care practices of younger and older people with Type 2 diabetes. Data were analysed from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) including 2552 adults with Type 2 diabetes from Australian Diabetes Centres. Pre-specified demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Self-care variables (physical activity, following dietary recommendations, medication adherence and monitoring blood glucose levels) were compared in people ≤ 64 and > 64 years of age. Mean age (± sd) of participants was 63 ± 13 years overall, 53 ± 9 years for the younger group and 73 ± 6 years for the older group. A greater proportion of younger people had HbA 1c levels > 53 mmol/mol (> 7.0%) (76% vs. 68%), reported difficulty following dietary recommendations (50% vs. 32%) and forgetting medications (37% vs. 22%) compared with older people (all P-values  64 years required insulin therapy (59% vs. 57%, P = 0.200). Younger age was associated with a twofold increase in the odds of not following the recommended self-care practices after adjustment for gender, smoking, insulin therapy, depression and allied health attendance (all P < 0.001). Despite shorter diabetes duration, younger age was associated with worse glycaemic control and poorer diabetes self-care practices among people with Type 2 diabetes. Targeted strategies are required to optimize diabetes self-care practices and thereby glycaemic control. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  4. Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Diagnosed Diabetes Performing Daily Self-Monitoring of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Years or Older with Diagnosed Diabetes Performing Daily Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose, United States, 1994–2010 From ... years or older with diagnosed diabetes performing daily self-monitoring of blood glucose increased by 27.9 points, ...

  5. Relation between BMI and diabetes mellitus and its complications among US older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Natallia; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy

    2015-01-01

    This study examined relations between elevated body mass index (BMI) and time to diagnosis with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications among older adults in the United States. Data came from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, 1991-2010. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess relations between excess BMI at the first Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey interview and time to diabetes mellitus diagnosis, complications, and insulin dependence among Medicare beneficiaries, older than 65 years of age with no prior diabetes mellitus diagnosis, and who were not enrolled in Medicare Advantage (N = 14,657). Among individuals diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus, elevated BMIs were associated with a progressively higher risk of complications from diabetes mellitus. For women with a BMI ≥40, the risk of insulin dependence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.36-5.39) was twice that for women with 25 ≤ BMI diabetes mellitus. For men, the increased risk of these complications occurred at higher BMI levels than in women. Ocular complications occurred at higher BMI levels than other complication types in both men and women.

  6. Control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: data from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Mastura, Ismail; Ahmad, Zaiton; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Adam, Bujang-Mohamad; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Lee, Ping-Yein; Syed-Alwi, Syed-Abdul-Rahman; Chew, Boon-How; Sriwahyu, Taher

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the association between age and these controls among older adults with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out using cases notified to the Adult Diabetes Control and Management database between 1 January and 31 December 2009. A total of 10 363 people aged over 60 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the analyses. A standard online case report form was used to record demographic data, clinical factors (diabetes duration, comorbid condition and treatment modalities), cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes complications and laboratory assessments. The cardiovascular disease risk factors controls assessed included glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) control of cardiovascular disease risk factors was suboptimal in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The oldest elderly were more likely to achieve target HbA(1c) (<7.0%) and triglycerides (<1.7 mmol/L) than older adults aged 60-69 years. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. The diabetes online community: Older adults supporting self-care through peer health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchman, Michelle L; Rothwell, Erin; Edelman, Linda S

    2018-03-01

    The use of the diabetes online community (DOC) is growing across all age groups. The aim of this exploratory study was to describe why older adults participated in the DOC, and how DOC users interacted with their healthcare providers. Telephone interviews (N=20) were conducted with older adult DOC users (born between 1946 and 1964) living in the United States. Interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis adhering to rigor and reproducibility standards. Themes that emerged from the data related to DOC participation included: information to improve self-care, emotional support, belonging to a community, validation of information, cause for concern and interaction with healthcare providers. Participants used the DOC for day to day diabetes management advice and healthcare providers for medical information and care. Participants highly valued the DOC and regarded their participation as a way to increase knowledge to improve self-care and reciprocate emotional support with others for diabetes management. The DOC filled gaps in knowledge and support participants were not able to get elsewhere. The DOC serves as an important source of information and support for individuals with diabetes and may be a cost-effective strategy to augment standard diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and frailty: A population-based, cross-sectional study of Mexican older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cesari, Matteo; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2017-06-01

    Chronic diseases are frequent in older adults, particularly hypertension and diabetes. The relationship between frailty and these two conditions is still unclear. The aim of the present analyses was to explore the association between frailty with diabetes and hypertension in Mexican older adults. Analyses of the Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey, a cross-sectional survey, are presented. Data on diabetes and hypertension were acquired along with associated conditions (time since diagnosis, pharmacological treatment, among others). A 36-item frailty index was constructed and rescaled to z-values (individual scores minus population mean divided by one standard deviation). Multiple linear regression models were carried out, adjusted for age and sex. From 7164 older adults, 54.8% were women, and their mean age was 70.6 years with a mean frailty index score of 0.175. The prevalence of diabetes was of 22.2%, and 37.3% for hypertension. An independent association between diabetes, hypertension or both conditions (coefficients 0.28, 0.4 and 0.63, respectively, P diabetic complication was significantly associated with frailty with a coefficient of 0.55 (95% CI 0.45-0.65, P Diabetes and hypertension are associated with frailty. In addition, an incremental association was found when both conditions were present or with worse associated features (any complication, more time since diagnosis). Frailty should be of particular concern in populations with a high prevalence of these conditions. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 925-930. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. [Standard control for diabetes in older adults based on practice guidelines--the target values of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Ken; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2013-11-01

    As for standard controls for life style diseases in older adults, the standard control for hypertension in elderly is defined in detail by the guideline for hypertension, however, that for diabetes or dyslipidemia is not clearly defined by each guideline although each has additional descriptions for elderly. The reports about 'Diabetes in Older Adults' and 'Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2013' have been published from American Diabetes Association (ADA), and the standard controls for diabetes might be reviewed in the light of these reports in Japan. Here we would like to consider the standard control and recent trends for diabetes in older adults on the basis of the current practice guidelines.

  10. Relevance of nerve conduction velocity in the assessment of balance performance in older adults with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Yun; Chen, Shih-Ching; Peng, Chih-Wei; Kang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Luen; Chen, Chun-Lung; Chou, Yi-Lin; Lai, Chien-Hung

    2017-03-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and balance performance in older adults with diabetes. Methods Twenty older adults with diabetes were recruited to evaluate the NCV of their lower limbs and balance performance. The balance assessments comprised the timed up and go (TUG) test, Berg balance scale (BBS), unipedal stance test (UST), multidirectional reach test (MDRT), maximum step length (MSL) test and quiet standing with eyes open and closed. The relationship between NCV and balance performance was evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficients, and the balance performances of the diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy were compared by using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results The NCV in the lower limbs exhibited a moderate to strong correlation with most of the balance tests including the TUG (r = -0.435 to -0.520, p tests, which are commonly used in clinics. Decline in nerve conduction velocity of the lower limbs may be related to the impairment of balance control in patients with diabetes. Diabetic older adults with peripheral neuropathy exhibited greater postural instability than those without peripheral neuropathy.

  11. A longitudinal analysis of salivary flow in control subjects and older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, E M; Borrell, L N; Taylor, G W; Ship, J A

    2001-02-01

    Many diabetics complain of xerostomia, a condition that can affect oral health, nutritional status, and diet selection. This study's purposes were (1) to investigate the effect on salivary flow of type 2 diabetes and change in glycemic control in a group of older adults over time and (2) to compare flow rates with subjective complaints of xerostomia. A total of 39 older adults, 24 with type 2 diabetes and 15 who were nondiabetic (controls), aged 54-90 years, participated in a 1-year follow-up study. Diabetic status was determined by means of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and 2-hour glucose tolerance tests. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c > 9%. Unstimulated whole, unstimulated parotid, and stimulated parotid saliva flow rates were measured for all subjects by a single examiner at baseline and 1 year later. Each subject completed a standardized xerostomia questionnaire at every visit. Age, sex, and duration of diabetes did not adversely affect salivary flow rates. Subjects with poorly controlled diabetes had significantly lower stimulated parotid saliva flow rates at both visits. There were no significant changes in flow rates over time on the basis of diabetic status or glycemic control. Subjects with diabetes reported significantly more complaints of thirst but not of xerostomia at 1 year. These results suggest that older adults with poorly controlled diabetes may have impaired salivary flow in comparison with subjects with better controlled diabetes and nondiabetic subjects, yet they may not have concomitant xerostomic complaints. There were no significant changes in salivary flow rates or glycemic control over the 1-year period.

  12. Humors Effect on Short-term Memory in Healthy and Diabetic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Gurinder Singh; Berk, Lee S; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Schwab, Ernie; Deshpande, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    With aging, the detrimental effects of stress can impair a person's ability to learn and sustain memory. Humor and its associated mirthful laughter can reduce stress by decreasing the hormone cortisol. Chronic release of cortisol can damage hippocampal neurons, leading to impairment of learning and memory. Objectives • The study intended to examine the effect of watching a humor video on short-term memory in older adults. Design • The research team designed a randomized, controlled trial. The study took place at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, CA, USA. The study included 30 participants: 20 normal, healthy, older adults-11 males and 9 females-and 10 older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-6 males and 4 females. The study included 2 intervention groups of older adults who viewed humorous videos, a healthy group (humor group), aged 69.9 ± 3.7 y, and the diabetic group, aged 67.1 ± 3.8 y. Each participant selected 1 of 2 humorous videos that were 20 min in length, either a Red Skeleton comedy or a montage of America's Funniest Home Videos. The control group, aged 68.7 ± 5.5 y, did not watch a humor video and sat in quiescence. A standardized, neuropsychological, memory-assessment tool, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), was used to assess the following abilities: (1) learning, (2) recall, and (3) visual recognition. The testing occurred twice, once before (RAVLT1) and once after (RAVLT2) the humorous video for the humor and diabetic groups, and once before (RAVLT1) and once after (RAVLT2) the period of quiescence for the control group. At 5 time points, measurements of salivary cortisol were also obtained. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to measure significance of the data based on the 3 groups. In the humor, diabetic, and control groups, (1) learning ability improved by 38.5%, 33.4%, and 24.0%, respectively (P = .025); (2) delayed recall improved by 43.6%, 48.1%, and 20.3%, respectively (P = .064); and (3) visual recognition

  13. Ethnic and sex differences in ownership of preventive health equipment among rural older adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ronny A; Arcury, Thomas A; Stafford, Jeanette M; Golden, Shannon L; Snively, Beverly M; Quandt, Sara A

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes self-management is important for achieving successful health outcomes. Different levels of self-management have been reported among various populations, though little is known about ownership of equipment that can enhance accomplishment of these tasks. This study examined diabetes self-management equipment ownership among rural older adults. Participants included African American, American Indian, and white men and women 65 years of age and older. Data included equipment ownership overall and by ethnicity and sex across diabetes self-management domains (glucose monitoring, foot care, medication adherence, exercise, and diet). Associations between equipment ownership and demographic and health characteristics were assessed using logistic regression. Equipment ownership ranged from 85.0% for blood glucose meters to less than 11% for special socks, modified dishes, and various forms of home exercise equipment. Equipment ownership was associated with ethnicity, living arrangements, mobility, poverty status, and formal education. Rural older adults with diabetes are at risk because they lack equipment to perform some self-management tasks. Providers should be sensitive to and assist patients in overcoming this barrier.

  14. Cognitive performance, psychological well-being, and brain magnetic resonance imaging in older patients with type 1 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Hoogma, R.P.L.M.; Henselmans, J.M.L.; Beek-Boter, J.W. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Haan, E.H.F. de; Biessels, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Modest cognitive impairment has been reported in young-adult patients with type 1 diabetes. In older patients with type 2 diabetes, cognitive impairments are more pronounced, which might be due to age but also to differential effects of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes on the brain. This study

  15. Multitasking in older adults with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Jason L; McDowd, Joan M; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Burns, Jeffrey M; Sabus, Carla H; Britton-Carpenter, Amanda J; Utech, Nora B; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in the ability to multitask contribute to gait abnormalities and falls in many at-risk populations. However, it is unclear whether older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) also demonstrate impairments in multitasking. The purpose of this study was to compare multitasking performance in cognitively intact older adults with and without DM and explore its relationship to measures of gait and functional ability. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 40 individuals aged 60 and older with type 2 DM and a matched group of 40 cognitively intact older adults without DM. Multitasking was examined via the ambulatory Walking and Remembering Test (WART) and seated Pursuit Rotor Test (PRT). Self-selected normal and fast walking speed and stride length variability were quantitatively measured, and self-reported functional ability was assessed via the Late Life Function and Disability Index (LLFDI). Participants with DM walked slower and took more steps off path when multitasking during the WART. No between-group differences in multitasking performance were observed on the PRT. Multitasking performance demonstrated little correlation with gait and functional ability in either group. Older adults with DM appear to perform poorly on an ambulatory measure of multitasking. However, we analyzed a relatively small, homogenous sample of older adults with and without type 2 DM and factors such as peripheral neuropathy and the use of multiple comparisons complicate interpretation of the data. Future research should explore the interactions between multitasking and safety, fall risk, and function in this vulnerable population. Clinicians should recognize that an array of factors may contribute to gait and physical dysfunction in older adults with type 2 diabetes, and be prepared to assess and intervene appropriately.

  16. Energy intake and expenditure in obese older adults with and without type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memelink, R.G.; Verreijen, A.M.; de Vogel-van den Bosch, J.; Weijs, P.J.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Mays, J.A.; Roeske, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (DM2), however not all obese people develop DM2. We explored differences in energy intake and expenditure between obese older adults with and without DM2. Methods: Baseline data from 2 lifestyle interventions with a total of 202 obese older

  17. Statin treatment and mortality in community-dwelling frail older patients with diabetes mellitus : A retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pilotto (Alberto); F. Panza (Francesco); Copetti, M. (Massimiliano); Simonato, M. (Matteo); D. Sancarlo; P. Gallina (Pietro); T.E. Strandberg (Timo); A.J. Cruz-Jentoft (A.); Daragjati, J. (Julia); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A. Fontana (Andrea); S. Maggi; F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); M. Paccalin; Polidori, M.C. (Maria Cristina); Schulz, R.-J. (Ralf-Joachim); E. Topinkova; G. Trifirò (Gianluca); A.-K. Welmer

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Older adults are often excluded from clinical trials. Decision making for administration of statins to older patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is under debate, particularly in frail older patients with comorbidity and high mortality risk. We tested the hypothesis that

  18. The Effects of Tai Chi on Peripheral Somatosensation, Balance, and Fitness in Hispanic Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot and Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth I. Cavegn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy and loss of somatosensation in older adults with type 2 diabetes can increase risk of falls and disability. In nondiabetic older adult population Tai Chi has been shown to enhance balance and fitness through improvements in somatosensation and neuromuscular control, and it is unclear if Tai Chi would elicit similar benefits in older adults with diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week, three-hour-per-week Tai Chi intervention on peripheral somatosensation in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants were eight Hispanic older adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in the Tai Chi intervention and a convenience sample of Hispanic older adults as a referent group. Baseline and postintervention assessments included ankle proprioception, foot tactile sense, plantar pressure distribution, balance, and fitness. After intervention, older adults with type 2 diabetes showed significant improvements in ankle proprioception and fitness and decreased plantar pressure in the forefoot, with no statistical effect noted in balance or tactile sensation. Study results suggest that Tai Chi may be beneficial for older adults with diabetes as it improves ankle proprioception; however, study findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample size randomized controlled trial.

  19. Multitasking in older adults with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L Rucker

    Full Text Available Deficits in the ability to multitask contribute to gait abnormalities and falls in many at-risk populations. However, it is unclear whether older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM also demonstrate impairments in multitasking. The purpose of this study was to compare multitasking performance in cognitively intact older adults with and without DM and explore its relationship to measures of gait and functional ability.We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 40 individuals aged 60 and older with type 2 DM and a matched group of 40 cognitively intact older adults without DM. Multitasking was examined via the ambulatory Walking and Remembering Test (WART and seated Pursuit Rotor Test (PRT. Self-selected normal and fast walking speed and stride length variability were quantitatively measured, and self-reported functional ability was assessed via the Late Life Function and Disability Index (LLFDI.Participants with DM walked slower and took more steps off path when multitasking during the WART. No between-group differences in multitasking performance were observed on the PRT. Multitasking performance demonstrated little correlation with gait and functional ability in either group.Older adults with DM appear to perform poorly on an ambulatory measure of multitasking. However, we analyzed a relatively small, homogenous sample of older adults with and without type 2 DM and factors such as peripheral neuropathy and the use of multiple comparisons complicate interpretation of the data. Future research should explore the interactions between multitasking and safety, fall risk, and function in this vulnerable population. Clinicians should recognize that an array of factors may contribute to gait and physical dysfunction in older adults with type 2 diabetes, and be prepared to assess and intervene appropriately.

  20. Low education and lack of spousal relationship are associated with dementia in older adults with diabetes mellitus in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Abdulkareem J; Baiyewu, Olusegun; Bakari, Adamu G; Garko, Sani B; Jibril, Mohammed E-B; Suleiman, Aishatu M; Muktar, Haruna M; Amedu, Micheal A

    2018-05-01

    The relationship between dementia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in older adults is well established in the literature. However, there have been few studies on this relationship in older adults living in low- and middle-income countries, and most demographic projections predict that older adult population will increase substantially in these regions by 2050. In this study, older adults with T2DM attending a tertiary health facility were examined and compared with community-dwelling older adults without T2DM. The participants were assessed using the Consortium to Establish Registry for Alzheimer's Disease, the Stick Design Test, the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale. Additionally, all the participants had a physical examination, including assessment of glycated haemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, and HIV status. A consensus diagnosis of dementia was made based on the criteria for dementia in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, and the International Classification for Diseases, 10th edition. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 for Windows. This study included 224 diabetic patients and 116 controls. A total of 27 diabetic patients (12.1%) had dementia, 19 of whom were women. Of the 27 diabetic patients with dementia, 25 patients (92.6%) had Alzheimer's disease and 2 patients (7.4%) had mixed dementia (vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease). Only one person among the controls had Alzheimer's type dementia. Dementia in the diabetic patients was significantly associated with advancing age, female gender, education level, duration of diabetes, and absence of a spouse. Dementia is common in older adults with T2DM in this low-resource setting, and the risk factors for dementia were similar to those reported in earlier studies in Western societies. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  1. Identifying Foods causing Allergies/ Intolerances among Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the foods that caused allergies / intolerances and symptoms of reaction experienced by diabetic patients attending State Specialist Hospital, Akure. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight diabetics aged 30-80 years (30 males and 68 females) were included in the study.

  2. The Prevalence, Correlates, Detection and Control of Diabetes among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group Population-Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles Salas

    Full Text Available Little is known of the epidemiology of diabetes among older people in low and middle income countries. We aimed to study and compare prevalence, social patterning, correlates, detection, treatment and control of diabetes among older people in Latin America, India, China and Nigeria.Cross-sectional surveys in 13 catchment area sites in nine countries. Diagnosed diabetes was assessed in all sites through self-reported diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was assessed in seven Latin American sites through fasting blood samples (glucose > = 7 mmol/L.Total diabetes prevalence in catchment sites in Cuba (prevalence 24.2%, SMR 116, Puerto Rico (43.4%, 197, and urban (27.0%, 125, and rural Mexico (23.7%, 111 already exceeds that in the USA, while that in Venezuela (20.9%, 100 is similar. Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied very widely, between low prevalences in sites in rural China (0.9%, rural India (6.6% and Nigeria (6.0%. and 32.1% in Puerto Rico, explained mainly by access to health services. Treatment coverage varied substantially between sites. Diabetes control (40 to 61% of those diagnosed was modest in the Latin American sites where this was studied. Diabetes was independently associated with less education, but more assets. Hypertension, central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia, but not hypercholesterolaemia were consistently associated with total diabetes.Diabetes prevalence is already high in most sites. Identifying undiagnosed cases is essential to quantify population burden, particularly in least developed settings where diagnosis is uncommon. Metabolic risk factors and associated lifestyles may play an important part in aetiology, but this requires confirmation with longitudinal data. Given the high prevalence among older people, more population research is indicated to quantify the impact of diabetes, and to monitor the effect of prevention and health system strengthening on prevalence, treatment and control.

  3. The Prevalence, Correlates, Detection and Control of Diabetes among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Aquiles; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, K S; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan J; Sosa, Ana L; Uwakwe, Richard; Williams, Joseph D; Jotheeswaran, A T; Liu, Zhaorui; Lopez Medina, A M; Salinas-Contreras, Rosa Maria; Prince, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known of the epidemiology of diabetes among older people in low and middle income countries. We aimed to study and compare prevalence, social patterning, correlates, detection, treatment and control of diabetes among older people in Latin America, India, China and Nigeria. Cross-sectional surveys in 13 catchment area sites in nine countries. Diagnosed diabetes was assessed in all sites through self-reported diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was assessed in seven Latin American sites through fasting blood samples (glucose > = 7 mmol/L). Total diabetes prevalence in catchment sites in Cuba (prevalence 24.2%, SMR 116), Puerto Rico (43.4%, 197), and urban (27.0%, 125), and rural Mexico (23.7%, 111) already exceeds that in the USA, while that in Venezuela (20.9%, 100) is similar. Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied very widely, between low prevalences in sites in rural China (0.9%), rural India (6.6%) and Nigeria (6.0%). and 32.1% in Puerto Rico, explained mainly by access to health services. Treatment coverage varied substantially between sites. Diabetes control (40 to 61% of those diagnosed) was modest in the Latin American sites where this was studied. Diabetes was independently associated with less education, but more assets. Hypertension, central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia, but not hypercholesterolaemia were consistently associated with total diabetes. Diabetes prevalence is already high in most sites. Identifying undiagnosed cases is essential to quantify population burden, particularly in least developed settings where diagnosis is uncommon. Metabolic risk factors and associated lifestyles may play an important part in aetiology, but this requires confirmation with longitudinal data. Given the high prevalence among older people, more population research is indicated to quantify the impact of diabetes, and to monitor the effect of prevention and health system strengthening on prevalence, treatment and control.

  4. The Prevalence, Correlates, Detection and Control of Diabetes among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Aquiles; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P.; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, K. S.; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z.; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan J.; Sosa, Ana L.; Uwakwe, Richard; Williams, Joseph D.; Jotheeswaran, A. T.; Liu, Zhaorui; Lopez Medina, A. M.; Salinas-Contreras, Rosa Maria; Prince, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known of the epidemiology of diabetes among older people in low and middle income countries. We aimed to study and compare prevalence, social patterning, correlates, detection, treatment and control of diabetes among older people in Latin America, India, China and Nigeria. Methods Cross-sectional surveys in 13 catchment area sites in nine countries. Diagnosed diabetes was assessed in all sites through self-reported diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was assessed in seven Latin American sites through fasting blood samples (glucose > = 7mmol/L). Results Total diabetes prevalence in catchment sites in Cuba (prevalence 24.2%, SMR 116), Puerto Rico (43.4%, 197), and urban (27.0%, 125), and rural Mexico (23.7%, 111) already exceeds that in the USA, while that in Venezuela (20.9%, 100) is similar. Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied very widely, between low prevalences in sites in rural China (0.9%), rural India (6.6%) and Nigeria (6.0%). and 32.1% in Puerto Rico, explained mainly by access to health services. Treatment coverage varied substantially between sites. Diabetes control (40 to 61% of those diagnosed) was modest in the Latin American sites where this was studied. Diabetes was independently associated with less education, but more assets. Hypertension, central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia, but not hypercholesterolaemia were consistently associated with total diabetes. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence is already high in most sites. Identifying undiagnosed cases is essential to quantify population burden, particularly in least developed settings where diagnosis is uncommon. Metabolic risk factors and associated lifestyles may play an important part in aetiology, but this requires confirmation with longitudinal data. Given the high prevalence among older people, more population research is indicated to quantify the impact of diabetes, and to monitor the effect of prevention and health system strengthening on prevalence, treatment and control

  5. The Impact of Social Health Insurance on Diabetes and Hypertension Process Indicators among Older Adults in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz; Rahman, Momotazur; Mor, Vincent; Galarraga, Omar

    2016-08-01

    To examine the impact of Seguro Popular (Mexican social health insurance for the poor; SP) on diabetes and hypertension care, intermediate process indicators for older adults (>50 years): pharmacological treatment, blood glucose tests, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and adherence to their nutrition and exercise program. (CAM was defined as products or practices that were not part of the medical standard of care.) Repeated cross-sectional surveys from Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey, ENSANUT), a nationally representative health and nutrition survey sampling N = 45,294 older adults in 2000, N = 45,241 older adults in 2005-2006, and N = 46,277 older adults in 2011-2012. Fixed-effects instrumental variable (FE-IV) repeated cross-sectional at the individual level with municipality fixed-effects estimation was performed. We found a marginally significant effect of SP on the use of insulin and oral agents (40 percentage points). Contrary to that expected, no other significant differences were found for diabetes or hypertension treatment and care indicators. Social health insurance for the poor improved some but not all health care process indicators among diabetic and hypertensive older people in Mexico. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Diabetes in older people: position statement of The Hong Kong Geriatrics Society and the Hong Kong Society of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C W; Lee, J Sw; Tam, K F; Hung, H F; So, W Y; Shum, C K; Lam, C Y; Cheng, J N; Man, S P; Auyeung, T W

    2017-10-01

    Following a survey on the clinical practice of geriatricians in the management of older people with diabetes and a study of hypoglycaemia in diabetic patients, a round-table discussion with geriatricians and endocrinologists was held in January 2015. Consensus was reached for six domains specifically related to older diabetic people: (1) the considerations when setting an individualised diabetic management; (2) inclusion of geriatric syndrome screening in assessment; (3) glycaemic and blood pressure targets; (4) pharmacotherapy; (5) restrictive diabetic diet; and (6) management goals for nursing home residents.

  7. Prevalence of diabetes treatment effect modifiers: the external validity of trials to older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carlos O; Boyd, Cynthia M; Wolff, Jennifer L; Leff, Bruce

    2012-08-01

    Potential treatment effect modifiers (TEMs) are specific diseases or conditions with a well-described mechanism for treatment effect modification. The prevalence of TEMs in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is unknown. Objectives were to 1) determine the prevalence of pre-specified potential TEMs; 2) demonstrate the potential impact of TEMs in the older adult population using a simulated trial; 3) identify TEM combinations associated with number of hospitalizations to test construct validity. Data are from the nationally-representative United States National Health and Examination Survey, 1999-2004: 8646 Civilian, non-institutionalized adults aged 45-64 or 65+ years, including 1443 with DM. TEMs were anemia, congestive heart failure, liver inflammation, polypharmacy, renal insufficiency, cognitive impairment, dizziness, frequent mental distress, mobility difficulty, and visual impairment. A trial was simulated to examine prevalence of potential TEM impact. The cross-sectional association between TEM patterns and number of hospitalizations was estimated to assess construct validity. The prevalence of TEMs was substantial such that 19.0% (95% CI 14.8-23.2) of middle-aged adults and 38.0% (95% CI 33.4-42.5) of older adults had any two. A simulated trial with modest levels of interaction suggested the prevalence of TEMs could nullify treatment benefit in 3.9-27.2% of older adults with DM. Compared to having DM alone, hospitalization rate was increased by several combinations of TEMs with substantial prevalence. We provide national benchmarks that can be used to evaluate TEM prevalence reported by clinical trials of DM, and correspondingly their external validity to older adults.

  8. Health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Minhat, Halimatus Sakdiah; Mohd Zulkefli, Nor Afiah; Baharom, Anisah

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes. The complications of diabetes among older people are a major health concern. Foot problems such as neuropathy, ulcer and ultimately amputation are a great burden on older people with diabetes. Diabetes foot education programmes can influence the behaviour of older people in practising foot self-care and controlling the foot problems. However, the educational approaches used by the educators are different. Therefore, it is important to assess the education programmes from various evidence-based practices. Six databases, EBSCOhost medical collections (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection), SAGE, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and Web of Science, were used to search for articles published from January 2000 to March 2015. The search was based on the inclusion criteria and keywords including 'foot', 'care' and 'diabetes'. Fourteen studies were assessed and reviewed in the final stage. Health education programmes varied according to their design, setting, approach, outcome measured and results. Foot assessment, verbal and written instructions and discussion were proved to improve the foot self-care and foot problems. Subsequent follow-ups and evaluations had a significant effect. An improvement was observed in foot self-care scores and foot problems (such as neuropathy, foot disability, lesion, ulcer, tinea pedis and callus grade) after implementation of the health education programme. The findings of this study support the claim that a health education programme increases the foot self-care scores and reduces the foot problems. However, there were certain methodological concerns in the reviewed articles, indicating the need for further evaluation. In future, researchers and practitioners must implement a vigorous education programme focusing on diabetes foot self-care among the

  9. Diabetes, hyperglycemia, and the burden of functional disability among older adults in a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Job G; Appel, Lawrence J; Gross, Alden L; Schrack, Jennifer A; Parrinello, Christina M; Kalyani, Rita R; Windham, Beverly Gwen; Pankow, James S; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for continued surveillance of diabetes-related functional disability. In the present study, we examined associations between diabetes, hyperglycemia, and the burden of functional disability in a community-based population. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 5035 participants who attended Visit 5 (2011-13) of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Functional disability was dichotomously defined by any self-reported difficulty performing 12 tasks essential to independent living grouped into four functional domains. Associations of diagnosed diabetes (via self-report) and undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes (via HbA1c) with functional disability were evaluated using Poisson regression. Participants had a mean age of 75 years, 42 % were male, 22 % were Black, and 31 % had diagnosed diabetes. Those with diagnosed diabetes had a significantly greater burden of functional disability than those without diabetes, even after adjustment for demographics, health behaviors, and comorbidities: prevalence ratios (95 % confidence intervals) were 1.24 (1.15, 1.34) for lower extremity mobility, 1.14 (1.07, 1.21) for general physical activities, 1.33 (1.16, 1.52) for instrumental activities of daily living (ADL), and 1.46 (1.24, 1.73) for ADL (all P  0.05). Among older adults, the burden of functional disability associated with diabetes was not entirely explained by known risk factors, including comorbidities. Hyperglycemia below the threshold for the diagnosis of diabetes was not associated with disability. Research into effective strategies for the prevention of functional disability among older adults with diabetes is needed. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Health benefits of Tai Chi for older patients with type 2 diabetes: The “Move It for Diabetes Study” – A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Tsang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tracey Tsang1, Rhonda Orr1, Paul Lam2, Elizabeth J Comino3, Maria Fiatarone Singh11School of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia; 2School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3The University of NSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Older adults with type 2 diabetes have mobility impairment and reduced fitness. This study aimed to test the efficacy of the “Tai Chi for Diabetes” form, developed to address health-related problems in diabetes, including mobility and physical function. Thirty-eight older adults with stable type 2 diabetes were randomized to Tai Chi or sham exercise, twice a week for 16 weeks. Outcomes included gait, balance, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular fitness, self-reported activity and quality of life. Static and dynamic balance index (−5.8 ± 14.2; p = 0.03 and maximal gait speed (6.2 ± 11.6%; p = 0.005 improved over time, with no significant group effects. There were no changes in other measures. Non-specific effects of exercise testing and/or study participation such as outcome expectation, socialization, the Hawthorne effect, or unmeasured changes in health status or compliance with medical treatment may underlie the modest improvements in gait and balance observed in this sham-exercise-controlled trial. This Tai Chi form, although developed specifically for diabetes, may not have been of sufficient intensity, frequency, or duration to effect positive changes in many aspects of physiology or health status relevant to older people with diabetes.Keywords: Tai Chi, Type 2 diabetes, physical function

  11. Diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in people aged 50 years and older in the Republic of Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderhoud, Janna; Pawiroredjo, Jerrel C; Bueno de Mesquita-Voigt, Anne-Marie T; Themen, Herman Ci; Siban, Michael R; Forster-Pawiroredjo, Cindy M; Limburg, Hans; van Nispen, Ruth Ma; Mans, Dennis Ra; Moll, Annette C

    2016-06-01

    Population-based surveys on diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are necessary to increase awareness and develop screening and therapeutic programmes. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of DR in older adults of different ethnic backgrounds in Suriname. Fifty clusters of 60 people aged ≥50 years were randomly selected with a probability proportional to the size of the population unit. Eligible people were randomly selected through compact segment sampling and examined using the Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness plus Diabetic Retinopathy (RAAB + DR) protocol. Participants were classified as having diabetes if they: were previously diagnosed with diabetes; were receiving treatment for glucose control; had a random blood glucose level >200 mg/dL. These participants were dilated for funduscopy, assessed for DR following the Scottish DR grading protocol and evaluated for ethnicity and DR ophthalmic screening frequencies. A total of 2806 individuals was examined (response 93.6%). The prevalence of diabetes was 24.6%. In these patients any type of DR and/or maculopathy occurred in 21.6% and sight-threatening DR in 8.0%. Of the known diabetics, 34.2% never had an eye examination for DR and in 13.0% the last examination was >24 months ago. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in Hindustani people compared with other major ethnic groups. The prevalence of diabetes and diabetics without regular DR control in people aged ≥50 years in Suriname was higher than expected. The uptake for special services for DR has to be expanded to decrease patient delay and DR-induced blindness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Cut points for identifying clinically significant diabetes distress in adolescents with type 1 diabetes using the PAID-T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Cameron, Fergus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish cut point(s) for the Problem Areas in Diabetes-teen version (PAID-T) scale to identify adolescents with clinically meaningful, elevated diabetes distress. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were available from the Diabetes Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment...... variables were examined to identify a clinically meaningful threshold for elevated diabetes distress. ANOVA was used to test whether these variables differed by levels of distress. RESULTS Two cut points distinguished none-to-mild (90) diabetes distress.......Moderate distresswas experienced by 18%of adolescents and high distress by 36%. Mean depressive symptoms, self-reported HbA1c, and SMBG differed significantly across the three levels of diabetes distress (all P defined two...

  13. Identifying User Preferences for a Digital Educational Solution for Young Seniors With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Pieta; Maas, Anne H; Chen, Wei; van Pul, Carola; Cottaar, Eduardus J E; van Riel, Natal A W; Hilbers, Peter A J; Haak, Harm R

    2017-08-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged 50-65 years) with type 2 diabetes were chosen as the target group because they are likely to have more affinity with digital devices than older people and because 88% of the Dutch diabetes population is >50 years of age. Data about the target group were gathered through literature research and interviews. The literature research covered data about their device use and education preferences. To gain insight into the daily life of diabetes patients and current diabetes education processes, 20 diabetes patients and 10 medical experts were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using affinity diagrams. Those diagrams, together with the literature data, formed the basis for two personas and corresponding customer journey maps. Literature showed that diabetes prevalence is inversely correlated to educational level. Computer and device use is relatively low within the target group, but is growing. The interviews showed that young seniors like to play board, card, and computer games, with others or alone. Family and loved ones play an important role in their lives. Medical experts are crucial in the diabetes education of young senior diabetes patients. These findings are translated into a list of design aspects that can be used for creating educational solutions.

  14. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2014-07-01

    Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Depression, self-esteem, diabetes care and self-care behaviors among middle-aged and older Mexicans☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz

    2016-01-01

    Aims Examine the associations of depression and self-esteem on self-care activities and care received among Mexicans with diabetes. Methods Using data from the Mexican Nutrition and Health Survey 2012, logistic regression models were fit to test the associations between each self-care activity and diabetes care, and self-esteem and depression. Results People with low self-esteem were less likely to follow a diet, but no other associations were found. Contrary to what was expected, there were no relationships between depression and quality of care received or self-care behaviors. Conclusion Current findings support the importance of looking at mental health and emotional state among older adults with diabetes. Future studies should explore the relationship between different psychological barriers to proper diabetes management. PMID:24846446

  16. Acceptance factors of mobile apps for diabetes by patients aged 50 or older: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Madlen; Reichelt, Julius; Bellmann, Maike; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-03-02

    Mobile apps for people with diabetes offer great potential to support therapy management, increase therapy adherence, and reduce the probability of the occurrence of accompanying and secondary diseases. However, they are rarely used by elderly patients due to a lack of acceptance. We investigated the question "Which factors influence the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older?" Particular emphasis was placed on the current use of mobile devices/apps, acceptance-promoting/-inhibiting factors, features of a helpful diabetes app, and contact persons for technical questions. This qualitative study was the third of three substudies investigating factors influencing acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Guided interviews were chosen in order to get a comprehensive insight into the subjective perspective of elderly diabetes patients. At the end of each interview, the patients tested two existing diabetes apps to reveal obstacles in (first) use. Altogether, 32 patients with diabetes were interviewed. The mean age was 68.8 years (SD 8.2). Of 32 participants, 15 (47%) knew apps, however only 2 (6%) had already used a diabetes app within their therapy. The reasons reported for being against the use of apps were a lack of additional benefits (4/8, 50%) compared to current therapy management, a lack of interoperability with other devices/apps (1/8, 12%), and no joy of use (1/8, 12%). The app test revealed the following main difficulties in use: nonintuitive understanding of the functionality of the apps (26/29, 90%), nonintuitive understanding of the menu navigation/labeling (19/29, 66%), font sizes and representations that were too small (14/29, 48%), and difficulties in recognizing and pressing touch-sensitive areas (14/29, 48%). Furthermore, the patients felt the apps lacked individually important functions (11/29, 38%), or felt the functions that were offered were unnecessary for their own therapy needs (10/29, 34%). The most

  17. Frequency of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by a FINDRISC survey in Puebla City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirales-Tamez O

    2012-11-01

    .2 years were older than those with impaired fasting glucose (46.19 ± 8.89 years, glucose intolerance (46.15 ± 10.9 years, and normal levels (41.9 ± 10.45 years, P < 0.05. We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus in those aged over 50 years than in younger subjects (46.15% versus 15.88%, respectively.Conclusion: The FINDRISC survey is a very useful tool for identifying individuals at high risk of developing diabetes and prediabetic states, especially in those older than 50 years.Keywords: diabetes prevention, diabetes survey, diabetes risk, diabetes Puebla, FINDRISC Mexico

  18. Exercise Training at Maximal Fat Oxidation Intensity for Older Women with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sijie; Du, Ping; Zhao, Wanting; Pang, Jiaqi; Wang, Jianxiong

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pleiotropic effects of 12 weeks of supervised exercise training at maximal fat oxidation (FATmax) intensity on body composition, lipid profile, glycemic control, insulin sensitivity and serum adipokine levels in older women with type 2 diabetes. Thirty-one women with type 2 diabetes, aged 60 to 69 years, were randomly allocated into exercise and control groups. Body composition, lipid profile, blood glucose, insulin resistance and serum leptin and adiponectin concentrations were measured before and after the intervention. Exercise group (n=16) walked at individualized FATmax intensities for 1 h/day for 3 days/week over 12 weeks. No dietary intervention was introduced during the experimental period. Maximal fat oxidation rate was 0.37±0.10 g/min, and occurred at 37.3±7.3% of the estimated VO 2 max. Within the exercise group, significant improvements were observed for most of the measured variables compared to non-exercising controls; in particular, the FATmax program reduced body fat% (presistance (pchange in daily energy intake for all participants during the intervention period. These results suggest that individualized FATmax training is an effective exercise training intensity for managing type 2 diabetes in older women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Identifying groups of nonparticipants in type 2 diabetes mellitus education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Wiese, Birgitt; Pawels, Marc; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hannah

    2013-06-01

    Patient education is a compulsory element of the nationwide disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany. However, a considerable proportion of patients do not attend diabetes self-management education courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe patient-reported reasons for nonparticipation and to identify typical subgroups of nonparticipants in order to improve recruitment strategies. The authors performed a cross-sectional observational study on 165 participants and 132 nonparticipants in diabetes education using a postal survey and chart review. Participants and nonparticipants were compared using 2-sided t tests and χ2 tests. Nonparticipants were grouped by cluster analysis based on the reasons for nonparticipation. A total of 95% of participants and 36% of nonparticipants reported to have received a recommendation for diabetes education from their physician. The authors identified 4 typical subgroups of nonparticipants: the "informed and responsible," the "unconcerned without desire for more information," the "uninformed but responsible," and the "anxious and burdened with psychosocial problems and functional limitations." The physician's recommendation seems to influence participation in diabetes education and should be used intentionally to increase participation rates. Also, differentiating barriers of nonparticipants can be determined by the degree of feeling informed and responsible for diabetes management. Physicians should more clearly explore patients' perception of their knowledge of diabetes and their attribution of responsibility for diabetes management. Starting from this patient perspective might help physicians motivate patients to participate in diabetes education.

  20. Other specific types of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade it became obvious that not all cases of diabetes that has developed in childhood and adolescence, as well as at an older age, are diabetes type 1 and 2. Patients often unable to identify MODY and LADA type of diabetes, as well as more rare syndromal form. This article reflects the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, clinic and diagnostics of MODY and LADA diabetes that allows to precise diagnosis and appointment of a patient pathogenetic therapy.

  1. Immunological Basis for Rapid Progression of Diabetes in Older NOD Mouse Recipients Post BM-HSC Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wang

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes (T1D, mediated by autoreactive T cell destruction of insulin-producing islet beta cells, has been treated with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cell (BM-HSC transplantation. Older non-obese diabetic (NOD mice recipients (3m, at disease-onset stage receiving syngeneic BM-HSC progressed more rapidly to end-stage diabetes post-transplantation than younger recipients (4-6w, at disease-initiation stage. FACS analyses showed a higher percentage and absolute number of regulatory T cells (Treg and lower proportion of proliferating T conventional cells (Tcon in pancreatic lymph nodes from the resistant mice among the younger recipients compared to the rapid progressors among the older recipients. Treg distribution in spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN, blood and thymus between the two groups was similar. However, the percentage of thymic Tcon and the proliferation of Tcon in MLN and blood were lower in the young resistants. These results suggest recipient age and associated disease stage as a variable to consider in BM-HSC transplantation for treating T1D.

  2. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, Mathieu; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. An economic (decision-tree) analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services) and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted. Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada. Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  3. Prevalence of abnormal plasma liver enzymes in older people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morling, J R; Strachan, M W J; Hayes, P C; Butcher, I; Frier, B M; Reynolds, R M; Price, J F

    2012-04-01

    To determine the prevalence and distribution of abnormal plasma liver enzymes in a representative sample of older adults with Type 2 diabetes. Plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyltransferase were measured in a randomly selected, population-based cohort of 1066 men and women aged 60-75 years with Type 2 diabetes (the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study). Overall, 29.1% (95% CI 26.1-31.8) of patients had one or more plasma liver enzymes above the upper limit of the normal reference range. Only 10.1% of these patients had a prior history of liver disease and a further 12.4% reported alcohol intake above recommended limits. Alanine aminotransferase was the most commonly raised liver enzyme (23.1% of patients). The prevalence of abnormal liver enzymes was significantly higher in men (odds ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.07-1.83), in the youngest 5-year age band (odds ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.44-2.84), in patients with diabetes duration enzyme abnormality. The prevalence of elevated liver enzymes in people with Type 2 diabetes is high, with only modest variation between clinically defined patient groups. Further research is required to determine the prognostic value of raised, routinely measured liver enzymes to inform decisions on appropriate follow-up investigations. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  4. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho HY

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsiu-Yu Ho,1,2 Mei-Hui Chen,2,3 Meei-Fang Lou1 1School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 2Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology, 3National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods: A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results: The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1 expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines; 2 comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals; 3 inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice; 4 impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress; and 5 weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support. Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion: This study found that the experience of older adults

  5. Development of a situation-specific theory for explaining health-related quality of life among older South Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a situation-specific theory for explaining health-related quality of life (QOL) among older South Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. To develop a situation-specific theory, three sources were considered: (a) the conceptual model of health promotion and QOL for people with chronic and disabling conditions (an existing theory related to the QOL in patients with chronic diseases); (b) a literature review using multiple databases including Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, PsycINFO, and two Korean databases; and (c) findings from our structural equation modeling study on health-related QOL in older South Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. The proposed situation-specific theory is constructed with six major concepts including barriers, resources, perceptual factors, psychosocial factors, health-promoting behaviors, and health-related QOL. The theory also provides the interrelationships among concepts. Health care providers and nurses could incorporate the proposed situation-specific theory into development of diabetes education programs for improving health-related QOL in older South Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Hyperglycemia Is Associated with Impaired Muscle Quality in Older Men with Diabetes: The Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Yoon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperglycemia on muscle quality in older men with type 2 diabetes.MethodsThis was a subsidiary study of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Health and Aging. Among 326 older men consenting to tests of body composition and muscle strength, 269 men were ultimately analyzed after the exclusion because of stroke (n=30 and uncertainty about the diagnosis of diabetes (n=27. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. Muscle strength for knee extension was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle quality was assessed from the ratio of leg strength to the entire corresponding leg muscle mass.ResultsThe muscle mass, strength, and quality in patients with type 2 diabetes did not differ significantly from controls. However, when patients with diabetes were subdivided according to their glycemic control status, patients with a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c level of ≥8.5% showed significantly decreased leg muscle quality by multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 4.510; P=0.045 after adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking amount, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and duration of diabetes. Physical performance status was also impaired in subjects with an HbA1c of ≥8.5%.ConclusionPoor glycemic control in these older patients with diabetes was associated with significant risk of decreased muscle quality and performance status. Glycemic control with an HbA1c of <8.5% might be needed to reduce the risk of adverse skeletal and functional outcomes in this population.

  7. Mobile applications for diabetics: a systematic review and expert-based usability evaluation considering the special requirements of diabetes patients age 50 years or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Madlen; Quade, Mandy; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2014-04-09

    A multitude of mhealth (mobile health) apps have been developed in recent years to support effective self-management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2. We carried out a systematic review of all currently available diabetes apps for the operating systems iOS and Android. We considered the number of newly released diabetes apps, range of functions, target user groups, languages, acquisition costs, user ratings, available interfaces, and the connection between acquisition costs and user ratings. Additionally, we examined whether the available applications serve the special needs of diabetes patients aged 50 or older by performing an expert-based usability evaluation. We identified relevant keywords, comparative categories, and their specifications. Subsequently, we performed the app review based on the information given in the Google Play Store, the Apple App Store, and the apps themselves. In addition, we carried out an expert-based usability evaluation based on a representative 10% sample of diabetes apps. In total, we analyzed 656 apps finding that 355 (54.1%) offered just one function and 348 (53.0%) provided a documentation function. The dominating app language was English (85.4%, 560/656), patients represented the main user group (96.0%, 630/656), and the analysis of the costs revealed a trend toward free apps (53.7%, 352/656). The median price of paid apps was €1.90. The average user rating was 3.6 stars (maximum 5). Our analyses indicated no clear differences in the user rating between free and paid apps. Only 30 (4.6%) of the 656 available diabetes apps offered an interface to a measurement device. We evaluated 66 apps within the usability evaluation. On average, apps were rated best regarding the criterion "comprehensibility" (4.0 out of 5.0), while showing a lack of "fault tolerance" (2.8 out of 5.0). Of the 66 apps, 48 (72.7%) offered the ability to read the screen content aloud. The number of functions was significantly negative correlated

  8. Mobile Applications for Diabetics: A Systematic Review and Expert-Based Usability Evaluation Considering the Special Requirements of Diabetes Patients Age 50 Years or Older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Mandy; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Background A multitude of mhealth (mobile health) apps have been developed in recent years to support effective self-management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2. Objective We carried out a systematic review of all currently available diabetes apps for the operating systems iOS and Android. We considered the number of newly released diabetes apps, range of functions, target user groups, languages, acquisition costs, user ratings, available interfaces, and the connection between acquisition costs and user ratings. Additionally, we examined whether the available applications serve the special needs of diabetes patients aged 50 or older by performing an expert-based usability evaluation. Methods We identified relevant keywords, comparative categories, and their specifications. Subsequently, we performed the app review based on the information given in the Google Play Store, the Apple App Store, and the apps themselves. In addition, we carried out an expert-based usability evaluation based on a representative 10% sample of diabetes apps. Results In total, we analyzed 656 apps finding that 355 (54.1%) offered just one function and 348 (53.0%) provided a documentation function. The dominating app language was English (85.4%, 560/656), patients represented the main user group (96.0%, 630/656), and the analysis of the costs revealed a trend toward free apps (53.7%, 352/656). The median price of paid apps was €1.90. The average user rating was 3.6 stars (maximum 5). Our analyses indicated no clear differences in the user rating between free and paid apps. Only 30 (4.6%) of the 656 available diabetes apps offered an interface to a measurement device. We evaluated 66 apps within the usability evaluation. On average, apps were rated best regarding the criterion “comprehensibility” (4.0 out of 5.0), while showing a lack of “fault tolerance” (2.8 out of 5.0). Of the 66 apps, 48 (72.7%) offered the ability to read the screen content aloud. The number of

  9. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tracey, Marsha L

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009-2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland.

  10. Neuropsychological benefits of stationary bike exercise and a cybercycle exergame for older adults with diabetes: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J; Westen, Sarah C; Nimon, Joseph; Zimmerman, Earl

    2012-07-01

    This quasi-experimental exploratory study investigated neuropsychological effects of exercise among older adults with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with adults without diabetes (non-DM), and it examined the feasibility of using a stationary bike exergame as a form of exercise for older adults with and without diabetes. It is a secondary analysis that uses a small dataset from a larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) called the Cybercycle Study, which compared cognitive and physiological effects of traditional stationary cycling versus cybercycling. In the RCT and the secondary analysis, older adults living in eight independent living retirement facilities in the state of New York were enrolled in the study and assigned to exercise five times per week for 45 min per session (two times per week was considered acceptable for retention in the study) by using a stationary bicycle over the course of 3 months. They were randomly assigned to use either a standard stationary bicycle or a "cybercycle" with a video screen that displayed virtual terrains, virtual tours, and racing games with virtual competitors. For this secondary analysis, participants in the RCT who had type 2 DM (n = 10) were compared with age-matched non-DM exercisers (n = 10). The relationship between exercise and executive function (i.e., Color Trials 2, Digit Span Backwards, and Stroop C tests) was examined for DM and non-DM patients. Older adults with and without diabetes were able to use cybercycles successfully and complete the study, so the feasibility of this form of exercise for this population was supported. However, in contrast with the larger RCT, this small subset did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in executive function between the participants who used cybercycles and those who used stationary bikes with no games or virtual content on a video screen. Therefore, the study combined the two groups and called them "exercisers" and compared cognitive outcomes for DM versus

  11. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Mei-Hui

    2018-01-01

    Background Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1) expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines); 2) comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals); 3) inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice); 4) impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress); and 5) weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support). Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion This study found that the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes was similar to that of a single disease, but the extent was greater than a single disease. The biggest difference is that the elderly think that their most serious problem is not diabetes, but rather, the comorbidities causing life limitations

  12. Neuropsychological functioning in older people with type 2 diabetes: the effect of controlling for confounding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulou, K G; Hampson, S E; Morrish, N J

    2002-04-01

    Neuropsychological functioning was examined in a group of 33 older (mean age 62.40 +/- 9.62 years) people with Type 2 diabetes (Group 1) and 33 non-diabetic participants matched with Group 1 on age, sex, premorbid intelligence and presence of hypertension and cardio/cerebrovascular conditions (Group 2). Data statistically corrected for confounding factors obtained from the diabetic group were compared with the matched control group. The results suggested small cognitive deficits in diabetic people's verbal memory and mental flexibility (Logical Memory A and SS7). No differences were seen between the two samples in simple and complex visuomotor attention, sustained complex visual attention, attention efficiency, mental double tracking, implicit memory, and self-reported memory problems. These findings indicate minimal cognitive impairment in relatively uncomplicated Type 2 diabetes and demonstrate the importance of control and matching for confounding factors.

