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Sample records for identify cluster sizes

  1. Cluster size statistic and cluster mass statistic: two novel methods for identifying changes in functional connectivity between groups or conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Alex; Schwarzbauer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Functional connectivity has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years. At a typical spatial resolution, approximately 300 million connections link each voxel in the brain with every other. This pattern of connectivity is known as the functional connectome. Connectivity is often compared between experimental groups and conditions. Standard methods used to control the type 1 error rate are likely to be insensitive when comparisons are carried out across the whole connectome, due to the huge number of statistical tests involved. To address this problem, two new cluster based methods--the cluster size statistic (CSS) and cluster mass statistic (CMS)--are introduced to control the family wise error rate across all connectivity values. These methods operate within a statistical framework similar to the cluster based methods used in conventional task based fMRI. Both methods are data driven, permutation based and require minimal statistical assumptions. Here, the performance of each procedure is evaluated in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, utilising a simulated dataset. The relative sensitivity of each method is also tested on real data: BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI scans were carried out on twelve subjects under normal conditions and during the hypercapnic state (induced through the inhalation of 6% CO2 in 21% O2 and 73%N2). Both CSS and CMS detected significant changes in connectivity between normal and hypercapnic states. A family wise error correction carried out at the individual connection level exhibited no significant changes in connectivity.

  2. Size selected metal clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The Optical Absorption Spectra of Small Silver Clusters (5-11) ... Soft Landing and Fragmentation of Small Clusters Deposited in Noble-Gas Films. Harbich, W.; Fedrigo, S.; Buttet, J. Phys. Rev. B 1998, 58, 7428. CO combustion on supported gold clusters. Arenz M ...

  3. Ethical implications of excessive cluster sizes in cluster randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Karla; Taljaard, Monica; Forbes, Gordon; Eldridge, Sandra M; Weijer, Charles

    2018-02-20

    The cluster randomised trial (CRT) is commonly used in healthcare research. It is the gold-standard study design for evaluating healthcare policy interventions. A key characteristic of this design is that as more participants are included, in a fixed number of clusters, the increase in achievable power will level off. CRTs with cluster sizes that exceed the point of levelling-off will have excessive numbers of participants, even if they do not achieve nominal levels of power. Excessively large cluster sizes may have ethical implications due to exposing trial participants unnecessarily to the burdens of both participating in the trial and the potential risks of harm associated with the intervention. We explore these issues through the use of two case studies. Where data are routinely collected, available at minimum cost and the intervention poses low risk, the ethical implications of excessively large cluster sizes are likely to be low (case study 1). However, to maximise the social benefit of the study, identification of excessive cluster sizes can allow for prespecified and fully powered secondary analyses. In the second case study, while there is no burden through trial participation (because the outcome data are routinely collected and non-identifiable), the intervention might be considered to pose some indirect risk to patients and risks to the healthcare workers. In this case study it is therefore important that the inclusion of excessively large cluster sizes is justifiable on other grounds (perhaps to show sustainability). In any randomised controlled trial, including evaluations of health policy interventions, it is important to minimise the burdens and risks to participants. Funders, researchers and research ethics committees should be aware of the ethical issues of excessively large cluster sizes in cluster trials. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  4. Cluster dynamics at different cluster size and incident laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tara; Bernardinello, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    X-ray emission spectra from aluminum clusters of diameter -0.4 μm and gold clusters of dia. ∼1.25 μm are experimentally studied by irradiating the cluster foil targets with 1.06 μm laser, 10 ns (FWHM) at an intensity ∼10 12 W/cm 2 . Aluminum clusters show a different spectra compared to bulk material whereas gold cluster evolve towards bulk gold. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of cluster dimension, laser wavelength and pulse duration. PIC simulations are performed to study the behavior of clusters at higher intensity I≥10 17 W/cm 2 for different size of the clusters irradiated at different laser wavelengths. Results indicate the dependence of cluster dynamics on cluster size and incident laser wavelength

  5. Relative efficiency and sample size for cluster randomized trials with variable cluster sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhiying; Williams, O Dale; Aban, Inmaculada; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Tiwari, Hemant K; Cutter, Gary

    2011-02-01

    The statistical power of cluster randomized trials depends on two sample size components, the number of clusters per group and the numbers of individuals within clusters (cluster size). Variable cluster sizes are common and this variation alone may have significant impact on study power. Previous approaches have taken this into account by either adjusting total sample size using a designated design effect or adjusting the number of clusters according to an assessment of the relative efficiency of unequal versus equal cluster sizes. This article defines a relative efficiency of unequal versus equal cluster sizes using noncentrality parameters, investigates properties of this measure, and proposes an approach for adjusting the required sample size accordingly. We focus on comparing two groups with normally distributed outcomes using t-test, and use the noncentrality parameter to define the relative efficiency of unequal versus equal cluster sizes and show that statistical power depends only on this parameter for a given number of clusters. We calculate the sample size required for an unequal cluster sizes trial to have the same power as one with equal cluster sizes. Relative efficiency based on the noncentrality parameter is straightforward to calculate and easy to interpret. It connects the required mean cluster size directly to the required sample size with equal cluster sizes. Consequently, our approach first determines the sample size requirements with equal cluster sizes for a pre-specified study power and then calculates the required mean cluster size while keeping the number of clusters unchanged. Our approach allows adjustment in mean cluster size alone or simultaneous adjustment in mean cluster size and number of clusters, and is a flexible alternative to and a useful complement to existing methods. Comparison indicated that we have defined a relative efficiency that is greater than the relative efficiency in the literature under some conditions. Our measure

  6. CLUSTER DYNAMICS LARGELY SHAPES PROTOPLANETARY DISK SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne, E-mail: kvincke@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    To what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars is still an open question. This is particularly true for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighborhood, in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment change considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies, the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has often been neglected; this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++, we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases—embedded, expulsion, and expansion—including the gas, and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disk size. We concentrate on massive clusters (M {sub cl} ≥ 10{sup 3}–6 ∗ 10{sup 4} M {sub Sun}), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98% of relevant encounters happen before gas expulsion. By contrast, disks in sparser clusters are initially less affected, but because these clusters expand more slowly, 13% of disks are truncated after gas expulsion. For ONC-like clusters, we find that disks larger than 500 au are usually affected by the environment, which corresponds to the observation that 200 au-sized disks are common. For NGC 6611-like clusters, disk sizes are cut-down on average to roughly 100 au. A testable hypothesis would be that the disks in the center of NGC 6611 should be on average ≈20 au and therefore considerably smaller than those in the ONC.

  7. Diametrical clustering for identifying anti-correlated gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M; Roshan, Usman

    2003-09-01

    Clustering genes based upon their expression patterns allows us to predict gene function. Most existing clustering algorithms cluster genes together when their expression patterns show high positive correlation. However, it has been observed that genes whose expression patterns are strongly anti-correlated can also be functionally similar. Biologically, this is not unintuitive-genes responding to the same stimuli, regardless of the nature of the response, are more likely to operate in the same pathways. We present a new diametrical clustering algorithm that explicitly identifies anti-correlated clusters of genes. Our algorithm proceeds by iteratively (i). re-partitioning the genes and (ii). computing the dominant singular vector of each gene cluster; each singular vector serving as the prototype of a 'diametric' cluster. We empirically show the effectiveness of the algorithm in identifying diametrical or anti-correlated clusters. Testing the algorithm on yeast cell cycle data, fibroblast gene expression data, and DNA microarray data from yeast mutants reveals that opposed cellular pathways can be discovered with this method. We present systems whose mRNA expression patterns, and likely their functions, oppose the yeast ribosome and proteosome, along with evidence for the inverse transcriptional regulation of a number of cellular systems.

  8. Structural stability of nano-sized clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Palasantzas, G; Vystavel, T; Koch, S; Ovidko,; Pande, CS; Krishnamoorti, R; Lavernia, E; Skandan, G

    2004-01-01

    This contribution presents challenges to control the microstructure in nano-structured materials via a relatively new approach, i.e. using a so-called nanocluster source. An important aspect is that the cluster size distribution is monodisperse and that the kinetic energy of the clusters during

  9. Sizing the star cluster population of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Andrés E.

    2018-04-01

    The number of star clusters that populate the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) at deprojected distances knowledge of the LMC cluster formation and dissolution histories, we closely revisited such a compilation of objects and found that only ˜35 per cent of the previously known catalogued clusters have been included. The remaining entries are likely related to stellar overdensities of the LMC composite star field, because there is a remarkable enhancement of objects with assigned ages older than log(t yr-1) ˜ 9.4, which contrasts with the existence of the LMC cluster age gap; the assumption of a cluster formation rate similar to that of the LMC star field does not help to conciliate so large amount of clusters either; and nearly 50 per cent of them come from cluster search procedures known to produce more than 90 per cent of false detections. The lack of further analyses to confirm the physical reality as genuine star clusters of the identified overdensities also glooms those results. We support that the actual size of the LMC main body cluster population is close to that previously known.

  10. Identifying probable suicide clusters in wales using national mortality data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Jones

    Full Text Available Up to 2% of suicides in young people may occur in clusters i.e., close together in time and space. In early 2008 unprecedented attention was given by national and international news media to a suspected suicide cluster among young people living in Bridgend, Wales. This paper investigates the strength of statistical evidence for this apparent cluster, its size, and temporal and geographical limits.The analysis is based on official mortality statistics for Wales for 2000-2009 provided by the UK's Office for National Statistics (ONS. Temporo-spatial analysis was performed using Space Time Permutation Scan Statistics with SaTScan v9.1 for suicide deaths aged 15 and over, with a sub-group analysis focussing on cases aged 15-34 years. These analyses were conducted for deaths coded by ONS as: (i suicide or of undetermined intent (probable suicides and (ii for a combination of suicide, undetermined, and accidental poisoning and hanging (possible suicides. The temporo-spatial analysis did not identify any clusters of suicide or undetermined intent deaths (probable suicides. However, analysis of all deaths by suicide, undetermined intent, accidental poisoning and accidental hanging (possible suicides identified a temporo-spatial cluster (p = 0.029 involving 10 deaths amongst 15-34 year olds centred on the County Borough of Bridgend for the period 27(th December 2007 to 19(th February 2008. Less than 1% of possible suicides in younger people in Wales in the ten year period were identified as being cluster-related.There was a possible suicide cluster in young people in Bridgend between December 2007 and February 2008. This cluster was smaller, shorter in duration, and predominantly later than the phenomenon that was reported in national and international print media. Further investigation of factors leading to the onset and termination of this series of deaths, in particular the role of the media, is required.

  11. Re-estimating sample size in cluster randomized trials with active recruitment within clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Sander; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Often only a limited number of clusters can be obtained in cluster randomised trials, although many potential participants can be recruited within each cluster. Thus, active recruitment is feasible within the clusters. To obtain an efficient sample size in a cluster randomised trial, the cluster

  12. Hierarchical modeling of cluster size in wildlife surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Clusters or groups of individuals are the fundamental unit of observation in many wildlife sampling problems, including aerial surveys of waterfowl, marine mammals, and ungulates. Explicit accounting of cluster size in models for estimating abundance is necessary because detection of individuals within clusters is not independent and detectability of clusters is likely to increase with cluster size. This induces a cluster size bias in which the average cluster size in the sample is larger than in the population at large. Thus, failure to account for the relationship between delectability and cluster size will tend to yield a positive bias in estimates of abundance or density. I describe a hierarchical modeling framework for accounting for cluster-size bias in animal sampling. The hierarchical model consists of models for the observation process conditional on the cluster size distribution and the cluster size distribution conditional on the total number of clusters. Optionally, a spatial model can be specified that describes variation in the total number of clusters per sample unit. Parameter estimation, model selection, and criticism may be carried out using conventional likelihood-based methods. An extension of the model is described for the situation where measurable covariates at the level of the sample unit are available. Several candidate models within the proposed class are evaluated for aerial survey data on mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

  13. Study of Cluster-size Effect on Damage Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Nakai, Atsuko; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulation and experiments were performed in order to understand the effect of cluster size on damage formation. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of cluster impact on solid targets derived the model function, which explains the relationship among cluster size, incident energy and number of displacements. On the other hand, time of flight mass measurement system was installed a cluster irradiation system, so that cluster ion beam which cluster size distribution is well known can be irradiated on the target. The damage properties under various cluster irradiation conditions were examined using RBS. The results from computer simulations and experiments showed good agreements with each other, which suggests that irradiation damage by cluster ion beam can be controlled by selecting cluster size distribution and incident energy

  14. Unequal cluster sizes in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristunas, Caroline; Morris, Tom; Gray, Laura

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the extent to which cluster sizes vary in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials (SW-CRT) and whether any variability is accounted for during the sample size calculation and analysis of these trials. Any, not limited to healthcare settings. Any taking part in an SW-CRT published up to March 2016. The primary outcome is the variability in cluster sizes, measured by the coefficient of variation (CV) in cluster size. Secondary outcomes include the difference between the cluster sizes assumed during the sample size calculation and those observed during the trial, any reported variability in cluster sizes and whether the methods of sample size calculation and methods of analysis accounted for any variability in cluster sizes. Of the 101 included SW-CRTs, 48% mentioned that the included clusters were known to vary in size, yet only 13% of these accounted for this during the calculation of the sample size. However, 69% of the trials did use a method of analysis appropriate for when clusters vary in size. Full trial reports were available for 53 trials. The CV was calculated for 23 of these: the median CV was 0.41 (IQR: 0.22-0.52). Actual cluster sizes could be compared with those assumed during the sample size calculation for 14 (26%) of the trial reports; the cluster sizes were between 29% and 480% of that which had been assumed. Cluster sizes often vary in SW-CRTs. Reporting of SW-CRTs also remains suboptimal. The effect of unequal cluster sizes on the statistical power of SW-CRTs needs further exploration and methods appropriate to studies with unequal cluster sizes need to be employed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Uniform deposition of size-selected clusters using Lissajous scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beniya, Atsushi; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Hirata, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Size-selected clusters can be deposited on the surface using size-selected cluster ion beams. However, because of the cross-sectional intensity distribution of the ion beam, it is difficult to define the coverage of the deposited clusters. The aggregation probability of the cluster depends on coverage, whereas cluster size on the surface depends on the position, despite the size-selected clusters are deposited. It is crucial, therefore, to deposit clusters uniformly on the surface. In this study, size-selected clusters were deposited uniformly on surfaces by scanning the cluster ions in the form of Lissajous pattern. Two sets of deflector electrodes set in orthogonal directions were placed in front of the sample surface. Triangular waves were applied to the electrodes with an irrational frequency ratio to ensure that the ion trajectory filled the sample surface. The advantages of this method are simplicity and low cost of setup compared with raster scanning method. The authors further investigated CO adsorption on size-selected Pt n (n = 7, 15, 20) clusters uniformly deposited on the Al 2 O 3 /NiAl(110) surface and demonstrated the importance of uniform deposition.

  16. Uniform deposition of size-selected clusters using Lissajous scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beniya, Atsushi; Watanabe, Yoshihide, E-mail: e0827@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Hirata, Hirohito [Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Size-selected clusters can be deposited on the surface using size-selected cluster ion beams. However, because of the cross-sectional intensity distribution of the ion beam, it is difficult to define the coverage of the deposited clusters. The aggregation probability of the cluster depends on coverage, whereas cluster size on the surface depends on the position, despite the size-selected clusters are deposited. It is crucial, therefore, to deposit clusters uniformly on the surface. In this study, size-selected clusters were deposited uniformly on surfaces by scanning the cluster ions in the form of Lissajous pattern. Two sets of deflector electrodes set in orthogonal directions were placed in front of the sample surface. Triangular waves were applied to the electrodes with an irrational frequency ratio to ensure that the ion trajectory filled the sample surface. The advantages of this method are simplicity and low cost of setup compared with raster scanning method. The authors further investigated CO adsorption on size-selected Pt{sub n} (n = 7, 15, 20) clusters uniformly deposited on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl(110) surface and demonstrated the importance of uniform deposition.

  17. Size dependent magnetism of mass selected deposited transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, T.

    2002-05-01

    The size dependent magnetic properties of small iron clusters deposited on ultrathin Ni/Cu(100) films have been studied with circularly polarised synchrotron radiation. For X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies, the magnetic moments of size selected clusters were aligned perpendicular to the sample surface. Exchange coupling of the clusters to the ultrathin Ni/Cu(100) film determines the orientation of their magnetic moments. All clusters are coupled ferromagnetically to the underlayer. With the use of sum rules, orbital and spin magnetic moments as well as their ratios have been extracted from X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra. The ratio of orbital to spin magnetic moments varies considerably as a function of cluster size, reflecting the dependence of magnetic properties on cluster size and geometry. These variations can be explained in terms of a strongly size dependent orbital moment. Both orbital and spin magnetic moments are significantly enhanced in small clusters as compared to bulk iron, although this effect is more pronounced for the spin moment. Magnetic properties of deposited clusters are governed by the interplay of cluster specific properties on the one hand and cluster-substrate interactions on the other hand. Size dependent variations of magnetic moments are modified upon contact with the substrate. (orig.)

  18. Stick–slip behavior identified in helium cluster growth in the subsurface of tungsten: effects of cluster depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Niu, Liang-Liang; Shu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a molecular dynamics study on the growth of helium (He) clusters in the subsurface of tungsten (W) (1 0 0) at 300 K, focusing on the role of cluster depth. Irregular ‘stick–slip’ behavior exhibited during the evolution of the He cluster growth is identified, which is due to the combined effects of the continuous cluster growth and the loop punching induced pressure relief. We demonstrate that the He cluster grows via trap-mutation and loop punching mechanisms. Initially, the self-interstitial atom SIA clusters are almost always attached to the He cluster; while they are instantly emitted to the surface once a critical cluster pressure is reached. The repetition of this process results in the He cluster approaching the surface via a ‘stop-and-go’ manner and the formation of surface adatom islands (surface roughening), ultimately leading to cluster bursting and He escape. We reveal that, for the Nth loop punching event, the critical size of the He cluster to trigger loop punching and the size of the emitted SIA clusters are correspondingly increased with the increasing initial cluster depth. We tentatively attribute the observed depth effects to the lower formation energies of Frenkel pairs and the greatly reduced barriers for loop punching in the stress field of the W subsurface. In addition, some intriguing features emerge, such as the morphological transformation of the He cluster from ‘platelet-like’ to spherical, to ellipsoidal with a ‘bullet-like’ tip, and finally to a ‘bottle-like’ shape after cluster rupture. (paper)

  19. The energetics and structure of nickel clusters: Size dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, C.L.; Landman, U.

    1991-01-01

    The energetics of nickel clusters over a broad size range are explored within the context of the many-body potentials obtained via the embedded atom method. Unconstrained local minimum energy configurations are found for single crystal clusters consisting of various truncations of the cube or octahedron, with and without (110) faces, as well as some monotwinnings of these. We also examine multitwinned structures such as icosahedra and various truncations of the decahedron, such as those of Ino and Marks. These clusters range in size from 142 to over 5000 atoms. As in most such previous studies, such as those on Lennard-Jones systems, we find that icosahedral clusters are favored for the smallest cluster sizes and that Marks' decahedra are favored for intermediate sizes (all our atomic systems larger than about 2300 atoms). Of course very large clusters will be single crystal face-centered-cubic (fcc) polyhedra: the onset of optimally stable single-crystal nickel clusters is estimated to occur at 17 000 atoms. We find, via comparisons to results obtained via atomistic calculations, that simple macroscopic expressions using accurate surface, strain, and twinning energies can usefully predict energy differences between different structures even for clusters of much smaller size than expected. These expressions can be used to assess the relative energetic merits of various structural motifs and their dependence on cluster size

  20. Size estimates of nobel gas clusters by Rayleigh scattering experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinpin Zhu (朱频频); Guoquan Ni (倪国权); Zhizhan Xu (徐至展)

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases (argon, krypton, and xenon) are puffed into vacuum through a nozzle to produce clusters for studying laser-cluster interactions. Good estimates of the average size of the argon, krypton and xenon clusters are made by carrying out a series of Rayleigh scattering experiments. In the experiments, we have found that the scattered signal intensity varied greatly with the opening area of the pulsed valve. A new method is put forward to choose the appropriate scattered signal and measure the size of Kr cluster.

  1. Cluster size matters: Size-driven performance of subnanometer clusters in catalysis, electrocatalysis and Li-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the strongly size-dependent performance of subnanometer cluster based catalysts in 1) heterogeneous catalysis, 2) electrocatalysis and 3) Li-air batteries. The experimental studies are based on I. fabrication of ultrasmall clusters with atomic precision control of particle size and their deposition on oxide and carbon based supports; II. test of performance, III. in situand ex situ X-ray characterization of cluster size, shape and oxidation state; and IV.electron microscopies. Heterogeneous catalysis. The pronounced effect of cluster size and support on the performance of the catalyst (catalyst activity and the yield of Cn products) will be illustrated on the example of nickel and cobalt clusters in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Electrocatalysis. The study of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on size-selected palladium clusters supported on ultrananocrystalline diamond show pronounced size effects. While Pd4 clusters show no reaction, Pd6 and Pd17 clusters are among the most active catalysts known (in in terms of turnover rate per Pd atom). The system (soft-landed Pd4, Pd6, or Pd17 clusters on an UNCD Si coated electrode) shows stable electrochemical potentials over several cycles, and the characterization of the electrodes show no evidence for evolution or dissolution of either the support Theoretical calculations suggest that this striking difference may be a demonstration that bridging Pd-Pd sites, which are only present in three-dimensional clusters, are active for the oxygen evolution reaction in Pd6O6. Li-air batteries. The studies show that sub-nm silver clusters have dramatic size-dependent effect on the lowering of the overpotential, charge capacity, morphology of the discharge products, as well as on the morphology of the nm size building blocks of the discharge products. The results suggest that by precise control of the active surface sites on the cathode, the performance of Li-air cells can be significantly improved

  2. Control of cluster ion sizes for efficient injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enjoji, Hiroshi; Be, S.H.; Yano, Katsuki; Okamoto, Kosuke

    1976-01-01

    For heating of plasmas by injection of hydrogen cluster ions, the specific size (N/Z) approximately 10 2 molecules/charge is believed to be most desirable. A fundamental research to develop a practical method for tailoring large cluster ions into small suitable sizes has been carried out by using nitrogen cluster ions of the initial mean specific size (N/Z) 0 approximately 10 5 . The beam of neutral large clusters of total intensity 20 mAsub(eq) was led to an ionizer and then the large cluster ions are accelerated to 8.9 keV before entering the divider which disintegrates them into small fragments by multiple ionization. The mean specific size of disintegrated cluster ions (N/Z)' becomes smaller with increase in ionizing electron current of the divider. (N/Z)' becomes 10 3 approximately 10 4 at an electron current of 140 mA and an accelerating voltage of 680 V of the divider with its efficiency of 20 approximately 60%. Thus, the original large cluster ions are divided into small fragments of which the mean specific size is 1/20 approximately 1/100 of the initial value without much decrease in total intensity of the cluster ion beam

  3. Determination of cluster size of Pratylenchus Penetrans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nursery field 21 m x 80 m was sampled sequentially for Pratylenchus penetrans by decreasing the plot sizes systematically. Plots sizes of 3.6 m x 8 m, 3.6 m x 3.6 m and 0.6 m x 0.6 m were sampled. Nematode counts were computed to obtain the respective sample mean and variance. The sample mean and variance ...

  4. Identifying seizure clusters in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Grayson L; Harlow, Lisa L; Machan, Jason T; Thomas, Dave; LaFrance, W C

    2017-08-01

    The present study explored how seizure clusters may be defined for those with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a topic for which there is a paucity of literature. The sample was drawn from a multisite randomized clinical trial for PNES; seizure data are from participants' seizure diaries. Three possible cluster definitions were examined: 1) common clinical definition, where ≥3 seizures in a day is considered a cluster, along with two novel statistical definitions, where ≥3 seizures in a day are considered a cluster if the observed number of seizures statistically exceeds what would be expected relative to a patient's: 1) average seizure rate prior to the trial, 2) observed seizure rate for the previous seven days. Prevalence of clusters was 62-68% depending on cluster definition used, and occurrence rate of clusters was 6-19% depending on cluster definition. Based on these data, clusters seem to be common in patients with PNES, and more research is needed to identify if clusters are related to triggers and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perspective: Size selected clusters for catalysis and electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Avik; Curtiss, Larry A.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Vajda, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Size-selected clusters containing a handful of atoms may possess noble catalytic properties different from nano-sized or bulk catalysts. Size- and composition-selected clusters can also serve as models of the catalytic active site, where an addition or removal of a single atom can have a dramatic effect on their activity and selectivity. In this perspective, we provide an overview of studies performed under both ultra-high vacuum and realistic reaction conditions aimed at the interrogation, characterization, and understanding of the performance of supported size-selected clusters in heterogeneous and electrochemical reactions, which address the effects of cluster size, cluster composition, cluster-support interactions, and reaction conditions, the key parameters for the understanding and control of catalyst functionality. Computational modeling based on density functional theory sampling of local minima and energy barriers or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations is an integral part of this research by providing fundamental understanding of the catalytic processes at the atomic level, as well as by predicting new materials compositions which can be validated in experiments. Finally, we discuss approaches which aim at the scale up of the production of well-defined clusters for use in real world applications.

  6. Finite-size modifications of the magnetic properties of clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Linderoth, Søren; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1993-01-01

    relative to the bulk, and the consequent neutron-scattering cross section exhibits discretely spaced wave-vector-broadened eigenstates. The implications of the finite size on thermodynamic properties, like the temperature dependence of the magnetization and the critical temperature, are also elucidated. We...... find the temperature dependence of the cluster magnetization to be well described by an effective power law, M(mean) is-proportional-to 1 - BT(alpha), with a size-dependent, but structure-independent, exponent larger than the bulk value. The critical temperature of the clusters is calculated from...... the spin-wave spectrum by a method based on the correlation theory and the spherical approximation generalized to the case of finite systems. A size-dependent reduction of the critical temperature by up to 50% for the smallest clusters is found. The trends found for the model clusters are extrapolated...

  7. Modified genetic algorithms to model cluster structures in medium-size silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazterra, Victor E.; Ona, Ofelia; Caputo, Maria C.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Fuentealba, Patricio; Facelli, Julio C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained using a genetic algorithm (GA) to search for stable structures of medium size silicon clusters. In this work the GA uses a semiempirical energy function to find the best cluster structures, which are further optimized using density-functional theory. For small clusters our results agree well with previously reported structures, but for larger ones different structures appear. This is the case of Si 36 where we report a different structure, with significant lower energy than those previously found using limited search approaches on common structural motifs. This demonstrates the need for global optimization schemes when searching for stable structures of medium-size silicon clusters

  8. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  9. Characterization of micron-size hydrogen clusters using Mie scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S; Tanaka, H; Matsui, R; Kanasaki, M; Sakaki, H; Kando, M; Kondo, K; Sugiyama, A; Uesaka, M; Kishimoto, Y; Fukuda, Y

    2017-08-07

    Hydrogen clusters with diameters of a few micrometer range, composed of 10 8-10 hydrogen molecules, have been produced for the first time in an expansion of supercooled, high-pressure hydrogen gas into a vacuum through a conical nozzle connected to a cryogenic pulsed solenoid valve. The size distribution of the clusters has been evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of laser light scattered from the clusters. The data were analyzed based on the Mie scattering theory combined with the Tikhonov regularization method including the instrumental functions, the validity of which was assessed by performing a calibration study using a reference target consisting of standard micro-particles with two different sizes. The size distribution of the clusters was found discrete peaked at 0.33 ± 0.03, 0.65 ± 0.05, 0.81 ± 0.06, 1.40 ± 0.06 and 2.00 ± 0.13 µm in diameter. The highly reproducible and impurity-free nature of the micron-size hydrogen clusters can be a promising target for laser-driven multi-MeV proton sources with the currently available high power lasers.

  10. Identifying clinical course patterns in SMS data using cluster analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been interest in using the short message service (SMS or text messaging), to gather frequent information on the clinical course of individual patients. One possible role for identifying clinical course patterns is to assist in exploring clinically important...... showed that clinical course patterns can be identified by cluster analysis using all SMS time points as cluster variables. This method is simple, intuitive and does not require a high level of statistical skill. However, there are alternative ways of managing SMS data and many different methods...

  11. Cluster size selectivity in the product distribution of ethene dehydrogenation on niobium clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnis, J Mark; Escobar-Cabrera, Eric; Thompson, Matthew G K; Jacula, J Paul; Lafleur, Rick D; Guevara-García, Alfredo; Martínez, Ana; Rayner, David M

    2005-08-18

    Ethene reactions with niobium atoms and clusters containing up to 25 constituent atoms have been studied in a fast-flow metal cluster reactor. The clusters react with ethene at about the gas-kinetic collision rate, indicating a barrierless association process as the cluster removal step. Exceptions are Nb8 and Nb10, for which a significantly diminished rate is observed, reflecting some cluster size selectivity. Analysis of the experimental primary product masses indicates dehydrogenation of ethene for all clusters save Nb10, yielding either Nb(n)C2H2 or Nb(n)C2. Over the range Nb-Nb6, the extent of dehydrogenation increases with cluster size, then decreases for larger clusters. For many clusters, secondary and tertiary product masses are also observed, showing varying degrees of dehydrogenation corresponding to net addition of C2H4, C2H2, or C2. With Nb atoms and several small clusters, formal addition of at least six ethene molecules is observed, suggesting a polymerization process may be active. Kinetic analysis of the Nb atom and several Nb(n) cluster reactions with ethene shows that the process is consistent with sequential addition of ethene units at rates corresponding approximately to the gas-kinetic collision frequency for several consecutive reacting ethene molecules. Some variation in the rate of ethene pick up is found, which likely reflects small energy barriers or steric constraints associated with individual mechanistic steps. Density functional calculations of structures of Nb clusters up to Nb(6), and the reaction products Nb(n)C2H2 and Nb(n)C2 (n = 1...6) are presented. Investigation of the thermochemistry for the dehydrogenation of ethene to form molecular hydrogen, for the Nb atom and clusters up to Nb6, demonstrates that the exergonicity of the formation of Nb(n)C2 species increases with cluster size over this range, which supports the proposal that the extent of dehydrogenation is determined primarily by thermodynamic constraints. Analysis of

  12. Model selection for semiparametric marginal mean regression accounting for within-cluster subsampling variability and informative cluster size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chung-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hau

    2018-03-13

    We propose a model selection criterion for semiparametric marginal mean regression based on generalized estimating equations. The work is motivated by a longitudinal study on the physical frailty outcome in the elderly, where the cluster size, that is, the number of the observed outcomes in each subject, is "informative" in the sense that it is related to the frailty outcome itself. The new proposal, called Resampling Cluster Information Criterion (RCIC), is based on the resampling idea utilized in the within-cluster resampling method (Hoffman, Sen, and Weinberg, 2001, Biometrika 88, 1121-1134) and accommodates informative cluster size. The implementation of RCIC, however, is free of performing actual resampling of the data and hence is computationally convenient. Compared with the existing model selection methods for marginal mean regression, the RCIC method incorporates an additional component accounting for variability of the model over within-cluster subsampling, and leads to remarkable improvements in selecting the correct model, regardless of whether the cluster size is informative or not. Applying the RCIC method to the longitudinal frailty study, we identify being female, old age, low income and life satisfaction, and chronic health conditions as significant risk factors for physical frailty in the elderly. © 2018, The International Biometric Society.

  13. Identifying clusters of active transportation using spatial scan statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Stinchcomb, David G; Pickle, Linda W; Dill, Jennifer; Berrigan, David

    2009-08-01

    There is an intense interest in the possibility that neighborhood characteristics influence active transportation such as walking or biking. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a spatial cluster identification method can evaluate the geographic variation of active transportation and identify neighborhoods with unusually high/low levels of active transportation. Self-reported walking/biking prevalence, demographic characteristics, street connectivity variables, and neighborhood socioeconomic data were collected from respondents to the 2001 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS; N=10,688) in Los Angeles County (LAC) and San Diego County (SDC). Spatial scan statistics were used to identify clusters of high or low prevalence (with and without age-adjustment) and the quantity of time spent walking and biking. The data, a subset from the 2001 CHIS, were analyzed in 2007-2008. Geographic clusters of significantly high or low prevalence of walking and biking were detected in LAC and SDC. Structural variables such as street connectivity and shorter block lengths are consistently associated with higher levels of active transportation, but associations between active transportation and socioeconomic variables at the individual and neighborhood levels are mixed. Only one cluster with less time spent walking and biking among walkers/bikers was detected in LAC, and this was of borderline significance. Age-adjustment affects the clustering pattern of walking/biking prevalence in LAC, but not in SDC. The use of spatial scan statistics to identify significant clustering of health behaviors such as active transportation adds to the more traditional regression analysis that examines associations between behavior and environmental factors by identifying specific geographic areas with unusual levels of the behavior independent of predefined administrative units.

  14. Cluster Analysis of Clinical Data Identifies Fibromyalgia Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Elisa; Collado, Antonio; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia (FM) is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. Material and Methods 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. Results Variables clustered into three independent dimensions: “symptomatology”, “comorbidities” and “clinical scales”. Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1), high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2), and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3), showing differences in measures of disease severity. Conclusions We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment. PMID:24098674

  15. Cataloging the Praesepe Cluster: Identifying Interlopers and Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Madeline R.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mann, Andrew; Douglas, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    We present radial velocity measurements from an ongoing survey of the Praesepe open cluster using the WIYN 3.5m Telescope. Our target stars include 229 early-K to mid-M dwarfs with proper motion memberships that have been observed by the repurposed Kepler mission, K2. With this survey, we will provide a well-constrained membership list of the cluster. By removing interloping stars and determining the cluster binary frequency we can avoid systematic errors in our analysis of the K2 findings and more accurately determine exoplanet properties in the Praesepe cluster. Obtaining accurate exoplanet parameters in open clusters allows us to study the temporal dimension of exoplanet parameter space. We find Praesepe to have a mean radial velocity of 34.09 km/s and a velocity dispersion of 1.13 km/s, which is consistent with previous studies. We derive radial velocity membership probabilities for stars with ≥3 radial velocity measurements and compare against published membership probabilities. We also identify radial velocity variables and potential double-lined spectroscopic binaries. We plan to obtain more observations to determine the radial velocity membership of all the stars in our sample, as well as follow up on radial velocity variables to determine binary orbital solutions.

  16. Modulation aware cluster size optimisation in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram Naik, M.; Kumar, Vinay

    2017-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play a great role because of their numerous advantages to the mankind. The main challenge with WSNs is the energy efficiency. In this paper, we have focused on the energy minimisation with the help of cluster size optimisation along with consideration of modulation effect when the nodes are not able to communicate using baseband communication technique. Cluster size optimisations is important technique to improve the performance of WSNs. It provides improvement in energy efficiency, network scalability, network lifetime and latency. We have proposed analytical expression for cluster size optimisation using traditional sensing model of nodes for square sensing field with consideration of modulation effects. Energy minimisation can be achieved by changing the modulation schemes such as BPSK, 16-QAM, QPSK, 64-QAM, etc., so we are considering the effect of different modulation techniques in the cluster formation. The nodes in the sensing fields are random and uniformly deployed. It is also observed that placement of base station at centre of scenario enables very less number of modulation schemes to work in energy efficient manner but when base station placed at the corner of the sensing field, it enable large number of modulation schemes to work in energy efficient manner.

  17. Identifying multiple influential spreaders by a heuristic clustering algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhong-Kui [School of Mathematical Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Liu, Jian-Guo [Data Science and Cloud Service Research Center, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, Shanghai, 200133 (China); Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: haifengzhang1978@gmail.com [School of Mathematical Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Department of Communication Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shan' xi 030051 (China)

    2017-03-18

    The problem of influence maximization in social networks has attracted much attention. However, traditional centrality indices are suitable for the case where a single spreader is chosen as the spreading source. Many times, spreading process is initiated by simultaneously choosing multiple nodes as the spreading sources. In this situation, choosing the top ranked nodes as multiple spreaders is not an optimal strategy, since the chosen nodes are not sufficiently scattered in networks. Therefore, one ideal situation for multiple spreaders case is that the spreaders themselves are not only influential but also they are dispersively distributed in networks, but it is difficult to meet the two conditions together. In this paper, we propose a heuristic clustering (HC) algorithm based on the similarity index to classify nodes into different clusters, and finally the center nodes in clusters are chosen as the multiple spreaders. HC algorithm not only ensures that the multiple spreaders are dispersively distributed in networks but also avoids the selected nodes to be very “negligible”. Compared with the traditional methods, our experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the performance of HC method on influence maximization is more significant. - Highlights: • A heuristic clustering algorithm is proposed to identify the multiple influential spreaders in complex networks. • The algorithm can not only guarantee the selected spreaders are sufficiently scattered but also avoid to be “insignificant”. • The performance of our algorithm is generally better than other methods, regardless of real networks or synthetic networks.

  18. Identifying multiple influential spreaders by a heuristic clustering algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Zhong-Kui; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The problem of influence maximization in social networks has attracted much attention. However, traditional centrality indices are suitable for the case where a single spreader is chosen as the spreading source. Many times, spreading process is initiated by simultaneously choosing multiple nodes as the spreading sources. In this situation, choosing the top ranked nodes as multiple spreaders is not an optimal strategy, since the chosen nodes are not sufficiently scattered in networks. Therefore, one ideal situation for multiple spreaders case is that the spreaders themselves are not only influential but also they are dispersively distributed in networks, but it is difficult to meet the two conditions together. In this paper, we propose a heuristic clustering (HC) algorithm based on the similarity index to classify nodes into different clusters, and finally the center nodes in clusters are chosen as the multiple spreaders. HC algorithm not only ensures that the multiple spreaders are dispersively distributed in networks but also avoids the selected nodes to be very “negligible”. Compared with the traditional methods, our experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the performance of HC method on influence maximization is more significant. - Highlights: • A heuristic clustering algorithm is proposed to identify the multiple influential spreaders in complex networks. • The algorithm can not only guarantee the selected spreaders are sufficiently scattered but also avoid to be “insignificant”. • The performance of our algorithm is generally better than other methods, regardless of real networks or synthetic networks.

  19. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  20. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes.Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method.The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001.The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  1. Determining wood chip size: image analysis and clustering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Febbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the standard methods for the determination of the size distribution of wood chips is the oscillating screen method (EN 15149- 1:2010. Recent literature demonstrated how image analysis could return highly accurate measure of the dimensions defined for each individual particle, and could promote a new method depending on the geometrical shape to determine the chip size in a more accurate way. A sample of wood chips (8 litres was sieved through horizontally oscillating sieves, using five different screen hole diameters (3.15, 8, 16, 45, 63 mm; the wood chips were sorted in decreasing size classes and the mass of all fractions was used to determine the size distribution of the particles. Since the chip shape and size influence the sieving results, Wang’s theory, which concerns the geometric forms, was considered. A cluster analysis on the shape descriptors (Fourier descriptors and size descriptors (area, perimeter, Feret diameters, eccentricity was applied to observe the chips distribution. The UPGMA algorithm was applied on Euclidean distance. The obtained dendrogram shows a group separation according with the original three sieving fractions. A comparison has been made between the traditional sieve and clustering results. This preliminary result shows how the image analysis-based method has a high potential for the characterization of wood chip size distribution and could be further investigated. Moreover, this method could be implemented in an online detection machine for chips size characterization. An improvement of the results is expected by using supervised multivariate methods that utilize known class memberships. The main objective of the future activities will be to shift the analysis from a 2-dimensional method to a 3- dimensional acquisition process.

  2. Colloidal solutions of luminescent porous silicon clusters with different cluster sizes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Podkorytov, E.; Šlechta, Miroslav; Cibulka, Ondřej; Leitner, J.; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2014), 1-5 ISSN 1931-7573 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline silicon * porous silicon * cluster size * luminescent markers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.524, year: 2012

  3. The size of clusters in a neutrino-dominated universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.D.M.; Davis, M.; Frenk, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Quite soon after the first collapse of structure almost half the matter in a neutrino-dominated universe is expected to reside in clusters. The masses and binding energies of these neutrino clusters are too large for them to be identified with observed galaxy clusters. Even if such objects were able to suppress all galaxy formation, their X-ray emission would, however, make them highly visible if more than 2.5 per cent of their mass was in ordinary matter. Such a low baryon density leads to insufficient cooling for galaxies to form in pancakes. A neutrino-dominated universe appears to conflict with observation irrespective of the details of the processes which govern galaxy formation. (author)

  4. Effects of Group Size and Lack of Sphericity on the Recovery of Clusters in K-Means Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Craen, Saskia; Commandeur, Jacques J. F.; Frank, Laurence E.; Heiser, Willem J.

    2006-01-01

    K-means cluster analysis is known for its tendency to produce spherical and equally sized clusters. To assess the magnitude of these effects, a simulation study was conducted, in which populations were created with varying departures from sphericity and group sizes. An analysis of the recovery of clusters in the samples taken from these…

  5. Selection of the Maximum Spatial Cluster Size of the Spatial Scan Statistic by Using the Maximum Clustering Set-Proportion Statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Xiaohua Andrew; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Spatial scan statistics are widely used in various fields. The performance of these statistics is influenced by parameters, such as maximum spatial cluster size, and can be improved by parameter selection using performance measures. Current performance measures are based on the presence of clusters and are thus inapplicable to data sets without known clusters. In this work, we propose a novel overall performance measure called maximum clustering set-proportion (MCS-P), which is based on the likelihood of the union of detected clusters and the applied dataset. MCS-P was compared with existing performance measures in a simulation study to select the maximum spatial cluster size. Results of other performance measures, such as sensitivity and misclassification, suggest that the spatial scan statistic achieves accurate results in most scenarios with the maximum spatial cluster sizes selected using MCS-P. Given that previously known clusters are not required in the proposed strategy, selection of the optimal maximum cluster size with MCS-P can improve the performance of the scan statistic in applications without identified clusters.

  6. Mesophase Formation Stabilizes High-purity Magic-sized Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Nevers, Douglas R.; Williamson, Curtis B.; Savitzky, Benjamin H; Hadar, Ido; Banin, Uri; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hanrath, Tobias; Robinson, Richard D.

    2018-01-01

    Magic-sized clusters (MSCs) are renowned for their identical size and closed-shell stability that inhibit conventional nanoparticle (NP) growth processes. Though MSCs have been of increasing interest, understanding the reaction pathways toward their nucleation and stabilization is an outstanding issue. In this work, we demonstrate that high concentration synthesis (1000 mM) promotes a well-defined reaction pathway to form high-purity MSCs (>99.9%). The MSCs are resistant to typical growth and dissolution processes. Based on insights from in-situ X-ray scattering analysis, we attribute this stability to the accompanying production of a large, hexagonal organic-inorganic mesophase (>100 nm grain size) that arrests growth of the MSCs and prevents NP growth. At intermediate concentrations (500 mM), the MSC mesophase forms, but is unstable, resulting in NP growth at the expense of the assemblies. These results provide an alternate explanation for the high stability of MSCs. Whereas the conventional mantra has been that the stability of MSCs derives from the precise arrangement of the inorganic structures (i.e., closed-shell atomic packing), we demonstrate that anisotropic clusters can also be stabilized by self-forming fibrous mesophase assemblies. At lower concentration (<200 mM or >16 acid-to-metal), MSCs are further destabilized and NPs formation dominates that of MSCs. Overall, the high concentration approach intensifies and showcases inherent concentration-dependent surfactant phase behavior that is not accessible in conventional (i.e., dilute) conditions. This work provides not only a robust method to synthesize, stabilize, and study identical MSC products, but also uncovers an underappreciated stabilizing interaction between surfactants and clusters.

  7. Mesophase Formation Stabilizes High-purity Magic-sized Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Nevers, Douglas R.

    2018-01-27

    Magic-sized clusters (MSCs) are renowned for their identical size and closed-shell stability that inhibit conventional nanoparticle (NP) growth processes. Though MSCs have been of increasing interest, understanding the reaction pathways toward their nucleation and stabilization is an outstanding issue. In this work, we demonstrate that high concentration synthesis (1000 mM) promotes a well-defined reaction pathway to form high-purity MSCs (>99.9%). The MSCs are resistant to typical growth and dissolution processes. Based on insights from in-situ X-ray scattering analysis, we attribute this stability to the accompanying production of a large, hexagonal organic-inorganic mesophase (>100 nm grain size) that arrests growth of the MSCs and prevents NP growth. At intermediate concentrations (500 mM), the MSC mesophase forms, but is unstable, resulting in NP growth at the expense of the assemblies. These results provide an alternate explanation for the high stability of MSCs. Whereas the conventional mantra has been that the stability of MSCs derives from the precise arrangement of the inorganic structures (i.e., closed-shell atomic packing), we demonstrate that anisotropic clusters can also be stabilized by self-forming fibrous mesophase assemblies. At lower concentration (<200 mM or >16 acid-to-metal), MSCs are further destabilized and NPs formation dominates that of MSCs. Overall, the high concentration approach intensifies and showcases inherent concentration-dependent surfactant phase behavior that is not accessible in conventional (i.e., dilute) conditions. This work provides not only a robust method to synthesize, stabilize, and study identical MSC products, but also uncovers an underappreciated stabilizing interaction between surfactants and clusters.

  8. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851...-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster... measurement as applicable to layer or cluster raisins with seeds are: (a) 3 Crown size or larger. “3 Crown...

  9. Small angle neutron scattering measurements of magnetic cluster sizes in magnetic recorging disks

    CERN Document Server

    Toney, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  10. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds, are not incorporated in the...

  11. Size and composition dependence of the frozen structures in Co-based bimetallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Cao, Yongze; Du, Jiaojiao; He, Jicheng

    2012-01-01

    This Letter studies the size-dependent freezing of Co, Co–Ni, and Co–Cu clusters by using molecular dynamics with embedded atom method. Size effect occurs in these three types of clusters. The clusters with large sizes always freeze to form their bulk-like structures. However, the frozen structures for small sizes are generally related to their compositions. The icosahedral clusters are formed for Co clusters (for ⩽3.2 nm diameter) and also for Co–Ni clusters but at a larger size range (for ⩽4.08 nm). Upon the Co–Cu clusters, decahedral structure is obtained for small size (for 2.47 nm). The released energy induced the structural transformation plays a key role in the frozen structures. These results indicate that the preformed clusters with special structures can be tuned by controlling their compositions and sizes. -- Highlights: ► The size effect occurs in the Co, Co–Ni, and Co–Cu clusters. ► The clusters with large sizes always freeze to form their bulk-like structures. ► The frozen structures for small sizes are generally related to their compositions. ► Icosahedron is formed for Co and also for Co–Ni but at a larger size range. ► Upon the Co–Cu clusters, decahedral structure is obtained for small size.

  12. Risk factors associated with cluster size of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of different RFLP lineages in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Renata Lyrio; Vinhas, Solange Alves; Ribeiro, Fabíola Karla Correa; Palaci, Moisés; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Reis-Santos, Bárbara; Zandonade, Eliana; Suffys, Philip Noel; Golub, Jonathan E; Riley, Lee W; Maciel, Ethel Leonor

    2018-02-08

    Tuberculosis (TB) transmission is influenced by patient-related risk, environment and bacteriological factors. We determined the risk factors associated with cluster size of IS6110 RFLP based genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates from Vitoria, Espirito Santo, Brazil. Cross-sectional study of new TB cases identified in the metropolitan area of Vitoria, Brazil between 2000 and 2010. Mtb isolates were genotyped by the IS6110 RFLP, spoligotyping and RD Rio . The isolates were classified according to genotype cluster sizes by three genotyping methods and associated patient epidemiologic characteristics. Regression Model was performed to identify factors associated with cluster size. Among 959 Mtb isolates, 461 (48%) cases had an isolate that belonged to an RFLP cluster, and six clusters with ten or more isolates were identified. Of the isolates spoligotyped, 448 (52%) were classified as LAM and 412 (48%) as non-LAM. Our regression model found that 6-9 isolates/RFLP cluster were more likely belong to the LAM family, having the RD Rio genotype and to be smear-positive (adjusted OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.08-1.26; adjusted OR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.14-1.37; crude OR = 2.68, 95% IC 1.13-6.34; respectively) and living in a Serra city neighborhood decrease the risk of being in the 6-9 isolates/RFLP cluster (adjusted OR = 0.29, 95% CI, 0.10-0.84), than in the others groups. Individuals aged 21 to 30, 31 to 40 and > 50 years were less likely of belonging the 2-5 isolates/RFLP cluster than unique patterns compared to individuals cluster group (adjustment OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.24-0.85) than unique patterns. We found that a large proportion of new TB infections in Vitoria is caused by prevalent Mtb genotypes belonging to the LAM family and RD Rio genotypes. Such information demonstrates that some genotypes are more likely to cause recent transmission. Targeting interventions such as screening in specific areas and social risk groups, should be a priority

  13. Identifying Clusters with Mixture Models that Include Radial Velocity Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnatowicz, Alexis; Ybarra, Jason E.

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar clusters plays an integral role in the study of star formation. We present a cluster mixture model that considers radial velocity data in addition to spatial data. Maximum likelihood estimation through the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used for parameter estimation. Our mixture model analysis can be used to distinguish adjacent or overlapping clusters, and estimate properties for each cluster.Work supported by awards from the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges (VFIC) Undergraduate Science Research Fellowship and The Research Experience @Bridgewater (TREB).

  14. Progeny Clustering: A Method to Identify Biological Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenyue W.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Slater, John H.; Qutub, Amina A.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the optimal number of clusters is a major challenge in applying cluster analysis to any type of dataset, especially to biomedical datasets, which are high-dimensional and complex. Here, we introduce an improved method, Progeny Clustering, which is stability-based and exceptionally efficient in computing, to find the ideal number of clusters. The algorithm employs a novel Progeny Sampling method to reconstruct cluster identity, a co-occurrence probability matrix to assess the clustering stability, and a set of reference datasets to overcome inherent biases in the algorithm and data space. Our method was shown successful and robust when applied to two synthetic datasets (datasets of two-dimensions and ten-dimensions containing eight dimensions of pure noise), two standard biological datasets (the Iris dataset and Rat CNS dataset) and two biological datasets (a cell phenotype dataset and an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reverse phase protein array (RPPA) dataset). Progeny Clustering outperformed some popular clustering evaluation methods in the ten-dimensional synthetic dataset as well as in the cell phenotype dataset, and it was the only method that successfully discovered clinically meaningful patient groupings in the AML RPPA dataset. PMID:26267476

  15. Effects of solvation shells and cluster size on the reaction of aluminum clusters with water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Mou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of aluminum clusters, Aln (n = 16, 17 and 18, with liquid water is investigated using quantum molecular dynamics simulations, which show rapid production of hydrogen molecules assisted by proton transfer along a chain of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds between water molecules, i.e. Grotthuss mechanism. The simulation results provide answers to two unsolved questions: (1 What is the role of a solvation shell formed by non-reacting H-bonds surrounding the H-bond chain; and (2 whether the high size-selectivity observed in gas-phase Aln-water reaction persists in liquid phase? First, the solvation shell is found to play a crucial role in facilitating proton transfer and hence H2 production. Namely, it greatly modifies the energy barrier, generally to much lower values (< 0.1 eV. Second, we find that H2 production by Aln in liquid water does not depend strongly on the cluster size, in contrast to the existence of magic numbers in gas-phase reaction. This paper elucidates atomistic mechanisms underlying these observations.