  13. Multifactorial intervention for diabetes control among older users of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vaz Machry

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if the closer follow-up with the supply of insulin pens and the measurement of capillary blood glucose improve the management of older patients with type 2 diabetes without adequate glycemic control despite extensive therapy. METHODS: This is a prospective, non-randomized, quasi-experimental study. We have included 45 patients over 60 years old, from both sexes, with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c > 8.5% using oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin. The intervention consisted of monthly medical visits, with the provision of insulin pens and strips for blood glucose measurement. All patients received insulin pen, refills of Neutral Protamine Hagedorn and regular insulin, needles for the pen, blood glucose meter, and capillary blood glucose tests (three tests/day. Treatment was adjusted with the same endocrinologist monthly for six months. Glycated hemoglobin was measured at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks after intervention. RESULTS: Glycated hemoglobin at baseline was 10.34% (SE = 0.22% and 8.54% (SE = 0.24%, p < 0.001 and 8.09% (SE = 0.21%, p < 0.001 at 12 and 24 weeks after intervention, respectively, with a significant reduction from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: More frequent medical visits, with treatment inputs including the use of insulin pens and self-monitoring, have improved glycemic control (reduction of 2.25% in HbA1C, on average, at 24 weeks of follow-up. Our data support a change in the management and medical behavior of older patients with chronically decompensated diabetes.

  14. Multifactorial intervention for diabetes control among older users of insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machry, Rafael Vaz; Pedroso, Henrique Umpierre; Vasconcellos, Luthiele Silva; Nunes, Rafaela Ramos; Evaldt, Cibelle de Abreu; Yunes, Eduardo Bardou; Rodrigues, Ticiana da Costa

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if the closer follow-up with the supply of insulin pens and the measurement of capillary blood glucose improve the management of older patients with type 2 diabetes without adequate glycemic control despite extensive therapy. METHODS: This is a prospective, non-randomized, quasi-experimental study. We have included 45 patients over 60 years old, from both sexes, with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 8.5% using oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin. The intervention consisted of monthly medical visits, with the provision of insulin pens and strips for blood glucose measurement. All patients received insulin pen, refills of Neutral Protamine Hagedorn and regular insulin, needles for the pen, blood glucose meter, and capillary blood glucose tests (three tests/day). Treatment was adjusted with the same endocrinologist monthly for six months. Glycated hemoglobin was measured at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks after intervention. RESULTS: Glycated hemoglobin at baseline was 10.34% (SE = 0.22%) and 8.54% (SE = 0.24%, p < 0.001) and 8.09% (SE = 0.21%, p < 0.001) at 12 and 24 weeks after intervention, respectively, with a significant reduction from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: More frequent medical visits, with treatment inputs including the use of insulin pens and self-monitoring, have improved glycemic control (reduction of 2.25% in HbA1C, on average, at 24 weeks of follow-up). Our data support a change in the management and medical behavior of older patients with chronically decompensated diabetes. PMID:29791677

  15. Insulin provision therapy and mortality in older adults with diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease: Insights from BARI-2D trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damluji, Abdulla A; Cohen, Erin R; Moscucci, Mauro; Myerburg, Robert J; Cohen, Mauricio G; Brooks, Maria M; Rich, Michael W; Forman, Daniel E

    2017-08-15

    Optimal strategies for glucose control in very old adults with diabetes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) are unclear. To compare the effects of insulin provision (IP) therapy versus insulin sensitizing (IS) therapy for glycemic control in older (≥75years) and younger (type II diabetes (DM) and SIHD. Adults enrolled in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) were studied. The BARI 2D study population (all with type II DM and SIHD) was randomized twice: (1) between revascularization plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone, and (2) between IP versus IS therapies. The primary endpoint was all-cause-mortality over five-year follow-up. In this substudy outcomes related to IP vs. IS are assessed in relation to age. Adults aged ≥75years who received IP versus IS are compared to those 182 (8%) were ≥75years. Compared to younger subjects, the older cohort had lower BMI, higher diuretic use, worse kidney function, and increased history of heart failure. Within the older cohort, the IP and IS subgroups were similar in respect to baseline cardiovascular risk factors, medications, and coronary artery disease severity. During follow-up, the older subjects receiving IP therapy had higher cardiovascular mortality compared to those receiving IS therapy (16% vs. 11%, p=0.040). Using Cox proportional hazards analysis, the older IP subjects were at increased risk for all-cause-mortality (hazard ratio 1.89, CI 1.1-3.2, p=0.020). No mortality difference between IP and IS was observed in those diabetes and SIHD aged ≥75years, IP therapy may be associated with increased mortality compared to IS therapy. Additional studies are needed to further refine optimal treatment strategies for diabetes and SIHD in old age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mortality in Individuals Aged 80 and Older with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Relation to Glycosylated Hemoglobin, Blood Pressure, and Total Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Shota; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate whether low glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and total cholesterol (TC) are associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality in very old individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population-based cohort study. Primary care database in the United Kingdom. Individuals aged 80 and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 25,966). Associations between baseline HbA1c, BP, and TC and all-cause mortality were evaluated in Cox proportional hazards models. Analyses were adjusted for sex, age, duration of diabetes mellitus, lifestyle variables, HbA1c, BP, TC, comorbidities, prescribing of antidiabetic and cardiovascular drugs, and participants' general practice. There were 4,490 deaths during follow-up (median 2.0 years; mortality 104.7 per 1,000 person-years). Mortality in participants with low (type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further research is required to understand these associations and to identify optimal treatment targets in this population. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Impaired Word and Face Recognition in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicola; Riby, Leigh M; Smith, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) exhibit accelerated decline in some domains of cognition including verbal episodic memory. Few studies have investigated the influence of DM2 status in older adults on recognition memory for more complex stimuli such as faces. In the present study we sought to compare recognition memory performance for words, objects and faces under conditions of relatively low and high cognitive load. Healthy older adults with good glucoregulatory control (n = 13) and older adults with DM2 (n = 24) were administered recognition memory tasks in which stimuli (faces, objects and words) were presented under conditions of either i) low (stimulus presented without a background pattern) or ii) high (stimulus presented against a background pattern) cognitive load. In a subsequent recognition phase, the DM2 group recognized fewer faces than healthy controls. Further, the DM2 group exhibited word recognition deficits in the low cognitive load condition. The recognition memory impairment observed in patients with DM2 has clear implications for day-to-day functioning. Although these deficits were not amplified under conditions of increased cognitive load, the present study emphasizes that recognition memory impairment for both words and more complex stimuli such as face are a feature of DM2 in older adults. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Boulin

    Full Text Available The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes.An economic (decision-tree analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted.Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada.Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  19. Hemoglobin A1c and Mortality in Older Adults With and Without Diabetes: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1988-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Priya; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Golden, Sherita H; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2017-04-01

    Hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) level has been associated with increased mortality in middle-aged populations. The optimal intensity of glucose control in older adults with diabetes remains uncertain. We sought to estimate the risk of mortality by HbA 1c levels among older adults with and without diabetes. We analyzed data from adults aged ≥65 years ( n = 7,333) from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (1998-1994) and Continuous NHANES (1999-2004) and their linked mortality data (through December 2011). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the relationship of HbA 1c with the risk of all-cause and cause-specific (cardiovascular disease [CVD], cancer, and non-CVD/noncancer) mortality, separately for adults with diabetes and without diabetes. Over a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 4,729 participants died (1,262 from CVD, 850 from cancer, and 2,617 from non-CVD/noncancer causes). Compared with those with diagnosed diabetes and an HbA 1c 8.0%. HRs were 1.6 (95% CI 1.02, 2.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.3, 2.6) for HbA 1c 8.0-8.9% and ≥9.0%, respectively ( P for trend 6.5% had a 1.3 (95% CI 1.03, 1.8) times greater risk of all-cause mortality compared with participants without diabetes and HbA 1c 5.0-5.6%. An HbA 1c >8.0% was associated with increased risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality in older adults with diabetes. Our results support the idea that better glycemic control is important for reducing mortality; however, in light of the conflicting evidence base, there is also a need for individualized glycemic targets for older adults with diabetes depending on their demographics, duration of diabetes, and existing comorbidities. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Lifestyle risk factors and new-onset diabetes mellitus in older adults: the cardiovascular health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kamineni, Aruna; Carnethon, Mercedes; Djoussé, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Siscovick, David

    2009-04-27

    The combined impact of lifestyle factors on incidence of diabetes mellitus later in life is not well established. The objective of this study was to determine how lifestyle factors, assessed in combination, relate to new-onset diabetes in a broad and relatively unselected population of older adults. We prospectively examined associations of lifestyle factors, measured using repeated assessments later in life, with incident diabetes mellitus during a 10-year period (1989-1998) among 4883 men and women 65 years or older (mean [SD] age at baseline, 73 [6] years) enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Low-risk lifestyle groups were defined by physical activity level (leisure-time activity and walking pace) above the median; dietary score (higher fiber intake and polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio, lower trans-fat intake and lower mean glycemic index) in the top 2 quintiles; never smoked or former smoker more than 20 years ago or for fewer than 5 pack-years; alcohol use (predominantly light or moderate); body mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); and waist circumference of 88 cm for women or 92 cm for men. The main outcome measure was incident diabetes defined annually by new use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications. We also evaluated fasting and 2-hour postchallenge glucose levels. During 34,539 person-years, 337 new cases of drug-treated diabetes mellitus occurred (9.8 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, race, educational level, and annual income, each lifestyle factor was independently associated with incident diabetes. Overall, the rate of incident diabetes was 35% lower (relative risk, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.71) for each 1 additional lifestyle factor in the low-risk group. Participants whose physical activity level and dietary, smoking, and alcohol habits were all in the low-risk group had an 82% lower incidence of diabetes (relative risk, 0.18; 95

  1. Nontraumatic fracture risk with diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in older white and black adults: the health, aging, and body composition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Cauley, Jane A; Schwartz, Ann V; Nevitt, Michael C; Resnick, Helaine E; Bauer, Douglas C; Tylavsky, Frances A; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B; Newman, Anne B

    2005-07-25

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and related complications may increase clinical fracture risk in older adults. Our objectives were to determine if type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired fasting glucose was associated with higher fracture rates in older adults and to evaluate how diabetic individuals with fractures differed from those without fractures. The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study participants were well-functioning, community-dwelling men and women aged 70 to 79 years (N = 2979; 42% black), of whom 19% had DM and 6% had impaired fasting glucose at baseline. Incident nontraumatic clinical fractures were verified by radiology reports for a mean +/- SD of 4.5 +/- 1.1 years. Cox proportional hazards regression models determined how DM and impaired fasting glucose affected subsequent risk of fracture. Diabetes mellitus was associated with elevated fracture risk (relative risk, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.51) after adjustment for a hip bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk factors. Impaired fasting glucose was not significantly associated with fractures (relative risk, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-2.67). Diabetic participants with fractures had lower hip BMD (0.818 g/cm(2) vs 0.967 g/cm(2); Pbattery score (5.0 vs 7.0), and falls (37% vs 21%) compared with diabetic participants without fractures (P<.05). These results indicate that older white and black adults with DM are at higher fracture risk compared with nondiabetic adults with a similar BMD since a higher risk of nontraumatic fractures was found after adjustment for hip BMD. Fracture prevention needs to target specific risk factors found in older adults with DM.

  2. Exercise interventions for the improvement of falls-related outcomes among older adults with diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Anna; Meyer, Claudia; Renehan, Emma; Hill, Keith D; Browning, Colette J

    2017-03-01

    Falls as a complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) can have a major impact on the health of older adults. Previous reviews have demonstrated that certain exercise interventions are effective at reducing falls in older people; however, no studies have quantified the effectiveness of exercise interventions on falls-related outcomes among older adults with DM. A systematic search for all years to September 2015 identified available literature. Eligibility criteria included: appropriate exercise intervention/s; assessed falls-related outcomes; older adults with DM. Effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Positive effect sizes favoured the intervention. Ten RCTs were eligible for the meta-analyses. Exercise interventions were more effective than the control condition for static balance (0.53, 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.93), lower-limb strength (0.63, 95% CI: 0.09 to 1.18), and gait (0.59, 95% CI: 0.22 to 0.96). No RCTs assessed falls-risk; one RCT reported 12month falls-rate, with no differential treatment effect observed. Exercise interventions can improve certain falls-related outcomes among older adults with DM. Substantial heterogeneity and limited numbers of studies should be considered when interpreting results. Among older adults, where DM burden is increasing, exercise interventions may provide promising approaches to assist the improvement of falls-related outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Is a hilly neighborhood environment associated with diabetes mellitus among older people? Results from the JAGES 2010 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Takamoto, Iseki; Amemiya, Airi; Hanazato, Masamichi; Suzuki, Norimichi; Nagamine, Yuiko; Sasaki, Yuri; Tani, Yukako; Yazawa, Aki; Inoue, Yosuke; Shirai, Kokoro; Shobugawa, Yugo; Kondo, Naoki; Kondo, Katsunori

    2017-06-01

    Although living in a hilly environment may promote muscular activity in the daily lives of residents, and such activity may prevent diabetes mellitus, few studies have focused on the impact of living in a hilly environment on diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a hilly neighborhood environment on DM in older people. We used data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study, a population-based, cross-sectional study of individuals aged 65 or older without long-term care needs in Japan, which was conducted in 2010. A total of 8904 participants in 46 neighborhoods had responded to the questionnaire and undergone a health check. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed as HbA 1c  ≥ 6.5% and those undergoing treatment for diabetes mellitus. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in those without other chronic diseases who had an HbA 1c > 7.5%, and in those with other chronic diseases if their HbA 1c was >8.0%. Neighborhood environment was evaluated based on the percentage of positive responses in the questionnaire and geographical information system data. A multilevel analysis was performed, adjusted for individual-level risk factors. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis was conducted for those who were undergoing treatment for diabetes mellitus (n = 1007). After adjustment for other physical environmental and individual covariates, a 1 interquartile range increase (1.48°) in slope in the neighborhood decreased the risk of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by 18% (odds ratio [OR]: 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70-0.97). Sensitivity analysis confirmed that larger slopes in the neighborhood showed a significant protective effect against diabetes mellitus among those who were undergoing treatment for diabetes mellitus (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59-0.90). A hilly neighborhood environment was not associated with diabetes mellitus, but was protective against poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  4. Diabetes in South African older adults: prevalence and impact on quality of life and functional disability - as assessed using SAGE Wave 1 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfalli, Mahmoud; Kassanjee, Reshma; Kalula, Sebastiana; Kowal, Paul; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Levitt, Naomi S

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease with severe late complications. It is known to impact the quality of life and cause disability, which may affect an individual's capacity to manage and maintain longer-term health and well-being. To examine the prevalence of self-report diabetes, and association between diabetes and each of health-related quality of life and disability amongst South Africa's older adults. To study both the direct relationship between diabetes and these two measures, as well as moderation effects, i.e. whether associations between other factors and these measures of well-being differed between individuals with diabetes and those without. Secondary analyses of data on participants aged 50 years and older from the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) in South Africa Wave 1 (2007-2008) were conducted. Prevalence of self-reported diabetes was assessed. Multivariable regressions describe the relationships between each of quality of life (WHOQoL) and disability (WHODAS), and diabetes, while controlling for selected socio-demographic characteristics, health risk behaviours and co-morbid conditions. In the regression models, we also investigated whether diabetes moderates the relationships between these additional factors and WHOQoL/WHODAS. Self-reported diabetes prevalence was 9.2% (95% CI: 7.8,10.9) and increased with age. Having diabetes was associated with poorer WHOQoL scores (additive effect: -4.2; 95% CI: -9.2,0.9; p-value disability (multiplicative effect: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.5,2.9; p-value disability were both related to not being in a relationship, lower education, less wealth, lower physical activity and a larger number of chronic conditions. Diabetes is associated with lower quality of life and greater disability amongst older South Africans. Attention needs to be given to enhancing the capacity of health systems to meet the changing needs of ageing populations with diabetes in SA as well as facilitating social support networks in communities.

  5. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  6. DIABETES, DEPRESSION, AND DEATH: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF A DEPRESSION TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR OLDER ADULTS BASED IN PRIMARY CARE (PROSPECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R; Morales, Knashawn H; Post, Edward P; Bruce, Martha L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our a priori hypothesis was that depressed patients with diabetes in practices implementing a depression management program would have a decreased risk of mortality compared to depressed patients with diabetes in usual care practices. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Multi-site practice-randomized controlled trial PROSPECT (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial) with patient recruitment from 5/99-8/01 and supplemented with a search of the National Death Index. Twenty primary care practices participated from New York City, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. In all, 584 participants who were identified though a two-stage, age-stratified (60-74; 75+) depression screening of randomly sampled patients and were classified as depressed with complete information on diabetes status are included in these analyses. Of all the 584 participants, 123 (21.2%) reported a history of diabetes. A depression care manager worked with primary care physicians to provide algorithm-based care. Vital status was assessed at 5 years. RESULTS After a median follow-up of 52.0 months, 110 depressed patients had died. Depressed patients with diabetes in the Intervention Condition were less likely to have died during the 5-year follow-up interval than were depressed persons with diabetes in Usual Care after accounting for baseline differences among patients (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49, 95% CI [0.24, 0.98]). CONCLUSIONS Older depressed primary care patients with diabetes in practices implementing depression care management were less likely to die over the course of a 5-year interval than were depressed patients with diabetes in usual care practices. PMID:17717284

  7. Procedures for identifying evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Adriana; Scogin, Forrest

    2007-03-01

    The authors describe the methods used to identify evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults in this contribution to the special section. Coding teams were assembled to review the literature on several problems relevant to mental health and aging. These teams used the manual developed by the Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology (Division 12) of the American Psychological Association that provided definitions of key constructs used in coding. The authors provide an overview of the process followed by the review teams and of some of the issues that emerged to illustrate the steps involved in the coding procedure. Identifying evidence-based treatments is a fundamental aspect of promoting evidence-based practice with older adults; such practice is advocated by most health care disciplines, including psychology. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Goal setting using telemedicine in rural underserved older adults with diabetes: experiences from the informatics for diabetes education and telemedicine project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Susan P; Lagua, Carina; Trief, Paula M; Izquierdo, Roberto; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2010-05-01

    To describe the use of telemedicine for setting goals for behavior change and examine the success in achieving these goals in rural underserved older adults with diabetes. Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes living in rural upstate New York who were enrolled in the telemedicine intervention of the Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine (IDEATel) project (n = 610) participated in home televisits with nurse and dietitian educators every 4-6 weeks for 2-6 years. Behavior change goals related to nutrition, physical activity, monitoring, diabetes health maintenance, and/or use of the home telemedicine unit were established at the conclusion of each televisit and assessed at the next visit. Collaborative goal setting was employed during 18,355 televisits (mean of 33 goal-setting televisits/participant). The most common goals were related to monitoring, followed by diabetes health maintenance, nutrition, exercise, and use of the telemedicine equipment. Overall, 68% of behavioral goals were rated as "improved" or "met." The greatest success was achieved for goals related to proper insulin injection technique and daily foot care. These elderly participants had the most difficulty achieving goals related to use of the computer. No gender differences in goal achievement were observed. Televisits can be successfully used to collaboratively establish behavior change goals to help improve diabetes self-management in underserved elderly rural adults.

  9. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Impact of a community-based exercise programme on physical fitness in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Themudo-Barata, José; Reis, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Physical fitness is related to all-cause mortality, quality of life and risk of falls in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to analyse the impact of a long-term community-based combined exercise program (aerobic+resistance+agility/balance+flexibility) developed with minimum and low-cost material resources on physical fitness in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. This was a non-experimental pre-post evaluation study. Participants (N=43; 62.92±5.92 years old) were engaged in a community-based supervised exercise programme (consisting of combined aerobic, resistance, agility/balance and flexibility exercises; three sessions per week; 70min per session) of 9 months' duration. Aerobic fitness (6-Minute Walk Test), muscle strength (30-Second Chair Stand Test), agility/balance (Timed Up and Go Test) and flexibility (Chair Sit and Reach Test) were assessed before (baseline) and after the exercise intervention. Significant improvements in the performance of the 6-Minute Walk Test (Δ=8.20%, p<0.001), 30-Second Chair Stand Test (Δ=28.84%, p<0.001), Timed Up and Go Test (Δ=14.31%, p<0.001), and Chair Sit and Reach Test (Δ=102.90%, p<0.001) were identified between baseline and end-exercise intervention time points. A long-term community-based combined exercise programme, developed with low-cost exercise strategies, produced significant benefits in physical fitness in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. This supervised group exercise programme significantly improved aerobic fitness, muscle strength, agility/balance and flexibility, assessed with field tests in community settings. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy to identify diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy risk profiles in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Evan J H; Perkins, Bruce A; Lovblom, Lief E; Bazinet, Richard P; Wolever, Thomas M S; Bril, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy (DSP) is the most prevalent complication in diabetes mellitus. Identifying DSP risk is essential for intervening early in the natural history of the disease. Small nerve fibers are affected earliest in the disease progression and evidence of this damage can be identified using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM). We applied IVCCM to a cohort of 40 patients with type 1 diabetes to identify their DSP risk profile. We measured standard IVCCM parameters including corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL), and performed nerve conduction studies and quantitative sensory testing. 40 patients (53% female), with a mean age of 48±14, BMI 28.1±5.8, and diabetes duration of 27±18 years were enrolled between March 2014 and June 2015. Mean IVCCM CNFL was 12.0±5.2 mm/mm 2 (normal ≥15 mm/mm 2 ). Ten patients (26%) without DSP were identified as being at risk of future DSP with mean CNFL 11.0±2.1 mm/mm 2 . Six patients (15%) were at low risk of future DSP with mean CNFL 19.0±4.6 mm/mm 2 , while 23 (59%) had established DSP with mean CNFL 10.5±4.5 mm/mm 2 . IVCCM can be used successfully to identify the risk profile for DSP in patients with type 1 diabetes. This methodology may prove useful to classify patients for DSP intervention clinical trials.

  12. Identifying diabetes knowledge network nodes as sites for a diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M; Arcury, Thomas A; Skelly, Anne H; Nash, Sally; Soward, April; Dougherty, Molly

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports on the methods used and results of a study that identified specific places within a community that have the potential to be sites for a diabetes prevention program. These sites, termed diabetes knowledge network nodes (DKNNs), are based on the concept of socio-spatial knowledge networks (SSKNs), the web of social relationships within which people obtain knowledge about type 2 diabetes. The target population for the study was working poor African Americans, Latinos, and European Americans of both sexes in a small rural southern town who had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Information was collected from a sample of 121 respondents on the places they visited in carrying out their daily activities. Data on number of visits to specific sites, degree of familiarity with these sites, and ratings of sites as places to receive diabetes information were used to develop three categories of DKNNs for six subgroups based on ethnicity and sex. Primary potential sites of importance to one or more subgroups included churches, grocery stores, drugstores, the local library, a beauty salon, laundromats, a community service agency, and a branch of the County Health Department. Secondary potential sites included gas stations, restaurants, banks, and post offices. Latent potential sites included three medical facilities. Most of the DKNNs were located either in the downtown area or in one of two shopping areas along the most used highway that passed through the town. The procedures used in this study can be generalized to other communities and prevention programs for other chronic diseases.

  13. Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erin A.; McAuley, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change. PMID:26162648

  14. Interventions to promote physical activity in older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazlina eShariff-Ghazali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM among people aged 60 years and above is a growing public health problem. Regular physical activity is one of the key elements in the management of T2DM. Recommendations suggest that older people with T2DM will benefit from regular physical activity for better disease control and delaying complications. Despite the known benefits, many remain sedentary. Hence, this review assessed interventions for promoting physical activity in persons aged 65 years and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A literature search was conducted using OvidMEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus and CINAHL databases to retrieve articles published between January 2000 and December 2012. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental designs comparing different strategies to increase physical activity level in persons aged 65 years and older with T2DM were included. The methodological quality of studies was assessed.Results: Twenty-one eligible studies were reviewed, only six studies were rated as good quality and only one study specifically targeted persons aged 65 years and older. Personalised coaching, goal setting, peer support groups, use of technology and physical activity monitors were proven to increase the level of physical activity. Incorporation of health behaviour theories and follow-up supports also were successful strategies. However, the methodological quality and type of interventions promoting physical activity of the included studies in this review varied widely across the eligible studies.Conclusion: Strategies that increased level of physical activity in persons with T2DM are evident but most studies focused on middle-aged persons and there was a lack of well-designed trials. Hence, more studies of satisfactory methodological quality with interventions promoting physical activity in older people are required.

  15. Associations between adherence and outcomes among older, type 2 diabetes patients: evidence from a Medicare Supplemental database

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    Boye KS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Secnik Boye,1 Sarah E Curtis,1 Maureen J Lage,2 Luis-Emilio Garcia-Perez3 1Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, 2HealthMetrics Outcomes Research, LLC, Bonita Springs, FL, 3Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To examine the association between adherence to glucose-lowering agents and patient outcomes, including costs, acute-care resource utilization, and complications, in an older, type 2 diabetic population.Data and methods: The study used Truven’s Medicare Supplemental database from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014. Patients aged 65 years or older were included if they had at least two type 2 diabetes diagnoses and received a glucose-lowering agent from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. Multivariable analyses examined the relationships among 3-year patient outcomes and levels of adherence, proxied by the proportion of days covered. Outcomes included all-cause medical costs, diabetes-related medical costs, acute-care resource utilization, and acute complications.Results: In this study (N=123,235, higher adherence was linked to reduced costs and improved health outcomes. For example, comparing an individual with adherence of proportion of days covered <20% to one with proportion of days covered ≥80% illustrates an average saving of $28,824 in total 3-year costs. Furthermore, a 1% increase in adherence among 1,000 patients was associated with all-cause savings of $65,464 over 3 years. The probability of a hospitalization, an emergency room (ER visit, or an acute complication decreased monotonically as adherence levels got higher, as did the number of hospitalizations, ER visits, and days hospitalized (P<0.005.Conclusion: Higher adherence was associated with substantially less need for acute care, as indicated by a lowered probability of hospitalization or ER use, a reduced

  16. Effectiveness and safety of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes in older adults: a systematic review and development of recommendations to reduce inappropriate prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Gisela; Martinez, Yolanda V; Ediriweera de Silva, R Erandie; Renom-Guiteras, Anna; Vögele, Anna; Reeves, David; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Marttila-Vaara, Minna; Sönnichsen, Andreas

    2017-10-16

    Preventable drug-related hospital admissions can be associated with drugs used in diabetes and the benefits of strict diabetes control may not outweigh the risks, especially in older populations. The aim of this study was to look for evidence on risks and benefits of DPP-4 inhibitors in older adults and to use this evidence to develop recommendations for the electronic decision support tool of the PRIMA-eDS project. Systematic review using a staged approach which searches for systematic reviews and meta-analyses first, then individual studies only if prior searches were inconclusive. The target population were older people (≥65 years old) with type 2 diabetes. We included studies reporting on the efficacy and/or safety of DPP-4 inhibitors for the management of type 2 diabetes. Studies were included irrespective of DPP-4 inhibitors prescribed as monotherapy or in combination with any other drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The target intervention was DPP-4 inhibitors compared to placebo, no treatment, other drugs to treat type 2 diabetes or a non-pharmacological intervention. Thirty studies (reported in 33 publications) were included: 1 meta-analysis, 17 intervention studies and 12 observational studies. Sixteen studies were focused on older adults and 14 studies reported subgroup analyses in participants ≥65, ≥70, or ≥75 years. Comorbidities were reported by 26 studies and frailty or functional status by one study. There were conflicting findings regarding the effectiveness of DPP-4 inhibitors in older adults. In general, DPP-4 inhibitors showed similar or better safety than placebo and other antidiabetic drugs. However, these safety data are mainly based on short-term outcomes like hypoglycaemia in studies with HbA1c control levels recommended for younger people. One recommendation was developed advising clinicians to reconsider the use of DPP-4 inhibitors for the management of type 2 diabetes in older adults with HbA1c companies and authored or

  17. Quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, and gait speed in older U.S. adults with diabetes mellitus: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Tra, Yolande; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Brancati, Frederick L

    2013-05-01

    To examine the independent association between diabetes mellitus (and its duration and severity) and quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, and gait speed in a national population of older adults. Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. United States. Two thousand five hundred seventy-three adults aged 50 and older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 who had assessment of quadriceps strength. Diabetes mellitus was ascertained according to questionnaire. Measurement of isokinetic knee extensor (quadriceps) strength was performed at 60º/s. Gait speed was assessed using a 20-foot walk test. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes mellitus status and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders or mediators. Older U.S. adults with diabetes mellitus had significantly slower gait speed (0.96 ± 0.02 m/s) than those without (1.08 ± 0.01 m/s; P diabetes mellitus was also associated with significantly lower quadriceps strength (-4.6 ± 1.9 Nm; P = .02) and power (-4.9 ± 2.0 W; P = .02) and slower gait speed (-0.05 ± 0.02 m/s; P = .002). Associations remained significant after adjusting for physical activity and C-reactive protein. After accounting for comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, amputation, cancer, arthritis, fracture, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), diabetes mellitus was independently associated only with gait speed (-0.04 ± 0.02 m/s; P = .02). Diabetes mellitus duration in men and women was negatively associated with age-adjusted quadriceps strength (-5.7 and -3.5 Nm/decade of diabetes mellitus, respectively) and power (-6.1 and -3.8 W/decade of diabetes mellitus, respectively) (all P ≤ .001, no significant interactions according to sex). Glycosylated hemoglobin was not associated with outcomes after accounting for body weight. Older U.S. adults with diabetes mellitus have lower quadriceps strength and quadriceps power that is related

  18. ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG OLDER RURAL ADULTS WITH DIABETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Sara A.; Graham, Christopher N.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Golden, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus disproportionately affects ethnic minorities and has serious economic, social, and personal implications. This study examines the effect of diabetes disease burden and social resources on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among older rural adults with diabetes. Data come from a population-based cross-sectional survey of 701 adults (age ≥65 years) with diabetes in North Carolina from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. HRQOL was assessed using the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12). Mean scores were 35.1 ± 11.4 and 50.5 ± 10.8 for the physical and mental components of the SF-12, respectively. In bivariate analyses, scores were significantly lower for Native Americans than Whites for both components. In multivariate analyses, higher physical HRQOL was associated with male sex, greater mobility ability, fewer chronic conditions, exercising vs not exercising, fewer depressive symptoms, and not receiving process assistance. Higher mental HRQOL was associated with greater mobility ability, fewer chronic conditions, and a high school education or more. Diabetes appears to have a substantial effect on physical HRQOL. Physical disability associated with diabetes may have a greater impact in the rural environment than in other areas. Aspects of rural social milieu may help to keep mental HRQOL high, even in the face of severe chronic disease. Ethnic differences in HRQOL are largely accounted for by diabetes disease burden and, to a lesser extent, social resources. Strategies to reduce diabetes-related complications (long term) and assist mobility (short term) may reduce ethnic disparities in HRQOL. (Ethn Dis. 2007;17:471–476) PMID:17985500

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth ...

  20. Association of multiple chronic conditions and pain among older black and white adults with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Baker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is often associated with the challenge of navigating daily tasks with a painful chronic medical illness. Yet, there is concern of the number of older adults impacted with more than one chronic condition. Despite the increasing number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and comorbid chronic illnesses, there remains a lack of understanding in how multiple illnesses relate to experiences of pain. To assess the association between multiple chronic conditions and pain, this study aimed to identify clusters of chronic medical conditions and their association with pain among a sample of older Black and White adults diagnosed with diabetes. Methods Two hundred and thirty-six participants responded to a series of questions assessing pain frequency and severity, as well as health and social characteristics. A factor analysis was used to categorize clusters of medical conditions, and multiple regression models were used to examine predictors of pain. Results Seven of the assessed chronic medical conditions loaded on three factors, and accounted for 57.2% of the total variance, with heart disease (factor 1 accounting for 21.9%, musculoskeletal conditions (factor 2 for another 18.4%, and factor 3 (microvascular diseases accounting for a final 16.9% of the variability among the chronic medical conditions. Covariate-adjusted models showed that fewer years of education and higher scores on the microvascular and musculoskeletal conditions factors were associated with higher pain frequency, with the musculoskeletal conditions factor being the strongest predictor. Conclusions Findings from this study compliment existent literature underscoring the prevalence and importance of comorbid diagnoses in relation to pain. Examining health-related factors beyond a single disease diagnosis also provides an opportunity to explore underlying disease co-occurrences that may persist beyond organ system classifications.

  1. Prevalence and treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension among older adults with intellectual disability in comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, Anna; Ahlström, Gerd; Höglund, Peter

    2017-11-23

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, which is the most common cause of death in the world. People with intellectual disability (ID) have been reported to have high rates of both these disorders. The aim of this study was to describe and compare prevalence ratios of diabetes mellitus and hypertension between older adults with ID and their age peers in the general population, and to describe and compare treatment patterns in these two groups. This is a Swedish register-based study, in which we established a cohort of people aged 55+ years and who had received support for those with ID in 2012 (n = 7936). We also established a same-sized referent cohort from the general population matched by sex and year of birth. Information on diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and prescription of drugs for these disorders, were collected from national registers for the period 2006-2012. The two cohorts were compared using generalized linear models (GLM). People with ID were 20% more likely than the general population to have a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, and 26% more likely to have prescription of drugs for diabetes mellitus. People in the general population were 81% more likely to have a diagnosis of hypertension, and 9% more likely to have a prescription of drugs for hypertension. Among those with diabetes, ID was associated with higher occurrence of prescription of insulin combination drugs and sulfonylureas, but lower occurrence of prescription of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) 4-inhibitors and exenatide/liraglutide. Among those with hypertension, ID was associated with higher occurrence of prescription of diuretics, but lower occurrence of prescription of calcium channel blockers and angiotensin II antagonists. Treatment regimens among people with ID tended to include older types of medication compared with what was prescribed in the general population. To ensure that this is medically appropriate and not due to

  2. Prevalence and treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension among older adults with intellectual disability in comparison with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Axmon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, which is the most common cause of death in the world. People with intellectual disability (ID have been reported to have high rates of both these disorders. The aim of this study was to describe and compare prevalence ratios of diabetes mellitus and hypertension between older adults with ID and their age peers in the general population, and to describe and compare treatment patterns in these two groups. Methods This is a Swedish register-based study, in which we established a cohort of people aged 55+ years and who had received support for those with ID in 2012 (n = 7936. We also established a same-sized referent cohort from the general population matched by sex and year of birth. Information on diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and prescription of drugs for these disorders, were collected from national registers for the period 2006–2012. The two cohorts were compared using generalized linear models (GLM. Results People with ID were 20% more likely than the general population to have a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, and 26% more likely to have prescription of drugs for diabetes mellitus. People in the general population were 81% more likely to have a diagnosis of hypertension, and 9% more likely to have a prescription of drugs for hypertension. Among those with diabetes, ID was associated with higher occurrence of prescription of insulin combination drugs and sulfonylureas, but lower occurrence of prescription of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP 4-inhibitors and exenatide/liraglutide. Among those with hypertension, ID was associated with higher occurrence of prescription of diuretics, but lower occurrence of prescription of calcium channel blockers and angiotensin II antagonists. Conclusions Treatment regimens among people with ID tended to include older types of medication compared with what was prescribed in the general

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

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    Full Text Available ... Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women ...

  5. Fecal pancreatic elastase-1 levels in older individuals without known gastrointestinal diseases or diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idziak Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural changes occur in the pancreas as a part of the natural aging process. With aging, also the incidence of maldigestive symptoms and malnutrition increases, raising the possibility that these might be caused at least in part by inadequate pancreatic enzyme secretion due to degenerative processes and damage of the gland. Fecal elastase-1 is a good marker of pancreatic exocrine secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the fecal elastase-1 levels among over 60 years old Finnish and Polish healthy individuals without any special diet, known gastrointestinal disease, surgery or diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 159 patients participated in this cross-sectional study. 106 older individuals (aged 60-92 years were recruited from outpatient clinics and elderly homes. They were divided to three age groups: 60-69 years old (n = 31; 70-79 years old (n = 38 and over 80 years old (n = 37. 53 young subjects (20-28 years old were investigated as controls. Inclusion criteria were age over 60 years, normal status and competence. Exclusion criteria were any special diet, diabetes mellitus, any known gastrointestinal disease or prior gastrointestinal surgery. Fecal elastase-1 concentration was measured from stool samples with an ELISA that uses two monoclonal antibodies against different epitopes of human elastase-1. Results Fecal elastase-1 concentrations correlated negatively with age (Pearson r = -0,3531, P P Conclusion In our study one fifth of healthy older individuals without any gastrointestinal disorder, surgery or diabetes mellitus suffer from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and might benefit from enzyme supplementation therapy.

  6. Diversity in Older Adults’ Use of the Internet: Identifying Subgroups Through Latent Class Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boekel, Leonieke C; Peek, Sebastiaan TM; Luijkx, Katrien G

    2017-01-01

    Background As for all individuals, the Internet is important in the everyday life of older adults. Research on older adults’ use of the Internet has merely focused on users versus nonusers and consequences of Internet use and nonuse. Older adults are a heterogeneous group, which may implicate that their use of the Internet is diverse as well. Older adults can use the Internet for different activities, and this usage can be of influence on benefits the Internet can have for them. Objective The aim of this paper was to describe the diversity or heterogeneity in the activities for which older adults use the Internet and determine whether diversity is related to social or health-related variables. Methods We used data of a national representative Internet panel in the Netherlands. Panel members aged 65 years and older and who have access to and use the Internet were selected (N=1418). We conducted a latent class analysis based on the Internet activities that panel members reported to spend time on. Second, we described the identified clusters with descriptive statistics and compared the clusters using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests. Results Four clusters were distinguished. Cluster 1 was labeled as the “practical users” (36.88%, n=523). These respondents mainly used the Internet for practical and financial purposes such as searching for information, comparing products, and banking. Respondents in Cluster 2, the “minimizers” (32.23%, n=457), reported lowest frequency on most Internet activities, are older (mean age 73 years), and spent the smallest time on the Internet. Cluster 3 was labeled as the “maximizers” (17.77%, n=252); these respondents used the Internet for various activities, spent most time on the Internet, and were relatively younger (mean age below 70 years). Respondents in Cluster 4, the “social users,” mainly used the Internet for social and leisure-related activities such as gaming and social network sites. The

  7. Bone Turnover Does Not Reflect Skeletal Aging in Older Hispanic Men with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianon, N.; McCormick, J.; Ambrose, C.; Smith, S. M.; Fisher-Hoch, S.

    2016-01-01

    The paradox of fragility fracture in the presence of non-osteoporotic bone mineral density in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) makes it difficult to clinically predict fracture in this vulnerable group. Serum osteocalcin (OC), a marker of bone turnover, increases with normal skeletal aging indicating risk of fracture. However, OC has been reported to be lower in patients with DM2. An inverse association between higher glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) and lower serum OC in older DM2 patients triggered discussions encouraging further investigation. A key question to be answered is whether changes in glucose metabolism is responsible for bone metabolic changes, ultimately leading to increased risk of fragility fractures in DM2 patients. While these studies were conducted among Caucasian and Asian populations, this has not been studied in Hispanic populations who suffer from a higher prevalence of DM2. The Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) in Texas is a homogeneous Hispanic cohort known to have high prevalence of DM2 (30%). Our preliminary data from this cohort reported OC levels lower than the suggested threshold for fragility fracture in post-menopausal women. We further investigated whether bone turnover in older CCHC adults with DM2 show a normal pattern of skeletal aging. Samples and data were obtained from a nested cohort of 68 (21 men and 47 women) Hispanic older adults (=50 years) who had a diagnosis of DM2. Given high prevalence of uncontrolled DM2 in this cohort, we divided population into two groups: i) poor DM2 control with HbA1c level =8 (48% men and 38% women) and ii) good DM2 control with HbA1c level <8). A crosssectional analysis documented associations between serum OC and age adjusted HbA1c levels. There was no direct association between age and OC concentrations in our study. Higher HbA1c was associated with lower serum OC in men (odds ratio -6.5, 95% confidence interval -12.7 to - 0.3, p < 0.04). No significant associations

  8. A prediction model to identify hospitalised, older adults with reduced physical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Inge H; Maribo, Thomas; Nørgaard, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    of discharge, health systems could offer these patients additional therapy to maintain or improve health and prevent institutionalisation or readmission. The principle aim of this study was to identify predictors for persisting, reduced physical performance in older adults following acute hospitalisation......BACKGROUND: Identifying older adults with reduced physical performance at the time of hospital admission can significantly affect patient management and trajectory. For example, such patients could receive targeted hospital interventions such as routine mobilisation. Furthermore, at the time...... admission, falls, physical activity level, self-rated health, use of a walking aid before admission, number of prescribed medications, 30s-CST, and the De Morton Mobility Index. RESULTS: A total of 78 (67%) patients improved in physical performance in the interval between admission and follow-up assessment...

  9. Relationship between chronic kidney disease with diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungchul; Lee, Sangyoon; Harada, Kazuhiro; Bae, Seongryu; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between kidney function with concomitant diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. The participants were 9606 residents (community-dwelling Japanese older adults) who completed baseline assessments. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) was determined according to the serum creatinine level, and participants were classified into four mutually exclusive categories: ≥60.0 (normal range), 45.0-59.9, 30.0-44.9 and who met three, four or five criteria satisfied the definition of having frailty. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between estimated glomerular filtration rate and frailty. After multivariate adjustment, participants with lower kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate hypertension (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.45-5.12) showed a significantly increased risk of frailty in the lower kidney function group, regardless of multivariate controls. Furthermore, the analyses showed an even greater increase in the risk of frailty in patients with a history of both diabetes and hypertension (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.13-14.1) CONCLUSIONS: A lower level of kidney function was associated with a higher risk of frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1527-1533. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Reverse Message-Framing Effects on Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity Among Older Outpatients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kin-Kit; Ng, Lorna; Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Fung, Helene H

    2017-06-01

    It has been suggested that gain-framed messages are more effective than loss-framed messages in promoting low-risk health behaviors such as physical activity. Because of a heightened health concern and possible medical complications, older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may consider physical activity to be risky. This study examined whether a reverse message-framing effect would be found among older adults with T2D. The participants included 211 sedentary and older adults with T2D recruited from an outpatient clinic. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either gain-framed or loss-framed messages and wore an accelerometer to monitor their physical activity for 2 weeks. The participants who received loss-framed messages were more physically active than those who received gain-framed messages (β = 0.13, p = .033). This loss-frame advantage might be attributable to the heightened perceived risks among older outpatients with T2D and the temporarily activated prevention-focused orientation in a clinical setting.

  11. Associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mehravar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Diabetes self-management can reduce complications and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 562 Iranian patients older than 30 years of age with type 2 diabetes who received treatment at the Diabetes Research Center of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were identified. The participants were enrolled and completed questionnaires between January and April 2014. Patients’ diabetes self-management was assessed as an independent variable by using the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire translated into Persian. The outcomes were the microvascular complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, identified from the clinical records of each patient. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs between diabetes self-management and the microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant association was found between the diabetes self-management sum scale and neuropathy (adjusted OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92, p=0.01. Additionally, weak evidence was found of an association between the sum scale score of diabetes self-management and nephropathy (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.05, p=0.09. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a lower diabetes self-management score was associated with higher rates of nephropathy and neuropathy.

  12. Cognitive impairment and dependence of patients with diabetes older than 65 years old in an urban area (DERIVA study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Mora-Simón, Sara; Patino-Alonso, María C; Pérez-Arechaederra, Diana; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Valero-Juan, Luis F; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed the associations between diabetes and cognitive impairment (CI) and dependence in a population of patients 65 years or older. Cross-sectional study. We randomly selected 311 participants over the age of 65 living in an urban area of Spain. The mean age of the cohort was 75.89 ± 7.12 years, and 69 of the individuals (22.2%) had diabetes. Two questionnaires were used to assess cognitive performance (MMSE and Seven Minute Screen Test), and two assessments were used to evaluate patient dependence (Barthel Index and Lawton-Brody Index). Clinical information and sociodemographic data were also gathered. Nearly one quarter of patients with diabetes (21.7%) lived alone. Diabetic patients were more sedentary (p = .033) than non-diabetic patients. Roughly one sixth (15.3%) of the diabetics and 10.1% of the non-diabetics were depressed (p = .332). CI was present in 26.1% of the diabetics and 14.5% of non-diabetics (p = .029). Diabetic patients had a MMSE score that was significantly worse than non-diabetics (24.88 ± 4.74 vs 26.05 ± 4.03; p cognitive assessment as necessary components in a standard evaluation in both clinical guides and randomized trials of therapeutic interventions in patients with diabetes.

  13. Diversity in Older Adults' Use of the Internet: Identifying Subgroups Through Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boekel, Leonieke C; Peek, Sebastiaan Tm; Luijkx, Katrien G

    2017-05-24

    As for all individuals, the Internet is important in the everyday life of older adults. Research on older adults' use of the Internet has merely focused on users versus nonusers and consequences of Internet use and nonuse. Older adults are a heterogeneous group, which may implicate that their use of the Internet is diverse as well. Older adults can use the Internet for different activities, and this usage can be of influence on benefits the Internet can have for them. The aim of this paper was to describe the diversity or heterogeneity in the activities for which older adults use the Internet and determine whether diversity is related to social or health-related variables. We used data of a national representative Internet panel in the Netherlands. Panel members aged 65 years and older and who have access to and use the Internet were selected (N=1418). We conducted a latent class analysis based on the Internet activities that panel members reported to spend time on. Second, we described the identified clusters with descriptive statistics and compared the clusters using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests. Four clusters were distinguished. Cluster 1 was labeled as the "practical users" (36.88%, n=523). These respondents mainly used the Internet for practical and financial purposes such as searching for information, comparing products, and banking. Respondents in Cluster 2, the "minimizers" (32.23%, n=457), reported lowest frequency on most Internet activities, are older (mean age 73 years), and spent the smallest time on the Internet. Cluster 3 was labeled as the "maximizers" (17.77%, n=252); these respondents used the Internet for various activities, spent most time on the Internet, and were relatively younger (mean age below 70 years). Respondents in Cluster 4, the "social users," mainly used the Internet for social and leisure-related activities such as gaming and social network sites. The identified clusters significantly differed in age (PInternet

  14. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a ...

  15. Innovative biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus: relevance to dietary management of frailty in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikwuobe, John; Bellary, Srikanth; Griffiths, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases in prevalence in the elderly. There is evidence for significant muscle loss and accelerated cognitive impairment in older adults with T2DM; these comorbidities are critical features of frailty. In the early stages of T2DM, insulin sensitivity can be improved by a "healthy" diet. Management of insulin resistance by diet in people over 65 years of age should be carefully re-evaluated because of the risk for falling due to hypoglycaemia. To date, an optimal dietary programme for older adults with insulin resistance and T2DM has not been described. The use of biomarkers to identify those at risk for T2DM will enable clinicians to offer early dietary advice that will delay onset of disease and of frailty. Here we have used an in silico literature search for putative novel biomarkers of T2DM risk and frailty. We suggest that plasma bilirubin, plasma, urinary DPP4-positive microparticles and plasma pigment epithelium-derived factor merit further investigation as predictive biomarkers for T2DM and frailty risk in older adults. Bilirubin is screened routinely in clinical practice. Measurement of specific microparticle frequency in urine is less invasive than a blood sample so is a good choice for biomonitoring. Future studies should investigate whether early dietary changes, such as increased intake of whey protein and micronutrients that improve muscle function and insulin sensitivity, affect biomarkers and can reduce the longer term complication of frailty in people at risk for T2DM.

  16. Long sleep duration and afternoon napping are associated with higher risk of incident diabetes in middle-aged and older Chinese: the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Bing; Wang, Jing; Pan, An; Li, Yaru; Hu, Hua; Li, Xiulou; Yang, Kun; Yuan, Jing; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping; Wei, Sheng; Wang, Youjie; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Guo, Huan; Yang, Handong; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; He, Meian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the independent and combined effects of sleep duration and afternoon napping on the risk of incident diabetes among a cohort of middle-aged and older Chinese adults. Information of sleep and napping was obtained by questionnaires during face-to-face interviews. We categorized sleep duration into napping was divided into no napping (0 min) (reference), 1-30 min, 31-60 min, 61-90 min, and > 90 min. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used. Compared with referential sleeping group, subjects sleeping ≥10 h had a 42% higher risk of developing diabetes. The HR was 1.28 for napping > 90 min when compared with no napping. These associations were more pronounced in individuals without hypertension. Combined effects of long sleep duration and afternoon napping were further identified. Individuals with both sleep duration ≥ 10 h and napping > 60 min had a 72% higher risk of incident diabetes than those with sleeping 7∼napping 0 min (all above p napping were independently and jointly associated with higher risk of incident diabetes. Key messages Sleep duration was associated with diabetes, but whether it is a real cause of incident diabetes especially in Chinese still remains to be elucidated. The association of afternoon napping and diabetes was not consistent and definite, we clarified this association in a large prospective study. Long sleep duration and afternoon napping were independently and jointly associated with higher risk of incident diabetes.

  17. Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Andersen, Jens Rikardt; Ritz, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic...... intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults....

  18. Management of Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Medha N; Florez, Hermes; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Mupanomunda, Maria; Pandya, Naushira; Swift, Carrie S; Taveira, Tracey H; Haas, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly

  19. Effects of Functional Disability and Depressive Symptoms on Mortality in Older Mexican-American Adults with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutambudzi, Miriam; Chen, Nai-Wei; Markides, Kyriakos S; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effect of co-occurring depressive symptoms and functional disability on mortality in older Mexican-American adults with diabetes mellitus. Longitudinal cohort study. Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (HEPESE) survey conducted in the southwestern United States (Texas, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, California). Community-dwelling Mexican Americans with self-reported diabetes mellitus participating in the HEPESE survey (N = 624). Functional disability was assessed using a modified version of the Katz activity of daily living scale. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Mortality was determined by examining death certificates and reports from relatives. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the hazard of mortality as a function of co-occurring depressive symptoms and functional disability. Over a 9.2-year follow-up, 391 participants died. Co-occurring high depressive symptoms and functional disability increased the risk of mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.11-4.34). Risk was greater in men (HR = 8.11, 95% CI = 4.34-16.31) than women (HR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.42-3.43). Co-occurring depressive symptoms and functional disability in older Mexican-American adults with diabetes mellitus increases mortality risk, especially in men. These findings have important implications for research, practice, and public health interventions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. A review of the relationship between leg power and selected chronic disease in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strollo, S. E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Ward, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    characterized. Importantly, individuals with these conditions have shown improved leg power with training. METHODS: A search was performed using PubMed to identify original studies published in English from January 1998 to August 2013. Leg power studies, among older adults ≥ 50 years of age, which assessed......OBJECTIVE: This review investigates the relationship between leg muscle power and the chronic conditions of osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease among older adults. Current literature assessing the impact of chronic disease on leg power has not yet been comprehensively......), diabetes mellitus (n=5), and cardiovascular disease (n=6). Studies generally supported associations of lower leg power among older adults with chronic disease, although small sample sizes, cross-sectional data, homogenous populations, varied disease definitions, and inconsistent leg power methods limited...