  16. Experimental equivalent cluster-size distributions in nano-metric volumes of liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosswendt, B.; De Nardo, L.; Colautti, P.; Pszona, S.; Conte, V.; Tornielli, G.

    2004-01-01

    Ionisation cluster-size distributions in nano-metric volumes of liquid water were determined for alpha particles at 4.6 and 5.4 MeV by measuring cluster-size frequencies in small gaseous volumes of nitrogen or propane at low gas pressure as well as by applying a suitable scaling procedure. This scaling procedure was based on the mean free ionisation lengths of alpha particles in water and in the gases measured. For validation, the measurements of cluster sizes in gaseous volumes and the cluster-size formation in volumes of liquid water of equivalent size were simulated by Monte Carlo methods. The experimental water-equivalent cluster-size distributions in nitrogen and propane are compared with those in liquid water and show that cluster-size formation by alpha particles in nitrogen or propane can directly be related to those in liquid water. (authors)

  17. Deposition of size-selected atomic clusters on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.J.

    1999-06-01

    This dissertation presents technical developments and experimental and computational investigations concerned with the deposition of atomic clusters onto surfaces. It consists of a collection of papers, in which the main body of results are contained, and four chapters presenting a subject review, computational and experimental techniques and a summary of the results presented in full within the papers. Technical work includes the optimization of an existing gas condensation cluster source based on evaporation, and the design, construction and optimization of a new gas condensation cluster source based on RF magnetron sputtering (detailed in Paper 1). The result of cluster deposition onto surfaces is found to depend on the cluster deposition energy; three impact energy regimes are explored in this work. (1) Low energy: n clusters create a defect in the surface, which pins the cluster in place, inhibiting cluster diffusion at room temperature (Paper V). (3) High energy: > 50 eV/atom. The clusters implant into the surface. For Ag 20 -Ag 200 clusters, the implantation depth is found to scale linearly with the impact energy and inversely with the cross-sectional area of the cluster, with an offset due to energy lost to the elastic compression of the surface (Paper VI). For smaller (Ag 3 ) clusters the orientation of the cluster with respect to the surface and the precise impact site play an important role; the impact energy has to be 'focused' in order for cluster implantation to occur (Paper VII). The application of deposited clusters for the creation of Si nanostructures by plasma etching is explored in Paper VIII. (author)

  18. Atomic size effect on the formation of ionized cluster beam epitaxy in Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Horngming; Averback, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ionized cluster beam deposition is studied by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic size of incident cluster atoms is different from the size of substrate atoms. Lennard-Jones interatomic potentials are used for the two-component system. The results provide the morphologies of the overlayers for various atomic sizes and are compared to simulation results of molecular beam epitaxy. (orig.)

  19. NASA Telescopes Help Identify Most Distant Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    WASHINGTON -- Astronomers have uncovered a burgeoning galactic metropolis, the most distant known in the early universe. This ancient collection of galaxies presumably grew into a modern galaxy cluster similar to the massive ones seen today. The developing cluster, named COSMOS-AzTEC3, was discovered and characterized by multi-wavelength telescopes, including NASA's Spitzer, Chandra and Hubble space telescopes, and the ground-based W.M. Keck Observatory and Japan's Subaru Telescope. "This exciting discovery showcases the exceptional science made possible through collaboration among NASA projects and our international partners," said Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Scientists refer to this growing lump of galaxies as a proto-cluster. COSMOS-AzTEC3 is the most distant massive proto-cluster known, and also one of the youngest, because it is being seen when the universe itself was young. The cluster is roughly 12.6 billion light-years away from Earth. Our universe is estimated to be 13.7 billion years old. Previously, more mature versions of these clusters had been spotted at 10 billion light-years away. The astronomers also found that this cluster is buzzing with extreme bursts of star formation and one enormous feeding black hole. "We think the starbursts and black holes are the seeds of the cluster," said Peter Capak of NASA's Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "These seeds will eventually grow into a giant, central galaxy that will dominate the cluster -- a trait found in modern-day galaxy clusters." Capak is first author of a paper appearing in the Jan. 13 issue of the journal Nature. Most galaxies in our universe are bound together into clusters that dot the cosmic landscape like urban sprawls, usually centered around one old, monstrous galaxy containing a massive black hole. Astronomers thought that primitive versions of these clusters, still forming and clumping

  20. Sample size adjustments for varying cluster sizes in cluster randomized trials with binary outcomes analyzed with second-order PQL mixed logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, Math J J M; Van Breukelen, Gerard J P

    2010-06-30

    Adjustments of sample size formulas are given for varying cluster sizes in cluster randomized trials with a binary outcome when testing the treatment effect with mixed effects logistic regression using second-order penalized quasi-likelihood estimation (PQL). Starting from first-order marginal quasi-likelihood (MQL) estimation of the treatment effect, the asymptotic relative efficiency of unequal versus equal cluster sizes is derived. A Monte Carlo simulation study shows this asymptotic relative efficiency to be rather accurate for realistic sample sizes, when employing second-order PQL. An approximate, simpler formula is presented to estimate the efficiency loss due to varying cluster sizes when planning a trial. In many cases sampling 14 per cent more clusters is sufficient to repair the efficiency loss due to varying cluster sizes. Since current closed-form formulas for sample size calculation are based on first-order MQL, planning a trial also requires a conversion factor to obtain the variance of the second-order PQL estimator. In a second Monte Carlo study, this conversion factor turned out to be 1.25 at most. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Chemisorption on size-selected metal clusters: activation barriers and chemical reactions for deuterium and aluminum cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrold, M.F.; Bower, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a new approach to investigating chemisorption on size-selected metal clusters. This approach involves investigating the collision-energy dependence of chemisorption using low-energy ion beam techniques. The method provides a direct measure of the activation barrier for chemisorption and in some cases an estimate of the desorption energy as well. They describe the application of this technique to chemisorption of deuterium on size-selected aluminum clusters. The activation barriers increase with cluster size (from a little over 1 eV for Al 10 + to around 2 eV for Al 27 + ) and show significant odd-even oscillations. The activation barriers for the clusters with an odd number of atoms are larger than those for the even-numbered clusters. In addition to chemisorption of deuterium onto the clusters, chemical reactions were observed, often resulting in cluster fragmentation. The main products observed were Al/sub n-1/D + , Al/sub n-2/ + , and Al + for clusters with n + and Al/sub n-1/D + for the larger clusters

  2. Soft landing of size selected clusters in rare gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.T; Wurth, W.; Ehrke, H-U.; Achleitner, A.

    2003-01-01

    Soft landing of mass selected clusters in rare gas matrices is a technique used to preserve mass selection in cluster deposition. To prevent fragmentation upon deposition, the substrate is covered with rare gas matrices to dissipate the cluster kinetic energy upon impact. Theoretical and experimental studies demonstrate the power of this technique. Besides STM, optical absorption, excitation, and fluorescence experiments, x-ray absorption at core levels can be used as a tool to study soft landing conditions, as will be shown here. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is also well suited to follow diffusion and agglomeration of clusters on surfaces via energy shifts in core level absorption

  3. Cluster analysis of rural, urban, and curbside atmospheric particle size data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddows, David C S; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M

    2009-07-01

    Particle size is a key determinant of the hazard posed by airborne particles. Continuous multivariate particle size data have been collected using aerosol particle size spectrometers sited at four locations within the UK: Harwell (Oxfordshire); Regents Park (London); British Telecom Tower (London); and Marylebone Road (London). These data have been analyzed using k-means cluster analysis, deduced to be the preferred cluster analysis technique, selected from an option of four partitional cluster packages, namelythe following: Fuzzy; k-means; k-median; and Model-Based clustering. Using cluster validation indices k-means clustering was shown to produce clusters with the smallest size, furthest separation, and importantly the highest degree of similarity between the elements within each partition. Using k-means clustering, the complexity of the data set is reduced allowing characterization of the data according to the temporal and spatial trends of the clusters. At Harwell, the rural background measurement site, the cluster analysis showed that the spectra may be differentiated by their modal-diameters and average temporal trends showing either high counts during the day-time or night-time hours. Likewise for the urban sites, the cluster analysis differentiated the spectra into a small number of size distributions according their modal-diameter, the location of the measurement site, and time of day. The responsible aerosol emission, formation, and dynamic processes can be inferred according to the cluster characteristics and correlation to concurrently measured meteorological, gas phase, and particle phase measurements.

  4. Relative efficiency of unequal versus equal cluster sizes in cluster randomized trials using generalized estimating equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingxia; Colditz, Graham A

    2018-05-01

    There is growing interest in conducting cluster randomized trials (CRTs). For simplicity in sample size calculation, the cluster sizes are assumed to be identical across all clusters. However, equal cluster sizes are not guaranteed in practice. Therefore, the relative efficiency (RE) of unequal versus equal cluster sizes has been investigated when testing the treatment effect. One of the most important approaches to analyze a set of correlated data is the generalized estimating equation (GEE) proposed by Liang and Zeger, in which the "working correlation structure" is introduced and the association pattern depends on a vector of association parameters denoted by ρ. In this paper, we utilize GEE models to test the treatment effect in a two-group comparison for continuous, binary, or count data in CRTs. The variances of the estimator of the treatment effect are derived for the different types of outcome. RE is defined as the ratio of variance of the estimator of the treatment effect for equal to unequal cluster sizes. We discuss a commonly used structure in CRTs-exchangeable, and derive the simpler formula of RE with continuous, binary, and count outcomes. Finally, REs are investigated for several scenarios of cluster size distributions through simulation studies. We propose an adjusted sample size due to efficiency loss. Additionally, we also propose an optimal sample size estimation based on the GEE models under a fixed budget for known and unknown association parameter (ρ) in the working correlation structure within the cluster. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Accounting for One-Group Clustering in Effect-Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citkowicz, Martyna; Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    In some instances, intentionally or not, study designs are such that there is clustering in one group but not in the other. This paper describes methods for computing effect size estimates and their variances when there is clustering in only one group and the analysis has not taken that clustering into account. The authors provide the effect size…

  6. Cluster analysis of spontaneous preterm birth phenotypes identifies potential associations among preterm birth mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, M Sean; Manuck, Tracy A; Varner, Michael W; Christensen, Bryce; Biggio, Joseph; Bukowski, Radek; Parry, Samuel; Zhang, Heping; Huang, Hao; Andrews, William; Saade, George; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M; Ilekis, John

    2015-09-01

    We sought to use an innovative tool that is based on common biologic pathways to identify specific phenotypes among women with spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) to enhance investigators' ability to identify and to highlight common mechanisms and underlying genetic factors that are responsible for SPTB. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective case-control multicenter study of SPTB. All cases delivered a preterm singleton at SPTB ≤34.0 weeks' gestation. Each woman was assessed for the presence of underlying SPTB causes. A hierarchic cluster analysis was used to identify groups of women with homogeneous phenotypic profiles. One of the phenotypic clusters was selected for candidate gene association analysis with the use of VEGAS software. One thousand twenty-eight women with SPTB were assigned phenotypes. Hierarchic clustering of the phenotypes revealed 5 major clusters. Cluster 1 (n = 445) was characterized by maternal stress; cluster 2 (n = 294) was characterized by premature membrane rupture; cluster 3 (n = 120) was characterized by familial factors, and cluster 4 (n = 63) was characterized by maternal comorbidities. Cluster 5 (n = 106) was multifactorial and characterized by infection (INF), decidual hemorrhage (DH), and placental dysfunction (PD). These 3 phenotypes were correlated highly by χ(2) analysis (PD and DH, P cluster 3 of SPTB. We identified 5 major clusters of SPTB based on a phenotype tool and hierarch clustering. There was significant correlation between several of the phenotypes. The INS gene was associated with familial factors that were underlying SPTB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimizing the maximum reported cluster size in the spatial scan statistic for ordinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sehwi; Jung, Inkyung

    2017-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is an important tool for spatial cluster detection. There have been numerous studies on scanning window shapes. However, little research has been done on the maximum scanning window size or maximum reported cluster size. Recently, Han et al. proposed to use the Gini coefficient to optimize the maximum reported cluster size. However, the method has been developed and evaluated only for the Poisson model. We adopt the Gini coefficient to be applicable to the spatial scan statistic for ordinal data to determine the optimal maximum reported cluster size. Through a simulation study and application to a real data example, we evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. With some sophisticated modification, the Gini coefficient can be effectively employed for the ordinal model. The Gini coefficient most often picked the optimal maximum reported cluster sizes that were the same as or smaller than the true cluster sizes with very high accuracy. It seems that we can obtain a more refined collection of clusters by using the Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient developed specifically for the ordinal model can be useful for optimizing the maximum reported cluster size for ordinal data and helpful for properly and informatively discovering cluster patterns.

  8. An Experimental Observation of Axial Variation of Average Size of Methane Clusters in a Gas Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Feng, Han; Chao-Wen, Yang; Jing-Wei, Miao; Jian-Feng, Lu; Meng, Liu; Xiao-Bing, Luo; Mian-Gong, Shi

    2010-01-01

    Axial variation of average size of methane clusters in a gas jet produced by supersonic expansion of methane through a cylindrical nozzle of 0.8 mm in diameter is observed using a Rayleigh scattering method. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 16 to 50 bar, and the power is strongly Z dependent varying from 8.4 (Z = 3 mm) to 5.4 (Z = 11 mm), which is much larger than that of the argon cluster. The scattered light intensity versus axial position shows that the position of 5 mm has the maximum signal intensity. The estimation of the average cluster size on axial position Z indicates that the cluster growth process goes forward until the maximum average cluster size is reached at Z = 9 mm, and the average cluster size will decrease gradually for Z > 9 mm

  9. Merging K-means with hierarchical clustering for identifying general-shaped groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Anna D; Ghosh, Arka P; Maitra, Ranjan

    2018-01-01

    Clustering partitions a dataset such that observations placed together in a group are similar but different from those in other groups. Hierarchical and K -means clustering are two approaches but have different strengths and weaknesses. For instance, hierarchical clustering identifies groups in a tree-like structure but suffers from computational complexity in large datasets while K -means clustering is efficient but designed to identify homogeneous spherically-shaped clusters. We present a hybrid non-parametric clustering approach that amalgamates the two methods to identify general-shaped clusters and that can be applied to larger datasets. Specifically, we first partition the dataset into spherical groups using K -means. We next merge these groups using hierarchical methods with a data-driven distance measure as a stopping criterion. Our proposal has the potential to reveal groups with general shapes and structure in a dataset. We demonstrate good performance on several simulated and real datasets.

  10. Modeling of correlated data with informative cluster sizes: An evaluation of joint modeling and within-cluster resampling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhiwei; Qu, Yanping; Chen, Zhen; Albert, Paul S

    2017-08-01

    Joint modeling and within-cluster resampling are two approaches that are used for analyzing correlated data with informative cluster sizes. Motivated by a developmental toxicity study, we examined the performances and validity of these two approaches in testing covariate effects in generalized linear mixed-effects models. We show that the joint modeling approach is robust to the misspecification of cluster size models in terms of Type I and Type II errors when the corresponding covariates are not included in the random effects structure; otherwise, statistical tests may be affected. We also evaluate the performance of the within-cluster resampling procedure and thoroughly investigate the validity of it in modeling correlated data with informative cluster sizes. We show that within-cluster resampling is a valid alternative to joint modeling for cluster-specific covariates, but it is invalid for time-dependent covariates. The two methods are applied to a developmental toxicity study that investigated the effect of exposure to diethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

  11. Cluster Analysis to Identify Possible Subgroups in Tinnitus Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berge, Minke J. C.; Free, Rolien H.; Arnold, Rosemarie; de Kleine, Emile; Hofman, Rutger; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; van Dijk, Pim

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In tinnitus treatment, there is a tendency to shift from a "one size fits all" to a more individual, patient-tailored approach. Insight in the heterogeneity of the tinnitus spectrum might improve the management of tinnitus patients in terms of choice of treatment and identification of

  12. Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects: Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammen, Nisha [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India; Spanu, Leonardo [Shell Technology Center, Shell India Markets Private Limited, -560048 Bangalore India; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Yang, Bing [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 60637 Chicago IL USA; Narasimhan, Shobhana [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India

    2017-12-22

    Having the ability to tune the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles is essential for their utility as catalysts. The degree of oxidation that maximizes product yield and selectivity is known to vary, depending on the particular reaction. Using first principles calculations and XANES measurements, we show that for subnanometer sizes in the gas phase, smaller Cu clusters are more resistant to oxidation. However, this trend is reversed upon deposition on an alumina support. We are able to explain this result in terms of strong cluster-support interactions, which differ significantly for the oxidized and elemental clusters. The stable cluster phases also feature novel oxygen stoichiometries. Our results suggest that one can tune the degree of oxidation of Cu catalysts by optimizing not just their size, but also the support they are deposited on.

  13. Identifying At-Risk Students in General Chemistry via Cluster Analysis of Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify academically at-risk students in first-semester general chemistry using affective characteristics via cluster analysis. Through the clustering of six preselected affective variables, three distinct affective groups were identified: low (at-risk), medium, and high. Students in the low affective group…

  14. Electron impact fragmentation of size-selected krypton clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinbach, Ch.; Fárník, Michal; Buck, U.; Brindle, C. A.; Janda, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 29 (2006), s. 9108-9115 ISSN 1089-5639 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) GRK 782; US National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0213149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : rare-gas cluster * bombardment fragmentation * scattering analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2006

  15. Superresolution Imaging of Aquaporin-4 Cluster Size in Antibody-Stained Paraffin Brain Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-12-15

    The water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) forms supramolecular clusters whose size is determined by the ratio of M1- and M23-AQP4 isoforms. In cultured astrocytes, differences in the subcellular localization and macromolecular interactions of small and large AQP4 clusters results in distinct physiological roles for M1- and M23-AQP4. Here, we developed quantitative superresolution optical imaging methodology to measure AQP4 cluster size in antibody-stained paraffin sections of mouse cerebral cortex and spinal cord, human postmortem brain, and glioma biopsy specimens. This methodology was used to demonstrate that large AQP4 clusters are formed in AQP4(-/-) astrocytes transfected with only M23-AQP4, but not in those expressing only M1-AQP4, both in vitro and in vivo. Native AQP4 in mouse cortex, where both isoforms are expressed, was enriched in astrocyte foot-processes adjacent to microcapillaries; clusters in perivascular regions of the cortex were larger than in parenchymal regions, demonstrating size-dependent subcellular segregation of AQP4 clusters. Two-color superresolution imaging demonstrated colocalization of Kir4.1 with AQP4 clusters in perivascular areas but not in parenchyma. Surprisingly, the subcellular distribution of AQP4 clusters was different between gray and white matter astrocytes in spinal cord, demonstrating regional specificity in cluster polarization. Changes in AQP4 subcellular distribution are associated with several neurological diseases and we demonstrate that AQP4 clustering was preserved in a postmortem human cortical brain tissue specimen, but that AQP4 was not substantially clustered in a human glioblastoma specimen despite high-level expression. Our results demonstrate the utility of superresolution optical imaging for measuring the size of AQP4 supramolecular clusters in paraffin sections of brain tissue and support AQP4 cluster size as a primary determinant of its subcellular distribution. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society

  16. Effect of laser spot size on fusion neutron yield in laser–deuterium cluster interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guanglong; Lu Haiyang; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Li Ruxin; Ni Guoquan; Xu Zhizhan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the laser spot size on the neutron yield of table-top nuclear fusion from explosions of a femtosecond intense laser pulse heated deuterium clusters is investigated by using a simplified model, in which the cluster size distribution and the energy attenuation of the laser as it propagates through the cluster jet are taken into account. It has been found that there exists a proper laser spot size for the maximum fusion neutron yield for a given laser pulse and a specific deuterium gas cluster jet. The proper spot size, which is dependent on the laser parameters and the cluster jet parameters, has been calculated and compared with the available experimental data. A reasonable agreement between the calculated results and the published experimental results is found

  17. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained

  18. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters]. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained.

  19. AutoSOME: a clustering method for identifying gene expression modules without prior knowledge of cluster number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper James B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clustering the information content of large high-dimensional gene expression datasets has widespread application in "omics" biology. Unfortunately, the underlying structure of these natural datasets is often fuzzy, and the computational identification of data clusters generally requires knowledge about cluster number and geometry. Results We integrated strategies from machine learning, cartography, and graph theory into a new informatics method for automatically clustering self-organizing map ensembles of high-dimensional data. Our new method, called AutoSOME, readily identifies discrete and fuzzy data clusters without prior knowledge of cluster number or structure in diverse datasets including whole genome microarray data. Visualization of AutoSOME output using network diagrams and differential heat maps reveals unexpected variation among well-characterized cancer cell lines. Co-expression analysis of data from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells using AutoSOME identifies >3400 up-regulated genes associated with pluripotency, and indicates that a recently identified protein-protein interaction network characterizing pluripotency was underestimated by a factor of four. Conclusions By effectively extracting important information from high-dimensional microarray data without prior knowledge or the need for data filtration, AutoSOME can yield systems-level insights from whole genome microarray expression studies. Due to its generality, this new method should also have practical utility for a variety of data-intensive applications, including the results of deep sequencing experiments. AutoSOME is available for download at http://jimcooperlab.mcdb.ucsb.edu/autosome.

  20. Detecting space-time disease clusters with arbitrary shapes and sizes using a co-clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ability to detect potential space-time clusters in spatio-temporal data on disease occurrences is necessary for conducting surveillance and implementing disease prevention policies. Most existing techniques use geometrically shaped (circular, elliptical or square scanning windows to discover disease clusters. In certain situations, where the disease occurrences tend to cluster in very irregularly shaped areas, these algorithms are not feasible in practise for the detection of space-time clusters. To address this problem, a new algorithm is proposed, which uses a co-clustering strategy to detect prospective and retrospective space-time disease clusters with no restriction on shape and size. The proposed method detects space-time disease clusters by tracking the changes in space–time occurrence structure instead of an in-depth search over space. This method was utilised to detect potential clusters in the annual and monthly malaria data in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan from 2012 to 2016 visualising the results on a heat map. The results of the annual data analysis showed that the most likely hotspot emerged in three sub-regions in the years 2013-2014. The most likely hotspots in monthly data appeared in the month of July to October in each year and showed a strong periodic trend.

  1. Parkinson's Disease Subtypes Identified from Cluster Analysis of Motor and Non-motor Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jesse; Chaudhuri, Kallol R; Bielza, Concha; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesus; Larrañaga, Pedro; Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is now considered a complex, multi-peptide, central, and peripheral nervous system disorder with considerable clinical heterogeneity. Non-motor symptoms play a key role in the trajectory of Parkinson's disease, from prodromal premotor to end stages. To understand the clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease, this study used cluster analysis to search for subtypes from a large, multi-center, international, and well-characterized cohort of Parkinson's disease patients across all motor stages, using a combination of cardinal motor features (bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, axial signs) and, for the first time, specific validated rater-based non-motor symptom scales. Two independent international cohort studies were used: (a) the validation study of the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale ( n = 411) and (b) baseline data from the global Non-Motor International Longitudinal Study ( n = 540). k -means cluster analyses were performed on the non-motor and motor domains (domains clustering) and the 30 individual non-motor symptoms alone (symptoms clustering), and hierarchical agglomerative clustering was performed to group symptoms together. Four clusters are identified from the domains clustering supporting previous studies: mild, non-motor dominant, motor-dominant, and severe. In addition, six new smaller clusters are identified from the symptoms clustering, each characterized by clinically-relevant non-motor symptoms. The clusters identified in this study present statistical confirmation of the increasingly important role of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease heterogeneity and take steps toward subtype-specific treatment packages.

  2. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  3. Identifying novel phenotypes of acute heart failure using cluster analysis of clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Yu; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Latif, A H M Mahbub; Urayama, Kevin Y; Aoki, Jiro; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Taishi; Sato, Yu; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koseki, Keita; Komiyama, Kota; Nakajima, Hiroyoshi; Hara, Kazuhiro; Tanabe, Kengo

    2018-07-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a heterogeneous disease caused by various cardiovascular (CV) pathophysiology and multiple non-CV comorbidities. We aimed to identify clinically important subgroups to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of AHF and inform clinical decision-making. We evaluated detailed clinical data of 345 consecutive AHF patients using non-hierarchical cluster analysis of 77 variables, including age, sex, HF etiology, comorbidities, physical findings, laboratory data, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and treatment during hospitalization. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate the association between the clusters and clinical outcomes. Three clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (n=108) represented "vascular failure". This cluster had the highest average systolic blood pressure at admission and lung congestion with type 2 respiratory failure. Cluster 2 (n=89) represented "cardiac and renal failure". They had the lowest ejection fraction (EF) and worst renal function. Cluster 3 (n=148) comprised mostly older patients and had the highest prevalence of atrial fibrillation and preserved EF. Death or HF hospitalization within 12-month occurred in 23% of Cluster 1, 36% of Cluster 2 and 36% of Cluster 3 (p=0.034). Compared with Cluster 1, risk of death or HF hospitalization was 1.74 (95% CI, 1.03-2.95, p=0.037) for Cluster 2 and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.13-2.93, p=0.014) for Cluster 3. Cluster analysis may be effective in producing clinically relevant categories of AHF, and may suggest underlying pathophysiology and potential utility in predicting clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Exacerbation-Prone Adult Asthmatics Identified by Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ae; Shin, Seung Woo; Park, Jong Sook; Uh, Soo Taek; Chang, Hun Soo; Bae, Da Jeong; Cho, You Sook; Park, Hae Sim; Yoon, Ho Joo; Choi, Byoung Whui; Kim, Yong Hoon; Park, Choon Sik

    2017-11-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterized by various types of airway inflammation and obstruction. Therefore, it is classified into several subphenotypes, such as early-onset atopic, obese non-eosinophilic, benign, and eosinophilic asthma, using cluster analysis. A number of asthmatics frequently experience exacerbation over a long-term follow-up period, but the exacerbation-prone subphenotype has rarely been evaluated by cluster analysis. This prompted us to identify clusters reflecting asthma exacerbation. A uniform cluster analysis method was applied to 259 adult asthmatics who were regularly followed-up for over 1 year using 12 variables, selected on the basis of their contribution to asthma phenotypes. After clustering, clinical profiles and exacerbation rates during follow-up were compared among the clusters. Four subphenotypes were identified: cluster 1 was comprised of patients with early-onset atopic asthma with preserved lung function, cluster 2 late-onset non-atopic asthma with impaired lung function, cluster 3 early-onset atopic asthma with severely impaired lung function, and cluster 4 late-onset non-atopic asthma with well-preserved lung function. The patients in clusters 2 and 3 were identified as exacerbation-prone asthmatics, showing a higher risk of asthma exacerbation. Two different phenotypes of exacerbation-prone asthma were identified among Korean asthmatics using cluster analysis; both were characterized by impaired lung function, but the age at asthma onset and atopic status were different between the two. Copyright © 2017 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease

  5. Van der Waals coefficients for alkali metal clusters and their size

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we employ the hydrodynamic formulation of time-dependent density functional theory to obtain the van der Waals coefficients 6 and 8 of alkali metal clusters of various sizes including very large clusters. Such calculations become computationally very demanding in the orbital-based Kohn-Sham formalism, ...

  6. Micron-size hydrogen cluster target for laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S.; Kanasaki, M.; Uno, M.; Matsui, R.; Uesaka, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Fukuda, Y.

    2018-04-01

    As a new laser-driven ion acceleration technique, we proposed a way to produce impurity-free, highly reproducible, and robust proton beams exceeding 100 MeV using a Coulomb explosion of micron-size hydrogen clusters. In this study, micron-size hydrogen clusters were generated by expanding the cooled high-pressure hydrogen gas into a vacuum via a conical nozzle connected to a solenoid valve cooled by a mechanical cryostat. The size distributions of the hydrogen clusters were evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of laser light scattered from the clusters. The data were analyzed mathematically based on the Mie scattering theory combined with the Tikhonov regularization method. The maximum size of the hydrogen cluster at 25 K and 6 MPa in the stagnation state was recognized to be 2.15 ± 0.10 μm. The mean cluster size decreased with increasing temperature, and was found to be much larger than that given by Hagena’s formula. This discrepancy suggests that the micron-size hydrogen clusters were formed by the atomization (spallation) of the liquid or supercritical fluid phase of hydrogen. In addition, the density profiles of the gas phase were evaluated for 25 to 80 K at 6 MPa using a Nomarski interferometer. Based on the measurement results and the equation of state for hydrogen, the cluster mass fraction was obtained. 3D particles-in-cell (PIC) simulations concerning the interaction processes of micron-size hydrogen clusters with high power laser pulses predicted the generation of protons exceeding 100 MeV and accelerating in a laser propagation direction via an anisotropic Coulomb explosion mechanism, thus demonstrating a future candidate in laser-driven proton sources for upcoming multi-petawatt lasers.

  7. Spectral properties and lattice-size dependences in cluster algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Kerler, W.

    1993-01-01

    Simulation results of Ising systems for several update rules, observables, and dimensions are analyzed. The lattice-size dependence is discussed for the autocorrelation times and for the weights of eigenvalues, giving fit results in the case of power laws. Implications of spectral properties are pointed out and the behavior of a particular observable not governed by detailed balance is explained.

  8. Clustering approaches to identifying gene expression patterns from DNA microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Jin Hwan; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2008-04-30

    The analysis of microarray data is essential for large amounts of gene expression data. In this review we focus on clustering techniques. The biological rationale for this approach is the fact that many co-expressed genes are co-regulated, and identifying co-expressed genes could aid in functional annotation of novel genes, de novo identification of transcription factor binding sites and elucidation of complex biological pathways. Co-expressed genes are usually identified in microarray experiments by clustering techniques. There are many such methods, and the results obtained even for the same datasets may vary considerably depending on the algorithms and metrics for dissimilarity measures used, as well as on user-selectable parameters such as desired number of clusters and initial values. Therefore, biologists who want to interpret microarray data should be aware of the weakness and strengths of the clustering methods used. In this review, we survey the basic principles of clustering of DNA microarray data from crisp clustering algorithms such as hierarchical clustering, K-means and self-organizing maps, to complex clustering algorithms like fuzzy clustering.

  9. A critical evaluation of the use of cluster analysis to identify contaminated sediments in the Ria de Vigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, B; Nombela, M. A; Vilas, F [Departamento de Geociencias Marinas y Ordenacion del Territorio, Vigo, Espana (Spain)

    2001-06-01

    The indiscriminate use of cluster analysis to distinguish contaminated and non-contaminated sediments has led us to make a comparative evaluation of different cluster analysis procedures as applied to heavy metal concentrations in subtidal sediments from the Ria de Vigo, NW Spain. The use of different clusters algorithms and other transformations from the same departing set of data lead to the formation of different clusters with a clear inconclusive result about the contamination status of the sediments. The results show that this approach is better suited to identifying groups of samples differing in sedimentological characteristics, such as grain size, rather than in the degree of contamination. Our main aim is to call attention to these aspects in cluster analysis and to suggest that researches should be rigorous with this kind of analysis. Finally, the use of discriminate analysis allows us to find a discriminate function that separates the samples into two clearly differentiated groups, which should not be treated jointly. [Spanish] El uso indiscriminado del analisis cluster para distinguir sedimentos contaminados y no contaminados nos ha llevado a realizar una evaluacion comparativa entre los diferentes procedimientos de estos analisis aplicada a la concentracion de metales pesados en sedimentos submareales de la Ria de Vigo, NW de Espana. La utilizacion de distintos algoritmos de cluster, asi como otras transformaciones de la misma matriz de datos conduce a la formacion de diferentes clusters con un resultado inconcluso sobre el estado de contaminacion de los sedimentos. Los resultados muestran que esta aproximacion se ajusta mejor para identificar grupos de muestras que difieren en caracteristicas sedimentologicas, tal como el tamano de grano, mas que el grado de contaminacion. El principal objetivo es llamar la atencion sobre estos aspectos del analisis cluster y sugerir a los investigadores que sean rigurosos con este tipo de analisis. Finalmente el uso

  10. Clustering for high-dimension, low-sample size data using distance vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    In high-dimension, low-sample size (HDLSS) data, it is not always true that closeness of two objects reflects a hidden cluster structure. We point out the important fact that it is not the closeness, but the "values" of distance that contain information of the cluster structure in high-dimensional space. Based on this fact, we propose an efficient and simple clustering approach, called distance vector clustering, for HDLSS data. Under the assumptions given in the work of Hall et al. (2005), w...

  11. Identifying spatial clustering properties of the 1997-2003 Liguria (Northern Italy) forest-fire sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Amatulli, Giuseppe; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lovallo, Michele; Santulli, Adriano

    2007-01-01

    The spatial clustering of the forest-fire sequence (1997-2003) of Liguria Region (Northern Italy) has been analysed using the correlation dimension D C , calculated by means of the correlation integral method. Studying the variations of this parameter, we recognize the presence of a strong variability of the spatial clusterization, modulated by seasonal cycles. Furthermore, we found that the larger fires (size >400 ha) mark the cyclic behaviour of the correlation dimension

  12. Evolution of the electronic and ionic structure of Mg clusters with increase in cluster size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2003-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral and singly charged magnesium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory and systematic post–Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory accounting for all electrons in the system....... We have investigated the appearance of the elements of the hcp structure and metallic evolution of the magnesium clusters, as well as the stability of linear chains and rings of magnesium atoms. The results obtained are compared with the available experimental data and the results of other...

  13. The effect of clustering on lot quality assurance sampling: a probabilistic model to calculate sample sizes for quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Mitsunaga, Tisha; Hund, Lauren; Olives, Casey; Pagano, Marcello

    2013-10-26

    Traditional Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) designs assume observations are collected using simple random sampling. Alternatively, randomly sampling clusters of observations and then individuals within clusters reduces costs but decreases the precision of the classifications. In this paper, we develop a general framework for designing the cluster(C)-LQAS system and illustrate the method with the design of data quality assessments for the community health worker program in Rwanda. To determine sample size and decision rules for C-LQAS, we use the beta-binomial distribution to account for inflated risk of errors introduced by sampling clusters at the first stage. We present general theory and code for sample size calculations.The C-LQAS sample sizes provided in this paper constrain misclassification risks below user-specified limits. Multiple C-LQAS systems meet the specified risk requirements, but numerous considerations, including per-cluster versus per-individual sampling costs, help identify optimal systems for distinct applications. We show the utility of C-LQAS for data quality assessments, but the method generalizes to numerous applications. This paper provides the necessary technical detail and supplemental code to support the design of C-LQAS for specific programs.

  14. Endohedral clusterfullerenes--playing with cluster and cage sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsch, Lothar; Yang, Shangfeng

    2007-06-28

    The family of endohedral fullerenes was significantly enlarged within the past six years by the clusterfullerenes containing structures like the M(2)C(2) carbides and the M(3)N nitrides. While the carbide clusters are generated under the standard arc burning conditions according to the stabilisation energy the nitride clusterfullerene type is formed by varying the composition of the cooling gas atmosphere in the arc burning process. The special situation in nitride clusterfullerene synthesis is described in detail and the optimum conditions for the production of nitride clusterfullerenes as the main product in fullerene synthesis are discussed. A review of new nitride clusterfullerenes reported recently is given summarizing the structures, properties and the stability of metal nitride clusterfullerenes. It is shown that all cages with even carbon atoms of C(68) and beyond are available as endohedral nitride clusterstructures. Furthermore the nitride clusterfullerenes are that class of endohedral fullerenes forming the largest number of non-IPR structures. Finally the prospects of this evolving field are briefly discussed taking the superior stability of these endohedral clusterfullerenes into account.

  15. Electron impact ionization of size selected hydrogen clusters (H2)N: ion fragment and neutral size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2008-05-21

    Clusters consisting of normal H2 molecules, produced in a free jet expansion, are size selected by diffraction from a transmission nanograting prior to electron impact ionization. For each neutral cluster (H2)(N) (N=2-40), the relative intensities of the ion fragments Hn+ are measured with a mass spectrometer. H3+ is found to be the most abundant fragment up to N=17. With a further increase in N, the abundances of H3+, H5+, H7+, and H9+ first increase and, after passing through a maximum, approach each other. At N=40, they are about the same and more than a factor of 2 and 3 larger than for H11+ and H13+, respectively. For a given neutral cluster size, the intensities of the ion fragments follow a Poisson distribution. The fragmentation probabilities are used to determine the neutral cluster size distribution produced in the expansion at a source temperature of 30.1 K and a source pressure of 1.50 bar. The distribution shows no clear evidence of a magic number N=13 as predicted by theory and found in experiments with pure para-H2 clusters. The ion fragment distributions are also used to extract information on the internal energy distribution of the H3+ ions produced in the reaction H2+ + H2-->H3+ +H, which is initiated upon ionization of the cluster. The internal energy is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated and to determine the number of molecules subsequently evaporated. The internal energy distribution found in this way is in good agreement with data obtained in an earlier independent merged beam scattering experiment.

  16. An imbalance in cluster sizes does not lead to notable loss of power in cross-sectional, stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with a continuous outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristunas, Caroline A; Smith, Karen L; Gray, Laura J

    2017-03-07

    The current methodology for sample size calculations for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials (SW-CRTs) is based on the assumption of equal cluster sizes. However, as is often the case in cluster randomised trials (CRTs), the clusters in SW-CRTs are likely to vary in size, which in other designs of CRT leads to a reduction in power. The effect of an imbalance in cluster size on the power of SW-CRTs has not previously been reported, nor what an appropriate adjustment to the sample size calculation should be to allow for any imbalance. We aimed to assess the impact of an imbalance in cluster size on the power of a cross-sectional SW-CRT and recommend a method for calculating the sample size of a SW-CRT when there is an imbalance in cluster size. The effect of varying degrees of imbalance in cluster size on the power of SW-CRTs was investigated using simulations. The sample size was calculated using both the standard method and two proposed adjusted design effects (DEs), based on those suggested for CRTs with unequal cluster sizes. The data were analysed using generalised estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation matrix and robust standard errors. An imbalance in cluster size was not found to have a notable effect on the power of SW-CRTs. The two proposed adjusted DEs resulted in trials that were generally considerably over-powered. We recommend that the standard method of sample size calculation for SW-CRTs be used, provided that the assumptions of the method hold. However, it would be beneficial to investigate, through simulation, what effect the maximum likely amount of inequality in cluster sizes would be on the power of the trial and whether any inflation of the sample size would be required.

  17. Lack of Dependence of the Sizes of the Mesoscopic Protein Clusters on Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, Maria A; Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-11-03

    Protein-rich clusters of steady submicron size and narrow size distribution exist in protein solutions in apparent violation of the classical laws of phase equilibrium. Even though they contain a minor fraction of the total protein, evidence suggests that they may serve as essential precursors for the nucleation of ordered solids such as crystals, sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. The cluster formation mechanism remains elusive. We use the highly basic protein lysozyme at nearly neutral and lower pH as a model and explore the response of the cluster population to the electrostatic forces, which govern numerous biophysical phenomena, including crystallization and fibrillization. We tune the strength of intermolecular electrostatic forces by varying the solution ionic strength I and pH and find that despite the weaker repulsion at higher I and pH, the cluster size remains constant. Cluster responses to the presence of urea and ethanol demonstrate that cluster formation is controlled by hydrophobic interactions between the peptide backbones, exposed to the solvent after partial protein unfolding that may lead to transient protein oligomers. These findings reveal that the mechanism of the mesoscopic clusters is fundamentally different from those underlying the two main classes of ordered protein solid phases, crystals and amyloid fibrils, and partial unfolding of the protein chain may play a significant role. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Observation of propane cluster size distributions during nucleation and growth in a Laval expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, Jorge J.; Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Schläppi, Bernhard; Signorell, Ruth [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-12-07

    We report on molecular-level studies of the condensation of propane gas and propane/ethane gas mixtures in the uniform (constant pressure and temperature) postnozzle flow of Laval expansions using soft single-photon ionization by vacuum ultraviolet light and mass spectrometric detection. The whole process, from the nucleation to the growth to molecular aggregates of sizes of several nanometers (∼5 nm), can be monitored at the molecular level with high time-resolution (∼3 μs) for a broad range of pressures and temperatures. For each time, pressure, and temperature, a whole mass spectrum is recorded, which allows one to determine the critical cluster size range for nucleation as well as the kinetics and mechanisms of cluster-size specific growth. The detailed information about the size, composition, and population of individual molecular clusters upon condensation provides unique experimental data for comparison with future molecular-level simulations.

  19. THE SIZE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RED AND BLUE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IS NOT DUE TO PROJECTION EFFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Metal-rich (red) globular clusters in massive galaxies are, on average, smaller than metal-poor (blue) globular clusters. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the two populations of clusters have different spatial distributions. We test this idea by comparing clusters observed in unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 with a simulated globular cluster population in which the red and blue clusters have different spatial distributions, matching the observations. We compare the overall distribution of cluster effective radii as well as the relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance for both the observed and simulated red and blue sub-populations. We find that the different spatial distributions does not produce a significant size difference between the red and blue sub-populations as a whole or at a given galactocentric distance. These results suggest that the size difference between red and blue globular clusters is likely due to differences during formation or later evolution.

  20. The Size Difference between Red and Blue Globular Clusters is not due to Projection Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Metal-rich (red) globular clusters in massive galaxies are, on average, smaller than metal-poor (blue) globular clusters. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the two populations of clusters have different spatial distributions. We test this idea by comparing clusters observed in unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 with a simulated globular cluster population in which the red and blue clusters have different spatial distributions, matching the observations. We compare the overall distribution of cluster effective radii as well as the relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance for both the observed and simulated red and blue sub-populations. We find that the different spatial distributions does not produce a significant size difference between the red and blue sub-populations as a whole or at a given galactocentric distance. These results suggest that the size difference between red and blue globular clusters is likely due to differences during formation or later evolution.

  1. Melting of size-selected gallium clusters with 60-183 atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyfer, Katheryne L; Kafader, Jared O; Yalamanchali, Anirudh; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-07-10

    Heat capacities have been measured as a function of temperature for size-selected gallium cluster cations with between 60 and 183 atoms. Almost all clusters studied show a single peak in the heat capacity that is attributed to a melting transition. The peaks can be fit by a two-state model incorporating only fully solid-like and fully liquid-like species, and hence no partially melted intermediates. The exceptions are Ga90(+), which does not show a peak, and Ga80(+) and Ga81(+), which show two peaks. For the clusters with two peaks, the lower temperature peak is attributed to a structural transition. The melting temperatures for clusters with less than 50 atoms have previously been shown to be hundreds of degrees above the bulk melting point. For clusters with more than 60 atoms the melting temperatures decrease, approaching the bulk value (303 K) at around 95 atoms, and then show several small upward excursions with increasing cluster size. A plot of the latent heat against the entropy change for melting reveals two groups of clusters: the latent heats and entropy changes for clusters with less than 94 atoms are distinct from those for clusters with more than 93 atoms. This observation suggests that a significant change in the nature of the bonding or the structure of the clusters occurs at 93-94 atoms. Even though the melting temperatures are close to the bulk value for the larger clusters studied here, the latent heats and entropies of melting are still far from the bulk values.

  2. Identifying Patient Attitudinal Clusters Associated with Asthma Control: The European REALISE Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Thys; Fletcher, Monica; Price, David

    Asthma is a highly heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical phenotypes, and treatment may be tailored accordingly. However, factors beyond purely clinical traits, such as patient attitudes and behaviors, can also have a marked impact on treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to further analyze data from the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) Europe survey, to identify distinct patient groups sharing common attitudes toward asthma and its management. Factor analysis of respondent data (N = 7,930) from the REALISE Europe survey consolidated the 34 attitudinal variables provided by the study population into a set of 8 summary factors. Cluster analyses were used to identify patient clusters that showed similar attitudes and behaviors toward each of the 8 summary factors. Five distinct patient clusters were identified and named according to the key characteristics comprising that cluster: "Confident and self-managing," "Confident and accepting of their asthma," "Confident but dependent on others," "Concerned but confident in their health care professional (HCP)," and "Not confident in themselves or their HCP." Clusters showed clear variability in attributes such as degree of confidence in managing their asthma, use of reliever and preventer medication, and level of asthma control. The 5 patient clusters identified in this analysis displayed distinctly different personal attitudes that would require different approaches in the consultation room certainly for asthma but probably also for other chronic diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  4. Magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus for formation and deposition of size-selected metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    selection is achieved using an electrostatic quadrupole mass selector. The deposited silver clusters are studied using atomic force microscopy. The height distributions show typical relative standard size deviation of 9-13% for given sizes in the range between 5-23 nm. Thus, the apparatus demonstrates good...... capability in formation of supported size-selected metal nanoparticles with controllable coverage for various practical applications....

  5. Arrays of Size-Selected Metal Nanoparticles Formed by Cluster Ion Beam Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Zenin, Volodymyr

    2018-01-01

    Deposition of size-selected copper and silver nanoparticles (NPs) on polymers using cluster beam technique is studied. It is shown that ratio of particle embedment in the film can be controlled by simple thermal annealing. Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition, and heat...... with required configurations which can be applied for wave-guiding, resonators, in sensor technologies, and surface enhanced Raman scattering....

  6. The role of micro size computing clusters for small physics groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevel, A Y

    2014-01-01

    A small physics group (3-15 persons) might use a number of computing facilities for the analysis/simulation, developing/testing, teaching. It is discussed different types of computing facilities: collaboration computing facilities, group local computing cluster (including colocation), cloud computing. The author discuss the growing variety of different computing options for small groups and does emphasize the role of the group owned computing cluster of micro size.

  7. Clustering analysis of water distribution systems: identifying critical components and community impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, K; Farmani, R; Fu, G; Astaraie-Imani, M; Ward, S; Butler, D

    2014-01-01

    Large water distribution systems (WDSs) are networks with both topological and behavioural complexity. Thereby, it is usually difficult to identify the key features of the properties of the system, and subsequently all the critical components within the system for a given purpose of design or control. One way is, however, to more explicitly visualize the network structure and interactions between components by dividing a WDS into a number of clusters (subsystems). Accordingly, this paper introduces a clustering strategy that decomposes WDSs into clusters with stronger internal connections than external connections. The detected cluster layout is very similar to the community structure of the served urban area. As WDSs may expand along with urban development in a community-by-community manner, the correspondingly formed distribution clusters may reveal some crucial configurations of WDSs. For verification, the method is applied to identify all the critical links during firefighting for the vulnerability analysis of a real-world WDS. Moreover, both the most critical pipes and clusters are addressed, given the consequences of pipe failure. Compared with the enumeration method, the method used in this study identifies the same group of the most critical components, and provides similar criticality prioritizations of them in a more computationally efficient time.

  8. Poly(methyl methacrylate) Composites with Size-selected Silver Nanoparticles Fabricated Using Cluster Beam Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammad, Hanif; Juluri, Raghavendra R.; Chirumamilla, Manohar

    2016-01-01

    based on cluster beam technique allowing the formation of monocrystalline size-selected silver nanoparticles with a ±5–7% precision of diameter and controllable embedment into poly (methyl methacrylate). It is shown that the soft-landed silver clusters preserve almost spherical shape with a slight...... tendency to flattening upon impact. By controlling the polymer hardness (from viscous to soft state) prior the cluster deposition and annealing conditions after the deposition the degree of immersion of the nanoparticles into polymer can be tuned, thus, making it possible to create composites with either...

  9. Desorption of large molecules with light-element clusters: Effects of cluster size and substrate nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcorte, Arnaud, E-mail: arnaud.delcorte@uclouvain.be [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences - Bio and Soft Matter, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud, 1 bte 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Garrison, Barbara J. [Department of Chemistry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This contribution focuses on the conditions required to desorb a large hydrocarbon molecule using light-element clusters. The test molecule is a 7.5 kDa coil of polystyrene (PS61). Several projectiles are compared, from C{sub 60} to 110 kDa organic droplets and two substrates are used, amorphous polyethylene and mono-crystalline gold. Different aiming points and incidence angles are examined. Under specific conditions, 10 keV nanodrops can desorb PS61 intact from a gold substrate and from a soft polyethylene substrate. The prevalent mechanism for the desorption of intact and 'cold' molecules is one in which the molecules are washed away by the projectile constituents and entrained in their flux, with an emission angle close to {approx}70 deg. The effects of the different parameters on the dynamics and the underlying physics are discussed in detail and the predictions of the model are compared with other published studies.

  10. Desorption of large molecules with light-element clusters: Effects of cluster size and substrate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcorte, Arnaud; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the conditions required to desorb a large hydrocarbon molecule using light-element clusters. The test molecule is a 7.5 kDa coil of polystyrene (PS61). Several projectiles are compared, from C 60 to 110 kDa organic droplets and two substrates are used, amorphous polyethylene and mono-crystalline gold. Different aiming points and incidence angles are examined. Under specific conditions, 10 keV nanodrops can desorb PS61 intact from a gold substrate and from a soft polyethylene substrate. The prevalent mechanism for the desorption of intact and 'cold' molecules is one in which the molecules are washed away by the projectile constituents and entrained in their flux, with an emission angle close to ∼70 deg. The effects of the different parameters on the dynamics and the underlying physics are discussed in detail and the predictions of the model are compared with other published studies.