  1. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Japanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamashita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for hip fracture in Japanese older populations are understudied compared with Western countries arguably due to the relatively lower prevalence rates in Japan. Nationally representative data from the Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging were analyzed using logistic regression to examine possible risk factors of hip fractures, separately for older women (n = 2,859 and older men (n = 2,108. Results showed that older Japanese women with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 1.9, with diabetes (OR = 1.7 times, and/or with more activity of daily living limitations (OR = 1.1 had higher risks of hip fracture. Older Japanese men with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 2.6, who use more external prescription drugs (OR = 1.9, and with cancer (OR = 2.0 times had higher risks of hip fracture. Further considerations of gender- and culture-specific factors along with the identified risk factors may provide insights into future intervention programs for hip fracture in Japanese older populations.

  2. Home urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Rachel E J; Shields, Beverley M; Hammersley, Suzanne E; Colclough, Kevin; McDonald, Timothy J; Gray, Zoe; Heywood, James J N; Barrett, Timothy G; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2013-05-01

    Making the correct diabetes diagnosis in children is crucial for lifelong management. Type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are seen in the pediatric setting, and can be difficult to discriminate from type 1 diabetes. Postprandial urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) is a non-invasive measure of endogenous insulin secretion that has not been tested as a diagnostic tool in children or in patients with diabetes duration MODY and type 2 in pediatric diabetes. Two-hour postprandial UCPCR was measured in 264 patients aged MODY, n = 63). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to identify the optimal UCPCR cutoff for discriminating diabetes subtypes. UCPCR was lower in type 1 diabetes [0.05 (MODY [3.51 (2.37-5.32) nmol/mmol, p MODY (p = 0.25), so patients were combined for subsequent analyses. After 2-yr duration, UCPCR ≥ 0.7 nmol/mmol has 100% sensitivity [95% confidence interval (CI): 92-100] and 97% specificity (95% CI: 91-99) for identifying non-type 1 (MODY + type 2 diabetes) from type 1 diabetes [area under the curve (AUC) 0.997]. UCPCR was poor at discriminating MODY from type 2 diabetes (AUC 0.57). UCPCR testing can be used in diabetes duration greater than 2 yr to identify pediatric patients with non-type 1 diabetes. UCPCR testing is a practical non-invasive method for use in the pediatric outpatient setting. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carmody, David

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1\\/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  4. Physical performance and muscle strength in older patients with and without diabetes from a public hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Chávez, Milenka; Dejo-Seminario, Christine; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2016-05-01

    To assess the relationship between physical performance (PP) and muscle strength (MS) in elderly subjects with and without diabetes in a public hospital of Lima, Peru. A cross-sectional analysis of subjects aged 60 years or older with and without diabetes. MS was measured with a handheld dynamometer, and PP with the «timed get-up-and-go» test. Nutritional status was determined using body mass index, body fat percentage measured with a handheld fat loss monitor and protein intake based on the 24-hour recall. Age, sex, and history of hospitalization and supplementation were also recorded. The association was assessed using adjusted prevalence ratios. Overall, 139 patients with diabetes (26.6% with low PP and 13.7% with decreased MS) and 382 subjects without diabetes (36.6% with low PP and 23.0% with decreased MS) were evaluated. No association was found between T2DM and MS (aPR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.67-1.57) or PP (aPR: 1.13; 95% CI: 0.84-1.52). Protein and supplement consumption was also unrelated (P>.05); however, history of hospitalization, age, sex, nutritional status, and body fat percentage were related (P>.05). No association was found between T2DM, MS, and PP. However, low PP was associated to female sex and overweight/obesity, and decreased MS was associated to high body fat percentage and underweight. Moreover, MS and PP were related to older age and history of hospitalization. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes-Associated Factors as Predictors of Nursing Home Admission and Costs in the Elderly Across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; Angelini, Viola; Feenstra, Talitha; Alessie, Rob J. M.

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main factors associated with the use of nursing home facilities and to calculate their costs among older people with diabetes in Europe. METHODS: The sample included 48,464 individuals aged 50 years and older in 12 European countries participating in the Survey of Health,

  6. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Mei-Hui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2018-01-01

    Hsiu-Yu Ho,1,2 Mei-Hui Chen,2,3 Meei-Fang Lou1 1School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 2Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology, 3National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adult...

  7. Diabetes among non-obese Filipino Americans: Findings from a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Roy, Adity; Chan, Keith Tsz-Kit; Kobayashi, Karen M

    2017-04-20

    Filipino Americans form the second-largest Asian American and Pacific Islanders subgroup. Growing evidence suggests that Filipino Americans have higher rates of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. The key objectives of this study are 1) to determine the prevalence of diabetes in non-obese Filipino Americans compared to non-obese non-Hispanic whites, and 2) to identify risk factors for diabetes in non-obese Filipino men and women. Secondary analysis of population-based data from combined waves (2007, 2009 and 2011) of the adult California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). The study sample was restricted to non-obese Filipino Americans (n = 1629) and non-Hispanic whites (n = 72 072). Non-obese Filipino Americans had more than twice the odds of diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites, even after correcting for several known risk factors (OR = 2.80, p < 0.001). For non-obese Filipino men, older age, poverty, cigarette smoking, and being overweight are associated with increased odds for diabetes, while older age was the only factor associated with diabetes among Filipina women. Diabetes prevention approaches need to be targeted towards non-obese Filipino Americans, due to their high risk of diabetes.

  8. A GIS Approach to Identifying Socially and Medically Vulnerable Older Adult Populations in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Elizabeth; Stoler, Justin; Emrich, Christopher T; Tewary, Sweta; Pandya, Naushira

    2017-11-10

    We define, map, and analyze geodemographic patterns of socially and medically vulnerable older adults within the tri-county region of South Florida. We apply principal components analysis (PCA) to a set of previously identified indicators of social and medical vulnerability at the census tract level. We create and map age-stratified vulnerability scores using a geographic information system (GIS), and use spatial analysis techniques to identify patterns and interactions between social and medical vulnerability. Key factors contributing to social vulnerability in areas with higher numbers of older adults include age, large household size, and Hispanic ethnicity. Medical vulnerability in these same areas is driven by disease burden, access to emergency cardiac services, availability of nursing home and hospice beds, access to home health care, and available mental health services. Age-dependent areas of social vulnerability emerge in Broward County, whereas age-dependent areas of medical vulnerability emerge in Palm Beach County. Older-adult social and medical vulnerability interact differently throughout the study area. Spatial analysis of older adult social and medical vulnerability using PCA and GIS can help identify age-dependent pockets of vulnerability that are not easily identifiable in a populationwide analysis; improve our understanding of the dynamic spatial organization of health care, health care needs, access to care, and outcomes; and ultimately serve as a tool for health care planning. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The relationship between C-type natriuretic peptide and cognitive impairment in older patients with Type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinling; Zhu Xiangyang; Huang Huaiyu; Jin Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between C-type natriuretic peptide and cognitive impairment in older patients with type 2 diabetes, and to explore the pathogenesis of diabetic cognitive impairment. Methods: According to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores, 80 type 2 diabetic patients over the age of 60 years were divided into two groups, one group including 31 cases with cognitive impairment, the other 49 patients with non-cognitive impairment. And 80 normal participants were selected as the control group. Plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide was measured by radio-immunity assay in all subjects. The changes and associations of the plasma C-type natriuretic peptide level among three groups was analyzed. Result: In the non-cognitive impairment group, plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide was higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). But the plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide in the cognitive impairment group was degraded, significantly deferent with those in the control group and the non-cognitive impairment group (P<0.01). MoCA scores of the cognitive impairment group positively correlated with plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide (r=0.513, P<0.01). Conclusion: In the early period of type 2 diabetes,the secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide was increased. When diabetic cognitive impairment complicated,the secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide was decompensated. Then plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide become low. The level of C-type natriuretic peptide closely correlated with diabetic cognitive impairment. It was suggested that diabetic angiopathies may act an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic cognitive impairment. (authors)

  10. Older adults and mobile phones for health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Jonathan; Demiris, George

    2013-10-01

    To report on the results of a review concerning the use of mobile phones for health with older adults. PubMed and CINAHL were searched for articles using "older adults" and "mobile phones" along with related terms and synonyms between 1965 and June 2012. Identified articles were filtered by the following inclusion criteria: original research project utilizing a mobile phone as an intervention, involve/target adults 60 years of age or older, and have an aim emphasizing the mobile phone's use in health. Twenty-one different articles were found and categorized into ten different clinical domains, including diabetes, activities of daily life, and dementia care, among others. The largest group of articles focused on diabetes care (4 articles), followed by COPD (3 articles), Alzheimer's/dementia Care (3 articles) and osteoarthritis (3 articles). Areas of interest studied included feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness. While there were many different clinical domains, the majority of studies were pilot studies that needed more work to establish a stronger base of evidence. Current work in using mobile phones for older adult use are spread across a variety of clinical domains. While this work is promising, current studies are generally smaller feasibility studies, and thus future work is needed to establish more generalizable, stronger base of evidence for effectiveness of these interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of re-coaching on self-injection of insulin in older diabetic patients - Impact of cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Keiko; Kawamura, Takahiko; Urata, Misako; Matsuura, Mayumi; Kusama, Minoru; Imamine, Rui; Watarai, Atsuko; Nakashima, Eitaro; Umemura, Toshitaka; Hotta, Nigishi

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effect of re-coaching on self-injection of insulin and impact of cognitive function in 100 older diabetic patients. We examined patients on a variety of skills and knowledge regarding self-injection of insulin and evaluated the effect of re-coaching the patients after 3months and 4years. We also investigated the influence of cognitive impairment (CI) on coaching. Skills scores for self-injection of insulin and HbA1c improved significantly 3months after re-coaching. In 51 patients followed-up for 4years, skills scores were maintained during the 4years, while knowledge scores improved after 3months but then returned to the baseline level. In the group of patients with CI as determined by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, skills scores were similar to those in the group without CI, while knowledge scores were significantly lower as compared with those in the group without CI at any time point. Skills scores were maintained during the 4years regardless of CI. The present study showed that re-coaching in skills for self-injection of insulin was effective in improving and maintaining insulin treatment in older diabetic patients, even if patients had CI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics ... Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination ...

  13. Awareness of Pre-diabetes or Diabetes and Associated Factors in People With Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L.; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A.; Watts, Gerald F.; Castle, David J.; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To estimate awareness of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes and associated factors in people with psychosis, a known high-risk group. Methods: Cross sectional analysis of a national sample with psychosis who were aged 18–64 years, gave a fasting blood sample (n = 1155), had pre-diabetes or diabetes based on testing (n = 359) and reported if they knew they had high blood sugar or diabetes at survey (n = 356). Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with awareness of pre-diabetes or diabetes prior to testing. Results: The prevalence of pre-diabetes (19.0% 219/1153) or type 2 diabetes (12.1%, 140/1153) was 31.1% (359/1153); 45% (160/356) were known prior to testing. Factors associated with detection were higher fasting blood glucose, older age, a perception of poor health, severe obesity, dyslipidaemia or treatment with a lipid regulating drug, a family history of diabetes, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, decreased cognitive functioning, regional economic disadvantage, treatment with an antihypertensive drug, and an elevated 5-year risk for cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of undiagnosed pre-diabetes/diabetes was highest in those aged 25–34 years at 34.2%. Conclusions: Clinical detection of pre-diabetes or diabetes in people with psychosis was strongly dependent on established risk factors for type 2 diabetes in the population but not on current antipsychotic drug treatment or psychiatric case management which should ensure regular screening. Screening must become a clinical priority and should not wait until age 40. PMID:27150636

  14. Determinants of uncontrolled hypertension in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus: an analysis of the Malaysian diabetes registry 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Boon How

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP is a significant contributor of morbidity and even mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2D patients. This study was done to determine the significant determinants of uncontrolled blood pressure in T2D patients in Malaysia. Methods Between 1st January 2009 to 31st December 2009, data from 70 889 patients with Type 2 diabetes was obtained from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management Registry for analysis; 303 centers participated in the study. Their demographic characteristics, the nature of their diabetes, their state of hypertension, treatment modalities, risk factors, and complications are described. Based on their most recent BP values, subjects were divided into controlled BP and uncontrolled BP and their clinical determinants compared. Independent determinants were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Results The mean age of patients at diagnosis of diabetes was 52.3 ± 11.1 years old. Most were women (59.0 % and of Malay ethnicity (61.9 %. The mean duration of diabetes was 5.9 ± 5.6 years. A total of 57.4 % were hypertensive. Of the 56 503 blood pressure (BP measured, 13 280 (23.5 % patients had BP two anti-hypertensive agents. Health clinics without doctor, older age (≥ 50 years old, shorter duration of diabetes ( Conclusions Major independent determinants of uncontrolled BP in our group of T2D patients were Malay ethnicity, older age, recent diagnosis of diabetes, overweight and follow-up at health clinics without a doctor and possibly the improper use of anti hypertensive agent. More effort, education and resources, especially in the primary health care centres are needed to improve hypertensive care among our patients with diabetes.

  15. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and

  16. Intervening before the onset of Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To set up a clinical trial to establish whether nicotinamide can prevent or delay clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes. METHOD: The European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial undertaken in 18 European...... countries, Canada and the USA. Entry criteria were a first-degree family history of Type 1 diabetes, age 3-40 years, confirmed islet cell antibody (ICA) levels greater than or equal to 20 JDF units, and a non-diabetic OGTT; the study group was further characterised by intravenous glucose tolerance testing......) centile in 34%. Additional islet autoantibodies were identified in 354 trial entrants. Diabetes-associated HLA class II haplotypes were found in 84% of the younger age group and 80% of the older group. The protective haplotype HLA-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 was found in 10% overall. CONCLUSIONS...

  17. Effectiveness of Personalized Feedback Alone or Combined with Peer Support to Improve Physical Activity in Sedentary Older Malays with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Browning, Colette Joy; Yasin, Shajahan

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is an important aspect of self-management among older people with type 2 diabetes but many remain inactive. Interventions to improve physical activity levels have been studied but few studies have evaluated the effects of personalized feedback (PF) or peer support (PS); and there was no study on older people of Asian heritage. Hence, this trial evaluated whether PF only or combined with PS improves physical activity among older Malays with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) compared to usual care only. A three-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted in a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. Sixty-nine sedentary Malays aged 60 years and older with T2DM who received usual diabetes care were randomized to PF or PS interventions or as controls for 12 weeks with follow-ups at weeks 24 and 36. Intervention groups performed unsupervised walking activity and received written feedback on physical activity. The PS group also received group and telephone contacts from trained peer mentors. The primary outcome was pedometer steps. Secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, quality of life, and psychosocial wellbeing. Fifty-two (75.4%) completed the 36-week study. The PS group showed greater daily pedometer readings than the PF and controls (p = 0.001). The PS group also had greater improvement in weekly duration (p fitness, and support from friends. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71447000.

  18. Setting Priorities for Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research and Identifying Evidence Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jimmy T; Hutfless, Susan; Li, Tianjing; Bressler, Neil M; Heyward, James; Bittner, Ava K; Glassman, Adam; Dickersin, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Prioritizing comparative effectiveness research may contribute to obtaining answers that clinicians perceive they need and may minimize research that could be considered wasteful. Our objective was to identify evidence gaps and set priorities for new systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials for managing diabetic retinopathy (DR), including diabetic macular edema (DME). Cross-sectional study. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) investigators. We provided recommendations from the American Academy of Ophthalmology's 2012 Preferred Practice Patterns for Diabetic Retinopathy as 91 answerable clinical research questions about intervention effectiveness to 410 DRCR.net investigators to rate each question's importance from 0 (not important) to 10 (very important) using a 2-round Delphi survey and to suggest additional questions. We considered questions as high priority if at least 75% of respondents to both rounds assigned an importance rating of 5 or more in round 2. We also extracted outcome measures relevant to DR and asked respondents to identify those that must be measured in all studies. We mapped Cochrane reviews published up to March 2016 to high-priority clinical research questions. Ranking of importance of each clinical question. Thirty-two individuals completed rounds 1 and 2 and suggested 15 questions. Among the final list of 106 clinical research questions, 22 questions met our definition of high priority: 9 of 22 concerned the effectiveness of anti-VEGF therapy, and 13 of 22 focused on how often patients should be followed up (re-examination) and treatment effectiveness in patients with specific characteristics (e.g., DME). Outcomes that 75% or more of respondents marked as "must be measured in all studies" included visual acuity and visual loss, death of participants, and intraocular pressure. Only 1 prioritized question was associated with conclusive evidence from a Cochrane systematic review. A limited response rate among

  19. Prevalence and biochemical risk factors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without neuropathic pain in Taiwanese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yen-Wei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lee, I-Te; Chang, Ming-Hong

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without neuropathic pain in Taiwanese. A cross-sectional, hospital-based observational study was conducted. We enrolled 2837 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy with or without pain were diagnosed using 2 validated screening tools, namely the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire. In our sample, 2233 participants had no neuropathy, 476 had diabetic peripheral neuropathy without pain, and 128 had diabetic peripheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain, representing an overall diabetic peripheral neuropathy prevalence of 21.3%, and the prevalence of neuropathic pain in diabetic peripheral neuropathy was 21.2%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age (Pperipheral neuropathy, whereas older age (Pperipheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain. During clinical visits involving biochemical studies, the risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy with neuropathic pain should be considered for people with older age, elevated glycated haemoglobin, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and overt proteinuria, with particular attention given to increased levels of albuminuria while concerning neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Diabetes, Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Metabolic Syndrome) in Older People with Intellectual Disability: Results of the HA-ID Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In older people with intellectual disability (ID), CVD is a substantial morbidity risk. The aims of the present study, which was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, were (1) to…

  1. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4% chance of type 1 diabetes (mother with diabetes who was younger that 25 when the child was born) and 1% chance of type 1 diabetes (mother with diabetes who was older than 25 when the child was born). *Risk doubles if the parent was ...

  2. Identifying Barriers and Enablers in the Dietary Management of Type 2 Diabetes in M'Bour, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Evan; BeLue, Rhonda

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify cultural enablers and barriers to dietary management of type 2 diabetes in M'Bour, Senegal. This qualitative study used the PEN-3 cultural model to explore diabetes dietary management within a cultural framework. Content analysis identified emergent themes based on the PEN-3 model. Forty-one individuals completed interviews. Themes reflecting ways that culture affects adherence to the diabetic diet included (a) having a different diet or eating separately from the communal family plate creates feelings of social isolation; (b) forgoing the diabetic diet sometimes occurs so that family members have enough food; (c) reducing servings of traditional foods feels like abandoning culture; and (d) women being responsible for preparing food, while men typically manage money for purchasing food yet do not provide input on what food is purchased. Results suggest that educating family units on the dietary management of diabetes may be more effective than individual education.

  3. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Adsani, Afaf M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes. Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes (n=165) attending the Diabetic Clinic at Al-sabah Hospital, Kuwait between October 2000 and March 2005 were screened for diabetic retinopathy. Any diabetic retinopathy was found in 40% while 20.6% had sight threatening retinopathy. Mild NPDR was present in 21.2%, moderate to severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) in 7.9%, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 3.0%. Maculopathy was present in 10.3% and 7.9 % pf patients were photocoagulated. Compared to those without retinopathy, diabetic patients with any retinopathy were significantly older (51.7+-10.3 versus 47.2+-9.5 years; p<0.005), had longer duration of diabetes (13.1+-6.3 versus 4.7 +-5.4 years; p<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (142.9+-23.0 versus 130.3+-20.2; p<0.0001) and poor glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c=10.1+-2.4 versus 8.9+-2.3; p<0.005). The prevalence of hypertension and nephropathy was significantly higher in patients with any retinopathy than those without retinopathy (70.8% versus 49.5%; p<0.01 and 64.4% versus 30.8%; p<0.0001) respectively. Longer duration of diabetes and presence of nephropathy was the most significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy. Treatment with sulphonylurea or insulin, and poor glycemic control were other significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy. Longer duration of diabetes, presence of nephropathy, glycemic control and mode of treatment were the most significant independent factors of diabetic retinopathy. However, population-based study is warranted to identify the risk factors, as well as the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  4. Development of a new risk score for incident type 2 diabetes using updated diagnostic criteria in middle-aged and older chinese.

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    Xingwang Ye

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM reaches an epidemic proportion among adults in China. However, no simple score has been created for the prediction of T2DM incidence diagnosed by updated criteria with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ≥ 6.5% included in Chinese. In a 6-year follow-up cohort in Beijing and Shanghai, China, we recruited a total of 2529 adults aged 50-70 years in 2005 and followed them up in 2011. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG, HbA1c, and C-reactive protein (CRP were measured and incident diabetes was identified by the recently updated criteria. Of the 1912 participants without T2DM at baseline, 924 were identified as having T2DM at follow-up, and most of them (72.4% were diagnosed using the HbA1c criterion. Baseline body mass index, FPG, HbA1c, CRP, hypertension, and female gender were all significantly associated with incident T2DM. Based upon these risk factors, a simple score was developed with an estimated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.714 (95% confidence interval: 0.691, 0.737, which performed better than most of existing risk score models developed for eastern Asian populations. This simple, newly constructed score of six parameters may be useful in predicting T2DM in middle-aged and older Chinese.

  5. Implementing Low-Cost, Community-Based Exercise Programs for Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Are the Benefits for Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Mendes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a long-term, community-based, combined exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Participants (n = 124; 63.25 ± 7.20 years old engaged in either a 9-month supervised exercise program (n = 39; consisting of combined aerobic, resistance, agility/balance, and flexibility exercise; three sessions per week; 70 min per session or a control group (n = 85 who maintained their usual care. Glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease were assessed before and after the 9-month intervention. Results: A significant time * group interaction effect (p < 0.001 was identified in the values of the glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease. Conclusions: A long-term, community-based, combined exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies was effective in inducing significant benefits on glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical Trial Identification Number: ISRCTN09240628.

  6. Classification trees for identifying non-use of community-based long-term care services among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkunas, Michael James; Eom, Kirsten Yuna; Chan, Angelique Wei-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Home- and center-based long-term care (LTC) services allow older adults to remain in the community while simultaneously helping caregivers cope with the stresses associated with providing care. Despite these benefits, the uptake of community-based LTC services among older adults remains low. We analyzed data from a longitudinal study in Singapore to identify the characteristics of individuals with referrals to home-based LTC services or day rehabilitation services at the time of hospital discharge. Classification and regression tree analysis was employed to identify combinations of clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of patients and their caregivers for individuals who did not take up their referred services. Patients' level of limitation in activities of daily living (ADL) and caregivers' ethnicity and educational level were the most distinguishing characteristics for identifying older adults who failed to take up their referred home-based services. For day rehabilitation services, patients' level of ADL limitation, home size, age, and possession of a national medical savings account, as well as caregivers' education level, and gender were significant factors influencing service uptake. Identifying subgroups of patients with high rates of non-use can help clinicians target individuals who are need of community-based LTC services but unlikely to engage in formal treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Older adults are mobile too!Identifying the barriers and facilitators to older adults' use of mHealth for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Samantha J; Jessel, Sonal; Richardson, Joshua E; Reid, M Cary

    2013-05-06

    Mobile health (mHealth) is a rapidly emerging field with the potential to assist older adults in the management of chronic pain (CP) through enhanced communication with providers, monitoring treatment-related side effects and pain levels, and increased access to pain care resources. Little is currently known, however, about older adults' attitudes and perceptions of mHealth or perceived barriers and facilitators to using mHealth tools to improve pain management. We conducted six focus groups comprised of 41 diverse older adults (≥60 years of age) with CP. Participants were recruited from one primary care practice and two multiservice senior community day-visit centers located in New York City that serve older adults in their surrounding neighborhoods. Focus group discussions were recorded and transcribed, and transcriptions were analyzed using direct content analysis to identify and quantify themes. Focus group discussions generated 38 individual themes pertaining to the use of mHealth to help manage pain and pain medications. Participants had low prior use of mHealth (5% of participants), but the vast majority (85%) were highly willing to try the devices. Participants reported that mHealth devices might help them reach their healthcare provider more expeditiously (27%), as well as help to monitor for falls and other adverse events in the home (15%). Barriers to device use included concerns about the cost (42%) and a lack of familiarity with the technology (32%). Facilitators to device use included training prior to device use (61%) and tailoring devices to the functional needs of older adults (34%). This study suggests that older adults with CP are interested and willing to use mHealth to assist in the management of pain. Participants in our study reported important barriers that medical professionals, researchers, and mHealth developers should address to help facilitate the development and evaluation of age-appropriate, and function-appropriate, m

  8. Right coronary wall cmr in the older asymptomatic advance cohort: positive remodeling and associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Brian K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary wall cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is a promising noninvasive approach to assess subclinical atherosclerosis, but data are limited in subjects over 60 years old, who are at increased risk. The purpose of the study was to evaluate coronary wall CMR in an asymptomatic older cohort. Results Cross-sectional images of the proximal right coronary artery (RCA were acquired using spiral black-blood coronary CMR (0.7 mm resolution in 223 older, community-based patients without a history of cardiovascular disease (age 60-72 years old, 38% female. Coronary measurements (total vessel area, lumen area, wall area, and wall thickness had small intra- and inter-observer variabilities (r = 0.93~0.99, all p Conclusions Right coronary wall CMR in asymptomatic older subjects showed increased coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes as well as coronary calcification. Coronary wall CMR may contribute to the noninvasive assessment of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in older, at-risk patient groups.

  9. Supervised Balance Training and Wii Fit-Based Exercises Lower Falls Risk in Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven; Simmons, Rachel; Colberg, Sheri R; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Aaron I

    2018-02-01

    This study examined the benefits of and differences between 12 weeks of thrice-weekly supervised balance training and an unsupervised at-home balance activity (using the Nintendo Wii Fit) for improving balance and reaction time and lowering falls risk in older individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Before-after trial. University research laboratory, home environment. Sixty-five older adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this study. Participants were randomly allocated to either supervised balance training (mean age 67.8 ± 5.2) or unsupervised training using the Nintendo Wii Fit balance board (mean age 66.1 ± 5.6). The training period for both groups lasted for 12 weeks. Individuals were required to complete three 40-minute sessions per week for a total of 36 sessions. The primary outcome measure was falls risk, which was as derived from the physiological profile assessment. In addition, measures of simple reaction time, lower limb proprioception, postural sway, knee flexion, and knee extension strength were also collected. Persons also self-reported any falls in the previous 6 months. Both training programs resulted in a significant lowering of falls risk (P general balance ability. Interestingly, the reduced falls risk occurred without significant changes in leg strength, suggesting that interventions to reduce falls risk that target intrinsic risk factors related to balance control (over muscle strength) may have positive benefits for the older adult with T2DM at risk for falls. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Glucokinase Monogenic Diabetes in a Multiethnic Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Cohort: New Pregnancy Screening Criteria and Utility of HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Victoria L; Hinchcliffe, Marcus; Pinner, Jason; Cole, Stuart; Mercorella, Belinda; Molyneaux, Lynda; Constantino, Maria; Yue, Dennis K; Ross, Glynis P; Wong, Jencia

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase monogenic diabetes (GCK-maturity-onset diabetes of the young [MODY]) should be differentiated from gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) because management differs. New pregnancy-specific screening criteria (NSC) have been proposed to identify women who warrant GCK genetic testing. We tested NSC and HbA1c in a multiethnic GDM cohort and examined projected referrals for GCK testing. Using a GDM database, 63 of 776 women had a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test suggestive of GCK-MODY. Of these 63 women, 31 agreed to undergo GCK testing. NSC accuracy and HbA1c were examined. Projected referrals were calculated by applying the NSC to a larger GDM database (n = 4,415). Four of 31 women were confirmed as having GCK-MODY (prevalence ∼0.5-1/100 with GDM). The NSC identified all Anglo-Celtic women but did not identify one Indian woman. The NSC will refer 6.1% of GDM cases for GCK testing, with more Asian/Indian women referred despite lower disease prevalence. Antepartum HbA1c was not higher in those with GCK-MODY. The NSC performed well in Anglo-Celtic women. Ethnic-specific criteria should be explored. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. The effectiveness of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behaviour in middle aged and older adults with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huen Sum Lam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Health literacy is the first step to self-management of type II diabetes mellitus, of which physical activity is the least compliant behavior. However, no reviews have summarized the effect and the process of interventions of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This article is the first to examine the effectiveness of health literacy oriented programs on physical activity behavior among middle aged and older adults with type II diabetes mellitus. This systematic review extracted articles from nine electronic databases between 1990 and 2013. Six interventional studies were extracted and reported in accordance with the guidance of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Findings demonstrated that health literacy oriented programs increased the frequency and duration of physical activity among patients with high health literacy. Although some studies effectively improved the health literacy of physical activity, gap in literature remains open for the indistinct and unreliable measurement of physical activity within self-management programs of type II diabetes mellitus, and the questionable cross-culture generalizability of findings. Further studies with well-knit theorybased intervention with respect to patients’ cultural background, duration of intervention and objective measurements are encouraged to elucidate the relationship between health literacy oriented programs and physical activity behavior.

  12. Identifying the Risk of Swallowing-Related Pulmonary Complications in Older Patients With Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Roy, Siddharth; Medvedev, Gleb; Wallace, Matthew; Neviaser, Robert J; O'Brien, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To identify and potentially modify the risk of pulmonary complications in a group of older patients with hip fracture, the authors obtained speech and language pathology consultations for these patients. Then they performed a retrospective chart review of all patients 65 years and older who were admitted to their institution between June 2011 and July 2013 with acute hip fracture, were treated surgically, and had a speech and language pathology evaluation in the immediate perioperative period. The authors identified 52 patients who met the study criteria. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification system, at the time of surgery, 1 patient (2%) was classified as ASA I, 12 patients (23%) were ASA II, 26 (50%) were ASA III, and 12 (23%) were ASA IV. Based on a speech and language pathology evaluation, 22 patients (42%) were diagnosed with dysphagia. Statistical analysis showed that ASA III status and ASA IV status were meaningful predictors of dysphagia and that dysphagia itself was a strong risk factor for pulmonary aspiration, pneumonia, and aspiration pneumonitis. Evaluation by a speech and language pathologist, particularly of patients classified as ASA III or ASA IV, may be an efficient means of averting pulmonary morbidity that is common in older patients with hip fracture. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  14. Adiposity predicts cognitive decline in older persons with diabetes: a 2-year follow-up.

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    Angela Marie Abbatecola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms related to cognitive impairment in older persons with Type 2 diabetes (DM remains unclear. We tested if adiposity parameters and body fat distribution could predict cognitive decline in older persons with DM vs. normal glucose tolerance (NGT. METHODOLOGY: 693 older persons with no dementia were enrolled: 253 with DM in good metabolic control; 440 with NGT (age range:65-85 years. Longitudinal study comparing DM and NGT individuals according to the association of baseline adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI, waist-hip-ratio (WHR, waist circumference (WC and total body fat mass to cognitive change (Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, a composite score of executive and attention functioning (CCS over time. FINDINGS: At baseline, in DM participants, MMSE correlated with WHR (beta = -0.240; p = 0.043, WC (beta = -0.264; p = 0.041 while CCS correlated with WHR (beta = -0.238; p = 0.041, WC (beta = -0.326; p = 0.013 after adjusting for confounders. In NGT subjects, no significant correlations were found among any adiposity parameters and MMSE, while CCS was associated with WHR (beta = -0.194; p = 0.036 and WC (beta = -0.210; p = 0.024. Participants with DM in the 3(rd tertile of total fat mass showed the greatest decline in cognitive performance compared to those in 1(st tertile (tests for trend: MMSE(p = 0.007, CCS(p = 0.003. Logistic regression models showed that 3(rd vs. 1(st tertile of total fat mass, WHR, and WC predicted an almost two-fold decline in cognitive function in DM subjects at 2(nd yr (OR 1.68, 95%IC 1.08-3.52. CONCLUSIONS: Total fat mass and central adiposity predict an increased risk for cognitive decline in older person with DM.

  15. Barriers to diabetes awareness and self-help are influenced by people's demographics: perspectives of South Asians with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardhan, Shahina; Nakafero, Georgina; Raman, Rajiv; Sapkota, Raju

    2018-03-26

    To determine whether barriers to diabetes awareness and self-help differ in South Asian participants of different demographic characteristics (age, gender, and literacy) with type 2 diabetes living in the United Kingdom. Six focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out in patients who were categorized according to age (30-60 years, ≥60 years), gender (male, female) and literacy status (literate, illiterate). Data were analysed following the iterative process of thematic analysis techniques. Barriers were demographic-specific. The illiterate groups reported language as the major barrier to improved diabetes awareness and self-help. The literate groups reported that information provided by healthcare providers was general, and not specific to their diet/culture. Major barriers to adherence to the recommended diet for diabetes included: insufficient knowledge/awareness about nutritional content of food (all groups); lack of self-will to resist eating sweets, especially during weddings/festivals (literate older groups/literate younger females/illiterate older males); difficulty cooking separate meals for diabetic and non-diabetic family members (illiterate/literate older females). Other barriers to seeking advice/help ranged from not wanting to disclose their diabetes as it may affect employment/work (literate groups) to fear of being singled out at social gatherings (illiterate groups). General lack of motivation to exercise was reported by all groups. Time constraints and not knowing what/how to exercise was reported by literate younger groups whilst the illiterate older groups reported to not having suitable exercising facilities at local communities. Different barriers were also reported when accessing healthcare; language barriers (illiterate groups), restricted access to doctors' appointments/difficulty attending specific appointment slots offered by General Practitioners (literate females). Different barriers exist to improved awareness about diabetes and

  16. Perceptions of Insulin Treatment Among African Americans With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockwoldt, Denise; Staffileno, Beth A; Coke, Lola; Quinn, Lauretta

    2016-03-01

    Little is known regarding perception of insulin treatment among midlife and older African American (AA) adults with type 2 diabetes, or how perception affects self-management behaviors. Using the Roy adaptation model, this qualitative descriptive study explored the perception of insulin treatment in midlife and older AAs living with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Three 1-hour focus groups were conducted with a total of 13 participants. Thematic analysis of transcribed audio recordings used the constant comparative method. Themes identified include (a) insulin as instigator of negative emotions, (b) adapting to a lifestyle with insulin, and (c) becoming an insulin user: a new identity. Adapting to insulin is a psychosocial process that commonly results in negative emotions, identity conflict, and new roles. Further research is needed to understand how AA adults perceive insulin treatment, understand the role of perception in self-management behaviors, and determine whether interventions to change perceptions may be effective in improving adaptation to diabetes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  18. Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, Mats; Alvariza, Anette; Winnberg, Elisabeth; Leksell, Janeth; Andershed, Birgitta; Goliath, Ida; Momeni, Pardis; Kneck, Åsa; Skott, Maria; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2018-03-31

    To adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability. Involvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals' approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed. A psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design. The content validity of the FIAQ was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used. The content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the FIAQ (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The study provides evidence that the FIAQ (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Mortality risk attributable to smoking, hypertension and diabetes among English and Brazilian older adults (The ELSA and Bambui cohort ageing studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmot, Michael G.; Demakakos, Panayotes; Vaz de Melo Mambrini, Juliana; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main aim of this study was to quantify and compare 6-year mortality risk attributable to smoking, hypertension and diabetes among English and Brazilian older adults. This study represents a rare opportunity to approach the subject in two different social and economic contexts. Methods: Data from the data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and the Bambuí Cohort Study of Ageing (Brazil) were used. Deaths in both cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Risk factors considered in this study were baseline smoking, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Both age–sex adjusted hazard ratios and population attributable risks (PAR) of all-cause mortality and their 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Participants were 3205 English and 1382 Brazilians aged 60 years and over. First, Brazilians showed much higher absolute risk of mortality than English and this finding was consistent in all age, independently of sex. Second, as a rule, hazard ratios for mortality to smoking, hypertension and diabetes showed more similarities than differences between these two populations. Third, there was strong difference among English and Brazilians on attributable deaths to hypertension. Conclusions: The findings indicate that, despite of being in more recent transitions, the attributable deaths to one or more risk factors was twofold among Brazilians relative to the English. These findings call attention for the challenge imposed to health systems to prevent and treat non-communicable diseases, particularly in populations with low socioeconomic level. PMID:26666869

  20. Medical and obstetric complications among pregnant women aged 45 and older.

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    Chad A Grotegut

    Full Text Available The number of women aged 45 and older who become pregnant is increasing. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of medical and obstetric complications among women aged 45 and older.The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify pregnant woman during admission for delivery. Deliveries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM codes. Using ICD-9-CM codes, pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications were identified in women at the time of delivery and were compared for women aged 45 years and older to women under age 35. Outcomes among women aged 35-44 were also compared to women under age 35 to determine if women in this group demonstrated intermediate risk between the older and younger groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications for both older groups relative to women under 35. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were also developed for outcomes at delivery among older women, while controlling for pre-existing medical conditions, multiple gestation, and insurance status, to determine the effect of age on the studied outcomes.Women aged 45 and older had higher adjusted odds for death, transfusion, myocardial infarction/ischemia, cardiac arrest, acute heart failure, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, acute renal failure, cesarean delivery, gestational diabetes, fetal demise, fetal chromosomal anomaly, and placenta previa compared to women under 35.Pregnant women aged 45 and older experience significantly more medical and obstetric complications and are more likely to die at the time of a delivery than women under age 35, though the absolute risks are low and these events are rare. Further research is needed to determine what associated factors among pregnant women aged 45 and older may contribute to these

  1. A systematic review of the experience of older women living and coping with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiemin; Drury, Vicki; Taylor, Beverley

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on a systematic review that sought to answer the research question: what is the experience of women living and coping with type 2 diabetes? A range of relevant terms were identified and electronic databases were searched. Only qualitative studies that explored the meaning of living and coping with type 2 diabetes and that included adult women aged ≥ 18 years were considered. We found evidence that women are challenged by their multi-caregiving roles and the complexities of managing their diabetes simultaneously. For female patients with diabetes, holistic care and individual psycho-education programmes appear to be facilitate more effective and successful diabetes management. In addition, carer programmes that provide information so that family and friends can support and assist the woman with diabetes are required. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Data analytics identify glycated haemoglobin co-markers for type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Stranieri, Andrew; Yatsko, Andrew; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2016-08-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is being more commonly used as an alternative test for the identification of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or to add to fasting blood glucose level and oral glucose tolerance test results, because it is easily obtained using point-of-care technology and represents long-term blood sugar levels. HbA1c cut-off values of 6.5% or above have been recommended for clinical use based on the presence of diabetic comorbidities from population studies. However, outcomes of large trials with a HbA1c of 6.5% as a cut-off have been inconsistent for a diagnosis of T2DM. This suggests that a HbA1c cut-off of 6.5% as a single marker may not be sensitive enough or be too simple and miss individuals at risk or with already overt, undiagnosed diabetes. In this study, data mining algorithms have been applied on a large clinical dataset to identify an optimal cut-off value for HbA1c and to identify whether additional biomarkers can be used together with HbA1c to enhance diagnostic accuracy of T2DM. T2DM classification accuracy increased if 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG), an oxidative stress marker, was included in the algorithm from 78.71% for HbA1c at 6.5% to 86.64%. A similar result was obtained when interleukin-6 (IL-6) was included (accuracy=85.63%) but with a lower optimal HbA1c range between 5.73 and 6.22%. The application of data analytics to medical records from the Diabetes Screening programme demonstrates that data analytics, combined with large clinical datasets can be used to identify clinically appropriate cut-off values and identify novel biomarkers that when included improve the accuracy of T2DM diagnosis even when HbA1c levels are below or equal to the current cut-off of 6.5%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  4. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Jacinda M; Zera, Chloe A; Seely, Ellen W; Abdul-Rahim, Zainab S; Rudloff, Noelle D; Levkoff, Sue E

    2011-03-24

    Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Despite this "window of opportunity," few intervention studies have targeted postpartum women with a history of GDM. We sought perspectives of women with a history of GDM to identify a) barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum, and b) specific intervention approaches that would facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle intervention program. We used mixed methods to gather data from women with a prior history of GDM, including focus groups and informant interviews. Analysis of focus groups relied on grounded theory and used open-coding to categorize data by themes, while frequency distributions were used for the informant interviews. Of 38 women eligible to participate in focus groups, only ten women were able to accommodate their schedules to attend a focus group and 15 completed informant interviews by phone. We analyzed data from 25 women (mean age 35, mean pre-pregnancy BMI 28, 52% Caucasian, 20% African American, 12% Asian, 8% American Indian, 8% refused to specify). Themes from the focus groups included concern about developing type 2 diabetes, barriers to changing diet, and barriers to increasing physical activity. In one focus group, women expressed frustration about feeling judged by their physicians during their GDM pregnancy. Cited barriers to lifestyle change were identified from both methods, and included time and financial constraints, childcare duties, lack of motivation, fatigue, and obstacles at work. Informants suggested facilitators for lifestyle change, including nutrition education, accountability, exercise partners/groups, access to gyms with childcare, and home exercise equipment. All focus group and informant interview participants reported access to the internet, and the majority expressed interest in an intervention program delivered primarily via the internet that would include the

  5. Initiatives on early detection and intervention to proactively identify health and social problems in older people: experiences from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lette, Manon; Baan, Caroline A; van den Berg, Matthijs; de Bruin, Simone R

    2015-10-30

    Over the last years, several initiatives on early detection and intervention have been put in place to proactively identify health and social problems in (frail) older people. An overview of the initiatives currently available in the Netherlands is lacking, and it is unknown whether they meet the preferences and needs of older people. Therefore, the objectives of this study were threefold: 1. To identify initiatives on early detection and intervention for older people in the Netherlands and compare their characteristics; 2. To explore the experiences of professionals with these initiatives; and 3. To explore to what extent existing initiatives meet the preferences and needs of older people. We performed a qualitative descriptive study in which we conducted semi-structured interviews with seventeen experts in preventive elderly care and three group interviews with volunteer elderly advisors. Data were analysed using the framework analysis method. We identified eight categories of initiatives based on the setting (e.g. general practitioner practice, hospital, municipality) in which they were offered. Initiatives differed in their aims and target groups. The utilization of peers to identify problems and risks, as was done by some initiatives, was seen as a strength. Difficulties were experienced with identifying the target group that would benefit from proactive delivery of care and support most, and with addressing prevalent issues among older people (e.g. psychosocial issues, self-reliance issues). Although there is a broad array of initiatives available, there is a discrepancy between supply and demand. Current initiatives insufficiently address needs of (frail) older people. More insight is needed in "what should be done by whom, for which target group and at what moment", in order to improve current practice in preventive elderly care.

  6. Investigating innovative means of prompting activity uptake in older adults with type 2 diabetes: a feasibility study of exergaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Hugh; Henwood, Tim; DE Souza, Daniel; Mitchell, Geoffrey

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity is effective in improving glycemic control in diabetes mellitus. Yet only 40% of people meet the recommended level of physical activity. Nintendo Wii tennis has an energy expenditure of moderate intensity, and may be a viable part of a physical activity programme. Eleven older people with diabetes who were sedentary participated in a pre-post-test designed study to examine physical activity levels, muscle strength, and physical performance after 4 weeks of group Nintendo Wii training. Significant effects occurred on moderate physical activity time, total physical activity, dominant handgrip strength, non-dominant handgrip strength, 30 second chair stand and 400m walk test. No effect was observed for BMI, quality of life, or balance. This study provided preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of group-based active video game programme on physical activity levels.

  7. Effectiveness of personalised feedback alone or combined with peer support to improve physical activity in sedentary older Malays with type 2 diabetes: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariff-Ghazali eSazlina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regular physical activity is an important aspect of self management among older people with type 2 diabetes but many remain inactive. Interventions to improve physical activity levels have been studied but few studies have evaluated the effects of personalised feedback or peer support; and there was no study on older people of Asian heritage. Hence, this trial evaluated whether personalised feedback (PF only or combined with peer support (PS improves physical activity among older Malays with type 2 diabetes (T2DM compared to usual care only. Materials and methods: A three arm randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. 69 sedentary Malays aged 60 years and older with T2DM who received usual diabetes care were randomised to PF or PS interventions or as controls for 12 weeks with follow-ups at weeks 24 and 36. Intervention groups performed unsupervised walking activity and received written feedback on physical activity. The PS group also received group and telephone contacts from trained peer mentors. The primary outcome was pedometer steps. Secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, quality of life and psychosocial wellbeing. Results: 52 (75.4% completed the 36-week study. The PS group showed greater daily pedometer readings than the PF and controls (p=0.001. The PS group also had greater improvement in weekly duration (p<0.001 and frequency (p<0.001 of moderate intensity physical activity, scores on the Physical Activity Scale for Elderly (p=0.003, six minute walk test (p<0.001 and social support from friends (p=0.032 than PF and control groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest personalised feedback combined with peer support in older Malays with T2DM improved their physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness and support from friends. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71447000.

  8. [Analysis of dietary pattern and diabetes mellitus influencing factors identified by classification tree model in adults of Fujian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F L; Ye, Y; Yan, Y S

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To find out the dietary patterns and explore the relationship between environmental factors (especially dietary patterns) and diabetes mellitus in the adults of Fujian. Methods: Multi-stage sampling method were used to survey residents aged ≥18 years by questionnaire, physical examination and laboratory detection in 10 disease surveillance points in Fujian. Factor analysis was used to identify the dietary patterns, while logistic regression model was applied to analyze relationship between dietary patterns and diabetes mellitus, and classification tree model was adopted to identify the influencing factors for diabetes mellitus. Results: There were four dietary patterns in the population, including meat, plant, high-quality protein, and fried food and beverages patterns. The result of logistic analysis showed that plant pattern, which has higher factor loading of fresh fruit-vegetables and cereal-tubers, was a protective factor for non-diabetes mellitus. The risk of diabetes mellitus in the population at T2 and T3 levels of factor score were 0.727 (95 %CI: 0.561-0.943) times and 0.736 (95 %CI : 0.573-0.944) times higher, respectively, than those whose factor score was in lowest quartile. Thirteen influencing factors and eleven group at high-risk for diabetes mellitus were identified by classification tree model. The influencing factors were dyslipidemia, age, family history of diabetes, hypertension, physical activity, career, sex, sedentary time, abdominal adiposity, BMI, marital status, sleep time and high-quality protein pattern. Conclusion: There is a close association between dietary patterns and diabetes mellitus. It is necessary to promote healthy and reasonable diet, strengthen the monitoring and control of blood lipids, blood pressure and body weight, and have good lifestyle for the prevention and control of diabetes mellitus.

  9. Ethnicity/culture modulates the relationships of the haptoglobin (Hp) 1-1 phenotype with cognitive function in older individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Berroa, Elizabeth; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Heymann, Anthony; Schmeidler, James; Hoffman, Hadas; Preiss, Rachel; Koifmann, Keren; Greenbaum, Lior; Levy, Andrew; Silverman, Jeremy M; Leroith, Derek; Sano, Mary; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal

    2016-05-01

    The haptoglobin (Hp) genotype has been associated with cognitive function in type 2 diabetes. Because ethnicity/culture has been associated with both cognitive function and Hp genotype frequencies, we examined whether it modulates the association of Hp with cognitive function. This cross-sectional study evaluated 787 cognitively normal older individuals (>65 years of age) with type 2 diabetes participating in the Israel Diabetes and Cognitive Decline study. Interactions in two-way analyses of covariance compared Group (Non-Ashkenazi versus Ashkenazi Jews) on the associations of Hp phenotype (Hp 1-1 versus non- Hp 1-1) with five cognitive outcome measures. The primary control variables were age, gender, and education. Compared with Ashkenazi Jews, non-Ashkenazi Jews with the Hp 1-1 phenotype had significantly poorer cognitive function than non-Hp 1-1 in the domains of Attention/Working Memory (p = 0.035) and Executive Function (p = 0.023), but not in Language/Semantic Categorization (p = 0.432), Episodic Memory (p = 0.268), or Overall Cognition (p = 0.082). After controlling for additional covariates (type 2 diabetes-related characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, Mini-mental State Examination, and extent of depressive symptoms), Attention/Working Memory (p = 0.038) and Executive Function (p = 0.013) remained significant. Older individuals from specific ethnic/cultural backgrounds with the Hp 1-1 phenotype may benefit more from treatment targeted at decreasing or halting the detrimental effects of Hp 1-1 on the brain. Future studies should examine differential associations of Hp 1-1 and cognitive impairment, especially for groups with high prevalence of both, such as African-Americans and Hispanics. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Risk factor screening to identify women requiring oral glucose tolerance testing to diagnose gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis and analysis of two pregnancy cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Farrar

    Full Text Available Easily identifiable risk factors including: obesity and ethnicity at high risk of diabetes are commonly used to indicate which women should be offered the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT to diagnose gestational diabetes (GDM. Evidence regarding these risk factors is limited however. We conducted a systematic review (SR and meta-analysis and individual participant data (IPD analysis to evaluate the performance of risk factors in identifying women with GDM.We searched MEDLINE, Medline in Process, Embase, Maternity and Infant Care and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL up to August 2016 and conducted additional reference checking. We included observational, cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies reporting the performance characteristics of risk factors used to identify women at high risk of GDM. We had access to IPD from the Born in Bradford and Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy cohorts, all pregnant women in the two cohorts with data on risk factors and OGTT results were included.Twenty nine published studies with 211,698 women for the SR and a further 14,103 women from two birth cohorts (Born in Bradford and the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy study for the IPD analysis were included. Six studies assessed the screening performance of guidelines; six examined combinations of risk factors; eight evaluated the number of risk factors and nine examined prediction models or scores. Meta-analysis using data from published studies suggests that irrespective of the method used, risk factors do not identify women with GDM well. Using IPD and combining risk factors to produce the highest sensitivities, results in low specificities (and so higher false positives. Strategies that use the risk factors of age (>25 or >30 and BMI (>25 or 30 perform as well as other strategies with additional risk factors included.Risk factor screening methods are poor predictors of which pregnant women will be diagnosed with GDM. A simple

  11. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur

    2010-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals...

  12. Age modifies the risk factor profiles for acute kidney injury among recently diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Wang, Jui; Wu, Hon-Yen; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2018-04-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) rises with age and is associated with multiple risk factors. Here, we compared the risk factors for AKI between younger and older incident diabetic patients to examine the trends in risk alteration for individual factors across different age groups. Between 2007 and 2013, we selected all incident type 2 diabetic adults from the Taiwan National Health Insurance registry, stratified based on age: young (< 65 years), old (≥ 65 but < 75 years), and older-old (≥ 75 years). All factors with potential renal influence (e.g., comorbidities, medications, and diagnostics/procedures) were recorded during the study period, with a nested case-controlled approach utilized to identify independent risk factors for AKI in each age group. Totally, 930,709 type 2 diabetic patients were categorized as young (68.7%), old (17.7%), or older-old (13.6%). Older-old patients showed a significantly higher incidence of AKI than the old and the young groups. Cardiovascular morbidities (hypertension, atrial fibrillation, acute coronary syndrome, and cerebrovascular disease) were shown to increase the risk of AKI, although the risk declined with increasing age. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and receiving cardiac catheterization elevated the risk of AKI preferentially in the older-old/old and older-old group, respectively, while the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme/α-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker/calcium channel blocker reduced the risk of AKI preferentially in the older-old and older-old/old group, respectively. In conclusion, our findings highlight the importance of devising age-specific risk factor panels for AKI in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  13. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  14. Assessing the Burden of Diabetes Mellitus in Emergency Departments in the United States: The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Kaminski, James; McEwen, Laura N.; Wu, Xiejian; Lee, Joyce M.; Herman, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of three alternative methods to identify diabetes in patients visiting Emergency Departments (EDs), and to describe the characteristics of patients with diabetes who are not identified when the alternative methods are used. Research Design and Methods We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) 2009 and 2010. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of using providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications (both excluding and including biguanides) to identify diabetes compared to using the checkbox for diabetes as the gold standard. We examined the characteristics of patients whose diabetes was missed using multivariate Poisson regression models. Results The checkbox identified 5,567 ED visits by adult patients with diabetes. Compared to the checkbox, the sensitivity was 12.5% for providers’ diagnoses alone, 20.5% for providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications excluding biguanides, and 21.5% for providers’ diagnoses and diabetes medications including biguanides. The specificity of all three of the alternative methods was >99%. Older patients were more likely to have diabetes not identified. Patients with self-payment, those who had glucose measured or received IV fluids in the ED, and those with more diagnosis codes and medications, were more likely to have diabetes identified. Conclusions NHAMCS's providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists do not identify the majority of patients with diabetes visiting EDs. The newly introduced checkbox is helpful in measuring ED resource utilization by patients with diabetes. PMID:24680472

  15. Diabetes and Hypertension among Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment Since 1998 in Senegal: Prevalence and Associated Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Assane; Cournil, Amandine; Ba-Fall, Khadidiatou; Ngom-Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Batista, Gilbert; Guèye, Papa Mandoumbé; Bâ, Pape Samba; Taverne, Bernard; Delaporte, Eric; Sow, Papa Salif

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in people on antiretroviral treatment (ART) are poorly documented in resource-constrained settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 to assess prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in a sample of 242 HIV-infected patients who had initiated ART between 1998 and 2002 in Dakar, Senegal (ANRS 1215 observational cohort). World Health Organization (WHO) criteria were applied to diagnose diabetes and hypertension. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with diabetes and hypertension. Patients had a median age of 46 years and had received ART for a median duration of about 9 years. 14.5% had diabetes and 28.1% had hypertension. Long duration of ART (≥119 months), older age, higher body mass index (BMI), and higher levels of total cholesterol were associated with higher risks of diabetes. Older age, higher BMI at ART initiation, and higher levels of triglycerides were associated with higher risk of hypertension. This study shows that diabetes and hypertension were frequent in these Senegalese HIV patients on ART. It confirms the association between duration of ART and diabetes and highlights the need to implement programs for prevention of cardiovascular risk factors in HIV patients from resource-constrained settings. PMID:24052880

  16. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F. Voight (Benjamin); L.J. Scott (Laura); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C. Dina (Christian); R.P. Welch (Ryan); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); C. Huth (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L.J. McCulloch (Laura); T. Ferreira (Teresa); H. Grallert (Harald); N. Amin (Najaf); G. Wu (Guanming); C.J. Willer (Cristen); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); S.A. McCarroll (Steven); C. Langenberg (Claudia); O.M. Hofmann (Oliver); J. Dupuis (Josée); L. Qi (Lu); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); M. van Hoek (Mandy); P. Navarro (Pau); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); B. Balkau (Beverley); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R. Blagieva (Roza); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K.B. Boström (Kristina Bengtsson); B. Bravenboer (Bert); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); N.P. Burtt (Noël); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); G. Crawford (Gabe); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); K.S. Elliott (Katherine); M.R. Erdos (Michael); C.S. Fox (Caroline); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); M. Ganser (Martha); C. Gieger (Christian); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Green (Todd); S. Griffin (Simon); C.J. Groves (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); S. Hadjadj (Samy); N. Hassanali (Neelam); C. Herder (Christian); B. Isomaa (Bo); A.U. Jackson (Anne); P.R.V. Johnson (Paul); T. Jørgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); M. Li (Man); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); M. Marre (Michel); T. Meitinger (Thomas); K. Midthjell (Kristian); M.A. Morken (Mario); N. Narisu (Narisu); P. Nilsson (Peter); K.R. Owen (Katharine); F. Payne (Felicity); J.R.B. Perry (John); A.K. Petersen; C. Platou (Carl); C. Proença (Christine); I. Prokopenko (Inga); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); N.R. Robertson (Neil); G. Rocheleau (Ghislain); M. Roden (Michael); M.J. Sampson (Michael); R. Saxena (Richa); B.M. Shields (Beverley); P. Shrader (Peter); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); T. Sparsø (Thomas); K. Strassburger (Klaus); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun (Qi); A.J. Swift (Amy); B. Thorand (Barbara); J. Tichet (Jean); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R.M. van Dam (Rob); T.W. van Haeften (Timon); T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S. Cauchi (Stephane); F.S. Collins (Francis); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); T. Hansen (Torben); W.A. Hide (Winston); G.A. Hitman (Graham); A. Hofman (Albert); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); M. Laakso (Markku); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Rudan (Igor); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); L.D. Stein (Lincoln); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); H. Campbell (Harry); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); J.B. Meigs (James); J.S. Pankow (James); O. Pedersen (Oluf); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); I.E. Barroso (Inês); J.C. Florez (Jose); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); R. Sladek (Rob); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.F. Wilson (James); T. Illig (Thomas); P. Froguel (Philippe); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); R.M. Watanabe (Richard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBy combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly g...

  18. The application of visceral adiposity index in identifying type 2 diabetes risks based on a prospective cohort in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Xu, Yan; Guo, Zhi-rong; Yang, Jie; Wu, Ming; Hu, Xiao-shu

    2014-07-08

    Visceral adiposity index (VAI), a novel sex-specific index for visceral fat measurement, has been proposed recently. We evaluate the efficacy of VAI in identifying diabetes risk in Chinese people, and compare the predictive ability between VAI and other body fatness indices, i.e., waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and waist- to- height ratio (WHtR). Participants (n=3,461) were recruited from an ongoing cohort study in Jiangsu Province, China. Hazard ratio (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) between diabetes risk and different body fatness indices were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression model. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and area under curve (AUC) were applied to compare the ability of identifying diabetes risk between VAI, WC, WHtR and BMI. A total number of 160 new diabetic cases occurred during the follow-up, with an incidence of 4.6%. Significant positive associations were observed for VAI with blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, WC, BMI and WHtR. Moreover, increased VAI was observed to be associated with higher diabetes risk with a positive dose-response trend (p for trendconvenience surrogate marker for visceral adipose measurement and could be used in identifying the risk of diabetes in large-scale epidemiologic studies.

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIABETES MELLITUS AND BODY MASS INDEX: PRIMARY CARE FACILITY IN PUERTO RICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavier-Roper, Rolance G; Alick-Ortiz, Sharlene; Davila-Plaza, Geraldine; Morales-Quiñones, Aixa G

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor in the development of Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Body Mass Index (BMI), an estimation based on the persons weight and height, helps identify patients at risk to develop DM. We report the relationship between DM and BMI using data from a primary care facility in Puerto Rico. Patients were chosen at random with the only requirement to be included in this study was age over 50. A population of 200 patients was obtained and each participant was categorized by gender, weight, height, BMI and their status as a known diabetic or not. In respect to the diabetic population identified, which totaled 67 patients, 1 out of 67 (1%) were underweight, 14 out of 67 (20%) were normal, 28 out of 67 (42%) were overweight, and 24 out of 67 (36%) obese. 78% of the diabetic population fell in the categories of either overweight or obese. BMI increases the incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in patients older than 50 years of age.

  20. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  1. How are metabolic control targets of patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus achieved in daily practice in the area with high diabetes prevalence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekäläinen, Päivi; Tirkkonen, Hilkka; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus and determined how the targets established in the guidelines for patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus were achieved in clinical practice in North Karelia, Finland. All adult Type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (n=1075) were identified from the regional electronic patient database. The data for HbA1c and LDL cholesterol measurements during the years 2013 and 2014 were obtained from medical records. The prevalence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the adult population in North Karelia was 0.8%, which is among the highest worldwide. HbA1c and LDL cholesterol were measured in 93% and 90% of participants, respectively. Nineteen percent of patients reached the HbA1c target of diabetes achieved glycaemic control targets compared with 13-16% of younger patients with diabetes. Glycaemic control was in line with the recommendations in only one-fifth of Type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and less than half of them had LDL cholesterol levels within the target range. Interestingly, older Type 1 diabetes mellitus patients met the glycaemic control target more often than younger patients with diabetes. The targets established for patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus are not achieved satisfactorily in daily practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes and Pregnancy: Three Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bonsembiante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 5% to 10% of diabetic patients have type 1 diabetes. Here we describe three cases of adult-onset type 1 diabetes in pregnancy treated at our clinic between 2009 and 2012. Two patients came for specialist examination during pregnancy, the third after pregnancy. These women had no prior overt diabetes and shared certain characteristics, that is, no family diabetes history, age over 35, normal prepregnancy BMI, need for insulin therapy as of the early weeks of pregnancy, and high-titer anti-GAD antibody positivity. The patients had persistent diabetes after delivery, suggesting that they developed adult-onset type 1 diabetes during pregnancy. About 10% of GDM patients become pancreatic autoantibody positive and the risk of developing overt diabetes is higher when two or more autoantibodies are present (particularly GAD and ICA. GAD-Ab shows the highest sensitivity for type 1 diabetes prediction. We need to bear in mind that older patients might conceivably develop an adult-onset type 1 diabetes during or after pregnancy. So we suggest that women with GDM showing the described clinical features shall be preferably tested for autoimmunity. Pregnant patients at risk of type 1 diabetes should be identified to avoid the maternal and fetal complications and the acute onset of diabetes afterwards.

  3. The resist diabetes trial: Rationale, design, and methods of a hybrid efficacy/effectiveness intervention trial for resistance training maintenance to improve glucose homeostasis in older prediabetic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinik, Elaina L; Kelleher, Sarah; Savla, Jyoti; Winett, Richard A; Davy, Brenda M

    2014-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with reduced levels of physical activity, increased body weight and fat, decreased lean body mass, and a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Resistance training (RT) increases muscle strength and lean body mass, and reduces risk of T2D among older adults. The Resist Diabetes trial will determine if a social cognitive theory (SCT)-based intervention improves RT maintenance in older, prediabetic adults, using a hybrid efficacy/effectiveness approach. Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25-39.9 kg/m(2)) adults aged 50-69 (N = 170) with prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk) initiation phase and were then randomly assigned (N = 159; 94% retention) to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. The SCT intervention consisted of faded contacts compared to standard care. Participants continue RT at an approved, self-selected community facility during maintenance. A subsequent 6-month period involves no contact for both conditions. Assessments occur at baseline and months 3 (post-initiation), 9 (post-intervention), and 15 (six months after no contact). Primary outcomes are prediabetes indices (i.e., impaired fasting and 2-hour glucose concentration) and strength. Secondary measures include insulin sensitivity, beta-cell responsiveness, and disposition index (oral glucose and C-peptide minimal model); adherence; body composition; and SCT measures. Resist Diabetes is the first trial to examine the effectiveness of a high fidelity SCT-based intervention for maintaining RT in older adults with prediabetes to improve glucose homeostasis. Successful application of SCT constructs for RT maintenance may support translation of our RT program for diabetes prevention into community settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The clinical identification of peripheral neuropathy among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K

    2002-11-01

    To identify simple clinical rules for the detection of a diffuse peripheral neuropathy among older outpatients. Observational, blinded, controlled study. A tertiary-care electrodiagnostic laboratory and biomechanics laboratory. One hundred research subjects, 68 with electrodiagnostic evidence of peripheral neuropathy, between the ages of 50 and 80 years. Not applicable. One examiner, unaware of the results of electrodiagnostic testing, evaluated Achilles' and patellar reflexes, Romberg testing, semiquantified vibration, and position sense at the toe and ankle in all subjects, and unipedal stance time and the Michigan Diabetes Neuropathy Score in a subset of subjects. Significant group differences were present in all clinical measures tested. Three signs, Achilles' reflex (absent despite facilitation), vibration (128Hz tuning fork perceived for <10s), and position sense (<8/10 1-cm trials) at the toe, were the best predictors of peripheral neuropathy on both univariate and logistic regression (pseudo R(2)=.744) analyses. The presence of 2 or 3 signs versus 0 or 1 sign identified peripheral neuropathy with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94.1%, 84.4%, 92.8%, and 87.1%, respectively. Values were similar among subgroups of subjects with and without diabetes mellitus. When other clinicians applied the technique to 12 more subjects, excellent interrater reliability regarding the presence of peripheral neuropathy (kappa=.833) and good to excellent interrater reliability for each sign (kappa range,.667-1.00) were shown. Among older persons, the presence of 2 or 3 of the 3 clinical signs strongly suggested electrodiagnostic evidence of a peripheral neuropathy, regardless of etiology. Age-related decline in peripheral nerve function need not be a barrier to the clinical recognition of a diffuse peripheral neuropathy among older persons. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of

  5. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rahim Zainab S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM have an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Despite this "window of opportunity," few intervention studies have targeted postpartum women with a history of GDM. We sought perspectives of women with a history of GDM to identify a barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum, and b specific intervention approaches that would facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle intervention program. Methods We used mixed methods to gather data from women with a prior history of GDM, including focus groups and informant interviews. Analysis of focus groups relied on grounded theory and used open-coding to categorize data by themes, while frequency distributions were used for the informant interviews. Results Of 38 women eligible to participate in focus groups, only ten women were able to accommodate their schedules to attend a focus group and 15 completed informant interviews by phone. We analyzed data from 25 women (mean age 35, mean pre-pregnancy BMI 28, 52% Caucasian, 20% African American, 12% Asian, 8% American Indian, 8% refused to specify. Themes from the focus groups included concern about developing type 2 diabetes, barriers to changing diet, and barriers to increasing physical activity. In one focus group, women expressed frustration about feeling judged by their physicians during their GDM pregnancy. Cited barriers to lifestyle change were identified from both methods, and included time and financial constraints, childcare duties, lack of motivation, fatigue, and obstacles at work. Informants suggested facilitators for lifestyle change, including nutrition education, accountability, exercise partners/groups, access to gyms with childcare, and home exercise equipment. All focus group and informant interview participants reported access to the internet, and the majority expressed interest in an intervention program delivered

  6. SDOCT imaging to identify macular pathology in patients diagnosed with diabetic maculopathy by a digital photographic retinal screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mackenzie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic macular edema (DME is an important cause of vision loss. England has a national systematic photographic retinal screening programme to identify patients with diabetic eye disease. Grading retinal photographs according to this national protocol identifies surrogate markers for DME. We audited a care pathway using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT clinic to identify macular pathology in this subset of patients. METHODS: A prospective audit was performed of patients referred from screening with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and surrogate markers for diabetic macular edema (M1 attending an SDOCT clinic. The SDOCT images were graded by an ophthalmologist as SDOCT positive, borderline or negative. SDOCT positive patients were referred to the medical retina clinic. SDOCT negative and borderline patients were further reviewed in the SDOCT clinic in 6 months. RESULTS: From a registered screening population of 17 551 patients with diabetes mellitus, 311 patients met the inclusion criteria between (March 2008 and September 2009. We analyzed images from 311 patients' SDOCT clinic episodes. There were 131 SDOCT negative and 12 borderline patients booked for revisit in the OCT clinic. Twenty-four were referred back to photographic screening for a variety of reasons. A total of 144 were referred to ophthalmology with OCT evidence of definite macular pathology requiring review by an ophthalmologist. DISCUSSION: This analysis shows that patients with diabetes, mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and evidence of diabetic maculopathy on non-stereoscopic retinal photographs (M1 have a 42.1% chance of having no macular edema on SDOCT imaging as defined by standard OCT definitions of DME when graded by a retinal specialist. SDOCT imaging is a useful adjunct to colour fundus photography in screening for referable diabetic maculopathy in our screening population.

  7. The geography of diabetes among the general adults aged 35 years and older in Bangladesh: recent evidence from a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mobarak Hossain Khan

    Full Text Available To report geographical variations of sex-specific diabetes by place of residence (large cities/city corporations, small towns/other urban areas, rural areas and region of residence (divided into seven divisions among general adults (35+ years of age in Bangladesh.The recent cross-sectional data, extracted from the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011, was used. A total of 3,720 men and 3,823 women aged 35+ years, who participated in the fasting blood sugar testing, were analysed. Any person with either fasting plasma glucose level (mmol/L ≥7.0 or taking medication for diabetes was considered as a person with diabetes.The prevalence of diabetes was 10.6% in men and 11.3% in women. Bivariable analyses indicated significant variations of diabetes by both geographical variables. The prevalence was highest in city corporations (men 18.0%, women 22.3%, followed by small towns (men 13.6%, women 15.2% and rural areas (men 9.3%, women 9.5%. Regional disparities in diabetes prevalence were also remarkable, with the highest prevalence in Chittagong division and lowest prevalence in Khulna division. Multivariable logistic regression analyses provided mixed patterns of geographical disparities (depending on the adjusted variables. Some other independent risk factors for diabetes were advancing age, higher level of education and wealth, having TV (a proxy indicator of physical activity, overweight/obesity and hypertension.Over 10% of the general adults aged 35 years and older were having diabetes. Most of the persons with diabetes were unaware of this before testing fasting plasma glucose level. Although significant disparities in diabetes prevalence by geographical variables were observed, such disparities are very much influenced by the adjusted variables. Finally, we underscore the necessities of area-specific strategies including early diagnosis and health education programmes for changing lifestyles to reduce the risk

  8. Higher Protein Intake Is Not Associated with Decreased Kidney Function in Pre-Diabetic Older Adults Following a One-Year Intervention—A Preview Sub-Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grith Møller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic men and women, aged 55 years and older. Analyses were based on baseline and one-year data in a sub-group of 310 participants included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World. Protein intake was estimated from four-day dietary records and 24-hour urinary urea excretion. We used linear regression to assess the association between protein intake after one year of intervention and kidney function markers: creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR, urinary urea/creatinine ratio (UCR, serum creatinine, and serum urea before and after adjustments for potential confounders. A higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in UCR (p = 0.03 and serum urea (p = 0.05 after one year. There were no associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults.

  9. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn…

  10. Identifying motivators and barriers to older community-dwelling people participating in resistance training: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Elissa; Lewin, Gill; Pettigrew, Simone; Hill, Anne-Marie; Bainbridge, Liz; Farrier, Kaela; Langdon, Trish; Airey, Phil; Hill, Keith D

    2017-08-01

    Participation rates of older people in resistance training (RT) are low despite increasing research showing many health benefits. To increase the number of older people participating in RT it is important to know what would motivate people to become involved, what motivates those who participate to continue, and the factors preventing many older people from commencing participation. To investigate these issues, a questionnaire was mailed to three groups of older people: (1) those receiving home care services, (2) members of a peak non-government seniors' organisation and (3) those participating in a specific gym-based RT programme. In total, 1327 questionnaires were returned (response rate = 42.5%). To feel good physically and mentally were the main reasons motivating participation among all three groups, and falls prevention was identified as an important motivator for the home care respondents. Pain, injury and illness were the main barriers to participating, or continuing to participate. However, medical advice was a factor influencing participation commencement. The results suggest organisations providing RT programmes for older people should tailor the promotion and delivery of programmes to address key motivators and barriers specific to each group to increase the proportion of older people initiating and continuing to engage in RT.

  11. Identifying Barriers to Appropriate Use of Metabolic/Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment: Policy Lab Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jennifer K.; Hesketh, Rachel; Martin, Adam; Herman, William H.; Rubino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, few patients who may be appropriate candidates and may benefit from this type of surgery avail themselves of this treatment option. To identify conceptual and practical barriers to appropriate use of surgical procedures, a Policy Lab was hosted at the 3rd World Congress on Interventional Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes on 29 September 2015. Twenty-six stakeholders participated in the Policy Lab, including academics, clinicians, policy-makers, industry leaders, and patient representatives. Participants were provided with a summary of available evidence about the cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery and the costs of increasing the use of bariatric/metabolic surgery, using U.K. and U.S. scenarios as examples of distinct health care systems. There was widespread agreement among this group of stakeholders that bariatric/metabolic surgery is a legitimate and cost-effective approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes in obese patients. The following four building blocks were identified to facilitate policy changes: 1) communicating the scale of the costs and harms associated with rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes; 2) properly articulating the role of bariatric/metabolic surgery for certain population groups; 3) identifying new funding sources for bariatric/metabolic surgery; and 4) incorporating bariatric/metabolic surgery into the appropriate clinical pathways. Although more research is needed to identify specific clinical scenarios for the prioritization of bariatric/metabolic surgery, the case appears to be strong enough to engage relevant policy-makers and practitioners in a concerted discussion of how to better use metabolic surgical resources in conjunction with other interventions in good diabetes practice. PMID:27222554

  12. Obesity, diabetes, and associated costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Fletcher, Tony; Govarts, Eva; Porta, Miquel; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J; Trasande, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and diabetes are epidemic in the European Union (EU). Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is increasingly recognized as a contributor, independent of diet and physical activity. The objective was to estimate obesity, diabetes, and associated costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the EU. An expert panel evaluated evidence for probability of causation using weight-of-evidence characterization adapted from that applied by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Exposure-response relationships and reference levels were evaluated for relevant EDCs, and biomarker data were organized from peer-reviewed studies to represent European exposure and burden of disease. Cost estimation as of 2010 utilized published cost estimates for childhood obesity, adult obesity, and adult diabetes. Setting, Patients and Participants, and Intervention: Cost estimation was performed from the societal perspective. The panel identified a 40% to 69% probability of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene causing 1555 cases of overweight at age 10 (sensitivity analysis: 1555-5463) in 2010 with associated costs of €24.6 million (sensitivity analysis: €24.6-86.4 million). A 20% to 39% probability was identified for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene causing 28 200 cases of adult diabetes (sensitivity analysis: 28 200-56 400) with associated costs of €835 million (sensitivity analysis: €835 million-16.6 billion). The panel also identified a 40% to 69% probability of phthalate exposure causing 53 900 cases of obesity in older women and €15.6 billion in associated costs. Phthalate exposure was also found to have a 40% to 69% probability of causing 20 500 new-onset cases of diabetes in older women with €607 million in associated costs. Prenatal bisphenol A exposure was identified to have a 20% to 69% probability of causing 42 400 cases of childhood obesity, with associated lifetime costs of €1.54 billion. EDC exposures in the EU contribute

  13. No increased risk of developing depression in diabetes compared to other chronic illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg; Siersma, Volkert

    2003-01-01

    of patients. There was no difference in the risk for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It is concluded that older patients with diabetes do not seem to have an increased risk of developing severe depression compared with patients with other chronic illness.......Several studies have found that the prevalence of depression in patients with diabetes is higher than in the general population but it is unclear whether patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing depression compared with patients with other chronic illnesses. In a nationwide case...... register study, all patients who had a discharge diagnosis of diabetes or of osteoarthritis at first admission in a period from 1977 to 1997 were identified. The probability of being readmitted and discharged with a diagnosis of depression was estimated with competing risks models in survival analysis...

  14. Sex-dependent association between erythrocyte n-3 PUFA and type 2 diabetes in older overweight people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kylie A; Veysey, Martin; Lucock, Mark; Niblett, Suzanne; King, Katrina; Burrows, Tracy; Garg, Manohar L

    2016-04-01

    The association between n-3 PUFA intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is unclear, and studies relating objective biomarkers of n-3 PUFA consumption to diabetic status remain limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether erythrocyte n-3 PUFA levels (n-3 index; n-3I) are associated with T2D in a cohort of older adults (n 608). To achieve this, the n-3I (erythrocyte %EPA+%DHA) was determined by GC and associated with fasting blood glucose; HbA1c; and plasma insulin. Insulin resistance (IR) was assessed using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA--IR). OR for T2D were calculated for each quartile of n-3I. In all, eighty-two type 2 diabetic (46·3 % female; 76·7 (sd 5·9) years) and 466 non-diabetic (57·9 % female; 77·8 (sd 7·1) years) individuals were included in the analysis. In overweight/obese (BMI≥27 kg/m2), the prevalence of T2D decreased across ascending n-3I quartiles: 1·0 (reference), 0·82 (95 % CI 0·31, 2·18), 0·56 (95 % CI 0·21, 1·52) and 0·22 (95 % CI 0·06, 0·82) (P trend=0·015). A similar but non-significant trend was seen in overweight men. After adjusting for BMI, no associations were found between n-3I and fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin or HOMA-IR. In conclusion, higher erythrocyte n-3 PUFA status may be protective against the development of T2D in overweight women. Further research is warranted to determine whether dietary interventions that improve n-3 PUFA status can improve measures of IR, and to further elucidate sex-dependent differences.

  15. The application of the diabetes prevention trial-type 1 risk score for identifying a preclinical state of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosenko, Jay M; Skyler, Jay S; Mahon, Jeffrey; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David C; Greenbaum, Carla J; Rafkin, Lisa E; Cowie, Catherine; Cuthbertson, David; Palmer, Jerry P

    2012-07-01

    We assessed the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for identifying individuals who are highly likely to progress to type 1 diabetes (T1D) within 2 years. The DPTRS was previously developed from Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) data and was subsequently validated in the TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS). DPTRS components included C-peptide and glucose indexes from oral glucose tolerance testing, along with age and BMI. The cumulative incidence of T1D was determined after DPTRS thresholds were first exceeded and after the first occurrences of glucose abnormalities. The 2-year risks after the 9.00 DPTRS threshold was exceeded were 0.88 and 0.77 in DPT-1 (n = 90) and the TNNHS (n = 69), respectively. In DPT-1, the 2-year risks were much lower after dysglycemia first occurred (0.37; n = 306) and after a 2-h glucose value between 190 and 199 mg/dL was first reached (0.64; n = 59). Among those who developed T1D in DPT-1, the 9.00 threshold was exceeded 0.81 ± 0.53 years prior to the conventional diagnosis. Postchallenge C-peptide levels were substantially higher (P = 0.001 for 30 min; P < 0.001 for other time points) when the 9.00 threshold was first exceeded compared with the levels at diagnosis. A DPTRS threshold of 9.00 identifies individuals who are very highly likely to progress to the conventional diagnosis of T1D within 2 years and, thus, are essentially in a preclinical diabetic state. The 9.00 threshold is exceeded well before diagnosis, when stimulated C-peptide levels are substantially higher.

  16. Community Program Improves Quality of Life and Self-Management in Older Adults with Diabetes Mellitus and Comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Ploeg, Jenny; Fraser, Kimberly D; Fisher, Kathryn A; Bartholomew, Amy; Griffith, Lauren E; Miklavcic, John; Gafni, Amiram; Thabane, Lehana; Upshur, Ross

    2018-02-01

    To compare the effect of a 6-month community-based intervention with that of usual care on quality of life, depressive symptoms, anxiety, self-efficacy, self-management, and healthcare costs in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 2 or more comorbidities. Multisite, single-blind, parallel, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial. Four communities in Ontario, Canada. Community-dwelling older adults (≥65) with T2DM and 2 or more comorbidities randomized into intervention (n = 80) and control (n = 79) groups (N = 159). Client-driven, customized self-management program with up to 3 in-home visits from a registered nurse or registered dietitian, a monthly group wellness program, monthly provider team case conferences, and care coordination and system navigation. Quality-of-life measures included the Physical Component Summary (PCS, primary outcome) and Mental Component Summary (MCS, secondary outcome) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Other secondary outcome measures were the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-10), Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease, and healthcare costs. Morbidity burden was high (average of eight comorbidities). Intention-to-treat analyses using analysis of covariance showed a group difference favoring the intervention for the MCS (mean difference = 2.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.28-5.09, P = .03), SDSCA (mean difference = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.02-6.56, P = .01), and CES-D-10 (mean difference = -1.45, 95% CI = -0.13 to -2.76, P = .03). No group differences were seen in PCS score, anxiety, self-efficacy, or total healthcare costs. Participation in a 6-month community-based intervention improved quality of life and self-management and reduced depressive symptoms in older adults with T2DM and comorbidity without increasing total healthcare costs.

  17. Socioeconomic and lifestyle factors associated with chronic conditions among older adults in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Pilar Egüez; Andrade, Flávia Cristina Drumond

    2015-09-01

    To explore socioeconomic and lifestyle factors associated with the prevalence of self-reported chronic conditions among older adults in Ecuador. The sample was drawn from the nationally representative observational cross-sectional data of the Health, Well-Being, and Aging survey conducted in Ecuador in 2009. Logistic regression models were used to explore the association between socioeconomic and lifestyle factors and the prevalence of selected chronic conditions. Older women in Ecuador are more likely than men to have been previously diagnosed with diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and arthritis. Results suggest no difference by education or health insurance on number and type of self-reported chronic conditions. However, older adults who resided in the coastal area were more likely to report having diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke than those in the highlands. Living in rural areas was associated with lower odds of having diabetes and high blood pressure. Compared to white older adults, indigenous older adults were less likely to report having high blood pressure, but more likely to report having arthritis. Older age in Ecuador is marked by low educational levels and poverty. Female gender and living in coastal areas were associated with higher risks of self-reported chronic conditions.

  18. Effects of long-term multicomponent exercise on health-related quality of life in older adults with type 2 diabetes: evidence from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Liliana C; Dias, Gonçalo; Souza, Nelba R; Veríssimo, Manuel T; Martins, Raul A

    2017-08-01

    To establish the effect of a long-term multicomponent exercise (LTMEX) intervention (24 months) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), in older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). This longitudinal retrospective cohort study analyzes the effects of a supervised LTMEX program on HRQoL in older adults with T2D (n = 279). Participants underwent one of two conditions: LTMEX (n = 241) trained three times per week; and unchanged lifestyle-the control group (CO; n = 38). Participants completed baseline, and 2-year follow-up evaluations including the Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), anthropometric, hemodynamic components, and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak). LTMEX improves HRQoL, specifically physical functioning (P health (P health (MH; P older adults with T2D, and also anthropometric, hemodynamic profile, and cardiorespiratory fitness.

  19. Glycaemic response after intake of a high energy, high protein, diabetes-specific formula in older malnourished or at risk of malnutrition type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksir, Hamid; Lansink, Mirian; Regueme, Sophie C; de Vogel-van den Bosch, Johan; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle

    2017-10-06

    Several studies with diabetes-specific formulas (DSFs) for hyperglycaemic patients in need of nutritional support have been conducted in non-malnourished patients, mainly comparing products with varying macronutrient compositions. Here, the effect of a high energy, high protein DSF on postprandial responses was compared to a product with a similar macronutrient composition in malnourished or at risk of malnutrition patients with type 2 diabetes. In this randomised, double-blind cross-over study, 20 patients were included. After overnight fasting, patients consumed 200 mL of a DSF or standard supplement (control) (19.6 g protein, 31.2 g carbohydrates and 10.6 g fat), while continuing their anti-diabetic medication. The formulas differed in type of carbohydrates and presence of fibre. The postprandial glucose, insulin and glucagon responses were monitored over 4 h. Data were analysed with a Linear Mixed Model, and results of the modified ITT population (n = 19) are shown. Postprandial glucose response as incremental area under the curve (iAUC), was lower after consumption of DSF compared with control (489.7 ± 268.5 (mean ± SD) vs 581.3 ± 273.9 mmol/L min, respectively; p = 0.008). Also, the incremental maximum concentration of glucose (iCmax) was lower for DSF vs control (3.5 ± 1.4 vs 4.0 ± 1.4 mmol/L; p = 0.007). Postprandial insulin and glucagon levels, expressed as iAUC or iCmax, were not significantly different between groups. Consumption of a high energy, high protein DSF by older malnourished or at risk of malnutrition type 2 diabetes patients resulted in a significantly lower glucose response compared to control. These data suggest that the use of a DSF is preferred for patients with diabetes in need of nutritional support. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified ...

  1. Use of a web portal by adult patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Heboyan, Vahé; Young, Lufei; De Leo, Gianluca; Wilkins, Thad

    2018-05-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of web portals by patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies of web portal use by patients with pre-diabetes have not been reported. To plan studies of web portal use by adult clinic patients seen for pre-diabetes and T2DM at an academic medical center, we examined characteristics of those who had or had not registered for a web portal. Electronic records were reviewed to identify web portal registration by patients treated for pre-diabetes or T2DM by age, sex, race and ethnicity. A total of 866 patients with pre-diabetes and 2,376 patients with T2DM were seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic. About 41.5% of patients with pre-diabetes and 34.7% of those with T2DM had registered for the web portal. In logistic regression analysis, web portal registration among patients with T2DM was significantly associated with age 41-45 years, and with Hispanic ethnicity. Similar results were obtained for pre-diabetes except that the positive association with age 41-45 years and inverse association with Hispanic ethnicity were not statistically significant. Among patients with pre-diabetes or T2DM, Black men and Black women were less likely to have registered than their white counterparts. Patients who were aged 18-25 and >65 years were less likely to have registered for the web portal than those 26-65 years. Additional research is needed to identify portal design features that improve health outcomes for patients with pre-diabetes and T2DM and interventions that will increase use of patient portals by pre-diabetic and diabetic patients, especially among Black patients and older patients.

  2. Identifying barriers to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes after completion of an accredited education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Chris M; Lantaff, Wendy M; Olenik, Nicole L

    The objective of this study was to identify patient-perceived barriers to achieving A1C targets after receiving instruction in an accredited diabetes education program. Qualitative research using semistructured interviews and thematic analyses. One pharmacist-run diabetes center located within an independent community pharmacy in a suburban region of southern Indiana. A total of 17 participants between the ages of 41-78 were interviewed in March and April 2016. Not applicable. Patient-perceived barriers to attaining glycemic control after completion of a pharmacist-taught diabetes self-management education (DSME) program accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Participants reported a variety of perceived barriers to glycemic control subsequent to the receipt of structured education. Seven major themes emerged: 1) health care provider factors; 2) self-identified indiscretions; 3) psychological barriers and poor social support; 4) knowledge deficits; 5) personal injury or adverse drug events; 6) time constraints and competing life demands; and 7) financial constraints. Participants reported a variety of perceived barriers to achieving A1C targets after completing DSME. Incorporation of solutions and coping mechanisms to these barriers into diabetes education programs may help patients attain glycemic control. Other factors may require individualized attention outside of DSME in follow-up episodes of diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying the social capital influencing diabetes control in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yohei; Suematsu, Mina; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Kentaro; Yasui, Hiroki; Hida, Takeshi; Uemura, Kazumasa; Murotani, Kenta; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    The number of patients with diabetes is increasing in Japan. Recently, Social capital (SC) has received increasing attention as a factor influencing health conditions. In the US, the relation between SC and diabetes control has been reported, but little attention has been paid to this connection in Japan. Three SC questionnaires, entitled “trust in people in a community,” “social support,” and “social relationships,” were constructed. The subjects were adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Inf...

  4. Glycemic control, cognitive function, and family support among middle-aged and older Hispanics with diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizich, Garrett; Kaplan, Robert C; González, Hector M; Daviglus, Martha L; Giachello, Aida L; Teng, Yanping; Lipton, Richard B; Grober, Ellen

    2016-07-01

    To examine among Hispanics in the U.S., a population with increased reliance on informal healthcare support structures, (1) the association between cognitive function and control of diabetes; and (2) whether this association is modified by family support. The Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), word fluency, and learning and delayed recall components of the Spanish English Verbal Learning Test were administered to 1794 Hispanic adults aged 45-76years with diagnosed diabetes. An executive function index and global cognitive function index (GCFI) were derived. Uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c⩾7% [53mmol/mol]) was compared across quartiles of cognitive function using multivariable logit models with interaction terms for cognitive function and family support. After adjustment, lower DSST scores were associated with uncontrolled diabetes (P=0.03). Family support modified the relationship between other measures of cognition and diabetes control (Pinteraction: 0.002, 0.09). Among individuals with low family support, as cognitive function declined, the odds of uncontrolled diabetes increased (P-trend across quartiles of the GCFI, 0.015). Among those with low family support, persons in the lowest quartile of global cognitive function were more than twice as likely to have uncontrolled diabetes as those in the highest performing quartile (OR=2.31; 95% CI: 1.17, 4.55). There was no similar effect among those with high family support. Family support may buffer the negative association between low cognitive functioning and diabetes control in US Hispanics/Latinos. Educational programs targeted at family members of middle-age and older persons with diabetes regardless of neurocognitive status may help improve population-level glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Geriatric-specific triage criteria are more sensitive than standard adult criteria in identifying need for trauma center care in injured older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichwan, Brian; Darbha, Subrahmanyam; Shah, Manish N; Thompson, Laura; Evans, David C; Boulger, Creagh T; Caterino, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of Ohio's 2009 emergency medical services (EMS) geriatric trauma triage criteria compared with the previous adult triage criteria in identifying need for trauma center care among older adults. We studied a retrospective cohort of injured patients aged 16 years or older in the 2006 to 2011 Ohio Trauma Registry. Patients aged 70 years or older were considered geriatric. We identified whether each patient met the geriatric and the adult triage criteria. The outcome measure was need for trauma center care, defined by surrogate markers: Injury Severity Score greater than 15, operating room in fewer than 48 hours, any ICU stay, and inhospital mortality. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of both triage criteria for both age groups. We included 101,577 patients; 33,379 (33%) were geriatric. Overall, 57% of patients met adult criteria and 68% met geriatric criteria. Using Injury Severity Score, for older adults geriatric criteria were more sensitive for need for trauma center care (93%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 92% to 93%) than adult criteria (61%; 95% CI 60% to 62%). Geriatric criteria decreased specificity in older adults from 61% (95% CI 61% to 62%) to 49% (95% CI 48% to 49%). Geriatric criteria in older adults (93% sensitivity, 49% specificity) performed similarly to the adult criteria in younger adults (sensitivity 87% and specificity 44%). Similar patterns were observed for other outcomes. Standard adult EMS triage guidelines provide poor sensitivity in older adults. Ohio's geriatric trauma triage guidelines significantly improve sensitivity in identifying Injury Severity Score and other surrogate markers of the need for trauma center care, with modest decreases in specificity for older adults. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Residential neighbourhood greenspace is associated with reduced risk of incident diabetes in older people: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Dalton

    2016-11-01

    this was non-significant (95% CI 0.88, 1.08; p = 0.603. The incidence of diabetes in the least green neighbourhoods (with 20% greenspace on average would fall by 10.7% (95% CI −2.1%, 25.2%; p = 0.106 if they were as green as the average neighbourhood observed across the whole cohort (59% greenspace on average. There were no significant interactions between rurality or socio-economic status and level of greenspace. Conclusions Greener home neighbourhoods may protect against risk of diabetes in older adults, although this study does not support a mediation role for physical activity. Causal mechanisms underlying the associations require further investigation.

  7. Motor function is associated with 1,25(OH)(2)D and indices of insulin-glucose dynamics in non-diabetic older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Jamie N; Pierpoint, Lauren A; Mani, Diba; Schwartz, Robert S; Enoka, Roger M

    2014-06-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by changes in metabolic characteristics, such as reduced insulin sensitivity and low levels of vitamin D, which may exacerbate age-related declines in physical function. The aim of the present study was to determine the associations between insulin-glucose dynamics, vitamin D metabolites, and performance on a battery of motor tasks in healthy, non-diabetic older adults. Sixty-nine community-dwelling men and women (65-90 years) were recruited. Insulin-glucose dynamics were determined by an intravenous glucose tolerance test, and vitamin D metabolites were measured. Motor function was characterized by the time to walk 500 m, chair-rise time, lower body strength, dorsiflexor steadiness and endurance time, and muscle coactivation. Significant unadjusted correlations were found between insulin-glucose dynamics and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] with walk time, strength, steadiness, endurance time, and muscle activation (p glucose (R (2) = 0.55, p glucose dynamics and the bio-active vitamin D metabolite 1,25(OH)2D. Walking endurance and strength were explained by 1,25(OH)2D and fasting blood glucose and insulin, even after adjusting for age, sex, and body fat. Motor function in a relatively small sample of non-diabetic older men and women was associated with metabolic factors that increase in prevalence with aging.

  8. Parent-adolescent dyads: association of parental autonomy support and parent-adolescent shared diabetes care responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, K M; Dashiff, C J; Stump, T E; Weaver, M T

    2013-09-01

    Parent-adolescent shared responsibility for diabetes care is advocated by experts to achieve beneficial diabetes and psychosocial outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parental autonomy support may be a way to facilitate this sharing. In this dyadic study, we examined parental diabetes-specific autonomy support experienced by adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents (n = 89 dyads), and its association with their experience of shared diabetes care responsibility. Path analysis was used to test an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model for parental autonomy support effects on shared responsibility. This was a secondary analysis of data from 89 parent-early/mid-adolescent dyads. Actor effects were identified. Parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parental autonomy support were associated with their respective reports of shared diabetes care responsibility. One partner effect was identified. Adolescents' reports of parental autonomy support were associated with parents' reports of shared responsibility. Parents and adolescents held similar views of autonomy support but discrepant views of shared responsibility. Older adolescents perceived less parental autonomy support. Increasing parental autonomy support may facilitate parent-adolescent sharing of diabetes care responsibility. Adolescent and parent perceptions influence each other and need to be considered when working with them to strengthen parental autonomy support. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Diabetes mellitus increases severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Lee, Yaun-Jinn; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2015-02-10

    Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate bacterial infection, but its effect on the severity of viral infection has not been well studied. The severity of thrombocytopenia is an indicator of the severity of dengue virus infection. We investigated whether diabetes is associated with thrombocytopenia in dengue-infected patients. We studied clinical characteristics of 644 patients with dengue infection at a university hospital during the epidemic on 1 June 2002 to 31 December 2002 in Taiwan. Platelet counts and biochemical data were compared between patients with and without diabetes. Potential risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia were explored using regression analyses. Dengue-infected patients with diabetes had lower platelet counts than patients without diabetes during the first three days (54.54±51.69 vs. 86.58±63.4 (p≤0.001), 43.98±44.09 vs. 64.52±45.06 (p=0.002), 43.86±35.75 vs. 62.72±51.2 (p=0.012)). Diabetes mellitus, death, dengue shock syndrome (DSS) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and increased glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels were significantly associated with lower platelet counts during the first day of hospitalization for dengue fever with regression β of -13.981 (95% confidence interval (CI) -27.587, -0.374), -26.847 (95% CI -37.562, -16.132), and 0.054 (95% CI 0.015, 0.094) respectively. Older age, hypoalbuminemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were independently correlated with thrombocytopenia in dengue patients with or without diabetes with regression β of -2.947 (p=0.004), 2.801 (p=0.005), and -3.568 (p≤0.001), respectively. Diabetic patients with dengue had a higher rate of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) than non-diabetic patients. They also had lower blood albumin, were older, and higher triglyceride levels. Older age, hypoalbuminemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were independently correlated with thrombocytopenia in dengue patients. Dengue patients with diabetes tended to have more severe

  10. Exercise improves gait, reaction time and postural stability in older adults with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Aaron I

    2014-01-01

    For older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), declines in balance and walking ability are risk factors for falls, and peripheral neuropathy magnifies this risk. Exercise training may improve balance, gait and reduce the risk of falling. This study investigated the effects of 12weeks of aerobic exercise training on walking, balance, reaction time and falls risk metrics in older T2DM individuals with/without peripheral neuropathy. Adults with T2DM, 21 without (DM; age 58.7±1.7years) and 16 with neuropathy (DM-PN; age 58.9±1.9years), engaged in either moderate or intense supervised exercise training thrice-weekly for 12weeks. Pre/post-training assessments included falls risk (using the physiological profile assessment), standing balance, walking ability and hand/foot simple reaction time. Pre-training, the DM-PN group had higher falls risk, slower (hand) reaction times (232 vs. 219ms), walked at a slower speed (108 vs. 113cm/s) with shorter strides compared to the DM group. Following training, improvements in hand/foot reaction times and faster walking speed were seen for both groups. While falls risk was not significantly reduced, the observed changes in gait, reaction time and balance metrics suggest that aerobic exercise of varying intensities is beneficial for improving dynamic postural control in older T2DM adults with/without neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Milagros; Bottle, Alex; Long, Susannah; Aylin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting. To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity. Retrospective observational study using administrative data. English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13. All admitted patients aged 65 years and over. By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis) we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%. We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups) up to 67% (80-84yr age-group). The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD). Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2), associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5), associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6) and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction. By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  12. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Ruiz

    Full Text Available No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting.To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity.Retrospective observational study using administrative data.English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13.All admitted patients aged 65 years and over.By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%.We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups up to 67% (80-84yr age-group. The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD. Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2, associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5, associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6 and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction.By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease in Non-Diabetic Older Adults: Associated Roles of the Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation, and Insulin Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Zammit

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to examine the association between CKD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components in older adults. We also explored two possible pathways linking the metabolic syndrome with CKD: inflammation as measured by high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP and insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR.Community-dwelling non-diabetic 70+ adults from the Einstein Aging Study participated in the study. We defined CKD as eGFR below 60mL/min/1.73m2. MetS was defined according to recent guidelines from the National Cholesterol Education Program. Binary logistic regressions were used to assess the association between the metabolic syndrome, its components and CKD with adjustments for demographics, HOMA-IR and hsCRP.Of 616 participants (mean age = 79.3 years, 65.5% female, 25% had MetS and 26.5% had CKD. Participants with CKD had a significantly higher prevalence of the MetS than individuals without CKD (34.4% vs. 24.3%. Binary logistic regression models showed that CKD was associated with MetS (OR = 1.72, 95%CI = 1.13-2.61. The association was unaltered by adjustment for hsCRP but altered by adjustment for HOMA-IR. As the number of MetS components increased the relative odds of CKD also increased. None of the individual components was independently associated with CKD.MetS is associated with CKD in non-diabetic older adults. Results showed that as the number of MetS components increased so did the odds for CKD. HOMA-IR seems to be in the casual pathway linking MetS to CKD.

  14. Cheiropathy in Diabetic Children. Kinesi- and Physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The charts of 240 patients were analyzed and 95 type 2 diabetic children were observed. the diabetic cheiropathy was found to develop in one third patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus not older than 9 years old. Cheiropathy was associated with neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy development and may be a phenotypic marker for these complications development in type 1 diabetic patients. Kinesitherapy and electrophoresis with potassium iodide can improve impaired fingers mobility in 80.2 % children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Identifying and responding to gaps in domestic abuse services for older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Domestic abuse is widespread and indiscriminate. Older women living with domestic abuse report more health-related concerns than any other group, and demonstrate a higher incidence of significant mental health issues. Research suggests that older women who have experienced domestic abuse are not having their psychological and physical support needs met by existing services. This article examines the physical and mental health issues that older women face as a result of abusive relationships, and the barriers to seeking help. Multidisciplinary healthcare professionals can facilitate the therapeutic engagement of older women living with domestic abuse. Refuges and related interventions are limited in terms of the support they can offer, however, research suggests that developing a stepped approach, tailored to suit older women's needs, could be beneficial.

  16. Wound Healing in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa J; Fulton, Ana Tuya

    2016-02-01

    Impaired wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem that is growing as our population ages. Wound healing is affected by age and by co-morbid conditions, particularly diabetes and obesity. This is particularly important in Rhode Island as the state has a very high percentage of vulnerable older adults. A multi- disciplinary approach that incorporates the skills of a comprehensive wound center with specialized nursing, geriatric medicine and palliative care will facilitate rapid wound healing, reduce costs and improve outcomes for our older adults that suffer from 'problem wounds'.

  17. Improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise and weight loss in older women with a history of gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alice S

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether a hypocaloric diet alone (WL) or with exercise training (AEX + WL) is effective in improving body composition, fitness, glucose utilization and CVD risk factors in sedentary women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) and with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Longitudinal clinical investigation of 25 overweight/obese (BMI: 32 ± 1 kg/m(2)) women (59 ± 1 yrs) with a GDM history (n = 20) or T2DM (n = 5). Women completed 6 months WL (n = 10) or AEX+WL (n = 15) with VO2max, body composition, and glucose tolerance testing. Insulin sensitivity was measured during the last 30 min of 2 h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (40 mU·m(-2.)min(-1)) before and after interventions. Body weight decreased ~7% after WL and AEX+WL (p exercise program combined with moderate weight loss reduces body weight, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat, and improves insulin sensitivity in older women who had previously been diagnosed with GDM and those with T2DM. These findings should encourage women with a history of GDM to engage in an active lifestyle and reduce caloric intake to lower the risk for the development of T2DM.

  18. Insulin dependent diabetes in under 5 year olds.

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson, I G; Smith, M A; Baum, J D

    1985-01-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus presenting in children under five years old exhibits several clinical and management features that differ from diabetes presenting in older children. In this review of the current population of the Oxford children's diabetes clinic, children with diabetes diagnosed aged 0- less than 5 years are compared with those diagnosed aged 5- less than 10 years to illustrate these differences. The mean annual age specific incidence of diabetes for children aged 0- les...