  11. Epidemiological analysis of Salmonella clusters identified by whole genome sequencing, England and Wales 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldram, Alison; Dolan, Gayle; Ashton, Philip M; Jenkins, Claire; Dallman, Timothy J

    2018-05-01

    The unprecedented level of bacterial strain discrimination provided by whole genome sequencing (WGS) presents new challenges with respect to the utility and interpretation of the data. Whole genome sequences from 1445 isolates of Salmonella belonging to the most commonly identified serotypes in England and Wales isolated between April and August 2014 were analysed. Single linkage single nucleotide polymorphism thresholds at the 10, 5 and 0 level were explored for evidence of epidemiological links between clustered cases. Analysis of the WGS data organised 566 of the 1445 isolates into 32 clusters of five or more. A statistically significant epidemiological link was identified for 17 clusters. The clusters were associated with foreign travel (n = 8), consumption of Chinese takeaways (n = 4), chicken eaten at home (n = 2), and one each of the following; eating out, contact with another case in the home and contact with reptiles. In the same time frame, one cluster was detected using traditional outbreak detection methods. WGS can be used for the highly specific and highly sensitive detection of biologically related isolates when epidemiological links are obscured. Improvements in the collection of detailed, standardised exposure information would enhance cluster investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying the ideal profile of French yogurts for different clusters of consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, M; Saint-Eve, A; Delarue, J; Blumenthal, D

    2016-05-01

    Identifying the sensory properties that affect consumer preferences for food products is an important feature of product development. Different methods, such as external preference mapping or partial least squares regression, are used to establish relationships between sensory data and consumer preferences and to identify sensory attributes that drive consumer preferences, by highlighting optimum products. Plain French yogurts were evaluated by a sensory profiling method performed by 12 trained judges. In parallel, 180 consumers were asked to score their overall liking and complete a cognitive restraint questionnaire. After hierarchical cluster analysis on the liking scores, preference mapping using a quadratic regression model was performed. Five clusters of consumers were identified as a function of different preference patterns. Contrary to our expectations, fat levels were not discriminating. For each cluster, the results of preference mapping enabled the identification of optimum products. A comparison of the 5 sensory profiles revealed numerous differences between key sensory attributes. For example, one consumer cluster had a strong preference for products perceived as very thick, grainy, but with a less flowing texture, less sticky, whey presence and color, in contrast to other clusters. In addition, each segment of consumers was characterized according to the results of the cognitive restraint questionnaire. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identifying influential individuals on intensive care units: using cluster analysis to explore culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Clark, Lindsey; Cheng, Tianyi; Franklin, Ella; Fernandez, Nicole; Ratwani, Raj; Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify attribute patterns of influential individuals in intensive care units using unsupervised cluster analysis. Despite the acknowledgement that culture of an organisation is critical to improving patient safety, specific methods to shift culture have not been explicitly identified. A social network analysis survey was conducted and an unsupervised cluster analysis was used. A total of 100 surveys were gathered. Unsupervised cluster analysis was used to group individuals with similar dimensions highlighting three general genres of influencers: well-rounded, knowledge and relational. Culture is created locally by individual influencers. Cluster analysis is an effective way to identify common characteristics among members of an intensive care unit team that are noted as highly influential by their peers. To change culture, identifying and then integrating the influencers in intervention development and dissemination may create more sustainable and effective culture change. Additional studies are ongoing to test the effectiveness of utilising these influencers to disseminate patient safety interventions. This study offers an approach that can be helpful in both identifying and understanding influential team members and may be an important aspect of developing methods to change organisational culture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Size-dependent valence change in small Pr, Nd, and Sm clusters isolated in solid Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebcke, M.; Sonntag, B.; Niemann, W.; Rabe, P.

    1986-01-01

    The L/sub III/ absorption thresholds of Pr, Nd, and Sm clusters isolated in solid Ar are marked by prominent white lines. The lines ascribed to divalent and trivalent rare-earth metals are well separated in energy. From the relative intensities of these lines an average valence of the rare-earth atoms in the cluster has been determined. For dimers and trimers the average valence is close to 2, the value for free atoms. For clusters consisting of more than 20 atoms the average valence approaches 3, the value for bulk metals. In between the valence changes abruptly, indicating the existence of a critical cluster size of approximately 5 atoms for Pr and Nd and of 13 atoms for Sm

  15. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  16. Preliminary Cluster Size and Efficiencies results of CMS RPC at GIF++

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Blanco Gonzalez, Genoveva

    2016-01-01

    A brief description and first preliminary results of the Efficiencies and Cluster Size measurements of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers, will be presented inside the Gamma Irradiation Facility GIF++ at CERN. Preliminary studies that sets the base performance measurements of CMS RPC for starting aging studies.

  17. A simple sample size formula for analysis of covariance in cluster randomized trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, S.; Eldridge, S.; Graff, M.J.; Hoop, E. de; Borm, G.F.

    2012-01-01

    For cluster randomized trials with a continuous outcome, the sample size is often calculated as if an analysis of the outcomes at the end of the treatment period (follow-up scores) would be performed. However, often a baseline measurement of the outcome is available or feasible to obtain. An

  18. Finite size effects in the evaporation rate of 3He clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirao, A.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.

    1991-01-01

    We have computed the density of states and the evaporation rate of 3 He clusters, paying special attention to finite size effects which modify the 3 He level density parameter and chemical potential from their bulk values. Ready-to-use liquid-drop expansions of these quantities are given. (orig.)

  19. Application of cluster analysis to geochemical compositional data for identifying ore-related geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuguang; Zhou, Kefa; Wang, Jinlin; Yang, Genfang; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-12-01

    Cluster analysis is a well-known technique that is used to analyze various types of data. In this study, cluster analysis is applied to geochemical data that describe 1444 stream sediment samples collected in northwestern Xinjiang with a sample spacing of approximately 2 km. Three algorithms (the hierarchical, k-means, and fuzzy c-means algorithms) and six data transformation methods (the z-score standardization, ZST; the logarithmic transformation, LT; the additive log-ratio transformation, ALT; the centered log-ratio transformation, CLT; the isometric log-ratio transformation, ILT; and no transformation, NT) are compared in terms of their effects on the cluster analysis of the geochemical compositional data. The study shows that, on the one hand, the ZST does not affect the results of column- or variable-based (R-type) cluster analysis, whereas the other methods, including the LT, the ALT, and the CLT, have substantial effects on the results. On the other hand, the results of the row- or observation-based (Q-type) cluster analysis obtained from the geochemical data after applying NT and the ZST are relatively poor. However, we derive some improved results from the geochemical data after applying the CLT, the ILT, the LT, and the ALT. Moreover, the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithms are more reliable than the hierarchical algorithm when they are used to cluster the geochemical data. We apply cluster analysis to the geochemical data to explore for Au deposits within the study area, and we obtain a good correlation between the results retrieved by combining the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms and the potential zones of Au mineralization. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms is an effective tool to identify potential zones of mineralization from geochemical data.

  20. Effects of manganese doping on the structure evolution of small-sized boron clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingquan; Qu, Xin; Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhang, Lijun; Hu, Ziyu; Gu, Guangrui; Ma, Yanming

    2017-07-01

    Atomic doping of clusters is known as an effective approach to stabilize or modify the structures and properties of resulting doped clusters. We herein report the effect of manganese (Mn) doping on the structure evolution of small-sized boron (B) clusters. The global minimum structures of both neutral and charged Mn doped B cluster \\text{MnB}nQ (n  =  10-20 and Q  =  0, ±1) have been proposed through extensive first-principles swarm-intelligence based structure searches. It is found that Mn doping has significantly modified the grow behaviors of B clusters, leading to two novel structural transitions from planar to tubular and then to cage-like B structures in both neutral and charged species. Half-sandwich-type structures are most favorable for small \\text{MnB}n-/0/+ (n  ⩽  13) clusters and gradually transform to Mn-centered double-ring tubular structures at \\text{MnB}16-/0/+ clusters with superior thermodynamic stabilities compared with their neighbors. Most strikingly, endohedral cages become the ground-state structures for larger \\text{MnB}n-/0/+ (n  ⩾  19) clusters, among which \\text{MnB}20+ adopts a highly symmetric structure with superior thermodynamic stability and a large HOMO-LUMO gap of 4.53 eV. The unique stability of the endohedral \\text{MnB}\\text{20}+ cage is attributed to the geometric fit and formation of 18-electron closed-shell configuration. The results significantly advance our understanding about the structure and bonding of B-based clusters and strongly suggest transition-metal doping as a viable route to synthesize intriguing B-based nanomaterials.

  1. Using Cluster Ensemble and Validation to Identify Subtypes of Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jess J.; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Holden, Jeanette J.A.; Shatkay, Hagit

    2007-01-01

    Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication and behavior.1 Given the diversity and varying severity of PDD, diagnostic tools attempt to identify homogeneous subtypes within PDD. Identifying subtypes can lead to targeted etiology studies and to effective type-specific intervention. Cluster analysis can suggest coherent subsets in data; however, different methods and assumptions lead to different resu...

  2. Exploratory Cluster Analysis to Identify Patterns of Chronic Kidney Disease in the 500 Cities Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shelley H; Li, Yan; Liu, Bian

    2018-05-17

    Chronic kidney disease is a leading cause of death in the United States. We used cluster analysis to explore patterns of chronic kidney disease in 500 of the largest US cities. After adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, we found that unhealthy behaviors, prevention measures, and health outcomes related to chronic kidney disease differ between cities in Utah and those in the rest of the United States. Cluster analysis can be useful for identifying geographic regions that may have important policy implications for preventing chronic kidney disease.

  3. Self-selection in size and structure in argon clusters formed on amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.; Waal, Benjamin W. van de

    2004-07-01

    Argon clusters formed on an amorphous carbon substrate as deposited from the vapor phase were studied by means of transmission high energy electron diffraction using the liquid helium cryostat. Electron diffractograms were analysed on the basis of assumption that there exist a cluster size distribution in samples formed on substrate and multi-shell structures such as icosahedra, decahedra, fcc and hcp were probed for different sizes up to {approx}15 000 atoms. The experimental data were considered as a result of a superposition of diffracted intensities from clusters of different sizes and structures. The comparative analysis was based on the R-factor minimization that was found to be equal to 0.014 for the best fit between experiment and modelling. The total size and structure distribution function shows the presence of 'non-crystallographic' structures such as icosahedra and decahedra with five-fold symmetry that was found to prevail and a smaller amount of fcc and hcp structures. Possible growth mechanisms as well as observed general tendency to self-selection in sizes and structures are presumably governed by confined pore-like geometry in an amorphous carbon substrate.

  4. Linear and nonlinear surface spectroscopy of supported size selected metal clusters and organic adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaemer, Martin Georg

    2012-03-08

    The spectroscopic investigation of supported size selected metal clusters over a wide wavelength range plays an important role for understanding their outstanding catalytic properties. The challenge which must be overcome to perform such measurements is the difficult detection of the weak spectroscopic signals from these samples. As a consequence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are applied, such as surface Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and surface Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic apparatus developed is shown to have a sensitivity which is high enough to detect sub-monolayer coverages of adsorbates on surfaces. In the measured spectra of small supported silver clusters of the sizes Ag{sub 4}2, Ag{sub 2}1, Ag{sub 9}, and Ag atoms a stepwise transition from particles with purely metallic character to particles with molecule-like properties can be observed within this size range.

  5. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis at a Low Pressure on Subnanometer Cobalt Oxide Clusters: The Effect of Cluster Size and Support on Activity and Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E.; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-05-21

    In this study, the catalytic activity and changes in the oxidation state during the Fischer Tropsch (FT) reaction was investigated on subnanometer size-selected cobalt clusters deposited on oxide (Al2O3, MgO) and carbon-based (ultrananocrystalline diamond UNCD) supports by temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) combined with in-situ grazing-incidence X-ray absorption characterization (GIXAS). The activity and selectivity of ultrasmall cobalt clusters exhibits a very strong dependence on cluster size and support. The evolution of the oxidation state of metal cluster during the reaction reveals that metal-support interaction plays a key role in the reaction.

  6. A DFT study of arsine adsorption on palladium doped graphene: Effects of palladium cluster size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai; Mudchimo, Tanabat; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The relationship between charge difference and adsorption strength demonstrates that charge migration from Pd_n-SDG to AsH_x significantly enhanced adsorption strength, the Pd_6 clusters doped SDG with a steep slope is recommended as a superior adsorbent material for AsH_3 removal from gas stream. - Highlights: • Pd atom and Pd clusters bind strongly onto the defective graphene surface. • Larger size of Pd cluster adsorbs arsine and its hydrogenated products stronger. • Order of adsorption strength on Pd_n doped graphene: As > AsH > AsH_2 > > AsH_3. • Charge migration characterizes the strong adsorption of AsH_2, AsH, and As. • Pd cluster doped graphene is thermodynamically preferable for arsine removal. - Abstract: In this study, we have investigated the size effects of palladium (Pd) doped single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to the adsorption of AsH_3 and its dehydrogenated products on Pd using density functional theory calculations. Here, Pd cluster binding study revealed that Pd_6 nanocluster bound strongest to the SDG surface, while adsorption of AsH_x (x = 0–3) on the most stable Pd_n doped SDG showed that dehydrogenated arsine compounds adsorbed onto the surface stronger than the pristine AsH_3 molecule. Charge analysis revealed that considerable amount of charge migration from Pd to dehydrogenated arsine molecules after adsorption may constitute strong adsorption for dehydrogenated arsine. In addition, study of thermodynamic pathways of AsH_3 dehydrogenation on Pd_n doped SDG adsorbents indicated that Pd cluster doping on SDG adsorbent tends to be thermodynamically favorable for AsH_3 decomposition than the single-Pd atom doped SDG. Hence, our study has indicated that Pd_6 clusters doped SDG is more advantageous as adsorbent material for AsH_3 removal.

  7. Computational and experimental study of the cluster size distribution in MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveugle, Elodie; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Sellinger, Aaron; Fitz-Gerald, James M.

    2007-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study is performed to investigate the origin and characteristics of the surface features observed in SEM images of thin polymer films deposited in matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Analysis of high-resolution SEM images of surface morphologies of the films deposited at different fluences reveals that the mass distributions of the surface features can be well described by a power-law, Y(N) ∝ N -t , with exponent -t ∼ -1.6. Molecular dynamic simulations of the MAPLE process predict a similar size distribution for large clusters observed in the ablation plume. A weak dependence of the cluster size distributions on fluence and target composition suggests that the power-law cluster size distribution may be a general characteristic of the ablation plume generated as a result of an explosive decomposition of a target region overheated above the limit of its thermodynamic stability. Based on the simulation results, we suggest that the ejection of large matrix-polymer clusters, followed by evaporation of the volatile matrix, is responsible for the formation of the surface features observed in the polymer films deposited in MAPLE experiments

  8. Identifying influential nodes in large-scale directed networks: the role of clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan-Bing; Gao, Hui; Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Identifying influential nodes in very large-scale directed networks is a big challenge relevant to disparate applications, such as accelerating information propagation, controlling rumors and diseases, designing search engines, and understanding hierarchical organization of social and biological networks. Known methods range from node centralities, such as degree, closeness and betweenness, to diffusion-based processes, like PageRank and LeaderRank. Some of these methods already take into account the influences of a node's neighbors but do not directly make use of the interactions among it's neighbors. Local clustering is known to have negative impacts on the information spreading. We further show empirically that it also plays a negative role in generating local connections. Inspired by these facts, we propose a local ranking algorithm named ClusterRank, which takes into account not only the number of neighbors and the neighbors' influences, but also the clustering coefficient. Subject to the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) spreading model with constant infectivity, experimental results on two directed networks, a social network extracted from delicious.com and a large-scale short-message communication network, demonstrate that the ClusterRank outperforms some benchmark algorithms such as PageRank and LeaderRank. Furthermore, ClusterRank can also be applied to undirected networks where the superiority of ClusterRank is significant compared with degree centrality and k-core decomposition. In addition, ClusterRank, only making use of local information, is much more efficient than global methods: It takes only 191 seconds for a network with about [Formula: see text] nodes, more than 15 times faster than PageRank.

  9. Identifying influential nodes in large-scale directed networks: the role of clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Identifying influential nodes in very large-scale directed networks is a big challenge relevant to disparate applications, such as accelerating information propagation, controlling rumors and diseases, designing search engines, and understanding hierarchical organization of social and biological networks. Known methods range from node centralities, such as degree, closeness and betweenness, to diffusion-based processes, like PageRank and LeaderRank. Some of these methods already take into account the influences of a node's neighbors but do not directly make use of the interactions among it's neighbors. Local clustering is known to have negative impacts on the information spreading. We further show empirically that it also plays a negative role in generating local connections. Inspired by these facts, we propose a local ranking algorithm named ClusterRank, which takes into account not only the number of neighbors and the neighbors' influences, but also the clustering coefficient. Subject to the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR spreading model with constant infectivity, experimental results on two directed networks, a social network extracted from delicious.com and a large-scale short-message communication network, demonstrate that the ClusterRank outperforms some benchmark algorithms such as PageRank and LeaderRank. Furthermore, ClusterRank can also be applied to undirected networks where the superiority of ClusterRank is significant compared with degree centrality and k-core decomposition. In addition, ClusterRank, only making use of local information, is much more efficient than global methods: It takes only 191 seconds for a network with about [Formula: see text] nodes, more than 15 times faster than PageRank.

  10. Identifying Influential Nodes in Large-Scale Directed Networks: The Role of Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan-Bing; Gao, Hui; Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Identifying influential nodes in very large-scale directed networks is a big challenge relevant to disparate applications, such as accelerating information propagation, controlling rumors and diseases, designing search engines, and understanding hierarchical organization of social and biological networks. Known methods range from node centralities, such as degree, closeness and betweenness, to diffusion-based processes, like PageRank and LeaderRank. Some of these methods already take into account the influences of a node’s neighbors but do not directly make use of the interactions among it’s neighbors. Local clustering is known to have negative impacts on the information spreading. We further show empirically that it also plays a negative role in generating local connections. Inspired by these facts, we propose a local ranking algorithm named ClusterRank, which takes into account not only the number of neighbors and the neighbors’ influences, but also the clustering coefficient. Subject to the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) spreading model with constant infectivity, experimental results on two directed networks, a social network extracted from delicious.com and a large-scale short-message communication network, demonstrate that the ClusterRank outperforms some benchmark algorithms such as PageRank and LeaderRank. Furthermore, ClusterRank can also be applied to undirected networks where the superiority of ClusterRank is significant compared with degree centrality and k-core decomposition. In addition, ClusterRank, only making use of local information, is much more efficient than global methods: It takes only 191 seconds for a network with about nodes, more than 15 times faster than PageRank. PMID:24204833

  11. Sample size calculations for cluster randomised crossover trials in Australian and New Zealand intensive care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnup, Sarah J; McKenzie, Joanne E; Pilcher, David; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Forbes, Andrew B

    2018-06-01

    The cluster randomised crossover (CRXO) design provides an opportunity to conduct randomised controlled trials to evaluate low risk interventions in the intensive care setting. Our aim is to provide a tutorial on how to perform a sample size calculation for a CRXO trial, focusing on the meaning of the elements required for the calculations, with application to intensive care trials. We use all-cause in-hospital mortality from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database clinical registry to illustrate the sample size calculations. We show sample size calculations for a two-intervention, two 12-month period, cross-sectional CRXO trial. We provide the formulae, and examples of their use, to determine the number of intensive care units required to detect a risk ratio (RR) with a designated level of power between two interventions for trials in which the elements required for sample size calculations remain constant across all ICUs (unstratified design); and in which there are distinct groups (strata) of ICUs that differ importantly in the elements required for sample size calculations (stratified design). The CRXO design markedly reduces the sample size requirement compared with the parallel-group, cluster randomised design for the example cases. The stratified design further reduces the sample size requirement compared with the unstratified design. The CRXO design enables the evaluation of routinely used interventions that can bring about small, but important, improvements in patient care in the intensive care setting.

  12. Methods for simultaneously identifying coherent local clusters with smooth global patterns in gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yun-Shien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical clustering tree (HCT with a dendrogram 1 and the singular value decomposition (SVD with a dimension-reduced representative map 2 are popular methods for two-way sorting the gene-by-array matrix map employed in gene expression profiling. While HCT dendrograms tend to optimize local coherent clustering patterns, SVD leading eigenvectors usually identify better global grouping and transitional structures. Results This study proposes a flipping mechanism for a conventional agglomerative HCT using a rank-two ellipse (R2E, an improved SVD algorithm for sorting purpose seriation by Chen 3 as an external reference. While HCTs always produce permutations with good local behaviour, the rank-two ellipse seriation gives the best global grouping patterns and smooth transitional trends. The resulting algorithm automatically integrates the desirable properties of each method so that users have access to a clustering and visualization environment for gene expression profiles that preserves coherent local clusters and identifies global grouping trends. Conclusion We demonstrate, through four examples, that the proposed method not only possesses better numerical and statistical properties, it also provides more meaningful biomedical insights than other sorting algorithms. We suggest that sorted proximity matrices for genes and arrays, in addition to the gene-by-array expression matrix, can greatly aid in the search for comprehensive understanding of gene expression structures. Software for the proposed methods can be obtained at http://gap.stat.sinica.edu.tw/Software/GAP.

  13. POLYMER COMPOSITE FILMS WITH SIZE-SELECTED METAL NANOPARTICLES FABRICATED BY CLUSTER BEAM TECHNIQUE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Popok, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Formation of polymer films with size-selected silver and copper nanoparticles (NPs) is studied. Polymers are prepared by spin coating while NPs are fabricated and deposited utilizing a magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus. The particle embedding into the films is provided by thermal annealing...... after the deposition. The degree of immersion can be controlled by the annealing temperature and time. Together with control of cluster coverage the described approach represents an efficient method for the synthesis of thin polymer composite layers with either partially or fully embedded metal NPs....... Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition and thermal annealing allows to form ordered arrays of metal NPs on polymer films. Plasticity and flexibility of polymer host and specific properties added by coinage metal NPs open a way for different applications of such composite materials...

  14. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    /C analogy. It is believed that the electronic transmutation concept will be effective and valuable in aiding the design of new boride materials with predictable properties. The study of boron clusters with intermediate properties between those of individual atoms and bulk solids has given rise to a unique opportunity to broaden the frontier of boron chemistry. Understanding boron clusters has spurred experimentalists and theoreticians to find new boron-based nanomaterials, such as boron fullerenes, nanotubes, two-dimensional boron, and new compounds containing boron clusters as building blocks. Here, a brief and timely overview is presented addressing the recent progress made on boron clusters and the approaches used in the authors’ laboratories to determine the structure, stability, and chemical bonding of size-selected boron clusters by joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical studies. Specifically, key findings on all-boron hydrocarbon analogues, metal-centered boron wheels, and electronic transmutation in boron clusters are summarized.

  15. Astronomy and big data a data clustering approach to identifying uncertain galaxy morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Kieran Jay

    2014-01-01

    With the onset of massive cosmological data collection through media such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), galaxy classification has been accomplished for the most part with the help of citizen science communities like Galaxy Zoo. Seeking the wisdom of the crowd for such Big Data processing has proved extremely beneficial. However, an analysis of one of the Galaxy Zoo morphological classification data sets has shown that a significant majority of all classified galaxies are labelled as “Uncertain”. This book reports on how to use data mining, more specifically clustering, to identify galaxies that the public has shown some degree of uncertainty for as to whether they belong to one morphology type or another. The book shows the importance of transitions between different data mining techniques in an insightful workflow. It demonstrates that Clustering enables to identify discriminating features in the analysed data sets, adopting a novel feature selection algorithms called Incremental Feature Select...

  16. A Binary System in the Hyades Cluster Hosting a Neptune-Sized Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Adina; Ciardi, David; Crossfield, Ian; Schlieder, Joshua; Petigura, Erik; David, Trevor J.; Bristow, Makennah; Patel, Rahul; Arnold, Lauren; Benneke, Björn; Christiansen, Jessie; Dressing, Courtney; Fulton, Benjamin; Howard, Andrew; Isaacson, Howard; Sinukoff, Evan; Thackeray, Beverly

    2018-01-01

    We report the discovery of a Neptune-size planet (Rp = 3.0Rearth) in the Hyades Cluster. The host star is in a binary system, comprising a K5V star and M7/8V star with a projected separation of 40 AU. The planet orbits the primary star with an orbital period of 17.3 days and a transit duration of 3 hours. The host star is bright (V = 11.2, J = 9.1) and so may be a good target for precise radial velocity measurements. The planet is the first Neptune-sized planet to be found orbiting in a binary system within an open cluster. The Hyades is the nearest star cluster to the Sun, has an age of 625-750 Myr, and forms one of the fundamental rungs in the distance ladder; understanding the planet population in such a well-studied cluster can help us understand and set contraints on the formation and evolution of planetary systems.

  17. Beyond assembly bias: exploring secondary halo biases for cluster-size haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yao-Yuan; Zentner, Andrew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2018-03-01

    Secondary halo bias, commonly known as `assembly bias', is the dependence of halo clustering on a halo property other than mass. This prediction of the Λ Cold Dark Matter cosmology is essential to modelling the galaxy distribution to high precision and interpreting clustering measurements. As the name suggests, different manifestations of secondary halo bias have been thought to originate from halo assembly histories. We show conclusively that this is incorrect for cluster-size haloes. We present an up-to-date summary of secondary halo biases of high-mass haloes due to various halo properties including concentration, spin, several proxies of assembly history, and subhalo properties. While concentration, spin, and the abundance and radial distribution of subhaloes exhibit significant secondary biases, properties that directly quantify halo assembly history do not. In fact, the entire assembly histories of haloes in pairs are nearly identical to those of isolated haloes. In general, a global correlation between two halo properties does not predict whether or not these two properties exhibit similar secondary biases. For example, assembly history and concentration (or subhalo abundance) are correlated for both paired and isolated haloes, but follow slightly different conditional distributions in these two cases. This results in a secondary halo bias due to concentration (or subhalo abundance), despite the lack of assembly bias in the strict sense for cluster-size haloes. Due to this complexity, caution must be exercised in using any one halo property as a proxy to study the secondary bias due to another property.

  18. Site-specific fragmentation of polystyrene molecule using size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Mukai, Gen; Hashinokuchi, Michihiro; Mochiji, Kozo

    2009-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) of a polystyrene thin film was investigated using a size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). The fragmentation in the SIM spectrum varied by kinetic energy per atom (E atom ); the E atom dependence of the secondary ion intensity of the fragment species of polystyrene can be essentially classified into three types based on the relationship between E atom and the dissociation energy of a specific bonding site in the molecule. These results indicate that adjusting E atom of size-selected GCIB may realize site-specific bond breaking within a molecule. (author)

  19. Size and Site Dependence of the Catalytic Activity of Iridium Clusters toward Ethane Dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yingbin; Jiang, Hao; Kato, Russell; Gummagatta, Prasuna

    2016-12-01

    This research focuses on optimizing transition metal nanocatalyst immobilization and activity to enhance ethane dehydrogenation. Ethane dehydrogenation, catalyzed by thermally stable Ir n (n = 8, 12, 18) atomic clusters that exhibit a cuboid structure, was studied using the B3LYP method with triple-ζ basis sets. Relativistic effects and dispersion corrections were included in the calculations. In the dehydrogenation reaction Ir n + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir n -C 2 H 5 → (H) 2 -Ir n -C 2 H 4 , the first H-elimination is the rate-limiting step, primarily because the reaction releases sufficient heat to facilitate the second H-elimination. The catalytic activity of the Ir clusters strongly depends on the Ir cluster size and the specific catalytic site. Cubic Ir 8 is the least reactive toward H-elimination in ethane: Ir 8 + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir 8 -C 2 H 5 has a large (65 kJ/mol) energy barrier, whereas Ir 12 (3 × 2 × 2 cuboid) and Ir 18 (3 × 3 × 2 cuboid) lower this energy barrier to 22 and 3 kJ/mol, respectively. The site dependence is as prominent as the size effect. For example, the energy barrier for the Ir 18 + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir 18 -C 2 H 5 reaction is 3, 48, and 71 kJ/mol at the corner, edge, or face-center sites of the Ir 18 cuboid, respectively. Energy release due to Ir cluster insertion into an ethane C-H bond facilitates hydrogen migration on the Ir cluster surface, and the second H-elimination of ethane. In an oxygen-rich environment, oxygen molecules may be absorbed on the Ir cluster surface. The oxygen atoms bonded to the Ir cluster surface may slightly increase the energy barrier for H-elimination in ethane. However, the adsorption of oxygen and its reaction with H atoms on the Ir cluster releases sufficient heat to yield an overall thermodynamically favored reaction: Ir n + C 2 H 6 + 1 / 2 O 2 → Ir n + C 2 H 4 + H 2 O. These results will be useful toward reducing the energy cost of ethane dehydrogenation in industry.

  20. A DFT study of arsine adsorption on palladium doped graphene: Effects of palladium cluster size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai, E-mail: manaschai@nanotec.or.th [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) , Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Mudchimo, Tanabat [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani 34190 (Thailand); Namuangruk, Supawadee [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) , Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Kungwan, Nawee [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Promarak, Vinich [Department of Material Science and Engineering, School of Molecular Science and Engineering, Vidyasirimedhi Institute of Science and Technology, Rayong 21201 (Thailand); Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn, E-mail: siriporn.j@ubu.ac.th [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani 34190 (Thailand)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The relationship between charge difference and adsorption strength demonstrates that charge migration from Pd{sub n}-SDG to AsH{sub x} significantly enhanced adsorption strength, the Pd{sub 6} clusters doped SDG with a steep slope is recommended as a superior adsorbent material for AsH{sub 3} removal from gas stream. - Highlights: • Pd atom and Pd clusters bind strongly onto the defective graphene surface. • Larger size of Pd cluster adsorbs arsine and its hydrogenated products stronger. • Order of adsorption strength on Pd{sub n} doped graphene: As > AsH > AsH{sub 2} > > AsH{sub 3}. • Charge migration characterizes the strong adsorption of AsH{sub 2}, AsH, and As. • Pd cluster doped graphene is thermodynamically preferable for arsine removal. - Abstract: In this study, we have investigated the size effects of palladium (Pd) doped single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to the adsorption of AsH{sub 3} and its dehydrogenated products on Pd using density functional theory calculations. Here, Pd cluster binding study revealed that Pd{sub 6} nanocluster bound strongest to the SDG surface, while adsorption of AsH{sub x} (x = 0–3) on the most stable Pd{sub n} doped SDG showed that dehydrogenated arsine compounds adsorbed onto the surface stronger than the pristine AsH{sub 3} molecule. Charge analysis revealed that considerable amount of charge migration from Pd to dehydrogenated arsine molecules after adsorption may constitute strong adsorption for dehydrogenated arsine. In addition, study of thermodynamic pathways of AsH{sub 3} dehydrogenation on Pd{sub n} doped SDG adsorbents indicated that Pd cluster doping on SDG adsorbent tends to be thermodynamically favorable for AsH{sub 3} decomposition than the single-Pd atom doped SDG. Hence, our study has indicated that Pd{sub 6} clusters doped SDG is more advantageous as adsorbent material for AsH{sub 3} removal.

  1. Manipulating cluster size of polyanion-stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle clusters via electrostatic-mediated assembly for tunable magnetophoresis behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng; Lim, JitKang

    2015-01-01

    We report in this article an approach for manipulating the size of magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) via electrostatic-mediated assembly technique using an electrolyte as a clustering agent. The clusters were surface-tethered with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) through electrostatic compensation to enhance their colloidal stability. Dynamic light scattering was employed to trace the evolution of cluster size. Simultaneously, electrophoretic mobility and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were conducted to investigate the possible schemes involved in both cluster formation and PSS grafting. Results showed that the average hydrodynamic cluster size of the PSS/MNCs and their corresponding size distributions were successfully shifted by means of manipulating the suspension pH, the ionic nature of the electrolyte, and the electrolyte concentration. More specifically, the electrokinetic behavior of the particles upon interaction with the electrolyte plays a profound role in the formation of the PSS/MNCs. Nonetheless, the solubility of the polymer in electrolyte solution and the purification of the particles from residual ions should not be omitted in determining the effectiveness of this clustering approach. The PSS adlayer makes the resultant entities highly water-dispersible and provides electrosteric stabilization to shield the PSS/MNCs from aggregation. In this study, the experimental observations were analyzed and discussed on the basis of existing fundamental colloidal theories. The strategy of cluster size manipulation proposed here is simple and convenient to implement. Furthermore, manipulating the size of the MNCs also facilitates the tuning of magnetophoresis kinetics on exposure to low magnetic field gradient, which makes this nano-entity useful for engineering applications, specifically in separation processes.

  2. Manipulating cluster size of polyanion-stabilized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticle clusters via electrostatic-mediated assembly for tunable magnetophoresis behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeap, Swee Pin, E-mail: sweepin0727@hotmail.com; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng; Lim, JitKang, E-mail: chjitkangl@usm.my [Universiti Sains Malaysia, School of Chemical Engineering (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    We report in this article an approach for manipulating the size of magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) via electrostatic-mediated assembly technique using an electrolyte as a clustering agent. The clusters were surface-tethered with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) through electrostatic compensation to enhance their colloidal stability. Dynamic light scattering was employed to trace the evolution of cluster size. Simultaneously, electrophoretic mobility and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were conducted to investigate the possible schemes involved in both cluster formation and PSS grafting. Results showed that the average hydrodynamic cluster size of the PSS/MNCs and their corresponding size distributions were successfully shifted by means of manipulating the suspension pH, the ionic nature of the electrolyte, and the electrolyte concentration. More specifically, the electrokinetic behavior of the particles upon interaction with the electrolyte plays a profound role in the formation of the PSS/MNCs. Nonetheless, the solubility of the polymer in electrolyte solution and the purification of the particles from residual ions should not be omitted in determining the effectiveness of this clustering approach. The PSS adlayer makes the resultant entities highly water-dispersible and provides electrosteric stabilization to shield the PSS/MNCs from aggregation. In this study, the experimental observations were analyzed and discussed on the basis of existing fundamental colloidal theories. The strategy of cluster size manipulation proposed here is simple and convenient to implement. Furthermore, manipulating the size of the MNCs also facilitates the tuning of magnetophoresis kinetics on exposure to low magnetic field gradient, which makes this nano-entity useful for engineering applications, specifically in separation processes.

  3. The Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Tool: Identifying Combinations and Permutations of Multiple Chronic Diseases Using a Record-Level Computational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Nicholson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multimorbidity, or the co-occurrence of multiple chronic health conditions within an individual, is an increasingly dominant presence and burden in modern health care systems.  To fully capture its complexity, further research is needed to uncover the patterns and consequences of these co-occurring health states.  As such, the Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Tool and the accompanying Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Toolkit have been created to allow researchers to identify distinct clusters that exist within a sample of participants or patients living with multimorbidity.  Development: The Tool and Toolkit were developed at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada.  This open-access computational program (JAVA code and executable file was developed and tested to support an analysis of thousands of individual records and up to 100 disease diagnoses or categories.  Application: The computational program can be adapted to the methodological elements of a research project, including type of data, type of chronic disease reporting, measurement of multimorbidity, sample size and research setting.  The computational program will identify all existing, and mutually exclusive, combinations and permutations within the dataset.  An application of this computational program is provided as an example, in which more than 75,000 individual records and 20 chronic disease categories resulted in the detection of 10,411 unique combinations and 24,647 unique permutations among female and male patients.  Discussion: The Tool and Toolkit are now available for use by researchers interested in exploring the complexities of multimorbidity.  Its careful use, and the comparison between results, will be valuable additions to the nuanced understanding of multimorbidity.

  4. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace, E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw

    2017-02-15

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of ~100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are systematically investigated with several advanced techniques. • A strong interaction between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases is found below 150 K. • Exchange bias field in finite sized NiO nanoparticles is due to anisotropy energy of Ni clusters over riding the domain wall energy of NiO.

  5. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2017-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of ~100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are systematically investigated with several advanced techniques. • A strong interaction between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases is found below 150 K. • Exchange bias field in finite sized NiO nanoparticles is due to anisotropy energy of Ni clusters over riding the domain wall energy of NiO.

  6. Differences in Flower Transcriptome between Grapevine Clones Are Related to Their Cluster Compactness, Fruitfulness, and Berry Size

    OpenAIRE

    Grimplet, Jérôme; Tello, Javier; Laguna Ullán, Natalia; Ibáñez Marcos, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Grapevine cluster compactness has a clear impact on fruit quality and health status, as clusters with greater compactness are more susceptible to pests and diseases and ripen more asynchronously. Different parameters related to inflorescence and cluster architecture (length, width, branching, etc.), fruitfulness (number of berries, number of seeds) and berry size (length, width) contribute to the final level of compactness. From a collection of 501 clones of cultivar Garnacha Tinta, two compa...

  7. Optimal Sizing for Wind/PV/Battery System Using Fuzzy c-Means Clustering with Self-Adapted Cluster Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating wind generation, photovoltaic power, and battery storage to form hybrid power systems has been recognized to be promising in renewable energy development. However, considering the system complexity and uncertainty of renewable energies, such as wind and solar types, it is difficult to obtain practical solutions for these systems. In this paper, optimal sizing for a wind/PV/battery system is realized by trade-offs between technical and economic factors. Firstly, the fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was modified with self-adapted parameters to extract useful information from historical data. Furthermore, the Markov model is combined to determine the chronological system states of natural resources and load. Finally, a power balance strategy is introduced to guide the optimization process with the genetic algorithm to establish the optimal configuration with minimized cost while guaranteeing reliability and environmental factors. A case of island hybrid power system is analyzed, and the simulation results are compared with the general FCM method and chronological method to validate the effectiveness of the mentioned method.

  8. Identifying areas of need relative to liver disease: geographic clustering within a health service district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atem, Nathan; Irvine, Katharine M; Valery, Patricia C; Wojcik, Kyle; Horsfall, Leigh; Johnson, Tracey; Janda, Monika; McPhail, Steven M; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2017-08-01

    Background Many people with chronic liver disease (CLD) are not detected until they present to hospital with advanced disease, when opportunities for intervention are reduced and morbidity is high. In order to build capacity and liver expertise in the community, it is important to focus liver healthcare resources in high-prevalence disease areas and specific populations with an identified need. The aim of the present study was to examine the geographic location of people seen in a tertiary hospital hepatology clinic, as well as ethnic and sociodemographic characteristics of these geographic areas. Methods The geographic locations of hepatology out-patients were identified via the out-patient scheduling database and grouped into statistical area (SA) regions for demographic analysis using data compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Results During the 3-month study period, 943 individuals from 71 SA Level 3 regions attended clinic. Nine SA Level 3 regions accounted for 55% of the entire patient cohort. Geographic clustering was seen especially for people living with chronic hepatitis B virus. There was a wide spectrum of socioeconomic advantage and disadvantage in areas with high liver disease prevalence. Conclusions The geographic area from which people living with CLD travel to access liver health care is extensive. However, the greatest demand for tertiary liver disease speciality care is clustered within specific geographic areas. Outreach programs targeted to these areas may enhance liver disease-specific health service resourcing. What is known about the topic? The demand for tertiary hospital clinical services in CLD is rising. However, there is limited knowledge about the geographic areas from which people living with CLD travel to access liver services, or the ethnic, socioeconomic and education characteristics of these areas. What does this paper add? The present study demonstrates that a substantial proportion of people living with CLD and

  9. Single Molecule Cluster Analysis Identifies Signature Dynamic Conformations along the Splicing Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Mario R.; Martin, Joshua S.; Kahlscheuer, Matthew L.; Krishnan, Ramya; Abelson, John; Laederach, Alain; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is the dynamic RNA-protein machine responsible for faithfully splicing introns from precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs). Many of the dynamic processes required for the proper assembly, catalytic activation, and disassembly of the spliceosome as it acts on its pre-mRNA substrate remain poorly understood, a challenge that persists for many biomolecular machines. Here, we developed a fluorescence-based Single Molecule Cluster Analysis (SiMCAn) tool to dissect the manifold conformational dynamics of a pre-mRNA through the splicing cycle. By clustering common dynamic behaviors derived from selectively blocked splicing reactions, SiMCAn was able to identify signature conformations and dynamic behaviors of multiple ATP-dependent intermediates. In addition, it identified a conformation adopted late in splicing by a 3′ splice site mutant, invoking a mechanism for substrate proofreading. SiMCAn presents a novel framework for interpreting complex single molecule behaviors that should prove widely useful for the comprehensive analysis of a plethora of dynamic cellular machines. PMID:26414013

  10. Pronounced cluster-size effects: gas-phase reactivity of bare vanadium cluster cations V(n)+ (n = 1-7) toward methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyel, Sandra; Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2009-05-14

    Mass spectrometric experiments are used to examine the size-dependent interactions of bare vanadium cluster cations V(n)(+) (n = 1-7) with methanol. The reactivity patterns exhibit enormous size effects throughout the range of clusters investigated. For example, dehydrogenation of methanol to produce V(n)OC(+) is only brought about by clusters with n > or = 3. Atomic vanadium cation V(+) also is reactive, but instead of dehydrogenation of the alcohol, expulsions of either methane or a methyl radical take place. In marked contrast, the reaction efficiency of the dinuclear cluster V(2)(+) is extremely low. For the cluster cations V(n)(+) (n = 3-7), complete and efficient dehydrogenation of methanol to produce V(n)OC(+) and two hydrogen molecules prevails. DFT calculations shed light on the mechanism of the dehydrogenation of methanol by the smallest reactive cluster cation V(3)(+) and propose the occurrence of chemisorption concomitant with C-O bond cleavage rather than adsorption of an intact carbon monoxide molecule by the cluster.

  11. Effects of incident cluster size, substrate temperature, and incident energy on bombardment of Ni clusters onto Cu (0 0 1) surface studied using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Guan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The bombardment process of a Ni cluster onto a Cu (0 0 1) surface is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on the tight-binding second-moment approximation (TB-SMA) many-body potential. The effects of incident cluster size, substrate temperature, and incident energy are evaluated in terms of molecular trajectories, kinetic energy, stress, self-diffusion coefficient, and sputtering yield. The simulation results clearly show that the penetration depth and Cu surface damage increase with increasing incident cluster size for a given incident energy per atom. The self-diffusion coefficient and the penetration depth of a cluster significantly increase with increasing substrate temperature. An incident cluster can be scattered into molecules or atoms that become embedded in the surface after incidence. When the incident energy is increased, the number of volcano-like defects and the penetration depth increase. A high sputtering yield can be obtained by increasing the incident energy at high temperature. The sputtering yield significantly increases with cluster size when the incident energy is above 5 eV/atom.

  12. PREDICTED SIZES OF PRESSURE-SUPPORTED HI CLOUDS IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton , we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  13. Hierarchical cluster analysis of technical replicates to identify interferents in untargeted mass spectrometry metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, Lindsay K; Kvalheim, Olav M; Cech, Nadja B

    2018-08-27

    Mass spectral data sets often contain experimental artefacts, and data filtering prior to statistical analysis is crucial to extract reliable information. This is particularly true in untargeted metabolomics analyses, where the analyte(s) of interest are not known a priori. It is often assumed that chemical interferents (i.e. solvent contaminants such as plasticizers) are consistent across samples, and can be removed by background subtraction from blank injections. On the contrary, it is shown here that chemical contaminants may vary in abundance across each injection, potentially leading to their misidentification as relevant sample components. With this metabolomics study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of replicate injections (technical replicates) as a methodology to identify chemical interferents and reduce their contaminating contribution to metabolomics models. Pools of metabolites with varying complexity were prepared from the botanical Angelica keiskei Koidzumi and spiked with known metabolites. Each set of pools was analyzed in triplicate and at multiple concentrations using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Before filtering, HCA failed to cluster replicates in the data sets. To identify contaminant peaks, we developed a filtering process that evaluated the relative peak area variance of each variable within triplicate injections. These interferent peaks were found across all samples, but did not show consistent peak area from injection to injection, even when evaluating the same chemical sample. This filtering process identified 128 ions that appear to originate from the UPLC-MS system. Data sets collected for a high number of pools with comparatively simple chemical composition were highly influenced by these chemical interferents, as were samples that were analyzed at a low concentration. When chemical interferent masses were removed, technical replicates clustered in

  14. Whole Genome Analysis of Injectional Anthrax Identifies Two Disease Clusters Spanning More Than 13 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Keim

    2015-11-01

    Lay Person Interpretation: Injectional anthrax has been plaguing heroin drug users across Europe for more than 10 years. In order to better understand this outbreak, we assessed genomic relationships of all available injectional anthrax strains from four countries spanning a >12 year period. Very few differences were identified using genome-based analysis, but these differentiated the isolates into two distinct clusters. This strongly supports a hypothesis of at least two separate anthrax spore contamination events perhaps during the drug production processes. Identification of two events would not have been possible from standard epidemiological analysis. These comprehensive data will be invaluable for classifying future injectional anthrax isolates and for future geographic attribution.

  15. IDENTIFYING REGIONAL CLUSTER MANAGEMENT POTENTIALS EMPIRICAL RESULTS FROM THREE NORTH RHINEWESTPHALIAN REGIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Rudiger Hamm; Christiane Goebel

    2010-01-01

    The development and support of clusters is an issue that became quite popular by players dealing with regional economic policy. But before a regional development agency can start to implement a cluster-oriented strategy there a two question that have to be answered: 1. What are the regional fields of competence (cluster potentials) that fulfill the requirements for a cluster-oriented regional development policy? 2. If you find such regional fields of competence, are the enterprises willing to...

  16. Ionic cluster size distributions of swollen nafion/sulfated beta-cyclodextrin membranes characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance cryoporometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Deok; Kwak, Seung-Yeop

    2007-08-16

    Nafion/sb-CD membranes were prepared by mixing 5 wt% Nafion solution with H+-form sulfated beta-cyclodextrin (sb-CD), and their water uptakes, ion exchange capacities (IECs), and ionic cluster size distributions were measured. Gravimetric and thermogravimetric measurements showed that the water uptake of the membranes increased with increases in their sb-CD content. The IECs of the membrane were measured with acid-base titration and found to increase with increases in the sb-CD content, reaching 0.96 mequiv/g for NC5 ("NCx" denotes a Nafion/sb-CD composite membrane containing x wt% of sb-CD). The cluster-correlation peaks and ionic cluster size distributions of the water-swollen membranes were determined using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry, respectively. The SAXS experiments confirmed that increases in the sb-CD content of the membranes shifted the maximum SAXS peaks to lower angles, indicating an increase in the cluster correlation peak. NMR cryoporometry is based on the theory of the melting point depression, Delta Tm, of a liquid confined within a pore, which is dependent on the pore diameter. The melting point depression was determined by analyzing the variation of the NMR signal intensity with temperature. Our analysis of the intensity-temperature (IT) curves showed that the ionic cluster size distribution gradually became broader with increases in the membrane sb-CD content due to the increased water content, indicating an increase in the ionic cluster size. This result indicates that the presence of sb-CD with its many sulfonic acid sites in the Nafion membranes results in increases in the ionic cluster size as well as in the water uptake and the IEC. We conclude that NMR cryoporometry provides a method for determining the ionic cluster size on the nanometer scale in an aqueous environment, which cannot be obtained using other methods.

  17. Identifying Children at Risk of Problematic Development: Latent Clusters Among Childhood Arrestees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, C.A.M.L.; van Domburgh, L.; Doreleijers, T.A.H.; Jansen, L.M.C.; Bouwmeester, S.; Galindo Garre, F.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of clusters characterized by distinct profiles of individual, family and peer characteristics among childhood arrestees was investigated and cluster membership stability after 2 years was determined. Identification of such clusters in this heterogeneous at-risk group can extend insight

  18. Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomprah, Samuel; Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred; Aboagye, Patrick; Matthews, Zoe

    2016-11-01

    To identify and evaluate clusters of births that occurred outside health facilities in Ghana for targeted intervention. A retrospective study was conducted using a convenience sample of live births registered in Ghanaian health facilities from January 1 to December 31, 2014. Data were extracted from the district health information system. A spatial scan statistic was used to investigate clusters of home births through a discrete Poisson probability model. Scanning with a circular spatial window was conducted only for clusters with high rates of such deliveries. The district was used as the geographic unit of analysis. The likelihood P value was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Ten statistically significant clusters with a high rate of home birth were identified. The relative risks ranged from 1.43 ("least likely" cluster; P=0.001) to 1.95 ("most likely" cluster; P=0.001). The relative risks of the top five "most likely" clusters ranged from 1.68 to 1.95; these clusters were located in Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and the Western, Eastern, and Greater regions of Accra. Health facility records, geospatial techniques, and geographic information systems provided locally relevant information to assist policy makers in delivering targeted interventions to small geographic areas. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens using sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials: Regression estimation and sample size considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NeCamp, Timothy; Kilbourne, Amy; Almirall, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens can be used to guide sequential treatment decision-making at the cluster level in order to improve outcomes at the individual or patient-level. In a cluster-level dynamic treatment regimen, the treatment is potentially adapted and re-adapted over time based on changes in the cluster that could be impacted by prior intervention, including aggregate measures of the individuals or patients that compose it. Cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials can be used to answer multiple open questions preventing scientists from developing high-quality cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens. In a cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial, sequential randomizations occur at the cluster level and outcomes are observed at the individual level. This manuscript makes two contributions to the design and analysis of cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. First, a weighted least squares regression approach is proposed for comparing the mean of a patient-level outcome between the cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens embedded in a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. The regression approach facilitates the use of baseline covariates which is often critical in the analysis of cluster-level trials. Second, sample size calculators are derived for two common cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs for use when the primary aim is a between-dynamic treatment regimen comparison of the mean of a continuous patient-level outcome. The methods are motivated by the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial which is, to our knowledge, the first-ever cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial in psychiatry.

  20. Onto-clust--a methodology for combining clustering analysis and ontological methods for identifying groups of comorbidities for developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Mor; Asbeh, Nuaman; Kuflik, Tsvi; Schertz, Mitchell

    2009-02-01

    Children with developmental disorders usually exhibit multiple developmental problems (comorbidities). Hence, such diagnosis needs to revolve on developmental disorder groups. Our objective is to systematically identify developmental disorder groups and represent them in an ontology. We developed a methodology that combines two methods (1) a literature-based ontology that we created, which represents developmental disorders and potential developmental disorder groups, and (2) clustering for detecting comorbid developmental disorders in patient data. The ontology is used to interpret and improve clustering results and the clustering results are used to validate the ontology and suggest directions for its development. We evaluated our methodology by applying it to data of 1175 patients from a child development clinic. We demonstrated that the ontology improves clustering results, bringing them closer to an expert generated gold-standard. We have shown that our methodology successfully combines an ontology with a clustering method to support systematic identification and representation of developmental disorder groups.

  1. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-01-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N 2 O) n O − (n = 1–12) and (N 2 O) n − (n = 7–15) in the region 800–1600 cm −1 . The charge carriers in these ions are NNO 2 − and O − for (N 2 O) n O − clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N 2 O − for (N 2 O) n − clusters. The N–N and N–O stretching vibrations of N 2 O − (solvated by N 2 O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm −1 and (894 ± 5) cm −1 , respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory.

  2. Towards Cluster-Assembled Materials of True Monodispersity in Size and Chemical Environment: Synthesis, Dynamics and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    thermodynamic and kinetic cluster size control on periodically wet - table surfaces, new questions came up concerning the link between diffusivity and...from ring-hollow (H,F) to ring-bridge (B). Left: STM annealing series (50×50 nm2), Moiré cell scheme and cluster position evaluation. Pd clus- ters...growth at T>700 K. Below: Measured and theoretically simulated (insets) STM images of various stages in the dehydrogenation process upon annealing

  3. Quantum-Size Dependence of the Energy for Vacancy Formation in Charged Small Metal Clusters. Drop Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogosov, V. V.; Reva, V. I.