  19. Effects of breast cancer on chronic disease medication adherence among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorelli, Melissa L; Steinberg, Michael B; Hirshfield, Kim M; Rhoads, George G; Bandera, Elisa V; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of breast cancer on chronic disease medication adherence among older women. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked data and a 5% random sample of Medicare enrollees were used. Stage I-III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2008 and women without cancer were eligible. Three cohorts of medication users 66+ years were identified using diagnosis codes and prescription fill records: diabetes, hypertension, and lipid disorders. For each cohort, breast cancer patients were frequency matched to comparison women by age and geographic area. Medication adherence was measured by the proportion of days covered and medication persistence. During the post-baseline period, the percentage of breast cancer patients who were non-adherent was 26.2% for diabetes medication, 28.9% for lipid-lowering medication, and 14.2% for hypertension medication. Breast cancer patients experienced an increased odds of diabetes medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07 to 1.95] and were more likely to be non-persistent with diabetes medication (hazard ratio = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.04 to 1.66) relative to women without cancer. The study failed to show a difference between breast cancer and comparison women in the odds of non-adherence to hypertensive (OR = 0.87; 95%CI: 0.71 to 1.05) or lipid-lowering medication (OR = 0. 91; 95%CI: 0.73 to 1.13) with a proportion of days covered threshold of 80%. Special attention should be given to the coordination of primary care for older breast cancer patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Different impacts of hypertension and diabetes mellitus on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in community-dwelling older adults: the Rancho Bernardo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jee-Young; Allison, Matthew A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence rates of hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus are slowing in some high-income countries, HTN and diabetes mellitus remain as the two major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. We aimed to observe the association of HTN and diabetes mellitus with all-cause and CVD mortality in older white adults. All community-dwelling Rancho Bernardo Study participants who were at least 55 years old and had carefully measured blood pressure and plasma glucose from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at the baseline visit (1984-1987, n = 2186) were followed up until death or the last clinic visit in 2013 (median 14.3 years, interquartile range 8.4-21.3). In unadjusted analyses, diabetes mellitus was associated with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.60] and CVD mortality (hazard ratio 1.67, 95% CI 1.39-2.00); HTN with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio 1.93 (1.73-2.15)] and CVD mortality [hazard ratio 2.45 (2.10-2.93)]. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, including age, BMI, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, smoking, exercise, and alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus was associated with CVD mortality only (hazard ratio 1.25, P = 0.0213). Conversely, HTN was associated with both all-cause (hazard ratio 1.34, P diabetes mellitus and HTN was associated with all-cause (hazard ratio 1.38, P = 0.0002) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio 1.70, P diabetes mellitus. Having both confers a modest increase in the hazards for these types of mortality.

  1. Connecting, Supporting, Colliding: The Work-Based Interactions of Young LGBQ-Identifying Workers and Older Queer Colleagues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Paul

    2010-01-01

    While attention has been given to older employees' experiences of sexuality-based discrimination and harassment, this paper explores young lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer identifying employees' (18-26 years old) accounts of working with queer coworkers and managers in Australian workplaces. Two sets of relationships are evidenced and discussed:…

  2. eHealth Literacy: Patient Engagement in Identifying Strategies to Encourage Use of Patient Portals Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Ulep, Robin; Luo, Qingyang

    2017-12-01

    Innovations in chronic disease management are growing rapidly as advancements in technology broaden the scope of tools. Older adults are less likely to be willing or able to use patient portals or smartphone apps for health-related tasks. The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of older adults (ages ≥50) with hypertension or diabetes to examine relationships between portal usage, interest in health-tracking tools, and eHealth literacy, and to solicit practical solutions to encourage technology adoption. Among 247 patients surveyed in a large integrated delivery health system between August 2015 and January 2016, eHealth literacy was positively associated with portal usage (OR [95% CI]: 1.3 [1.2-1.5]) and interest in health-tracking tools (1.2 [1.1-1.3]). Portal users compared to nonusers (N = 137 vs.110) had higher rates of interest in using websites/smartphone apps to track blood pressure (55% vs. 36%), weight (53% vs. 35%), exercise (53% vs. 32%), or medication (46% vs 33%, all P marketing initiatives that capture patient stories demonstrating real-life applications of what patients can do with digital technology, how to use it, and why it may be useful. Health systems also must screen for eHealth literacy, provide training, promote proxy users, and institute quality assurance that ensures patients' experiences will not vary across the system.

  3. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Almoguera Castillo, Berta; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Crook, Errol D.; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N.; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F. A.; Kumari, Meena; van der Harst, Pim; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Hofker, Marten H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom similar to 50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with similar to 2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and

  4. Factors associated with bone mineral density and risk of fall in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged 50 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Park, Moon Seok

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporotic fractures in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM) carry higher mortality and morbidity. Because bone strength and minor trauma, such as a falls, are considered to be significant factors contributing to osteoporotic fractures, it is important to elucidate the associated factors with these. This study was performed to investigate the factors associated with bone mineral density (BMD) and falls in noninstitutionalized subjects with DM aged 50 years or older. We used the database from the 2010 Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Subjects with DM aged 50 years or older were selected and included in the data analyses. Associated factors with BMD of the femoral neck and lumbar spine and those with falls were analyzed using multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression analyses, respectively. Three hundred sixty-two subjects [209 males; 153 females; average age, 66.0 y (SD 8.2 y)] were included. Among the male subjects, the total body muscle mass (P factors with femoral neck BMD, whereas age (P risk of falls. Total body muscle mass was the most prominent factor predicting femoral neck BMD and risk of falls in community-dwelling elderly subjects with DM. Further investigation is required to determine their role in preventing osteoporotic fractures in diabetic subjects.

  5. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes Person with prediabetes Person at risk for diabetes Family member, friend, or caregiver Health care professional Teacher or school health professional K-8th grade Community health worker Community organization Age Select one: Child Teen and young adult Adult Older adult (65+) ...

  6. It's Never Too Late To Prevent Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast delivers a diabetes prevention message tailored for older adults.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/20/2007.

  7. Self-Care Adherence and Psychological Functioning of Older Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Effects of Persuasion, Social Pressure, and Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Pang, Joyce S; Cheng, Wendy J Y

    2016-12-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the role of family members' use of persuasion versus pressure as distinct forms of social control by which family members attempt to encourage better diabetes management among older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study also examined how self-efficacy might moderate the relationship between persuasion/pressure, psychological functioning, and self-care adherence. Participants were 96 men and 103 women with T2DM, with a mean age of 63.3 years. Regression results show that neither persuasion nor pressure was significantly related to self-care adherence, but persuasion and pressure were associated in complex ways with diabetes-related emotional distress and depressive symptoms for which significant interaction effects were found. Patients with lower self-efficacy benefited from persuasion, but were adversely affected by pressure. In contrast, patients with higher self-efficacy were adversely affected by persuasion, but were less negatively affected by pressure. Findings highlight the importance of reducing pressure-based social control, considering patients' self-efficacy when family members seek to influence patients' self-care behaviors, and targeting patient-family interactions in future interventions.

  8. Necessidades especiais de escolares com diabetes mellitus tipo 1 identificadas por familiares Special needs of students with diabetes mellitus type 1 identified by relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Moron Saes Braga

    2012-09-01

    purpose of this study was to identify the special needs of children with diabetes mellitus type 1. The participants were 37 family members of students in treatment in an outpatient center at a state of São Paulo medical school. A semi-structured interview was carried, which was audio recorded and transcribed for analysis. The results showed that all participants informed the school informed about their child's condition, however 29,7% reported that inclusion or access to school was difficult, due to the teacher being uninformed about diabetes control, inadequate school lunches, and preconceptions of peers and school supervisor, or the student's embarrassment. Absenteeism occurred among 70,3% of the students, mainly due to doctor appointments. Special needs were identified by 32,4%, including meals, performance in school tasks and the need to better inform school professionals about the condition. Furthermore, 72,9% reported some kind of support to cope with diabetes had been provided, mainly by health professionals. In order to improve their child's development at school 51,3% presented suggestions such as including appropriate school meals, better preparation of school for dealing with diabetes, i.e. lectures and training for teachers. Our suggestion is that there should be a closer relationship between the school and health services, but the first step towards intersector integration is to identify the needs of students with chronic diseases, such as this study showed, by focusing on diabetes mellitus and its impact on the school.

  9. Identifying Dietary Patterns Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Korean Adults Using Reduced Rank Regression

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    Dayeon Shin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet plays a crucial role in cognitive function. Few studies have examined the relationship between dietary patterns and cognitive functions of older adults in the Korean population. This study aimed to identify the effect of dietary patterns on the risk of mild cognitive impairment. A total of 239 participants, including 88 men and 151 women, aged 65 years and older were selected from health centers in the district of Seoul, Gyeonggi province, and Incheon, in Korea. Dietary patterns were determined using Reduced Rank Regression (RRR methods with responses regarding vitamin B6, vitamin C, and iron intakes, based on both a one-day 24-h recall and a food frequency questionnaire. Cognitive function was assessed using the Korean-Mini Mental State Examination (K-MMSE. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between dietary pattern score and the risk of mild cognitive impairment. A total of 20 (8% out of the 239 participants had mild cognitive impairment. Three dietary patterns were identified: seafood and vegetables, high meat, and bread, ham, and alcohol. Among the three dietary patterns, the older adult population who adhered to the seafood and vegetables pattern, characterized by high intake of seafood, vegetables, fruits, bread, snacks, soy products, beans, chicken, pork, ham, egg, and milk had a decreased risk of mild cognitive impairment compared to those who did not (adjusted odds ratios 0.06, 95% confidence interval 0.01–0.72 after controlling for gender, supplementation, education, history of dementia, physical activity, body mass index (BMI, and duration of sleep. The other two dietary patterns were not significantly associated with the risk of mild cognitive impairment. In conclusion, high consumption of fruits, vegetables, seafood, and protein foods was significantly associated with reduced mild cognitive impairment in older Korean adults. These results can contribute to the establishment of

  10. Trends in Diabetes Incidence Among 7 Million Insured Adults, 2006–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A.; Schroeder, Emily B.; Karter, Andrew J.; Gregg, Edward W.; Desai, Jay; Lawrence, Jean M.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Xu, Stanley; Newton, Katherine M.; Raebel, Marsha A.; Pathak, Ram D.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Segal, Jodi; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Butler, Melissa G.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Thomas, Abraham; Steiner, John F.

    2015-01-01

    An observational cohort analysis was conducted within the Surveillance, Prevention, and Management of Diabetes Mellitus (SUPREME-DM) DataLink, a consortium of 11 integrated health-care delivery systems with electronic health records in 10 US states. Among nearly 7 million adults aged 20 years or older, we estimated annual diabetes incidence per 1,000 persons overall and by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and body mass index. We identified 289,050 incident cases of diabetes. Age- and sex-adjusted population incidence was stable between 2006 and 2010, ranging from 10.3 per 1,000 adults (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.8, 10.7) to 11.3 per 1,000 adults (95% CI: 11.0, 11.7). Adjusted incidence was significantly higher in 2011 (11.5, 95% CI: 10.9, 12.0) than in the 2 years with the lowest incidence. A similar pattern was observed in most prespecified subgroups, but only the differences for persons who were not white were significant. In 2006, 56% of incident cases had a glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c) test as one of the pair of events identifying diabetes. By 2011, that number was 74%. In conclusion, overall diabetes incidence in this population did not significantly increase between 2006 and 2010, but increases in hemoglobin A1c testing may have contributed to rising diabetes incidence among nonwhites in 2011. PMID:25515167

  11. Identifying compensatory driving behavior among older adults using the situational avoidance questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica J; Conlon, Elizabeth G

    2017-12-01

    Driving self-regulation is considered a means through which older drivers can compensate for perceived declines in driving skill or more general feelings of discomfort on the road. One form of driving self-regulation is situational avoidance, the purposeful avoidance of situations perceived as challenging or potentially hazardous. This study aimed to validate the Situational Avoidance Questionnaire (SAQ, Davis, Conlon, Ownsworth, & Morrissey, 2016) and identify the point on the scale at which drivers practicing compensatory avoidance behavior could be distinguished from those whose driving is unrestricted, or who are avoiding situations for other, non-compensatory reasons (e.g., time or convenience). Seventy-nine Australian drivers (M age =71.48, SD=7.16, range: 55 to 86years) completed the SAQ and were classified as a compensatory-restricted or a non-restricted driver based on a semi-structured interview designed to assess the motivations underlying avoidance behavior reported on the SAQ. Using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, the SAQ was found to have high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity: 85%, specificity: 82%) in correctly classifying the driver groups. Group comparisons confirmed that compensatory-restricted drivers were self-regulating their driving behavior to reduce the perceived demands of the driving task. This group had, on average, slower hazard perception reaction times, and reported greater difficulty with driving, more discomfort when driving due to difficulty with hazard perception skills, and greater changes in cognition over the past five years. The SAQ is a psychometrically sound measure of situational avoidance for drivers in baby boomer and older adult generations. Use of validated measures of driving self-regulation that distinguish between compensatory and non-compensatory behavior, such as the SAQ, will advance our understanding of the driving self-regulation construct and its potential safety benefits for older road users

  12. Self-care behaviors of Filipino-American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Deovina N; Jordan, James L

    2010-01-01

    To examine the diabetes self-care behaviors of Filipino-American (FA) adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities-Revised and Expanded measure was administered to 192 (74 males and 118 females) FA adult immigrants with type 2 DM. Older FAs (> or =65 years), females, those who were older when they immigrated, and participants diagnosed with type 2 DM longer were more likely to follow recommended medication regimens. Younger FAs (healthful eating plans. Likewise, females reported eating five or more servings of fruits and/or vegetables daily. Moreover, older FAs reported evenly spacing carbohydrate intake everyday. Furthermore, older participants, those with less education, participants who were older when they immigrated, and those older when diagnosed with type 2 DM ate fewer foods high in fats. As to physical activity, FA males and participants with higher education exercised more frequently. Younger FAs were less likely to perform optimum type 2 DM self-care behaviors pertaining to diet, medication taking, and blood glucose testing compared to their older counterparts. This finding suggests an increased risk for type 2 DM comorbidities and/or complications in younger FAs, which may require more intensive treatments in later years. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Association of HCV with diabetes mellitus: an Egyptian case-control study

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    Esmat Gamal G

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest Hepatitis C Virus (HCV prevalence in the world occurs in Egypt. Several studies from different parts of the world have found that 13% to 33% of patients with chronic HCV have associated diabetes, mostly type II Diabetes Mellitus (DM. In Egypt the prevalence of DM is 25.4% among HCV patients. Therefore, it is important to identify the magnitude of the problem of diabetes in order to optimize the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Methods The objective of this case-control study was to evaluate the prevalence of DM and other extrahepatic (EH manifestations among patients with different HCV morbidity stages including asymptomatic, chronic hepatic and cirrhotic patients. In this study, 289 HCV patients older than 18 were selected as cases. Also, 289 healthy controls were included. Laboratory investigations including Liver Function tests (LFT and blood glucose level were done. Also serological assays including cryoglobulin profile, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, HCV-PCR were performed. Results Out of 289 HCV cases, 40 (13.84% were diabetic. Out of 289 healthy controls, 12 (4.15% were diabetic. It was found that the diabetic HCV group mean age was [48.1 (± 9.2]. Males and urbanians represented 72.5% and 85% respectively. Lower level of education was manifested in 52.5% and 87.5% were married. In the nondiabetic HCV group mean age was [40.7 (± 10.4]. Males and urbanians represented 71.5% and 655% respectively. secondary and higher level of education was attained in 55.4% and 76.7% were married. Comparing between the diabetic HCV group and the non diabetic HCV group, age, residence and alcohol drinking were the only significant factors affecting the incidence of diabetes between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding sonar findings although cirrhosis was more prevalent among diabetic HCV cases and the fibrosis score was higher in diabetic HCV patients than among the non diabetic HCV cases

  14. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among older adults in Ecuador: Results of the SABE survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orces, Carlos H; Gavilanez, Enrique Lopez

    2017-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among older adults in Ecuador. A secondary objective was to examine the relationship between metabolic syndrome and its components and insulin resistance among non-diabetic participants. The National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging survey was used to examine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to demographic, behavioral, and health characteristics of the participants. Logistic regression models adjusted for covariates were used to examine the independent association of metabolic syndrome and its components and insulin resistance in non-diabetic older adults. Of 2298 participants with a mean age of 71.6 (SD 8.1) years, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 66.0% (95% CI, 62.6%, 69.3%) in women and 47.1% (95% CI, 43.2%, 50.9) in men. However, even higher prevalence rates were seen among literate individuals, residents from urban areas of the coastal and Andes Mountains region, obese subjects, those diagnosed with diabetes, and participants with≥2 comorbidities. Overall, abdominal obesity followed by elevated blood pressure were the metabolic syndrome components more prevalent and associated with insulin resistance among older Ecuadorians. Moreover, after adjustment for covariates, older adults defined as having metabolic syndrome had a 3-fold higher odds of having insulin resistance as compared with those without. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is high among older adults in Ecuador. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement programs of lifestyle and behavioral modification targeting older adults at increased risk for this cardio metabolic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative risk of hypertension and coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, G.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    During the year 1996-1997, 3275 diabetic patients, registered in Diabetic Clinic of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, were studied to note the effect of various variables of diabetes mellitus (DM) on hypertension (HTN) and coronary artery diseases (CAD). Out of these 1402 (42.8%) were hypertensive patients. HTN was observed more frequently in obese, older age, longer duration of DM, poor glycemic control and dyslipidemia with p<0.0001. The relative risk (RR) of HTN was significantly increased (p<0.001) in obese (M2.53, F7.77 times), older age (M 3.69,F 9.64 times), longer duration of Dm (2.3 times for both sexes), poor glycemic control (M 2.89, F 4.75 times) and dyslipedemia (M 1.62-5.27, F2.56-9.53 times). While the RR of CAD due to HTN was 4.6 times (M5.4, F4.2 times) (p<0.0001) as compared to normotensive diabetic patients. The risk of developing HTN is more in female diabetics and of CAD in male hypertensive diabetic patients. It is concluded that obesity, older age, poor glycemic control, longer duration of DM and dyslipidemia increases the risk of HTN 2-9.5 times and HTN increases the risk of CAD by 4-5 times, hence requiring aggressive and comprehensive treatment of the diabetes mellitus syndrome. (author)

  16. Relative risk of hypertension and coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, G M.D. [Nishter Medical Coll., Multan (Pakistan). Dept. of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    During the year 1996-1997, 3275 diabetic patients, registered in Diabetic Clinic of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, were studied to note the effect of various variables of diabetes mellitus (DM) on hypertension (HTN) and coronary artery diseases (CAD). Out of these 1402 (42.8%) were hypertensive patients. HTN was observed more frequently in obese, older age, longer duration of DM, poor glycemic control and dyslipidemia with p<0.0001. The relative risk (RR) of HTN was significantly increased (p<0.001) in obese (M2.53, F7.77 times), older age (M 3.69,F 9.64 times), longer duration of Dm (2.3 times for both sexes), poor glycemic control (M 2.89, F 4.75 times) and dyslipedemia (M 1.62-5.27, F2.56-9.53 times). While the RR of CAD due to HTN was 4.6 times (M5.4, F4.2 times) (p<0.0001) as compared to normotensive diabetic patients. The risk of developing HTN is more in female diabetics and of CAD in male hypertensive diabetic patients. It is concluded that obesity, older age, poor glycemic control, longer duration of DM and dyslipidemia increases the risk of HTN 2-9.5 times and HTN increases the risk of CAD by 4-5 times, hence requiring aggressive and comprehensive treatment of the diabetes mellitus syndrome. (author)

  17. Word-stem priming and recognition in type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, María Teresa; Beltrán-Brotóns, José Luís; Reales, José Manuel; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the pattern of performance on implicit and explicit memory of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is more similar to those of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or to cognitively normal older adults and (b) whether glycosylated hemoglobin levels (a measure of glucose regulation) are related to performance on the two memory tasks, implicit word-stem completion and "old-new" recognition. The procedures of both memory tasks included encoding and memory test phases separated by a short delay. Three groups of participants (healthy older adults, DM2 patients and AD patients) completed medical and psychological assessments and performed both memory tasks on a computer. The results of the word-stem completion task showed similar implicit memory in the three groups. By contrast, explicit recognition of the three groups differed. Implicit memory was not affected by either normal or pathological aging, but explicit memory deteriorated in the two groups of patients, especially in AD patients, showing a severe impairment compared to the cognitively healthy older adults. Importantly, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were not related to performance on either implicit or explicit memory tasks. These findings revealed a clear dissociation between explicit and implicit memory tasks in normal and pathological aging. Neuropsychologists and clinicians working with TM2 patients should be aware that the decline of voluntary, long-term explicit memory could have a negative impact on their treatment management. By contrast, the intact implicit memory of the two clinical groups could be used in rehabilitation.

  18. Depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Natalie; Pease, Anthony; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Wischer, Natalie; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Speight, Jane; de Courten, Barbora; Zoungas, Sophia

    2018-05-18

    This study explores the prevalence of, and factors associated with, likely depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes in a large, national sample. Australian National Diabetes Audit data were analysed from adults with type 2 diabetes attending 50 diabetes centres. The Brief Case find for Depression and Diabetes Distress Score 17 were administered to screen for likely depression and diabetes-related distress, respectively. A total of 2,552 adults with type 2 diabetes participated: (mean ± SD) age was 63 ± 13 years, diabetes duration was 12 ± 10 years, and HbA1c was 8 ± 2%. Twenty-nine percent of patients had likely depression, 7% had high diabetes distress, and 5% had both. Difficulty following dietary recommendations, smoking, forgetting medications, and diabetes distress were all associated with greater odds of depression whereas higher own health rating was associated with lower odds (all p < 0.02). Female gender, increasing HbA1c, insulin use, difficulty following dietary recommendations and depression were all associated with greater odds of diabetes distress & older age, higher own health rating and monitoring blood glucose levels as recommended were associated with lower odds (all p < 0.04). Depression was associated with sub-optimal self-care, while diabetes distress was associated with higher HbA1c and sub-optimal self-care.

  19. Implementing Low-Cost, Community-Based Exercise Programs for Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Are the Benefits for Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Reis, Victor Machado; Themudo-Barata, Jose Luis

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a long-term, community-based, combined exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants ( n = 124; 63.25 ± 7.20 years old) engaged in either a 9-month supervised exercise program ( n = 39; consisting of combined aerobic, resistance, agility/balance, and flexibility exercise; three sessions per week; 70 min per session) or a control group ( n = 85) who maintained their usual care. Glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease were assessed before and after the 9-month intervention. A significant time * group interaction effect ( p exercise program developed with low-cost exercise strategies was effective in inducing significant benefits on glycemic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, anthropometric profile, and the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease in middle-aged and older patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical Trial Identification Number: ISRCTN09240628.

  20. Women Are Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes at Higher Body Mass Indices and Older Ages than Men: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010

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    Su Kyoung Kwon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany epidemiologic studies have shown that women with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared with men with diabetes. The aim of this study is to elucidate whether disparities of adiposity, age and insulin resistance (IR at the time of diabetes diagnosis exist between women and men in the adult Korean population.MethodsData from The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, performed in Korea from 2007 to 2010, were used. In the survey, anthropometric data and blood samples were obtained during a fasting state. IR and β-cell function were calculated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR and HOMA-β, respectvely.ResultsThe mean age of diabetes diagnosis was 58.5 years in women and was 55.1 years in men (P=0.015. The mean body mass index (BMI of newly diagnosed diabetes subjects was 26.1 kg/m2 in women and 25.0 kg/m2 in men (P=0.001. The BMI was inversely related to age in both genders, and the higher BMI in women than men was consistent throughout all age groups divided by decade. The HOMA-IR in women with diabetes is higher than in men with diabetes (7.25±0.77 vs. 5.20±0.32; P=0.012.ConclusionKorean adult women are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at higher BMI and older age than men and are more insulin-resistant at the time of diabetes diagnosis. This may help explain why women with diabetes have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease after the diagnosis of diabetes, compared to men.

  1. Diabetes Mellitus Following Renal Transplantation: Clinical and Pharmacological Considerations for the Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsford, David; Steinberg, Adam; Dwyer, Karen M

    2017-08-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus occurs in 30-50% of cases during the first year post-renal transplantation. It is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Risk factors include age and specific immunosuppression regimens. At the same time, renal transplantation is increasingly indicated in elderly (aged >65 years) patients as this proportion of older patients in the prevalent dialysis population has increased. The immune system and β cells undergo senescence and this impacts on the risk for developing post-transplant diabetes and our ability to prevent such development. It may, however, be possible to identify patients at risk of developing post-transplant diabetes, enabling treatment protocols that prevent or reduce the impact of post-transplant diabetes. Much work remains to be completed in this area and is facilitated by the growing base of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of post-transplant diabetes. Should post-transplant diabetes develop, there are a range of treatment options available. There is increasing interest in using newer agents, although their safety and efficacy in transplant recipients remains to be conclusively established.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus Increases Severity of Thrombocytopenia in Dengue-Infected Patients

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    Chung-Yuan Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate bacterial infection, but its effect on the severity of viral infection has not been well studied. The severity of thrombocytopenia is an indicator of the severity of dengue virus infection. We investigated whether diabetes is associated with thrombocytopenia in dengue-infected patients. Methods: We studied clinical characteristics of 644 patients with dengue infection at a university hospital during the epidemic on 1 June 2002 to 31 December 2002 in Taiwan. Platelet counts and biochemical data were compared between patients with and without diabetes. Potential risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia were explored using regression analyses. Results: Dengue-infected patients with diabetes had lower platelet counts than patients without diabetes during the first three days (54.54 ± 51.69 vs. 86.58 ± 63.4 (p ≤ 0.001, 43.98 ± 44.09 vs. 64.52 ± 45.06 (p = 0.002, 43.86 ± 35.75 vs. 62.72 ± 51.2 (p = 0.012. Diabetes mellitus, death, dengue shock syndrome (DSS and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and increased glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT levels were significantly associated with lower platelet counts during the first day of hospitalization for dengue fever with regression β of −13.981 (95% confidence interval (CI −27.587, −0.374, −26.847 (95% CI −37.562, −16.132, and 0.054 (95% CI 0.015, 0.094 respectively. Older age, hypoalbuminemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were independently correlated with thrombocytopenia in dengue patients with or without diabetes with regression β of −2.947 (p = 0.004, 2.801 (p = 0.005, and −3.568 (p ≤ 0.001, respectively. Diabetic patients with dengue had a higher rate of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS than non-diabetic patients. They also had lower blood albumin, were older, and higher triglyceride levels. Older age, hypoalbuminemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were independently correlated with thrombocytopenia in

  3. Opportunistic pathology-based screening for diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Aaron J; Krowka, Renata; Kerrigan, Jennifer L; Southcott, Emma K; Wilson, J Dennis; Potter, Julia M; Nolan, Christopher J; Hickman, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the potential of opportunistic glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) testing of pathology samples to detect previously unknown diabetes. Design Pathology samples from participants collected for other reasons and suitable for HbA1c testing were utilised for opportunistic diabetes screening. HbA1c was measured with a Biorad Variant II turbo analyser and HbA1c levels of ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) were considered diagnostic for diabetes. Confirmation of previously unknown diabetes status was obtained by a review of hospital medical records and phone calls to general practitioners. Setting Hospital pathology laboratory receiving samples from hospital-based and community-based (CB) settings. Participants Participants were identified based on the blood sample collection location in the CB, emergency department (ED) and inpatient (IP) groups. Exclusions pretesting were made based on the electronic patient history of: age <18 years, previous diabetes diagnosis, query for diabetes status in the past 12 months, evidence of pregnancy and sample collected postsurgery or transfusion. Only one sample per individual participant was tested. Results Of the 22 396 blood samples collected, 4505 (1142 CB, 1113 ED, 2250 IP) were tested of which 327 (7.3%) had HbA1c levels ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). Of these 120 (2.7%) were determined to have previously unknown diabetes (11 (1%) CB, 21 (1.9%) ED, 88 (3.9%) IP). The prevalence of previously unknown diabetes was substantially higher (5.4%) in hospital-based (ED and IP) participants aged over 54 years. Conclusions Opportunistic testing of referred pathology samples can be an effective method of screening for diabetes, especially in hospital-based and older persons. PMID:24065696

  4. Serum AGEs in black South African patients with type 2 diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T2D and 81 non-diabetic patients at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. Outcome ... Subjects. In total, 138 subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 81 control subjects were ..... loss of glucose tolerance associated with the diabetic state, treatment ..... fracture risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Identifying Underlying Beliefs About Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Low-Income Older Adults: An Elicitation Study Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung Eun; Shin, Yeon Ho; Kim, Sunyoung; Hermann, Janice; Bice, Crystal

    2017-10-01

    Identify underlying salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs about fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption among limited-income older adults. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used as the framework for conducting semistructured individual interviews in 2016. Two congregate meal sites in the city of Tuscaloosa, AL. A total of 25 low-income older adults aged ≥60 years. Behavioral, normative, and control beliefs about F&V intake. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a hybrid inductive and deductive content analysis approach. The elicitation interviews identified salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs about F&V intake among low-income older adults. These results can be used to develop nutrition education programs aimed at improving economically vulnerable older adults' F&V intake. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between continuity of care and adverse outcomes varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes

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    Eva H. DuGoff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Follow us on Twitter Co-Editors-in-Chief Martin Fortin Jane Gunn Stewart W. Mercer Susan Smith Marjan van den Akker Society for Academic Primary Care Journal Help USER You are logged in as... avalster My Profile Log Out JOURNAL CONTENT Search Search Scope Search Browse By Issue By Author By Title By Sections By Identify Types OPEN JOURNAL SYSTEMS FONT SIZE Make font size smallerMake font size defaultMake font size larger INFORMATION For Readers For Authors For Librarians ARTICLE TOOLS Print this article Indexing metadata How to cite item Supplementary files Finding References Email this article Email the author Post a Comment NOTIFICATIONS View (378 new Manage IRCMO NEWS ‘Addressing the global challenge of... Publications on multimorbidity... The CARE Plus study Prevalence of multimorbidity in the... Multimorbidity in adults from a... CURRENT ISSUE Atom logo RSS2 logo RSS1 logo HOSTED BY Part of the PKP Publishing Services Network HOME ABOUT USER HOME SEARCH CURRENT ARCHIVES ANNOUNCEMENTS PUBLISHER AUTHOR GUIDELINES SUBMISSIONS WHY PUBLISH WITH US? Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2016 >\tDuGoff Relationship between continuity of care and adverse outcomes varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes Eva H. DuGoff, Karen Bandeen-Roche, Gerard F. Anderson Abstract Background: Continuity of care is a basic tenant of primary care practice. However, the evidence on the importance of continuity of care for older adults with complex conditions is mixed. Objective: To assess the relationship between measurement of continuity of care, number of chronic conditions, and health outcomes. Design: We analyzed data from a cohort of 1,600 US older adults with diabetes and ≥1 other chronic condition in a private Medicare health plan from July 2010 to December 2011. Multivariate regression models were used to examine the association of baseline continuity (the first 6 months and the composite outcome of any emergency room use or inpatient

  7. Hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype predicts diabetes: a cohort study in Chinese urban adults

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    Zhang Meilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertriglycedemic-waist (HTGW phenotype is a simple and inexpensive screening parameter to identify people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We evaluated whether the HTGW phenotype predicts prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese urban adults. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and eight (2908 subjects including 1957 men and 951 women, aged 20 years and older, free of prediabetes and diabetes at baseline were enrolled in 2008 and followed for 3 years. Meanwhile, new cases of prediabetes and diabetes were identified via annual physical examination. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of HTGW phenotype with the incidence of prediabetes and diabetes. Results One thousand five hundred and thirty-three (1533 new prediabetes and 90 new diabetes cases were diagnosed during the follow-up period. The accumulated incidence of prediabetes and diabetes was 52.7% and 3.1%, respectively. Compared with the normal waist normal triglyceride (NWNT group, those in the HTGW group had higher incidence of prediabetes and diabetes for both men and women. The hazard ratio (HR for developing prediabetes in the presence of HTGW phenotype at baseline was 1.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.04-2.19 in women, not in men (HR=1.01; 95% CI = 0.82-1.24, after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. The HR for developing diabetes were 4.46 (95% CI = 1.88-10.60 in men and 4.64 (95% CI = 1.20-17.97 in women for people who were HTGW phenotype at baseline, after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Conclusions The HTGW phenotype can be used as a simple screening approach to predict diabetes. By using this approach, it is possible to identify individuals at high-risk for diabetes, which is of great significance in reducing the incidence of diabetes among Chinese

  8. The impact of diabetes self-management education on glucose management and empowerment in ethnic Armenians with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccashian, Zarmine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of diabetes self-management education on glycemic control and perceptions of empowerment in Armenian American immigrants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental pre and post design was used to investigate the impact of using education on self-management as measured by A1C levels and empowerment scores. Nine hours of diabetes self-management education classes were offered in the Armenian language to 75 clients at 2 adult health day care centers over 6 weeks. The participants were mostly first-generation Armenian immigrants aged 65 years and older. A1C results, the 8-item Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), and the 15-item Armenian Ethnic Orientation Questionnaire-Revised (AEOQ-R) were used to determine the impact of education on self-care management. After institutional review board approval was obtained, 75 participants completed the study. A paired t test indicated that the postintervention mean A1C level was significantly lower than the preintervention mean A1C level. The postintervention mean DES score was significantly greater than the preintervention mean DES score. No mediating effects of age, gender, acculturation, and number of years with the disease were identified for either A1C or DES score. The findings demonstrate the efficacy of the diabetes self-management education classes in improving diabetes self-care management skills. © 2014 The Author(s).

  9. Prevalence of Gall Bladder Stones among Type 2 Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of gallstones in Libyan diabetic patients is higher than the rates reported in other parts of the world. Libyan diabetic patients with gallstones tend to be older and more obese than those without gallstones. Duration of diabetes mellitus and type of treatment does not seem to influence the ...

  10. Maternal parenting style and adjustment in adolescents with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jorie M; Skinner, Michelle; Gelfand, Donna; Berg, Cynthia A; Wiebe, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the cross-sectional relationship between maternal parenting style and indicators of well-being among adolescents with diabetes. Seventy-eight adolescents (ages 11.58-17.42 years, M = 14.21) with type 1 diabetes and their mothers separately reported perceptions of maternal parenting style. Adolescents reported their own depressed mood, self-efficacy for managing diabetes, and diabetes regimen adherence. Adolescents' perceptions of maternal psychological control were associated with greater depressed mood regardless of age and gender. Firm control was strongly associated with greater depressed mood and poorer self-efficacy among older adolescents, less strongly among younger adolescents. Adolescents' perceptions of maternal acceptance were associated with less depressed mood, particularly for girls and with better self-efficacy for diabetes management, particularly for older adolescents and girls. Maternal reports of acceptance were associated only with adherence. Maternal parenting style is associated with well-being in adolescents with diabetes, but this association is complex and moderated by age and gender.

  11. Comparison of 10 single and stepped methods to identify frail older persons in primary care: diagnostic and prognostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutorius, Fleur L; Hoogendijk, Emiel O; Prins, Bernard A H; van Hout, Hein P J

    2016-08-03

    Many instruments have been developed to identify frail older adults in primary care. A direct comparison of the accuracy and prevalence of identification methods is rare and most studies ignore the stepped selection typically employed in routine care practice. Also it is unclear whether the various methods select persons with different characteristics. We aimed to estimate the accuracy of 10 single and stepped methods to identify frailty in older adults and to predict adverse health outcomes. In addition, the methods were compared on their prevalence of the identified frail persons and on the characteristics of persons identified. The Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI), the PRISMA-7, polypharmacy, the clinical judgment of the general practitioner (GP), the self-rated health of the older adult, the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS), the Identification Seniors At Risk Primary Care (ISAR PC), the Frailty Index (FI), the InterRAI screener and gait speed were compared to three measures: two reference standards (the clinical judgment of a multidisciplinary expert panel and Fried's frailty criteria) and 6-years mortality or long term care admission. Data were used from the Dutch Identification of Frail Elderly Study, consisting of 102 people aged 65 and over from a primary care practice in Amsterdam. Frail older adults were oversampled. The accuracy of each instrument and several stepped strategies was estimated by calculating the area under the ROC-curve. Prevalence rates of frailty ranged from 14.8 to 52.9 %. The accuracy for recommended cut off values ranged from poor (AUC = 0.556 ISAR-PC) to good (AUC = 0.865 gait speed). PRISMA-7 performed best over two reference standards, GP predicted adversities best. Stepped strategies resulted in lower prevalence rates and accuracy. Persons selected by the different instruments varied greatly in age, IADL dependency, receiving homecare and mood. We found huge differences between methods to identify frail persons in prevalence

  12. Rationale and Methodology for a Community-Based Study of Diabetic Retinopathy in an Indonesian Population with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Jogjakarta Eye Diabetic Study in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, Muhammad B; Agni, Angela N; Wardhana, Firman S; Kotha, Satya P; Gupta, Prateek; Widayanti, Tri W; Supanji; Widyaputri, Felicia; Widyaningrum, Rifa; Wong, Tien Y; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wang, Jie Jin; Pawiroranu, Suhardjo

    2017-02-01

    There are no available data about diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Indonesian population. This report summarizes the rationale and study design of the Jogjakarta Eye Diabetic Study in the Community (JOGED.COM), a community-based study to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of DR in persons with type 2 diabetes in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. The JOGED.COM aimed to examine a cross-sectional sample of 1200 persons with type 2 diabetes aged 30 years and older residing in the study area. We identified 121 community health centers (CHCs) in Jogjakarta and listed 35 CHCs with non-communicable diseases facilities. Multi-stage, clustered random sampling was used to select 22 CHCs randomly. We included CHCs with coverage population >30,000, and excluded those classified as 100% rural. Lists of persons with diabetes confirmed by their family physician were provided from each CHC. Examinations procedures included detailed interviews, general and eye examinations, anthropometry and body composition scan, and dilated fundus photography. We collaborated with local health authorities, family physicians, and local health practitioners in the recruitment phase. A total of 1435 invitations were distributed, and 1184 people (82.5%) with type 2 diabetes participated in this study, of whom 1138 (79.3%) had completed data with gradable retinal images. JOGED.COM is the first epidemiologic study of DR in an Indonesian population. This study will provide key information about the prevalence and risk factors of DR in the community. These data are very important for future health promotion programs to reduce the burden of DR in the population.

  13. The molecular signature of impaired diabetic wound healing identifies serpinB3 as a healing biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Albiero, Mattia; Millioni, Renato; Poncina, Nicol; Rigato, Mauro; Scotton, Rachele; Boscari, Federico; Brocco, Enrico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Villano, Gianmarco; Turato, Cristian; Biasiolo, Alessandra; Pontisso, Patrizia; Avogaro, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    Chronic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes, driving morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying delaying wound healing in diabetes are incompletely understood and tools to identify such pathways are eagerly awaited. Wound biopsies were obtained from 75 patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Matched subgroups of rapidly healing (RH, n = 17) and non-healing (NH, n = 11) patients were selected. Proteomic analysis was performed by labelling with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification and mass spectrometry. Differentially expressed proteins were analysed in NH vs RH for identification of pathogenic pathways. Individual sample gene/protein validation and in vivo validation of candidate pathways in mouse models were carried out. Pathway analyses were conducted on 92/286 proteins that were differentially expressed in NH vs RH. The following pathways were enriched in NH vs RH patients: apoptosis, protease inhibitors, epithelial differentiation, serine endopeptidase activity, coagulation and regulation of defence response. SerpinB3 was strongly upregulated in RH vs NH wounds, validated as protein and mRNA in individual samples. To test the relevance of serpinB3 in vivo, we used a transgenic mouse model with α1-antitrypsin promoter-driven overexpression of human SERPINB3. In this model, wound healing was unaffected by SERPINB3 overexpression in non-diabetic or diabetic mice with or without hindlimb ischaemia. In an independent validation cohort of 47 patients, high serpinB3 protein content was confirmed as a biomarker of healing improvement. We provide a benchmark for the unbiased discovery of novel molecular targets and biomarkers of impaired diabetic wound healing. High serpinB3 protein content was found to be a biomarker of successful healing in diabetic patients.

  14. Diabetes and change in bone mineral density at the hip, calcaneus, spine, and radius in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann V. Schwartz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Older women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM have higher bone mineral density (BMD but also have higher rates of fracture compared to those without DM. Limited evidence suggests that DM may also be associated with more rapid bone loss. To determine if bone loss rates differ by DM status in older women, we analyzed BMD data in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF between 1986 and 1998. SOF participants were women >65 years at baseline who were recruited from four regions in the U.S. DM was ascertained by self-report. BMD was measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA at baseline and at least one follow-up visit at the hip (N=6624 and calcaneus (N=6700 and, on a subset of women, at the spine (N=396 and distal radius (N=306. Annualized percent change in BMD was compared by DM status, using random effects models. Of 6,867 women with at least one follow-up DXA scan, 409 had DM at baseline. Mean age was 70.8 (SD 4.7 years. Baseline BMD was higher in women with DM at all measured sites. In models adjusted for age and clinic, women with prevalent DM lost bone more rapidly than those without DM at the femoral neck (-0.96% vs. -0.59% per year, p < 0.001, total hip (-0.98% vs. -0.70% per year, p<0.001, calcaneus (-1.64% vs. -1.40% per year, p=0.005, and spine (-0.33% vs. +0.33% per year, p=0.033, but not at the distal radius (-0.97% vs. -0.90% per year, p=0.91. These findings suggest that despite higher baseline BMD, older women with DM experience more rapid bone loss than those without DM at the hip, spine and calcaneus, but not the radius. Higher rates of bone loss may partially explain higher fracture rates in older women with DM.

  15. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with prior gestational diabetes, Oklahoma, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J; Peercy, Michael; Woods, J Cedric; Parker, Stephany P; Jackson, Teresa; Mata, Sara A; McCage, Shondra; Levkoff, Sue E; Nicklas, Jacinda M; Seely, Ellen W

    2015-04-02

    Innovative approaches are needed to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with a history of gestational diabetes. We assessed beliefs of Oklahoma American Indian women about preventing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease after having gestational diabetes. We also assessed barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum and intervention approaches that facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle program. In partnership with a tribal health system, we conducted a mixed-method study with American Indian women aged 19 to 45 years who had prior gestational diabetes, using questionnaires, focus groups, and individual interviews. Questionnaires were used to identify women's cardiometabolic risk perceptions and feasibility and acceptability of Internet or mobile phone technology for delivery of a postpartum lifestyle modification program. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted to identify key perspectives and preferences related to a potential program. Participants were 26 women, all of whom completed surveys; 11 women participated in focus group sessions, and 15 participated in individual interviews. Most women believed they would inevitably develop diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both; however, they were optimistic that they could delay onset with lifestyle change. Most women expressed enthusiasm for a family focused, technology-based intervention that emphasizes the importance of delaying disease onset, provides motivation, and promotes accountability while accommodating women's competing priorities. Our findings suggest that an intervention that uses the Internet, text messaging, or both and that emphasizes the benefits of delaying disease onset should be tested as a novel, culturally relevant approach to reducing rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this high-risk population.

  16. Rates and risks for co-morbid depression in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Nijpels, G

    2003-01-01

    factors of co-morbid depression in a community-based sample of older adults, comparing Type 2 diabetic patients with healthy control subjects. METHODS: A large (n=3107) community-based study in Dutch adults (55-85 years of age) was conducted. Pervasive depression was defined as a CES-D score greater than...... could play an essential role in the development of depression in Type 2 diabetes. These findings can enable clinicians and researchers to identify high-risk groups and set up prevention and treatment programs.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There is accumulating evidence that depression is common in people with Type 2 diabetes. However, most prevalence-studies are uncontrolled and could also be inaccurate from selection-bias, as they are conducted in specialized treatment settings. We studied the prevalence and risk...

  17. Identifying common impairments in frail and dependent older people: validation of the COPE assessment for non-specialised health workers in low resource primary health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A T, Jotheeswaran; Dias, Amit; Philp, Ian; Beard, John; Patel, Vikram; Prince, Martin

    2015-10-14

    Frail and dependent older people in resource-poor settings are poorly served by health systems that lack outreach capacity. The COPE (Caring for Older PEople) multidimensional assessment tool is designed to help community health workers (CHWs) identify clinically significant impairments and deliver evidence-based interventions Older people (n = 150) identified by CHWs as frail or dependent, were assessed at home by the CHW using the structured COPE assessment tool, generating information on impairments in nutrition, mobility, vision, hearing, continence, cognition, mood and behaviour. The older people were reassessed by local physicians who reached a clinical judgment regarding the presence or absence of the same impairments based upon clinical examination guided by the EASY-Care assessment tool. The COPE tool was considered easy to administer, and gave CHWs a sense of empowerment to understand and act upon the needs of older people. Agreement between COPE assessment by CHW and clinician assessors was modest (ranged from 45.8 to 91.3 %) for most impairments. However, the prevalence of impairments was generally higher according to clinicians, particularly for visual impairment (98.7 vs 45.8 %), cognitive impairment (78.4 vs. 38.2 %) and depression (82.0 vs. 59.9 %). Most cases identified by WHO-COPE were clinician confirmed (positive predictive values - 72.2 to 98.5 %), and levels of disability and needs for care among those identified by COPE were higher than those additionally identified by the clinician alone. The COPE is a feasible tool for the identification of specific impairments in frail dependent older people in the community. Those identified are likely to be confirmed as having clinically relevant problems by clinicians working in the same service, and the COPE may be particularly effective at targeting attention upon those with the most substantial unmet needs.

  18. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Voight, Benjamin; Scott, Laura; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBy combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combined P 5 × 10 8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of ov...

  19. Individual differences in regulatory mode moderate the effectiveness of a pilot mHealth trial for diabetes management among older veterans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Dugas

    Full Text Available mHealth tools to help people manage chronic illnesses have surged in popularity, but evidence of their effectiveness remains mixed. The aim of this study was to address a gap in the mHealth and health psychology literatures by investigating how individual differences in psychological traits are associated with mHealth effectiveness. Drawing from regulatory mode theory, we tested the role of locomotion and assessment in explaining why mHealth tools are effective for some but not everyone. A 13-week pilot study investigated the effectiveness of an mHealth app in improving health behaviors among older veterans (n = 27 with poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes. We developed a gamified mHealth tool (DiaSocial aimed at encouraging tracking of glucose control, exercise, nutrition, and medication adherence. Important individual differences in longitudinal trends of adherence, operationalized as points earned for healthy behavior, over the course of the 13-week study period were found. Specifically, low locomotion was associated with unchanging levels of adherence during the course of the study. In contrast, high locomotion was associated with generally stronger adherence although it exhibited a quadratic longitudinal trend. In addition, high assessment was associated with a marginal, positive trend in adherence over time while low assessment was associated with a marginal, negative trend. Next, we examined the relationship between greater adherence and improved clinical outcomes, finding that greater adherence was associated with greater reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels. Findings from the pilot study suggest that mHealth technologies can help older adults improve their diabetes management, but a "one size fits all" approach may yield suboptimal outcomes.

  20. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), diabetes and trajectories of change in episodic memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Colleen; Andel, Ross; Infurna, Frank J; Seetharaman, Shyam

    2017-02-01

    As the ageing population grows, it is important to identify strategies to moderate cognitive ageing. We examined glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and diabetes in relation to level and change in episodic memory in older adults with and without diabetes. Data from 4419 older adults with (n=950) and without (n=3469) diabetes participating in a nationally representative longitudinal panel study (the Health and Retirement Study) were examined. Average baseline age was 72.66 years and 58% were women. HbA1c was measured in 2006 and episodic memory was measured using immediate and delayed list recall over 4 biennial waves between 2006 and 2012. Growth curve models were used to assess trajectories of episodic memory change. In growth curve models adjusted for age, sex, education, race, depressive symptoms and waist circumference, higher HbA1c levels and having diabetes were associated with poorer baseline episodic memory (p=0.036 and HbA1c on episodic memory decline was smaller than the effect of age. The results were stronger for women than men and were not modified by age or race. When the main analyses were estimated for those with and without diabetes separately, HbA1c was significantly linked to change in episodic memory only among those with diabetes. Higher HbA1c and diabetes were both associated with declines in episodic memory, with this relationship further exacerbated by having diabetes and elevated HbA1c. HbA1c appeared more important for episodic memory performance among women than men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Reasons for participation and non-participation in a diabetes prevention trial among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infanti, Jennifer J; O'Dea, Angela; Gibson, Irene; McGuire, Brian E; Newell, John; Glynn, Liam G; O'Neill, Ciaran; Connolly, Susan B; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2014-01-24

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle intervention can prevent progression to type 2 diabetes in high risk populations. We designed a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of an established lifestyle intervention compared to standard care for delaying diabetes onset in European women with recent GDM. Recruitment into the RCT was more challenging than anticipated with only 89 of 410 (22%) women agreeing to participate. This paper identifies factors that could enhance participation of the target population in future interventions. We hypothesised that women who agreed to participate would have higher diabetes risk profiles than those who declined, and secondly that it would be possible to predict participation on the bases of those risk factors. To test our hypothesis, we identified the subset of women for whom we had comprehensive data on diabetes risks factors 3-5 years following GDM, reducing the sample to 43 participants and 73 decliners. We considered established diabetes risk factors: smoking, daily fruit and vegetable intake, participation in exercise, family history of diabetes, glucose values and BMI scores on post-partum re-screens, use of insulin during pregnancy, and age at delivery. We also analysed narrative data from 156 decliners to further understand barriers to and facilitators of participation. Two factors differentiated participants and decliners: age at delivery (with women older than 34 years being more likely to participate) and insulin use during pregnancy (with women requiring the use of insulin in pregnancy less likely to participate). Binary logistic regression confirmed that insulin use negatively affected the odds of participation. The most significant barriers to participation included the accessibility, affordability and practicality of the intervention. Women with recent GDM face multiple barriers to lifestyle change. Intervention designers

  2. Racial and ethnic differences in smoking changes after chronic disease diagnosis among middle-aged and older adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Ana R; Nagel, Corey L; Newsom, Jason T; Huguet, Nathalie; Sheridan, Paige; Thielke, Stephen M

    2017-02-08

    Middle-aged and older Americans from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds are at risk for greater chronic disease morbidity than their white counterparts. Cigarette smoking increases the severity of chronic illness, worsens physical functioning, and impairs the successful management of symptoms. As a result, it is important to understand whether smoking behaviors change after the onset of a chronic condition. We assessed the racial/ethnic differences in smoking behavior change after onset of chronic diseases among middle-aged and older adults in the US. We use longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS 1992-2010) to examine changes in smoking status and quantity of cigarettes smoked after a new heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, or lung disease diagnosis among smokers. The percentage of middle-aged and older smokers who quit after a new diagnosis varied by racial/ethnic group and disease: for white smokers, the percentage ranged from 14% after diabetes diagnosis to 32% after cancer diagnosis; for black smokers, the percentage ranged from 15% after lung disease diagnosis to 40% after heart disease diagnosis; the percentage of Latino smokers who quit was only statistically significant after stoke, where 38% quit. In logistic models, black (OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.19-0.99) and Latino (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 0.11-0.65) older adults were less likely to continue smoking relative to white older adults after a stroke, and Latinos were more likely to continue smoking relative to black older adults after heart disease onset (OR = 2.69, 95% CI [1.05-6.95]). In models evaluating changes in the number of cigarettes smoked after a new diagnosis, black older adults smoked significantly fewer cigarettes than whites after a new diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, stroke or cancer, and Latino older adults smoked significantly fewer cigarettes compared to white older adults after newly diagnosed diabetes and heart disease. Relative to black

  3. Usability and utility evaluation of the web-based "Should I Start Insulin?" patient decision aid for patients with type 2 diabetes among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew Kong; Lee, Ping Yein; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Teo, Chin Hai; Abu Bakar, Ahmad Ihsan; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Khoo, Ee Ming; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Low, Wah Yun; Chiew, Thiam Kian

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usability (ease of use) and utility (impact on user's decision-making process) of a web-based patient decision aid (PDA) among older-age users. A pragmatic, qualitative research design was used. We recruited patients with type 2 diabetes who were at the point of making a decision about starting insulin from a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia in 2014. Computer screen recording software was used to record the website browsing session and in-depth interviews were conducted while playing back the website recording. The interviews were analyzed using the framework approach to identify usability and utility issues. Three cycles of iteration were conducted until no more major issues emerged. Thirteen patients participated: median age 65 years old, 10 men, and nine had secondary education/diploma, four were graduates/had postgraduate degree. Four usability issues were identified (navigation between pages and sections, a layout with open display, simple language, and equipment preferences). For utility, participants commented that the website influenced their decision about insulin in three ways: it had provided information about insulin, it helped them deliberate choices using the option-attribute matrix, and it allowed them to involve others in their decision making by sharing the PDA summary printout.