    2018-04-01

    Self-consistent computations of the monovacancy formation energy are performed for Na N , Mg N , and Al N (12 < N ≤ 168) spherical clusters in the drop model for stable jelly. Scenarios of the Schottky vacancy formation and "bubble vacancy blowing" are considered. It is shown that the asymptotic behavior of the size dependences of the energy for the vacancy formation by these two mechanisms is different and the difference between the characteristics of a charged and neutral cluster is entirely determined by the difference between the ionization potentials of clusters and the energies of electron attachment to them.

  4. Identifying subtypes among offenders with antisocial personality disorder: a cluster-analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poythress, Norman G; Edens, John F; Skeem, Jennifer L; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Douglas, Kevin S; Frick, Paul J; Patrick, Christopher J; Epstein, Monica; Wang, Tao

    2010-05-01

    The question of whether antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and psychopathy are largely similar or fundamentally different constructs remains unresolved. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), many of the personality features of psychopathy are cast as associated features of ASPD, although the DSM-IV offers no guidance as to how, or the extent to which, these features relate to ASPD. In a sample of 691 offenders who met DSM-IV criteria for ASPD, we used model-based clustering to identify subgroups of individuals with relatively homogeneous profiles on measures of associated features (psychopathic personality traits) and other constructs with potential etiological significance for subtypes of ASPD. Two emergent groups displayed profiles that conformed broadly to theoretical descriptions of primary psychopathy and Karpman's (1941) variant of secondary psychopathy. As expected, a third group (nonpsychopathic ASPD) lacked substantial associated features. A fourth group exhibited elevated psychopathic features as well as a highly fearful temperament, a profile not clearly predicted by extant models. Planned comparisons revealed theoretically informative differences between primary and secondary groups in multiple domains, including self-report measures, passive avoidance learning, clinical ratings, and official records. Our results inform ongoing debates about the overlap between psychopathy and ASPD and raise questions about the wisdom of placing most individuals who habitually violate social norms and laws into a single diagnostic category.

  5. Identifying multiple outliers in linear regression: robust fit and clustering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robiah Adnan; Mohd Nor Mohamad; Halim Setan

    2001-01-01

    This research provides a clustering based approach for determining potential candidates for outliers. This is modification of the method proposed by Serbert et. al (1988). It is based on using the single linkage clustering algorithm to group the standardized predicted and residual values of data set fit by least trimmed of squares (LTS). (Author)

  6. Social Learning Network Analysis Model to Identify Learning Patterns Using Ontology Clustering Techniques and Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausiah Mansur, Andi Besse; Yusof, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Clustering on Social Learning Network still not explored widely, especially when the network focuses on e-learning system. Any conventional methods are not really suitable for the e-learning data. SNA requires content analysis, which involves human intervention and need to be carried out manually. Some of the previous clustering techniques need…

  7. Identifying Two Groups of Entitled Individuals: Cluster Analysis Reveals Emotional Stability and Self-Esteem Distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Michael L; LoPilato, Alexander C; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The present study hypothesized that there exist two distinct groups of entitled individuals: grandiose-entitled, and vulnerable-entitled. Self-report scores of entitlement were collected for 916 individuals using an online platform. Model-based cluster analyses were conducted on the individuals with scores one standard deviation above mean (n = 159) using the five-factor model dimensions as clustering variables. The results support the existence of two groups of entitled individuals categorized as emotionally stable and emotionally vulnerable. The emotionally stable cluster reported emotional stability, high self-esteem, more positive affect, and antisocial behavior. The emotionally vulnerable cluster reported low self-esteem and high levels of neuroticism, disinhibition, conventionality, psychopathy, negative affect, childhood abuse, intrusive parenting, and attachment difficulties. Compared to the control group, both clusters reported being more antagonistic, extraverted, Machiavellian, and narcissistic. These results suggest important differences are missed when simply examining the linear relationships between entitlement and various aspects of its nomological network.

  8. Size exclusion chromatography for semipreparative scale separation of Au38(SR)24 and Au40(SR)24 and larger clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppe, Stefan; Boudon, Julien; Dolamic, Igor; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a semipreparative scale (10 mg and more) was used to size-select ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (<2 nm) from polydisperse mixtures. In particular, the ubiquitous byproducts of the etching process toward Au(38)(SR)(24) (SR, thiolate) clusters were separated and gained in high monodispersity (based on mass spectrometry). The isolated fractions were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, MALDI mass spectrometry, HPLC, and electron microscopy. Most notably, the separation of Au(38)(SR)(24) and Au(40)(SR)(24) clusters is demonstrated.

  9. Identifying typical patterns of vulnerability: A 5-step approach based on cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietz, Diana; Lüdeke, Matthias; Kok, Marcel; Lucas, Paul; Carsten, Walther; Janssen, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Specific processes that shape the vulnerability of socio-ecological systems to climate, market and other stresses derive from diverse background conditions. Within the multitude of vulnerability-creating mechanisms, distinct processes recur in various regions inspiring research on typical patterns of vulnerability. The vulnerability patterns display typical combinations of the natural and socio-economic properties that shape a systems' vulnerability to particular stresses. Based on the identification of a limited number of vulnerability patterns, pattern analysis provides an efficient approach to improving our understanding of vulnerability and decision-making for vulnerability reduction. However, current pattern analyses often miss explicit descriptions of their methods and pay insufficient attention to the validity of their groupings. Therefore, the question arises as to how do we identify typical vulnerability patterns in order to enhance our understanding of a systems' vulnerability to stresses? A cluster-based pattern recognition applied at global and local levels is scrutinised with a focus on an applicable methodology and practicable insights. Taking the example of drylands, this presentation demonstrates the conditions necessary to identify typical vulnerability patterns. They are summarised in five methodological steps comprising the elicitation of relevant cause-effect hypotheses and the quantitative indication of mechanisms as well as an evaluation of robustness, a validation and a ranking of the identified patterns. Reflecting scale-dependent opportunities, a global study is able to support decision-making with insights into the up-scaling of interventions when available funds are limited. In contrast, local investigations encourage an outcome-based validation. This constitutes a crucial step in establishing the credibility of the patterns and hence their suitability for informing extension services and individual decisions. In this respect, working at

  10. Size-selected methyl lactate clusters: fragmentation and spectroscopic fingerprints of chiral recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fárník, Michal; Weimann, M.; Steinbach, Ch.; Buck, U.; Borho, N.; Adler, T. B.; Suhm, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2006), s. 1148-1158 ISSN 1463-9076 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 357; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) GRK 782 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron-bombardment fragmentation * methanol clusters * methanol clusters * water clusters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2006

  11. The efficiency of average linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm associated multi-scale bootstrap resampling in identifying homogeneous precipitation catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Zun Liang; Ismail, Noriszura; Shinyie, Wendy Ling; Lit Ken, Tan; Fam, Soo-Fen; Senawi, Azlyna; Yusoff, Wan Nur Syahidah Wan

    2018-04-01

    Due to the limited of historical precipitation records, agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithms widely used to extrapolate information from gauged to ungauged precipitation catchments in yielding a more reliable projection of extreme hydro-meteorological events such as extreme precipitation events. However, identifying the optimum number of homogeneous precipitation catchments accurately based on the dendrogram resulted using agglomerative hierarchical algorithms are very subjective. The main objective of this study is to propose an efficient regionalized algorithm to identify the homogeneous precipitation catchments for non-stationary precipitation time series. The homogeneous precipitation catchments are identified using average linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm associated multi-scale bootstrap resampling, while uncentered correlation coefficient as the similarity measure. The regionalized homogeneous precipitation is consolidated using K-sample Anderson Darling non-parametric test. The analysis result shows the proposed regionalized algorithm performed more better compared to the proposed agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithm in previous studies.

  12. Effect of the size of an artificial neural network used as pattern identifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynoso V, M.R.; Vega C, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    A novel way to extract relevant parameters associated with the outgoing ions from nuclear reactions, obtained by digitizing the signals provided by a Bragg curve spectrometer (BCS) is presented. This allowed the implementation of a more thorough pulse-shape analysis. Due to the complexity of this task, it was required to take advantage of new and more powerful computational paradigms. This was fulfilled using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) as a pattern identifier. Over training of ANNs is a common problem during the training stage. In the performance of the ANN there is a compromise between its size and the size of the training set. Here, this effect will be illustrated in relation to the problem of Bragg Curve (BC) identification. (Author)

  13. Effect of the size of an artificial neural network used as pattern identifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoso V, M.R.; Vega C, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A novel way to extract relevant parameters associated with the outgoing ions from nuclear reactions, obtained by digitizing the signals provided by a Bragg curve spectrometer (BCS) is presented. This allowed the implementation of a more thorough pulse-shape analysis. Due to the complexity of this task, it was required to take advantage of new and more powerful computational paradigms. This was fulfilled using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) as a pattern identifier. Over training of ANNs is a common problem during the training stage. In the performance of the ANN there is a compromise between its size and the size of the training set. Here, this effect will be illustrated in relation to the problem of Bragg Curve (BC) identification. (Author)

  14. Differences in Flower Transcriptome between Grapevine Clones Are Related to Their Cluster Compactness, Fruitfulness, and Berry Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Grimplet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine cluster compactness has a clear impact on fruit quality and health status, as clusters with greater compactness are more susceptible to pests and diseases and ripen more asynchronously. Different parameters related to inflorescence and cluster architecture (length, width, branching, etc., fruitfulness (number of berries, number of seeds and berry size (length, width contribute to the final level of compactness. From a collection of 501 clones of cultivar Garnacha Tinta, two compact and two loose clones with stable differences for cluster compactness-related traits were selected and phenotyped. Key organs and developmental stages were selected for sampling and transcriptomic analyses. Comparison of global gene expression patterns in flowers at the end of bloom allowed identification of potential gene networks with a role in determining the final berry number, berry size and ultimately cluster compactness. A large portion of the differentially expressed genes were found in networks related to cell division (carbohydrates uptake, cell wall metabolism, cell cycle, nucleic acids metabolism, cell division, DNA repair. Their greater expression level in flowers of compact clones indicated that the number of berries and the berry size at ripening appear related to the rate of cell replication in flowers during the early growth stages after pollination. In addition, fluctuations in auxin and gibberellin signaling and transport related gene expression support that they play a central role in fruit set and impact berry number and size. Other hormones, such as ethylene and jasmonate may differentially regulate indirect effects, such as defense mechanisms activation or polyphenols production. This is the first transcriptomic based analysis focused on the discovery of the underlying gene networks involved in grapevine traits of grapevine cluster compactness, berry number and berry size.

  15. Differences in Flower Transcriptome between Grapevine Clones Are Related to Their Cluster Compactness, Fruitfulness, and Berry Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimplet, Jérôme; Tello, Javier; Laguna, Natalia; Ibáñez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Grapevine cluster compactness has a clear impact on fruit quality and health status, as clusters with greater compactness are more susceptible to pests and diseases and ripen more asynchronously. Different parameters related to inflorescence and cluster architecture (length, width, branching, etc.), fruitfulness (number of berries, number of seeds) and berry size (length, width) contribute to the final level of compactness. From a collection of 501 clones of cultivar Garnacha Tinta, two compact and two loose clones with stable differences for cluster compactness-related traits were selected and phenotyped. Key organs and developmental stages were selected for sampling and transcriptomic analyses. Comparison of global gene expression patterns in flowers at the end of bloom allowed identification of potential gene networks with a role in determining the final berry number, berry size and ultimately cluster compactness. A large portion of the differentially expressed genes were found in networks related to cell division (carbohydrates uptake, cell wall metabolism, cell cycle, nucleic acids metabolism, cell division, DNA repair). Their greater expression level in flowers of compact clones indicated that the number of berries and the berry size at ripening appear related to the rate of cell replication in flowers during the early growth stages after pollination. In addition, fluctuations in auxin and gibberellin signaling and transport related gene expression support that they play a central role in fruit set and impact berry number and size. Other hormones, such as ethylene and jasmonate may differentially regulate indirect effects, such as defense mechanisms activation or polyphenols production. This is the first transcriptomic based analysis focused on the discovery of the underlying gene networks involved in grapevine traits of grapevine cluster compactness, berry number and berry size.

  16. Quantum size correction to the work function and the centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Payami

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different values . For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model (SJM as well as simple jellium model (JM with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere.

  17. Quantum size correction to the work function and centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payami, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different r s values (2≤ r s ≥ 7). For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes 2≤ N ≥100 in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model as well as simple jellium model with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere

  18. Exploring the Potential of Different-Sized Supported Subnanometer Pt Clusters as Catalysts for Wet Chemical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Rondelli, Manuel

    2017-05-10

    The use of physicochemical preparation techniques of metal clusters in the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) allows for high control of cluster nuclearity and size distribution for fundamental studies in catalysis. Surprisingly, the potential of these systems as catalysts for organic chemistry transformations in solution has not been explored. To this end, single Pt atoms and Pt clusters with two narrow size distributions were prepared in the UHV and applied for the hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene to p-chloroaniline in ethanol. Following the observation of very high catalytic turnovers (approaching the million molecules of p-nitroaniline formed per Pt cluster) and of size-dependent activity, this work addresses fundamental questions with respect to the suitability of these systems as heterogeneous catalysts for the conversion of solution-phase reagents. For this purpose, we employ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization before and after reaction to assess the stability of the clusters on the support and the question of heterogeneity versus homogeneity in the catalytic process.

  19. Fabrication of large size alginate beads for three-dimensional cell-cluster culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengtao; Ruan, Meilin; Liu, Hongni; Cao, Yiping; He, Rongxiang

    2017-08-01

    We fabricated large size alginate beads using a simple microfluidic device under a co-axial injection regime. This device was made by PDMS casting with a mold formed by small diameter metal and polytetrafluorothylene tubes. Droplets of 2% sodium alginate were generated in soybean oil through the device and then cross-linked in a 2% CaCl2 solution, which was mixed tween80 with at a concentration of 0.4 to 40% (w/v). Our results showed that the morphology of the produced alginate beads strongly depends on the tween80 concentration. With the increase of concentration of tween80, the shape of the alginate beads varied from semi-spherical to tailed-spherical, due to the decrease of interface tension between oil and cross-link solution. To access the biocompatibility of the approach, MCF-7 cells were cultured with the alginate beads, showing the formation of cancer cells clusters which might be useful for future studies.

  20. A first-principles investigation of the effect of Pt cluster size on CO and NO oxidation intermediates and energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ye; Getman, Rachel B; Shelton, William Allison Jr.; Schneider, William F

    2008-01-01

    As catalysis research strives toward designing structurally and functionally well-defined catalytic centers containing as few active metal atoms as possible, the importance of understanding the reactivity of small metal clusters, and in particular of systematic comparisons of reaction types and cluster sizes, has grown concomitantly. Here we report density functional theory calculations (GGA-PW91) that probe the relationship between particle size, intermediate structures, and energetics of CO and NO oxidation by molecular and atomic oxygen on Ptx clusters (x = 1-5 and 10). The preferred structures, charge distributions, vibrational spectra, and energetics are systematically examined for oxygen (O2, 2O, and O), CO, CO2, NO, and NO2, for CO/NO co-adsorbed with O2, 2O, and O, and for CO2/NO2 co-adsorbed with O. The binding energies of oxygen, CO, NO, and the oxidation products CO2 and NO2 are all markedly enhanced on Ptx compared to Pt(111), and they trend toward the Pt(111) levels as cluster size increases. Because of the strong interaction of both the reactants and products with the Ptx clusters, deep energy sinks develop on the potential energy surfaces of the respective oxidation processes, indicating worse reaction energetics than on Pt(111). Thus the smallest Pt clusters are less effective for catalyzing CO and NO oxidation in their original state than bulk Pt. Our results further suggests that oxidation by molecular O2 is thermodynamically more facile than oxidation by atomic O on Ptx. Conditions and applications in which the Ptx clusters may be effective catalysts are discussed

  1. Exploring the Potential of Different-Sized Supported Subnanometer Pt Clusters as Catalysts for Wet Chemical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Rondelli, Manuel; Zwaschka, Gregor; Krause, Maximilian; Rö tzer, Marian D.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Hogerl, Manuel Peter; D’ Elia, Valerio; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli

    2017-01-01

    as catalysts for organic chemistry transformations in solution has not been explored. To this end, single Pt atoms and Pt clusters with two narrow size distributions were prepared in the UHV and applied for the hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene to p

  2. A catalogue of clusters of galaxies identified from all sky surveys of 2MASS, WISE, and SuperCOSMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.; Yang, F.

    2018-03-01

    We identify 47 600 clusters of galaxies from photometric data of Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and SuperCOSMOS, among which 26 125 clusters are recognized for the first time and mostly in the sky outside the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) area. About 90 per cent of massive clusters of M500 > 3 × 1014 M⊙ in the redshift range of 0.025 < z < 0.3 have been detected from such survey data, and the detection rate drops down to 50 per cent for clusters with a mass of M500 ˜ 1 × 1014 M⊙. Monte Carlo simulations show that the false detection rate for the whole cluster sample is less than 5 per cent. By cross-matching with ROSAT and XMM-Newton sources, we get 779 new X-ray cluster candidates which have X-ray counterparts within a projected offset of 0.2 Mpc.

  3. Size effects in van der Waals clusters studied by spin and angle-resolved electron spectroscopy and multi-coincidence ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Pesic, Z D; Zhang, H; Bilodeau, R C; Bozek, J D; Berrah, N

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the valence and inner-shell photoionization of free rare-gas clusters by means of angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and momentum resolving electron-multi-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The electron measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution and spin polarization parameters as a function of photon energy and cluster size, and reveal a strong cluster size dependence of the photoelectron angular distributions in certain photon energy regions. In contrast, the spin polarization parameter of the cluster photoelectrons is found to be very close to the atomic value for all covered photon energies and cluster sizes. The ion imaging measurements, which probe the fragmentation dynamics of multiply charged van der Waals clusters, also exhibit a pronounced cluster size dependence

  4. Germline variant in MSX1 identified in a Dutch family with clustering of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.J. van Nistelrooij (Annemarie); R. van Marion (Ronald); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A. de Klein (Annelies); A. Wagner (Anja); K. Biermann (Katharina); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); J.J.B. van Lanschot (Jan); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe vast majority of esophageal adenocarcinoma cases are sporadic and caused by somatic mutations. However, over the last decades several families have been identified with clustering of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. This observation suggests that one or more

  5. On the application of the weak-beam technique to the determination of the sizes of small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have made an analysis of the conditions necessary for the successful use of the weak-beam technique for identifying and characterizing small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper. The visibility of small defects was found to depend only weakly on the magnitude of the beam-convergence. In general, the image sizes of small clusters were found to be most sensitive to the magnitude of Sa with the image sizes of some individual defects changing by large amounts with changes as small as 0.025 nm -1 . The most reliable information on the true defect size is likely to be obtained by taking a series of 5-9 micrographs with a systematic variation of deviation parameter from 0.2-0.3 nm -1 . This procedure allows size information to be obtained down to a resolution limit of about 0.5 nm for defects situated throughout a foil thickness of 60 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of changes in the sizes of small defects produced by a low-temperature in-situ irradiation and annealing experiment

  6. Cluster-size entropy in the Axelrod model of social influence: Small-world networks and mass media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandica, Y.; Charmell, A.; Villegas-Febres, J.; Bonalde, I.

    2011-10-01

    We study the Axelrod's cultural adaptation model using the concept of cluster-size entropy Sc, which gives information on the variability of the cultural cluster size present in the system. Using networks of different topologies, from regular to random, we find that the critical point of the well-known nonequilibrium monocultural-multicultural (order-disorder) transition of the Axelrod model is given by the maximum of the Sc(q) distributions. The width of the cluster entropy distributions can be used to qualitatively determine whether the transition is first or second order. By scaling the cluster entropy distributions we were able to obtain a relationship between the critical cultural trait qc and the number F of cultural features in two-dimensional regular networks. We also analyze the effect of the mass media (external field) on social systems within the Axelrod model in a square network. We find a partially ordered phase whose largest cultural cluster is not aligned with the external field, in contrast with a recent suggestion that this type of phase cannot be formed in regular networks. We draw a q-B phase diagram for the Axelrod model in regular networks.

  7. Chemistry and kinetics of size-selected cobalt cluster cations at thermal energies. I. Reactions with CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B. C.; Kerns, K. P.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The chemistry and kinetics of size-selected Co+n cluster-ion (n=2-8) reactions with CO are studied using a selected ion drift tube affixed with a laser vaporization source operated under well-defined thermal conditions. All reactions studied in the present work are found to be association reactions. Their absolute rate constants, which are determined quantitatively, are found to have a strong dependence on cluster size. Similar to the cases of reactions with many other reactants such as H2 and CH4, Co+4 and Co+5 display a higher reactivity toward the CO molecule than do clusters of neighboring size. The multiple-collision conditions employed in the present work have enabled a determination of the maximum coordination number of CO molecules bound onto each Co+n cluster. It is found that the tetramer tends to bond 12 CO molecules, the pentamer 14 CO, hexamer 16 CO, and so on. The results are interpreted in terms of Lauher's calculation and the polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory. All the measured maximum coordination numbers correlate extremely well with the predictions of these theories, except for the trimer where the measured number is one CO less than the predicted value. The good agreement between experiment and theory enables one to gain some insight into the geometric structure of the clusters. Based on the present findings, the cobalt tetramer cation is interpreted to have a tetrahedral structure, the pentamer a trigonal bipyramid, and the hexamer an octahedral structure. Other cluster structures are also discussed.

  8. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  9. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  10. Genomic characterization of a new endophytic Streptomyces kebangsaanensis identifies biosynthetic pathway gene clusters for novel phenazine antibiotic production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwairiah Remali

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Streptomyces are well known for their capability to produce many bioactive secondary metabolites with medical and industrial importance. Here we report a novel bioactive phenazine compound, 6-((2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenoxy carbonyl phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (HCPCA extracted from Streptomyces kebangsaanensis, an endophyte isolated from the ethnomedicinal Portulaca oleracea. Methods The HCPCA chemical structure was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We conducted whole genome sequencing for the identification of the gene cluster(s believed to be responsible for phenazine biosynthesis in order to map its corresponding pathway, in addition to bioinformatics analysis to assess the potential of S. kebangsaanensis in producing other useful secondary metabolites. Results The S. kebangsaanensis genome comprises an 8,328,719 bp linear chromosome with high GC content (71.35% consisting of 12 rRNA operons, 81 tRNA, and 7,558 protein coding genes. We identified 24 gene clusters involved in polyketide, nonribosomal peptide, terpene, bacteriocin, and siderophore biosynthesis, as well as a gene cluster predicted to be responsible for phenazine biosynthesis. Discussion The HCPCA phenazine structure was hypothesized to derive from the combination of two biosynthetic pathways, phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid and 4-methoxybenzene-1,2-diol, originated from the shikimic acid pathway. The identification of a biosynthesis pathway gene cluster for phenazine antibiotics might facilitate future genetic engineering design of new synthetic phenazine antibiotics. Additionally, these findings confirm the potential of S. kebangsaanensis for producing various antibiotics and secondary metabolites.

  11. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  12. Using cluster analysis to identify patterns in students’ responses to contextually different conceptual problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stewart

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the evolution of student responses to seven contextually different versions of two Force Concept Inventory questions in an introductory physics course at the University of Arkansas. The consistency in answering the closely related questions evolved little over the seven-question exam. A model for the state of student knowledge involving the probability of selecting one of the multiple-choice answers was developed. Criteria for using clustering algorithms to extract model parameters were explored and it was found that the overlap between the probability distributions of the model vectors was an important parameter in characterizing the cluster models. The course data were then clustered and the extracted model showed that students largely fit into two groups both pre- and postinstruction: one that answered all questions correctly with high probability and one that selected the distracter representing the same misconception with high probability. For the course studied, 14% of the students were left with persistent misconceptions post instruction on a static force problem and 30% on a dynamic Newton’s third law problem. These students selected the answer representing the predominant misconception slightly more consistently postinstruction, indicating that the course studied had been ineffective at moving this subgroup of students nearer a Newtonian force concept and had instead moved them slightly farther away from a correct conceptual understanding of these two problems. The consistency in answering pairs of problems with varied physical contexts is shown to be an important supplementary statistic to the score on the problems and suggests that the inclusion of such problem pairs in future conceptual inventories would be efficacious. Multiple, contextually varied questions further probe the structure of students’ knowledge. To allow working instructors to make use of the additional insight gained from cluster analysis, it

  13. Identifying Subgroups of Tinnitus Using Novel Resting State fMRI Biomarkers and Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-13

    psychological therapies or pharmacological drugs. 2. KEYWORDS: fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging), tinnitus, brain imaging, cluster analysis...9/2016). Details in next section.  6-9 months: • Task 2: Participant recruitment, participant evaluation, MRI and behavioral data acquisition 3...WHASC: N = 40 patients and 20 controls o For year 2 (at end of first 24 months) details see next section. • Task 4: Behavioral and MRI data

  14. Recursive expectation-maximization clustering: A method for identifying buffering mechanisms composed of phenomic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingyu; Tian, Dehua; McKinney, Brett A.; Hartman, John L.

    2010-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and/or environmental factors are ubiquitous, affecting the phenotypes of organisms in complex ways. Knowledge about such interactions is becoming rate-limiting for our understanding of human disease and other biological phenomena. Phenomics refers to the integrative analysis of how all genes contribute to phenotype variation, entailing genome and organism level information. A systems biology view of gene interactions is critical for phenomics. Unfortunately the problem is intractable in humans; however, it can be addressed in simpler genetic model systems. Our research group has focused on the concept of genetic buffering of phenotypic variation, in studies employing the single-cell eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We have developed a methodology, quantitative high throughput cellular phenotyping (Q-HTCP), for high-resolution measurements of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on a genome-wide scale. Q-HTCP is being applied to the complete set of S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains, a unique resource for systematically mapping gene interactions. Genetic buffering is the idea that comprehensive and quantitative knowledge about how genes interact with respect to phenotypes will lead to an appreciation of how genes and pathways are functionally connected at a systems level to maintain homeostasis. However, extracting biologically useful information from Q-HTCP data is challenging, due to the multidimensional and nonlinear nature of gene interactions, together with a relative lack of prior biological information. Here we describe a new approach for mining quantitative genetic interaction data called recursive expectation-maximization clustering (REMc). We developed REMc to help discover phenomic modules, defined as sets of genes with similar patterns of interaction across a series of genetic or environmental perturbations. Such modules are reflective of buffering mechanisms, i.e., genes that play a related role in the maintenance

  15. Identifying and ranking influential spreaders in complex networks by combining a local-degree sum and the clustering coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengtian; Zhang, Ruisheng; Hu, Rongjing; Yang, Fan; Yao, Yabing; Yuan, Yongna

    2018-03-01

    Identifying influential spreaders is a crucial problem that can help authorities to control the spreading process in complex networks. Based on the classical degree centrality (DC), several improved measures have been presented. However, these measures cannot rank spreaders accurately. In this paper, we first calculate the sum of the degrees of the nearest neighbors of a given node, and based on the calculated sum, a novel centrality named clustered local-degree (CLD) is proposed, which combines the sum and the clustering coefficients of nodes to rank spreaders. By assuming that the spreading process in networks follows the susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model, we perform extensive simulations on a series of real networks to compare the performances between the CLD centrality and other six measures. The results show that the CLD centrality has a competitive performance in distinguishing the spreading ability of nodes, and exposes the best performance to identify influential spreaders accurately.

  16. Sample size estimation to substantiate freedom from disease for clustered binary data with a specific risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostoulas, P.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Browne, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    and power when applied to these groups. We propose the use of the variance partition coefficient (VPC), which measures the clustering of infection/disease for individuals with a common risk profile. Sample size estimates are obtained separately for those groups that exhibit markedly different heterogeneity......, thus, optimizing resource allocation. A VPC-based predictive simulation method for sample size estimation to substantiate freedom from disease is presented. To illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach we give two examples with the analysis of data from a risk factor study on Mycobacterium avium...

  17. Lowest-energy cage structures of medium-sized (ZnO){sub n} clusters with n = 15 − 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lingli; Sai, Linwei [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Jijun, E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China and Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Qiu, Ruifeng [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-01-22

    Fullerene-like cage structures of medium-sized (ZnO){sub n} clusters with n = 15 − 24 were generated by spiral algorithm and optimized using density functional theory calculations. Most of these lowest-energy cage structures contain only four-membered and six-membered rings, whereas eight-membered rings were found in the lowest-energy cages of (ZnO){sub n} (n = 19, 20, 23, 24). Our best cage configurations either reproduce or prevail the previously reported ones. The size-dependent electronic properties were also discussed.

  18. Tiny changes in local order identify the cluster formation threshold in model fluids with competing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomont, Jean-Marc; Costa, Dino; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis

    2017-06-14

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to carry out a thorough analysis of structural correlations arising in a relatively dense fluid of rigid spherical particles with prototype competing interactions (short-range attractive and long-range repulsive two-Yukawa model). As the attraction strength increases, we show that the local density of the fluid displays a tiny reversal of trend within specific ranges of interparticle distances, whereupon it decreases first and increases afterwards, passing through a local minimum. Particles involved in this trend display, accordingly, distinct behaviours: for a sufficiently weak attraction, they seem to contribute to the long-wave oscillations typically heralding the formation of patterns in such fluids; for a stronger attraction, after the reversal of the local density has occurred, they form an outer shell of neighbours stabilizing the existing aggregation seeds. Following the increment of attraction, precisely in correspondence of the local density reversal, the local peak developed in the structure factor at small wavevectors markedly rises, signalling-in agreement with recent structural criteria-the onset of a clustered state. A detailed cluster analysis of microscopic configurations fully validates this picture.

  19. Identifying models of HIV care and treatment service delivery in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia using cluster analysis and Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Sharon; Denison, Julie A; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Chang, Larry W; Koole, Olivier; Torpey, Kwasi; Van Praag, Eric; Farley, Jason; Ford, Nathan; Stuart, Leine; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred

    2017-12-06

    Organization of HIV care and treatment services, including clinic staffing and services, may shape clinical and financial outcomes, yet there has been little attempt to describe different models of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Information about the relative benefits and drawbacks of different models could inform the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and associated services in resource-limited settings (RLS), especially in light of expanded client populations with country adoption of WHO's test and treat recommendation. We characterized task-shifting/task-sharing practices in 19 diverse ART clinics in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia and used cluster analysis to identify unique models of service provision. We ran descriptive statistics to explore how the clusters varied by environmental factors and programmatic characteristics. Finally, we employed the Delphi Method to make systematic use of expert opinions to ensure that the cluster variables were meaningful in the context of actual task-shifting of ART services in SSA. The cluster analysis identified three task-shifting/task-sharing models. The main differences across models were the availability of medical doctors, the scope of clinical responsibility assigned to nurses, and the use of lay health care workers. Patterns of healthcare staffing in HIV service delivery were associated with different environmental factors (e.g., health facility levels, urban vs. rural settings) and programme characteristics (e.g., community ART distribution or integrated tuberculosis treatment on-site). Understanding the relative advantages and disadvantages of different models of care can help national programmes adapt to increased client load, select optimal adherence strategies within decentralized models of care, and identify differentiated models of care for clients to meet the growing needs of long-term ART patients who require more complicated treatment management.

  20. Cluster size influence on the survivability of Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus larvae under low relative humidity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low relative humidity (RH) levels (=63%) have been previously shown to be a determining factor in the survival of southern cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, larvae, regardless of temperature. Supporting this observation, large larval clusters can retain more water than isolated larvae. Th...

  1. Characteristics of autumn-winter extreme precipitation on the Norwegian west coast identified by cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkilae, U. [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Uni Bjerknes Centre, Bergen (Norway); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sorteberg, A. [University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-08-15

    Extremely high autumn and winter precipitation events on the European west coast are often driven by low-pressure systems in the North Atlantic. Climate projections suggest the number and intensity of these events is likely to increase far more than the mean precipitation. In this study we investigate the autumn-winter extreme precipitation on the Norwegian west coast and the connection between its spatial distribution and sea level pressure (SLP) patterns using the k-means cluster analysis. We use three relatively high resolved downscalings of one global coupled model: the Arpege global atmospheric model (stretched grid with 35-km horizontal resolution over Norway) and the WRF-downscaled Arpege model (30 and 10-km) for the 30-year periods of 1961-1990 and 2021-2050. The cluster analysis finds three main SLP patterns responsible for extreme precipitation in different parts of the country. The SLP patterns found are similar to the NAO positive pattern known to strengthen the westerly flow towards European coast. We then apply the method to investigate future change in extreme precipitation. We find an increase in the number of days with extreme precipitation of 15, 39 and 35% in the two simulations (Arpege 35-km and WRF 30 and 10-km, respectively). We do not find evidence of a significant change in the frequency of weather patterns between the present and the future periods. Rather, it is the probability of a given weather pattern to cause extreme precipitation which is increased in the future, probably due to higher temperatures and an increased moisture content of the air. The WRF model predicts the increase in this probability caused by the most important SLP patterns to be >50%. The Arpege model does not predict such a significant change because the general increase in extreme precipitation predicted is smaller, probably due to its coarser resolution over ocean which leads to smoother representation of the low pressure systems. (orig.)

  2. A critical size for emergence of nonbulk electronic and geometric structures in dodecanethiolate-protected Au clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Yuichi; Nakazaki, Tafu; Malola, Sami; Takano, Shinjiro; Niihori, Yoshiki; Kurashige, Wataru; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2015-01-28

    We report on how the transition from the bulk structure to the cluster-specific structure occurs in n-dodecanethiolate-protected gold clusters, Au(n)(SC12)m. To elucidate this transition, we isolated a series of Au(n)(SC12)m in the n range from 38 to ∼520, containing five newly identified or newly isolated clusters, Au104(SC12)45, Au(∼226)(SC12)(∼76), Au(∼253)(SC12)(∼90), Au(∼356)(SC12)(∼112), and Au(∼520)(SC12)(∼130), using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Low-temperature optical absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the Au cores of Au144(SC12)60 and smaller clusters have molecular-like electronic structures and non-fcc geometric structures, whereas the structures of the Au cores of larger clusters resemble those of the bulk gold. A new structure model is proposed for Au104(SC12)45 based on combined approach between experiments and DFT calculations.

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies the SERPINB gene cluster as a susceptibility locus for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenholz, Ingo; Grosche, Sarah; Kalb, Birgit; Rüschendorf, Franz; Blümchen, Katharina; Schlags, Rupert; Harandi, Neda; Price, Mareike; Hansen, Gesine; Seidenberg, Jürgen; Röblitz, Holger; Yürek, Songül; Tschirner, Sebastian; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Xiaobin; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Nöthen, Markus M; Hübner, Norbert; Niggemann, Bodo; Beyer, Kirsten; Lee, Young-Ae

    2017-10-20

    Genetic factors and mechanisms underlying food allergy are largely unknown. Due to heterogeneity of symptoms a reliable diagnosis is often difficult to make. Here, we report a genome-wide association study on food allergy diagnosed by oral food challenge in 497 cases and 2387 controls. We identify five loci at genome-wide significance, the clade B serpin (SERPINB) gene cluster at 18q21.3, the cytokine gene cluster at 5q31.1, the filaggrin gene, the C11orf30/LRRC32 locus, and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Stratifying the results for the causative food demonstrates that association of the HLA locus is peanut allergy-specific whereas the other four loci increase the risk for any food allergy. Variants in the SERPINB gene cluster are associated with SERPINB10 expression in leukocytes. Moreover, SERPINB genes are highly expressed in the esophagus. All identified loci are involved in immunological regulation or epithelial barrier function, emphasizing the role of both mechanisms in food allergy.

  4. Chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum--a top-down approach to identify and delete irrelevant gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthan, Simon; Baumgart, Meike; Radek, Andreas; Herbst, Marius; Siebert, Daniel; Brühl, Natalie; Bartsch, Anna; Bott, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Marin, Kay; Hans, Stephan; Krämer, Reinhard; Seibold, Gerd; Frunzke, Julia; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Noack, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    For synthetic biology applications, a robust structural basis is required, which can be constructed either from scratch or in a top-down approach starting from any existing organism. In this study, we initiated the top-down construction of a chassis organism from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, aiming for the relevant gene set to maintain its fast growth on defined medium. We evaluated each native gene for its essentiality considering expression levels, phylogenetic conservation, and knockout data. Based on this classification, we determined 41 gene clusters ranging from 3.7 to 49.7 kbp as target sites for deletion. 36 deletions were successful and 10 genome-reduced strains showed impaired growth rates, indicating that genes were hit, which are relevant to maintain biological fitness at wild-type level. In contrast, 26 deleted clusters were found to include exclusively irrelevant genes for growth on defined medium. A combinatory deletion of all irrelevant gene clusters would, in a prophage-free strain, decrease the size of the native genome by about 722 kbp (22%) to 2561 kbp. Finally, five combinatory deletions of irrelevant gene clusters were investigated. The study introduces the novel concept of relevant genes and demonstrates general strategies to construct a chassis suitable for biotechnological application. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivs Licence, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non- commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  5. Resistance gene candidates identified by PCR with degenerate oligonucleotide primers map to clusters of resistance genes in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, K A; Meyers, B C; Islam-Faridi, M N; Chin, D B; Stelly, D M; Michelmore, R W

    1998-08-01

    The recent cloning of genes for resistance against diverse pathogens from a variety of plants has revealed that many share conserved sequence motifs. This provides the possibility of isolating numerous additional resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate oligonucleotide primers. We amplified resistance gene candidates (RGCs) from lettuce with multiple combinations of primers with low degeneracy designed from motifs in the nucleotide binding sites (NBSs) of RPS2 of Arabidopsis thaliana and N of tobacco. Genomic DNA, cDNA, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were successfully used as templates. Four families of sequences were identified that had the same similarity to each other as to resistance genes from other species. The relationship of the amplified products to resistance genes was evaluated by several sequence and genetic criteria. The amplified products contained open reading frames with additional sequences characteristic of NBSs. Hybridization of RGCs to genomic DNA and to BAC clones revealed large numbers of related sequences. Genetic analysis demonstrated the existence of clustered multigene families for each of the four RGC sequences. This parallels classical genetic data on clustering of disease resistance genes. Two of the four families mapped to known clusters of resistance genes; these two families were therefore studied in greater detail. Additional evidence that these RGCs could be resistance genes was gained by the identification of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) regions in sequences adjoining the NBS similar to those in RPM1 and RPS2 of A. thaliana. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the clustered genomic distribution of these sequences. The use of PCR with degenerate oligonucleotide primers is therefore an efficient method to identify numerous RGCs in plants.

  6. Clustering ERP implementation project activities: a foundation for project size definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.; Kusters, R.J.; Heemstra, F.J.; Sadiq, A.; Reichert, M.; Schultz, K.; Trienekens, J.J.M.; Moller, C.; Kusters, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The size of an ERP project can be a useful measurement for predicting the effort needed to complete an ERP implementation project. Because this measurement does not exist, research is needed to find a set of variables which can define the size of an ERP implementation project. This paper shows 21

  7. A spectral clustering search algorithm for predicting shallow landslide size and location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dino Bellugi; David G. Milledge; William E. Dietrich; Jim A. McKean; J. Taylor Perron; Erik B. Sudderth; Brian Kazian

    2015-01-01

    The potential hazard and geomorphic significance of shallow landslides depend on their location and size. Commonly applied one-dimensional stability models do not include lateral resistances and cannot predict landslide size. Multi-dimensional models must be applied to specific geometries, which are not known a priori, and testing all possible geometries is...

  8. Understanding the cluster randomised crossover design: a graphical illustraton of the components of variation and a sample size tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnup, Sarah J; McKenzie, Joanne E; Hemming, Karla; Pilcher, David; Forbes, Andrew B

    2017-08-15

    In a cluster randomised crossover (CRXO) design, a sequence of interventions is assigned to a group, or 'cluster' of individuals. Each cluster receives each intervention in a separate period of time, forming 'cluster-periods'. Sample size calculations for CRXO trials need to account for both the cluster randomisation and crossover aspects of the design. Formulae are available for the two-period, two-intervention, cross-sectional CRXO design, however implementation of these formulae is known to be suboptimal. The aims of this tutorial are to illustrate the intuition behind the design; and provide guidance on performing sample size calculations. Graphical illustrations are used to describe the effect of the cluster randomisation and crossover aspects of the design on the correlation between individual responses in a CRXO trial. Sample size calculations for binary and continuous outcomes are illustrated using parameters estimated from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society - Adult Patient Database (ANZICS-APD) for patient mortality and length(s) of stay (LOS). The similarity between individual responses in a CRXO trial can be understood in terms of three components of variation: variation in cluster mean response; variation in the cluster-period mean response; and variation between individual responses within a cluster-period; or equivalently in terms of the correlation between individual responses in the same cluster-period (within-cluster within-period correlation, WPC), and between individual responses in the same cluster, but in different periods (within-cluster between-period correlation, BPC). The BPC lies between zero and the WPC. When the WPC and BPC are equal the precision gained by crossover aspect of the CRXO design equals the precision lost by cluster randomisation. When the BPC is zero there is no advantage in a CRXO over a parallel-group cluster randomised trial. Sample size calculations illustrate that small changes in the specification of

  9. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  10. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  11. Size and Structure of Cytochrome-c bound to Gold nano-clusters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CATHERINE GHOSH

    Addition of ethanol causes partial restoration of ellipticity and hence, structure of Cyt C. FCS data indicate that size (hydrodynamic ... of attention recently because of their photo-stability, ... led to selective killing of the breast cancer cells.14 The.

  12. High sintering resistance of size-selected platinum cluster catalysts by suppressed ostwald ripening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Deiana, Davide

    2014-01-01

    on different supports exhibit remarkable intrinsic sintering resistance even under reaction conditions. The observed stability is related to suppression of Ostwald ripening by elimination of its main driving force via size-selection. This study thus constitutes a general blueprint for the rational design...... of sintering resistant catalyst systems and for efficient experimental strategies to determine sintering mechanisms. Moreover, this is the first systematic experimental investigation of sintering processes in nanoparticle systems with an initially perfectly monomodal size distribution under ambient conditions....

  13. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  14. Promise and Pitfalls of Using Grain Size Analysis to Identify Glacial Sediments in Alpine Lake Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes fed by glacier outwash should have a clastic particle-size record distinct from non-glacial lakes in the same area, but do they? The unique turquoise color of alpine glacial lakes reflects the flux of suspended clastic glacial rock flour to those lakes; conversely, lakes not fed by outwash are generally clear with sediments dominated by organics or slope-wash from nearby hillslopes. This contrast in sediment types and sources should produce a distinct and measureable different in grain sizes between the two settings. Results from a variety of lakes suggest the actual situation is often more subtle and complex. I compare grain size results to other proxies to assess the value of grain size analysis for paleoglacier studies. Over the past 10 years, my colleagues and I have collected and analyzed sediment cores from a wide variety of lakes below small alpine glaciers in an attempt to constrain the timing and magnitude of alpine glaciation in those basins. The basic concept is that these lakes act as continuous catchments for any rock flour produced upstream by glacier abrasion; as a glacier grows, the flux of rock flour to the lake will also increase. If the glacier disappears entirely, rock flour deposition will also cease in short order. We have focused our research in basins with simple sedimentologic settings: mostly small, high-altitude, stripped granitic or metamorphic cirques in which the cirque glaciers are the primary source of clastic sediments. In most cases, the lakes are fed by meltwater from a modern glacier, but were ice free during the earlier Holocene. In such cases, the lake cores should record formation of and changes in activity of the glacier upstream. We used a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser particle size analyzer for our grain size analyses, as well as recording magnetic susceptibility, color, and organics for the same cores. The results indicate that although lakes often experience increases in silt and clay-size (<0.63 mm) clastic

  15. Application of a parallel genetic algorithm to the global optimization of medium-sized Au-Pd sub-nanometre clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Heider A.; Demiroglu, Ilker; Johnston, Roy L.

    2018-02-01

    To contribute to the discussion of the high activity and reactivity of Au-Pd system, we have adopted the BPGA-DFT approach to study the structural and energetic properties of medium-sized Au-Pd sub-nanometre clusters with 11-18 atoms. We have examined the structural behaviour and stability as a function of cluster size and composition. The study suggests 2D-3D crossover points for pure Au clusters at 14 and 16 atoms, whereas pure Pd clusters are all found to be 3D. For Au-Pd nanoalloys, the role of cluster size and the influence of doping were found to be extensive and non-monotonic in altering cluster structures. Various stability criteria (e.g. binding energies, second differences in energy, and mixing energies) are used to evaluate the energetics, structures, and tendency of segregation in sub-nanometre Au-Pd clusters. HOMO-LUMO gaps were calculated to give additional information on cluster stability and a systematic homotop search was used to evaluate the energies of the generated global minima of mono-substituted clusters and the preferred doping sites, as well as confirming the validity of the BPGA-DFT approach.

  16. Design and capabilities of an experimental setup based on magnetron sputtering for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters on ultra-clean surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hannes; Popok, Vladimir; Barke, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of an experimental setup utilizing a magnetron sputtering source for production of beams of ionized size-selected clusters for deposition in ultra-high vacuum is described. For the case of copper cluster formation the influence of different source parameters is studied...

  17. Location and Size Planning of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation in Distribution network System Based on K-means Clustering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siqi; Wang, Xiaorong; Wu, Junyong

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a method to generate the planning scenarios, which is based on K-means clustering analysis algorithm driven by data, for the location and size planning of distributed photovoltaic (PV) units in the network. Taken the power losses of the network, the installation and maintenance costs of distributed PV, the profit of distributed PV and the voltage offset as objectives and the locations and sizes of distributed PV as decision variables, Pareto optimal front is obtained through the self-adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) and solutions are ranked by a method called technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS). Finally, select the planning schemes at the top of the ranking list based on different planning emphasis after the analysis in detail. The proposed method is applied to a 10-kV distribution network in Gansu Province, China and the results are discussed.

  18. Cluster Analysis of an International Pressure Pain Threshold Database Identifies 4 Meaningful Subgroups of Adults With Mechanical Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, David M; Kwok, Timothy S H; Mehta, Swati

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine pressure pain detection threshold (PPDT) related phenotypes of individuals with mechanical neck pain that may be identifiable in clinical practice. METHODS: This report describes a secondary analysis of 5 independent, international mechanical neck pain databases of PPDT...... values taken at both a local and distal region (total N=1176). Minor systematic differences in mean PPDT values across cohorts necessitated z-transformation before analysis, and each cohort was split into male and female sexes. Latent profile analysis (LPA) using the k-means approach was undertaken...... to identify the most parsimonious set of PPDT-based phenotypes that were both statistically and clinically meaningful. RESULTS: LPA revealed 4 distinct clusters named according to PPDT levels at the local and distal zones: low-low PPDT (67%), mod-mod (25%), mod-high (4%), and high-high (4%). Secondary...

  19. Low PIP2 molar fractions induce nanometer size clustering in giant unilamellar vesicles containing POPC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvemini, Iyrri; Gaua, D.; Reid, J.

    2014-01-01

    generalized polarization function (GP) with unlabeled PIP2 and single point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and brightness analysis of various BODIPY labeled PIP2 to determine the presence of clusters in the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3......-phosphocholine (POPC) or a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), sphingomyelin and cholesterol. We determined the number of freely diffusing fluorescent BODIPY molecules in the membrane and found that in GUVs containing various amounts of labeled PIP2, this number was significantly lower...... than in GUVs made with the control BODIPY labeled hexadecyl phosphatidylcholine (BODIPY-HPC). Also, we noted an increase in brightness of the labeled PIP2 particles with increasing labeled PIP2 molar fraction. Together with the observed change in LAURDAN GP with increasing molar fraction of unlabeled...

  20. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...

  1. Dynamics of suspended sediment concentration, flow discharge and sediment particle size interdependency to identify sediment source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-11-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of sediment yield is a key for proper watershed management. This study analyzed statistical characteristics and trends of suspended sediment concentration (SCS), flow discharge (FD) and sediment particle sizes using data from 24 gage stations scattered throughout the United States. Analysis showed significant time- and location-specific differences of these variables. The median values of SSC, FD and percentage of particle sizes smaller than 63 μm (P63) for all 24 gage stations were found to be 510.236 mg l-1 (right skewed), 45.406 m3 s-1 (left skewed) and 78.648% (right skewed), respectively. Most of the stations exhibited significant trends (P practices which may call for local or regional planning based on natural (i.e., precipitation amount, type and erosivity, watershed area, and soil erodibility) and human-affected (i.e., land use and hydraulic structures and water resources management) factors governing the study variables.

  2. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome size as a marker for identifying the invasive alien taxa in Fallopia section Reynoutria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suda, Jan; Trávníček, P.; Mandák, Bohumil; Berchová-Bímová, Kateřina

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2010), s. 97-106 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6005301; GA AV ČR IAA600050711; GA AV ČR IAA600050707 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : cytometry * ploidy * genome size Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2010

  4. Identifying grain-size dependent errors on global forest area estimates and carbon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    Satellite-derived coarse-resolution data are typically used for conducting global analyses. But the forest areas estimated from coarse-resolution maps (e.g., 1 km) inevitably differ from a corresponding fine-resolution map (such as a 30-m map) that would be closer to ground truth. A better understanding of changes in grain size on area estimation will improve our...

  5. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy–interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10–100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas–Fermi potential and the so-called “Universal” potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10 −7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent

  6. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  7. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER SIZE AND DYNAMICAL STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that magnetic fields from radio jets and lobes powered by their central super massive black holes can be an important source of magnetic fields in the galaxy clusters. This is Paper II in a series of studies where we present self-consistent high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus. We studied 12 different galaxy clusters with virial masses ranging from 1 x 10 14 to 2 x 10 15 M sun . In this work, we examine the effects of the mass and merger history on the final magnetic properties. We find that the evolution of magnetic fields is qualitatively similar to those of previous studies. In most clusters, the injected magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence during the cluster formation process with hierarchical mergers, while the amplification history and the magnetic field distribution depend on the cluster formation and magnetism history. This can be very different for different clusters. The total magnetic energies in these clusters are between 4 x 10 57 and 10 61 erg, which is mainly decided by the cluster mass, scaling approximately with the square of the total mass. Dynamically older relaxed clusters usually have more magnetic fields in their ICM. The dynamically very young clusters may be magnetized weakly since there is not enough time for magnetic fields to be amplified.