  4. Risk of Diabetes in Older Adults with Co-Occurring Depressive Symptoms and Cardiometabolic Abnormalities: Prospective Analysis from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Freitas

    Full Text Available High depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities are independently associated with an increased risk of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities on risk of diabetes in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 years and older. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The sample comprised of 4454 participants without diabetes at baseline. High depressive symptoms were based on a score of 4 or more on the 8-item binary Centre for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. Cardiometabolic abnormalities were defined as 3 or more cardiometabolic risk factors (hypertension, impaired glycemic control, systemic inflammation, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides, and central obesity. Cox proportional hazards regressions assessed the association between co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities with incidence of diabetes. Multiple imputation by chained equations was performed to account for missing data. Covariates included age, sex, education, income, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and cardiovascular comorbidity. The follow-up period consisted of 106 months, during which 193 participants reported a diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes incidence rates were compared across the following four groups: 1 no or low depressive symptoms and no cardiometabolic abnormalities (reference group, n = 2717; 2 high depressive symptoms only (n = 338; 3 cardiometabolic abnormalities only (n = 1180; and 4 high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities (n = 219. Compared to the reference group, the hazard ratio for diabetes was 1.29 (95% CI 0.63, 2.64 for those with high depressive symptoms only, 3.88 (95% CI 2.77, 5.44 for those with cardiometabolic abnormalities only, and 5.56 (95% CI 3.45, 8.94 for those with both high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic

  5. Community-Based Diabetes Screening and Risk Assessment in Rural West Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjita Misra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This project utilized a cross-sectional study design to assess diabetes risk among 540 individuals from 12 counties using trained extension agents and community organizations in West Virginia. Individuals were screened for diabetes using (1 the validated 7-item diabetes risk assessment survey and (2 hemoglobin A1c tests. Demographic and lifestyle behaviors were also collected. The average age, body mass index, and A1c were 51.2±16.4, 31.1±7.5, and 5.8±0.74, respectively. The majority were females, Non-Hispanic Whites with no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Screenings showed that 61.8% of participants were at high risk for diabetes. Family history of diabetes (siblings or parents, overweight or obese status, sedentary lifestyle, and older age were commonly prevalent risk factors. Higher risk scores computed from the 7-item questions correlated positively with higher A1c (r=0.221, P<0.001. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, higher diabetes risk was predicted by obesity, older age, family history of hypertension, and gestational diabetes. Females were 4 times at higher risk than males. The findings indicated that community-based screenings were an effective way to assess diabetes risk in rural West Virginia. Linking diabetes screenings with referrals to lifestyle programs for high risk individuals can help reduce the burden of diabetes in the state.

  6. [Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Bello, Carlos; Capitão, Ricardo Miguel; Sequeira Duarte, João; Azinheira, Jorge; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2017-10-31

    , the results report a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the type 2 diabetic population. This study also demonstrates that the B12 deficiency risk is higher in older people, with longer diabetes mellitus duration, hypothyroidism and treated with metformin. Further studies are needed to identify the risk factors for the B12 deficit. The recognition of these variables will contribute to optimize the screening and prevention of the B12 deficiency in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Diabetes eye screening in urban settings serving minority populations: detection of diabetic retinopathy and other ocular findings using telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald; Lee, David J; Lam, Byron L; Friedman, David S; Gower, Emily W; Haller, Julia A; Hark, Lisa A; Saaddine, Jinan

    2015-02-01

    The use of a nonmydriatic camera for retinal imaging combined with the remote evaluation of images at a telemedicine reading center has been advanced as a strategy for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening, particularly among patients with diabetes mellitus from ethnic/racial minority populations with low utilization of eye care. To examine the rate and types of DR identified through a telemedicine screening program using a nonmydriatic camera, as well as the rate of other ocular findings. A cross-sectional study (Innovative Network for Sight [INSIGHT]) was conducted at 4 urban clinic or pharmacy settings in the United States serving predominantly ethnic/racial minority and uninsured persons with diabetes. Participants included persons aged 18 years or older who had type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and presented to the community-based settings. The percentage of DR detection, including type of DR, and the percentage of detection of other ocular findings. A total of 1894 persons participated in the INSIGHT screening program across sites, with 21.7% having DR in at least 1 eye. The most common type of DR was background DR, which was present in 94.1% of all participants with DR. Almost half (44.2%) of the sample screened had ocular findings other than DR; 30.7% of the other ocular findings were cataract. In a DR telemedicine screening program in urban clinic or pharmacy settings in the United States serving predominantly ethnic/racial minority populations, DR was identified on screening in approximately 1 in 5 persons with diabetes. The vast majority of DR was background, indicating high public health potential for intervention in the earliest phases of DR when treatment can prevent vision loss. Other ocular conditions were detected at a high rate, a collateral benefit of DR screening programs that may be underappreciated.

  8. Routine monitoring of diabetes mellitus in adults at primary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycaemic targets for control in type 1 diabetes mellitus* .... CGM can be useful in selected adults older than 25 years with type 1 diabetes to lower the HbA1c .... Lifestyle modifications should be addressed regularly, including weight loss if ...

  9. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but can return later in life How are MODY and neonatal diabetes diagnosed? Because monogenic diabetes is rare, this diagnosis ... type 1 or type 2 diabetes and identify MODY or neonatal diabetes. Blood tests Blood tests of glucose levels, and ...

  10. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyon K; Serafin, Bethany L

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by the body's inability to process blood glucose properly. It is generally classified as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or type 1, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or type 2. Type 1 is characterized by a defect in insulin secretion by the beta cells of the pancreas, usually secondary to autoimmune destruction of those cells. Type 2 is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance with an insulin-secretory defect that varies in severity. Diabetes is a common medical condition that affects 6% of Americans younger than 50 years and approximately 10% to 15% of those older than 50 years. Increasing numbers of patients who have diabetes are presenting to the oral surgeon's office for care. Patients who have diabetes have a 50% chance of undergoing a surgical procedure in their lifetime.

  11. Diabetes in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mordarska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of both type 2 diabetes and prediabetes increases with advancing age. The most important factors leading to hyperglycaemia are as follows: deficiency of insulin secretion developing with age, and growing insulin resistance caused by a change in body composition and sarcopaenia. Clinical features of diabetes in the elderly could be different. Diabetes in elderly people is often diagnosed with delay due to atypical symptoms (dementia, urinary incontinence and occurrence of mainly postprandial hyperglycaemia. Elderly people are more exposed to diabetes complications, have more risk of myocardial infarction and end-stage renal disease, and are hospitalised more often due to hypoglycaemia than are younger patients. Elderly people with diabetes are a heterogeneous group with different life expectancy, concomitant of chronic diseases, and the ability to self-control blood glucose or give themselves an injection. The therapy should be individualised. Older people with long-term diabetes and numerous chronic complications need a more liberal approach to reach specific goals of therapy. Additional goals should be avoiding hypoglycaemia, safety of the therapy, and its acceptance by the patient.

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes among Adults 18 Years or Older in Florida: A Multinomial Logistic Modeling Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifechukwude Obiamaka Okwechime

    Full Text Available Individuals with pre-diabetes and diabetes have increased risks of developing macro-vascular complications including heart disease and stroke; which are the leading causes of death globally. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes, and to investigate their predictors among adults ≥18 years in Florida.Data covering the time period January-December 2013, were obtained from Florida's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS. Survey design of the study was declared using SVYSET statement of STATA 13.1. Descriptive analyses were performed to estimate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes. Predictors of pre-diabetes and diabetes were investigated using multinomial logistic regression model. Model goodness-of-fit was evaluated using both the multinomial goodness-of-fit test proposed by Fagerland, Hosmer, and Bofin, as well as, the Hosmer-Lemeshow's goodness of fit test.There were approximately 2,983 (7.3% and 5,189 (12.1% adults in Florida diagnosed with pre-diabetes and diabetes, respectively. Over half of the study respondents were white, married and over the age of 45 years while 36.4% reported being physically inactive, overweight (36.4% or obese (26.4%, hypertensive (34.6%, hypercholesteremic (40.3%, and 26% were arthritic. Based on the final multivariable multinomial model, only being overweight (Relative Risk Ratio [RRR] = 1.85, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] = 1.41, 2.42, obese (RRR = 3.41, 95% CI = 2.61, 4.45, hypertensive (RRR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.33, 2.15, hypercholesterolemic (RRR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.55, 2.43, and arthritic (RRR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.55 had significant associations with pre-diabetes. However, more predictors had significant associations with diabetes and the strengths of associations tended to be higher than for the association with pre-diabetes. For instance, the relative risk ratios for the association between diabetes and being overweight (RRR = 2.00, 95

  13. Associations between long-term exposure to air pollution, glycosylated hemoglobin and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Trenton; Pun, Vivian C; Manjourides, Justin; Suh, Helen

    2017-10-01

    ) increase in one-year moving average PM 2.5 was positively associated with increased diabetes prevalence (prevalence odds ratio, POR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.53). Similarly, an IQR (8.6 ppb) increase in NO 2 was also significantly associated with diabetes prevalence (POR 1.27, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.48). PM 2.5 (1.8%±0.6%, p<0.01) and NO 2 (2.0%±0.7%, p<0.01) exposures were associated with higher HbA1c levels in diabetic participants, while only NO 2 was significantly associated with HbA1c in non-diabetic participants (0.8%±0.2%, p<0.01). Significant dose response relationships were identified for both pollutants in diabetic participants and for NO 2 in non-diabetic participants. In a cohort of older men and women in the United States, PM 2.5 and NO 2 exposures were significantly associated with prevalence of DM and increased HbA1c levels among both non-diabetic and diabetic participants. These associations suggest that air pollution could be a key risk factor for abnormal glucose metabolism and diabetes in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative genetics: synergizing human and NOD mouse studies for identifying genetic causation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, John P; Chen, Yi-Guang; Mathews, Clayton E

    2012-01-01

    Although once widely anticipated to unlock how human type 1 diabetes (T1D) develops, extensive study of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has failed to yield effective treatments for patients with the disease. This has led many to question the usefulness of this animal model. While criticism about the differences between NOD and human T1D is legitimate, in many cases disease in both species results from perturbations modulated by the same genes or different genes that function within the same biological pathways. Like in humans, unusual polymorphisms within an MHC class II molecule contributes the most T1D risk in NOD mice. This insight supports the validity of this model and suggests the NOD has been improperly utilized to study how to cure or prevent disease in patients. Indeed, clinical trials are far from administering T1D therapeutics to humans at the same concentration ranges and pathological states that inhibit disease in NOD mice. Until these obstacles are overcome it is premature to label the NOD mouse a poor surrogate to test agents that cure or prevent T1D. An additional criticism of the NOD mouse is the past difficulty in identifying genes underlying T1D using conventional mapping studies. However, most of the few diabetogenic alleles identified to date appear relevant to the human disorder. This suggests that rather than abandoning genetic studies in NOD mice, future efforts should focus on improving the efficiency with which diabetes susceptibility genes are detected. The current review highlights why the NOD mouse remains a relevant and valuable tool to understand the genes and their interactions that promote autoimmune diabetes and therapeutics that inhibit this disease. It also describes a new range of technologies that will likely transform how the NOD mouse is used to uncover the genetic causes of T1D for years to come.

  15. Diabetes mellitus in Zambia and the Western Cape province of South Africa: Prevalence, risk factors, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah Lou; Ayles, Helen; Beyers, Nulda; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Muyoyeta, Monde; du Toit, Elizabeth; Yudkin, John S; Floyd, Sian

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus and examine its diagnosis and management in the study communities. This is a population-based cross-sectional study among adults in 24 communities from Zambia and the Western Cape (WC) province of South Africa. Diabetes is defined as a random blood glucose concentration (RBG)⩾11.1mmol/L, or RBGdiabetes diagnosis. For individuals with a prior diagnosis of diabetes, RBGprevalence of diabetes was 3.5% and 7.2% respectively. The highest risk groups identified were those of older age and those with obesity. Of those identified to have diabetes, 34.5% in Zambia and 12.7% in WC were previously unaware of their diagnosis. Among Zambian participants with diabetes, this proportion was lower among individuals with better education or with higher household socio-economic position. Of all those with previously diagnosed diabetes, 66.0% in Zambia and 59.4% in WC were not on any diabetes treatment, and 34.4% in Zambia and 32.7% in WC had a RBG concentration beyond the recommended level, ⩾7.8mmol/L. The diabetes risk factor profile for our study communities is similar to that seen in high-income populations. A high proportion of individuals with diabetes are not on diabetes treatment and of those on treatment a high proportion have high glycaemic concentrations. Such data may assist in healthcare planning to ensure timely diagnosis and management of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of cognitive disorders in older people with diabetes – preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Kozieł

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Diabetes is a growing public health problem. Epidemiological studies indicate that the disease shortens life and significantly deteriorates its quality. The impact of diabetes on physical health of patients is well documented, but its impact on cognitive abilities has not been studied in detail so far. The deficit of reports regarding this problem among Polish researchers was an inspiration to start new studies. Aim of the research: To evaluate mild cognitive disorders in elderly patients with diabetes. Material and methods: The study was conducted in 2015. The study group included 7 elderly people with type 2 diabetes for more than 10 years. The control group consisted of 7 individuals of the same age without diabetes. The research tool was a self-made questionnaire to examine the cognitive abilities. An analysis of cognitive functions such as short-term memory, performing analysis and synthesis processes, understanding and creating metaphorical examples, narration and performing metalinguistic operations was performed. Results : Differences in cognitive functioning in the field of the studied variables were observed between examined groups. Elderly people with diabetes achieved significantly lower scores in all examined cognitive functions than healthy respondents. Conclusions : Elderly patients with type 2 diabetes are particularly susceptible to mild cognitive impairment. It is necessary to take this group of patients under diagnosis and early secondary prevention in order to prevent the negative impact of the disease.

  17. Increased active von Willebrand factor during disease development in the aging diabetic patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang Feng; Xia, Zuo Li; Han, Ji Ju; Wang, Yi Ting; Wang, Ji Yue; Pan, Shao Dong; Wu, Ya Ping; Zhang, Bin; Li, Guang Yao; Du, Jing Wei; Gao, Hen Qiang; de Groot, Philip G; de Laat, Bas; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is known to cause endothelial activation resulting in the secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF). We have shown that levels of VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation are increased in specific clinical settings. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether active VWF levels increase during aging and the development of diabetes within the population of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Patients and controls were divided into two groups based on age: older and younger than 60 years of age. VWF antigen, VWF propeptide, VWF activation factor and total active VWF were measured. Patients older than 60 years of age had increased levels of total active VWF, VWF activation factor and VWF propeptide compared to younger patients and controls. All measured VWF parameters were associated with age in diabetic patients. Total active VWF and VWF propeptide correlated with the period of being diagnosed with diabetes. Regression analyses showed that especially the VWF activation factor was strongly associated with diabetes in patients older than 60 years of age. In conclusion, we found that the conformation of VWF could be involved in the disease process of diabetes and that the VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation could play a role as risk marker during the development of diabetes in combination with an increase in age. Our study shows that the active quality of VWF was more important than the quantity.

  18. Diabetes, Triglyceride Levels, and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Fang; Boland, Michael V; Gupta, Priya; Gadkaree, Shekhar K; Vitale, Susan; Guallar, Eliseo; Zhao, Di; Friedman, David S

    2016-04-01

    To determine risk factors for glaucoma in a population-based study in the United States. Participants age 40 and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey underwent questionnaires, physical examination, laboratory tests, and vision tests including fundus imaging. Glaucoma was determined based on expert grading of fundus photographs. Regression modeling of glaucoma risk factors was performed. Participants with glaucoma (172) were older (mean age 68.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65.6-70.7] vs. 56.4 years [95% CI 55.6-57.2, P glucose, insulin dependence, body mass index, cholesterol levels, diastolic hypertension, systolic hypotension, obstructive sleep apnea, and marijuana were not associated with glaucoma. Multivariable modeling showed associations between glaucoma and older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.09 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.14), black race (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.71-11.30), and poverty (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.73-6.66). Diabetes was no longer associated with glaucoma after adjustment for triglyceride levels. Sex, education, insurance status, body mass index, blood pressure, obstructive sleep apnea, and smoking were not associated with glaucoma. People who are older, of black race, and with lower income levels have a higher prevalence of glaucoma. A novel association between diabetes, triglyceride levels, and glaucoma is also identified.

  19. Single-leg squats identify independent stair negotiation ability in older adults referred for a physiotherapy mobility assessment at a rural hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockings, Rowena L; Schmidt, David D; Cheung, Christopher W

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether single-leg squats identify ability to negotiate stairs in older adults at a rural hospital. Cross-sectional analytical study. Acute wards and emergency department of a rural hospital in Australia. A systematic sample of 143 older adults (72 men, 71 women, 80.0 ± 6.8 years) from the emergency department or acute wards of Shoalhaven Hospital referred for a physiotherapy mobility assessment. Ability to complete up to three single-leg squats and negotiate up to three steps were measured. Covariates and demographic variables were collected. The squat test had 86% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 49% negative predictive value in correctly identifying stair negotiation ability. Participants who could complete single-leg squats were 57 times more likely to be able to independently negotiate stairs than participants who could not complete squats. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that walker use, pain severity and whether participants lived alone were significant and independent predictors of ability to negotiate stairs independently. Single-leg squats may be an accurate identifier of stair negotiation ability in older adults admitted to the hospital for an acute illness or injury. A traditional stairs assessment would be required if older adults were unable to complete the squat test or had moderate to severe pain, used a walker to ambulate, or did not live alone. The squat test is a potentially more-efficient assessment tool than traditional stair assessments in determining an individual's ability to negotiate stairs and suitability for discharge where poor mobility is a problem. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People with Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Goeman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS. Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients’ diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management.

  1. Identifying the content of home-based health behaviour change interventions for frail older people: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicic, Ana; Gardner, Benjamin; Belk, Celia; Kharicha, Kalpa; Iliffe, Steve; Manthorpe, Jill; Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari; Walters, Kate

    2015-11-04

    Meeting the needs of the growing number of older people is a challenge for health and social care services. Home-based interventions aiming to modify health-related behaviours of frail older people have the potential to improve functioning and well-being. Previous reviews have focused on whether such interventions are effective, rather than what might make them effective. Recent advances in behavioural science make possible the identification of potential 'active ingredients' of effective interventions, such as component behaviour change techniques (BCTs), and intended intervention functions (IFs; e.g. to educate, to impart skills). This paper reports a protocol for a systematic review that seeks to (a) identify health behaviour change interventions for older frail people, (b) describe the content of these interventions, and (c) explore links between intervention content and effectiveness. The protocol is reported in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 guidelines. Studies will be identified through a systematic search of 15 electronic databases, supplemented by citation tracking. Studies will be retained for review where they report randomised controlled trials focusing on home-based health promotion delivered by a health professional for frail older people in community settings, written in English, and either published from 1980 onwards, or, for registered trials only, unpublished but completed with results obtainable from authors. Interventions will be coded for their content (BCTs, IFs) and for evidence of effectiveness (outcome data relating to behavioural and health outcomes). Analyses will describe characteristics of all interventions. Interventions for which effectiveness data are available will be categorised into those showing evidence of effectiveness versus those showing no such evidence. The potential for each intervention characteristic to contribute to change in behaviour or

  2. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery and ...

  3. Performance of the modified Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in identifying delirium  in older ED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Florian F; Hasemann, Wolfgang; Kressig, Reto W; Bingisser, Roland; Nickel, Christian H

    2017-09-01

    Delirium in older emergency department (ED) patients is associated with severe negative patient outcomes and its detection is challenging for ED clinicians. ED clinicians need easy tools for delirium detection. We aimed to test the performance criteria of the modified Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (mRASS) in identifying delirium in older ED patients. The mRASS was applied to a sample of consecutive ED patients aged 65 or older by specially trained nurses during an 11-day period in November 2015. Reference standard delirium diagnosis was based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) criteria, and was established by geriatricians. Performance criteria were computed. Analyses were repeated in the subsamples of patients with and without dementia. Of 285 patients, 20 (7.0%) had delirium and 41 (14.4%) had dementia. The sensitivity of an mRASS other than 0 to detect delirium was 0.70 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.48; 0.85), specificity 0.93 (95% CI 0.90; 0.96), positive likelihood ratio 10.31 (95% CI 6.06; 17.51), negative likelihood ratio 0.32 (95% CI 0.16; 0.63). In the sub-sample of patients with dementia, sensitivity was 0.55 (95% CI 0.28; 0.79), specificity 0.83 (95% CI 0.66; 0.93), positive likelihood ratio 3.27 (95% CI 1.25; 8.59), negative likelihood ratio 0.55 (95% CI 0.28; 1.06). The sensitivity of the mRASS to detect delirium in older ED patients was low, especially in patients with dementia. Therefore its usefulness as a stand-alone screening tool is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exercise in the healthy older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, R; McLaughlin, M A; Cassel, C K

    2001-01-01

    Habitual exercise provides numerous health benefits to the older adult. While dynamic aerobic activities increase stamina and lung capacity, isometric or resistance training improves muscle strength and endurance. Long-term benefits of continued exercise include a decreased risk of death from heart disease, enhanced balance and mobility, a decreased risk of diabetes, and an improvement in depressive symptoms. While the hazards of exercise relate predominantly to extremes of intensity and duration, all older adults should consult with a physician before beginning a new activity program. A prescription for exercise should include both aerobic and resistance training components, and frequent follow-up to improve adherence is highly recommended. (c)2001 CVRR, Inc.

  5. Prevalence of Diabetes and Associated Factors in the Uyghur and Han Population in Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiying Gong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the prevalence of diabetes and identify risk factors in the Uyghur and Han population in Xinjiang, China. Methods: A cross-sectional study in urban and rural areas in Xinjiang, including 2863 members of the Uyghur population and 3060 of the Han population aged 20 to 80 years, was conducted from June 2013 to August 2013. Data on fasting plasma glucose (FPG and personal history of diabetes were used to estimate the prevalence of diabetes. Data on demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, and lipid profiles were collected to identify risks factors using the multivariate logistic regression model. Results: In urban areas, the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 8.21%, and the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was higher in the Uyghur population (10.47% than in the Han population (7.36%. In rural areas, the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 6.08%, and it did not differ significantly between the Uyghur population (5.71% and the Han population (6.59%. The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, obesity, high triglycerides (TG, and hypertension were all associated with an increased risk of diabetes in the Uyghur and Han population. Urban residence and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were associated with an increased risk of diabetes in the Uyghur population. Being an ex-drinker was associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heavy physical activity was associated with a decreased risk of diabetes in the Han population. Conclusions: Our study indicates that diabetes is more prevalent in the Uyghur population compared with the Han population in urban areas. Strategies aimed at the prevention of diabetes require ethnic targeting.

  6. Prevalence of Diabetes and Associated Factors in the Uyghur and Han Population in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haiying; Pa, Lize; Wang, Ke; Mu, Hebuli; Dong, Fen; Ya, Shengjiang; Xu, Guodong; Tao, Ning; Pan, Li; Wang, Bin; Shan, Guangliang

    2015-10-14

    To estimate the prevalence of diabetes and identify risk factors in the Uyghur and Han population in Xinjiang, China. A cross-sectional study in urban and rural areas in Xinjiang, including 2863 members of the Uyghur population and 3060 of the Han population aged 20 to 80 years, was conducted from June 2013 to August 2013. Data on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and personal history of diabetes were used to estimate the prevalence of diabetes. Data on demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, and lipid profiles were collected to identify risks factors using the multivariate logistic regression model. In urban areas, the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 8.21%, and the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was higher in the Uyghur population (10.47%) than in the Han population (7.36%). In rural areas, the age- and gender-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 6.08%, and it did not differ significantly between the Uyghur population (5.71%) and the Han population (6.59%). The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, obesity, high triglycerides (TG), and hypertension were all associated with an increased risk of diabetes in the Uyghur and Han population. Urban residence and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were associated with an increased risk of diabetes in the Uyghur population. Being an ex-drinker was associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heavy physical activity was associated with a decreased risk of diabetes in the Han population. Our study indicates that diabetes is more prevalent in the Uyghur population compared with the Han population in urban areas. Strategies aimed at the prevention of diabetes require ethnic targeting.

  7. 75 FR 16142 - FY 2010 Special Diabetes Program for Indians Community-Directed Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... older had diagnosed diabetes (unpublished IHS Diabetes Program Statistics, 2006) compared to 7.8% for... the delinquency is attributable to the failure of the grantee organization or the individual...

  8. Identifying the Potential for Robotics to Assist Older Adults in Different Living Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzner, Tracy L.; Chen, Tiffany L.; Kemp, Charles C.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    As the older adult population grows and becomes more diverse, so will their needs and preferences for living environments. Many adults over 65 years of age require some assistance [1, 2]; yet it is important for their feelings of well-being that the assistance not restrict their autonomy [3]. Not only is autonomy correlated with quality of life [4], autonomy enhancement may improve functionality [2, 5]. The goal of this paper is to provide guidance for the development of technology to enhance autonomy and quality of life for older adults. We explore the potential for robotics to meet these needs. We evaluated older adults' diverse living situations and the predictors of residential moves to higher levels of care in the United States. We also examined older adults' needs for assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and medical conditions when living independently or in a long-term care residence. By providing support for older adults, mobile manipulator robots may reduce need-driven, undesired moves from residences with lower levels of care (i.e., private homes, assisted living) to those with higher levels of care (i.e., skilled nursing). PMID:24729800

  9. 75 FR 1389 - FY 2010 Special Diabetes Program for Indians Community-Directed Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... or older had diagnosed diabetes (unpublished IHS Diabetes Program Statistics, 2006) compared to 7.8... applies whether the delinquency is attributable to the failure of the grantee organization or the...

  10. The role of diabetes in acromegaly associated neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cheng

    Full Text Available The risk and mortality due to cancer in patients with acromegaly have been previously investigated. Although GH/IGF-1 excess provides a probable pathophysiological explanation, the degree of IGF-1 excess and the role in acromegaly-associated neoplasms of diabetes, a common comorbidity in acromegaly with known association with cancer, remains unclear.Acromegalic patients treated in three Canadian referral centers (Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton were included. All available clinical information was recorded including: age, initial and last percentage of the upper limit of normal (%ULN IGF-1 levels, comorbidities and other neoplasms (benign and malignant.408 cases were assessed. 185 were women (45.3%, 126 (30.9% developed extra-pituitary neoplasms: 55 malignant and 71 benign. The most frequent anatomic site was the gastrointestinal tract (46 [11.3%], followed by head and neck (36 [8.8%] and multiple locations (14 [3.4%]. 106 (26.0% cases had diabetes. Initial IGF-1 was significantly higher in men older than 50 (380.15 vs. 284.78, p = 0.001 when compared to men younger than 50. Diabetics showed significantly higher initial IGF-1 (389.38 vs. 285.27, p = 0.009, as did diabetics older than 50 compared with those without diabetes. 45.3% (48/106 of cases with diabetes developed extra-pituitary neoplasms vs. 24.3% (71/292 without diabetes (p = 0.001, OR: 2.576 95%CI 1.615-4.108. 22.6% (24/106 of cases with diabetes developed malignant tumors vs. 9.2% (27/292, (p < 0.001, OR 2.873, 95%CI 1.572-5.250.These data suggest that acromegalic patients with diabetes are more likely to develop extra-pituitary neoplasms and their initial IGF-1 levels are higher. The contribution of IGF-1 vs. diabetes alone or in combination in the development of extra-pituitary neoplasms warrants further investigation.

  11. Associations of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events in 32 871 drug-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    ?stgren, C J; Sundstr?m, J; Svennblad, B; Lohm, L; Nilsson, P M; Johansson, G

    2013-01-01

    Aims To explore the association of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Methods A cohort of 32 871 patients with Type 2 diabetes aged 35 years and older identified by extracting data from electronic patient records for all patients who had a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes and had glucose-lowering agents prescribed between 1999 and 2009 at 84 primary care centres in Sweden. Associations of mean HbA1c levels and educational...

  12. Identifying primary care patients at risk for future diabetes and cardiovascular disease using electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrader Peter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD is possible but identification of at-risk patients for targeting interventions is a challenge in primary care. Methods We analyzed electronic health record (EHR data for 122,715 patients from 12 primary care practices. We defined patients with risk factor clustering using metabolic syndrome (MetS characteristics defined by NCEP-ATPIII criteria; if missing, we used surrogate characteristics, and validated this approach by directly measuring risk factors in a subset of 154 patients. For subjects with at least 3 of 5 MetS criteria measured at baseline (2003-2004, we defined 3 categories: No MetS (0 criteria; At-risk-for MetS (1-2 criteria; and MetS (≥ 3 criteria. We examined new diabetes and CHD incidence, and resource utilization over the subsequent 3-year period (2005-2007 using age-sex-adjusted regression models to compare outcomes by MetS category. Results After excluding patients with diabetes/CHD at baseline, 78,293 patients were eligible for analysis. EHR-defined MetS had 73% sensitivity and 91% specificity for directly measured MetS. Diabetes incidence was 1.4% in No MetS; 4.0% in At-risk-for MetS; and 11.0% in MetS (p MetS vs No MetS = 6.86 [6.06-7.76]; CHD incidence was 3.2%, 5.3%, and 6.4% respectively (p Conclusion Risk factor clustering in EHR data identifies primary care patients at increased risk for new diabetes, CHD and higher resource utilization.

  13. Potential Explanatory Factors for Higher Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Older Diabetic Adults

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    Elsa S. Strotmeyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N=5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9–20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1–12.9 and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7–11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6–7.7, but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01–1.78. PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92–1.57 and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04–1.10 modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87–1.57. Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions.

  14. Prevalence and correlates of diabetic retinopathy in a population-based survey of older people in Nakuru, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathenge, Wanjiku; Bastawrous, Andrew; Peto, Tunde; Leung, Irene; Yorston, David; Foster, Allen; Kuper, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of and factors associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) among people aged ≥ 50 years in Nakuru, Kenya. Probability-proportional-to-size sampling was used to select 100 clusters of 50 people aged ≥ 50 years during 2007-2008. Households within clusters were selected through compact segment sampling. Participants underwent dilated slit lamp biomicroscopy (SLB) by an ophthalmologist and digital retinal photography. Images were graded for DR at the Moorfields Eye Hospital Reading Centre, UK. Diagnosis of DR was based on retinal images where available, otherwise on SLB. Anthropometric measures, including random glucose, and lifestyle factors were measured. We examined 4414 adults (response rate 88.1%), of whom 287 had diabetes. A total of 277 of these were screened for DR by SLB, and 195 also underwent retinal photography. The prevalence of any DR diagnosed by retinal images among diabetics was 35.9% (95% confidence interval, CI, 29.7-42.6%). The most common grade of DR was mild/moderate non-proliferative DR (NPDR; 22.1%, 95% CI 16.1-29.4%), while severe NPDR and proliferative DR were less frequent (13.9%, 95% CI 10.0-18.8%). SLB significantly underdiagnosed DR compared to retinal photography, particularly for milder grades. Of 87 individuals with DR, 23 had visual impairment (visual acuity <6/12). DR was associated with younger age, male sex, duration and control of diabetes, and treatment compliance. Coverage of photocoagulation in those needing immediate laser was low (25%). DR remains a threat to sight in people with diabetes in this elderly Kenyan population. Screening diabetics may enable those requiring treatment to be identified in time to preserve their sight.

  15. Validation of self-reported diabetes in a representative sample of São Paulo city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane de Mello Fontanelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To validate the self-reported diabetes mellitus in adults and older adults living in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS We have used data of 569 subjects (284 adults and 285 older adults, participants of the population-based cross-sectional study Inquérito de Saúde do Município de São Paulo (Health Survey of São Paulo. Fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dL and/or use of drugs (oral hypoglycemic and/or insulin defined the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. We have validated the self-reported diabetes mellitus by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values. We have used Poisson regression with robust variance to verify the factors associated with the sensitivity of the self-reported datum. For all analyses, we have considered the sample design of the study. RESULTS The sensitivity of self-reported diabetes mellitus was 63.8% (95%CI 49.2–76.3, specificity was 99.7% (95%CI 99.1–99.9, positive predictive value was 95.5% (95%CI 84.4–98.8, and negative predictive value was 96.9% (95%CI 94.9–98.2. The correct reporting of diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among older adults (PR = 2.0; 95%CI 1.2–3.5 than among adults. CONCLUSIONS The use of the datum of self-reported diabetes mellitus is valid, especially among older adults living in the city of São Paulo. The results highlight the need to track diabetes mellitus in asymptomatic subjects who have one or more risk factors for it, mainly in the adult population of this city.

  16. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  17. Prevalence of hypotension and its association with cognitive function among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Haron, Sharifah Azizah; Bagat, Mohamad Fazdillah; Mohammadi, Fatemeh

    2018-04-01

    The negative effect of hypertension has overshadowed possible health problems associated with hypotension. The purposes of this study were to describe the prevalence of hypotension in older adults and to determine the association between hypotension and cognitive function, after adjusting for possible covariates. The data for the study consisting of 1067 community-dwelling older adults were obtained from a national survey entitled "Identifying Psychosocial and Identifying Economic Risk Factor of Cognitive Impairment among Elderly", conducted in Malaysia. The hypotension was considered as blood pressure age of the respondents was 68.27 (SD = 5.93). Mean score of cognitive function as measured by MMSE was 22.70 (SD = 4.95). The prevalence of hypotension was 29.3%. The prevalence of cognitive impairment for hypotension group was 25.6%. Results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that hypotension is negatively associated with cognitive function (Beta = -0.11, page, gender, education, marital status, employment status, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and gastritis. The study showing hypotension is significantly associated with decreased cognitive function in later life, implies more attention to low blood pressure in old age.

  18. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Downregulation of the Neurotrophin-MAPK Signaling Pathway in Female Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Cai, Jiang-Jia; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Mi; Hu, Su-Pei; Xu, Jin; Ji, Lin-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is not diagnosed or managed properly in the majority of patients because its pathogenesis remains controversial. In this study, human whole genome microarrays identified 2898 and 4493 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in DM and DPN patients, respectively. A further KEGG pathway analysis indicated that DPN and DM share four pathways, including apoptosis, B cell receptor signaling pathway, endocytosis, and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. The DEGs identified through comparison of DPN and DM were significantly enriched in MAPK signaling pathway, NOD-like receptor signaling pathway, and neurotrophin signaling pathway, while the "neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway" was notably downregulated. Seven DEGs from the neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway were validated in additional 78 samples, and the results confirmed the initial microarray findings. These findings demonstrated that downregulation of the neurotrophin-MAPK signaling pathway may be the major mechanism of DPN pathogenesis, thus providing a potential approach for DPN treatment.

  19. The assessment of clinical distal symmetric polyneuropathy in type 1 diabetes: a comparison of methodologies from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambianco, G; Costacou, T; Strotmeyer, Elsa; Orchard, T J

    2011-05-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, but often difficult to diagnose reliably. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between three point-of-care devices, Vibratron II, NC-stat(®), and Neurometer(®), and two clinical protocols, MNSI and monofilament, in identifying those with DSP, and/or amputation/ulcer/neuropathic pain (AUP), the two outcomes of major concern. This report presents data from 195 type 1 diabetic participants of the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study attending the 18-year examination (2004-2006). Participants with physician-diagnosed DSP, AUP or who were abnormal on the NC-stat, and the Vibratron II, MNSI, and monofilament were older (pAUP, or any testing modality, with the exception of NCstat (motor). The Vibratron II and MNSI showed the highest sensitivity for DSP (>87%) and AUP (>80%), whereas the monofilament had the highest specificity (98% DSP, 94% AUP) and positive predictive value (89% DSP, 47% AUP), but lowest sensitivity (20% DSP, 30% AUP). The MNSI also had the highest negative predictive value (83%) and Youden's Index (37%) and currently presents the single best combination of sensitivity and specificity of DSP in type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Health benefits of Quran memorization for older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Nazmus; Saquib, Juliann; Alhadlag, Abdulrahman; Albakour, Mohamad Anas; Aljumah, Bader; Sughayyir, Mohammed; Alhomidan, Ziad; Alminderej, Omar; Aljaser, Mohamed; Al-Dhlawiy, Ahmed Mohammed; Al-Mazrou, Abdulrahman

    2017-01-01

    To examine the association between Quran memorization and health among older men. This cross-sectional study included older Saudi men (age ≥ 55 years) from Buraidah, Al-Qassim. The neighborhoods were selected randomly (20 out of 96); eligible men from the mosques were recruited. Demographics, lifestyle, and depression were assessed with standardized questionnaires; height, weight, blood pressure, and random blood glucose (glucometer) were measured with standard protocol. The mean and standard deviation for age, body mass index, and Quran memorization were 63 years (7.5), 28.9 kg/m 2 (4.8), and 4.3 sections (6.9). Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and depression were 71%, 29%, and 22%, respectively. Those who memorized at least 10 sections of Quran were 64%, 71%, and 81% less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, and depression compared to those who memorized less than 0.5 sections, after controlling for covariates. There was a strong linear association between Quran memorization and hypertension, diabetes, and depression indicating that those who had memorized a larger portion of the Quran were less likely to have one of these chronic diseases. Future studies should explore the potential health benefits of Quran memorization and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Functional Investigations of HNF1A Identify Rare Variants as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, Laeya Abdoli; Aukrust, Ingvild; Flannick, Jason; Molnes, Janne; Burtt, Noel; Molven, Anders; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David; Johansson, Stefan; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Variants in HNF1A encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF-1A) are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young form 3 (MODY 3) and type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether functional classification of HNF1A rare coding variants can inform models of diabetes risk prediction in the general population by analyzing the effect of 27 HNF1A variants identified in well-phenotyped populations (n = 4,115). Bioinformatics tools classified 11 variants as likely pathogenic and showed no association with diabetes risk (combined minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.22%; odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% CI 0.73–5.60; P = 0.18). However, a different set of 11 variants that reduced HNF-1A transcriptional activity to diabetes in the general population (combined MAF 0.22%; OR 5.04; 95% CI 1.99–12.80; P = 0.0007). Our functional investigations indicate that 0.44% of the population carry HNF1A variants that result in a substantially increased risk for developing diabetes. These results suggest that functional characterization of variants within MODY genes may overcome the limitations of bioinformatics tools for the purposes of presymptomatic diabetes risk prediction in the general population. PMID:27899486

  2. Association between dietary patterns and blood lipid profiles in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Yeon-Sook; Chang, Hak Chul; Moon, Min Kyong; Song, YoonJu

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to explore the associations of dietary patterns with blood lipid profiles and obesity in adults with type 2 diabetes. The data were obtained from the Forth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008. Adults 30 yr or older, from which had both biochemical and dietary data were obtained. Among them, 680 subjects were defined as having diabetes based on criteria of fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, anti-diabetic treatment, or previously diagnosed diabetes. Dietary data from a 24-hr recall were used to derive dietary patterns by factor analysis. Four dietary patterns by factor analysis were identified: 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol', 'Noodles & Seafood', 'Rice & Vegetables', and 'Korean Healthy' patterns. Serum cholesterol levels in the highest quartile of the 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol' pattern were significantly higher compared with those in the lowest quartile. In addition, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the highest quartile of the 'Korean Healthy' pattern were significantly lower after adjusting for potential confounders. Dietary patterns of adults with diabetes were found to be associated with blood lipid profiles. 'Korean Healthy' pattern including whole grains, legumes, vegetables, and fruits could thus improve lipid profiles among those with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Characteristics Predicting Dyslipidemia in Drug-naïve Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Dou Lin

    2006-09-01

    Conclusion: We recommend a more intensive monitoring of lipid levels in drug-naïve diabetic patients who possess the characteristics of alcohol consumption or older age (men, long duration of diabetes (women, and higher BMI or WHR (both genders.

  4. Identifying reliable predictors of protein-energy malnutrition in hospitalized frail older adults. A prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Gianfranco; Bertocchi, Luca; Dal Bo, Eugenia; Di Pasquale, Carmen Luisa; Zanetti, Michela

    2018-03-07

    Decreased food intake is a risk factor for relevant complications (e.g. infections, pressure ulcers), longer hospital stays, higher readmission rates, greater health care costs and increased patient mortality, particularly in frail hospitalized older adults who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Nurses are called to improve this criticality, starting from accurately identify patients for malnutrition at hospital admission and effectively monitoring their food intake. The primary aim was to identify reliable predictive indicators of reduced food intake at hospital admission. The secondary aims were to assess the adequacy of daily energy and protein intake and the impact of nutrient intake on patient outcomes. Prospective observational longitudinal study. Internal Medicine Ward of an Academic Teaching University Hospital. Acute older adults who were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (Nutritional Risk Score-2002 ≥ 3, middle-upper arm circumference energy and protein intake was monitored during the first 5 days of hospital stay by a photographic method and compared to the daily energy and protein requirement calculated by specific equations. Data on anthropometry, inflammation/malnutrition laboratory data and body composition (phase angle calculated using bioelectrical impedance analysis) were collected. Eighty-one subjects (age 81.5 ± 11.5 years) were enrolled. Mean energy intake was 669.0 ± 573.9 kcal/day, and mean protein intake was 30.7 ± 25.8 g/day. Over 60% of patients ingested ≤50% of their calculated energy and protein requirements: these patients were older (p = 0.026), had a lower middle-upper arm circumference (p = 0.022) and total arm area (p = 0.038), a higher C-reactive protein/albumin ratio and Instant Nutritional Assessment score (p protein/albumin ratio, and impaired self-feeding at admission were independently associated with critically reduced energy and protein intake. Middle

  5. Oral anti-diabetics in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Najmul

    2015-05-01

    A large proportion of Muslim patients with type 2 diabetes fast during the month of Ramadan worldwide. Hypoglycaemia is one of the major complications associated with long periods without food during the fasting hours. There is also a risk of hyperglycaemia due to over indulgence in food during the two main meals of Suhur and Iftar. Healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the risk of fasting and be competent to provide Ramadan adjusted diabetes care particularly adjustment of oral anti diabetics. This review article has taken into consideration observational studies, randomized trial data, pathophysiology and practical experience in recommending adjustment in oral anti-diabetics during fasting in type-2 diabetics. Metformin and Thiazolidinediones (TZD'S) being insulin sensitizers need minimum adjustment with low risk of hypoglycaemia. Older generation Sulphonylureas (SU) pose a high risk of hypoglycaemia but the newer generations of Sulphonylureas have a reasonable safety profile. Alpha- Glucosidase inhibitors are safe during fasting but their use is limited due to the side effects.

  6. Structured nursing follow-up: does it help in diabetes care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Michal; Nakar, Sasson; Lustman, Alex; Lahad, Amnon; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    In 1995 Clalit Health Services introduced a structured follow-up schedule, by primary care nurses, of diabetic patients. This was supplementary care, given in addition to the family physician's follow-up care. This article aims to describe the performance of diabetes follow-up and diabetes control in patients with additional structured nursing follow-up care, compared to those patients followed only by their family physician. We randomly selected 2,024 type 2 diabetic subjects aged 40-76 years. For each calendar year, from 2005-2007, patients who were "under physician follow-up only" were compared to those who received additional structured nursing follow-up care. Complete diabetes follow-up parameters including: HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, microalbumin, blood pressure measurements and fundus examination. The average age of study participants was 60.7 years, 52% were females and 38% were from low socioeconomic status (SES). In 2005, 39.5% of the diabetic patients received structured nursing follow-up, and the comparable figures for 2006 and 2007 were 42.1% 49.6%, respectively. The intervention subjects tended to be older, from lower SES, suffered from more chronic diseases and visited their family physician more frequently than the control patients. Patients in the study group were more likely to perform a complete diabetes follow-up plan: 52.8% vs. 21.5% (2005; p nursing follow-up care were more likely to perform complete diabetes follow-up protocol. Our results reinforce the importance of teamwork in diabetic care. Further study is required to identify strategies for channeling the use of the limited resources to the patients who stand to benefit the most.

  7. Oral Health Conditions of Older People: Focus on the Balkan Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzopoulos Georgios S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral health plays a pivotal role in general health, especially in older people. Oral diseases may affect the development of systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension. The most important oral health conditions that have been recorded in dental literature for older population include tooth loss, dental caries, periodontal diseases, xerostomia (dry mouth) and oral cancer. Edentulism influences social life, either causing aesthetic problems or...

  8. Diabetes related risk factors did not explain the increased risk for urinary incontinence among women with diabetes. The Norwegian HUNT/EPINCONT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midthjell Kristian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown an association between diabetes mellitus (DM and urinary incontinence (UI in women, especially severe UI. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether diabetes related variables could explain this association. Methods The study is part of the EPINCONT study, which is based on the large Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 2 (HUNT 2, performed in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, during the years 1995 - 1997. Questions on diabetes and UI were answered by a total of 21 057 women aged 20 years and older. Of these 685 were identified as having diabetes, and thus comprise the population of our study. A variety of clinical and biochemical variables were recorded from the participants. Results Blood-glucose, HbA1c, albumine:creatinine ratio (ACR, duration of diabetes, diabetes treatment, type of diabetes, cholesterol and triglycerides did not significantly differ in women with and without UI in crude analyses. However, the diabetic women with UI had more hospitalizations during the last 12 months, more homecare, and a higher prevalence of angina and use of oestrogene treatment (both local and oral/patch. After adjusting for age, BMI, parity and smoking, there were statistically significant associations between any UI and angina (OR 1.89; 95% CI: 1.22 - 2.93, homecare (OR 1.72; 95% CI: 1.02 - 2.89, and hospitalization during the last 12 months (OR 1.67; 95% CI: 1.18 - 2.38. In adjusted analyses severe UI was also significantly associated with the same variables, and also with diabetes drug treatment (OR 2.10; 95% CI: 1.07 - 4.10 and stroke (OR 2.47; 95% CI: 1.09 - 5.59. Conclusion No single diabetes related risk factor seems to explain the increased risk for UI among women with diabetes. However, we found associations between UI and some clinical correlates of diabetes.

  9. Factors associated with diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy screening in Korea: the Third and Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES III and IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Tyler Hyung Taek; Byun, Il Hwan; Kim, Han Sang; Lee, Sang Yeul; Yoon, Jin Sook

    2013-06-01

    This cross-sectional study was done to identify and determine the socio-demographic and health-related factors associated with diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy screening in Korea. Participants included 2,660 adults, aged 40 or older, with diabetes. Of the 2,660 adults, 998 (37%) and 1,226 (46.1%) had received a diabetic retinopathy and a nephropathy screening within one year, respectively. Regarding retinopathy, subjects older than 65, living in urban areas, with high educational levels, and with self-reported "unhealthy" status were likely to receive annual screening. Subjects living in urban areas, with higher educational levels, with self-reported "fair" or "unhealthy" status, and with 1 to 2 co-morbidities were likely to receive annual nephropathy screening. The Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) continued to rise until 2007 when it started to decline over the subsequent years, following the same curve as the diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy screening rates during that time. Together with the financial matter, lack of patient education proved to be a hindrance to diabetes-related screening. The relatively low screening rates in Korea compared to the Western countries are likely to be due to the difference in the health system, economic situations and national demographics.

  10. Effects of aging and insulin resistant states on protein anabolic responses in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jose A; Jacob, Kathryn Wright; Chevalier, Stéphanie

    2018-07-15

    Insulin is the principal postprandial anabolic hormone and resistance to its action could contribute to sarcopenia. We developed different types of hyperinsulinemic clamp protocols to measure simultaneously glucose and protein metabolism in insulin resistant states (older adults, obesity, diabetes, etc.). To define effects of healthy aging in response to insulin, we employed the hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic and isoaminoacidemic (HYPER-1) clamp. The net whole-body anabolic (protein balance) response to hyperinsulinemia was lower in the elderly vs young (p = 0.007) and was highly correlated with the clamp glucose rate of disposal (r = 0.671, p anabolism compared with young ones. As most of the anabolism occurs during feeding, we studied the fed-state metabolic responses with aging using the hyperinsulinemic, hyperglycemic and hyperaminoacidemic clamp, including muscle biopsies. Older women showed comparable whole-body protein anabolic responses and stimulation of mixed-muscle protein synthesis by feeding to the young. The responses of skeletal muscle insulin signaling through the Akt-mTORC1 pathway were also unaltered, and therefore consistent with muscle protein synthesis results. Given that type 2 diabetes infers insulin resistance of protein metabolism with aging, we studied 10 healthy, 8 obese, and 8 obese type 2 diabetic elderly women using the HYPER-1 clamp. When compared to the group of young lean women to define the effects of obesity and diabetes with aging, whole-body change in net protein balance with hyperinsulinemia was similarly blunted in obese and diabetic older women. However, only elderly obese women with diabetes had lower net balance than lean older women. We conclude that with usual aging, the blunted whole-body anabolic response in elderly subjects is mediated by the failure of insulin to stimulate protein synthesis to the same extent as in the young, especially in men. This blunted response can be overcome at the whole-body and muscle

  11. Short term outcome of Percutanous Coronary Intervention in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouzari Y

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite recent improvement in coronary intervention, there are many controversies about it’s results in diabetic patients. The goal of this study is comparison of in hospital outcome of diabetics after coronary intervention with nondiabetics. Methods: In this study 115 diabetic and 115non diabetic patients who admitted for coronary intervention in our center during 1383&84 were entered in an analytic study of Cohort type. Datas about clinical, aniographic, procedural and post procedural (24hours characteristics were entered in each patient’s form. Independent T test,chi-square and Fisher’s exact test were used for analyzing datas. Results: The Diabetic Patients were most often older men, and they had higher angina class, more co-risk factors and lower ejection fractions. Diabetic’s lesions were longer and more located in proximal portion of vessels. But success rate, major complication (death, revascularization, Q Wave MI and CVA, and minor complications (coronary/peripheral arteries complication, pulmonary edema, ischemic ECG had no significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus does not affect short outcomes of coronary intervention as an independent factor. So intervention could be done in these patients with considering favorable outcomes.

  12. IL-1beta induced protein changes in diabetes prone BB rat islets of Langerhans identified by proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, T; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Mose Larsen, P

    2002-01-01

    of 82 out of 1 815 protein spots detected by two dimensional gel electrophoresis in IL-1beta exposed diabetes prone Bio Breeding (BB-DP) rat islets of Langerhans in vitro. The aim of this study was to identify the proteins in these 82 spots by mass spectrometry and compare these changes with those seen......Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterized by selective destruction of the insulin producing beta cells. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) modulates the beta-cell function, protein synthesis, energy production and causes apoptosis. We have previously shown changes in the expression...