  8. Size-matched alkyne-conjugated cyanine fluorophores to identify differences in protein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R; Plechaty, Anna M; Berninsone, Patricia M

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are few methods to detect differences in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in a specific manner from complex mixtures. Thus, we developed an approach that combines the sensitivity and specificity of click chemistry with the resolution capabilities of 2D-DIGE. In "Click-DIGE", posttranslationally modified proteins are metabolically labeled with azido-substrate analogs, then size- and charge-matched alkyne-Cy3 or alkyne-Cy5 dyes are covalently attached to the azide of the PTM by click chemistry. The fluorescently-tagged protein samples are then multiplexed for 2DE analysis. Whereas standard DIGE labels all proteins, Click-DIGE focuses the analysis of protein differences to a targeted subset of posttranslationally modified proteins within a complex sample (i.e. specific labeling and analysis of azido glycoproteins within a cell lysate). Our data indicate that (i) Click-DIGE specifically labels azido proteins, (ii) the resulting Cy-protein conjugates are spectrally distinct, and (iii) the conjugates are size- and charge-matched at the level of 2DE. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by detecting multiple differentially expressed glycoproteins between a mutant cell line defective in UDP-galactose transport and the parental cell line. We anticipate that the diversity of azido substrates already available will enable Click-DIGE to be compatible with analysis of a wide range of PTMs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Cluster analysis as a method for determining size ranges for spinal implants: disc lumbar replacement prosthesis dimensions from magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dang; Holder, Roger L; Smith, Francis W; Wardlaw, Douglas; Hukins, David W L

    2006-12-01

    Statistical analysis of clinical radiologic data. To develop an objective method for finding the number of sizes for a lumbar disc replacement. Cluster analysis is a well-established technique for sorting observations into clusters so that the "similarity level" is maximal if they belong to the same cluster and minimal otherwise. Magnetic resonance scans from 69 patients, with no abnormal discs, yielded 206 sagittal and transverse images of 206 discs (levels L3-L4-L5-S1). Anteroposterior and lateral dimensions were measured from vertebral margins on transverse images; disc heights were measured from sagittal images. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to determine the number of clusters followed by nonhierarchical (K-means) cluster analysis. Discriminant analysis was used to determine how well the clusters could be used to classify an observation. The most successful method of clustering the data involved the following parameters: anteroposterior dimension; lateral dimension (both were the mean of results from the superior and inferior margins of a vertebral body, measured on transverse images); and maximum disc height (from a midsagittal image). These were grouped into 7 clusters so that a discriminant analysis was capable of correctly classifying 97.1% of the observations. The mean and standard deviations for the parameter values in each cluster were determined. Cluster analysis has been successfully used to find the dimensions of the minimum number of prosthesis sizes required to replace L3-L4 to L5-S1 discs; the range of sizes would enable them to be used at higher lumbar levels in some patients.

  10. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mining environmental high-throughput sequence data sets to identify divergent amplicon clusters for phylogenetic reconstruction and morphotype visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Environmental high-throughput sequencing (envHTS) is a very powerful tool, which in protistan ecology is predominantly used for the exploration of diversity and its geographic and local patterns. We here used a pyrosequenced V4-SSU rDNA data set from a solar saltern pond as test case to exploit such massive protistan amplicon data sets beyond this descriptive purpose. Therefore, we combined a Swarm-based blastn network including 11 579 ciliate V4 amplicons to identify divergent amplicon clusters with targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design for full-length small subunit of the ribosomal DNA retrieval and probe design for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This powerful strategy allows to benefit from envHTS data sets to (i) reveal the phylogenetic position of the taxon behind divergent amplicons; (ii) improve phylogenetic resolution and evolutionary history of specific taxon groups; (iii) solidly assess an amplicons (species') degree of similarity to its closest described relative; (iv) visualize the morphotype behind a divergent amplicons cluster; (v) rapidly FISH screen many environmental samples for geographic/habitat distribution and abundances of the respective organism and (vi) to monitor the success of enrichment strategies in live samples for cultivation and isolation of the respective organisms. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Novel Method To Identify Source-Associated Phylogenetic Clustering Shows that Listeria monocytogenes Includes Niche-Adapted Clonal Groups with Distinct Ecological Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nightingale, K. K.; Lyles, K.; Ayodele, M.

    2006-01-01

    population are identified (TreeStats test). Analysis of sequence data for 120 L. monocytogenes isolates revealed evidence of clustering between isolates from the same source, based on the phylogenies inferred from actA and inlA (P = 0.02 and P = 0.07, respectively; SourceCluster test). Overall, the Tree...... are biologically valid. Overall, our data show that (i) the SourceCluster and TreeStats tests can identify biologically meaningful source-associated phylogenetic clusters and (ii) L. monocytogenes includes clonal groups that have adapted to infect specific host species or colonize nonhost environments......., including humans, animals, and food. If the null hypothesis that the genetic distances for isolates within and between source populations are identical can be rejected (SourceCluster test), then particular clades in the phylogenetic tree with significant overrepresentation of sequences from a given source...

  13. THE CANDIDATE CLUSTER AND PROTOCLUSTER CATALOG (CCPC). II. SPECTROSCOPICALLY IDENTIFIED STRUCTURES SPANNING 2 <  z  < 6.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, J. R.; McGaugh, S. S. [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    The Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC) is a list of objects at redshifts z  > 2 composed of galaxies with spectroscopically confirmed redshifts that are coincident on the sky and in redshift. These protoclusters are identified by searching for groups in volumes corresponding to the expected size of the most massive protoclusters at these redshifts. In CCPC1 we identified 43 candidate protoclusters among 14,000 galaxies between 2.74 <  z  < 3.71. Here we expand our search to more than 40,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts z  > 2.00, resulting in an additional 173 candidate structures. The most significant of these are 36 protoclusters with overdensities δ {sub gal} > 7. We also identify three large proto-supercluster candidates containing multiple protoclusters at z  = 2.3, 3.5 and z  = 6.56. Eight candidates with N  ≥ 10 galaxies are found at redshifts z  > 4.0. The last system in the catalog is the most distant spectroscopic protocluster candidate known to date at z  = 6.56.

  14. CdTe magic-sized clusters and the use as building blocks for assembling two-dimensional nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hu; Hou, Yumei; Zhang, Hua

    2017-06-01

    A facile one-pot noninjection synthesis of CdTe magic-sized clusters (MSCs) and their use as building blocks for assembling two-dimensional (2D) quantum confined nanoplatelets (NPLs) are reported. Four distinct MSC families, with the first exciton absorption peaks at 447 nm (F447), 485 nm (F485), 535 nm (F535), and 555 nm (F555), are synthesized by the reaction between cadmium oleate and trioctylphosphine tellurium (TOP-Te) in octadecene media containing primary amine and TOP at appropriate intermediate temperatures. Especially, F447 is obtained in pure form and can self-assemble in situ into 2D NPLs in the reaction solution. The formation, growth, and transformation of CdTe MSCs are monitored mainly by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The pure F447 and its assembled 2D NPLs are further characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of various experimental variables, including reaction temperature, the nature, and amount of capping ligands, on the stability and growth kinetics of the obtained MSC families has been systematically investigated. Experimental results indicate that the appropriate reaction temperature and the presence of long hydrocarbon chain primary amines play a crucial role in the formation of MSCs and the subsequent assembly into 2D NPLs. Primary amines can also promote ultra-small sized CdTe regular nanocrystals to transform into MSCs, and therefore, CdTe MSCs can be obtained indirectly from regularly sized nanocrystals. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Clustering of transcriptional profiles identifies changes to insulin signaling as an early event in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Harriet M; Soto, Ileana; Graham, Leah C; Carter, Gregory W; Howell, Gareth R

    2013-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease affects more than 35 million people worldwide but there is no known cure. Age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease but it is not clear how age-related changes impact the disease. Here, we used a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease to identify age-specific changes that occur prior to and at the onset of traditional Alzheimer-related phenotypes including amyloid plaque formation. To identify these early events we used transcriptional profiling of mouse brains combined with computational approaches including singular value decomposition and hierarchical clustering. Our study identifies three key events in early stages of Alzheimer's disease. First, the most important drivers of Alzheimer's disease onset in these mice are age-specific changes. These include perturbations of the ribosome and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Second, the earliest detectable disease-specific changes occur to genes commonly associated with the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis. These include the down-regulation of genes relating to metabolism, depression and appetite. Finally, insulin signaling, in particular the down-regulation of the insulin receptor substrate 4 (Irs4) gene, may be an important event in the transition from age-related changes to Alzheimer's disease specific-changes. A combination of transcriptional profiling combined with computational analyses has uncovered novel features relevant to Alzheimer's disease in a widely used mouse model and offers avenues for further exploration into early stages of AD.

  16. The effects of charge, polymerization, and cluster size on the diffusivity of dissolved Si species in pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant cation in crustal rocks. The charge and degree of polymerization of dissolved Si significantly change depending on solution pH and Si concentration. We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the self-diffusion coefficients of dissolved Si, DSi, for 15 monomeric and polymeric species at ambient temperature. The results showed that DSi decreased with increasing negative charge and increasing degree of polymerization. The relationship between DSi and charge (Z) can be expressed by DSi/10-6 = 2.0 + 9.8e0.47Z, and that between DSi and number of polymerization (NSi) by DSi/10-6 = 9.7/NSi0.56. The results also revealed that multiple Si molecules assembled into a cluster and D decreased as the cluster size increased. Experiments to evaluate the diffusivity of Si in pore water revealed that the diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing Si concentration, a result consistent with the MD simulations. Simulation results can now be used to quantitatively assess water-rock interactions and water-concrete reactions over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions.

  17. Steric restrictions of RISC in RNA interference identified with size-expanded RNA nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Armando R; Peterson, Larryn W; Kool, Eric T

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the interactions between small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), the key protein complex of RNA interference (RNAi), is of great importance to the development of siRNAs with improved biological and potentially therapeutic function. Although various chemically modified siRNAs have been reported, relatively few studies with modified nucleobases exist. Here we describe the synthesis and hybridization properties of siRNAs bearing size-expanded RNA (xRNA) nucleobases and their use as a novel and systematic set of steric probes in RNAi. xRNA nucleobases are expanded by 2.4 Å using benzo-homologation and retain canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing groups. Our data show that the modified siRNA duplexes display small changes in melting temperature (+1.4 to -5.0 °C); substitutions near the center are somewhat destabilizing to the RNA duplex, while substitutions near the ends are stabilizing. RNAi studies in a dual-reporter luciferase assay in HeLa cells revealed that xRNA nucleobases in the antisense strand reduce activity at some central positions near the seed region but are generally well tolerated near the ends. Most importantly, we observed that xRNA substitutions near the 3'-end increased activity over that of wild-type siRNAs. The data are analyzed in terms of site-dependent steric effects in RISC. Circular dichroism experiments show that single xRNA substitutions do not significantly distort the native A-form helical structure of the siRNA duplex, and serum stability studies demonstrated that xRNA substitutions protect siRNAs against nuclease degradation.

  18. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  19. Cluster evolution and critical cluster sizes for the square and triangular lattice Ising models using lattice animals and Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Growth and decay of clusters at temperatures below T-c have been studied for a two-dimensional Ising model for both square and triangular lattices using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and the enumeration of lattice animals. For the lattice animals, all unique cluster configurations with their internal

  20. Conformationally averaged vertical detachment energy of finite size NO3(-)·nH2O clusters: a route connecting few to many.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Maity, Dilip Kumar

    2011-04-07

    We report conformationally averaged VDEs (VDE(w)(n)) for different sizes of NO(3)(-)·nH(2)O clusters calculated by using uncorrelated HF, correlated hybrid density functional (B3LYP, BHHLYP) and correlated ab intio (MP2 and CCSD(T)) theory. It is observed that the VDE(w)(n) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/Aug-cc-Pvtz and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) levels is very close to the experimentally measured VDE. It is shown that the use of calculated results of the conformationally averaged VDE for small-sized solvated negatively-charged clusters and a microscopic theory-based general expression for the same provides a route to obtain the VDE for a wide range of cluster sizes, including bulk.

  1. One-pot solvothermal synthesis of highly water-dispersible size-tunable functionalized magnetite nanocrystal clusters for lipase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Hou, Chen; Li, Yijing; Zhao, Guanghui; Liu, Xiao; Hou, Ke; Li, Yanfeng

    2013-07-01

    A facile one-pot synthesis of highly water-dispersible size-tunable magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystal clusters (MNCs) end-functionalized with amino or carboxyl groups by a modified solvothermal reduction reaction has been developed. Dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyhydroxycinnamic acid were used for the first time as both a surfactant and interparticle linker in a polylol process for economical and environment-friendly purposes. Morphology, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of the prepared particles were investigated by several methods, including FESEM, TEM, XRD, XPS, Raman, FTIR, TGA, zeta potential, and VSM. The sizes of the particles could be easily tuned over a wide range from 175 to 500 nm by varying the surfactant concentration. Moreover, ethylene glycol/diethylene glycol (EG/DEG) solvent mixtures with different ratios could be used as reductants to obtain the particles with smaller sizes. The XRD data demonstrated that the surfactants restrained the crystal growth of the grains. The nanoparticles showed superior magnetic properties and high colloidal stability in water. The cytotoxicity results indicated the feasibility of using the synthesized nanocrystals in biology-related fields. To estimate the applicability of the obtained MNCs in biotechnology, Candida rugosa lipase was selected for the enzyme immobilization process. The immobilized lipase exhibited excellent thermal stability and reusability in comparison with the free enzyme. This novel strategy would simplify the reaction protocol and improve the efficiency of materials functionalization, thus offering new potential applications in biotechnology and organocatalysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Analyzing indirect effects in cluster randomized trials. The effect of estimation method, number of groups and group sizes on accuracy and power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop eHox

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster randomized trials assess the effect of an intervention that is carried out at the group or cluster level. Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour is often used to model the effect of the intervention as an indirect effect mediated in turn by attitude, norms and behavioural intention. Structural equation modelling (SEM is the technique of choice to estimate indirect effects and their significance. However, this is a large sample technique, and its application in a cluster randomized trial assumes a relatively large number of clusters. In practice, the number of clusters in these studies tends to be relatively small, e.g. much less than fifty. This study uses simulation methods to find the lowest number of clusters needed when multilevel SEM is used to estimate the indirect effect. Maximum likelihood estimation is compared to Bayesian analysis, with the central quality criteria being accuracy of the point estimate and the confidence interval. We also investigate the power of the test for the indirect effect. We conclude that Bayes estimation works well with much smaller cluster level sample sizes such as 20 cases than maximum likelihood estimation; although the bias is larger the coverage is much better. When only 5 to 10 clusters are available per treatment condition even with Bayesian estimation problems occur.

  3. Gene co-expression analysis identifies gene clusters associated with isotropic and polarized growth in Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltussen, Tim J H; Coolen, Jordy P M; Zoll, Jan; Verweij, Paul E; Melchers, Willem J G

    2018-04-26

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprophytic fungus that extensively produces conidia. These microscopic asexually reproductive structures are small enough to reach the lungs. Germination of conidia followed by hyphal growth inside human lungs is a key step in the establishment of infection in immunocompromised patients. RNA-Seq was used to analyze the transcriptome of dormant and germinating A. fumigatus conidia. Construction of a gene co-expression network revealed four gene clusters (modules) correlated with a growth phase (dormant, isotropic growth, polarized growth). Transcripts levels of genes encoding for secondary metabolites were high in dormant conidia. During isotropic growth, transcript levels of genes involved in cell wall modifications increased. Two modules encoding for growth and cell cycle/DNA processing were associated with polarized growth. In addition, the co-expression network was used to identify highly connected intermodular hub genes. These genes may have a pivotal role in the respective module and could therefore be compelling therapeutic targets. Generally, cell wall remodeling is an important process during isotropic and polarized growth, characterized by an increase of transcripts coding for hyphal growth and cell cycle/DNA processing when polarized growth is initiated. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-01-01

    Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x TBA ≈ 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x TBA ≈ 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x TBA ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level

  5. Influence of stacking fault energies on the size distribution and character of defect clusters formed by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the influence of the stacking fault energy (SFE as a single variable parameter on defect formation by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals. The simulations are performed for energies of a primary knock-on atom (EPKA up to 50keV at 100K by using six sets of the recently developed embedded atom method–type potentials. Neither the number of residual defects nor their clustering behavior is found to be affected by the SFE, except for the mean size of the vacancy clusters at EPKA=50keV. The mean size increases as the SFE decreases because of the enhanced formation of large vacancy clusters, which prefer to have stacking faults inside them. On the other hand, the ratio of glissile self-interstitial atom (SIA clusters decreases as the SFE increases. At higher SFEs, both the number of Frank loops and number of perfect loops tend to decrease; instead, three-dimensional irregular clusters with higher densities appear, most of which are sessile. The effect of SFE on the number of Frank loops becomes apparent only at a high EPKA of 50keV, where comparably large SIA clusters can be formed with a higher density.

  6. Diffusion of two-dimensional epitaxial clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Facile versus nucleation-mediated behavior and their merging for larger sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, King C.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-01

    For diffusion of two-dimensional homoepitaxial clusters of N atoms on metal(100) surfaces mediated by edge atom hopping, macroscale continuum theory suggests that the diffusion coefficient scales like DN ~ N -β with β = 3/2. However, we find quite different and diverse behavior in multiple size regimes. These include: (i) facile diffusion for small sizes N < 9; (ii) slow nucleation-mediated diffusion with small β < 1 for “perfect” sizes N = N p = L 2 or L(L+1), for L = 3, 4,… having unique ground state shapes, for moderate sizes 9 ≤ N ≤ O(10 2 ); the same also applies for N = N p +3, N p + 4,… (iii) facile diffusion but with large β > 2 for N = Np + 1 and N p + 2 also for moderate sizes 9 ≤ N ≤ O(10 2 ); (iv) merging of the above distinct branches and subsequent anomalous scaling with 1 ≲ β < 3/2, reflecting the quasi-facetted structure of clusters, for larger N = O(10 2 ) to N = O(10 3 ); and (v) classic scaling with β = 3/2 for very large N = O(103) and above. The specified size ranges apply for typical model parameters. We focus on the moderate size regime where show that diffusivity cycles quasi-periodically from the slowest branch for N p + 3 (not Np) to the fastest branch for Np + 1. Behavior is quantified by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate stochastic lattice-gas model. However, precise analysis must account for a strong enhancement of diffusivity for short time increments due to back-correlation in the cluster motion. Further understanding of this enhancement, of anomalous size scaling behavior, and of the merging of various branches, is facilitated by combinatorial analysis of the number of the ground state and low-lying excited state cluster configurations, and also of kink populations.

  7. Using self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces to calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for the sulfuric acid-water binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    We construct tables of reaction enthalpies and entropies for the association reactions involving sulfuric acid vapor, water vapor, and the bisulfate ion. These tables are created from experimental measurements and quantum chemical calculations for molecular clusters and a classical thermodynamic model for larger clusters. These initial tables are not thermodynamically consistent. For example, the Gibbs free energy of associating a cluster consisting of one acid molecule and two water molecules depends on the order in which the cluster was assembled: add two waters and then the acid or add an acid and a water and then the second water. We adjust the values within the tables using the method of Lagrange multipliers to minimize the adjustments and produce self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces for the neutral clusters and the charged clusters. With the self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces, we calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for a variety of atmospheric conditions. Depending on the conditions, nucleation can be dominated by growth along the neutral channel or growth along the ion channel followed by ion-ion recombination.

  8. Hydration structure and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in water clusters of varying size and temperature: Quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A theoretical study of hydroxide ion-water clusters is carried for varying cluster size and temperature. ► The structures of OH − (H 2 O) n are found out through quantum chemical calculations for n = 4, 8, 16 and 20. ► The finite temperature behavior of the clusters is studied through ab initio dynamical simulations. ► The spectral features of OH modes (deuterated) and their dependence on hydrogen bonding states of water are discussed. ► The mechanism and kinetics of proton transfer processes in these anionic clusters are also investigated. - Abstract: We have investigated the hydration structure and dynamics of OH − (H 2 O) n clusters (n = 4, 8, 16 and 20) by means of quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that the solvation structure of the hydroxide ion transforms from three and four-coordinated surface states to five-coordinated interior state with increase in cluster size. Several other isomeric structures with energies not very different from the most stable isomer are also found. Ab initio simulations show that the most probable configurations at higher temperatures need not be the lowest energy isomeric structure. The rates of proton transfer in these clusters are found to be slower than that in bulk water. The vibrational spectral calculations reveal distinct features for free OH (deuterated) stretch modes of water in different hydrogen bonding states. Effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties are also investigated for the largest cluster considered here.

  9. The role of cluster types and firm size in designing the level of network relations: The experience of the Antalya tourism region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus Öztürk, H.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of developing global as well as local networks between tourism firms and clusters seeking to attain global competitiveness has been increasingly emphasized in previous studies. The aim of this paper is to examine the role of local and global networking in firms of different sizes and

  10. Using Cluster Analysis and ICP-MS to Identify Groups of Ecstasy Tablets in Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Camila; de Oliveira Souza, Vanessa Cristina; Togni, Loraine Rezende; da Costa, José Luiz; Campiglia, Andres Dobal; Barbosa, Fernando; Barbosa, Rommel Melgaço

    2017-11-01

    The variations found in the elemental composition in ecstasy samples result in spectral profiles with useful information for data analysis, and cluster analysis of these profiles can help uncover different categories of the drug. We provide a cluster analysis of ecstasy tablets based on their elemental composition. Twenty-five elements were determined by ICP-MS in tablets apprehended by Sao Paulo's State Police, Brazil. We employ the K-means clustering algorithm along with C4.5 decision tree to help us interpret the clustering results. We found a better number of two clusters within the data, which can refer to the approximated number of sources of the drug which supply the cities of seizures. The C4.5 model was capable of differentiating the ecstasy samples from the two clusters with high prediction accuracy using the leave-one-out cross-validation. The model used only Nd, Ni, and Pb concentration values in the classification of the samples. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Mechanistic study on lowering the sensitivity of positive atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometric analyses: size-dependent reactivity of solvent clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Choi, Cheol Ho; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-11-15

    Understanding the mechanism of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) is important for studies employing APPI liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In this study, the APPI mechanism for polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds dissolved in toluene and methanol or water mixture was investigated by use of MS analysis and quantum mechanical simulation. In particular, four different mechanisms that could contribute to the signal reduction were considered based on a combination of MS data and quantum mechanical calculations. The APPI mechanism is clarified by combining MS data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To obtain MS data, a positive-mode (+) APPI Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer was used to analyze each solution. DFT calculations were performed using the general atomic and molecular electronic structure system (GAMESS). The experimental results indicated that methanol significantly reduced the signal in (+) APPI, but no significative signal reduction was observed when water was used as a co-solvent with toluene. The signal reduction is more significant especially for molecular ions than for protonated ions. Therefore, important information about the mechanism of methanol-induced signal reduction in (+) APPI-MS can be gained due its negative impact on APPI efficiency. The size-dependent reactivity of methanol clusters ((CH3 OH)n , n = 1-8) is an important factor in determining the sensitivity of (+) APPI-MS analyses. Clusters can compete with toluene radical ions for electrons. The reactivity increases as the sizes of the methanol clusters increase and this effect can be caused by the size-dependent ionization energy of the solvent clusters. The resulting increase in cluster reactivity explains the flow rate and temperature-dependent signal reduction observed in the analytes. Based on the results presented here, minimizing the sizes of methanol clusters can improve the sensitivity of LC/(+)-APPI-MS. Copyright © 2015 John

  12. Nonsphericity Index and Size Ratio Identify Morphologic Differences between Growing and Stable Aneurysms in a Longitudinal Study of 93 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, A; Xu, M; Yokota, H; Scalzo, F; Morimoto, E; Salamon, N

    2018-01-25

    Recent studies have strongly associated intracranial aneurysm growth with increased risk of rupture. Identifying aneurysms that are likely to grow would be beneficial to plan more effective monitoring and intervention strategies. Our hypothesis is that for unruptured intracranial aneurysms of similar size, morphologic characteristics differ between aneurysms that continue to grow and those that do not. From aneurysms in our medical center with follow-up imaging dates in 2015, ninety-three intracranial aneurysms (23 growing, 70 stable) were selected. All CTA images for the aneurysm diagnosis and follow-up were collected, a total of 348 3D imaging studies. Aneurysm 3D geometry for each imaging study was reconstructed, and morphologic characteristics, including volume, surface area, nonsphericity index, aspect ratio, and size ratio were calculated. Morphologic characteristics were found to differ between growing and stable groups. For aneurysms of 7 mm, volume ( P differ between those that are growing and those that are stable. The nonsphericity index, in particular, was found to be higher among growing aneurysms. The size ratio was found to be the second most significant parameter associated with growth. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  14. Unsupervised consensus cluster analysis of [18F]-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography identified textural features for the diagnosis of pseudoprogression in high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebir, Sied; Khurshid, Zain; Gaertner, Florian C; Essler, Markus; Hattingen, Elke; Fimmers, Rolf; Scheffler, Björn; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Glas, Martin

    2017-01-31

    Timely detection of pseudoprogression (PSP) is crucial for the management of patients with high-grade glioma (HGG) but remains difficult. Textural features of O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography (FET-PET) mirror tumor uptake heterogeneity; some of them may be associated with tumor progression. Fourteen patients with HGG and suspected of PSP underwent FET-PET imaging. A set of 19 conventional and textural FET-PET features were evaluated and subjected to unsupervised consensus clustering. The final diagnosis of true progression vs. PSP was based on follow-up MRI using RANO criteria. Three robust clusters have been identified based on 10 predominantly textural FET-PET features. None of the patients with PSP fell into cluster 2, which was associated with high values for textural FET-PET markers of uptake heterogeneity. Three out of 4 patients with PSP were assigned to cluster 3 that was largely associated with low values of textural FET-PET features. By comparison, tumor-to-normal brain ratio (TNRmax) at the optimal cutoff 2.1 was less predictive of PSP (negative predictive value 57% for detecting true progression, p=0.07 vs. 75% with cluster 3, p=0.04). Clustering based on textural O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET features may provide valuable information in assessing the elusive phenomenon of pseudoprogression.

  15. Athletic groin pain (part 2): a prospective cohort study on the biomechanical evaluation of change of direction identifies three clusters of movement patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn-Miller, A; Richter, C; King, E; Gore, S; Moran, K; Strike, S; Falvey, E C

    2017-01-01

    Background Athletic groin pain (AGP) is prevalent in sports involving repeated accelerations, decelerations, kicking and change-of-direction movements. Clinical and radiological examinations lack the ability to assess pathomechanics of AGP, but three-dimensional biomechanical movement analysis may be an important innovation. Aim The primary aim was to describe and analyse movements used by patients with AGP during a maximum effort change-of-direction task. The secondary aim was to determine if specific anatomical diagnoses were related to a distinct movement strategy. Methods 322 athletes with a current symptom of chronic AGP participated. Structured and standardised clinical assessments and radiological examinations were performed on all participants. Additionally, each participant performed multiple repetitions of a planned maximum effort change-of-direction task during which whole body kinematics were recorded. Kinematic and kinetic data were examined using continuous waveform analysis techniques in combination with a subgroup design that used gap statistic and hierarchical clustering. Results Three subgroups (clusters) were identified. Kinematic and kinetic measures of the clusters differed strongly in patterns observed in thorax, pelvis, hip, knee and ankle. Cluster 1 (40%) was characterised by increased ankle eversion, external rotation and knee internal rotation and greater knee work. Cluster 2 (15%) was characterised by increased hip flexion, pelvis contralateral drop, thorax tilt and increased hip work. Cluster 3 (45%) was characterised by high ankle dorsiflexion, thorax contralateral drop, ankle work and prolonged ground contact time. No correlation was observed between movement clusters and clinically palpated location of the participant's pain. Conclusions We identified three distinct movement strategies among athletes with long-standing groin pain during a maximum effort change-of-direction task These movement strategies were not related to clinical

  16. Molecular limit of a bulk semiconductor: size dependent optical spectroscopy study of CdSe cluster molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V.N.; Banin, U. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Physical Chemistry; Eichhoefer, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Nanotechnologie; Fenske, D. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Nanotechnologie; Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2001-03-01

    Steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of a homologous series of CdSe cluster molecules were performed over a broad temperature range (T = 5-200 K). The absorption and low temperature PLE onset of the clusters shifts systematically to the blue in smaller clusters, manifesting the quantum confinement effect. The emission in all cluster molecules is observed only at low temperatures and is red-shifted significantly from the absorption onset. It is assigned to optically forbidden transitions involving surface states, as substantiated by the {mu}s range of lifetimes and by the involvement of low frequency vibrations of capping selenophenol ligands in the nonradiative relaxation of excited cluster molecules. (orig.)

  17. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n = 70) reported multiple symptoms (M = 8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Skeletal dosimetry for external exposures to photons based on {mu}CT images of spongiosa: Consideration of voxel resolution, cluster size, and medullary bone surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; Brown, K. A. Robson [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 500, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil and Escola Politecnica, UPE, Rua Benfica 455, CEP 50751-460, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Imaging Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, 43 Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Skeletal dosimetry based on {mu}CT images of trabecular bone has recently been introduced to calculate the red bone marrow (RBM) and the bone surface cell (BSC) equivalent doses in human phantoms for external exposure to photons. In order to use the {mu}CT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the skeletons were replaced at run time by so-called micromatrices, which have exactly the size of a spongiosa voxel and contain segmented trabecular bone and marrow microvoxels. A cluster (=parallelepiped) of 2x2x2=8 micromatrices was used systematically and periodically throughout the spongiosa volume during the radiation transport calculation. Systematic means that when a particle leaves a spongiosa voxel to enter into a neighboring spongiosa voxel, then the next micromatrix in the cluster will be used. Periodical means that if the particle travels through more than two spongiosa voxels in a row, then the cluster will be repeated. Based on the bone samples available at the time, clusters of up to 3x3x3=27 micromatrices were studied. While for a given trabecular bone volume fraction the whole-body RBM equivalent dose showed converging results for cluster sizes between 8 and 27 micromatrices, this was not the case for the BSC equivalent dose. The BSC equivalent dose seemed to be very sensitive to the number, form, and thickness of the trabeculae. In addition, the cluster size and/or the microvoxel resolution were considered to be possible causes for the differences observed. In order to resolve this problem, this study used a bone sample large enough to extract clusters containing up to 8x8x8=512 micromatrices and which was scanned with two different voxel resolutions. Taking into account a recent proposal, this investigation also calculated the BSC equivalent dose on medullary surfaces of cortical bone in the arm and leg bones. The results showed (1) that different voxel resolutions have no effect on the RBM equivalent dose but do influence the BSC equivalent

  19. Diffusion of two-dimensional epitaxial clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Facile versus nucleation-mediated behavior and their merging for larger sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, King C.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2017-12-01

    For diffusion of two-dimensional homoepitaxial clusters of N atoms on metal (100) surfaces mediated by edge atom hopping, macroscale continuum theory suggests that the diffusion coefficient scales like DN˜ N-β with β =3 /2 . However, we find quite different and diverse behavior in multiple size regimes. These include: (i) facile diffusion for small sizes N mediated diffusion with small β 2 for N =Np+1 and Np+2 also for moderate sizes 9 ≤N ≤O (102) ; (iv) merging of the above distinct branches and subsequent anomalous scaling with 1 ≲β analysis must account for a strong enhancement of diffusivity for short time increments due to back correlation in the cluster motion. Further understanding of this enhancement, of anomalous size scaling behavior, and of the merging of various branches, is facilitated by combinatorial analysis of the number of the ground-state and low-lying excited state cluster configurations, and also of kink populations.

  20. Accounting for regional background and population size in the detection of spatial clusters and outliers using geostatistical filtering and spatial neutral models: the case of lung cancer in Long Island, New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goovaerts Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete Spatial Randomness (CSR is the null hypothesis employed by many statistical tests for spatial pattern, such as local cluster or boundary analysis. CSR is however not a relevant null hypothesis for highly complex and organized systems such as those encountered in the environmental and health sciences in which underlying spatial pattern is present. This paper presents a geostatistical approach to filter the noise caused by spatially varying population size and to generate spatially correlated neutral models that account for regional background obtained by geostatistical smoothing of observed mortality rates. These neutral models were used in conjunction with the local Moran statistics to identify spatial clusters and outliers in the geographical distribution of male and female lung cancer in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties, New York, USA. Results We developed a typology of neutral models that progressively relaxes the assumptions of null hypotheses, allowing for the presence of spatial autocorrelation, non-uniform risk, and incorporation of spatially heterogeneous population sizes. Incorporation of spatial autocorrelation led to fewer significant ZIP codes than found in previous studies, confirming earlier claims that CSR can lead to over-identification of the number of significant spatial clusters or outliers. Accounting for population size through geostatistical filtering increased the size of clusters while removing most of the spatial outliers. Integration of regional background into the neutral models yielded substantially different spatial clusters and outliers, leading to the identification of ZIP codes where SMR values significantly depart from their regional background. Conclusion The approach presented in this paper enables researchers to assess geographic relationships using appropriate null hypotheses that account for the background variation extant in real-world systems. In particular, this new

  1. A New Approach to Identify High Burnout Medical Staffs by Kernel K-Means Cluster Analysis in a Regional Teaching Hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Huang, Shian-Chang; Huang, Chih-Hsuan; Wu, Hsin-Hung

    2016-01-01

    This study uses kernel k-means cluster analysis to identify medical staffs with high burnout. The data collected in October to November 2014 are from the emotional exhaustion dimension of the Chinese version of Safety Attitudes Questionnaire in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. The number of effective questionnaires including the entire staffs such as physicians, nurses, technicians, pharmacists, medical administrators, and respiratory therapists is 680. The results show that 8 clusters are generated by kernel k-means method. Employees in clusters 1, 4, and 5 are relatively in good conditions, whereas employees in clusters 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 need to be closely monitored from time to time because they have relatively higher degree of burnout. When employees with higher degree of burnout are identified, the hospital management can take actions to improve the resilience, reduce the potential medical errors, and, eventually, enhance the patient safety. This study also suggests that the hospital management needs to keep track of medical staffs' fatigue conditions and provide timely assistance for burnout recovery through employee assistance programs, mindfulness-based stress reduction programs, positivity currency buildup, and forming appreciative inquiry groups. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. A New Approach to Identify High Burnout Medical Staffs by Kernel K-Means Cluster Analysis in a Regional Teaching Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii-Ching Lee PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study uses kernel k-means cluster analysis to identify medical staffs with high burnout. The data collected in October to November 2014 are from the emotional exhaustion dimension of the Chinese version of Safety Attitudes Questionnaire in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. The number of effective questionnaires including the entire staffs such as physicians, nurses, technicians, pharmacists, medical administrators, and respiratory therapists is 680. The results show that 8 clusters are generated by kernel k-means method. Employees in clusters 1, 4, and 5 are relatively in good conditions, whereas employees in clusters 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 need to be closely monitored from time to time because they have relatively higher degree of burnout. When employees with higher degree of burnout are identified, the hospital management can take actions to improve the resilience, reduce the potential medical errors, and, eventually, enhance the patient safety. This study also suggests that the hospital management needs to keep track of medical staffs’ fatigue conditions and provide timely assistance for burnout recovery through employee assistance programs, mindfulness-based stress reduction programs, positivity currency buildup, and forming appreciative inquiry groups.

  3. Gene cluster statistics with gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Narayanan; Durand, Dannie

    2009-05-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such "gene clusters" is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  4. Identifying the source of farmed escaped Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Bayesian clustering analysis increases accuracy of assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Skaala, Oystein

    2009-01-01

    44 cages located on 26 farms in the Hardangerfjord, western Norway. This fjord represents one of the major salmon farming areas in Norway, with a production of 57,000 t in 2007. Based upon genetic data from 17 microsatellite markers, significant but highly variable differentiation was observed among....... Accuracy of assignment varied greatly among the individual samples. For the Bayesian clustered data set consisting of five genetic groups, overall accuracy of self-assignment was 99%, demonstrating the effectiveness of this strategy to significantly increase accuracy of assignment, albeit at the expense...

  5. Psychosocial Clusters and their Associations with Well-Being and Health: An Empirical Strategy for Identifying Psychosocial Predictors Most Relevant to Racially/Ethnically Diverse Women’s Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M.; Bowen, Deborah; Weinberg, Janice; Kroenke, Candyce; Luo, Juhua; Messina, Catherine; Shumaker, Sally; Tindle, Hilary A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Strategies for identifying the most relevant psychosocial predictors in studies of racial/ethnic minority women’s health are limited because they largely exclude cultural influences and they assume that psychosocial predictors are independent. This paper proposes and tests an empirical solution. METHODS Hierarchical cluster analysis, conducted with data from 140,652 Women’s Health Initiative participants, identified clusters among individual psychosocial predictors. Multivariable analyses tested associations between clusters and health outcomes. RESULTS A Social Cluster and a Stress Cluster were identified. The Social Cluster was positively associated with well-being and inversely associated with chronic disease index, and the Stress Cluster was inversely associated with well-being and positively associated with chronic disease index. As hypothesized, the magnitude of association between clusters and outcomes differed by race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS By identifying psychosocial clusters and their associations with health, we have taken an important step toward understanding how individual psychosocial predictors interrelate and how empirically formed Stress and Social clusters relate to health outcomes. This study has also demonstrated important insight about differences in associations between these psychosocial clusters and health among racial/ethnic minorities. These differences could signal the best pathways for intervention modification and tailoring. PMID:27279761

  6. A Fast SVM-Based Tongue’s Colour Classification Aided by k-Means Clustering Identifiers and Colour Attributes as Computer-Assisted Tool for Tongue Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Diyana Kamarudin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In tongue diagnosis, colour information of tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. Qualitatively, practitioners may have difficulty in their judgement due to the instable lighting condition and naked eye’s ability to capture the exact colour distribution on the tongue especially the tongue with multicolour substance. To overcome this ambiguity, this paper presents a two-stage tongue’s multicolour classification based on a support vector machine (SVM whose support vectors are reduced by our proposed k-means clustering identifiers and red colour range for precise tongue colour diagnosis. In the first stage, k-means clustering is used to cluster a tongue image into four clusters of image background (black, deep red region, red/light red region, and transitional region. In the second-stage classification, red/light red tongue images are further classified into red tongue or light red tongue based on the red colour range derived in our work. Overall, true rate classification accuracy of the proposed two-stage classification to diagnose red, light red, and deep red tongue colours is 94%. The number of support vectors in SVM is improved by 41.2%, and the execution time for one image is recorded as 48 seconds.

  7. A Fast SVM-Based Tongue's Colour Classification Aided by k-Means Clustering Identifiers and Colour Attributes as Computer-Assisted Tool for Tongue Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chia Yee; Kawanabe, Tadaaki; Odaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Fuminori

    2017-01-01

    In tongue diagnosis, colour information of tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. Qualitatively, practitioners may have difficulty in their judgement due to the instable lighting condition and naked eye's ability to capture the exact colour distribution on the tongue especially the tongue with multicolour substance. To overcome this ambiguity, this paper presents a two-stage tongue's multicolour classification based on a support vector machine (SVM) whose support vectors are reduced by our proposed k-means clustering identifiers and red colour range for precise tongue colour diagnosis. In the first stage, k-means clustering is used to cluster a tongue image into four clusters of image background (black), deep red region, red/light red region, and transitional region. In the second-stage classification, red/light red tongue images are further classified into red tongue or light red tongue based on the red colour range derived in our work. Overall, true rate classification accuracy of the proposed two-stage classification to diagnose red, light red, and deep red tongue colours is 94%. The number of support vectors in SVM is improved by 41.2%, and the execution time for one image is recorded as 48 seconds. PMID:29065640

  8. A Fast SVM-Based Tongue's Colour Classification Aided by k-Means Clustering Identifiers and Colour Attributes as Computer-Assisted Tool for Tongue Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Nur Diyana; Ooi, Chia Yee; Kawanabe, Tadaaki; Odaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Fuminori

    2017-01-01

    In tongue diagnosis, colour information of tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. Qualitatively, practitioners may have difficulty in their judgement due to the instable lighting condition and naked eye's ability to capture the exact colour distribution on the tongue especially the tongue with multicolour substance. To overcome this ambiguity, this paper presents a two-stage tongue's multicolour classification based on a support vector machine (SVM) whose support vectors are reduced by our proposed k -means clustering identifiers and red colour range for precise tongue colour diagnosis. In the first stage, k -means clustering is used to cluster a tongue image into four clusters of image background (black), deep red region, red/light red region, and transitional region. In the second-stage classification, red/light red tongue images are further classified into red tongue or light red tongue based on the red colour range derived in our work. Overall, true rate classification accuracy of the proposed two-stage classification to diagnose red, light red, and deep red tongue colours is 94%. The number of support vectors in SVM is improved by 41.2%, and the execution time for one image is recorded as 48 seconds.

  9. Nanometer size 3d–4d and 3d–5d substitutional clusters: Promising candidates for magnetic storageapplications

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Spin-polarized density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for FemRhn and FemPtn clusters having N=m+n,N≤19 atoms. The spin magnetic moments, orbital magnetic moments, and the magnetic anisotropy energies

  10. Evaluation of the detachment energy of hydrated phosphate anion over a wide range of cluster size and revisiting solvent-berg model: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup Kumar

    2014-12-01

    An explicit analytical expression has been obtained for vertical detachment energy (VDE) that can be used to calculate the same over a wide range (both stable and unstable regions) of cluster sizes including the bulk from the knowledge of VDE for a finite number of stable clusters (n = 16-23). The calculated VDE for the bulk is found to be very good in agreement (within 1%) with the available experimental result and the domain of instability lies between n = 0 and n = 15 for the hydrated clusters, PO3 -4 . nH2O. The minimum number (n0) of water molecules needed to stabilise the phosphate anion is 16. We are able to explain the origin of solvent-berg model and anomalous conductivity from the knowledge of first stable cluster. We have also provided a scheme to calculate the radius of the solvent-berg for phosphate anion. The calculated conductivity using Stokes-Einstein relation and the radius of solvent-berg is found to be very good in agreement (within 4%) with the available experimental results.

  11. The nano-fractal structured tungsten oxides films with high thermal stability prepared by the deposition of size-selected W clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Chemistry, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Dollinger, Andreas; Huether, Lukas; Blankenhorn, Moritz; Koehler, Kerstine; Gantefoer, Gerd [Konstanz University, Department of Physics, Constance (Germany); Seo, Hyun Ook [Sangmyung University, Department of Chemistry and Energy Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Size-selected W{sub n}{sup -} clusters (n = 1650) were deposited on the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface at room temperature under high vacuum conditions by utilizing a magnetron sputtering source and a magnet sector field. Moreover, geometrical structure and surface chemical states of deposited clusters were analyzed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The formation of 2-D islands (lateral size ∝150 nm) with multiple dendritic arms was observed by STM, and the structure of the individual W{sub 1650} clusters survived within the dendritic arms. To study the thermal stability of the nano-fractal structure under the atmospheric conditions, the sample was brought to the ambient air conditions and sequentially post-annealed at 200, 300, and 500 C in the air. The nano-fractal structure was maintained after the 1st post-annealing process at 200 C for 1 h in the air, and the subsequent 2nd post-annealing at 300 C (for 1 h, in the air) also did not induce any noticeable change in the topological structure of the sample. The topological changes were observed only after the further post-annealing at a higher temperature (at 500 C, 1 h) in the air. We show high potential use of these nano-structured films of tungsten oxides in ambient conditions. (orig.)

  12. Computational Study of Magic-Size CdSe Clusters with Complementary Passivation by Carboxylic and Amine Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Jain, Ankit; Sargent, Edward H.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and optical properties of tetrahedral CdSe magic clusters (average diameter.5 nm) protected by carboxyl and amine ligands, which correspond to previously reported experimental structures, are studied using density functional theory. We find extreme ligand packing densities, capping every single dangling bond of the inorganic core, strong dependence of the Z-type metal carboxylate binding on the amount of excess amine, and potential for improved photoluminescence upon replacing phenyl ligands with alkanes. The computed absorption spectra of the Cd35Se20 cluster agree well with experiments, resolving the 0.2 eV splitting of the first exciton peak due to spin-orbit coupling. We discuss the origin of the significant broadening of the optical spectra as due to phonons and structural variations in the ligand configurations and inorganic core apexes. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  13. Computational Study of Magic-Size CdSe Clusters with Complementary Passivation by Carboxylic and Amine Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr

    2016-04-28

    The electronic and optical properties of tetrahedral CdSe magic clusters (average diameter.5 nm) protected by carboxyl and amine ligands, which correspond to previously reported experimental structures, are studied using density functional theory. We find extreme ligand packing densities, capping every single dangling bond of the inorganic core, strong dependence of the Z-type metal carboxylate binding on the amount of excess amine, and potential for improved photoluminescence upon replacing phenyl ligands with alkanes. The computed absorption spectra of the Cd35Se20 cluster agree well with experiments, resolving the 0.2 eV splitting of the first exciton peak due to spin-orbit coupling. We discuss the origin of the significant broadening of the optical spectra as due to phonons and structural variations in the ligand configurations and inorganic core apexes. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  14. Nanometer size 3d–4d and 3d–5d substitutional clusters: Promising candidates for magnetic storageapplications

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-01

    Spin-polarized density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for FemRhn and FemPtn clusters having N=m+n,N≤19 atoms. The spin magnetic moments, orbital magnetic moments, and the magnetic anisotropy energies have been determined. A significant enhancement of magnetic anisotropy energies is found by the substitutional nanoalloying of Fe with Rh and Pt atoms. We obtained a remarkable non-monotonous dependence of the MAE as a function of Fe content, i.e., upon going from pure Fe to pure Rh and Pt. The substitutional nanoalloying boost the magnetic anisotropy energies by creating significant cluster symmetry lowerings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Fragmentation of size-selected Xe clusters: Why does the monomer ion channel dominate the Xen and Krn ionization?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poterya, Viktoriya; Fárník, Michal; Buck, U.; Bonhomommeneau, D.; Halberstadt, N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 280, 1-3 (2009), s. 78-84 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400400651; GA ČR GA203/06/1290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : cluster * fragmentation * ionization * molecular beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.117, year: 2009

  16. Fragmentation dynamics of size selected pyrrole clusters prepared by electron impact ionization: Forming a solvated dimer ion core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Profant, V.; Poterya, Viktoriya; Fárník, Michal; Slavíček, P.; Buck, U.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 49 (2007), s. 12477-12486 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400400651; GA ČR GA203/06/1290 Grant - others:GA ČR GP203/07/P449; University Grant(CZ) 8113-10/257852 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : pyrrole cluster s * structure * dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.918, year: 2007

  17. Identifying consumer segments in health services markets: an application of conjoint and cluster analyses to the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrol, N V; Gagon, J P

    1983-01-01

    Because of increasing competition, it is becoming more important that health care providers pursue consumer-based market segmentation strategies. This paper presents a methodology for identifying and describing consumer segments in health service markets, and demonstrates the use of the methodology by presenting a study of consumer segments in the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

  18. Proteins associated with the size and expansion rate of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall as identified by proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Delbosc, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) holds the key to non-surgical intervention and improved selection for AAA repair. We aimed to associate the basic proteomic composition of AAA wall tissue with the expansion rate and size in patients with AAA....

  19. RHAPSODY. I. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND FORMATION HISTORY FROM A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF RE-SIMULATED CLUSTER-SIZE HALOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Hahn, Oliver; Wechsler, Risa H.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results from the RHAPSODY cluster re-simulation project: a sample of 96 'zoom-in' simulations of dark matter halos of 10 14.8±0.05 h –1 M ☉ , selected from a 1 h –3 Gpc 3 volume. This simulation suite is the first to resolve this many halos with ∼5 × 10 6 particles per halo in the cluster mass regime, allowing us to statistically characterize the distribution of and correlation between halo properties at fixed mass. We focus on the properties of the main halos and how they are affected by formation history, which we track back to z = 12, over five decades in mass. We give particular attention to the impact of the formation history on the density profiles of the halos. We find that the deviations from the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model and the Einasto model depend on formation time. Late-forming halos tend to have considerable deviations from both models, partly due to the presence of massive subhalos, while early-forming halos deviate less but still significantly from the NFW model and are better described by the Einasto model. We find that the halo shapes depend only moderately on formation time. Departure from spherical symmetry impacts the density profiles through the anisotropic distribution of massive subhalos. Further evidence of the impact of subhalos is provided by analyzing the phase-space structure. A detailed analysis of the properties of the subhalo population in RHAPSODY is presented in a companion paper.

  20. High-throughput bacterial SNP typing identifies distinct clusters of Salmonella Typhi causing typhoid in Nepalese children

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holt, Kathryn E

    2010-05-31

    Abstract Background Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, which remains an important public health issue in many developing countries. Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, is an area of high incidence and the pediatric population appears to be at high risk of exposure and infection. Methods We recently defined the population structure of S. Typhi, using new sequencing technologies to identify nearly 2,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be used as unequivocal phylogenetic markers. Here we have used the GoldenGate (Illumina) platform to simultaneously type 1,500 of these SNPs in 62 S. Typhi isolates causing severe typhoid in children admitted to Patan Hospital in Kathmandu. Results Eight distinct S. Typhi haplotypes were identified during the 20-month study period, with 68% of isolates belonging to a subclone of the previously defined H58 S. Typhi. This subclone was closely associated with resistance to nalidixic acid, with all isolates from this group demonstrating a resistant phenotype and harbouring the same resistance-associated SNP in GyrA (Phe83). A secondary clone, comprising 19% of isolates, was observed only during the second half of the study. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of SNP typing for monitoring bacterial populations over a defined period in a single endemic setting. We provide evidence for genotype introduction and define a nalidixic acid resistant subclone of S. Typhi, which appears to be the dominant cause of severe pediatric typhoid in Kathmandu during the study period.

  1. Combining multiple hypothesis testing and affinity propagation clustering leads to accurate, robust and sample size independent classification on gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellariou Argiris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A feature selection method in microarray gene expression data should be independent of platform, disease and dataset size. Our hypothesis is that among the statistically significant ranked genes in a gene list, there should be clusters of genes that share similar biological functions related to the investigated disease. Thus, instead of keeping N top ranked genes, it would be more appropriate to define and keep a number of gene cluster exemplars. Results We propose a hybrid FS method (mAP-KL, which combines multiple hypothesis testing and affinity propagation (AP-clustering algorithm along with the Krzanowski & Lai cluster quality index, to select a small yet informative subset of genes. We applied mAP-KL on real microarray data, as well as on simulated data, and compared its performance against 13 other feature selection approaches. Across a variety of diseases and number of samples, mAP-KL presents competitive classification results, particularly in neuromuscular diseases, where its overall AUC score was 0.91. Furthermore, mAP-KL generates concise yet biologically relevant and informative N-gene expression signatures, which can serve as a valuable tool for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, as well as a source of potential disease biomarkers in a broad range of diseases. Conclusions mAP-KL is a data-driven and classifier-independent hybrid feature selection method, which applies to any disease classification problem based on microarray data, regardless of the available samples. Combining multiple hypothesis testing and AP leads to subsets of genes, which classify unknown samples from both, small and large patient cohorts with high accuracy.