  13. Quality Indicators for the Management of Diabetes Mellitus for Vulnerable Older Persons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shekelle, Paul

    2004-01-01

    .... Direct medical expenditures on diabetic care were estimated at $44 million. At Northern California Kaiser, a matched cohort analysis indicated that the annual excess expenditures for diabetic patients totaled $3,500 per person...

  14. Maternal age at birth and childhood type 1 diabetes: a pooled analysis of 30 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2009-01-01

    for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios and to investigate heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS: Data were available for 5 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 14,724 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was, on average, a 5% (95% CI 2......OBJECTIVE: The aim if the study was to investigate whether children born to older mothers have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies using individual patient data to adjust for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Relevant studies...... published before June 2009 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of studies were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct prespecified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by maternal age were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment...

  15. Identifying user preferences for a digital educational solution for young seniors with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, P.; Maas, A.H.; Chen, W.; van Pul, C.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; van Riel, N.A.W.; Hilbers, P.A.J.; Haak, H.R.

    2017-01-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged

  16. Identifying User Preferences for a Digital Educational Solution for Young Seniors With Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Pieta; Maas, Anne H.; Chen, Wei; van Pul, Carola; Cottaar, Eduardus J. E.; van Riel, Natal A. W.; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Haak, Harm R.

    2017-01-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged

  17. Identifying diabetes-related important protein targets with few interacting partners with the PageRank algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolmusz, Vince I

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes is a growing concern for the developed nations worldwide. New genomic, metagenomic and gene-technologic approaches may yield considerable results in the next several years in its early diagnosis, or in advances in therapy and management. In this work, we highlight some human proteins that may serve as new targets in the early diagnosis and therapy. With the help of a very successful mathematical tool for network analysis that formed the basis of the early successes of Google(TM), Inc., we analyse the human protein-protein interaction network gained from the IntAct database with a mathematical algorithm. The novelty of our approach is that the new protein targets suggested do not have many interacting partners (so, they are not hubs or super-hubs), so their inhibition or promotion probably will not have serious side effects. We have identified numerous possible protein targets for diabetes therapy and/or management; some of these have been well known for a long time (these validate our method), some of them appeared in the literature in the last 12 months (these show the cutting edge of the algorithm), and the remainder are still unknown to be connected with diabetes, witnessing completely new hits of the method.

  18. Protective effect of metformin against retinal vein occlusions in diabetes mellitus - A nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found that metformin can reduce cardiovascular risk, but its association with retinal vein occlusion (RVO is unknown. In this population-based cohort study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD, we demonstrated the protective effect of metformin against RVO in diabetes mellitus (DM and explored the incidence rate and factors associated with RVO development in general and diabetic populations. One million patients were randomly selected from the registry files of the NHIRD, and all their claims data were collected for the 1996-2011 period. Patients with a new diagnosis of central or branch RVO were identified using International Classification of Disease codes. DM was defined for patients with diagnoses and treatments. Factors associated with RVO development in the non-DM and DM cohorts were explored using Cox proportional regression models. In total, 1,018 RVO patients were identified from the database. The average incidence of RVO was 9.93 and 53.5 cases per 100,000 person-years in the non-DM and DM cohorts, respectively. Older age, DM, hypertension, and glaucoma were significant risk factors for RVO, whereas the prescription of anticoagulants was a significant protective factor. In the DM cohort, older age, hypertension, and diabetic retinopathy were significant risk factors for RVO, whereas metformin treatment was a significant protective factor. These results confirmed the risk factors for RVO and demonstrated the protective effect of metformin against RVO in DM patients. Prescribing metformin for DM patients may be beneficial for reducing the incidence of RVO, along with its hypoglycemic action.

  19. Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners by older Australians: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Laurann; Jowsey, Tanisha; McRae, Ian S

    2013-04-02

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and CAM practitioners is common, most frequently for the management of musculoskeletal conditions. Knowledge is limited about the use of CAM practitioners by older people, and specifically those with other long term or chronic conditions. In 2011 we conducted an Australia wide survey targeting older adults aged over 50 years (n = 2540). Participants were asked to identify their chronic conditions, and from which health professionals they had 'received advice or treatment from in the last 3 months', including 'complementary health practitioners, e.g. naturopath'. Descriptive analyses were undertaken using SPSS and STATA software. Overall, 8.8% of respondents reported seeing a CAM practitioner in the past three months, 12.1% of women and 3.9% of men; the vast majority also consulting medical practitioners in the same period. Respondents were more likely to report consulting a CAM practitioner if they had musculoskeletal conditions (osteoporosis, arthritis), pain, or depression/anxiety. Respondents with diabetes, hypertension and asthma were least likely to report consulting a CAM practitioner. Those over 80 reported lower use of CAM practitioners than younger respondents. CAM practitioner use in a general older population was not associated with the number of chronic conditions reported, or with the socio-economic level of residence of the respondent. Substantial numbers of older Australians with chronic conditions seek advice from CAM practitioners, particularly those with pain related conditions, but less often with conditions where there are clear treatment guidelines using conventional medicine, such as with diabetes, hypertension and asthma. Given the policy emphasis on better coordination of care for people with chronic conditions, these findings point to the importance of communication and integration of health services and suggest that the concept of the 'treating team' needs a broad interpretation.

  20. A new blood glucose management algorithm for type 2 diabetes: a position statement of the Australian Diabetes Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunton, Jenny E; Cheung, N Wah; Davis, Timothy M E; Zoungas, Sophia; Colagiuri, Stephen

    2014-12-11

    Lowering blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes has clear benefits for preventing microvascular complications and potential benefits for reducing macrovascular complications and death. Treatment needs to be individualised for each person with diabetes. This should start with selecting appropriate glucose and glycated haemoglobin targets, taking into account life expectancy and the patient's wishes. For most people, early use of glucose-lowering therapies is warranted. A range of recently available therapies has added to the options for lowering glucose levels, but this has made the clinical pathway for treating diabetes more complicated. This position statement from the Australian Diabetes Society outlines the risks, benefits and costs of the available therapies and suggests a treatment algorithm incorporating the older and newer agents.

  1. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes: a long-term follow-up in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  2. Does knowledge on diabetes management influence glycemic control? A nationwide study in patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes MB

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Marilia Brito Gomes,1 Deborah Conte Santos,1 Marcela H Pizarro,1 Bianca Senger V Barros,1 Laura G Nunes de Melo,2 Carlos A Negrato3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetes Unit, State University Hospital of Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Bauru’s Diabetics Association, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish demographic and clinical data associated with the knowledge on diabetes management and its influence on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, multicenter study conducted with 1,760 patients between August 2011 and August 2014 in 10 cities of Brazil.Results: Overall, 1,190 (67.6% patients knew what glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c means. These patients were older, had longer disease duration, longer follow-up in each center, reported lower frequency of self-reported hypoglycemia, and were more frequently Caucasians and at glycemic goal. Multivariate analysis showed that knowledge on what HbA1c means was related to more years of school attendance, self-reported ethnicity (Caucasians, severe hypoglycemia, economic status, follow-up time in each center, and participation on diabetes educational programs. Good glycemic control was related to older age, more years of school attendance, higher frequency of daily self-monitoring of blood glucose, higher adherence to diet, and knowledge on what HbA1c means.Conclusion: Patients with a knowledge on what HbA1c means had a better chance of reaching an adequate glycemic control that was not found in the majority of our patients. Diabetes care teams should rethink the approaches to patients and change them to more proactive schedules, reinforcing education, patients’ skills, and empowerment to have positive attitudes toward reaching and maintaining a better glycemic control. Finally, the glucocentric

  3. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults: Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cnossen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics. Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults. For effective persuasion,

  4. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults : Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, Rosemarijn; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cnossen, Fokie

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults For effective persuasion, the

  5. [Diabetes care and incidence of severe hypoglycemia in nursing home facilities and nursing services: The Heidelberg Diabetes Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrmann, A; Wörz, E; Specht-Leible, N; Oster, P; Bahrmann, P

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a structured analysis of the treatment quality and acute complications of geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) cared for by nursing services and nursing home facilities. Secondly, structural problems and potentials for improvement in the care of multimorbid older people with DM treated by nursing homes and nursing services were analysed from the viewpoint of geriatric nurses, managers of nursing homes and general practitioners. In all, 77 older persons with DM from 13 nursing homes and 3 nursing services were included in the analysis (76.6% female, HbA1c 6.9 ± 1.4%, age 81.6 ± 9.9 years). Structural problems and potentials for improvement were collected from 95 geriatric nurses, 9 managers of nursing homes and 6 general practitioners using semistandardized questionnaires. Metabolic control was too strict in care-dependent older people with DM (mean HbA1c value: 6.9 ± 1.4 %; recommended by guidelines: 7-8%). The measurement of HbA1c was performed in 16 of 77 people (20.8%) within the last year despite a high visitation frequency of the general practitioners (12.7 ± 7.7 within the last 6 months). The incidence of severe hypoglycemia was 7.8%/patient/year. Regarding the management in case of diabetes-related acute complications 33 geriatric nurses (34.7%) stated not having any written standard (nursing home 39%, geriatric services 16.7%). Complex insulin therapies are still used in older people with DM with the consequence of a high incidence of severe hypoglycemia. Concrete management standards in the case of diabetes-related acute complications for geriatric nurses are lacking for more than one third of the nursing services.

  6. [Diabetes mellitus in Mexico. Status of the epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the magnitude of diabetes in Mexico, as well as discuss alternative policies to face it appropriately. Descriptive analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012, using reported information on previous diagnosis of diabetes from adults and adolescents. From all adults 20 years and older in Mexico, 9.17% has been diagnosed with diabetes, presenting an important geographical heterogeneity, ranging from 5.6% in the southern state of Chiapas, to 12.3% in Mexico City. Of all people with diabetes, 46.95% also have been diagnosed with hypertension, 4.47% has had a stroke, and 54.46%, reported family background of diabetes. Regarding adolescents, 0.68% has been already diagnosed with diabetes. The burden of diabetes in Mexico and the fact that is a preventable condition, calls to strengthen the health sector strategies to face it. The negative effect it has on the quality of life makes diabetes a priority for the health sector.

  7. Burden of cardiovascular risk factors and disease among patients with type 1 diabetes: results of the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Anthony; Earnest, Arul; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Nanayakkara, Natalie; Liew, Danny; Wischer, Natalie; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Zoungas, Sophia

    2018-06-02

    Cardiovascular risk stratification is complex in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesised that traditional and diabetes-specific cardiovascular risk factors were prevalent and strongly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) among adults with type 1 diabetes attending Australian diabetes centres. De-identified, prospectively collected data from patients with type 1 diabetes aged ≥ 18 years in the 2015 Australian National Diabetes Audit were analysed. The burden of cardiovascular risk factors [age, sex, diabetes duration, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure, lipid profile, body mass index, smoking status, retinopathy, renal function and albuminuria] and associations with CVD inclusive of stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft surgery/angioplasty and peripheral vascular disease were assessed. Restricted cubic splines assessed for non-linearity of diabetes duration and likelihood ratio test assessed for interactions between age, diabetes duration, centre type and cardiovascular outcomes of interest. Discriminatory ability of multivariable models were assessed with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Data from 1169 patients were analysed. Mean (± SD) age and median diabetes duration was 40.0 (± 16.7) and 16.0 (8.0-27.0) years respectively. Cardiovascular risk factors were prevalent including hypertension (21.9%), dyslipidaemia (89.4%), overweight/obesity (56.4%), ever smoking (38.5%), albuminuria (31.1%), estimated glomerular filtration rate  7.0% (53 mmol/mol) (81.0%). Older age, longer diabetes duration, smoking and antihypertensive therapy use were positively associated with CVD, while high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure were negatively associated (p < 0.05). Association with CVD and diabetes duration remained constant until 20 years when a linear increase was noted. Longer diabetes duration also had the highest population attributable risk of 6.5% (95% CI 1

  8. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-MAIL UPDATES External Link Disclaimer National Diabetes Education Program HealthSense Home Make a Plan Articles About ... Community health worker Community organization Age Select one: Child Teen and young adult Adult Older adult (65+) ...

  9. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  10. Older adults who persistently present to the emergency department with severe, non-severe, and indeterminate episode patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohsfeldt Robert L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that older adults figure prominently in the use of emergency departments (ED across the United States. Previous research has differentiated ED visits by levels of clinical severity and found health status and other individual characteristics distinguished severe from non-severe visits. In this research, we classified older adults into population groups that persistently present with severe, non-severe, or indeterminate patterns of ED episodes. We then contrasted the three groups using a comprehensive set of covariates. Methods Using a unique dataset linking individual characteristics with Medicare claims for calendar years 1991-2007, we identified patterns of ED use among the large, nationally representative AHEAD sample consisting of 5,510 older adults. We then classified one group of older adults who persistently presented to the ED with clinically severe episodes and another group who persistently presented to the ED with non-severe episodes. These two groups were contrasted using logistic regression, and then contrasted against a third group with a persistent pattern of ED episodes with indeterminate levels of severity using multinomial logistic regression. Variable selection was based on Andersen's behavioral model of health services use and featured clinical status, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors, health service use patterns, local health care supply, and other contextual effects. Results We identified 948 individuals (17.2% of the entire sample who presented a pattern in which their ED episodes were typically defined as severe and 1,076 individuals (19.5% who typically presented with non-severe episodes. Individuals who persistently presented to the ED with severe episodes were more likely to be older (AOR 1.52, men (AOR 1.28, current smokers (AOR 1.60, experience diabetes (AOR (AOR 1.80, heart disease (AOR 1.70, hypertension (AOR 1.32 and have a greater amount of

  11. Older adults who persistently present to the emergency department with severe, non-severe, and indeterminate episode patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian; Obrizan, Maksym; Jones, Michael P; Bentler, Suzanne; Weigel, Paula; Hockenberry, Jason; Wallace, Robert B; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Rosenthal, Gary E; Wolinsky, Fredric D

    2011-10-21

    It is well known that older adults figure prominently in the use of emergency departments (ED) across the United States. Previous research has differentiated ED visits by levels of clinical severity and found health status and other individual characteristics distinguished severe from non-severe visits. In this research, we classified older adults into population groups that persistently present with severe, non-severe, or indeterminate patterns of ED episodes. We then contrasted the three groups using a comprehensive set of covariates. Using a unique dataset linking individual characteristics with Medicare claims for calendar years 1991-2007, we identified patterns of ED use among the large, nationally representative AHEAD sample consisting of 5,510 older adults. We then classified one group of older adults who persistently presented to the ED with clinically severe episodes and another group who persistently presented to the ED with non-severe episodes. These two groups were contrasted using logistic regression, and then contrasted against a third group with a persistent pattern of ED episodes with indeterminate levels of severity using multinomial logistic regression. Variable selection was based on Andersen's behavioral model of health services use and featured clinical status, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors, health service use patterns, local health care supply, and other contextual effects. We identified 948 individuals (17.2% of the entire sample) who presented a pattern in which their ED episodes were typically defined as severe and 1,076 individuals (19.5%) who typically presented with non-severe episodes. Individuals who persistently presented to the ED with severe episodes were more likely to be older (AOR 1.52), men (AOR 1.28), current smokers (AOR 1.60), experience diabetes (AOR (AOR 1.80), heart disease (AOR 1.70), hypertension (AOR 1.32) and have a greater amount of morbidity (AOR 1.48) than those who persistently

  12. Effect of pretransplant diabetes on short-term outcomes after liver transplantation: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Richard S; Singhal, Ashish; Wima, Koffi; Sutton, Jeffrey M; Paterno, Flavio; Steve Woodle, E; Hohmann, Sam; Abbott, Daniel E; Shah, Shimul A

    2015-07-01

    We sought to analyse the effect of pretransplant diabetes on post-operative outcomes and resource utilization following liver transplantation. A retrospective cohort study was designed using a linkage between the University HealthSystem Consortium and Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients databases. We identified 12 442 patients who underwent liver transplantation at 63 centres from 2007-2011 and separated cohorts of patients with diabetes (n = 2971; 24%) and without (n = 9471; 76%) at the time of transplant. We analysed transplant related outcomes and short-term survival. Diabetic recipients were more likely to be male (70% vs 67%), non-white (32% vs 26%), older (age ≥60; 41% vs 28%), and have a higher BMI (29 vs 27; P diabetic patients were on haemodialysis (10% vs 7%), had cirrhosis caused by NASH (24% vs 9%; P 1.49; 46% vs 42%; P diabetic recipients had longer hospital length of stay (10 vs 9 days), higher peri-transplant mortality (5% vs 4%) and 30-day readmission rates (41% vs 37%), were less often discharged to home (83% vs 87%; P diabetics ($105 078 vs $100 624, P diabetic recipients were less likely discharged home following transplant (75% vs 82%, P diabetes is associated with inferior post-operative outcomes and increased resource utilization after liver transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Falls among older adults in the South of Brazil: prevalence and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luna S; Gomes, Ana Paula; Bierhals, Isabel O; Farías-Antúnez, Simone; Ribeiro, Camila G; Miranda, Vanessa I A; Lutz, Bárbara H; Barbosa-Silva, Thiago G; Lima, Natália P; Bertoldi, Andréa D; Tomasi, Elaine

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evaluate the prevalence and the factors associated with the occurrence of falls among older adults. METHODS A cross-sectional study with a representative sample of 1,451 elderly residents in the urban area of Pelotas, RS, in 2014. A descriptive analysis of the data was performed and the prevalence of falls in the last year was presented. The analysis of demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral and health factors associated with the outcome was performed using Poisson regression with adjustment for robust variance according to the hierarchical model. The variables were adjusted to each other within each level and for the higher level. Those with p ≤ 0.20 were maintained in the model for confounding control and those with p falls among older adults in the last year was 28.1% (95%CI 25.9-30.5), and most occurred in the person's own residence. Among the older adults who fell, 51.5% (95%CI 46.6-56.4) had a single fall and 12.1% (95%CI 8.9-15.3) had a fracture as a consequence, usually in the lower limbs. The prevalence of falls was higher in women, adults of advanced age, with lower income and schooling level, with functional incapacity for instrumental activities, and patients with diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and arthritis. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of falls reached almost a third of the older adults, and the prevalence was higher in specific segments of the population in question. About 12% of the older adults who fell fractured some bone. The factors associated with the occurrence of falls identified in this study may guide measures aimed at prevention in the older adult population.

  14. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afkhami-Ardekani Mohammad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to assess the prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy (DR in type 2 diabetic patients and their contributing factors. Methods 199 type 2 diabetic patients referred to Yazd Diabetes Research Center were consecutively selected. All Subjects were assessed by questionnaire about other diseases and drugs. Dry eye syndrome was assessed with Tear break up time tests and Schirmer. All the subjects underwent indirect ophthalmoscopy and retinal color photography. DR was graded according to early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy (ETDRS criteria. Results Of 199 subjects, 108 patients (54.3% suffer from dry eye syndrome. Although dry eye syndrome was more common in older and female patients, this association was not significant. But there was significantly association between dry eye syndrome and duration of diabetes (P = 0.01. Dry eye syndrome was more frequent in diabetic patients with DR (P = 0.02. DR was found in 140 patients (70.35%, which included 34 patients (17.1% with mild non proliferative DR (NPDR, 34 patients (17.1% with moderate NPDR, 22 patients (11.1% with severe NPDR and 25 patients (25.1% with proliferative DR (PDR. There were significant relation between age, sex and duration of diabetes and DR. Conclusion In this study the prevalence of dry eye syndrome was 54.3%. Diabetes and dry eyes appear to have a common association. Further studies need to be undertaken to establish an etiologic relationship. However, examination for dry eye should be an integral part of the assessment of diabetic eye disease.

  15. Ketosis-Onset Diabetes and Ketosis-Prone Diabetes: Same or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Beiyan; Yu, Changhua; Li, Qiang; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare clinical characteristics, immunological markers, and β-cell functions of 4 subgroups (“Aβ” classification system) of ketosis-onset diabetes and ketosis prone diabetes patients without known diabetes, presenting with ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and admitted to our department from March 2011 to December 2011 in China, with 50 healthy persons as control group. Results. β-cell functional reserve was preserved in 63.52% of patients. In almost each subgroup (except A−  β− subgroup of ketosis prone group), male patients were more than female ones. The age of the majority of patients in ketosis prone group was older than that of ketosis-onset group, except A−  β− subgroup of ketosis prone group. The durations from the patient first time ketosis or DKA onset to admitting to the hospital have significant difference, which were much longer for the ketosis prone group except the A+ β+ subgroup. BMI has no significant difference among subgroups. FPG of ketosis prone group was lower than that of A−  β+ subgroup and A+ β+ subgroup in ketosis-onset group. A−  β− subgroup and A+ β+ subgroup of ketosis prone group have lower HbA1c than ketosis-onset group. Conclusions. Ketosis-onset diabetes and ketosis prone diabetes do not absolutely have the same clinical characteristics. Each subgroup shows different specialty. PMID:23710177

  16. High mortality in diabetic recipients of high KDPI deceased donor kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Ronald P; Pesavento, Todd E; Rajab, Amer; Henry, Mitchell L

    2016-08-01

    Deceased donor (DD) kidney quality is determined by calculating the Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI). Optimizing high KDPI (≥85%) DD transplant outcome is challenging. This retrospective study was performed to review our high KDPI DD transplant results to identify clinical practices that can improve future outcomes. We retrospectively calculated the KDPI for 895 DD kidney recipients transplanted between 1/2002 and 11/2013. Age, race, body mass index (BMI), retransplantation, gender, diabetes (DM), dialysis time, and preexisting coronary artery disease (CAD) (previous myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass (CABG), or stenting) were determined for all recipients. About 29.7% (266/895) of transplants were from donors with a KDPI ≥85%. By Cox regression older age, diabetes, female gender, and dialysis time >4 years correlated with shorter patient survival time. Diabetics with CAD who received a high KDPI donor kidney had a significantly increased risk of death (HR 4.33 (CI 1.82-10.30), P=.001) compared to low KDPI kidney recipients. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve for diabetic recipients of high KDPI kidneys was significantly worse if they had preexisting CAD (P<.001 by log-rank test). Patient survival using high KDPI donor kidneys may be improved by avoiding diabetic candidates with preexisting CAD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Time's up. descriptive epidemiology of multi-morbidity and time spent on health related activity by older Australians: a time use survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanisha Jowsey

    Full Text Available Most Western health systems remain single illness orientated despite the growing prevalence of multi-morbidity. Identifying how much time people with multiple chronic conditions spend managing their health will help policy makers and health service providers make decisions about areas of patient need for support. This article presents findings from an Australian study concerning the time spent on health related activity by older adults (aged 50 years and over, most of whom had multiple chronic conditions. A recall questionnaire was developed, piloted, and adjusted. Sampling was undertaken through three bodies; the Lung Foundation Australia (COPD sub-sample, National Diabetes Services Scheme (Diabetes sub-sample and National Seniors Australia (Seniors sub-sample. Questionnaires were mailed out during 2011 to 10,600 older adults living in Australia. 2540 survey responses were received and analysed. Descriptive analyses were completed to obtain median values for the hours spent on each activity per month. The mean number of chronic conditions was 3.7 in the COPD sub-sample, 3.4 in the Diabetes sub-sample and 2.0 in the NSA sub-sample. The study identified a clear trend of increased time use associated with increased number of chronic conditions. Median monthly time use was 5-16 hours per month overall for our three sub-samples. For respondents in the top decile with five or more chronic conditions the median time use was equivalent to two to three hours per day, and if exercise is included in the calculations, respondents spent from between five and eight hours per day: an amount similar to full-time work. Multi-morbidity imposes considerable time burdens on patients. Ageing is associated with increasing rates of multi-morbidity. Many older adults are facing high demands on their time to manage their health in the face of decreasing energy and mobility. Their time use must be considered in health service delivery and health system reform.

  18. Geriatric Family Support and Diabetic Type-2 Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Heidari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As the most part of geriatric (65 years and older diabetic care is given at home, family support has an important role in their blood sugar level control care. This study aimed to assess the relationship between family support and blood sugar level control in such elderly suffering type-2 diabetes. Methods & Materials: Via descriptive-correlative study, one hundred fifty geriatric patients with type-2 diabetes, who referred to Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism in Iran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Samplings based on nonrandomized and convenience. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographic data glucose-labeled hemoglobin (HbA1C and received-perceived family support by applying the standard questionnaire of "Diabetes Social Support-Family Version" format. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15 by using Chi-square and Pierson Tests. Results: Results showed a significant relationship between family support and glycemic control (r=-0.56, P<0.0001. Also there were significant relationships between family support, gender and marital status (P<0.0001. There were also significant relationships between glycemic control and marital status (P=0.02, financial status (P=0.04 and educational level (P=0.05. Conclusion: Findings of this research added further evidence about the impact of family support on the health of older adults with diabetes. These findings suggest using family centered nursing interventions and collaboration of family members in care of the elderly with type-2 diabetes.

  19. Renal radioisotope clearance in an unselected group of diabetics - a tool for the early recognition of diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doschek, D.; Wulf, R.; Krause, F.J.; Kreiskrankenhaus Albstadt

    1980-01-01

    Our study in unselected patients with diabetes was undertaken to determine the relation between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) according to the patient's age. The diagnostic work-up was done with patients in unselected disease states because a classification of all systemic manifestations of the diabetes was not possible. The lack of selection may therefore reduce the value of our statistical results. From age 55 onwards, there was a reduction in GFR and, to a lesser extent, in PRF esceeding that which was age-dependent. It is, therefore, recommended to check the clearance in all patients with diabetes older than 55 years. The clearance with radioisotopically labeled substances, being a very sensitive method for the evaluation of restricted renal function, may permit an early recognition of diabetic nephropathy. (orig.) [de

  20. PREJUÍZOS COGNITIVOS EM IDOSOS COM DIABETES MELLITUS TIPO 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria Fernandes Lopes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The advance of health conditions is propitiating the progressive increase of longevity and life expectancy. Studies have identified the existence of a connection between Diabetes Mellitus and (DM and dementia. The hyperglycemia can be a significant factor for the incidence of Alzheimer, which could be a secondary cause for dementia. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2 is associated to cognitive and functional deficits and, one of the tools, which can be used to assess executive functions, is the WCST. The objetive was the assessment of the cognitive prejudice in older people with DM2 through the WCST. Two hundred and fifty four (254 old people of both genders, with 60 years of age or older, divided into 44 persons with a DM2 diagnosis and 210 old people of the control group from the general population. The design was that of a quantitative and transversal study. The instruments used were: sociodemographic filing cards, WCST, MMSE, BDI, BAI, GDS. The Vocabulary, Coding, Digit Span, Block Design and WAIS – III sub-tests. The results showed there were a significant difference in the performance of old people with DM2, when compared to old people of the control group in four describers of the WCST, cognitive prejudice. The old people with DM2 showed intensity of depressive and anxiety symptoms of statistically larger regarding the group control.

  1. Older persons' worries expressed during home care visits: Exploring the content of cues and concerns identified by the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafskjold, Linda; Eide, Tom; Holmström, Inger K; Sundling, Vibeke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Eide, Hilde

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about how older persons in home care express their concerns. Emotional cues and concerns can be identified by the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES), but the method gives no insight into what causes the distress and the emotions involved. The aims of this study are to explore (1) older persons' worries and (2) the content of these expressions. An observational exploratory two-step approach was used to investigate audiotaped recordings from 38 Norwegian home care visits with older persons and nurse assistants. First, 206 cues and concerns were identified using VR-CoDES. Second, the content and context of these expressions were analysed inductively. Four main categories emerged: worries about relationships with others, worries about health care-related issues, worries about aging and bodily impairment, and life narratives and value issues, with several subcategories showing the causes of worry and emotions involved. The two-step approach provides an in-depth knowledge of older persons' worries, causes of worries, and their related emotions. The subcategories described in a language close to the experience can be useful in practice development and communication training for students and health care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hemoglobin A1c and arterial and ventricular stiffness in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Zieman

    Full Text Available Arterial and ventricular stiffening are characteristics of diabetes and aging which confer significant morbidity and mortality; advanced glycation endproducts (AGE are implicated in this stiffening pathophysiology. We examined the association between HbA(1c, an AGE, with arterial and ventricular stiffness measures in older individuals without diabetes.Baseline HbA(1c was measured in 830 participants free of diabetes defined by fasting glucose or medication use in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a population-based cohort study of adults aged ≥ 65 years. We performed cross-sectional analyses using baseline exam data including echocardiography, ankle and brachial blood pressure measurement, and carotid ultrasonography. We examined the adjusted associations between HbA(1c and multiple arterial and ventricular stiffness measures by linear regression models and compared these results to the association of fasting glucose (FG with like measures.HbA(1c was correlated with fasting and 2-hour postload glucose levels (r = 0.21; p<0.001 for both and positively associated with greater body-mass index and black race. In adjusted models, HbA(1c was not associated with any measure of arterial or ventricular stiffness, including pulse pressure (PP, carotid intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, end-arterial elastance, or left ventricular mass (LVM. FG levels were positively associated with systolic, diastolic and PP and LVM.In this sample of older adults without diabetes, HbA(1c was not associated with arterial or ventricular stiffness measures, whereas FG levels were. The role of AGE in arterial and ventricular stiffness in older adults may be better assessed using alternate AGE markers.

  3. Urinary tract infections in older women: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-02-26

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and vaginal estrogen therapy effectively reduce

  4. Sarcopenia in diabetic nephropathy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeliker, Meral; Selçuk, Mustafa Yavuz; Olt, Serdar

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between sarcopenia and diabetic nephropathy. 56 diabetic patients without complications, 50 diabetic patients with nephropathy, 53 healthy controls included in this present study. Demographic characteristics such as sex, age, anthropometric measurements such as weight, body mass index [BMI], hip circumference, waist circumference and upper arm circumference were measured. Sarcopenia diagnosis was based on European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People [EWGSOP] criteria which consist of hand grip strength, 6-meter walking test and muscle mass. The frequency of sarcopenia increased gradually from 15.1% in healthy control group to 21.4% in the diabetes group, and 34% in diabetic nephropathy group (X2 for trend, p = 0.029). The frequency of sarcopenia was similar in diabetes and diabetic nephropathy group. However, the frequency of sarcopenia was higher in diabetic nephropathy than healthy controls (OR = 2.89, CI [1.11-7.51] in logistic regression). In the present study, the prevalence of sarcopenia was higher in patients with diabetic nephropathy compared to healthy controls.

  5. Identifying Challenging Job and Environmental Demands of Older Nurses Within the National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosaiye, Isaiah Oluremi; Hadjri, Karim; Liyanage, Champika Lasanthi

    2016-04-01

    To explore the existing theoretical contexts of the job and environmental demands of the nursing profession in the National Health Service (NHS) and to investigate how these job and environmental demands impact on the personal constructs of older nurses within the NHS. Nursing is the single most widely practiced profession in the healthcare sector in the United Kingdom. However, nurses contend with challenging job and environmental demands on a daily basis, which deplete them of personal constructs (or resources) required to stay in the profession. A multilevel exploratory qualitative research design was employed. Ten managers were interviewed for the preliminary study, based on which the three characteristics of an age-friendly NHS workplace were established: health, retirement, and flexibility. Then an in-depth literature review revealed that the most adversely affected job within the NHS was the nursing profession. Finally, a focus group study was undertaken with six older nurses working in the NHS. The most compelling finding of this study is that older nurses would generally not want to stay on the job if they had to work in the ward area. The physical, cognitive, and sensory constructs of older nurses are negatively affected by the job and environmental demands of the ward areas. Understanding how these job and environmental demands of the workplace affect an older nurse's personal constructs may help support a better design of nurse work and the wards and help extend the working lives of older nurses in the NHS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Chronic kidney disease in lithium-treated older adults: a review of epidemiology, mechanisms, and implications for the treatment of late-life mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, Soham; Elie, Dominique; Mucsi, Istvan; Looper, Karl J; Segal, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important medication in the treatment of mood disorders. However, clinicians are hesitant to use lithium in older adults for fear of its medical effects, particularly kidney disease. This review describes the current understanding of the epidemiology and mechanisms underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD) in older lithium users, with recommendations for using lithium safely in late life. Prevalence estimates of CKD in older lithium users range from 42-50%, which does not differ greatly from the 37.8% rates seen in community-dwelling non-lithium using, non-psychiatric populations. Clinical and pre-clinical data suggest a variety of synergistic mechanisms contributing to CKD in older lithium users, including aging, cardiovascular factors, oxidative stress, inflammation, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, acute kidney injury, and medication interactions. With regards to CKD, lithium can be used safely in many older adults with mood disorders. Compared to patients with pre-existing CKD, those with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) are probably not as susceptible to lithium-associated renal decline. Using lithium concentrations kidney injury, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, and coronary artery disease can all help prevent CKD and further renal decline in older lithium users.

  7. Effects of Social Support Network Size on Mortality Risk: Considerations by Diabetes Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Ford, M Allison

    2018-05-01

    Previous work demonstrates that social support is inversely associated with mortality risk. Less research, however, has examined the effects of the size of the social support network on mortality risk among those with and without diabetes, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, with participants followed through 2011. This study included 1,412 older adults (≥60 years of age) with diabetes and 5,872 older adults without diabetes. The size of the social support network was assessed via self-report and reported as the number of participants' close friends. Among those without diabetes, various levels of social support network size were inversely associated with mortality risk. However, among those with diabetes, only those with a high social support network size (i.e., at least six close friends) had a reduced risk of all-cause mortality. That is, compared to those with zero close friends, those with diabetes who had six or more close friends had a 49% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-0.94). To mitigate mortality risk, a greater social support network size may be needed for those with diabetes.

  8. [Frequency of diabetic microangiopathy in newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus in Conakry: late diagnosis and lack of screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, N M; Kaba, M L; Baldé, M D; Diallo, A O; Goépogui, A; Diakité, M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes morbidity is not only connected to a scarce therapeutic care. It is especially the fact of late diagnosis of diabetes, at a time where complications are already present. The aims were to estimate the frequency of microangiopathy observed at the time of diabetes diagnosis within diabetic patients received in Conakry University Hospital and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients who had this complication. We prospectively examined 116 patients [76 men (65.5%) and 40 women (34.5%); 11% type 1 diabetes and 89% type 2 diabetes] consecutively received and for whom known evolution of diabetes was lower or equal to three-months. All patients were interrogated (in search of cardiovascular risk factors), had a systematic check for retinopathy (exam done by ophthalmologist) or nephropathy (by measure of creatinine, urea and proteinuria). Diabetic retinopathy was present in 29 cases (24.8%) and diabetic nephropathy in 9 cases (7.8%), one at the stage of chronic renal failure. The patients who had microangiopathy were older than the others (p = 0.003) and have more frequently Type 2 diabetes (p = 0.005). However, glycaemia level and cardiovascular risk factors (nicotine addiction, arterial high blood pressure, obesity and sedentary) were not statistically different between both groups. Diabetic microangiopathy is frequent at the time of diabetes diagnosis in Guinea. Thus need for a check-up at the diabetes discovery time, as these results point the therapeutic choices and justify patient's compliance.

  9. Analysis of epidemiological indices of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the adult population of Moscow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Fedorovna Kalashnikova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a disease that presents a global medical problem. It is necessary to implement an in-depth analysis of the epidemiological situation of type 2 diabetes mellitus for planning and organizing specialized medical help to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aim. To rate the basic epidemiological indices of type 2 diabetes mellitus in actual clinical practice using the informational database of national registry of diabetic patients. Materials and methods. Epidemiological analyses were performed in two administrative districts of Moscow. From 1999 to 2011 48978 adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were aged 18 years and older were registered. We used methods of clinical, analytical and statistical epidemiology with elements of descriptive research. Results. The prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 1590 per hundred thousand, most patients were in the 60?64 and 70?74 age groups, and approximately 80% of patients were older than 55 years. The morbidity rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 138,72 per hundred thousand and was found to be higher in women at 1,89. The mortality rate of adult patients with diabetes mellitus was 0,83, mostly in men of all ages. Cardiovascular diseases accounted for most of the registered cases of deaths (34,4%. The average life expectancy appeared to be 75,24?0,45 years, although women lived 6 years longer than men. The average duration of the disease was 10,04?0,34 years. A total of 0,4% of patients underwent hospital treatment and the average length of treatment was 17?18 days. The total number of days of disablement was an average of 307,33?30,13 days (80% of patients were older than 55 years. In the study group, a mean grade of НbА1c

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging identifies deficits in white matter microstructure in subjects with type 1 diabetes that correlate with reduced neurocognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodl, Christopher T; Franc, Daniel T; Rao, Jyothi P; Anderson, Fiona S; Thomas, William; Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2008-11-01

    Long-standing type 1 diabetes is associated with deficits on neurocognitive testing that suggest central white matter dysfunction. This study investigated whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a type of magnetic resonance imaging that measures white matter integrity quantitatively, could identify white matter microstructural deficits in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes and whether these differences would be associated with deficits found by neurocognitive tests. Twenty-five subjects with type 1 diabetes for at least 15 years and 25 age- and sex-matched control subjects completed DTI on a 3.0 Tesla scanner and a battery of neurocognitive tests. Fractional anisotropy was calculated for the major white matter tracts of the brain. Diabetic subjects had significantly lower mean fractional anisotropy than control subjects in the posterior corona radiata and the optic radiation (P < 0.002). In type 1 diabetic subjects, reduced fractional anisotropy correlated with poorer performance on the copy portion of the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure Drawing Test and the Grooved Peg Board Test, both of which are believed to assess white matter function. Reduced fractional anisotropy also correlated with duration of diabetes and increased A1C. A history of severe hypoglycemia did not correlate with fractional anisotropy. DTI can detect white matter microstructural deficits in subjects with long-standing type 1 diabetes. These deficits correlate with poorer performance on selected neurocognitive tests of white matter function.

  11. Type 2 diabetes: identifying high risk Asian American subgroups in a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elsie J; Wong, Eric C; Dixit, Anjali A; Fortmann, Stephen P; Linde, Randolph B; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2011-08-01

    We compared the prevalence and treatment of type 2 diabetes across Asian American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and Non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) in a Northern California healthcare system. A three-year, cross-sectional sample of patient electronic health records was accessed to compare diabetes prevalence in 21,816 Asian and 73,728 NHWs aged 35+ years. Diabetes was classified through ICD-9 codes, abnormal laboratory values, or use of oral anti-diabetic medication. Multivariate adjusted prevalence rates for each Asian subgroup, and adjusted odds ratios (OR) relative to NHWs, were compared. Age-adjusted prevalence ranged from 5.8% to 18.2% (women) and 8.1 to 25.3% (men). Age-adjusted ORs of Asian subgroups ranged 1.11-3.94 (women) and 1.14-4.56 (men). The odds of diabetes were significantly higher in Asian Indians (women OR 3.44, men OR 3.54) and Filipinos (women OR 3.94, men OR 4.56), compared to NHWs. Results for Asian Indians and Filipinos were similar with age-and-BMI adjustment. Treatment rates across subgroups were 59.7-82.0% (women) and 62.9-79.4% (men). Heterogeneity exists in the prevalence of diabetes across Asian subgroups, independent of obesity prevalence. Asian Indian and Filipino subgroups had particularly high prevalence of diabetes when compared to NHWs. Future studies should explore these clinically important differences among Asian subgroups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying and meeting the challenges of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorli C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Sorli,1,* Michael K Heile2,*1Billings Clinic Research Center, Billings, MT, USA; 2The Family Medical Group Glenway, Cincinnati, OH, USA*Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a chronic illness that requires clinical recognition and treatment of the dual pathophysiologic entities of altered glycemic control and insulin resistance to reduce the risk of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications. Although insulin is one of the most effective and widely used therapeutic options in the management of diabetes, it is used by less than one-half of patients for whom it is recommended. Clinician-, patient-, and health care system-related challenges present numerous obstacles to insulin use in T2DM. Clinicians must remain informed about new insulin products, emerging technologies, and treatment options that have the potential to improve adherence to insulin therapy while optimizing glycemic control and mitigating the risks of therapy. Patient-related challenges may be overcome by actively listening to the patient's fears and concerns regarding insulin therapy and by educating patients about the importance, rationale, and evolving role of insulin in individualized self-treatment regimens. Enlisting the services of Certified Diabetes Educators and office personnel can help in addressing patient-related challenges. Self-management of diabetes requires improved patient awareness regarding the importance of lifestyle modifications, self-monitoring, and/or continuous glucose monitoring, improved methods of insulin delivery (eg, insulin pens, and the enhanced convenience and safety provided by insulin analogs. Health care system-related challenges may be improved through control of the rising cost of insulin therapy while making it available to patients. To increase the success rate of treatment of T2DM, the 2012 position statement from the American Diabetes Association and the European

  13. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups ( n =30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions ( e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity ( e.g. , focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens ( e.g. , protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  14. Genomet og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

    2014-01-01

    In terms of their genetic architecture monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes represent two extremes. Whereas each subtype of monogenic diabetes is caused by one penetrant, rare mutation in a single gene, the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be attributed to many low-penetrant variants...... across the genome. At present, only 10% of the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be explained by the hitherto identified 90 genomic loci. Here we briefly review the genetics of monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes and outline future directions of research within this field....

  15. Etnische verschillen in diabetes, risicofactoren voor hart- en vaatziekten en zorggebruik. Resultaten van de Amsterdamse Gezondheidsmonitor 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos G; Jacobs-van der Bruggen MAM; Ujcic-Voortman JK; Uitenbroek DG; Baan CA; GGD Amsterdam, Cluster; PZO

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in inhabitants of Amsterdam (18 years and older) is 4%. The prevalence of diabetes is three times higher among Turkish people and four times higher among Moroccans in comparison to Dutch people. Turkish diabetes patients have a higher mean body mass index compared to Dutch

  16. [Early invasive strategy in diabetic patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza Román, Anna; Latour Pérez, Jaime; de Miguel Balsa, Eva; Pino Izquierdo, Karel; Coves Orts, Francisco Javier; García Ochando, Luis; de la Torre Fernández, Maria José

    2014-05-20

    In the management of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), several studies have shown a reduction in mortality with the use of an invasive strategy in high-risk patients, including diabetic patients. Paradoxically, other studies have shown an under-utilization of this invasive strategy in these patients. The aim of this study is to determine the characteristics of patients managed conservatively and identify determinants of the use of invasive or conservative strategy. Retrospective cohort study conducted in diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS included in the ARIAM-SEMICYUC registry (n=531) in 2010 and 2011. We performed crude and adjusted unconditional logistic regression. We analyzed 531 diabetic patients, 264 (49.7%) of which received invasive strategy. Patients managed conservatively were a subgroup characterized by older age and cardiovascular comorbidity, increased risk of bleeding and the absence of high-risk electrocardiogram (ECG). In diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS, independent predictors associated with conservative strategy were low-risk ECG, initial Killip class>1, high risk of bleeding and pretreatment with clopidogrel. The fear of bleeding complications or advanced coronary lesions could be the cause of the underutilization of an invasive strategy in diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast cancer screening in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, L S; Haynes, S G

    1996-01-01

    There is currently an epidemic of breast cancer in women 65 years of age and older. The purposes of this paper are to explore the breast cancer screening behaviors of older women and to identify some of the determinants of screening in these women. Data were analyzed from the 1987 National Health Interview Survey, a continuous nationwide household interview survey of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population. As in other studies, the utilization of breast cancer screening by older women was less in older women than in younger women. This was true for both mammography and clinical breast examination. A number of determinants of screening in older women were identified here. Women with a usual source of care and/or no activity limitation, as well as high school graduates, were the ones most likely to have received a screening mammogram and/or a screening clinical breast exam during the past year. The failure of older women to receive adequate breast cancer screening is an important concern which should be reevaluated, given the breast cancer epidemic in this population. This study identified a number of determinants of breast cancer screening in older women. For the most part, these determinants point to the primary care physician as the key to breast cancer screening in these women. Therefore, the primary care physician must be informed of, and encouraged to follow, the recommendations for periodic breast cancer screening in older women.

  18. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs.

  19. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Manage Your Weight Small Steps. Big Rewards. Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Information for Patients These three booklets ... Teen and young adult Adult Older adult (65+) Type of Resource Select one: Printable documents Online programs ... Application Website Webinar Language ...

  20. Type 2 diabetes and in-hospital complications after revision of total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana López-de-Andrés

    Full Text Available To assess the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM on hospital outcomes such as in hospital postoperative complications (IHPC, length of hospital stay (LOHS and in-hospital mortality (IHM after the revision of total hip arthroplasty (RHA and total knee arthroplasty (RKA and to identify factors associated with IHPC among T2DM patients undergoing these procedures.We performed a retrospective study using the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database, 2005-2014. We included patients who were ≥40 years old that had undergone RHA and RKA. For each T2DM patient, we selected a year-, gender-, age- and Charlson Comorbidity Index-matched non-diabetic patient.We identified 44,055 and 39,938 patients who underwent RHA (12.72% with T2DM and RKA (15.01% with T2DM. We matched 4,700 and 5,394 couples with RHA and RKA, respectively. Any IHPC was more frequent among patients with T2DM than among non-T2DM patients (19% vs. 15.64% in the RHA cohort and 12.94% vs. 11.09% in the RKA cohort, respectively. For patients who underwent RHA, postoperative infection (4.51% vs. 2.94%, p<0.001, acute post-hemorrhagic anemia (9.53% vs. 7.70%, p<0.001, mean LOHS and IHM were significantly higher in patients with T2DM. Among RKA patients, the incidence of acute posthemorrhagic anemia (7.21% vs. 5.62%; p = 0.001 and urinary tract infection (1.13% vs. 0.72%; p = 0.029 was significantly higher in patients with diabetes. Older age, obesity, infection due to internal joint prosthesis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, mild liver disease and renal disease and emergency room admission were significantly associated with a higher risk of IHPC in T2DM patients. IHPC decreased over time only in T2DM patients who underwent RHA (OR 0.94, 95%CI 0.89-0.98.Patients with T2DM who underwent RHA and RKA procedures had more IHPC after controlling for the effects of possible confounders. LOHS and IHM were also higher among RHA patients with diabetes. Older age, comorbidity, obesity

  1. The association of short-term memory and cognitive impairment with ghrelin, leptin, and cortisol levels in non-diabetic and diabetic elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yu Ming; Wang, Li Jun; Mao, Hong Xian; Lou, Xue Yong; Zhu, Yi Jun

    2018-06-01

    This study assessed short-term memory and biochemical indicators with the levels of ghrelin, leptin, and cortisol between cognitive impairment and normal older adults with or without diabetes. We enrolled 286 older adults (aged 65-85 years) with or without diabetes from the local community. Short-term memory was assessed using pictures of common objects; cognitive functioning was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The physiological indexes assessed were plasma levels of fasting ghrelin and leptin, ghrelin level at 2_h after breakfast, 24-h urinary cortisol value, body mass index, and plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m., and 12:00 p.m. In both non-diabetic and diabetic subjects, short-term memory was significantly lower in the impaired cognition group (5.99 ± 2.90 in non-diabetic subjects and 4.71 ± 2.14 in diabetic subjects) than in the normal cognition group (8.14 ± 2.23 in non-diabetic subjects and 7.82 ± 3.37 in diabetic subjects). Baseline ghrelin level was significantly lower in the impaired cognition group (9.07 ± 1.13 ng/mL in non-diabetic subjects and 7.76 ± 1.34 ng/mL in diabetic subjects) than in the normal cognition group (10.94 ± 1.53 ng/mL in non-diabetic subjects and 9.93 ± 1.76 ng/mL in diabetic subjects); plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m., and 12:00 p.m. were significantly higher in the impaired cognition group than in the normal cognition group, while no significant difference was observed in plasma levels of fasting leptin between different groups. Fasting plasma ghrelin and cortisol levels may be markers of cognitive decline and memory loss. It is possible that adjusting their levels may have a therapeutic effect, and this should be investigated in future studies.

  2. Air pollution and respiratory health among diabetic and non-diabetic subjects in Pune, India-results from the Wellcome Trust Genetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafaie, Morteza Abdullatif; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Yajnik, Chittaranjan Sakerlal; Ojha, Ajay; Khafaie, Behzad; Gore, Sharad Damodar

    2017-06-01

    Diabetics may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of ambient air pollutants than healthy individuals. But, the risk factors that lead to susceptibility to air pollution in diabetics have not yet been identified. We examined the effect of exposure to ambient PM 10 on chronic symptoms and the pulmonary function tests (PFT) in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Also, to investigate possible determinants of susceptibility, we recruited 400 type 2 diabetic and 465 healthy subjects who were investigated for chronic respiratory symptoms (CRSs) and then underwent measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume 1 (FEV1) according to standard protocol. Percent predicted FEV1 and FVC (FEV1% and FVC%, respectively) for each subject were calculated. Particulate matter (PM 10 ) concentrations at residence place of subjects were estimated using AERMOD dispersion model. The association between PM 10 and CRSs was explored using logistic regression. We also used linear regression models controlling for potential confounders to study the association between chronic exposure to PM 10 and FEV1% and FVC%. Prevalence of current wheezing, allergy symptom, chest tightness, FEV1/FVC effect for 1 SD μg/m 3 (=98.38) increase in PM 10 concentration was 3.71% (95% CI, 0.48-4.99) decrease in FVC%. In addition, we indicated that strength of these associations was higher in overweight, smoker, and aged persons. We demonstrated a possible contribution of air pollution to reduced lung function independent of diabetes status. This study suggests that decline in exposure may significantly reduce disease manifestation as dyspnea and impaired lung function. We conduct that higher BMI, smoking, and older age were associated with higher levels of air pollution effects.

  3. Hypoglycemia in Older People - A Less Well Recognized Risk Factor for Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Morley, John E.; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in older people with diabetes and is likely to be less recognized and under reported by patients and health care professionals. Hypoglycemia in this age group is associated with significant morbidities leading to both physical and cognitive dysfunction. Repeated hospital admissions due to frequent hypoglycemia are also associated with further deterioration in patients’ general health. This negative impact of hypoglycemia is likely to eventually lead to frailty, disability and poor outcomes. It appears that the relationship between hypoglycemia and frailty is bidirectional and mediated through a series of influences including under nutrition. Therefore, attention should be paid to the management of under nutrition in the general elderly population by improving energy intake and maintaining muscle mass. Increasing physical activity and having a more conservative approach to glycemic targets in frail older people with diabetes may be worthwhile. PMID:25821643

  4. Postural hypotension in type 1 diabetes: The influence of glycemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-04

    saharan ... Key words: Diabetes mellitus, duration, glycemic control, postural hypotension. Date of ... or older) provided informed consent before enrolment in the study. .... asymptomatic despite significant falls in blood pressure.[26].