  2. Application of cluster and discriminant analyses to diagnose lithological heterogeneity of the parent material according to its particle-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giniyatullin, K. G.; Valeeva, A. A.; Smirnova, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    Particle-size distribution in soddy-podzolic and light gray forest soils of the Botanical Garden of Kazan Federal University has been studied. The cluster analysis of data on the samples from genetic soil horizons attests to the lithological heterogeneity of the profiles of all the studied soils. It is probable that they are developed from the two-layered sediments with the upper colluvial layer underlain by the alluvial layer. According to the discriminant analysis, the major contribution to the discrimination of colluvial and alluvial layers is that of the fraction >0.25 mm. The results of canonical analysis show that there is only one significant discriminant function that separates alluvial and colluvial sediments on the investigated territory. The discriminant function correlates with the contents of fractions 0.05-0.01, 0.25-0.05, and >0.25 mm. Classification functions making it possible to distinguish between alluvial and colluvial sediments have been calculated. Statistical assessment of particle-size distribution data obtained for the plow horizons on ten plowed fields within the garden indicates that this horizon is formed from colluvial sediments. We conclude that the contents of separate fractions and their ratios cannot be used as a universal criterion of the lithological heterogeneity. However, adequate combination of the cluster and discriminant analyses makes it possible to give a comprehensive assessment of the lithology of soil samples from data on the contents of sand and silt fractions, which considerably increases the information value and reliability of the results.

  3. Multimorbidity Patterns in the Elderly: A New Approach of Disease Clustering Identifies Complex Interrelations between Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; Schön, Gerhard; Koller, Daniela; Hansen, Heike; Kolonko, Tina; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Wegscheider, Karl; Glaeske, Gerd; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Objective Multimorbidity is a common problem in the elderly that is significantly associated with higher mortality, increased disability and functional decline. Information about interactions of chronic diseases can help to facilitate diagnosis, amend prevention and enhance the patients' quality of life. The aim of this study was to increase the knowledge of specific processes of multimorbidity in an unselected elderly population by identifying patterns of statistically significantly associated comorbidity. Methods Multimorbidity patterns were identified by exploratory tetrachoric factor analysis based on claims data of 63,104 males and 86,176 females in the age group 65+. Analyses were based on 46 diagnosis groups incorporating all ICD-10 diagnoses of chronic diseases with a prevalence ≥ 1%. Both genders were analyzed separately. Persons were assigned to multimorbidity patterns if they had at least three diagnosis groups with a factor loading of 0.25 on the corresponding pattern. Results Three multimorbidity patterns were found: 1) cardiovascular/metabolic disorders [prevalence female: 30%; male: 39%], 2) anxiety/depression/somatoform disorders and pain [34%; 22%], and 3) neuropsychiatric disorders [6%; 0.8%]. The sampling adequacy was meritorious (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure: 0.85 and 0.84, respectively) and the factors explained a large part of the variance (cumulative percent: 78% and 75%, respectively). The patterns were largely age-dependent and overlapped in a sizeable part of the population. Altogether 50% of female and 48% of male persons were assigned to at least one of the three multimorbidity patterns. Conclusion This study shows that statistically significant co-occurrence of chronic diseases can be subsumed in three prevalent multimorbidity patterns if accounting for the fact that different multimorbidity patterns share some diagnosis groups, influence each other and overlap in a large part of the population. In recognizing the full complexity of

  4. Multimorbidity patterns in the elderly: a new approach of disease clustering identifies complex interrelations between chronic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Schäfer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Multimorbidity is a common problem in the elderly that is significantly associated with higher mortality, increased disability and functional decline. Information about interactions of chronic diseases can help to facilitate diagnosis, amend prevention and enhance the patients' quality of life. The aim of this study was to increase the knowledge of specific processes of multimorbidity in an unselected elderly population by identifying patterns of statistically significantly associated comorbidity. METHODS: Multimorbidity patterns were identified by exploratory tetrachoric factor analysis based on claims data of 63,104 males and 86,176 females in the age group 65+. Analyses were based on 46 diagnosis groups incorporating all ICD-10 diagnoses of chronic diseases with a prevalence ≥ 1%. Both genders were analyzed separately. Persons were assigned to multimorbidity patterns if they had at least three diagnosis groups with a factor loading of 0.25 on the corresponding pattern. RESULTS: Three multimorbidity patterns were found: 1 cardiovascular/metabolic disorders [prevalence female: 30%; male: 39%], 2 anxiety/depression/somatoform disorders and pain [34%; 22%], and 3 neuropsychiatric disorders [6%; 0.8%]. The sampling adequacy was meritorious (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure: 0.85 and 0.84, respectively and the factors explained a large part of the variance (cumulative percent: 78% and 75%, respectively. The patterns were largely age-dependent and overlapped in a sizeable part of the population. Altogether 50% of female and 48% of male persons were assigned to at least one of the three multimorbidity patterns. CONCLUSION: This study shows that statistically significant co-occurrence of chronic diseases can be subsumed in three prevalent multimorbidity patterns if accounting for the fact that different multimorbidity patterns share some diagnosis groups, influence each other and overlap in a large part of the population. In recognizing the

  5. Meaningful Effect Sizes, Intraclass Correlations, and Proportions of Variance Explained by Covariates for Planning Two- and Three-Level Cluster Randomized Trials of Social and Behavioral Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo; Reinke, Wendy M; Herman, Keith C; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Murray, Desiree W

    2016-09-30

    There is a need for greater guidance regarding design parameters and empirical benchmarks for social and behavioral outcomes to inform assumptions in the design and interpretation of cluster randomized trials (CRTs). We calculated the empirical reference values on critical research design parameters associated with statistical power for children's social and behavioral outcomes, including effect sizes, intraclass correlations (ICCs), and proportions of variance explained by a covariate at different levels (R 2 ). Children from kindergarten to Grade 5 in the samples from four large CRTs evaluating the effectiveness of two classroom- and two school-level preventive interventions. Teacher ratings of students' social and behavioral outcomes using the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Checklist and the Social Competence Scale-Teacher. Two types of effect size benchmarks were calculated: (1) normative expectations for change and (2) policy-relevant demographic performance gaps. The ICCs and R 2 were calculated using two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), where students are nested within schools, and three-level HLM, where students were nested within classrooms, and classrooms were nested within schools. Comprehensive tables of benchmarks and ICC values are provided to inform prevention researchers in interpreting the effect size of interventions and conduct power analyses for designing CRTs of children's social and behavioral outcomes. The discussion also provides a demonstration for how to use the parameter reference values provided in this article to calculate the sample size for two- and three-level CRTs designs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Demographic clusters identified within the northern Gulf of Mexico common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncates unusual mortality event: January 2010-June 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Venn-Watson

    Full Text Available A multi-year unusual mortality event (UME involving primarily common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates was declared in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM with an initial start date of February 2010 and remains ongoing as of August 2014. To examine potential changing characteristics of the UME over time, we compared the number and demographics of dolphin strandings from January 2010 through June 2013 across the entire GoM as well as against baseline (1990-2009 GoM stranding patterns. Years 2010 and 2011 had the highest annual number of stranded dolphins since Louisiana's record began, and 2011 was one of the years with the highest strandings for both Mississippi and Alabama. Statewide, annual numbers of stranded dolphins were not elevated for GoM coasts of Florida or Texas during the UME period. Demographic, spatial, and temporal clusters identified within this UME included increased strandings in northern coastal Louisiana and Mississippi (March-May 2010; Barataria Bay, Louisiana (August 2010-December 2011; Mississippi and Alabama (2011, including a high prevalence and number of stranded perinates; and multiple GoM states during early 2013. While the causes of the GoM UME have not been determined, the location and magnitude of dolphin strandings during and the year following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including the Barataria Bay cluster from August 2010 to December 2011, overlap in time and space with locations that received heavy and prolonged oiling. There are, however, multiple known causes of previous GoM dolphin UMEs, including brevetoxicosis and dolphin morbillivirus. Additionally, increased dolphin strandings occurred in northern Louisiana and Mississippi before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Identification of spatial, temporal, and demographic clusters within the UME suggest that this mortality event may involve different contributing factors varying by location, time, and bottlenose dolphin populations that will be

  7. Effect of Modifying Intervention Set Size with Acquisition Rate Data among Students Identified with a Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Katherine; Burns, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information that students can successfully learn and recall at least 1 day later is called an acquisition rate (AR) and is unique to the individual student. The current study extended previous drill rehearsal research with word recognition by (a) using students identified with a learning disability in reading, (b) assessing set sizes…

  8. Correlation between the size and the magnetic properties of Ag2+ clusters loaded on ceria surface and their catalytic performance in the total oxidation of propylene. EPR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hany, Sara; Skaf, Mira; Aouad, Samer; Gennequin, Cédric; Labaki, Madona; Abi-Aad, Edmond; Aboukaïs, Antoine

    2018-03-01

    Three different types of Ag2+ ions ("a", "b", and "c") have been identified and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) on 10% wt Ag/CeO2 prepared by impregnation method. One of them, Ag2+(b), behaves differently than the two others, Ag2+(a) and Ag2+(c), under redox atmospheres. The fact that, in reducing conditions (vacuum, propylene, hydrogen, and carbon black), Ag2+(a) and Ag2+(c) species were more easily reduced than Ag2+(b) ones, could not explain the catalytic performance and stability of this latter species compared to the first ones in the reaction of total oxidation of propylene. The EPR technique evidenced that Ag2+(b) species form, upon propene oxidation, a cluster. This cluster is composed of two parallel electron spins (dimer) and three nuclear spins (trimer). It seems that before propylene oxidation, Ag2+(b) clusters were ferromagnetic. This ferromagnetic character of Ag2+(b) species may explain their better catalytic performance, in propylene oxidation, than those of Ag2+(a) and Ag2+(c) ones.

  9. Development of a composite large-size SiPM (assembled matrix) based modular detector cluster for MAGIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, A., E-mail: ahahn@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Mazin, D., E-mail: mazin@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277–8582 (Japan); Bangale, P., E-mail: priya@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Dettlaff, A., E-mail: todettl@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Fink, D., E-mail: fink@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Grundner, F., E-mail: grundner@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Haberer, W., E-mail: haberer@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Maier, R., E-mail: rma@mpp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); and others

    2017-02-11

    The MAGIC collaboration operates two 17 m diameter Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) on the Canary Island of La Palma. Each of the two telescopes is currently equipped with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) based imaging camera. Due to the advances in the development of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), they are becoming a widely used alternative to PMTs in many research fields including gamma-ray astronomy. Within the Otto-Hahn group at the Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich, we are developing a SiPM based detector module for a possible upgrade of the MAGIC cameras and also for future experiments as, e.g., the Large Size Telescopes (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Because of the small size of individual SiPM sensors (6 mm×6 mm) with respect to the 1-inch diameter PMTs currently used in MAGIC, we use a custom-made matrix of SiPMs to cover the same detection area. We developed an electronic circuit to actively sum up and amplify the SiPM signals. Existing non-imaging hexagonal light concentrators (Winston cones) used in MAGIC have been modified for the angular acceptance of the SiPMs by using C++ based ray tracing simulations. The first prototype based detector module includes seven channels and was installed into the MAGIC camera in May 2015. We present the results of the first prototype and its performance as well as the status of the project and discuss its challenges. - Highlights: • The design of the first SiPM large-size IACT pixel is described. • The simulation of the light concentrators is presented. • The temperature stability of the detector module is demonstrated. • The calibration procedure of SiPM device in the field is described.

  10. Development of a composite large-size SiPM (assembled matrix) based modular detector cluster for MAGIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, A.; Mazin, D.; Bangale, P.; Dettlaff, A.; Fink, D.; Grundner, F.; Haberer, W.; Maier, R.; Mirzoyan, R.; Podkladkin, S.; Teshima, M.; Wetteskind, H.

    2017-02-01

    The MAGIC collaboration operates two 17 m diameter Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) on the Canary Island of La Palma. Each of the two telescopes is currently equipped with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) based imaging camera. Due to the advances in the development of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), they are becoming a widely used alternative to PMTs in many research fields including gamma-ray astronomy. Within the Otto-Hahn group at the Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich, we are developing a SiPM based detector module for a possible upgrade of the MAGIC cameras and also for future experiments as, e.g., the Large Size Telescopes (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Because of the small size of individual SiPM sensors (6 mm×6 mm) with respect to the 1-inch diameter PMTs currently used in MAGIC, we use a custom-made matrix of SiPMs to cover the same detection area. We developed an electronic circuit to actively sum up and amplify the SiPM signals. Existing non-imaging hexagonal light concentrators (Winston cones) used in MAGIC have been modified for the angular acceptance of the SiPMs by using C++ based ray tracing simulations. The first prototype based detector module includes seven channels and was installed into the MAGIC camera in May 2015. We present the results of the first prototype and its performance as well as the status of the project and discuss its challenges.

  11. The effect of peer-group size on the delivery of feedback in basic life support refresher training: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Roh, Hye Rin; Chang, Chulho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho

    2016-07-04

    Students are largely providing feedback to one another when instructor facilitates peer feedback rather than teaching in group training. The number of students in a group affect the learning of students in the group training. We aimed to investigate whether a larger group size increases students' test scores on a post-training test with peer feedback facilitated by instructor after video-guided basic life support (BLS) refresher training. Students' one-rescuer adult BLS skills were assessed by a 2-min checklist-based test 1 year after the initial training. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of student number in a group on BLS refresher training. Participants included 115 final-year medical students undergoing their emergency medicine clerkship. The median number of students was 8 in the large groups and 4 in the standard group. The primary outcome was to examine group differences in post-training test scores after video-guided BLS training. Secondary outcomes included the feedback time, number of feedback topics, and results of end-of-training evaluation questionnaires. Scores on the post-training test increased over three consecutive tests with instructor-led peer feedback, but not differ between large and standard groups. The feedback time was longer and number of feedback topics generated by students were higher in standard groups compared to large groups on the first and second tests. The end-of-training questionnaire revealed that the students in large groups preferred the smaller group size compared to their actual group size. In this BLS refresher training, the instructor-led group feedback increased the test score after tutorial video-guided BLS learning, irrespective of the group size. A smaller group size allowed more participations in peer feedback.

  12. In Silico Analysis of Gene Expression Network Components Underlying Pigmentation Phenotypes in the Python Identified Evolutionarily Conserved Clusters of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J. L. Irizarry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Color variation provides the opportunity to investigate the genetic basis of evolution and selection. Reptiles are less studied than mammals. Comparative genomics approaches allow for knowledge gained in one species to be leveraged for use in another species. We describe a comparative vertebrate analysis of conserved regulatory modules in pythons aimed at assessing bioinformatics evidence that transcription factors important in mammalian pigmentation phenotypes may also be important in python pigmentation phenotypes. We identified 23 python orthologs of mammalian genes associated with variation in coat color phenotypes for which we assessed the extent of pairwise protein sequence identity between pythons and mouse, dog, horse, cow, chicken, anole lizard, and garter snake. We next identified a set of melanocyte/pigment associated transcription factors (CREB, FOXD3, LEF-1, MITF, POU3F2, and USF-1 that exhibit relatively conserved sequence similarity within their DNA binding regions across species based on orthologous alignments across multiple species. Finally, we identified 27 evolutionarily conserved clusters of transcription factor binding sites within ~200-nucleotide intervals of the 1500-nucleotide upstream regions of AIM1, DCT, MC1R, MITF, MLANA, OA1, PMEL, RAB27A, and TYR from Python bivittatus. Our results provide insight into pigment phenotypes in pythons.

  13. DNA-based hair sampling to identify road crossings and estimate population size of black bears in Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Wills, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    The planned widening of U.S. Highway 17 along the east boundary of Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GDSNWR) and a lack of knowledge about the refugeâ s bear population created the need to identify potential sites for wildlife crossings and estimate the size of the refugeâ s bear population. I collected black bear hair in order to collect DNA samples to estimate population size, density, and sex ratio, and determine road crossing locations for black bears (Ursus americanus) in G...

  14. On the size and structure of helium snowballs formed around charged atoms and clusters of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx(+) ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He20(84)Kr2(+) and the isobaric, nonmagic He41(84)Kr(+). Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr(+), which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa(+) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7300] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx(+) (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx(+) suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr(+) to Kr3(+). Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2(+) and He12Kr3(+) [Kim , J. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214301] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex(+) (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr(+) and HenXe(+) show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr(+); differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions.

  15. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  16. Identifying specific profiles in patients with different degrees of painful knee osteoarthritis based on serological biochemical and mechanistic pain biomarkers: a diagnostic approach based on cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Eskehave, Thomas Navndrup; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and pain biomarkers can be applied to patients with painful osteoarthritis profiles and may provide more details compared with conventional clinical tools. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal combination of biochemical and pain biomarkers for classification of patients with different degrees of knee pain and joint damage. Such profiling may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic options. A total of 216 patients with different degrees of knee pain (maximal pain during the last 24 hours rated on a visual analog scale [VAS]) (VAS 0-100) and 64 controls (VAS 0-9) were recruited. Patients were separated into 3 groups: VAS 10 to 39 (N = 81), VAS 40 to 69 (N = 70), and VAS 70 to 100 (N = 65). Pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation to pressure stimuli, and conditioning pain modulation were measured from the peripatellar and extrasegmental sites. Biochemical markers indicative for autoinflammation and immunity (VICM, CRP, and CRPM), synovial inflammation (CIIIM), cartilage loss (CIIM), and bone degradation (CIM) were analyzed. WOMAC, Lequesne, and pain catastrophizing scores were collected. Principal component analysis was applied to select the optimal variable subset, and cluster analysis was applied to this subset to create distinctly different knee pain profiles. Four distinct knee pain profiles were identified: profile A (N = 27), profile B (N = 59), profile C (N = 85), and profile D (N = 41). Each knee pain profile had a unique combination of biochemical markers, pain biomarkers, physical impairments, and psychological factors that may provide the basis for mechanism-based diagnosis, individualized treatment, and selection of patients for clinical trials evaluating analgesic compounds. These results introduce a new profiling for knee OA and should be regarded as preliminary.

  17. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The longit...... but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  18. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  19. Clustering of low-valence particles: structure and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Olga; Alberts, Jonathan; Munro, Edwin; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2014-08-01

    We compute the structure and kinetics of two systems of low-valence particles with three or six freely oriented bonds in two dimensions. The structure of clusters formed by trivalent particles is complex with loops and holes, while hexavalent particles self-organize into regular and compact structures. We identify the elementary structures which compose the clusters of trivalent particles. At initial stages of clustering, the clusters of trivalent particles grow with a power-law time dependence. Yet at longer times fusion and fission of clusters equilibrates and clusters form a heterogeneous phase with polydispersed sizes. These results emphasize the role of valence in the kinetics and stability of finite-size clusters.

  20. The Nature and Origin of UCDs in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Tully, R. Brent; Madrid, Juan; Phillipps, Steven; Carter, David; Peng, Eric

    2018-01-01

    UCDs are super massive star clusters found largely in dense regions but have also been found around individual galaxies and in smaller groups. Their origin is still under debate but currently favored scenarios include formation as giant star clusters, either as the brightest globular clusters or through mergers of super star clusters, themselves formed during major galaxy mergers, or as remnant nuclei from tidal stripping of nucleated dwarf ellipticals. Establishing the nature of these enigmatic objects has important implications for our understanding of star formation, star cluster formation, the missing satellite problem, and galaxy evolution. We are attempting to disentangle these competing formation scenarios with a large survey of UCDs in the Coma cluster. Using ACS two-passband imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we are using colors and sizes to identify the UCD cluster members. With a large size limited sample of the UCD population within the core region of the Coma cluster, we are investigating the population size, properties, and spatial distribution, and comparing that with the Coma globular cluster and nuclear star cluster populations to discriminate between the threshing and globular cluster scenarios. In previous work, we had found a possible correlation of UCD colors with host galaxy and a possible excess of UCDs around a non-central giant galaxy with an unusually large globular cluster population, both suggestive of a globular cluster origin. With a larger sample size and additional imaging fields that encompass the regions around these giant galaxies, we have found that the color correlation with host persists and the giant galaxy with unusually large globular cluster population does appear to host a large UCD population as well. We present the current status of the survey.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid modifies the clustering and size of lipid rafts and the lateral organization and surface expression of MHC class I of EL4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Salameh, Muhammad; Carraway, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    An emerging molecular mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts its effects is modification of lipid raft organization. The biophysical model, based on studies with liposomes, shows that DHA avoids lipid rafts because of steric incompatibility between DHA and cholesterol. The model predicts that DHA does not directly modify rafts; rather, it incorporates into nonrafts to modify the lateral organization and/or conformation of membrane proteins, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Here, we tested predictions of the model at a cellular level by incorporating oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and DHA, compared with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) control, into the membranes of EL4 cells. Quantitative microscopy showed that DHA, but not EPA, treatment, relative to the BSA control diminished lipid raft clustering and increased their size. Approximately 30% of DHA was incorporated directly into rafts without changing the distribution of cholesterol between rafts and nonrafts. Quantification of fluorescence colocalization images showed that DHA selectively altered MHC class I lateral organization by increasing the fraction of the nonraft protein into rafts compared with BSA. Both DHA and EPA treatments increased antibody binding to MHC class I compared with BSA. Antibody titration showed that DHA and EPA did not change MHC I conformation but increased total surface levels relative to BSA. Taken together, our findings are not in agreement with the biophysical model. Therefore, we propose a model that reconciles contradictory viewpoints from biophysical and cellular studies to explain how DHA modifies lipid rafts on several length scales. Our study supports the notion that rafts are an important target of DHA's mode of action.

  2. Using Radiochromic Films to Characterize the Dispersion of ZrO{sub 2} Nano-sized Grain Clusters in Protective Polymer Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontainha, C.C.P.; Nolasco, A.V. [Depto. de Engenharia Nuclear - DEN / UFMG - MG, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Santos, A.P.; Faria, L.O. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, C.P. 941, 30270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    . This result is discussed in terms of the high Z halides added to the sensitive layer of EB3 film, once the main components are C (42.3%), H (39.7%) and O (16.0%)1-2. Based on the above results, we have speculated about the abilities of XR-AQ films in the detection of the distribution of nano-sized particles that has high mass-energy attenuation coefficients for low energy x-rays, in polymer composites. In another investigation we tested the ability of XR-QA2 Gafchromic{sup R} films to evaluate the dispersion of ZrO{sub 2} nano-sized grain clusters in protective composites. The P(VDFTrFE)/ ZrO{sub 2} film was sandwiched between two XR-QA2 radiochromic films. In this setup, one radiochromic film is directly exposed to 100 mGy of the x-rays beam and another one measures the attenuated beam. After storage for 24 hours at room temperature under no light conditions, the irradiated radiochromic films were scanned under the same conditions in order to obtain a more reliable result. All films were scanned using the same size ROI in high resolution mode and saved as tagged image file format (TIFF). The untreated scanned image of the XR-AQ2 film directed exposed to the X-ray beam and the correspondent treated image with digital filters are shown. The untreated and treated image of the XR-AQ2 film that was exposed to the attenuated x-ray beam is shown. The image treated with digital filters seems to reproduce the dispersion of ZrO{sub 2} nano-sized grain clusters in the P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer matrix. This result is also discussed in terms of the high Z halides added to the sensitive layer of XR-AQ2 film and compared to the MEV images obtained from the P(VDF-TrFE)/ZrO{sub 2} composites. The results indicate a clear correlation between the 2D radiochromic image and the MEV photography.

  3. Identifying patterns of general practitioner service utilisation and their relationship with potentially preventable hospitalisations in people with diabetes: The utility of a cluster analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ninh Thi; Harris, Mark; Preen, David; Robinson, Suzanne; Moorin, Rachael

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to characterise use of general practitioners (GP) simultaneously across multiple attributes in people with diabetes and examine its impact on diabetes related potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPHs). Five-years of panel data from 40,625 adults with diabetes were sourced from Western Australian administrative health records. Cluster analysis (CA) was used to group individuals with similar patterns of GP utilisation characterised by frequency and recency of services. The relationship between GP utilisation cluster and the risk of PPHs was examined using multivariable random-effects negative binomial regression. CA categorised GP utilisation into three clusters: moderate; high and very high usage, having distinct patient characteristics. After adjusting for potential confounders, the rate of PPHs was significantly lower across all GP usage clusters compared with those with no GP usage; IRR = 0.67 (95%CI: 0.62-0.71) among the moderate, IRR = 0.70 (95%CI 0.66-0.73) high and IRR = 0.76 (95%CI 0.72-0.80) very high GP usage clusters. Combination of temporal factors with measures of frequency of use of GP services revealed patterns of primary health care utilisation associated with different underlying patient characteristics. Incorporation of multiple attributes, that go beyond frequency-based approaches may better characterise the complex relationship between use of GP services and diabetes-related hospitalisation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Binomial outcomes in dataset with some clusters of size two: can the dependence of twins be accounted for? A simulation study comparing the reliability of statistical methods based on a dataset of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzet, Odile; Peacock, Janet L

    2017-07-20

    The analysis of perinatal outcomes often involves datasets with some multiple births. These are datasets mostly formed of independent observations and a limited number of clusters of size two (twins) and maybe of size three or more. This non-independence needs to be accounted for in the statistical analysis. Using simulated data based on a dataset of preterm infants we have previously investigated the performance of several approaches to the analysis of continuous outcomes in the presence of some clusters of size two. Mixed models have been developed for binomial outcomes but very little is known about their reliability when only a limited number of small clusters are present. Using simulated data based on a dataset of preterm infants we investigated the performance of several approaches to the analysis of binomial outcomes in the presence of some clusters of size two. Logistic models, several methods of estimation for the logistic random intercept models and generalised estimating equations were compared. The presence of even a small percentage of twins means that a logistic regression model will underestimate all parameters but a logistic random intercept model fails to estimate the correlation between siblings if the percentage of twins is too small and will provide similar estimates to logistic regression. The method which seems to provide the best balance between estimation of the standard error and the parameter for any percentage of twins is the generalised estimating equations. This study has shown that the number of covariates or the level two variance do not necessarily affect the performance of the various methods used to analyse datasets containing twins but when the percentage of small clusters is too small, mixed models cannot capture the dependence between siblings.

  5. Binomial outcomes in dataset with some clusters of size two: can the dependence of twins be accounted for? A simulation study comparing the reliability of statistical methods based on a dataset of preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Sauzet

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of perinatal outcomes often involves datasets with some multiple births. These are datasets mostly formed of independent observations and a limited number of clusters of size two (twins and maybe of size three or more. This non-independence needs to be accounted for in the statistical analysis. Using simulated data based on a dataset of preterm infants we have previously investigated the performance of several approaches to the analysis of continuous outcomes in the presence of some clusters of size two. Mixed models have been developed for binomial outcomes but very little is known about their reliability when only a limited number of small clusters are present. Methods Using simulated data based on a dataset of preterm infants we investigated the performance of several approaches to the analysis of binomial outcomes in the presence of some clusters of size two. Logistic models, several methods of estimation for the logistic random intercept models and generalised estimating equations were compared. Results The presence of even a small percentage of twins means that a logistic regression model will underestimate all parameters but a logistic random intercept model fails to estimate the correlation between siblings if the percentage of twins is too small and will provide similar estimates to logistic regression. The method which seems to provide the best balance between estimation of the standard error and the parameter for any percentage of twins is the generalised estimating equations. Conclusions This study has shown that the number of covariates or the level two variance do not necessarily affect the performance of the various methods used to analyse datasets containing twins but when the percentage of small clusters is too small, mixed models cannot capture the dependence between siblings.

  6. Formation of stable products from cluster-cluster collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanova, Denitsa; Grigoryan, Valeri G; Springborg, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of stable products from copper cluster-cluster collisions is investigated by using classical molecular-dynamics simulations in combination with an embedded-atom potential. The dependence of the product clusters on impact energy, relative orientation of the clusters, and size of the clusters is studied. The structures and total energies of the product clusters are analysed and compared with those of the colliding clusters before impact. These results, together with the internal temperature, are used in obtaining an increased understanding of cluster fusion processes

  7. The regulatory network of cluster-root function and development in phosphate-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus) identified by transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengrui; Straub, Daniel; Yang, Huaiyu; Kania, Angelika; Shen, Jianbo; Ludewig, Uwe; Neumann, Günter

    2014-07-01

    Lupinus albus serves as model plant for root-induced mobilization of sparingly soluble soil phosphates via the formation of cluster-roots (CRs) that mediate secretion of protons, citrate, phenolics and acid phosphatases (APases). This study employed next-generation sequencing to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind these complex adaptive responses at the transcriptome level. We compared different stages of CR development, including pre-emergent (PE), juvenile (JU) and the mature (MA) stages. The results confirmed that the primary metabolism underwent significant modifications during CR maturation, promoting the biosynthesis of organic acids, as had been deduced from physiological studies. Citrate catabolism was downregulated, associated with citrate accumulation in MA clusters. Upregulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway reflected the accumulation of phenolics. Specific transcript expression of ALMT and MATE transporter genes correlated with the exudation of citrate and flavonoids. The expression of transcripts related to nucleotide degradation and APases in MA clusters coincided with the re-mobilization and hydrolysis of organic phosphate resources. Most interestingly, hormone-related gene expression suggested a central role of ethylene during CR maturation. This was associated with the upregulation of the iron (Fe)-deficiency regulated network that mediates ethylene-induced expression of Fe-deficiency responses in other species. Finally, transcripts related to abscisic acid and jasmonic acid were upregulated in MA clusters, while auxin- and brassinosteroid-related genes and cytokinin receptors were most strongly expressed during CR initiation. Key regulations proposed by the RNA-seq data were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and some physiological analyses. A model for the gene network regulating CR development and function is presented. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Au70S20(PPh3)12: an intermediate sized metalloid gold cluster stabilized by the Au4S4 ring motif and Au-PPh3 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzler, Sebastian; Schrenk, Claudio; Frojd, Andrew R; Häkkinen, Hannu; Clayborne, Andre Z; Schnepf, Andreas

    2018-01-02

    Reducing (Ph 3 P)AuSC(SiMe 3 ) 3 with l-Selectride® gives the medium-sized metalloid gold cluster Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 . Computational studies show that the phosphine bound Au-atoms not only stabilize the electronic structure of Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 , but also behave as electron acceptors leading to auride-like gold atoms on the exterior.

  9. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-01-01

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community

  10. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963......-2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing...... in new resources to the cluster but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  11. Results from an exploratory study to identify the factors that contribute to success for UK medical device small- and medium-sized enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, P C; Williams, D J

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the results from an exploratory study that sets out to identify and compare the strategic approaches and patterns of business practice employed by 14 UK small- and medium-sized enterprises to achieve success in the medical device sector of the health-care industry. An interview-based survey was used to construct individual case studies of the medical device technology (MDT) companies. A cross-case analysis was performed to search for patterns and themes that cut across these individual cases. Exploratory results revealed the heterogeneity of MDT companies and the distinctive features of the MDT innovation process that emphasize the importance of a strategic approach for achieving milestones in the product development and exploitation process and for creating value for the company and its stakeholders. Recognizing the heterogeneity of MDT companies, these exploratory findings call for further investigation to understand better the influence of components of the MDT innovation process on the commercialization life cycle and value trajectory. This is required to assist start-up or spin-out MDT companies in the UK and worldwide to navigate the critical transitions that determine access to financial and consumer markets and enhance the potential to build a successful business. This will be important not only for bioscience-based companies but also for engineering-based companies aiming to convert their activities into medical devices and the health- and social-care market.

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Soranzo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide (GW scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7 and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11. One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12 identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk and lower-body (hip axis and femur skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4, hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4, and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6. Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.

  13. Identifying a size-specific hazard of silica nanoparticles after intravenous administration and its relationship to the other hazards that have negative correlations with the particle size in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Takayuki; Hirai, Toshiro; Izumi, Natsumi; Eto, Shun-ichi; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Nagano, Kazuya; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2017-03-01

    Many of the beneficial and toxic biological effects of nanoparticles have been shown to have a negative correlation with particle size. However, few studies have demonstrated biological effects that only occur at specific nanoparticle sizes. Further elucidation of the size-specific biological effects of nanoparticles may reveal not only unknown toxicities, but also novel benefits of nanoparticles. We used surface-unmodified silica particles with a wide range of diameters and narrow size intervals between the diameters (10, 30, 50, 70, 100, 300, and 1000 nm) to investigate the relationship between particle size and acute toxicity after intravenous administration in mice. Negative correlations between particle size and thrombocytopenia, liver damage, and lethal toxicity were observed. However, a specific size-effect was observed for the severity of hypothermia, where silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm induced the most severe hypothermia. Further investigation revealed that this hypothermia was mediated not by histamine, but by platelet-activating factor, and it was independent of the thrombocytopenia and the liver damage. In addition, macrophages/Kupffer cells and platelets, but not neutrophils, play a critical role in the hypothermia. The present results reveal that silica nanoparticles have particle size-specific toxicity in mice, suggesting that other types of nanoparticles may also have biological effects that only manifest at specific particle sizes. Further study of the size-specific effects of nanoparticles is essential for safer and more effective nanomedicines.

  14. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  15. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  16. A simulation study of sample size demonstrated the importance of the number of events per variable to develop prediction models in clustered data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynants, L.; Bouwmeester, W.; Moons, K. G. M.; Moerbeek, M.; Timmerman, D.; Van Huffel, S.; Van Calster, B.; Vergouwe, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the influence of the amount of clustering [intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0%, 5%, or 20%], the number of events per variable (EPV) or candidate predictor (EPV = 5, 10, 20, or 50), and backward variable selection on the performance of prediction models.

  17. Structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of small-sized Zr{sub 2}Si{sub n} (n=1-11) clusters. A density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jing-He; Liu, Chang-Xin [Henan Institute of Education, Zhengzhou (China). Dept. of Physics; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Cheng [Nanyang Normal Univ (China). Dept. of Physics; Yang, Gui [Anyang Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Physics and Electrical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio methods based on density functional theory at B3LYP level have been applied in investigating the equilibrium geometries, growth patterns, relative stabilities, and electronic properties of Zr{sub 2}-doped Si{sub n} clusters. The optimisation results shown that the lowest-energy configurations for Zr{sub 2}Si{sub n} clusters do not keep the corresponding silicon framework unchanged, which reflects that the doped Zr atoms dramatically affect the most stable structures of the Si{sub n} clusters. By analysing the relative stabilities, it is found that the doping of zirconium atoms reduces the chemical stabilities of silicon host. The Zr{sub 2}Si{sub 4} and Zr{sub 2}Si{sub 7} clusters are the magic numbers. The natural population and natural electronic configuration analyses indicated that the Zr atoms possess positive charge for n=1-6 and negative charge for n=7-11. In addition, the chemical hardness, chemical potential, infrared, and Raman spectra are also discussed.

  18. Householders' Mental Models of Domestic Energy Consumption: Using a Sort-And-Cluster Method to Identify Shared Concepts of Appliance Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabe-Thomas, Elizabeth; Walker, Ian; Verplanken, Bas; Shaddick, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    If in-home displays and other interventions are to successfully influence people's energy consumption, they need to communicate about energy in terms that make sense to users. Here we explore householders' perceptions of energy consumption, using a novel combination of card-sorting and clustering to reveal shared patterns in the way people think about domestic energy consumption. The data suggest that, when participants were asked to group appliances which they felt naturally 'went together', there are relatively few shared ideas about which appliances are conceptually related. To the extent participants agreed on which appliances belonged together, these groupings were based on activities (e.g., entertainment) and location within the home (e.g., kitchen); energy consumption was not an important factor in people's categorisations. This suggests messages about behaviour change aimed at reducing energy consumption might better be tied to social practices than to consumption itself.

  19. Householders' Mental Models of Domestic Energy Consumption: Using a Sort-And-Cluster Method to Identify Shared Concepts of Appliance Similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Gabe-Thomas

    Full Text Available If in-home displays and other interventions are to successfully influence people's energy consumption, they need to communicate about energy in terms that make sense to users. Here we explore householders' perceptions of energy consumption, using a novel combination of card-sorting and clustering to reveal shared patterns in the way people think about domestic energy consumption. The data suggest that, when participants were asked to group appliances which they felt naturally 'went together', there are relatively few shared ideas about which appliances are conceptually related. To the extent participants agreed on which appliances belonged together, these groupings were based on activities (e.g., entertainment and location within the home (e.g., kitchen; energy consumption was not an important factor in people's categorisations. This suggests messages about behaviour change aimed at reducing energy consumption might better be tied to social practices than to consumption itself.

  20. State-specific Brillouin-Wigner Multireference Coupled Cluster Study of the F.sub.2./sub. Molecule: Assessment of the a Posteriori Size-extensivity Correction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pittner, Jiří; Šmydke, Jan; Čársky, Petr; Hubač, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 547, - (2001), s. 239-244 ISSN 0166-1280 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D9.10; GA ČR GA203/99/D009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : potential curve * spectroscopic constants of F2 * multireference coupled clusters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.919, year: 2001

  1. FORMATION EPOCHS, STAR FORMATION HISTORIES, AND SIZES OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN CLUSTER AND FIELD ENVIRONMENTS AT z = 1.2: INSIGHTS FROM THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettura, Alessandro; Demarco, R.; Ford, H. C.; Rosati, P.; Gobat, R.; Nonino, M.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Menci, N.; Strazzullo, V.; Mei, S.

    2010-01-01

    We derive stellar masses, ages, and star formation histories (SFHs) of massive early-type galaxies in the z = 1.237 RDCS1252.9-2927 cluster and compare them with those measured in a similarly mass-selected sample of field contemporaries drawn from the Great Observatories Origin Deep Survey South Field. Robust estimates of these parameters are obtained by comparing a large grid of composite stellar population models with 8-9 band photometry in the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, optical, and IR, thus sampling the entire relevant domain of emission of the different stellar populations. Additionally, we present new, deep U-band photometry of both fields, giving access to the critical far-ultraviolet rest frame, in order to empirically constrain the dependence of the most recent star formation processes on the environment. We also analyze the morphological properties of both samples to examine the dependence of their scaling relations on their mass and environment. We find that early-type galaxies, both in the cluster and in the field, show analogous optical morphologies, follow comparable mass versus size relation, have congruent average surface stellar mass densities, and lie on the same Kormendy relation. We also show that a fraction of early-type galaxies in the field employ longer timescales, τ, to assemble their mass than their cluster contemporaries. Hence, we conclude that while the formation epoch of early-type galaxies only depends on their mass, the environment does regulate the timescales of their SFHs. Our deep U-band imaging strongly supports this conclusion. We show that cluster galaxies are at least 0.5 mag fainter than their field contemporaries of similar mass and optical-to-infrared colors, implying that the last episode of star formation must have happened more recently in the field than in the cluster.

  2. Percolation with multiple giant clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2005-01-01

    We study mean-field percolation with freezing. Specifically, we consider cluster formation via two competing processes: irreversible aggregation and freezing. We find that when the freezing rate exceeds a certain threshold, the percolation transition is suppressed. Below this threshold, the system undergoes a series of percolation transitions with multiple giant clusters ('gels') formed. Giant clusters are not self-averaging as their total number and their sizes fluctuate from realization to realization. The size distribution F k , of frozen clusters of size k, has a universal tail, F k ∼ k -3 . We propose freezing as a practical mechanism for controlling the gel size. (letter to the editor)

  3. Electronic and atomic impacts on large clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gspann, J.

    1982-01-01

    Describing first the generation and properties of molecular beams of large Van der Waals clusters such as speed distribution, cluster size distribution, and internal temperature of the clusters, the review then features the results of electronic impacts on large clusters: metastable electronic cluster excitations, ejection of positive cluster ions of less than 100 atoms from much larger parent clusters, and ionization of the large clusters. Atomic impacts at thermal energies are treated with respect to the scattering cross section of the clusters, their drag coefficient in free molecular flow, and the peculiarities of impacts on helium clusters of either isotope. (Auth.)

  4. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kun, E-mail: cqdxwk@126.com [College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu, Juanfang, E-mail: juanfang@cqu.edu.cn [College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Qinghua, E-mail: qhchen@cqu.edu.cn [College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: The site-exchange between the substrate and cluster atoms can result in the formation of the surface alloys and the reconstruction of the cluster structure before the collision system approaching the thermal equilibrium. The deposited cluster adjusted the atom arrangement as possibly as to match the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up. The structural reconstruction is accompanied by the system potential energy minimization. - Highlights: • The deposition process can divide explicitly into three stages: adsorption, collision, relaxation. • The local melt does not emerge inside the substrate during the deposition process. • Surface alloys are formed by the site-exchange between the cluster and substrate atoms. • The cluster reconstructs the atom arrangement following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up. • The structural reconstruction ability and scope depend on the cluster size and incident energy. - Abstract: To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature

  5. Genome-wide profiling of HPV integration in cervical cancer identifies clustered genomic hot spots and a potential microhomology-mediated integration mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Zheng; Zhu, Da; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) integration is a key genetic event in cervical carcinogenesis1. By conducting whole-genome sequencing and high-throughput viral integration detection, we identified 3,667 HPV integration breakpoints in 26 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, 104 cervical carcinomas and ...

  6. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  7. Electron localization in water clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, U.; Barnett, R.N.; Cleveland, C.L.; Jortner, J.

    1987-01-01

    Electron attachment to water clusters was explored by the quantum path integral molecular dynamics method, demonstrating that the energetically favored localization mode involves a surface state of the excess electron, rather than the precursor of the hydrated electron. The cluster size dependence, the energetics and the charge distribution of these novel electron-cluster surface states are explored. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Basic Equations Interrelate Atomic and Nuclear Properties to Patterns at the Size Scales of the Cosmos, Extended Clusters of Galaxies, Galaxies, and Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rob

    2016-09-01

    Structures within molecules and nuclei have relationships to astronomical patterns. The COBE cosmic scale plots, and large scale surveys of galaxy clusters have patterns also repeating and well known at atomic scales. The Induction, Strong Force, and Nuclear Binding Energy Periods within the Big Bang are revealed to have played roles in the formation of these large scale distributions. Equations related to the enormous patterns also model chemical bonds and likely nucleus and nucleon substructures. ratios of the forces that include gravity are accurately calculated from the distributions and shapes. In addition, particle masses and a great many physical constants can be derived with precision and accuracy from astrophysical shapes. A few very basic numbers can do modelling from nucleon internals to molecules to super novae, and up to the Visible Universe. Equations are also provided along with possible structural configurations for some Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy.

  9. Electron: Cluster interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E ∼ 0.1 to E ∼ 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na 8 , Na 20 , Na 40 . The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size

  10. 2D and 3D Stem Cell Models of Primate Cortical Development Identify Species-Specific Differences in Progenitor Behavior Contributing to Brain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Tomoki; Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H; Simons, Benjamin D; Livesey, Frederick J

    2016-04-07

    Variation in cerebral cortex size and complexity is thought to contribute to differences in cognitive ability between humans and other animals. Here we compare cortical progenitor cell output in humans and three nonhuman primates using directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in adherent two-dimensional (2D) and organoid three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Clonal lineage analysis showed that primate cortical progenitors proliferate for a protracted period of time, during which they generate early-born neurons, in contrast to rodents, where this expansion phase largely ceases before neurogenesis begins. The extent of this additional cortical progenitor expansion differs among primates, leading to differences in the number of neurons generated by each progenitor cell. We found that this mechanism for controlling cortical size is regulated cell autonomously in culture, suggesting that primate cerebral cortex size is regulated at least in part at the level of individual cortical progenitor cell clonal output. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ionization of nitrogen cluster beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Katsuki; Be, S.H.; Enjoji, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Kosuke

    1975-01-01

    A nitrogen cluster beam (neutral particle intensity of 28.6 mAsub(eq)) is ionized by electron collisions in a Bayard-Alpert gauge type ionizer. The extraction efficiency of about 65% is obtained at an electron current of 10 mA with an energy of 50 eV. The mean cluster size produced at a pressure of 663 Torr and temperature of 77.3 K is 2x10 5 molecules per cluster. By the Coulomb repulsion force, multiply ionized cluster ions are broken up into smaller fragments and the cluster ion size reduces to one-fourth at an electron current of 15 mA. Mean neutral cluster sizes depend strongly on the initial degree of saturation PHI 0 and are 2x10 5 , 7x10 4 and 3x10 4 molecules per cluster at PHI 0 's of 0.87, 0.66 and 0.39, respectively. (auth.)

  12. Dairy Herd Mastitis Program in Argentina: Farm Clusters and Effects on Bulk Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vissio1*, SA Dieser2, CG Raspanti2, JA Giraudo1, CI Bogni2, LM Odierno2 and AJ Larriestra1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted to characterize dairy farm clusters according to mastitis control program practiced among small and medium dairy producer from Argentina, and also to evaluate the effect of such farm cluster patterns on bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC. Two samples of 51 (cross-sectional and 38 (longitudinal herds were selected to identify farm clusters and study the influence of management on monthly BMSCC, respectively. The cross-sectional sample involved the milking routine and facilities assessment of each herd visited. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to find the most discriminating farm attributes in the cross sectional sample. Afterward, the herd cluster typologies were identified in the longitudinal sample. Herd monthly BMSCC average was evaluated during 12 months fitting a linear mixed model. Two clusters were identified, the farms in the Cluster I applied a comprehensive mastitis program in opposite to Cluster II. Post-dipping, dry cow therapy and milking machine test were routinely applied in Cluster I. In the longitudinal study, 14 out of 38 dairy herds were labeled as Cluster I and the rest were assigned to Cluster II. Significant difference in BMSCC was found between cluster I and II (60,000 cells/mL. The present study showed the relevance and potential impact of promoting mastitis control practices among small and medium sized dairy producers in Argentina.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Support and cobalt cluster size effects on kinetics over Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Co/SiO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenping Ma; Gary Jacobs; Dennis E. Sparks; Muthu K. Gnanamani; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala; Chia H. Yen; Jennifer L.S. Klettlinger; Thomas M. Tomsik; Burtron H. Davis [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (USA). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2011-02-15

    The influence of support type and cobalt cluster size (i.e., with average diameters falling within the range of 8-40 nm) on the kinetics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) were investigated by kinetic tests employing a CSTR and two Co/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts having different average pore sizes, and two Co/SiO{sub 2} catalysts prepared on the same support but having different loadings. A kinetic model -r{sub CO}=kP{sup a}{sub co}P{sup b}{sub H2}/(1 + mP{sub H2O}/P{sub H2}) that contains a water effect constant 'm' was used to fit the experimental data obtained with all four catalysts. Kinetic parameters suggest that both support type and average Co particle size impact FT behavior. Cobalt cluster size influenced kinetic parameters such as reaction order, rate constant, and the water effect parameter.Decreasing the average Co cluster diameter by about 30% led to an increase in the intrinsic reaction rate constant k, defined on a per g of catalyst basis, by 62-102% for the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}-supported cobalt catalysts. Moreover, less inhibition by adsorbed CO and greater H{sub 2} dissociation on catalysts having smaller Co particles was suggested by the higher a and lower b values obtained for the measured reaction orders. Irrespective of support type, the catalysts having smaller average Co particles were more sensitive to water. Comparing the catalysts having strong interactions between cobalt and support (Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to the ones with weak interactions (Co/SiO{sub 2}), the water effect parameters were found to be positive (indicating a negative influence on CO conversion) and negative (denoting a positive effect on CO conversion), respectively. Greater a and a/b values were observed for both Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Co catalysts, implying greater inhibition of the FT rate by strongly adsorbed CO on Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to Co/SiO{sub 2}. 78 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Cluster fusion-fission dynamics in the Singapore stock exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the cross-correlations between stocks in the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) evolve over 2008 and 2009 within overlapping one-month time windows. In particular, we examine how these cross-correlations change before, during, and after the Sep-Oct 2008 Lehman Brothers Crisis. To do this, we extend the complete-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm, to obtain robust clusters of stocks with stronger intracluster correlations, and weaker intercluster correlations. After we identify the robust clusters in all time windows, we visualize how these change in the form of a fusion-fission diagram. Such a diagram depicts graphically how the cluster sizes evolve, the exchange of stocks between clusters, as well as how strongly the clusters mix. From the fusion-fission diagram, we see a giant cluster growing and disintegrating in the SGX, up till the Lehman Brothers Crisis in September 2008 and the market crashes of October 2008. After the Lehman Brothers Crisis, clusters in the SGX remain small for few months before giant clusters emerge once again. In the aftermath of the crisis, we also find strong mixing of component stocks between clusters. As a result, the correlation between initially strongly-correlated pairs of stocks decay exponentially with average life time of about a month. These observations impact strongly how portfolios and trading strategies should be formulated.

  15. Clustering by reordering of similarity and Laplacian matrices: Application to galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, E.; Shoukry, A.; Takey, A.

    2018-04-01

    Similarity metrics, kernels and similarity-based algorithms have gained much attention due to their increasing applications in information retrieval, data mining, pattern recognition and machine learning. Similarity Graphs are often adopted as the underlying representation of similarity matrices and are at the origin of known clustering algorithms such as spectral clustering. Similarity matrices offer the advantage of working in object-object (two-dimensional) space where visualization of clusters similarities is available instead of object-features (multi-dimensional) space. In this paper, sparse ɛ-similarity graphs are constructed and decomposed into strong components using appropriate methods such as Dulmage-Mendelsohn permutation (DMperm) and/or Reverse Cuthill-McKee (RCM) algorithms. The obtained strong components correspond to groups (clusters) in the input (feature) space. Parameter ɛi is estimated locally, at each data point i from a corresponding narrow range of the number of nearest neighbors. Although more advanced clustering techniques are available, our method has the advantages of simplicity, better complexity and direct visualization of the clusters similarities in a two-dimensional space. Also, no prior information about the number of clusters is needed. We conducted our experiments on two and three dimensional, low and high-sized synthetic datasets as well as on an astronomical real-dataset. The results are verified graphically and analyzed using gap statistics over a range of neighbors to verify the robustness of the algorithm and the stability of the results. Combining the proposed algorithm with gap statistics provides a promising tool for solving clustering problems. An astronomical application is conducted for confirming the existence of 45 galaxy clusters around the X-ray positions of galaxy clusters in the redshift range [0.1..0.8]. We re-estimate the photometric redshifts of the identified galaxy clusters and obtain acceptable values

  16. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nantais, Julie B.; Huchra, John P.; Zezas, Andreas; Gazeas, Kosmas; Strader, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We perform aperture photometry and profile fitting on 419 globular cluster (GC) candidates with m V ≤ 23 mag identified in Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys BVI imaging, and estimate the effective radii of the clusters. We identify 85 previously known spectroscopically confirmed clusters, and newly identify 136 objects as good cluster candidates within the 3σ color and size ranges defined by the spectroscopically confirmed clusters, yielding a total of 221 probable GCs. The luminosity function peak for the 221 probable GCs with estimated total dereddening applied is V ∼ (20.26 ± 0.13) mag, corresponding to a distance of ∼3.7 ± 0.3 Mpc. The blue and red GC candidates, and the metal-rich and metal-poor spectroscopically confirmed clusters, respectively, are similar in half-light radius. Red confirmed clusters are about 6% larger in median half-light radius than blue confirmed clusters, and red and blue good GC candidates are nearly identical in half-light radius. The total population of confirmed and 'good' candidates shows an increase in half-light radius as a function of galactocentric distance.

  18. A Genome-wide CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Screen Identifies NEK7 as an Essential Component of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Chauhan, Dhruv; Schmidt, Tobias; Ebert, Thomas S; Reinhardt, Julia; Endl, Elmar; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high molecular weight protein complexes that assemble in the cytosol upon pathogen encounter. This results in caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine maturation, as well as a special type of cell death, known as pyroptosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in pathogen defense, but at the same time, its activity has also been implicated in many common sterile inflammatory conditions. To this effect, several studies have identified Nlrp3 inflammasome engagement in a number of common human diseases such as atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer disease, or gout. Although it has been shown that known Nlrp3 stimuli converge on potassium ion efflux upstream of Nlrp3 activation, the exact molecular mechanism of Nlrp3 activation remains elusive. Here, we describe a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screen in immortalized mouse macrophages aiming at the unbiased identification of gene products involved in Nlrp3 inflammasome activation. We employed a FACS-based screen for Nlrp3-dependent cell death, using the ionophoric compound nigericin as a potassium efflux-inducing stimulus. Using a genome-wide guide RNA (gRNA) library, we found that targeting Nek7 rescued macrophages from nigericin-induced lethality. Subsequent studies revealed that murine macrophages deficient in Nek7 displayed a largely blunted Nlrp3 inflammasome response, whereas Aim2-mediated inflammasome activation proved to be fully intact. Although the mechanism of Nek7 functioning upstream of Nlrp3 yet remains elusive, these studies provide a first genetic handle of a component that specifically functions upstream of Nlrp3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Delineation of gravel-bed clusters via factorial kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chi-Kuei; Huang, Guo-Hao

    2018-05-01

    Gravel-bed clusters are the most prevalent microforms that affect local flows and sediment transport. A growing consensus is that the practice of cluster delineation should be based primarily on bed topography rather than grain sizes. Here we present a novel approach for cluster delineation using patch-scale high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). We use a geostatistical interpolation method, i.e., factorial kriging, to decompose the short- and long-range (grain- and microform-scale) DEMs. The required parameters are determined directly from the scales of the nested variograms. The short-range DEM exhibits a flat bed topography, yet individual grains are sharply outlined, making the short-range DEM a useful aid for grain segmentation. The long-range DEM exhibits a smoother topography than the original full DEM, yet groupings of particles emerge as small-scale bedforms, making the contour percentile levels of the long-range DEM a useful tool for cluster identification. Individual clusters are delineated using the segmented grains and identified clusters via a range of contour percentile levels. Our results reveal that the density and total area of delineated clusters decrease with increasing contour percentile level, while the mean grain size of clusters and average size of anchor clast (i.e., the largest particle in a cluster) increase with the contour percentile level. These results support the interpretation that larger particles group as clusters and protrude higher above the bed than other smaller grains. A striking feature of the delineated clusters is that anchor clasts are invariably greater than the D90 of the grain sizes even though a threshold anchor size was not adopted herein. The average areal fractal dimensions (Hausdorff-Besicovich dimensions of the projected areas) of individual clusters, however, demonstrate that clusters delineated with different contour percentile levels exhibit similar planform morphologies. Comparisons with a

  20. Cluster Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni Genotypes Isolated from Small and Medium-Sized Mammalian Wildlife and Bovine Livestock from Ontario Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, M; Pearl, D L; Taboada, E N; Parmley, E J; Mutschall, S K; Jardine, C M

    2017-05-01

    Using data collected from a cross-sectional study of 25 farms (eight beef, eight swine and nine dairy) in 2010, we assessed clustering of molecular subtypes of C. jejuni based on a Campylobacter-specific 40 gene comparative genomic fingerprinting assay (CGF40) subtypes, using unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis, and multiple correspondence analysis. Exact logistic regression was used to determine which genes differentiate wildlife and livestock subtypes in our study population. A total of 33 bovine livestock (17 beef and 16 dairy), 26 wildlife (20 raccoon (Procyon lotor), five skunk (Mephitis mephitis) and one mouse (Peromyscus spp.) C. jejuni isolates were subtyped using CGF40. Dendrogram analysis, based on UPGMA, showed distinct branches separating bovine livestock and mammalian wildlife isolates. Furthermore, two-dimensional multiple correspondence analysis was highly concordant with dendrogram analysis showing clear differentiation between livestock and wildlife CGF40 subtypes. Based on multilevel logistic regression models with a random intercept for farm of origin, we found that isolates in general, and raccoons more specifically, were significantly more likely to be part of the wildlife branch. Exact logistic regression conducted gene by gene revealed 15 genes that were predictive of whether an isolate was of wildlife or bovine livestock isolate origin. Both multiple correspondence analysis and exact logistic regression revealed that in most cases, the presence of a particular gene (13 of 15) was associated with an isolate being of livestock rather than wildlife origin. In conclusion, the evidence gained from dendrogram analysis, multiple correspondence analysis and exact logistic regression indicates that mammalian wildlife carry CGF40 subtypes of C. jejuni distinct from those carried by bovine livestock. Future studies focused on source attribution of C. jejuni in human infections will help determine whether wildlife

  1. Continuous scanning of the mobility and size distribution of charged clusters and nanometer particles in atmospheric air and the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer BSMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, H.

    2006-12-01

    Measuring of charged nanometer particles in atmospheric air is a routine task in research on atmospheric electricity, where these particles are called the atmospheric ions. An aspiration condenser is the most popular instrument for measuring atmospheric ions. Continuous scanning of a mobility distribution is possible when the aspiration condenser is connected as an arm of a balanced bridge. Transfer function of an aspiration condenser is calculated according to the measurements of geometric dimensions, air flow rate, driving voltage, and electric current. The most complicated phase of the calibration is the estimation of the inlet loss of ions due to the Brownian deposition. The available models of ion deposition on the protective inlet screen and the inlet control electrofilter have the uncertainty of about 20%. To keep the uncertainty of measurements low the adsorption should not exceed a few tens of percent. The online conversion of the mobility distribution to the size distribution and a correct reduction of inlet losses are possible when air temperature and pressure are measured simultaneously with the mobility distribution. Two instruments called the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzers (BSMA) were manufactured and tested in routine atmospheric measurements. The concentration of atmospheric ions of the size of about a few nanometers is very low and a high air flow rate is required to collect enough of ion current. The air flow of 52 l/s exceeds the air flow in usual aerosol instruments by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The high flow rate reduces the time of ion passage to 60 ms and the heating of air in an analyzer to 0.2 K, which suppresses a possible transformation of ions inside the instrument. The mobility range of the BSMA of 0.032-3.2 cm 2 V - 1 s - 1 is logarithmically uniformly divided into 16 fractions. The size distribution is presented by 12 fractions in the diameter range of 0.4-7.5 nm. The measurement noise of a fraction concentration is typically

  2. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  3. Nanospectroscopy of thiacyanine dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticle clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralević, Uroš; Isić, Goran; Anicijević, Dragana Vasić; Laban, Bojana; Bogdanović, Una; Lazović, Vladimir M.; Vodnik, Vesna; Gajić, Radoš

    2018-03-01

    The adsorption of thiacyanine dye molecules on citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticle clusters drop-cast onto freshly cleaved mica or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces is examined using colocalized surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The incidence of dye Raman signatures in photoluminescence hotspots identified around nanoparticle clusters is considered for both citrate- and borate-capped silver nanoparticles and found to be substantially lower in the former case, suggesting that the citrate anions impede the efficient dye adsorption. Rigorous numerical simulations of light scattering on random nanoparticle clusters are used for estimating the electromagnetic enhancement and elucidating the hotspot formation mechanism. The majority of the enhanced Raman signal, estimated to be more than 90%, is found to originate from the nanogaps between adjacent nanoparticles in the cluster, regardless of the cluster size and geometry.

  4. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of Technology-aided Testing and Feedback on Physical Activity and Biological Age Among Employees in a Medium-sized Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Mika; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Laukkanen, Raija

    2017-12-01

    It has been suggested that engaging technology can empower individuals to be more proactive about their health and reduce their health risks. The aim of the present intervention was to study the effects of technology-aided testing and feedback on physical activity and biological age of employees in a middle-sized enterprise. In all, 121 employees (mean age 42 ± 10 years) participated in the 12-month three-arm cluster randomized trial. The fitness measurement process (Body Age) determined the participants' biological age in years. Physical activity was measured with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form. Physical activity did not change during the intervention. Biological age (better fitness) improved in all groups statistically significantly ( p  physical activity but may enhance physical fitness measured by biological age.

  5. Air void clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Air void clustering around coarse aggregate in concrete has been identified as a potential source of : low strengths in concrete mixes by several Departments of Transportation around the country. Research was : carried out to (1) develop a quantitati...

  6. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical sizes and critical characteristics of nanoclusters, nanostructures and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzdalev, I.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Critical sizes and characteristics of nanoclusters and nanostructures are introduced as the parameters of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The next critical characteristics are considered: atomic and electronic 'magic number', critical size of cluster nucleation, critical size of melting-freezing of cluster, critical size of quantum (laser) radiation, critical sizes for the single electron conductivity, critical energy and magnetic field for the magnetic tunneling, critical cluster sizes for the giant magnetic resistance, critical size of the first order magnetic phase transition. The critical characteristics are estimated by thermodynamic approaches, by Moessbauer spectroscopy, AFM, heat capacity, SQUID magnetometry and other technique, The influence of cluster-cluster interactions, cluster-matrix interactions and cluster defects on cluster atomic dynamics, cluster melting, cluster critical sizes, Curie or Neel points and the character of magnetic phase transitions were investigated. The applications of critical size and critical characteristic parameters for the nanomaterial characterization are considered

  8. Sequencing of mitochondrial genomes of nine Aspergillus and Penicillium species identifies mobile introns and accessory genes as main sources of genome size variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joardar, Vinita; Abrams, Natalie F; Hostetler, Jessica; Paukstelis, Paul J; Pakala, Suchitra; Pakala, Suman B; Zafar, Nikhat; Abolude, Olukemi O; Payne, Gary; Andrianopoulos, Alex; Denning, David W; Nierman, William C

    2012-12-12

    The genera Aspergillus and Penicillium include some of the most beneficial as well as the most harmful fungal species such as the penicillin-producer Penicillium chrysogenum and the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, respectively. Their mitochondrial genomic sequences may hold vital clues into the mechanisms of their evolution, population genetics, and biology, yet only a handful of these genomes have been fully sequenced and annotated. Here we report the complete sequence and annotation of the mitochondrial genomes of six Aspergillus and three Penicillium species: A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. oryzae, A. flavus, Neosartorya fischeri (A. fischerianus), A. terreus, P. chrysogenum, P. marneffei, and Talaromyces stipitatus (P. stipitatum). The accompanying comparative analysis of these and related publicly available mitochondrial genomes reveals wide variation in size (25-36 Kb) among these closely related fungi. The sources of genome expansion include group I introns and accessory genes encoding putative homing endonucleases, DNA and RNA polymerases (presumed to be of plasmid origin) and hypothetical proteins. The two smallest sequenced genomes (A. terreus and P. chrysogenum) do not contain introns in protein-coding genes, whereas the largest genome (T. stipitatus), contains a total of eleven introns. All of the sequenced genomes have a group I intron in the large ribosomal subunit RNA gene, suggesting that this intron is fixed in these species. Subsequent analysis of several A. fumigatus strains showed low intraspecies variation. This study also includes a phylogenetic analysis based on 14 concatenated core mitochondrial proteins. The phylogenetic tree has a different topology from published multilocus trees, highlighting the challenges still facing the Aspergillus systematics. The study expands the genomic resources available to fungal biologists by providing mitochondrial genomes with consistent annotations for future genetic, evolutionary and population

  9. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  10. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a role. Unlike migraine and tension headache, cluster headache generally isn't associated with triggers, such as foods, hormonal changes or stress. Once a cluster period begins, however, drinking alcohol ...

  11. Study of a few cluster candidates in the Magellanic Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Subramaniam Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2018-06-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (LMC & SMC) are gas rich, metal poor, dwarf satellite galaxies to our Milky Way that are interacting with each other. The Magellanic Bridge (MB), joining the larger and smaller Cloud is considered to be a signature of this interaction process. Studies have revealed that the MB, apart from gas also hosts stellar populations and star clusters. The number of clusters, with well-estimated parameters within the MB is still underway. In this work, we study a sample of 9 previously cataloged star clusters in the MB region. We use Washington C, Harris R and Cousins I bands data from literature, taken using the 4-m Blanco telescope to estimate the cluster properties (size, age, reddening). We also identify and separate out genuine cluster candidates from possible clusters/asterism. The increase in number of genuine cluster candidates with well-estimated parameters is important in the context of understanding cluster formation and evolution in such low-metallicity, and tidally disrupted environment. The clusters studied here can also help estimate distances to different parts of the MB, as recent studies indicate that portions of MB near the SMC is a closer to us, than the LMC.

  12. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Iris

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  13. Categorias Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dayane Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as categorias cluster, que foram introduzidas por Aslak Bakke Buan, Robert Marsh, Markus Reineke, Idun Reiten e Gordana Todorov, com o objetivo de categoriíicar as algebras cluster criadas em 2002 por Sergey Fomin e Andrei Zelevinsky. Os autores acima, em [4], mostraram que existe uma estreita relação entre algebras cluster e categorias cluster para quivers cujo grafo subjacente é um diagrama de Dynkin. Para isto desenvolveram uma teoria tilting na estrutura triang...

  14. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  15. Horticultural cluster

    OpenAIRE

    SHERSTIUK S.V.; POSYLAYEVA K.I.

    2013-01-01

    In the article there are the theoretical and methodological approaches to the nature and existence of the cluster. The cluster differences from other kinds of cooperative and integration associations. Was develop by scientific-practical recommendations for forming a competitive horticultur cluster.

  16. OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE MILKY WAY OUTER DISK: NEWLY DISCOVERED AND UNSTUDIED CLUSTERS IN THE SPITZER GLIMPSE-360, CYG-X, AND SMOG SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasowski, G.; Beaton, R. L.; Hamm, K. K.; Majewski, S. R.; Patterson, R. J.; Babler, B.; Churchwell, E.; Meade, M.; Whitney, B. A.; Benjamin, R. A.; Watson, C.

    2013-01-01

    Open stellar clusters are extremely valuable probes of Galactic structure, star formation, kinematics, and chemical abundance patterns. Near-infrared (NIR) data have enabled the detection of hundreds of clusters hidden from optical surveys, and mid-infrared (MIR) data are poised to offer an even clearer view into the most heavily obscured parts of the Milky Way. We use new MIR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE-360, Cyg-X, and SMOG surveys to visually identify a large number of open cluster candidates in the outer disk of the Milky Way (65° < l < 265°). Using NIR color-magnitude diagrams, stellar isochrones, and stellar reddening estimates, we derive cluster parameters (metallicity, distance, reddening) for those objects without previous identification and/or parameters in the literature. In total, we present coordinates and sizes of 20 previously unknown open cluster candidates; for 7 of these we also present metallicity, distance, and reddening values. In addition, we provide the first estimates of these values for nine clusters that had been previously cataloged. We compare our cluster sizes and other derived parameters to those in the open cluster catalog of Dias et al. and find strong similarities except for a higher mean reddening for our objects, which signifies our increased detection sensitivity in regions of high extinction. The results of this cluster search and analysis demonstrate the ability of MIR imaging and photometry to augment significantly the current census of open clusters in the Galaxy

  17. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  18. Using cluster analysis to organize and explore regional GPS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Savage, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers a simple visual exploratory tool for the initial investigation of regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations, which are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, can be subjective and is often guided by the distribution of known faults. To illustrate our method, we apply cluster analysis to GPS velocities from the San Francisco Bay Region, California, to search for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence of block-like behavior. The clustering process identifies four robust groupings of velocities that we identify with four crustal blocks. Although the analysis uses no prior geologic information other than the GPS velocities, the cluster/block boundaries track three major faults, both locked and creeping.

  19. A model-based clustering method to detect infectious disease transmission outbreaks from sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary M McCloskey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustering infections by genetic similarity is a popular technique for identifying potential outbreaks of infectious disease, in part because sequences are now routinely collected for clinical management of many infections. A diverse number of nonparametric clustering methods have been developed for this purpose. These methods are generally intuitive, rapid to compute, and readily scale with large data sets. However, we have found that nonparametric clustering methods can be biased towards identifying clusters of diagnosis-where individuals are sampled sooner post-infection-rather than the clusters of rapid transmission that are meant to be potential foci for public health efforts. We develop a fundamentally new approach to genetic clustering based on fitting a Markov-modulated Poisson process (MMPP, which represents the evolution of transmission rates along the tree relating different infections. We evaluated this model-based method alongside five nonparametric clustering methods using both simulated and actual HIV sequence data sets. For simulated clusters of rapid transmission, the MMPP clustering method obtained higher mean sensitivity (85% and specificity (91% than the nonparametric methods. When we applied these clustering methods to published sequences from a study of HIV-1 genetic clusters in Seattle, USA, we found that the MMPP method categorized about half (46% as many individuals to clusters compared to the other methods. Furthermore, the mean internal branch lengths that approximate transmission rates were significantly shorter in clusters extracted using MMPP, but not by other methods. We determined that the computing time for the MMPP method scaled linearly with the size of trees, requiring about 30 seconds for a tree of 1,000 tips and about 20 minutes for 50,000 tips on a single computer. This new approach to genetic clustering has significant implications for the application of pathogen sequence analysis to public health, where

  20. Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy and Tracking of Bacterial Flotillin (Reggie Paralogs Provide Evidence for Defined-Sized Protein Microdomains within the Bacterial Membrane but Absence of Clusters Containing Detergent-Resistant Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Dempwolff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes have been proposed to contain microdomains of a specific lipid composition, in which distinct groups of proteins are clustered. Flotillin-like proteins are conserved between pro-and eukaryotes, play an important function in several eukaryotic and bacterial cells, and define in vertebrates a type of so-called detergent-resistant microdomains. Using STED microscopy, we show that two bacterial flotillins, FloA and FloT, form defined assemblies with an average diameter of 85 to 110 nm in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, flotillin microdomains are of similar size in eukaryotic cells. The soluble domains of FloA form higher order oligomers of up to several hundred kDa in vitro, showing that like eukaryotic flotillins, bacterial assemblies are based in part on their ability to self-oligomerize. However, B. subtilis paralogs show significantly different diffusion rates, and consequently do not colocalize into a common microdomain. Dual colour time lapse experiments of flotillins together with other detergent-resistant proteins in bacteria show that proteins colocalize for no longer than a few hundred milliseconds, and do not move together. Our data reveal that the bacterial membrane contains defined-sized protein domains rather than functional microdomains dependent on flotillins. Based on their distinct dynamics, FloA and FloT confer spatially distinguishable activities, but do not serve as molecular scaffolds.

  1. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country...... of this handbook, which focuses on the role of CSR in MSMEs. Hence we contribute to the literature on CSR in industrial clusters and specifically CSR in Indian industrial clusters by investigating the drivers of CSR in India’s industrial clusters....

  2. Clusters e redes de cooperação de pequenas e médias empresas: observatório europeu, caso alemão e contribuições ao caso brasileiro Clusters and cooperation networks of small and medium-sized companies: analysis of european and German experiences and contributions to the brazilian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Cecílio Gerolamo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta os recentes estudos sobre clusters e redes de cooperação de pequenas e médias empresas na Europa, realizados pela Comissão Européia, bem como a descrição da atual estratégia de desenvolvimento de redes de competência na Alemanha (Kompetenznetze Deutschland, abordando especificamente o caso da região de Berlim e Brandemburgo. O objetivo principal é, por meio das análises dos programas europeus de desenvolvimento de clusters e redes de cooperação entre pequenas e médias empresas, verificar possibilidades de adaptação para a realidade brasileira no que se refere a arranjos produtivos locais e parques tecnológicos. Em linhas gerais, pequenas e médias empresas pertencentes a clusters na Europa têm demonstrado desempenho acima da média quando comparadas às demais empresas de seus respectivos setores. O aumento da competitividade de clusters e o crescimento econômico regional estão fortemente associados ao investimento em inovação. Esse é o caso da Alemanha que incentiva o desenvolvimento de inovação por meio de suas redes de competência. A região Berlim-Brandemburgo retrata o exemplo de uma estratégia coerente de desenvolvimento local. Pode-se dizer que possíveis alternativas para o Brasil seriam o apoio mais direto do poder público, foco em inovação e definição de processos para gerenciamento das redes de cooperação.This paper presents studies on clusters and cooperation networks of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs developed by the European Commission, as well as a description of the current German strategy for developing competence networks (Kompetenznetze Deutschland, focusing specifically on the case of the regions of Berlin and Brandenburg. The main goal of this work is to analyze the experience of the European and German initiatives and to verify the possibilities of adapting such initiatives to the context of local productive systems and technology parks in Brazil. In

  3. Persistent Spatial Clusters of Prescribed Antimicrobials among Danish Pig Farms – A Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertner, Mette; Sanchez, Javier; Boklund, Anette; Stryhn, Henrik; Dupont, Nana; Toft, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of pathogens resistant to antimicrobials has prompted political initiatives targeting a reduction in the use of veterinary antimicrobials in Denmark, especially for pigs. This study elucidates the tendency of pig farms with a significantly higher antimicrobial use to remain in clusters in certain geographical regions of Denmark. Animal Daily Doses/100 pigs/day were calculated for all three age groups of pigs (weaners, finishers and sows) for each quarter during 2012–13 in 6,143 commercial indoor pig producing farms. The data were split into four time periods of six months. Repeated spatial cluster analyses were performed to identify persistent clusters, i.e. areas included in a significant cluster throughout all four time periods. Antimicrobials prescribed for weaners did not result in any persistent clusters. In contrast, antimicrobial use in finishers clustered persistently in two areas (157 farms), while those issued for sows clustered in one area (51 farms). A multivariate analysis including data on antimicrobial use for weaners, finishers and sows as three separate outcomes resulted in three persistent clusters (551 farms). Compared to farms outside the clusters during this period, weaners, finishers and sows on farms within these clusters had 19%, 104% and 4% higher use of antimicrobials, respectively. Production type, farm type and farm size seemed to have some bearing on the clustering effect. Adding these factors as categorical covariates one at a time in the multivariate analysis reduced the persistent clusters by 24.3%, 30.5% and 34.1%, respectively. PMID:26317206

  4. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H Lee

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm.The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization.The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  5. Electronic structure of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertheim, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of valence electrons in metal clusters, together with threshold ionization potential measurements, provide a coherent picture of the development of the electronic structure from the isolated atom to the large metallic cluster. An insulator-metal transition occurs at an intermediate cluster size, which serves to define the boundary between small and large clusters. Although the outer electrons may be delocalized over the entire cluster, a small cluster remains insulating until the density of states near the Fermi level exceeds 1/kT. In large clusters, with increasing cluster size, the band structure approaches that of the bulk metal. However, the bands remain significantly narrowed even in a 1000-atom cluster, giving an indication of the importance of long-range order. The core-electron binding-energy shifts of supported metal clusters depend on changes in the band structure in the initial state, as well as on various final-state effects, including changes in core hole screening and the coulomb energy of the final-state charge. For cluster supported on amorphous carbon, this macroscopic coulomb shift is often dominant, as evidenced by the parallel shifts of the core-electron binding energy and the Fermi edge. Auger data confirm that final-state effects dominate in cluster of Sn and some other metals. Surface atom core-level shifts provide a valuable guide to the contributions of initial-state changes in band structure to cluster core-electron binding energy shifts, especially for Au and Pt. The available data indicate that the shift observed in supported, metallic clusters arise largely from the charge left on the cluster by photoemission. As the metal-insulator transition is approached from above, metallic screening is suppressed and the shift is determined by the local environment. (orig.)

  6. How large are the consequences of covariate imbalance in cluster randomized trials: a simulation study with a continuous outcome and a binary covariate at the cluster level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerbeek, Mirjam; van Schie, Sander

    2016-07-11

    The number of clusters in a cluster randomized trial is often low. It is therefore likely random assignment of clusters to treatment conditions results in covariate imbalance. There are no studies that quantify the consequences of covariate imbalance in cluster randomized trials on parameter and standard error bias and on power to detect treatment effects. The consequences of covariance imbalance in unadjusted and adjusted linear mixed models are investigated by means of a simulation study. The factors in this study are the degree of imbalance, the covariate effect size, the cluster size and the intraclass correlation coefficient. The covariate is binary and measured at the cluster level; the outcome is continuous and measured at the individual level. The results show covariate imbalance results in negligible parameter bias and small standard error bias in adjusted linear mixed models. Ignoring the possibility of covariate imbalance while calculating the sample size at the cluster level may result in a loss in power of at most 25 % in the adjusted linear mixed model. The results are more severe for the unadjusted linear mixed model: parameter biases up to 100 % and standard error biases up to 200 % may be observed. Power levels based on the unadjusted linear mixed model are often too low. The consequences are most severe for large clusters and/or small intraclass correlation coefficients since then the required number of clusters to achieve a desired power level is smallest. The possibility of covariate imbalance should be taken into account while calculating the sample size of a cluster randomized trial. Otherwise more sophisticated methods to randomize clusters to treatments should be used, such as stratification or balance algorithms. All relevant covariates should be carefully identified, be actually measured and included in the statistical model to avoid severe levels of parameter and standard error bias and insufficient power levels.

  7. Small gold clusters on graphene, their mobility and clustering: a DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amft, Martin; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Skorodumova, Natalia V

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the experimentally observed high mobility of gold atoms on graphene and their tendency to form nanometer-sized clusters, we present a density functional theory study of the ground state structures of small gold clusters on graphene, their mobility and clustering. Our detailed analysis of the electronic structures identifies the opportunity to form strong gold-gold bonds and the graphene-mediated interaction of the pre-adsorbed fragments as the driving forces behind gold's tendency to aggregate on graphene. While clusters containing up to three gold atoms have one unambiguous ground state structure, both gas phase isomers of a cluster with four gold atoms can be found on graphene. In the gas phase the diamond-shaped Au 4 D cluster is the ground state structure, whereas the Y-shaped Au 4 Y becomes the actual ground state when adsorbed on graphene. As we show, both clusters can be produced on graphene by two distinct clustering processes. We also studied in detail the stepwise formation of a gold dimer out of two pre-adsorbed adatoms, as well as the formation of Au 3 . All reactions are exothermic and no further activation barriers, apart from the diffusion barriers, were found. The diffusion barriers of all studied clusters range from 4 to 36 meV only, and are substantially exceeded by the adsorption energies of - 0.1 to - 0.59 eV. This explains the high mobility of Au 1-4 on graphene along the C-C bonds.

  8. Dense Fe cluster-assembled films by energetic cluster deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, D.L.; Yamada, H.; Hihara, T.; Uchida, T.; Sumiyama, K.

    2004-01-01

    High-density Fe cluster-assembled films were produced at room temperature by an energetic cluster deposition. Though cluster-assemblies are usually sooty and porous, the present Fe cluster-assembled films are lustrous and dense, revealing a soft magnetic behavior. Size-monodispersed Fe clusters with the mean cluster size d=9 nm were synthesized using a plasma-gas-condensation technique. Ionized clusters are accelerated electrically and deposited onto the substrate together with neutral clusters from the same cluster source. Packing fraction and saturation magnetic flux density increase rapidly and magnetic coercivity decreases remarkably with increasing acceleration voltage. The Fe cluster-assembled film obtained at the acceleration voltage of -20 kV has a packing fraction of 0.86±0.03, saturation magnetic flux density of 1.78±0.05 Wb/m 2 , and coercivity value smaller than 80 A/m. The resistivity at room temperature is ten times larger than that of bulk Fe metal

  9. Cluster evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster luminosity functions are constructed from a model of the mass distribution based on hierarchical clustering at an epoch where the matter distribution is non-linear. These luminosity functions are seen to reproduce the present distribution of objects as can be inferred from the observations. They can be used to deduce the redshift dependence of the cluster distribution and to extrapolate the observations towards the past. The predicted evolution of the cluster distribution is quite strong, although somewhat less rapid than predicted by the linear theory

  10. THE ASSEMBLY OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the formation of 53 galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10 14.0-14.76 M sun ) formed within a pair of cosmological Λ cold dark matter N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host ∼0.3 L * galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'preprocessing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; less than 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past (∼<6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local cluster processes such as ram pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass, and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with ∼20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and ∼20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate timescale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be ∼6 Gyr.

  11. Discriminating isogenic cancer cells and identifying altered unsaturated fatty acid content as associated with metastasis status, using k-means clustering and partial least squares-discriminant analysis of Raman maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martin; Krafft, Christoph; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    level of a few proteins and genes. Raman maps were recorded of single cells after fixation and drying using 785 nm laser excitation. K-means clustering reduced the amount of data from each cell and improved the signal-to-noise ratio of cluster-averaged spectra. Spectra representing the nucleus were...

  12. Support Policies in Clusters: Prioritization of Support Needs by Cluster Members According to Cluster Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Salıngan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic development has always been a moving target. Both the national and local governments have been facing the challenge of implementing the effective and efficient economic policy and program in order to best utilize their limited resources. One of the recent approaches in this area is called cluster-based economic analysis and strategy development. This study reviews key literature and some of the cluster based economic policies adopted by different governments. Based on this review, it proposes “the cluster life cycle” as a determining factor to identify the support requirements of clusters. A survey, designed based on literature review of International Cluster support programs, was conducted with 30 participants from 3 clusters with different maturity stage. This paper discusses the results of this study conducted among the cluster members in Eskişehir- Bilecik-Kütahya Region in Turkey on the requirement of the support to foster the development of related clusters.

  13. PHAT STELLAR CLUSTER SURVEY. I. YEAR 1 CATALOG AND INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hodge, Paul W.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C.; Seth, Anil C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Larsen, Søren S.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata; Bianchi, Luciana; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Girardi, Léo; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kalirai, Jason; Lang, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-cycle program to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of one-third of the M31 disk at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, we present the first installment of the PHAT stellar cluster catalog. When completed, the PHAT cluster catalog will be among the largest and most comprehensive surveys of resolved star clusters in any galaxy. The exquisite spatial resolution achieved with HST has allowed us to identify hundreds of new clusters that were previously inaccessible with existing ground-based surveys. We identify 601 clusters in the Year 1 sample, representing more than a factor of four increase over previous catalogs within the current survey area (390 arcmin 2 ). This work presents results derived from the first ∼25% of the survey data; we estimate that the final sample will include ∼2500 clusters. For the Year 1 objects, we present a catalog with positions, radii, and six-band integrated photometry. Along with a general characterization of the cluster luminosities and colors, we discuss the cluster luminosity function, the cluster size distributions, and highlight a number of individually interesting clusters found in the Year 1 search.

  14. PHAT STELLAR CLUSTER SURVEY. I. YEAR 1 CATALOG AND INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hodge, Paul W.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Larsen, Soren S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Guhathakurta, Puragra [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lang, Dustin, E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2012-06-20

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-cycle program to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of one-third of the M31 disk at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, we present the first installment of the PHAT stellar cluster catalog. When completed, the PHAT cluster catalog will be among the largest and most comprehensive surveys of resolved star clusters in any galaxy. The exquisite spatial resolution achieved with HST has allowed us to identify hundreds of new clusters that were previously inaccessible with existing ground-based surveys. We identify 601 clusters in the Year 1 sample, representing more than a factor of four increase over previous catalogs within the current survey area (390 arcmin{sup 2}). This work presents results derived from the first {approx}25% of the survey data; we estimate that the final sample will include {approx}2500 clusters. For the Year 1 objects, we present a catalog with positions, radii, and six-band integrated photometry. Along with a general characterization of the cluster luminosities and colors, we discuss the cluster luminosity function, the cluster size distributions, and highlight a number of individually interesting clusters found in the Year 1 search.

  15. Comparação de tamanhos e distâncias de subparcelas aplicadas em processo de amostragem por conglomerado Comparison of sizes and distances of subplots applied in the process of cluster sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberdan Müller M. das Flores

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo com unidades amostrais conglomeradas de estrutura cruzada usando banco de dados de inventário florestal 100% de uma Unidade de produção Anual (UPA-08, localizada na fazenda Martins no alto Pacajá, Município de Portel, Estado do Pará, para estudar os efeitos da variação entre e dentro dos conglomerados usando como referência três variáveis resposta: i VT = Volume total de madeira das 77 espécies florestais encontradas na área de estudo; ii VO = Volume Total das 10 espécies florestais de maior ocorrência e volume na área de estudo; e iii VC = Volume Total das 10 espécies florestais mais comercializadas pela empresa Cikel, tendo como objetivo determinar o tamanho e a distância ideal de subparcelas a partir do Método da Curvatura Máxima, uma vez definido o tamanho, sua área é fixada e então são estudadas cinco diferentes valores para determinar a distancia ideal do centro do conglomerado até as subparcelas e entre as mesmas. Os resultados permitiram inferir que o tamanho de subparcela 0,10 ha, a distância de 50 m entre as subparcelas, e a estrutura cruzada com 8 (subparcelas são eficientes para estimar os parâmetros estudados.We conducted a study with sample units of conglomerate structure using cross-database of forest inventory 100% of Annual Production Unit (APU-08, located at the Top Pacajá Martins farm, municipality of Portel-PA to study the effects of variation between and within clusters with reference to three response variables they were: i VT = Total volume of wood of 77 tree species found in the study area, ii VO = Total Volume of the 10 most frequent tree species and volume in the study area and, iii Vt = Total volume of 10 forest species Cikel more commercialized by the company we aimed to determine the ideal size and distance of plots from the Method of Maximum Curvature, once defined the size, its area was fixed and then there was tested five different values to determine the ideal

  16. OBSERVED SCALING RELATIONS FOR STRONG LENSING CLUSTERS: CONSEQUENCES FOR COSMOLOGY AND CLUSTER ASSEMBLY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comerford, Julia M.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relations of observed galaxy cluster properties are useful tools for constraining cosmological parameters as well as cluster formation histories. One of the key cosmological parameters, σ 8 , is constrained using observed clusters of galaxies, although current estimates of σ 8 from the scaling relations of dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters are limited by the large scatter in the observed cluster mass-temperature (M-T) relation. With a sample of eight strong lensing clusters at 0.3 8 , but combining the cluster concentration-mass relation with the M-T relation enables the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters as well. Thus, the resultant gains in the accuracy of σ 8 measurements from clusters are twofold: the errors on σ 8 are reduced and the cluster sample size is increased. Therefore, the statistics on σ 8 determination from clusters are greatly improved by the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters. Exploring cluster scaling relations further, we find that the correlation between brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) luminosity and cluster mass offers insight into the assembly histories of clusters. We find preliminary evidence for a steeper BCG luminosity-cluster mass relation for strong lensing clusters than the general cluster population, hinting that strong lensing clusters may have had more active merging histories.

  17. Are clusters of dietary patterns and cluster membership stable over time? Results of a longitudinal cluster analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Soetens, Katja; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2014-11-01

    Developing nutrition education interventions based on clusters of dietary patterns can only be done adequately when it is clear if distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived and reproduced over time, if cluster membership is stable, and if it is predictable which type of people belong to a certain cluster. Hence, this study aimed to: (1) identify clusters of dietary patterns among Dutch adults, (2) test the reproducibility of these clusters and stability of cluster membership over time, and (3) identify sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. This study had a longitudinal design with online measurements at baseline (N=483) and 6 months follow-up (N=379). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed, followed by a K-means cluster analysis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. At baseline and follow-up, a comparable three-cluster solution was derived, distinguishing a healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy dietary pattern. Male and lower educated participants were significantly more likely to have a less healthy dietary pattern. Further, 251 (66.2%) participants remained in the same cluster, 45 (11.9%) participants changed to an unhealthier cluster, and 83 (21.9%) participants shifted to a healthier cluster. Men and people living alone were significantly more likely to shift toward a less healthy dietary pattern. Distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived. Yet, cluster membership is unstable and only few sociodemographic factors were associated with cluster membership and cluster transition. These findings imply that clusters based on dietary intake may not be suitable as a basis for nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. STM observations of ferromagnetic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawro, A.; Kasuya, A.

    1998-01-01

    Co, Fe and Ni clusters of nanometer size, deposited on silicon and graphite (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), were observed by a scanning tunneling microscope. Deposition as well as the scanning tunneling microscope measurements were carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum system at room temperature. Detailed analysis of Co cluster height was done with the scanning tunneling microscope equipped with a ferromagnetic tip in a magnetic field up to 70 Oe. It is found that bigger clusters (few nanometers in height) exhibit a dependence of their apparent height on applied magnetic field. We propose that such behaviour originates from the ferromagnetic ordering of cluster and associate this effect to spin polarized tunneling. (author)

  19. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  20. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-01

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10 15 W/cm 2 . For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  1. Fission of Polyanionic Metal Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S.; Jankowski, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wolfram, M.

    2018-04-01

    Size-selected dianionic lead clusters Pbn2 -, n =34 - 56 , are stored in a Penning trap and studied with respect to their decay products upon photoexcitation. Contrary to the decay of other dianionic metal clusters, these lead clusters show a variety of decay channels. The mass spectra of the fragments are compared to the corresponding spectra of the monoanionic precursors. This comparison leads to the conclusion that, in the cluster size region below about n =48 , the fission reaction Pbn2 -→Pbn-10 -+Pb10- is the major decay process. Its disappearance at larger cluster sizes may be an indication of a nonmetal to metal transition. Recently, the pair of Pb10- and Pbn-10 - were observed as pronounced fragments in electron-attachment studies [S. König et al., Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 421, 129 (2017), 10.1016/j.ijms.2017.06.009]. The present findings suggest that this combination is the fingerprint of the decay of doubly charged lead clusters. With this assumption, the dianion clusters have been traced down to Pb212 -, whereas the smallest size for the direct observation was as high as n =28 .

  2. Clustering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romli

    1997-01-01

    Cluster analysis is the name of group of multivariate techniques whose principal purpose is to distinguish similar entities from the characteristics they process.To study this analysis, there are several algorithms that can be used. Therefore, this topic focuses to discuss the algorithms, such as, similarity measures, and hierarchical clustering which includes single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage method. also, non-hierarchical clustering method, which is popular name K -mean method ' will be discussed. Finally, this paper will be described the advantages and disadvantages of every methods

  3. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  4. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  5. PERFECTED enhanced recovery (PERFECT-ER) care versus standard acute care for patients admitted to acute settings with hip fracture identified as experiencing confusion: study protocol for a feasibility cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Simon P; Cross, Jane L; Shepstone, Lee; Backhouse, Tamara; Henderson, Catherine; Poland, Fiona; Sims, Erika; MacLullich, Alasdair; Penhale, Bridget; Howard, Robert; Lambert, Nigel; Varley, Anna; Smith, Toby O; Sahota, Opinder; Donell, Simon; Patel, Martyn; Ballard, Clive; Young, John; Knapp, Martin; Jackson, Stephen; Waring, Justin; Leavey, Nick; Howard, Gregory; Fox, Chris

    2017-12-04

    Health and social care provision for an ageing population is a global priority. Provision for those with dementia and hip fracture has specific and growing importance. Older people who break their hip are recognised as exceptionally vulnerable to experiencing confusion (including but not exclusively, dementia and/or delirium and/or cognitive impairment(s)) before, during or after acute admissions. Older people experiencing hip fracture and confusion risk serious complications, linked to delayed recovery and higher mortality post-operatively. Specific care pathways acknowledging the differences in patient presentation and care needs are proposed to improve clinical and process outcomes. This protocol describes a multi-centre, feasibility, cluster-randomised, controlled trial (CRCT) to be undertaken across ten National Health Service hospital trusts in the UK. The trial will explore the feasibility of undertaking a CRCT comparing the multicomponent PERFECTED enhanced recovery intervention (PERFECT-ER), which acknowledges the differences in care needs of confused older patients experiencing hip fracture, with standard care. The trial will also have an integrated process evaluation to explore how PERFECT-ER is implemented and interacts with the local context. The study will recruit 400 hip fracture patients identified as experiencing confusion and will also recruit "suitable informants" (individuals in regular contact with participants who will complete proxy measures). We will also recruit NHS professionals for the process evaluation. This mixed methods design will produce data to inform a definitive evaluation of the intervention via a large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT). The trial will provide a preliminary estimate of potential efficacy of PERFECT-ER versus standard care; assess service delivery variation, inform primary and secondary outcome selection, generate estimates of recruitment and retention rates, data collection difficulties, and

  6. Cosmology and cluster halo scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Melo, Pablo A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of dark matter and dark energy on the dynamical scaling properties of galaxy clusters. We investigate the cluster Faber-Jackson (FJ), Kormendy and Fundamental Plane (FP) relations between the mass, radius and velocity dispersion of cluster-sized haloes in cosmological N-body

  7. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  8. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  9. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I [Urbana, IL; Petrov, Ivan G [Champaign, IL

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  10. Cluster Bulleticity

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657−56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025−12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary ‘baryonic’ matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. C...

  11. Cluster headache

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur ...

  12. Study protocol: a cluster randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a multi-pronged behavioural intervention to improve use of personal protective equipment among migrant workers exposed to organic solvents in small and medium-sized enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, most of migrant workers work in the small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs and are a vulnerable group for occupational health. Migrant workers are at increased risk of occupational health risks due to poor occupational health behaviours such as the low use of personal protective equipment (PPE. However, there is a lack of solid evidence regarding how to improve the use of PPE among migrant workers in SMEs. The current study will assess the effectiveness of a multi-pronged behavioural intervention designed to promote PPE utilization among migrant workers exposed to organic solvents in SMEs. Methods/Design This is a single blind, three-arm cluster randomized trial with 60 SMEs equally randomized to receive a top-down intervention (i.e. general health education and mHealth intervention provided by researchers or a comprehensive intervention (which includes both top-down intervention and peer education or a control condition (participants will not receive the intervention, but study measures will be obtained. Interventions will be conducted at the SMEs level for 6 months and all eligible migrant workers in these SMEs will be enrolled into the trial. The primary outcome is effective use of PPE during the last week. The secondary outcomes are occupational health knowledge and attitude and participation in occupational health check-up. Data will be collected and assessed at baseline; 3 months post baseline and the end of the intervention. Discussion This theory- and evidence based intervention will contribute to the limited evidence of behaviour change intervention in improving PPE utilization of migrant workers in SMEs, and provide timely evidence for the development of basic occupational health services in China and elsewhere with similar industrialization contexts. Trial registration ChiCTR-IOR-15006929 . Registered on 16 August 2015.

  13. Connection between Seyfert galaxies and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    To identify Seyfert galaxies that are members of clusters, the sample of known Seyfert galaxies (464 objects) is tested against the Zwicky, Abell, and southern clusters. On the basis of the criteria adopted in the paper, 67 Seyfert galaxies are selected as probable members of Zwicky clusters, 15 as members of Abell clusters, and 18 as members of southern clusters. Lists of these objects are given

  14. Characteristics of Clusters of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157 Detected by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis that Predict Identification of Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Timothy F; Sashti, Nupur; Ingram, Amanda; Phan, Quyen; Booth, Hillary; Rounds, Joshua; Nicholson, Cyndy S; Cosgrove, Shaun; Crocker, Kia; Gould, L Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Molecular subtyping of pathogens is critical for foodborne disease outbreak detection and investigation. Many clusters initially identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are not confirmed as point-source outbreaks. We evaluated characteristics of clusters that can help prioritize investigations to maximize effective use of limited resources. A multiagency collaboration (FoodNet) collected data on Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157 clusters for 3 years. Cluster size, timing, extent, and nature of epidemiologic investigations were analyzed to determine associations with whether the cluster was identified as a confirmed outbreak. During the 3-year study period, 948 PFGE clusters were identified; 849 (90%) were Salmonella and 99 (10%) were E. coli O157. Of those, 192 (20%) were ultimately identified as outbreaks (154 [18%] of Salmonella and 38 [38%] of E. coli O157 clusters). Successful investigation was significantly associated with larger cluster size, more rapid submission of isolates (e.g., for Salmonella, 6 days for outbreaks vs. 8 days for nonoutbreaks) and PFGE result reporting to investigators (16 days vs. 29 days, respectively), and performance of analytic studies (completed in 33% of Salmonella outbreaks vs. 1% of nonoutbreaks) and environmental investigations (40% and 1%, respectively). Intervals between first and second cases in a cluster did not differ significantly between outbreaks and nonoutbreaks. Molecular subtyping of pathogens is a rapidly advancing technology, and successfully identifying outbreaks will vary by pathogen and methods used. Understanding criteria for successfully investigating outbreaks is critical for efficiently using limited resources.

  15. Properties of an ionised-cluster beam from a vaporised-cluster ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Yamada, I.; Sasaki, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new type of ion source vaporised-metal cluster ion source, has been developed for deposition and epitaxy. A cluster consisting of 10 2 to 10 3 atoms coupled loosely together is formed by adiabatic expansion ejecting the vapour of materials into a high-vacuum region through the nozzle of a heated crucible. The clusters are ionised by electron bombardment and accelerated with neutral clusters toward a substrate. In this paper, mechanisms of cluster formation experimental results of the cluster size (atoms/cluster) and its distribution, and characteristics of the cluster ion beams are reported. The size is calculated from the kinetic equation E = (1/2)mNVsub(ej) 2 , where E is the cluster beam energy, Vsub(ej) is the ejection velocity, m is the mass of atom and N is the cluster size. The energy and the velocity of the cluster are measured by an electrostatic 127 0 energy analyser and a rotating disc system, respectively. The cluster size obtained for Ag is about 5 x 10 2 to 2 x 10 3 atoms. The retarding potential method is used to confirm the results for Ag. The same dependence on cluster size for metals such as Ag, Cu and Pb has been obtained in previous experiments. In the cluster state the cluster ion beam is easily produced by electron bombardment. About 50% of ionised clusters are obtained under typical operation conditions, because of the large ionisation cross sections of the clusters. To obtain a uniform spatial distribution, the ionising electrode system is also discussed. The new techniques are termed ionised-cluster beam deposition (ICBD) and epitaxy (ICBE). (author)

  16. Cluster lot quality assurance sampling: effect of increasing the number of clusters on classification precision and operational feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Hiromasa; Brown, Alexandra E; Nzioki, Michael M; Gasasira, Alex N; Takane, Marina; Mkanda, Pascal; Wassilak, Steven G F; Sutter, Roland W

    2014-11-01

    To assess the quality of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has used cluster lot quality assurance sampling (C-LQAS) methods since 2009. However, since the inception of C-LQAS, questions have been raised about the optimal balance between operational feasibility and precision of classification of lots to identify areas with low SIA quality that require corrective programmatic action. To determine if an increased precision in classification would result in differential programmatic decision making, we conducted a pilot evaluation in 4 local government areas (LGAs) in Nigeria with an expanded LQAS sample size of 16 clusters (instead of the standard 6 clusters) of 10 subjects each. The results showed greater heterogeneity between clusters than the assumed standard deviation of 10%, ranging from 12% to 23%. Comparing the distribution of 4-outcome classifications obtained from all possible combinations of 6-cluster subsamples to the observed classification of the 16-cluster sample, we obtained an exact match in classification in 56% to 85% of instances. We concluded that the 6-cluster C-LQAS provides acceptable classification precision for programmatic action. Considering the greater resources required to implement an expanded C-LQAS, the improvement in precision was deemed insufficient to warrant the effort. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Cross section measurements of the processes occurring in the fragmentation of Hn+ (3 ≤ n ≤ 35) hydrogen clusters induced by high speed (60 keV/u) collisions on helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louc, Sandrine

    1997-01-01

    Different processes involved in the fragmentation of ionised hydrogen clusters H 3 + (H 2 ) (n-3)/2 (n = 5-35) have been studied in the same experiment: the fragmentation of the cluster is induced by the collision with an helium atom at high velocity (≅ c/100). The collision is realised in reversed kinematic - clusters are accelerated - which allows the detection of neutral and charged fragments. The different channels of fragmentation are identified by using coincidence techniques. For all the cluster sizes studied the capture cross sections of one electron of the target by the cluster is equal to the capture cross section of the H 3 + ion. In the same way, the dissociation cross section of the H 3 + core of the cluster does not depend on cluster size. These fragmentation processes are due to the interaction of H 3 + core of the cluster and the helium atom without ionization of another component of the cluster. On the contrary, the cross sections of loss of one, two and three molecules by the cluster and the dissociation cross section of the cluster in all its molecular components depends strongly on the cluster size. This dependence is different from the one measured for the metastable decay of the cluster. Thus, the process of loss of molecules induced by a collision should correspond to a different dissociation mechanism. In regard of the singularities observed for the size dependence, the H 9 + , H 15 + , H 19 + and H 29 + clusters could be the 'core' of the biggest clusters. These observation are in agreement with the size effects of smaller magnitude observed for the dissociation cross section (all the processes). The values of the cross section for the process of at least one ionization of the cluster indicate that about 80% of the fragmentation events result from this process. (author)

  18. Changing cluster composition in cluster randomised controlled trials: design and analysis considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many methodological challenges in the conduct and analysis of cluster randomised controlled trials, but one that has received little attention is that of post-randomisation changes to cluster composition. To illustrate this, we focus on the issue of cluster merging, considering the impact on the design, analysis and interpretation of trial outcomes. Methods We explored the effects of merging clusters on study power using standard methods of power calculation. We assessed the potential impacts on study findings of both homogeneous cluster merges (involving clusters randomised to the same arm of a trial) and heterogeneous merges (involving clusters randomised to different arms of a trial) by simulation. To determine the impact on bias and precision of treatment effect estimates, we applied standard methods of analysis to different populations under analysis. Results Cluster merging produced a systematic reduction in study power. This effect depended on the number of merges and was most pronounced when variability in cluster size was at its greatest. Simulations demonstrate that the impact on analysis was minimal when cluster merges were homogeneous, with impact on study power being balanced by a change in observed intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC). We found a decrease in study power when cluster merges were heterogeneous, and the estimate of treatment effect was attenuated. Conclusions Examples of cluster merges found in previously published reports of cluster randomised trials were typically homogeneous rather than heterogeneous. Simulations demonstrated that trial findings in such cases would be unbiased. However, simulations also showed that any heterogeneous cluster merges would introduce bias that would be hard to quantify, as well as having negative impacts on the precision of estimates obtained. Further methodological development is warranted to better determine how to analyse such trials appropriately. Interim recommendations

  19. Supersonic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.E.; Hansen, S.G.; Geusic, M.E.; Michalopoulos, D.L.; Smalley, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Copper clusters ranging in size from 1 to 29 atoms have been prepared in a supersonic beam by laser vaporization of a rotating copper target rod within the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle using helium for the carrier gas. The clusters were cooled extensively in the supersonic expansion [T(translational) 1 to 4 K, T(rotational) = 4 K, T(vibrational) = 20 to 70 K]. These clusters were detected in the supersonic beam by laser photoionization with time-of-flight mass analysis. Using a number of fixed frequency outputs of an exciplex laser, the threshold behavior of the photoionization cross section was monitored as a function of cluster size.nce two-photon ionization (R2PI) with mass selective detection allowed the detection of five new electronic band systems in the region between 2690 and 3200 A, for each of the three naturally occurring isotopic forms of Cu 2 . In the process of scanning the R2PI spectrum of these new electronic states, the ionization potential of the copper dimer was determined to be 7.894 +- 0.015 eV

  20. Greedy subspace clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We consider the problem of subspace clustering: given points that lie on or near the union of many low-dimensional linear subspaces, recover the subspaces. To this end, one first identifies sets of points close to the same subspace and uses the sets ...