  5. A1C as a diagnostic criteria for diabetes in low- and middle-income settings: evidence from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Stanojevic, Sanja; Malaga, German; Gilman, Robert H; Smeeth, Liam

    2011-03-25

    To determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in three groups of Peruvian adults, using fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). This study included adults from the PERU MIGRANT Study who had fasted ≥ 8 h. Fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL and A1C ≥ 6.5% were used, separately, to define diabetes. Subjects with a current diagnosis of diabetes were excluded. 964 of 988 subjects were included in this analysis. Overall, 0.9% (95%CI 0.3-1.5) and 3.5% (95%CI 2.4-4.7) had diabetes using fasting glucose and A1C criteria, respectively. Compared to those classified as having diabetes using fasting glucose, newly classified subjects with diabetes using A1C (n = 25), were older, poorer, thinner and more likely to come from rural areas. Of these, 40% (10/25) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG). This study shows that the use of A1C as diagnostic criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus identifies people of different characteristics than fasting glucose. In the PERU MIGRANT population using A1C to define diabetes tripled the prevalence; the increase was more marked among poorer and rural populations. More than half the newly diagnosed people with diabetes using A1C had normal fasting glucose.

  6. Effect of fetal and infant malnutrition on metabolism in older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Peter; Leitner, Miriam; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Thurner, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    While malnutrition is an important concern in the developing world, Western countries are experiencing a pandemic of obesity and metabolic diseases. This work reviews the current state of knowledge of the effects of malnutrition during early life on metabolism in older age. The impact of early-life determinants on diabetes and related metabolic diseases in later life is elucidated by three different methodological approaches. First, results from animal studies in dietary manipulation models are reviewed. Second, findings from epidemiological studies that often use natural experiments to determine the effects of famines on the health status of the population are discussed. Finally, the relation between maternal or childhood malnutrition and diabetes in adulthood is explored in a big-data study using the entire population of a country across a century. We present overwhelming evidence that the maternal or early childhood nutritional status negatively affects both the short- and long-term health status and development of the offspring, thereby providing starting points to formulate intervention and prevention strategies. In particular, it was found that in the case of early-life exposure to famine, the risk of the offspring to develop type 2 diabetes in older age is up to 125% higher than without famine exposure. Due to its inherent complexity, an understanding of the long-term effects of maternal and childhood malnutrition on metabolism in older age necessitates interdisciplinary and big-data approaches. Only then can we hope to prevent chronic diseases at their earliest beginning. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Falls among older adults in the South of Brazil: prevalence and determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna S Vieira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Evaluate the prevalence and the factors associated with the occurrence of falls among older adults. METHODS A cross-sectional study with a representative sample of 1,451 elderly residents in the urban area of Pelotas, RS, in 2014. A descriptive analysis of the data was performed and the prevalence of falls in the last year was presented. The analysis of demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral and health factors associated with the outcome was performed using Poisson regression with adjustment for robust variance according to the hierarchical model. The variables were adjusted to each other within each level and for the higher level. Those with p ≤ 0.20 were maintained in the model for confounding control and those with p < 0.05 were considered to be associated with the outcome. RESULTS The prevalence of falls among older adults in the last year was 28.1% (95%CI 25.9–30.5, and most occurred in the person’s own residence. Among the older adults who fell, 51.5% (95%CI 46.6–56.4 had a single fall and 12.1% (95%CI 8.9–15.3 had a fracture as a consequence, usually in the lower limbs. The prevalence of falls was higher in women, adults of advanced age, with lower income and schooling level, with functional incapacity for instrumental activities, and patients with diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and arthritis. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of falls reached almost a third of the older adults, and the prevalence was higher in specific segments of the population in question. About 12% of the older adults who fell fractured some bone. The factors associated with the occurrence of falls identified in this study may guide measures aimed at prevention in the older adult population.

  8. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy in Filipino vs Caucasian Americans: a retrospective cross-sectional epidemiologic study of two convenience samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáles, Christopher S; Lee, Roland Y; Agadzi, Anthony K; Hee, Michael R; Singh, Kuldev; Lin, Shan C

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in Filipino and Caucasian Americans in two clinic populations. Retrospective cross-sectional epidemiologic study of two convenience samples. Five hundred twelve Filipino and 600 Caucasian patients aged 40 years or older examined by two community-based comprehensive ophthalmology clinics during a one-year period. The prevalence of self-reported type 2 diabetes mellitus among Filipino (F) and Caucasian Americans (C) was 40.6% and 24.8%, respectively (PFilipino; 149 Caucasian), there was a statistically insignificant higher prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among Filipino diabetics compared to Caucasians (F vs C: all forms of diabetic retinopathy, 24.5% vs 16.8%, P=.08; non-proliferative retinopathy, 17.3% vs 12.8%, P=.24; proliferative retinopathy, 7.2% vs. 4.0%, P=.21). In multivariate analyses of the diabetic subpopulation, Filipino ethnicity was not a significant predictor of diabetic retinopathy. Filipino Americans may have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy than Caucasian Americans. Among those with type 2 diabetes, however, Filipino Americans were not found to be more likely to show manifestations of diabetic retinopathy than Caucasian Americans.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of the Absorb Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffold for Treatment of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: Results of the Absorb Diabetic Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereiakes, Dean J; Ellis, Stephen G; Kimura, Takeshi; Abizaid, Alexandre; Zhao, Weiying; Veldhof, Susan; Vu, Minh-Thien; Zhang, Zhen; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Chevalier, Bernard; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-01-09

    The study sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Absorb everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, Illinois) in patients with diabetes mellitus. Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated comparable clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention with either Absorb BVS or metallic Xience everolimus-eluting stent. However, these trials lack power required to provide reliable treatment effect estimates in this high-risk population. In a pre-specified, powered analysis, patients with diabetes who received ≥1 Absorb were pooled from the ABSORB II, III, and JAPAN randomized trials and from the single arm ABSORB EXTEND registry. The study composite primary endpoint was target lesion failure (TLF) at 1 year following Absorb BVS compared with a performance goal of 12.7%. Among 754 diabetic patients included in analysis (27.3% insulin treated), the 1-year TLF rate was 8.3% (upper 1-sided 95% confidence limit: 10.1%; p = 0.0001 vs. performance goal). Scaffold thrombosis (definite or probable) was observed in 2.3% of patients. Multivariable regression identified older age, insulin treatment, and smaller pre-procedure reference vessel diameter as significant independent predictors of 1-year TLF. The Absorb diabetic substudy suggests efficacy and safety of the Absorb BVS for treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical characteristics of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Tung, Yi-Ching; Liu, Shih-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Ting; Tsai, Wen-Yu

    2017-05-01

    Cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children aged younger than 6 years in Taiwan has increased in the past 10 years. This retrospective study aimed to review the management experience of such patients in a single center. From January 2004 to June 2015, 52 newly diagnosed diabetic children younger than 6 years who had regular follow-up for > 1 year were enrolled, as well as 94 older diabetic children for comparison. Their medical records were thoroughly reviewed. The most common symptoms and signs were polyuria, polydipsia, dry lips, weight loss, and nocturia. Among the children younger than 6 years, 87% had ketoacidosis upon diagnosis-significantly higher than that of the older age group-and 88% had at least one islet cell autoantibody detected. Their serum C-peptide levels were significantly lower and the frequency of insulin autoantibodies detected was significantly higher compared with the older age group (37% vs. 10%). The remission rate of the young diabetic patients was significantly lower than that of the older age group (40% vs. 59%), but there was no difference in time of onset and duration of remission between the two groups. Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is an important cause of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years. These patients usually have a low insulin reserve and severe ketoacidosis upon diagnosis. A high index of suspicion in the presence of classic symptoms of diabetes in young children is important to prevent complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluation of a program to improve diabetes care through intensified care management activities and diabetes medication copayment reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Stephen J; Johnson, Scott; Higgins, Tara; Quilliam, Brian

    2012-05-01

    's employer groups who received at least once-yearly monitoring of A1c, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and LDL-C; medical attention (or drug therapy) for nephropathy; and an eye examination. We conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the effect of the intervention and other patient characteristics and comorbidities on rates of performance of these care processes, aggregating the 5 processes of care into an "all or none" single composite outcome. We also developed a propensity score-weighted model to attempt to adjust for differences between the intervention and nonintervention groups resulting from the nonrandomized study design. Additionally, we quantified average plan payments to providers less patient copayments (i.e., net plan cost) per patient per year (PPPY) for the 12-month follow-up period and compared these costs for the intervention versus nonintervention groups. The study sample consisted of 9,698 patients with diabetes; 649 (6.7%) of whom participated in the intervention. 9,049 (93.3%) patients were identified by the insurer as patients with diabetes receiving usual care. Patients in the intervention and nonintervention groups were similarly likely to have all 5 recommended processes of care performed (40.1% vs. 38.9%, respectively, P = 0.543). Younger patients received all 5 recommended care processes less frequently than older patients (30.5%, 38.0%, and 47.0% for ages 18-48 years, 49-59 years, and 60 years or older, respectively, P management components did not receive recommended care any more or less frequently than other enrolled members with diabetes. Younger patients and those utilizing oral antidiabetic monotherapy as their drug regimens were less likely to have the recommended processes of care performed. While prescription drug expenditures incurred by the plan were greater for intervention patients, between-group differences in total costs for medications and all-cause medical care were not statistically significant

  12. [Susceptibility of induced sickle in samples of heterozygous hemoglobin S patients (sickle cell trait) suffering diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Piedra, Pablo; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Ramos-Jiménez, Raúl; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin S is an abnormal protein that induces morphological changes in erythrocyte in low-oxygen conditions. In Mexico, it is reported that up to 13.7% of the population with mutation in one allele are considered asymptomatic (sickle cell trait). The sickle cell trait and diabetes mellitus are conditions that occur together in more than one million patients worldwide. Both diseases possibly produce microvascular changes in retinopathy and acute chest syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the induction of sickle cells in samples of diabetic patients with sickle cell trait to identify altered red cell parameters. We obtained samples of diabetic patients to determine hemoglobin A1c and S; furthermore, red blood cell biometrics data were analyzed. We found that older men with diabetes were susceptible to generate sickle cells and this correlated with reduced red blood cell count and an increase in media cell volume. In samples of women diabetes, there were no differences. We conclude that samples from patients with sickle cell trait and diabetes can cause sickle cells with high frequency in men, with lower red blood cells count and increased mean corpuscular volume as susceptibility parameters.

  13. Exploration of the Raven APM-National Adult Reading Test discrepancy as a measure of intellectual decline in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Esther; Nys, Gudrun M S; Brands, Augustina M A; Ruis, Carla; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Kessels, Roy P C

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the discrepancy between performance on "fluid" and "crystallized" intelligence measures may serve as an indicator for intellectual decline. The validity of this procedure in older persons is unknown. The present study developed a multiple regression equation, to predict the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) score from the National Adult Reading Test (NART) score and demographic variables in a large sample of healthy older persons (n = 270). The discrepancy between the predicted and observed Raven APM scores was transformed into a percentile distribution as an indicator of intellectual decline, which can be used in clinical practice. The validity of the procedure was further examined by comparing the proportion of persons with a significant decline (at the -1 and -1.65 SD level) between two older patient samples (87 patients with cerebral stroke and 387 patients with diabetes mellitus) by means of χ(2) tests. There was a significantly higher rate of intellectual decline at the -1 SD ("below average") and -1.65 SD ("impaired") cutoff levels for patients with stroke compared with patients with diabetes (stroke, 34% and 14%; diabetes, 16% and 5%, p Raven APM-NART discrepancy may be a useful measure of intellectual decline in older persons.

  14. Stress and mental health among midlife and older gay-identified men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Richard G; LeBlanc, Allen J; de Vries, Brian; Detels, Roger

    2012-03-01

    We investigated associations between stress and mental health (positive affect, depressive symptoms) among HIV-negative and HIV-positive midlife and older gay-identified men, along with the mediating and moderating effects of mastery and emotional support. We also studied the mental health effects of same-sex marriage. We obtained data from self-administered questionnaires completed in 2009 or 2010 by a subsample (n = 202; average age = 56.91 years; age range = 44-75 years) of participants in the University of California, Los Angeles component of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest and longest-running natural-history studies of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Both sexual minority stress (perceived gay-related stigma, excessive HIV bereavements) and aging-related stress (independence and fiscal concerns) appeared to have been detrimental to mental health. Sense of mastery partially mediated these associations. Being legally married was significantly protective net of all covariates, including having a domestic partner but not being married. Education, HIV status, and race/ethnicity had no significant effects. Sexual minority and aging-related stress significantly affected the emotional lives of these men. Personal sense of mastery may help to sustain them as they age. We observed specific mental health benefits of same-sex legal marriage.

  15. Comparison of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Jotkowitz, Alan; Rabaev, Elena; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, however patients with type 2 diabetes are also susceptible to DKA under stressful conditions. The aims of our study were to evaluate and compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with DKA. A retrospective cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with DKA between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of DKA patients with type-1 DM were compared with those of patients with type-2 DM. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 201 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was DKA: 166 patients (82.6%) with type-1 DM and 35 patients (17.4%) with type-2 DM. The patients with DKA and type-2 DM were significantly older than patients with type-1 DM (64.3 versus 37.3, P ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  16. The provision of diabetes care in nursing homes in Galway city and county: a survey of nursing homes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    In addition to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, our population is growing older and living longer. This survey aimed to determine the care provided to residents with diabetes in Nursing Homes.\\r\

  17. Physical Activity, Adiposity, and Diabetes Risk in Middle-Aged and Older Chinese Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Li; Corpeleijn, Eva; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Thomas, G. Neil; Schooling, C. Mary; Zhang, Weisen; Cheng, Kar Keung; Leung, Gabriel M.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Lam, Tai Hing

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- Physical activity may modify the association of adiposity with type 2 diabetes. We investigated the independent and joint association of adiposity and physical activity with fasting plasma glucose, impaired fasting glucose, and type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND

  18. What factors influence uptake of retinal screening among young adults with type 2 diabetes? A qualitative study informed by the theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Amelia J; Browne, Jessica L; Rees, Gwyneth; Speight, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Young adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 18-39years) face increased risk of vision loss from diabetic retinopathy (DR). Retinal screening is essential to detect DR, yet screening rates for this group are low and little is known about the underlying factors influencing this important behavior. Using the theoretical domains framework (TDF) to guide data collection and analysis, we explored screening barriers and facilitator, contrasting them with a comparator group of older adults with T2D (40+ years). Thirty semi-structured telephone interviews (10 younger, 20 older adults) were conducted. Data were coded into TDF domains with salience identified by "frequency" of reference. Screening facilitators and barriers were systematically compared between groups. Although many screening facilitators and barriers were shared by younger and older adults, additional factors highly relevant to the former included: social comparison with others ('social influences'); concern for the impact on the family unit, unrealistic optimism and perceived invulnerability ('beliefs about consequences'); lack of time and financial resources ('environmental context and resources'), and DR misconceptions ('knowledge'). This study demonstrated that young adult retinal screening behavior was influenced by additional social cognitive factors compared to older adults, providing a first-step evidence base for clinicians and other health professionals, and potential targets for future eye health and retinal screening interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression profiling feline peripheral blood monocytes identifies a transcriptional signature associated with type two diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Caroline A; Sedhom, Mamdouh; Reeve-Johnson, Mia; Mallyon, John; Irvine, Katharine M

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease of cats and is similar to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans, especially with respect to the role of obesity-induced insulin resistance, glucose toxicity, decreased number of pancreatic β-cells and pancreatic amyloid deposition. Cats have thus been proposed as a valuable translational model of T2D. In humans, inflammation associated with adipose tissue is believed to be central to T2D development, and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) are important in the inflammatory cascade which leads to insulin resistance and β-cell failure. PBM may thus provide a useful window to study the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus in cats, however feline monocytes are poorly characterised. In this study, we used the Affymetrix Feline 1.0ST array to profile peripheral blood monocytes from 3 domestic cats with T2D and 3 cats with normal glucose tolerance. Feline monocytes were enriched for genes expressed in human monocytes, and, despite heterogeneous gene expression, we identified a T2D-associated expression signature associated with cell cycle perturbations, DNA repair and the unfolded protein response, oxidative phosphorylation and inflammatory responses. Our data provide novel insights into the feline monocyte transcriptome, and support the hypothesis that inflammatory monocytes contribute to T2D pathogenesis in cats as well as in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery...... and subsequent validation analyses (23,399 T2D cases and 31,722 controls) identify 7 new loci with genome-wide significance (P2, rs7107784 near MIR4686 and rs67839313 near INAFM2....... Of these, the association of 4 loci with T2D is replicated in multi-ethnic populations other than Japanese (up to 65,936 T2Ds and 158,030 controls, P

  1. A multicomponent approach to identify predictors of hospital outcomes in older in-patients: a multicentre, observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie L De Buyser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of older patients at risk of poor hospital outcomes (e.g. longer hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, and institutionalisation is important to provide an effective healthcare service. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors related to older patients' clinical, nutritional, functional and socio-demographic profiles at admission to an acute care ward that can predict poor hospital outcomes. DESIGN AND SETTING: The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project was a multicentre, observational study performed in geriatric and internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. SUBJECTS: One thousand one hundred twenty-three consecutively admitted patients aged 65 years or older. METHODS: Hospital outcomes were length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and institutionalisation. RESULTS: Mean age of participants was 81 years, 56% were women. Median length of stay was 10 (7-14 days, 41 patients died during hospital stay and 37 were newly institutionalised. Number of drugs before admission, metastasized cancer, renal failure or dialysis, infection, falls at home during the last year, pain, and walking speed were independent predictors of LoS. Total dependency in activities of daily living and inability to perform grip strength test were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Malnutrition and total dependency in activities of daily living were independent predictors of institutionalisation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that not only diseases, but also multifaceted aspects of ageing such as physical function and malnutrition are strong predictors of hospital outcomes and suggest that these variables should be systematically recorded.

  2. Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Change in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Nola; McCrindle, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of self-regulation models: theory of planned behavior, protection motivation theory, health belief model, action control theory, transtheoretical model of behavior change, health action process, and precaution adoption process. Applies models to health behavior change in older adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes.…

  3. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  4. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Fisher-Hoch

    Full Text Available Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC; a two-stage randomly selected 'Framingham-like' cohort of Mexican Americans on the US Mexico border with severe health disparities. We examined prevalence, risk factors and metabolic health in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. Two thirds of this Mexican American population has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was 28.0%, nearly half undiagnosed, and pre-diabetes 31.6%. Mean BMI among those with diabetes was 33.5 kg/m2 compared with 29.0 kg/m2 for those without diabetes. Significant risk factors were low income and educational levels. Most with diabetes had increased waist/hip ratio. Lack of insurance and access to health services played a decisive role in failure to have diabetes diagnosed. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes had similar measures of poor metabolic health similar but generally not as severe as those with diagnosed diabetes. More than 50% of a minority Mexican American population in South Texas has diabetes or pre-diabetes and is metabolically unhealthy. Only a third of diabetes cases were diagnosed. Sustained efforts are imperative to identify, diagnose and treat individuals in underserved communities.

  5. FDA drug safety communications: a narrative review and clinical considerations for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Zachary A; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2012-08-01

    adults. Finally, several warnings were made about statins. Routine periodic monitoring of liver enzymes does not appear to be effective in detecting or preventing serious liver injury from statin use; thus, liver enzymes are no longer recommended to be routinely monitored. Statin-induced cognitive changes are rare, and insufficient evidence is currently available to establish causality. Statins appear to moderately increase the risk of developing diabetes (versus placebo), and regular screening for diabetes should be considered, especially for patients taking high-dose statins and patients with multiple risk factors for diabetes. FDA drug safety communications incorporate complex methodologies that investigate the risks (and relative benefits) of medication therapy. Clinicians caring for older adults need to be aware of the most current evidence behind these drug risks to effectively communicate with and care for their patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes and the risk of multi-system aging phenotypes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ping Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggested an association between diabetes and the risk of various geriatric conditions (i.e., cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, mobility impairment, disability, falls, and urinary incontinence. However, the magnitude and impact of diabetes on older adults have not been reviewed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MEDLINE and PSYCINFO databases were searched through November 2007 for published studies, supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key articles. Population-based, prospective cohort studies that reported risk of geriatric outcomes in relation to diabetes status at baseline were selected. Two authors independently extracted the data, including study population and follow-up duration, ascertainment of diabetes status at baseline, outcomes of interest and their ascertainment, adjusted covariates, measures of association, and brief results. Fifteen studies examined the association of DM with cognitive dysfunction. DM was associated with a faster decline in cognitive function among older adults. The pooled adjusted risk ratio (RR for all dementia when persons with DM were compared to those without was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.25 to 1.73. Summary RRs for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia comparing persons with DM to those without were 1.39 (CI, 1.16 to 1.66 and 2.38 (CI, 1.79 to 3.18, respectively. Four of 5 studies found significant association of DM with faster mobility decline and incident disability. Two studies examined the association of diabetes with falls in older women. Both found statistically significant associations. Insulin users had higher RR for recurrent falls. One study for urinary incontinence in older women found statistically significant associations. Two studies for depression did not suggest that DM was an independent predictor of incident depression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Current evidence supports that DM is associated with increased risk for selected geriatric

  7. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal health: dentists' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Al-Shammari, Khalaf F

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong body of evidence to support the relationship between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus. Unless dental practitioners are aware of this link, they cannot apply the information to their daily practice. The aim of the study was, therefore, to evaluate the knowledge of dental practitioners concerning the effect of diabetes on periodontal health. This was a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected dental practitioners in Kuwait. Participants were asked about specific periodontal complications which they believed that patients diagnosed with diabetes were more susceptible to. A total of 220 dental practitioners (133 general dental practitioners and 87 dental specialists) participated in the study. Less than 60% of all study participants reported that tooth loss due to periodontal reasons and periodontal abscess were frequent among diabetic patients. Dental specialists, especially periodontists, were significantly more aware of periodontal complications associated with diabetes. Factors significantly associated with having knowledge about the effect of diabetes on periodontal health in logistic regression analysis were dentists who were older and those who were specialists. The results of this study indicate that knowledge about the effects of diabetes on periodontal health among this sample of dental practitioners is generally low, and dentists may underestimate the outcomes of periodontal diseases in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Caregivers of older persons with multiple sclerosis: determinants of health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhse, Marijean; Della Ratta, Carol; Galiczewski, Janet; Eckardt, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine which factors (clinical and demographic) are associated with mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for caregivers of older persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The Andersen's Healthcare Utilization Model guided this study. Knowledge of identified predictors of HRQOL may prompt nurses who care for persons with MS to address these issues and provide supportive care. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to examine the relationship between patient with MS and caregiver clinical and demographic factors with caregiver physical and mental HRQOL. Patients with MS aged 60 years or older and their caregivers from four MS centers on Long Island, New York, self-selected into this study (n = 102). A caregiver survey was administered that collected demographic information and included validated questionnaires measuring HRQOL, caregiver burden, and caregiver perception of risk for neuropsychological impairment of patients with MS. Patient surveys collected demographic information and validated questionnaires measuring cognition, depression, and disability. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine patient and caregiver variables to explain caregiver physical and mental HRQOL. The caregivers in this study were older (mean age = 61 years) with existing comorbidities. We found that caregiver mental HRQOL was negatively associated with patient depression and, surprisingly, positively associated with caregiver burden and caregiver comorbidity of heart disease. Caregiver physical HRQOL was negatively associated with caregiver comorbidities of arthritis and diabetes and lower household income. The challenges older caregivers face when caring for older persons with MS have been shown to affect their mental and physical QOL. Nurses who care for older patients with MS will increasingly rely on older caregivers to provide patient-centered interventions. This descriptive study, based on the Anderson theoretical

  9. [Erectile dysfunction and diabetes in Conakry (Guinea): frequency and clinical characteristics from 187 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, N M; Diallo, A B; Baldé, M C; Kaké, A; Diallo, M M; Diallo, M B; Maugendre, D

    2006-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is frequent in the diabetic population. In Africa, medical care for erectile dysfunction is underprovided, profoundly altering the quality of life of the patients. We report the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in 187 diabetic patients followed in the department of Endocrinology of the Conakry teaching hospital. Prevalence was estimated from the French version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Erectile dysfunction concerned 90 patients (48%) of whom a severe form was observed in 54%, a moderate form in 35% and a mild form in 12%. The patients who presented erectile dysfunction were significantly older, displayed longer duration of diabetes with more complications (sensorial neuropathy and macroangiopathy) and often took drugs for associated cardiovascular diseases. In 28% of the cases, erectile dysfunction was associated with a decline in libido and in 26% with ejaculation disorders. In conclusion, erectile dysfunction is frequent and severe among diabetic patients in Guinea. The medical staff plays an essential role to initiate early diagnosis, promote psychological support and provide medication, if possible.

  10. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  11. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide for overweight adult patients with type 1 diabetes and insufficient glycaemic control (Lira-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Hansen, Tanja Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    to insulin for overweight adult patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at Steno Diabetes Center (Gentofte, Denmark). Patients aged 18 years or older with type 1 diabetes, insufficient glycaemic control (HbA1c >8% [64 mmol/mol]), and overweight (BMI...

  12. Association of abdominal fat with serum amylase in an older cohort: The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jenny Pena; Schrack, Jennifer A; Shardell, Michelle D; Egan, Josephine M; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal fat is a major determinant of metabolic diseases in older individuals. Obesity and diabetes are associated with low serum amylase (SA) levels, but the association between SA and metabolic disease is poorly understood. We investigated the association of low SA with diabetes and sex-specific associations of serum amylase with abdominal fat in older adults. In community-dwelling volunteers from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (778 participants, age 66.8±13.6years), we assessed abdominal fat by computed tomography and diabetes status using the American Diabetes Association criteria. Linear regression analyses assessed the cross-sectional associations between abdominal fat and SA, and logistic regression assessed the odds of diabetes, given low SA. In unadjusted analyses, individuals in the lowest SA quartile (abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT, dm(2)) or BMI. In adjusted analyses, VAT and SAT were significantly associated with SA in both sexes. Among women, SA was more strongly associated with VAT than with SAT or BMI; VAT (β=-0.117±0.048, Pabdominal visceral fat. In women, SA was more strongly associated with VAT than with BMI or SAT. These findings provide motivation for future mechanistic studies on SA's role in metabolic diseases. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Technology-Intensified Diabetes Education Study (TIDES) in African Americans with type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joni S; Lynch, Cheryl P; Knapp, Rebecca G; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-11-25

    Compared to American Whites, African Americans have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), experiencing poorer metabolic control and greater risks for complications and death. Patient-level factors, such as diabetes knowledge, self-management skills, empowerment, and perceived control, account for >90% of the variance observed in outcomes between these racial groups. There is strong evidence that self-management interventions that include telephone-delivered diabetes education and skills training are effective at improving metabolic control in diabetes. Web-based home telemonitoring systems in conjunction with active care management are also effective ways to lower glycosylated hemoglobin A1c values when compared to standard care, and provide feedback to patients; however, there are no studies in African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM that examine the use of technology-based feedback to tailor or augment diabetes education and skills training. This study provides a unique opportunity to address this gap in the literature. We describe an ongoing 4-year randomized clinical trial, which will test the efficacy of a technology-intensified diabetes education and skills training (TIDES) intervention in African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM. Two hundred male and female AfricanAmerican participants, 21 years of age or older and with a glycosylated hemoglobin A1c level ≥ 8%, will be randomized into one of two groups for 12 weeks of telephone interventions: (1) TIDES intervention group or (2) a usual-care group. Participants will be followed for 12 months to ascertain the effect of the interventions on glycemic control. Our primary hypothesis is that, among African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM, patients randomized to the TIDES intervention will have significantly greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c at 12 months of follow-up compared to the usual-care group. Results from this study will add to the current literature

  14. What keeps you strong? A systematic review identifying how primary health-care and aged-care services can support the well-being of older Indigenous peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; Aitken, Graham; Dodd, Garth; Rigney, Janice; Hayes, Jenny; Van Emden, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify primary health-care or aged-care strategies that have or could support the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. A search was undertaken of primary databases including Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Papers which reported on the perspectives of older Indigenous peoples, community members and provider participants were included. Findings were pooled using a meta-aggregative approach. Three high-level synthesised findings - maintaining Indigenous identity, promoting independence and delivering culturally safe care - were believed to be important for supporting the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. As physical independence often diminishes with age, having the support of culturally safe primary health-care and aged-care services that understand the importance of maintaining an Indigenous identity and promoting independence will be crucial for the well-being of older Indigenous peoples. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  15. Exercise but not metformin improves health-related quality of life and mood states in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Liliana C; Machado-Rodrigues, Aristides M; Martins, Raul A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this cohort study is to analyse the effect of three types of treatment: (i) exercise training with multicomponent exercise (E); (ii) pharmacologic treatment with oral hypoglycaemic drug - metformin (M); and (iii) a combined therapy - exercise and metformin (E + M) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood states in older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with comorbidity in an early stage of the disease. Participants (n = 284) underwent 1 of the following 3 conditions: (i) E (n = 59) trained three times/week; (ii) M (n = 30) used 850 mg of metformin twice daily; and (iii) E + M (n = 195) combined exercise and metformin. Furthermore, participants completed baseline and 2-year follow-up evaluations including a Shortform Health Survey 36, Profile of Mood States - Short-form, the health history questionnaires, anthropometric, and blood biochemistry. E and E + M revealed improved mood states, with large effect size on the vigour domain, and moderate effect size in the anger and total mood disturbance (TMD) domains (P  0.05). Metformin had no significant effect on the self-referred HRQoL in T2D participants aged above 60 years, in an early stage of the disease. The E and E + M were the most effective long-term therapies to improve mood states and HRQoL in older adults with T2D.

  16. Characterization of human myotubes from type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects using complementary quantitative mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Bak, Steffen; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    2 diabetes. Several abnormalities have been identified in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects, however, the exact molecular mechanisms leading to the diabetic phenotype has still not been found. Here we present a large-scale study in which we combine a quantitative proteomic discovery...... strategy using iTRAQ and a label-free study with a targeted quantitative proteomic approach using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to identify, quantify and validate changes in protein abundance between human myotubes obtained from non-diabetic lean, non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic subjects...

  17. [Prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Basto-Abreu, Ana; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Zárate-Rojas, Emiliano; Villalpando, Salvador; Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh

    2018-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes in 2016 with previous national surveys and to describe treatment and its complications. Mexico's national surveys Ensa 2000, Ensanut 2006, 2012 and 2016 were used. For 2016, logistic regression models and measures of central tendency and dispersion were obtained. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes in 2016 was 9.4%. The increase of 2.2% relative to 2012 was not significant and only observed in patients older than 60 years. While preventive measures have increased, the access to medical treatment and lifestyle has not changed. The treatment has been modified, with an increase in insulin and decrease in hypoglycaemic agents. Population aging, lack of screening actions and the increase in diabetes complications will lead to an increase on the burden of disease. Policy measures targeting primary and secondary prevention of diabetes are crucial.

  18. Effectiveness of a behavior modification program for older people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnapiruk, Liwan; Wirojratana, Virapun; Meehatchai, Nitaya; Turale, Sue

    2014-06-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effectiveness of a behavior modification program for diabetic control in Thai elders with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. Purposive sampling was used to select 30 elders from one community as an intervention group, and 30 from a neighboring community as a control group. The intervention group participated in a program of 12 weeks' duration involving activities related to group counseling, group discussion, and an empowerment process that enhanced appropriate consumption of healthy diet, medication taking, and exercise. Data were collected by interviews using a questionnaire to assess knowledge of diabetes, perceived self-efficacy, and diabetes control behavior, including fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, were examined at the baseline and three months thereafter. At program completion, the intervention group had significantly higher scores of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors than those in the control group, but blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were not significantly different. Although nurses can use aspects of this program to benefit elders with diabetes who require support and education, further research is required to provide improved health outcomes such as better glycemic control. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. A prospective association between dietary folate intake and type 2 diabetes risk among Korean adults aged 40 years or older: the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort (MRCohort) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang M; Woo, Hey W; Kim, Mi K; Kim, Se Y; Lee, Young-Hoon; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Min-Ho; Chun, Byung-Yeol; Choi, Bo Y

    2017-12-01

    It has not been well established whether dietary folate intake reduces the risk of diabetes development. We aimed to clarify the prospective association between dietary folate intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk among 7333 Korean adults aged 40 years or older who were included in the Multi-Rural Communities Cohort. Dietary folate intake was estimated from all 106 food items listed on a FFQ, not including folate intake from supplements. Two different measurements of dietary folate intake were used: the baseline consumption and the average consumption from baseline until just before the end of follow-up. The association between folate intake and T2D risk was determined through a modified Poisson regression model with a robust error estimator controlling for potential confounders. For 29 745 person years, 319 cases of diabetes were ascertained. In multivariable analyses, dietary folate intake was inversely associated with risk of T2D for women, not for men. For women, the incidence rate ratio of diabetes in the third tertile compared with the first tertile was 0·57 (95 % CI 0·38-0·87, P for trend=0·0085) in the baseline consumption model and 0·64 (95 % CI 0·43-0·95, P for trend=0·0244) in the average consumption model. These inverse associations was found in both normal fasting blood glucose group and impaired fasting glucose group among women. Among non-users of multinutrients and vitamin supplements, the significant inverse association remained. Thus, higher dietary intake of folate is prospectively associated with lower risk of diabetes for women.

  20. Identifying Risk Factors for the Prediction of Hospital Readmission among Older Persons with Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Renee Annette

    Older persons (55 years and older) with cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for hospital readmission when compared to other subgroups of our population. This issue presents an economic problem, a concern for the quality and type of care provided, and an urgent need to implement innovative strategies designed to reduce the rising cost of…

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa

    2008-01-01

    analyses had limited power to identify variants with modest effects, we carried out meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans comprising 10,128 individuals of European descent and approximately 2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed), followed by replication testing in an independent sample......Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published...

  2. Comparison of potentially preventable hospitalizations related to diabetes among Native Hawaiian, Chinese, Filipino, and Japanese elderly compared with whites, Hawai'i, December 2006-December 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentell, Tetine L; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Juarez, Deborah T; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Chen, John J; Salvail, Florentina R; Miyamura, Jill; Mau, Marjorie L M

    2013-07-25

    Approximately 25% of individuals aged 65 years or older in the United States have diabetes mellitus. Diabetes rates in this age group are higher for Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AA/PI) than for whites. We examined racial/ethnic differences in diabetes-related potentially preventable hospitalizations (DRPH) among people aged 65 years or older for Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Native Hawaiians, and whites. Discharge data for hospitalizations in Hawai'i for people aged 65 years or older from December 2006 through December 2010 were compared. Annual rates of DRPH by patient were calculated for each racial/ethnic group by sex. Rate ratios (RRs) were calculated relative to whites. Multivariable models controlling for insurer, comorbidity, diabetes prevalence, age, and residence location provided final adjusted rates and RRs. A total of 1,815 DRPH were seen from 1,515 unique individuals. Unadjusted RRs for DRPH by patient were greater than 1 in all AA/PI study groups compared with whites, but were highest among Native Hawaiians and Filipinos [corrected]. In fully adjusted models accounting for higher diabetes prevalence in AA/PI groups, Native Hawaiian (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] = 1.59), Filipino (aRR = 2.26), and Japanese (aRR = 1.86) men retained significantly higher rates of diabetes-related potentially preventable hospitalizations than whites, as did Filipino women (aRR = 1.61). Native Hawaiian, Filipino, and Japanese men and Filipino women aged 65 years or older have a higher risk than whites for DRPH. Health care providers and public health programs for elderly patients should consider effective programs to reduce potentially preventable hospitalizations among Native Hawaiian, Filipino, and Japanese men and Filipino women aged 65 years or older.

  3. Synthesis of evidence of diagnostic tests and preventive programs identifying pre-diabetes type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Tučková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D has become the main type of diabetes in children and it is expected that in countries with high income diabetes it is projected to be one of the leading causes of death by 2030. Another fact is that programs and tests diagnosing pre-diabetes type 2 (T2P-DMC are missing. Methods: The aim of the paper is to present the steps for the synthesis of the evidence within the brand new type of the systematic review (SR: SR of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA. Using the acronym PIRD it was developed a review question, search strategy and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: The initial search was done in two databases (MedLine and Cinahl with 2 025 results. The second search after the improvement of the sensitivity and the specificity was done in 15 databases with 3 681 results. Conclusion: This methodological paper introduces how to conduct the systematic review protocols of diagnostic test accuracy on the example of T2P-DMC.

  4. Napping is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kin-Bong Hubert; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Thomas, G Neil; Arora, Teresa; Zhang, Wei Sen; Taheri, Shahrad; Adab, Peymané; Lam, Tai Hing; Cheng, Kar Keung

    2010-03-01

    Intentional napping is very common, particularly in China. However, there are limited data regarding its potential health effects. We therefore examined the possible relationship between napping and type 2 diabetes. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Community-based elderly association in Guangzhou, China. 19,567 Chinese men and women aged 50 years or older. Self-reported frequency of napping was obtained by questionnaire and type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting blood glucose and/or self-reports of physician diagnosis or treatment. Participants reporting frequent naps (4-6 days/week and daily) were 42% to 52% more likely to have diabetes. The relationships remained essentially unchanged after adjustments were made for demographics, lifestyle and sleep habits, health status, adiposity, and metabolic markers (odds ratio for diabetes 1.36 [95% CI 1.17-1.57] in 4-6 days/week, 1.28 [1.15-1.44] in daily nappers). Similar associations were found between napping and impaired fasting glucose. Removal of those with potential ill health and daytime sleepiness did not alter the observed associations. Napping is associated with elevated prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in this older Chinese sample. Our finding suggests that it is less likely that diabetes leads to daytime sleepiness. This raises the possibility that napping may increase the risk of diabetes. Confirmation by longitudinal studies is needed.

  5. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes in adult Zoroastrians in Yazd, Iran: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Saeedhossein; Afkhami-Ardekani, Mohammad; Afrand, Mohammadhosain

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) varies among ethnic groups. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) for the first time in an ethnic population, specifically Zoroastrian citizens in Yazd, Iran whose ages were 30 or older. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, participants aged≥30 years were selected using systematic random sampling. An inventory, including socio-demographic data, was completed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) were measured using standard methods. Also, blood levels of glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), urea, creatinine (Cr), and uric acid were measured. The latest criteria established by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were used to diagnose DM. Results: The mean age of the participants (n=403) was 56.9±12.8 years. The total prevalence of diabetes, including previously diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, IFG, and IGT was 26.1%, 18.6%, 7.5%, 34.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Participants with diabetes had higher fasting blood sugar (FBS) (PZoroastrian population of Yazd, Iran. One-third of the total cases with diabetes were undiagnosed. PMID:26052411

  6. Anti-Diabetic Potential of the Leaves of Anisomeles malabarica in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddanna Kotha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus is a pandemic metabolic disorder that is affecting a majority of populations in recent years. There is a requirement for new drugs that are safer and cheaper due to the side effects associated with the available medications. Methods: We investigated the anti-diabetic activity of leaves of Anisomeles malabarica following bioactivity guided fractionation. The different solvent (hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts of A. malabarica leaves were used in acute treatment studies to evaluate and identify the active fraction. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to further fractionation using silica gel column chromatography and the compounds were identified by LC-SRM/MS and GC-MS. Additional chronic treatment studies were carried out using this active fraction (AMAF for 30 days in experimental diabetic rats. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and glucose tolerance were measured along with insulin resistance/sensitivity indicators (HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI to assess the beneficial effects of A. malabarica in the management of diabetes mellitus. Results: Among the different solvent extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract showed maximum (66% anti-hyperglycemic activity. The hexane and ethyl acetate (1: 1 fraction that has maximum anti-diabetic activity was identified as active fraction of A. malabarica (AMAF. The FBG, HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity/resistance indicators such as glucose tolerance, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI were significantly improved to near normal in diabetic rats treated with AMAF. Further, we identified key flavonoids and fatty acids as the anti-diabetic active principles from the AMAF of A. malabarica leaves. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that Anisomeles malabarica has potential anti-diabetic activity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  7. Diabetes HealthSense: Resources for Living Well

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or school health professional K-8th grade Community health worker Community organization Age Select one: Child Teen and young adult Adult Older adult (65+) Type of Resource Select one: Printable documents Online ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892-2560, Telephone: 301.496.3583

  8. Relation between risk of falling and postural sway complexity in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S; Colberg, S R; Parson, H K; Vinik, A I

    2012-04-01

    For older individuals with diabetes, any decline in balance control can be especially problematic since it is often a precursor to an increased risk of falling. This study was designed to evaluate differences in postural motion dynamics and falls risk for older individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) classified as fallers/non-fallers and, to assess what impact exercise has on balance and falls risk. The results demonstrated that the risk of falling is greater for those older individuals with multiple risk factors including diabetes and a previous falls history. The postural motion features of the high-risk individuals (T2DM-fallers) were also different, being characterized by increased variability and complexity, increased AP-ML coupling, less overall COP motion and increased velocity. One suggestion is that these individuals evoked a stiffening strategy during the more challenging postural tasks. Following training, a decline in falls risk was observed for all groups, with this effect being most pronounced for the T2DM-fallers. Interestingly, the COP motion of this group became more similar to controls, exhibiting decreased complexity and variability, and decreased velocity. The reciprocal changes in COP complexity support the broader view that age/disease-related changes in physiological complexity are bi-directional. Overall, these results show that, even for older T2DM individuals at greater risk of falling, targeted interventions can positively enhance their postural dynamics. Further, the finding that the pattern of postural motion variability and complexity was altered highlights that a decline in physiological complexity may not always be negatively associated with aging and/or disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Older Subjects with β-cell Dysfunction have an Accentuated Incretin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno-Garcia, José de Jesús; Gastaldelli, Amalia; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Lertwattanarak, Raweewan; Holst, Jens J; Musi, Nicolas

    2018-04-16

    Insulin secretion declines with age and this contributes to the increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in older subjects. Insulin secretion is regulated by the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). Here we tested the hypotheses that incretin release is reduced in older subjects, and that this decline is associated with β-cell dysfunction. 40 young (25±3 y) and 53 older (74±7 y) lean non-diabetic subjects underwent a 2 h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Based on the OGTT, subjects were divided in 3 groups: young normal glucose tolerant (Y-NGT, n=40), older with NGT (O-NGT, n=32), and older with IGT (O-IGT, n=21). Plasma insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, and GIP concentrations were measured every 15-30 min. We quantitated insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) and insulin secretory rate (ISR) by deconvolution of C-peptide with the calculation of β-cell glucose sensitivity. Matsuda index, early phase ISR (0-30min) and parameters of β-cell function were reduced in O-IGT vs. Y-NGT, but not in O-NGT. GLP-1 concentrations were elevated in both older groups [GLP-1_AUC0-120 was 2.8±0.1 in Y-NGT, 3.8±0.5 in O-NGT, and 3.7±0.4 nmol/l∙120 min in O-IGT (P<0.05)] while GIP secretion was elevated in O-NGT vs. Y-NGT [GIP_AUC0-120 was 4.7±0.3 in Y-NGT, 6.0±0.4 in O-NGT, and 4.8±0.3 nmol/l∙120 min in O-IGT (P<0.05)]. Aging is associated with an exaggerated GLP-1 secretory response. However, this was not sufficient to increase insulin first phase release in O-IGT and overcome insulin resistance.

  10. Factors that drive the gap in diabetes rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in non-remote NSW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Rebecca; Church, Jody; Haas, Marion; Bradford, Wylie; Viney, Rosalie

    2014-10-01

    To identify factors underpinning the gap in diabetes rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in non-remote NSW. This will indicate appropriate target areas for policy and for monitoring progress towards reducing the gap. Data from the 2004-05 National Health Survey and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey were used to estimate differences in self-reported diabetes rates and risk/prevention factors between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in non-remote NSW. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the contribution of each factor to predicting the probability of diabetes. Risk factors for diabetes are more prevalent and diabetes rates 2.5 to 4 times higher in Aboriginal compared to non-Aboriginal adults in non-remote NSW. The odds of (known) diabetes for both groups are significantly higher for older people, those with low levels of education and those who are overweight or obese. In the Aboriginal sample, the odds of diabetes are significantly higher for people reporting forced removal of their relatives. Differences in BMI and education appear to be driving the diabetes gap, together with onset at younger ages in the Aboriginal population. Psychological distress, indicated by removal of relatives, may contribute to increased risk of diabetes in the Aboriginal population. The results imply that improved nutrition and exercise, capacity to access and act upon health care information and early intervention are required to reduce the diabetes gap. Current strategies appear to be appropriately aligned with the evidence; however, further research is required to determine whether implementation methods are effective. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  11. Development of health over four years among middle-aged and older Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Sonja; Eriksen, Mette Lindholm; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Older adults in Eastern and Central European countries have a higher risk of developing poor self-rated health over four years. The same geographical pattern is seen for a higher risk of developing hypertension and diabetes. Low educational level significantly increases the risk of developing poor...... self-perceived health....

  12. Influence of diabetes on physical function among the elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Tabassum

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition that the complications associated with type-2 diabetes may translate into functional impairments in older people.This cross sectional study was conducted between January and June 2008 to determine the influence of diabetes on physical functions in an elderly (³55 years population. Fifty-five elderly diabetics attending the out-patient department of a diabetic centre were selected by convenient sampling and compared with fifty-five non-diabetic elderly persons of the near-by community. Their physical functions were assessed by Barthel Index, SF-36 Health Survey and Modified Physical Performance test. Diabetic elderly persons, on average, obtained lower scores in all these three tests. After removing the effect of socio-demographic variables, influence of diabetes on level of independence measured by Barthel Index did not persist. However, the difference in SF-36 health survey and Modified Physical Performance test scores between diabetics and non-diabetics remained significant after controlling for socio-demographic variables. The current study showed influence of diabetes on physical functions in the elderly. People should be motivated and guided properly to practice a healthy lifestyle in order to prevent and control diabetes and thus avoid complications of diabetes mellitus and disabilities in later life. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2009; 3(2: 45-49

  13. A machine learning-based framework to identify type 2 diabetes through electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tao; Xie, Wei; Xu, Liling; He, Xiaoying; Zhang, Ya; You, Mingrong; Yang, Gong; Chen, You

    2017-01-01

    To discover diverse genotype-phenotype associations affiliated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) via genome-wide association study (GWAS) and phenome-wide association study (PheWAS), more cases (T2DM subjects) and controls (subjects without T2DM) are required to be identified (e.g., via Electronic Health Records (EHR)). However, existing expert based identification algorithms often suffer in a low recall rate and could miss a large number of valuable samples under conservative filtering standards. The goal of this work is to develop a semi-automated framework based on machine learning as a pilot study to liberalize filtering criteria to improve recall rate with a keeping of low false positive rate. We propose a data informed framework for identifying subjects with and without T2DM from EHR via feature engineering and machine learning. We evaluate and contrast the identification performance of widely-used machine learning models within our framework, including k-Nearest-Neighbors, Naïve Bayes, Decision Tree, Random Forest, Support Vector Machine and Logistic Regression. Our framework was conducted on 300 patient samples (161 cases, 60 controls and 79 unconfirmed subjects), randomly selected from 23,281 diabetes related cohort retrieved from a regional distributed EHR repository ranging from 2012 to 2014. We apply top-performing machine learning algorithms on the engineered features. We benchmark and contrast the accuracy, precision, AUC, sensitivity and specificity of classification models against the state-of-the-art expert algorithm for identification of T2DM subjects. Our results indicate that the framework achieved high identification performances (∼0.98 in average AUC), which are much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithm (0.71 in AUC). Expert algorithm-based identification of T2DM subjects from EHR is often hampered by the high missing rates due to their conservative selection criteria. Our framework leverages machine learning and feature

  14. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk.

  15. Achievement of therapeutic targets in Mexican patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Chiquete, Erwin; de la Luz, Julieta; Ochoa-Guzmán, Ana; Sánchez-Orozco, Laura V; Godínez-Gutiérrez, Sergio A

    2012-12-01

    Complications of diabetes comprise the leading cause of death in Mexico. We aimed to describe the characteristics of management and achievement of therapeutic targets in Mexican patients with diabetes mellitus. We analyzed data from 2642 Mexican patients with type 1 (T1D, n=203, 7.7%) and type 2 diabetes (T2D, n=2439, 92.3%) included in the third wave of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study. Of T2D patients, 63% were on oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLD) exclusively (mostly metformin), 11% on insulin, 22% on OGLD plus insulin, and 4% on diet and exercise exclusively. T2D patients on insulin were more likely to be trained on diabetes, but they were older, had worse control, longer disease duration and more chronic complications than patients on OGLD only. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) diabetes did not reach therapeutic targets. Insulin was used mostly in complicated cases with advanced disease. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient-provider communication and trust in relation to use of an online patient portal among diabetes patients: The Diabetes and Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Courtney R; Sarkar, Urmimala; Ralston, James D; Adler, Nancy; Schillinger, Dean; Moffet, Howard H; Huang, Elbert S; Karter, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Patient-provider relationships influence diabetes care; less is known about their impact on online patient portal use. Diabetes patients rated provider communication and trust. In this study, we linked responses to electronic medical record data on being a registered portal user and using secure messaging (SM). We specified regression models to evaluate main effects on portal use, and subgroup analyses by race/ethnicity and age. 52% of subjects were registered users; among those, 36% used SM. Those reporting greater trust were more likely to be registered users (relative  risk (RR)=1.14) or SM users (RR=1.29). In subgroup analyses, increased trust was associated with being a registered user among white, Latino, and older patients, as well as SM use among white patients. Better communication ratings were also related to being a registered user among older patients. Since increased trust and communication were associated with portal use within subgroups, this suggests that patient-provider relationships encourage portal engagement.

  17. Glycemic Excursions in Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Semiparametric Statistical Approach to Identify Sensitive Time Points during Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the gestational glycemic profile and identify specific times during pregnancy that variability in glucose levels, measured by change in velocity and acceleration/deceleration of blood glucose fluctuations, is associated with delivery of a large-for-gestational-age (LGA baby, in women with type 1 diabetes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of capillary blood glucose levels measured multiple times daily throughout gestation in women with type 1 diabetes was performed using semiparametric mixed models. Results. Velocity and acceleration/deceleration in glucose levels varied across gestation regardless of delivery outcome. Compared to women delivering LGA babies, those delivering babies appropriate for gestational age exhibited significantly smaller rates of change and less variation in glucose levels between 180 days of gestation and birth. Conclusions. Use of innovative statistical methods enabled detection of gestational intervals in which blood glucose fluctuation parameters might influence the likelihood of delivering LGA baby in mothers with type 1 diabetes. Understanding dynamics and being able to visualize gestational changes in blood glucose are a potentially useful tool to assist care providers in determining the optimal timing to initiate continuous glucose monitoring.

  18. Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such…

  19. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Diabetes education for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Robert; Jetha, Mary; Dryden, Donna M; Hooten, Nicola; Liang, Yuanyuan; Durec, Tamara; Sumamo, Elizabeth; Spooner, Carol; Milne, Andrea; O'Gorman, Kate; Klassen, Terry P

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of diabetes education on metabolic control, diabetes-related hosp