  1. Cosmology with clusters in the CMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Subhabrata

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the seminal work by Sunyaev and Zel'dovich describing the distortion of the CMB spectrum, due to photons passing through the hot inter cluster gas on its way to us from the surface of last scattering (the so called Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE)), small scale distortions of the CMB by clusters has been used to detect clusters as well as to do cosmology with clusters. Cosmology with clusters in the CMB can be divided into three distinct regimes: a) when the clusters are completely unresolved and contribute to the secondary CMB distortions power spectrum at small angular scales; b) when we can just about resolve the clusters so as to detect the clusters through its total SZE flux such that the clusters can be tagged and counted for doing cosmology and c) when we can completely resolve the clusters so as to measure their sizes and other cluster structural properties and their evolution with redshift. In this article, we take a look at these three aspects of SZE cluster studies and their implication for using clusters as cosmological probes. We show that clusters can be used as effective probes of cosmology, when in all of these three cases, one explores the synergy between cluster physics and cosmology as well take clues about cluster physics from the latest high precision cluster observations (for example, from Chandra and XMM - Newton). As a specific case, we show how an observationally motivated cluster SZ template can explain the CBI-excess without the need for a high σ 8 . We also briefly discuss 'self-calibration' in cluster surveys and the prospect of using clusters as an ensemble of cosmic rulers to break degeneracies arising in cluster cosmology.

  2. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  3. Macroeconomic Dimensions in the Clusterization Processes: Lithuanian Biomass Cluster Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickas Valentinas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Future production systems’ increasing significance will impose work, which maintains not a competitive, but a collaboration basis, with concentrated resources and expertise, which can help to reach the general purpose. One form of collaboration among medium-size business organizations is work in clusters. Clusterization as a phenomenon has been known from quite a long time, but it offers simple benefits to researches at micro and medium levels. The clusterization process evaluation in macroeconomic dimensions has been comparatively little investigated. Thereby, in this article, the clusterization processes is analysed by concentrating our attention on macroeconomic factor researches. The authors analyse clusterization’s influence on country’s macroeconomic growth; they apply a structure research methodology for clusterization’s macroeconomic influence evaluation and propose that clusterization processes benefit macroeconomic analysis. The theoretical model of clusterization processes was validated by referring to a biomass cluster case. Because biomass cluster case is a new phenomenon, currently there are no other scientific approaches to them. The authors’ accomplished researches show that clusterization allows the achievement of a large positive slip in macroeconomics, which proves to lead to a high value added to creation, a faster country economic growth, and social situation amelioration.

  4. A COMPARISON OF TWO FUZZY CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjit Das

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available - In fuzzy clustering, unlike hard clustering, depending on the membership value, a single object may belong exactly to one cluster or partially to more than one cluster. Out of a number of fuzzy clustering techniques Bezdek’s Fuzzy C-Means and GustafsonKessel clustering techniques are well known where Euclidian distance and Mahalanobis distance are used respectively as a measure of similarity. We have applied these two fuzzy clustering techniques on a dataset of individual differences consisting of fifty feature vectors of dimension (feature three. Based on some validity measures we have tried to see the performances of these two clustering techniques from three different aspects- first, by initializing the membership values of the feature vectors considering the values of the three features separately one at a time, secondly, by changing the number of the predefined clusters and thirdly, by changing the size of the dataset.

  5. Comparative genomics of chondrichthyan Hoxa clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ying-Fu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondrichthyan or cartilaginous fish (chimeras, sharks, skates and rays occupy an important phylogenetic position as the sister group to all other jawed vertebrates and as an early lineage to diverge from the vertebrate lineage following two whole genome duplication events in vertebrate evolution. There have been few comparative genomic analyses incorporating data from chondrichthyan fish and none comparing genomic information from within the group. We have sequenced the complete Hoxa cluster of the Little Skate (Leucoraja erinacea and compared to the published Hoxa cluster of the Horn Shark (Heterodontus francisci and to available data from the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii genome project. Results A BAC clone containing the full Little Skate Hoxa cluster was fully sequenced and assembled. Analyses of coding sequences and conserved non-coding elements reveal a strikingly high level of conservation across the cartilaginous fish, with twenty ultraconserved elements (100%,100 bp found between Skate and Horn Shark, compared to three between human and marsupials. We have also identified novel potential non-coding RNAs in the Skate BAC clone, some of which are conserved to other species. Conclusion We find that the Little Skate Hoxa cluster is remarkably similar to the previously published Horn Shark Hoxa cluster with respect to sequence identity, gene size and intergenic distance despite over 180 million years of separation between the two lineages. We suggest that the genomes of cartilaginous fish are more highly conserved than those of tetrapods or teleost fish and so are more likely to have retained ancestral non-coding elements. While useful for isolating homologous DNA, this complicates bioinformatic approaches to identify chondrichthyan-specific non-coding DNA elements

  6. More Planets in the Hyades Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    through the K2 light curves of young stars as part of the ZEIT (Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time) Survey. Using these data, they identified the presence of three planets in the EPIC 247589423 system:a roughly Earth-sized planet ( 1.0 Earth radii) with a period of 8.0 days,the mini-Neptune identified in the other study, with a size of 2.9 Earth radii and period of 17 days, anda super-Earth, with a size of 1.5 Earth radii and period of 26 days.Light curve of EPIC 247589423 from K2, with the lower panels showing the transits of the three discovered planets. [Mann et al. 2018]The smallest planet is among the youngest Earth-sized planets ever discovered, allowing us a rare glimpse into the history and evolution of planets similar to our own.But these planetary discoveries are additionally exciting because theyre orbiting a bright star thats relatively quiet for its age making the system an excellent target for dedicated radial-velocity observations to determine the planet masses.Since most young star clusters are much further away, they lie out of range of radial-velocity follow-up, rendering EPIC 247589423 a unique opportunity to explore the properties of young planets in detail. With more discoveries like these from Keplers data, we can hope to soon learn more about planets in all their stages of evolution.CitationAndrew W. Mann et al 2018 AJ 155 4. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa9791

  7. Semi-supervised clustering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Cluster analysis methods seek to partition a data set into homogeneous subgroups. It is useful in a wide variety of applications, including document processing and modern genetics. Conventional clustering methods are unsupervised, meaning that there is no outcome variable nor is anything known about the relationship between the observations in the data set. In many situations, however, information about the clusters is available in addition to the values of the features. For example, the cluster labels of some observations may be known, or certain observations may be known to belong to the same cluster. In other cases, one may wish to identify clusters that are associated with a particular outcome variable. This review describes several clustering algorithms (known as "semi-supervised clustering" methods) that can be applied in these situations. The majority of these methods are modifications of the popular k-means clustering method, and several of them will be described in detail. A brief description of some other semi-supervised clustering algorithms is also provided.

  8. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.; Hou, Siqing

    2017-01-01

    baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number

  9. Thermodynamically accessible titanium clusters TiN, N = 2-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazauskas, Tomas; Sokol, Alexey A; Buckeridge, John; Catlow, C Richard A; Escher, Susanne G E T; Farrow, Matthew R; Mora-Fonz, David; Blum, Volker W; Phaahla, Tshegofatso M; Chauke, Hasani R; Ngoepe, Phuti E; Woodley, Scott M

    2018-05-10

    We have performed a genetic algorithm search on the tight-binding interatomic potential energy surface (PES) for small TiN (N = 2-32) clusters. The low energy candidate clusters were further refined using density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBEsol exchange-correlation functional and evaluated with the PBEsol0 hybrid functional. The resulting clusters were analysed in terms of their structural features, growth mechanism and surface area. The results suggest a growth mechanism that is based on forming coordination centres by interpenetrating icosahedra, icositetrahedra and Frank-Kasper polyhedra. We identify centres of coordination, which act as centres of bulk nucleation in medium sized clusters and determine the morphological features of the cluster.

  10. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  11. Air void clustering : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Air void clustering around coarse aggregate in concrete has been : identified as a potential source of low strengths in concrete mixes by : several Departments of Transportation around the country. Research : was carried out to (1) develop a quantita...

  12. Gas phase reactivity of thermal metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.; Harms, A.C.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Reaction kinetics of metal cluster ions under well defined thermal conditions were studied using a flow tube reactor in combination with laser vaporization. Aluminum anions and cations were reacted with oxygen, and several species which are predicted jellium shell closings, were found to have special stability. Metal alloy cluster anions comprised of Al, V and Nb were also seen to react with oxygen. Alloy clusters with an even number of electrons reacted more slowly than odd electron species, and certain clusters appeared to be exceptionally unreactive. Copper cation clusters were observed to associate with carbon monoxide with reactivities that approach bulk behavior at surprisingly small cluster size. These reactions demonstrate how the rate of reaction changes with cluster size. (orig.)

  13. Gas phase reactivity of thermal metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Harms, A. C.; Leuchtner, R. E.

    1991-03-01

    Reaction kinetics of metal cluster ions under well defined thermal conditions were studied using a flow tube reactor in combination with laser vaporization. Aluminum anions and cations were reacted with oxygen, and several species which are predicted jellium shell closings, were found to have special stability. Metal alloy cluster anions comprised of Al, V and Nb were also seen to react with oxygen. Alloy clusters with an even number of electrons reacted more slowly than odd electron species, and certain clusters appeared to be exceptionally unreactive. Copper cation clusters were observed to associate with carbon monoxide with reactivities that approach bulk behavior at surprisingly small cluster size. These reactions demonstrate how the rate of reaction changes with cluster size.

  14. Stopping of hypervelocity clusters in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Christian; Ziegenhain, Gerolf; Urbassek, Herbert M; Bringa, Eduardo M

    2011-01-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulations, we study the processes underlying the stopping of energetic clusters upon impact in matter. We investigate self-bombardment of both a metallic (Cu) and a van-der-Waals bonded (frozen Ar) target. Clusters with sizes up to N = 10 4 atoms and with energies per atom of E/N = 0.1-1600 eV atom -1 were studied. We find that the stopping force exerted on a cluster follows an N 2/3 -dependence with cluster size N; thus large clusters experience less stopping than equi-velocity atoms. In the course of being stopped, the cluster is strongly deformed and attains a roughly pancake shape. Due to the cluster inertia, maximum deformation occurs later than the maximum stopping force. The time scale of projectile stopping is set by t 0 , the time the cluster needs to cover its own diameter before impacting the target; it thus depends on both cluster size and velocity. The time when the cluster experiences its maximum stopping force is around (0.7-0.8)t 0 . We find that the cluster is deformed with huge strain rates of around 1/2t 0 ; this amounts to 10 11 -10 13 s -1 for the cases studied here. (paper)

  15. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations and the clusterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenko, B.F.; Musul'manbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the forward-backward multiplicity correlations for pp- and p-barp-collisions has been fulfilled in the framework of the statistical cluster model. Connection between the strength of correlations and sizes of clusters is investigated. The dependence of masses and sizes of clusters on the energy of colliding hadrons is obtained. 15 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Identifying Clusters of Complex Urban–Rural Issues as Part of Policy Making Process Using a Network Analysis Approach: A Case Study in Bahía de Los Ángeles, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sandoval

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Improving human settlements diagnosis is a key factor in effective urban planning and the design of efficient policy making. In this paper, we illustrate how network theory concepts can be applied to reveal the topological structure of functional relationships in a network of heterogeneous urban–rural issues. This mapping is done using clustering algorithms and centrality value techniques. By analyzing emergent groups of urban–rural related issues, our methodology was applied to a rural community, considering in this exercise environmental matters and real estate interests as a way to better understand the structure of salient issues in the context of its urban development program design. Results show clusters that arrange themselves not by an obvious similarity in their constituent components, but by relations observed in urban–rural settings that hint on the issues that the urban development program must focus. Due to its complex nature, the classification of these emerging clusters and how they must be treated in traditional planning instruments is a new challenge that this novel methodology reveals.

  17. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...... or management. Both the Accelerate Wales and the Accelerate Cluster programmes target this issue by trying to establish networks between companies that can be used to supply knowledge from research institutions to manufacturing companies. The paper concludes that public sector interventions can make...... businesses. The universities were not considered by the participating companies to be important parts of the local business environment and inputs from universities did not appear to be an important source to access knowledge about new product development or new techniques in production, distribution...

  18. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  19. Cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mucha, Hans-Joachim; Sofyan, Hizir

    2000-01-01

    As an explorative technique, duster analysis provides a description or a reduction in the dimension of the data. It classifies a set of observations into two or more mutually exclusive unknown groups based on combinations of many variables. Its aim is to construct groups in such a way that the profiles of objects in the same groups are relatively homogenous whereas the profiles of objects in different groups are relatively heterogeneous. Clustering is distinct from classification techniques, ...

  20. Computational Design of Clusters for Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Izal, Elisa; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2018-04-01

    When small clusters are studied in chemical physics or physical chemistry, one perhaps thinks of the fundamental aspects of cluster electronic structure, or precision spectroscopy in ultracold molecular beams. However, small clusters are also of interest in catalysis, where the cold ground state or an isolated cluster may not even be the right starting point. Instead, the big question is: What happens to cluster-based catalysts under real conditions of catalysis, such as high temperature and coverage with reagents? Myriads of metastable cluster states become accessible, the entire system is dynamic, and catalysis may be driven by rare sites present only under those conditions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are highly dependent on size, composition, shape, support, and environment. To probe and master cluster catalysis, sophisticated tools are being developed for precision synthesis, operando measurements, and multiscale modeling. This review intends to tell the messy story of clusters in catalysis.

  1. Star clusters in evolving galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Florent

    2018-04-01

    Their ubiquity and extreme densities make star clusters probes of prime importance of galaxy evolution. Old globular clusters keep imprints of the physical conditions of their assembly in the early Universe, and younger stellar objects, observationally resolved, tell us about the mechanisms at stake in their formation. Yet, we still do not understand the diversity involved: why is star cluster formation limited to 105M⊙ objects in the Milky Way, while some dwarf galaxies like NGC 1705 are able to produce clusters 10 times more massive? Why do dwarfs generally host a higher specific frequency of clusters than larger galaxies? How to connect the present-day, often resolved, stellar systems to the formation of globular clusters at high redshift? And how do these links depend on the galactic and cosmological environments of these clusters? In this review, I present recent advances on star cluster formation and evolution, in galactic and cosmological context. The emphasis is put on the theory, formation scenarios and the effects of the environment on the evolution of the global properties of clusters. A few open questions are identified.

  2. Semi-supervised clustering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Cluster analysis methods seek to partition a data set into homogeneous subgroups. It is useful in a wide variety of applications, including document processing and modern genetics. Conventional clustering methods are unsupervised, meaning that there is no outcome variable nor is anything known about the relationship between the observations in the data set. In many situations, however, information about the clusters is available in addition to the values of the features. For example, the cluster labels of some observations may be known, or certain observations may be known to belong to the same cluster. In other cases, one may wish to identify clusters that are associated with a particular outcome variable. This review describes several clustering algorithms (known as “semi-supervised clustering” methods) that can be applied in these situations. The majority of these methods are modifications of the popular k-means clustering method, and several of them will be described in detail. A brief description of some other semi-supervised clustering algorithms is also provided. PMID:24729830

  3. Statistical Significance for Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, Patrick K.; Liu, Yufeng; Hayes, D. Neil; Marron, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cluster analysis has proved to be an invaluable tool for the exploratory and unsupervised analysis of high dimensional datasets. Among methods for clustering, hierarchical approaches have enjoyed substantial popularity in genomics and other fields for their ability to simultaneously uncover multiple layers of clustering structure. A critical and challenging question in cluster analysis is whether the identified clusters represent important underlying structure or are artifacts of natural sampling variation. Few approaches have been proposed for addressing this problem in the context of hierarchical clustering, for which the problem is further complicated by the natural tree structure of the partition, and the multiplicity of tests required to parse the layers of nested clusters. In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo based approach for testing statistical significance in hierarchical clustering which addresses these issues. The approach is implemented as a sequential testing procedure guaranteeing control of the family-wise error rate. Theoretical justification is provided for our approach, and its power to detect true clustering structure is illustrated through several simulation studies and applications to two cancer gene expression datasets. PMID:28099990

  4. Performance of small cluster surveys and the clustered LQAS design to estimate local-level vaccination coverage in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Andrea; Riera-Montes, Margarita; Nackers, Fabienne; Roederer, Thomas; Koudika, Marie Hortense; Sekkenes, Johanne; Taconet, Aurore; Fermon, Florence; Touré, Albouhary; Grais, Rebecca F; Checchi, Francesco

    2012-10-12

    Estimation of vaccination coverage at the local level is essential to identify communities that may require additional support. Cluster surveys can be used in resource-poor settings, when population figures are inaccurate. To be feasible, cluster samples need to be small, without losing robustness of results. The clustered LQAS (CLQAS) approach has been proposed as an alternative, as smaller sample sizes are required. We explored (i) the efficiency of cluster surveys of decreasing sample size through bootstrapping analysis and (ii) the performance of CLQAS under three alternative sampling plans to classify local VC, using data from a survey carried out in Mali after mass vaccination against meningococcal meningitis group A. VC estimates provided by a 10 × 15 cluster survey design were reasonably robust. We used them to classify health areas in three categories and guide mop-up activities: i) health areas not requiring supplemental activities; ii) health areas requiring additional vaccination; iii) health areas requiring further evaluation. As sample size decreased (from 10 × 15 to 10 × 3), standard error of VC and ICC estimates were increasingly unstable. Results of CLQAS simulations were not accurate for most health areas, with an overall risk of misclassification greater than 0.25 in one health area out of three. It was greater than 0.50 in one health area out of two under two of the three sampling plans. Small sample cluster surveys (10 × 15) are acceptably robust for classification of VC at local level. We do not recommend the CLQAS method as currently formulated for evaluating vaccination programmes.

  5. Performance of small cluster surveys and the clustered LQAS design to estimate local-level vaccination coverage in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minetti Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of vaccination coverage at the local level is essential to identify communities that may require additional support. Cluster surveys can be used in resource-poor settings, when population figures are inaccurate. To be feasible, cluster samples need to be small, without losing robustness of results. The clustered LQAS (CLQAS approach has been proposed as an alternative, as smaller sample sizes are required. Methods We explored (i the efficiency of cluster surveys of decreasing sample size through bootstrapping analysis and (ii the performance of CLQAS under three alternative sampling plans to classify local VC, using data from a survey carried out in Mali after mass vaccination against meningococcal meningitis group A. Results VC estimates provided by a 10 × 15 cluster survey design were reasonably robust. We used them to classify health areas in three categories and guide mop-up activities: i health areas not requiring supplemental activities; ii health areas requiring additional vaccination; iii health areas requiring further evaluation. As sample size decreased (from 10 × 15 to 10 × 3, standard error of VC and ICC estimates were increasingly unstable. Results of CLQAS simulations were not accurate for most health areas, with an overall risk of misclassification greater than 0.25 in one health area out of three. It was greater than 0.50 in one health area out of two under two of the three sampling plans. Conclusions Small sample cluster surveys (10 × 15 are acceptably robust for classification of VC at local level. We do not recommend the CLQAS method as currently formulated for evaluating vaccination programmes.

  6. Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

  7. Chronorisk in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Haddock, Bryan; Lund, Nunu T

    2018-01-01

    and a spectral analysis identifying oscillations in risk. Results The Gaussian model fit for the chronorisk distribution for all patients reporting diurnal rhythmicity (n = 286) had a goodness of fit R2 value of 0.97 and identified three times of increased risk peaking at 21:41, 02:02 and 06:23 hours....... In subgroups, three to five modes of increased risk were found and goodness of fit values ranged from 0.85-0.99. Spectral analysis revealed multiple distinct oscillation frequencies in chronorisk in subgroups including a dominant circadian oscillation in episodic patients and an ultradian in chronic....... Conclusions Chronorisk in cluster headache can be characterised as a sum of individual, timed events of increased risk, each having a Gaussian distribution. In episodic cluster headache, attacks follow a circadian rhythmicity whereas, in the chronic variant, ultradian oscillations are dominant reflecting...

  8. CSR in Industrial Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Pillay, Renginee G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to review the literature on CSR in industrial clusters in developing countries, identifying the main strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in this literature, pointing to future research directions and policy implications in the area of CSR and industrial cluster development....... Design/methodology/approach – A literature review is conducted of both academic and policy-oriented writings that contain the keywords “industrial clusters” and “developing countries” in combination with one or more of the following terms: corporate social responsibility, environmental management, labor...... standards, child labor, climate change, social upgrading, and environmental upgrading. The authors examine the key themes in this literature, identify the main gaps, and point to areas where future work in this area could usefully be undertaken. Feedback has been sought from some of the leading authors...

  9. Unraveling the atomic structure of ultrafine iron clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Unraveling the atomic structures of ultrafine iron clusters is critical to understanding their size-dependent catalytic effects and electronic properties. Here, we describe the stable close-packed structure of ultrafine Fe clusters for the first

  10. Electricity Consumption Clustering Using Smart Meter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tureczek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Electricity smart meter consumption data is enabling utilities to analyze consumption information at unprecedented granularity. Much focus has been directed towards consumption clustering for diversifying tariffs; through modern clustering methods, cluster analyses have been performed. However, the clusters developed exhibit a large variation with resulting shadow clusters, making it impossible to truly identify the individual clusters. Using clearly defined dwelling types, this paper will present methods to improve clustering by harvesting inherent structure from the smart meter data. This paper clusters domestic electricity consumption using smart meter data from the Danish city of Esbjerg. Methods from time series analysis and wavelets are applied to enable the K-Means clustering method to account for autocorrelation in data and thereby improve the clustering performance. The results show the importance of data knowledge and we identify sub-clusters of consumption within the dwelling types and enable K-Means to produce satisfactory clustering by accounting for a temporal component. Furthermore our study shows that careful preprocessing of the data to account for intrinsic structure enables better clustering performance by the K-Means method.

  11. Space-time clustering characteristics of tuberculosis in China, 2005-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: China is one of the 22 tuberculosis (TB high-burden countries in the world. As TB is a major public health problem in China, spatial analysis could be applied to detect geographic distribution of TB clusters for targeted intervention on TB epidemics. METHODS: Spatial analysis was applied for detecting TB clusters on county-based TB notification data in the national notifiable infectious disease case reporting surveillance system from 2005 to 2011. Two indicators of TB epidemic were used including new sputum smear-positive (SS+ notification rate and total TB notification rate. Global Moran's I by ArcGIS was used to assess whether TB clustering and its trend were significant. SaTScan software that used the retrospective space-time analysis and Possion probability model was utilized to identify geographic areas and time period of potential clusters with notification rates on county-level from 2005 to 2011. RESULTS: Two indicators of TB notification had presented significant spatial autocorrelation globally each year (p<0.01. Global Moran's I of total TB notification rate had positive trend as time went by (t=6.87, p<0.01. The most likely clusters of two indicators had similar spatial distribution and size in the south-central regions of China from 2006 to 2008, and the secondary clusters in two regions: northeastern China and western China. Besides, the secondary clusters of total TB notification rate had two more large clustering centers in Inner Mongolia, Gansu and Qinghai provinces and several smaller clusters in Shanxi, Henan, Hebei and Jiangsu provinces. CONCLUSION: The total TB notification cases clustered significantly in some special areas each year and the clusters trended to aggregate with time. The most-likely and secondary clusters that overlapped among two TB indicators had higher TB burden and risks of TB transmission. These were the focused geographic areas where TB control efforts should be prioritized.

  12. Clustering methods for the optimization of atomic cluster structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagattini, Francesco; Schoen, Fabio; Tigli, Luca

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a revised global optimization method and apply it to large scale cluster conformation problems. In the 1990s, the so-called clustering methods were considered among the most efficient general purpose global optimization techniques; however, their usage has quickly declined in recent years, mainly due to the inherent difficulties of clustering approaches in large dimensional spaces. Inspired from the machine learning literature, we redesigned clustering methods in order to deal with molecular structures in a reduced feature space. Our aim is to show that by suitably choosing a good set of geometrical features coupled with a very efficient descent method, an effective optimization tool is obtained which is capable of finding, with a very high success rate, all known putative optima for medium size clusters without any prior information, both for Lennard-Jones and Morse potentials. The main result is that, beyond being a reliable approach, the proposed method, based on the idea of starting a computationally expensive deep local search only when it seems worth doing so, is capable of saving a huge amount of searches with respect to an analogous algorithm which does not employ a clustering phase. In this paper, we are not claiming the superiority of the proposed method compared to specific, refined, state-of-the-art procedures, but rather indicating a quite straightforward way to save local searches by means of a clustering scheme working in a reduced variable space, which might prove useful when included in many modern methods.

  13. Transformation dynamics of Ni clusters into NiO rings under electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.knez@felmi-zfe.at [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Kothleitner, Gerald [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, Wolfgang E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Hofer, Ferdinand [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    We report the transformation of nickel clusters into NiO rings by an electron beam induced nanoscale Kirkendall effect. High-purity nickel clusters consisting of a few thousand atoms have been used as precursors and were synthesized with the superfluid helium droplet technique. Aberration-corrected, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy was applied to oxidise and simultaneously analyse the nanostructures. The transient dynamics of the oxidation could be documented by time lapse series using high-angle annular dark-field imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. A two-step Cabrera-Mott oxidation mechanism was identified. It was found that water adsorbed adjacent to the clusters acts as oxygen source for the electron beam induced oxidation. The size-dependent oxidation rate was estimated by quantitative EELS measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings could serve to better control sample changes during examination in an electron microscope, and might provide a methodology to generate other metal oxide nanostructures. - Highlights: • Beam induced conversion of Ni clusters into crystalline NiO rings has been observed. • Ni clusters were grown with the superfluid He-droplet technique. • oxidizeSTEM was utilized to investigate and simultaneously oxidize these clusters. • Oxidation dynamics was captured in real-time. • Cluster sizes and the oxidation rate were estimated via EELS and molecular dynamics.

  14. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  15. Coulomb Fission in Multiply-Charged Ammonia Clusters: Accurate Measurements of the Rayleigh Instability Limit from Fragmentation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher; Stace, Anthony J

    2018-03-15

    A series of experiments have been undertaken on the fragmentation of multiply charged ammonia clusters, (NH 3 ) n z+ , where z ≤ 8 and n ≤ 850, to establish Rayleigh instability limits, whereby clusters at certain critical sizes become unstable due to Coulomb repulsion between the resident charges. Experimental results on size-selected clusters are found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of Rayleigh instability limits at all values of the charge. Electrostatic theory has been used to help identify fragmentation patterns on the assumption that the clusters separate into two dielectric spheres, and the predicted Coulomb repulsion energies used to establish pathways and the sizes of cluster fragments. The results show that fragmentation is very asymmetric in terms of both the numbers of molecules involved and the amount of charge each fragment accommodates. For clusters carrying a charge ≤+4, the results show that fragmentation proceeds via the loss of small, singly charged clusters. When clusters carry a charge of +5 or more, the experimental observations suggest a marked switch in behavior. Although the laboratory measurements equate to fragmentation via the loss of a large dication cluster, electrostatic theory supports an interpretation that involves the sequential loss of two smaller, singly charged clusters possibly accompanied by the extensive evaporation of neutral molecules. It is suggested that this change in fragmentation pattern is driven by the channelling of Coulomb repulsion energy into intermolecular modes within these larger clusters. Overall, the results appear to support the ion evaporation model that is frequently used to interpret electrospray experiments.

  16. CytoCluster: A Cytoscape Plugin for Cluster Analysis and Visualization of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Li, Dongyan; Tang, Yu; Wu, Fangxiang; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-08-31

    Nowadays, cluster analysis of biological networks has become one of the most important approaches to identifying functional modules as well as predicting protein complexes and network biomarkers. Furthermore, the visualization of clustering results is crucial to display the structure of biological networks. Here we present CytoCluster, a cytoscape plugin integrating six clustering algorithms, HC-PIN (Hierarchical Clustering algorithm in Protein Interaction Networks), OH-PIN (identifying Overlapping and Hierarchical modules in Protein Interaction Networks), IPCA (Identifying Protein Complex Algorithm), ClusterONE (Clustering with Overlapping Neighborhood Expansion), DCU (Detecting Complexes based on Uncertain graph model), IPC-MCE (Identifying Protein Complexes based on Maximal Complex Extension), and BinGO (the Biological networks Gene Ontology) function. Users can select different clustering algorithms according to their requirements. The main function of these six clustering algorithms is to detect protein complexes or functional modules. In addition, BinGO is used to determine which Gene Ontology (GO) categories are statistically overrepresented in a set of genes or a subgraph of a biological network. CytoCluster can be easily expanded, so that more clustering algorithms and functions can be added to this plugin. Since it was created in July 2013, CytoCluster has been downloaded more than 9700 times in the Cytoscape App store and has already been applied to the analysis of different biological networks. CytoCluster is available from http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/cytocluster.

  17. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Armani Paschoal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1% of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3% were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease.

  18. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, José Antonio Armani; Paschoal, Vania Del'Arco; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ismael, Manuela Gallo y Sanches; Sichieri, Eduvaldo Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1%) of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3%) were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease. PMID:24288467

  19. Quantifying clustering in disordered carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The quantification of disorder and the effects of clustering in the sp 2 phase of amorphous carbon thin films are discussed. The sp 2 phase is described in terms of disordered nanometer-sized conductive sp 2 clusters embedded in a less conductive sp 3 matrix. Quantification of the clustering of the sp 2 phase is estimated from optical as well as from electron and nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Unlike in other disordered group IV thin film semiconductors, we show that care must be exercised in attributing a meaning to the Urbach energy extracted from absorption measurements in the disordered carbon system. The influence of structural disorder, associated with sp 2 clusters of similar size, and topological disorder due to undistorted clusters of different sizes is also discussed. Extensions of this description to other systems are also presented

  20. Percolation technique for galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    We study percolation in mass and galaxy distributions obtained in 3D simulations of the CDM, C + HDM, and the power law (n = -1) models in the Omega = 1 universe. Percolation statistics is used here as a quantitative measure of the degree to which a mass or galaxy distribution is of a filamentary or cellular type. The very fast code used calculates the statistics of clusters along with the direct detection of percolation. We found that the two parameters mu(infinity), characterizing the size of the largest cluster, and mu-squared, characterizing the weighted mean size of all clusters excluding the largest one, are extremely useful for evaluating the percolation threshold. An advantage of using these parameters is their low sensitivity to boundary effects. We show that both the CDM and the C + HDM models are extremely filamentary both in mass and galaxy distribution. The percolation thresholds for the mass distributions are determined.

  1. Binding energies of cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  2. Structure of small rare earth clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayane, D.; Benamar, A.; Tribollet, B.; Broyer, M.; Melinon, P.

    1991-01-01

    Rare earth clusters are produced by the inert gas condensation technique. The observed size distribution shows large peaks at n=13, 19, 23, 26, 29, 32, 34, 37, 39, 45, .... The beginning of this sequence (up to 34) has been already observed in argon clusters and recently by our group in barium clusters; this sequence may be interpreted in terms of icosahedral structures corresponding to the addition of caps on a core icosahedron of 13 atoms. (orig.)

  3. BCS superconductivity for weakly coupled clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedel, J.

    1992-01-01

    BCS superconductivity is expected to have fairly high critical temperatures when clusters of moderate sizes are weakly coupled to form a crystal. This remark extends to quasi zerodimensional cases, a remark initially made by Labbe for quasi one-dimensional ones and by Hirsch, Bok and Labbe for quasi twodimensional ones. Possible applications are envisaged for twodimensional clusters (fullerene) or threedimensional ones (metal clusters, Chevrel phases). Conditions for optimal applicability of the scheme are somewhat restricted. (orig.)

  4. Galaxy Clusters, Near and Far, Have a Lot in Common

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    clusters are merging and another extremely massive cluster which appears very "relaxed" and undisturbed. The X-ray data allowed the scientists to measure the temperatures and luminosities of the gas in the clusters. They were then able to infer their total masses, which varied between 200 and 1,100 times the mass of our Milky Way galaxy. These measurements were then used to test whether galaxy clusters of different sizes and located at different distances from us are simply scaled versions of each other -- a condition known as being "self-similar." This is an important characteristic for astronomers to identify if they hope to get the true weights of galaxy clusters. "For example, chocolate bars are strongly self-similar," said Maughan. "If you shrank a king-size bar to a fun-size bar, they would be identical versions of each other but just different sizes." "However, if you shrank a castle to the size of a bungalow, they would be very different structures, despite being the same size. This means that they are not strongly self-similar objects." Another possible type of relationship between clusters is what scientists call "weakly self-similar." In this case, galaxy clusters in the distant universe and those nearby are almost identical to each other, but not exactly the same. (The only differences between them can be accounted for by the expansion of the Universe since the Big Bang.) Although astronomers have known for some time that galaxy clusters are not strongly self-similar, the question of whether or not they are weakly self-similar has remained open. The new results show that as long as astronomers take into account the continuous expansion of the Universe, then galaxy clusters are, in fact, weakly self-similar. This means that the same scaling relations used to weigh nearby galaxy clusters hold true for these very distant clusters. "Our results mean that weighing distant galaxy clusters could become as easy as converting from Fahrenheit to Celsius," said Maughan

  5. Adding dimensions to the analysis of the quality of health information of websites returned by Google. Cluster analysis identifies patterns of websites according to their classification and the type of intervention described.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eGhezzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Most of the instruments used to assess the quality of health information on the Web (e.g. the JAMA criteria only analyze one dimension of information quality, trustworthiness. We try to compare these characteristics with the type of treatments the website describe, whether evidence-based medicine or note, and correlate this with the established criteria.Methods: We searched Google for migraine cure and analyzed the first 200 websites for: 1 JAMA criteria (authorship, attribution, disclosure, currency; 2 class of websites (commercial, health portals, professional, patient groups, no-profit; and 3 type of intervention described (approved drugs, alternative medicine, food, procedures, lifestyle, drugs still at the research stage. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to assess associations between classes of websites and types of intervention described. Subgroup analysis on the first 10 websites returned was performed. Results: Google returned health portals (44%, followed by commercial websites (31% and journalism websites (11%. The type of intervention mentioned most often was alternative medicine (55%, followed by procedures (49%, lifestyle (42%, food (41% and approved drugs (35%. Cluster analysis indicated that health portals are more likely to describe more than one type of treatment while commercial websites most often describe only one. The average JAMA score of commercial websites was significantly lower than for health portals or journalism websites, and this was mainly due to lack of information on the authors of the text and indication of the date the information was written. Looking at the first 10 websites from Google, commercial websites are under-represented and approved drugs over-represented. Conclusions: This approach allows the appraisal of the quality of health-related information on the Internet focusing on the type of therapies/prevention methods that are shown to the patient.

  6. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  7. Agglomerative clustering of growing squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castermans, Thom; Speckmann, Bettina; Staals, Frank; Verbeek, Kevin; Bender, M.A.; Farach-Colton, M.; Mosteiro, M.A.

    2018-01-01

    We study an agglomerative clustering problem motivated by interactive glyphs in geo-visualization. Consider a set of disjoint square glyphs on an interactive map. When the user zooms out, the glyphs grow in size relative to the map, possibly with different speeds. When two glyphs intersect, we wish

  8. Directional clustering in highest energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    An unexpected degree of small-scale clustering is observed in highest-energy cosmic ray events. Some directional clustering can be expected due to purely statistical fluctuations for sources distributed randomly in the sky. This creates a background for events originating in clustered sources. We derive analytic formulas to estimate the probability of random cluster configurations, and use these formulas to study the strong potential of the HiRes, Auger, Telescope Array and EUSO-OWL-AirWatch facilities for deciding whether any observed clustering is most likely due to nonrandom sources. For a detailed comparison to data, our analytical approach cannot compete with Monte Carlo simulations, including experimental systematics. However, our derived formulas do offer two advantages: (i) easy assessment of the significance of any observed clustering, and most importantly, (ii) an explicit dependence of cluster probabilities on the chosen angular bin size

  9. Proteomic properties reveal phyloecological clusters of Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nela Nikolic

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a novel way to describe the variety of environmental adaptations of Archaea. We have clustered 57 Archaea by using a non-redundant set of proteomic features, and verified that the clusters correspond to environmental adaptations to the archaeal habitats. The first cluster consists dominantly of hyperthermophiles and hyperthermoacidophilic aerobes. The second cluster joins together halophilic and extremely halophilic Archaea, while the third cluster contains mesophilic (mostly methanogenic Archaea together with thermoacidophiles. The non-redundant subset of proteomic features was found to consist of five features: the ratio of charged residues to uncharged, average protein size, normalized frequency of beta-sheet, normalized frequency of extended structure and number of hydrogen bond donors. We propose this clustering to be termed phyloecological clustering. This approach could give additional insights into relationships among archaeal species that may be hidden by sole phylogenetic analysis.

  10. Microstructure and fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel retrieved from the field: the potential role of radiation-induced clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.; Soneda, N.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Marquis, E.A.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of six material/fluence combinations of stainless steels retrieved from BWR components (top guide and control rods) have been examined by atom probe tomography; the irradiated microstructure had been already characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture toughness of two material/fluence combinations had been previously measured. The aggregate results strongly suggest that radiation-induced clusters play a significant role in the degradation of fracture toughness that occurs at fluences below ∼ 13 dpa. Because TEM has not been able to consistently identify and quantify the nano-sized clusters in this fluence range, it has not highlighted the potential role of radiation-induced clusters. (authors)

  11. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Thieden, Elisabeth; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of b...

  12. CO dissociation on magnetic Fen clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Jedidi, Abdesslem; Markovits, Alexis; Minot, Christian; Abderrabba, Manef Ben; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2014-01-01

    triangular facet of the nanoparticle. Dissociation becomes easier when the cluster size increases. Then, the C atom is bonded to a square facet that is generated as a result of the adsorption if it does not yet exist in the bare cluster, while the O atom

  13. Industrial Clusters and CSR in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayyaz, Anjum; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Lindgreen, Adam

    2017-01-01

    - and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). A case study of the Sialkot football-manufacturing cluster in Pakistan indicates that donor-funded support of CSR initiatives in industrial clusters in developing countries may be short-lived, due to the political economy of aid, the national context of CSR implementation...

  14. CO2 laser photolysis of clustered ions, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Soga, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ohno, Shin-ichi.

    1990-09-01

    Vibrational excitation and the following decomposition of cluster ions by CO 2 laser photons are studied. Characteristics of the cluster ion and the CO 2 laser photon are summarized in their relation to the photolysis of cluster ions. An apparatus was installed, which is composed of (1) corona discharge-jet expansion section (formation of cluster ions), (2) CO 2 laser section (photolysis of cluster ions), and (3) mass spectrometer section. Experimental results of ammonia cluster ions were described. Effects of repeller voltage, shape of repellers, and adiabatic cooling are examined on the formation of ammonia cluster ions by corona discharge-jet expansion method. Collisional dissociation of cluster ions was observed at high repeller voltages. Size distribution of the ammonia cluster ion is discussed in connection with the temperature of cluster ions. Intensity of CO 2 laser was related to decomposition yield of cluster ions. (author)

  15. Clustering Teachers' Motivations for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Wijnveen, Gerda J.; Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The motivation to teach is a powerful, yet neglected, force in teaching at institutes of higher education. A better understanding of academics' motivations for teaching is necessary. The aim of this mixed-method study was to identify groups with distinctively different motivations for teaching. Six clusters were identified: expertise, duty,…

  16. Clustering problems for geochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, V.E.; Larson, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    The Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Uranium Resource Evaluation Project uses a two-stage sampling program to identify potential uranium districts. Cluster analysis techniques are used in locating high density sampling areas as well as in identifying potential uranium districts. Problems are considered involving the analysis of multivariate censored data, laboratory measurement error, and data standardization

  17. Cluster growing process and a sequence of magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2003-01-01

    demonstrate that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the cluster growing process. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system, and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster sizes of more than 100 atoms. We...

  18. IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r ∼ 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

  19. Cluster analysis in phenotyping a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, C C; Sa-Couto, P; Todo-Bom, A; Bousquet, J

    2015-09-03

    Unbiased cluster analysis using clinical parameters has identified asthma phenotypes. Adding inflammatory biomarkers to this analysis provided a better insight into the disease mechanisms. This approach has not yet been applied to asthmatic Portuguese patients. To identify phenotypes of asthma using cluster analysis in a Portuguese asthmatic population treated in secondary medical care. Consecutive patients with asthma were recruited from the outpatient clinic. Patients were optimally treated according to GINA guidelines and enrolled in the study. Procedures were performed according to a standard evaluation of asthma. Phenotypes were identified by cluster analysis using Ward's clustering method. Of the 72 patients enrolled, 57 had full data and were included for cluster analysis. Distribution was set in 5 clusters described as follows: cluster (C) 1, early onset mild allergic asthma; C2, moderate allergic asthma, with long evolution, female prevalence and mixed inflammation; C3, allergic brittle asthma in young females with early disease onset and no evidence of inflammation; C4, severe asthma in obese females with late disease onset, highly symptomatic despite low Th2 inflammation; C5, severe asthma with chronic airflow obstruction, late disease onset and eosinophilic inflammation. In our study population, the identified clusters were mainly coincident with other larger-scale cluster analysis. Variables such as age at disease onset, obesity, lung function, FeNO (Th2 biomarker) and disease severity were important for cluster distinction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. The interaction of super-intense ultra-short laser pulse and micro-clusters with large atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jingwei; Yang Chaowen; An Zhu; Yuan Xuedong; Sun Weiguo; Luo Xiaobing; Wang Hu; Bai Lixing; Shi Miangong; Miao Lei; Zhen Zhijian; Gu Yuqin; Liu Hongjie; Zhu Zhouseng; Sun Liwei; Liao Xuehua

    2007-01-01

    The fusion mechanism of large deuterium clusters (100-1000 Atoms/per cluster) in super-intense ultra-short laser pulse field, Coulomb explosions of micro-cluster in solids, gases and Large-size clusters have been studied using the interaction of a high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with large deuterium clusters, collision of high-quality beam of micro-cluster from 2.5 MV van de Graaff accelerator with solids, gases and large clusters. The experimental advance of the project is reported. (authors)

  1. Profiling Local Optima in K-Means Clustering: Developing a Diagnostic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Using the cluster generation procedure proposed by D. Steinley and R. Henson (2005), the author investigated the performance of K-means clustering under the following scenarios: (a) different probabilities of cluster overlap; (b) different types of cluster overlap; (c) varying samples sizes, clusters, and dimensions; (d) different multivariate…

  2. Statistical properties and fractals of nucleotide clusters in DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Tingting; Zhang Linxi; Chen Jin; Jiang Zhouting

    2004-01-01

    Statistical properties of nucleotide clusters in DNA sequences and their fractals are investigated in this paper. The average size of nucleotide clusters in non-coding sequence is larger than that in coding sequence. We investigate the cluster-size distribution P(S) for human chromosomes 21 and 22, and the results are different from previous works. The cluster-size distribution P(S 1 +S 2 ) with the total size of sequential Pu-cluster and Py-cluster S 1 +S 2 is studied. We observe that P(S 1 +S 2 ) follows an exponential decay both in coding and non-coding sequences. However, we get different results for human chromosomes 21 and 22. The probability distribution P(S 1 ,S 2 ) of nucleotide clusters with the size of sequential Pu-cluster and Py-cluster S 1 and S 2 respectively, is also examined. In the meantime, some of the linear correlations are obtained in the double logarithmic plots of the fluctuation F(l) versus nucleotide cluster distance l along the DNA chain. The power spectrums of nucleotide clusters are also discussed, and it is concluded that the curves are flat and hardly changed and the 1/3 frequency is neither observed in coding sequence nor in non-coding sequence. These investigations can provide some insights into the nucleotide clusters of DNA sequences

  3. How to detect trap cluster systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandowski, Arkadiusz

    2008-01-01

    Spatially correlated traps and recombination centres (trap-recombination centre pairs and larger clusters) are responsible for many anomalous phenomena that are difficult to explain in the framework of both classical models, i.e. model of localized transitions (LT) and the simple trap model (STM), even with a number of discrete energy levels. However, these 'anomalous' effects may provide a good platform for identifying trap cluster systems. This paper considers selected cluster-type effects, mainly relating to an anomalous dependence of TL on absorbed dose in the system of isolated clusters (ICs). Some consequences for interacting cluster (IAC) systems, involving both localized and delocalized transitions occurring simultaneously, are also discussed

  4. Dental caries clusters among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John J; Van Buren, John M; Levy, Steven M; Marshall, Teresa A; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Curtis, Alexandra M; Kolker, Justine L; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin

    2017-12-01

    There have been very few longitudinal studies of dental caries in adolescents, and little study of the caries risk factors in this age group. The purpose of this study was to describe different caries trajectories and associated risk factors among members of the Iowa Fluoride Study (IFS) cohort. The IFS recruited a birth cohort from 1992 to 1995, and has gathered dietary, fluoride and behavioural data at least twice yearly since recruitment. Examinations for dental caries were completed when participants were ages 5, 9, 13 and 17 years. For this study, only participants with decayed and filled surface (DFS) caries data at ages 9, 13 and 17 were included (N=396). The individual DFS counts at age 13 and the DFS increment from 13 to 17 were used to identify distinct caries trajectories using Ward's hierarchical clustering algorithm. A number of multinomial logistic regression models were developed to predict trajectory membership, using longitudinal dietary, fluoride and demographic/behavioural data from 9 to 17 years. Model selection was based on the akaike information criterion (AIC). Several different trajectory schemes were considered, and a three-trajectory scheme-no DFS at age 17 (n=142), low DFS (n=145) and high DFS (n=109)-was chosen to balance sample sizes and interpretability. The model selection process resulted in use of an arithmetic average for dietary variables across the period from 9 to 17 years. The multinomial logistic regression model with the best fit included the variables maternal education level, 100% juice consumption, brushing frequency and sex. Other favoured models also included water and milk consumption and home water fluoride concentration. The high caries cluster was most consistently associated with lower maternal education level, lower 100% juice consumption, lower brushing frequency and being female. The use of a clustering algorithm and use of Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to determine the best representation of the data

  5. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  6. Lipoprotein lipase S447X variant associated with VLDL, LDL and HDL diameter clustering in the MetS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous analysis clustered 1,238 individuals from the general population Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs Network (GOLDN) study by the size of their fasting very low-density, low-density and high-density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL) using latent class analysis. From two of the eight identified gro...

  7. MD simulation of cluster formation during sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, T.; Okai, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Yorizane, K.; Yamamura, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The cluster ejection due to cluster impact on a solid surface is studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations are performed for Cu cluster impacts on the Cu(1 1 1) surface for cluster energy 100 eV/atom, and for clusters of 6, 13, 28 and 55 atoms. Interatomic interactions are described by the AMLJ-EAM potential. The vibration energy spectrum is independent of the incident cluster size and energy. This comes from the fact that sputtered clusters become stable through the successive fragmentation of nascent large sputtered clusters. The vibration energy spectra for large sputtered clusters have a peak, whose energy corresponds to the melting temperature of Cu. The exponent of the power-law fit of the abundance distribution and the total sputtering yield for the cluster impacts are higher than that for the monatomic ion impacts with the same total energy, where the exponent δ is given by Y n ∝n δ and Y n is the yield of sputtered n-atom cluster. The exponent δ follows a unified function of the total sputtering yield, which is a monotonic increase function, and it is nearly equal to δ ∼ -3 for larger yield

  8. Alpha condensates and nonlocalized cluster structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funaki, Yasuro

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a container structure for non-gaslike cluster states, in which single Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-ROpke (THSR) wave functions are shown to be almost 100% equivalent to the full solutions of the corresponding RGM/GCM equations, for the inversion doublet band states in 20 Ne, α-linear-chain states, and α + α + A cluster states in 9 Λ Be. The recognition of the fact that the THSR wave function describes well not only gaslike cluster states but also non-gaslike cluster states is a recent remarkable development of nuclear cluster physics. This fact tells us that the cluster structure is composed of cluster-mean-field motion under the constraint of inter-cluster Pauli repulsion, in which we call the cluster-mean-field potential the container. We demonstrate that the evolution of the cluster structure of a nucleus is governed by the size parameter of the cluster-mean-field potential (container), for 16 O nucleus

  9. Geometric structure of percolation clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Wang, Junfeng; Zhou, Zongzheng; Garoni, Timothy M; Deng, Youjin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the geometric properties of percolation clusters by studying square-lattice bond percolation on the torus. We show that the density of bridges and nonbridges both tend to 1/4 for large system sizes. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the probability that a given edge is not a bridge but has both its loop arcs in the same loop and find that it is governed by the two-arm exponent. We then classify bridges into two types: branches and junctions. A bridge is a branch iff at least one of the two clusters produced by its deletion is a tree. Starting from a percolation configuration and deleting the branches results in a leaf-free configuration, whereas, deleting all bridges produces a bridge-free configuration. Although branches account for ≈43% of all occupied bonds, we find that the fractal dimensions of the cluster size and hull length of leaf-free configurations are consistent with those for standard percolation configurations. By contrast, we find that the fractal dimensions of the cluster size and hull length of bridge-free configurations are given by the backbone and external perimeter dimensions, respectively. We estimate the backbone fractal dimension to be 1.643 36(10).

  10. Percolation and epidemics in random clustered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joel C.

    2009-08-01

    The social networks that infectious diseases spread along are typically clustered. Because of the close relation between percolation and epidemic spread, the behavior of percolation in such networks gives insight into infectious disease dynamics. A number of authors have studied percolation or epidemics in clustered networks, but the networks often contain preferential contacts in high degree nodes. We introduce a class of random clustered networks and a class of random unclustered networks with the same preferential mixing. Percolation in the clustered networks reduces the component sizes and increases the epidemic threshold compared to the unclustered networks.

  11. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, L.; Bruch, S.; Donahue, M.

    2009-01-01

    Most galaxy clusters contain a Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) which is larger than the other cluster ellipticals and has a more extended profile. In the hierarchical model, the BCG forms through many galaxy mergers in the crowded center of the cluster, and thus its properties give insight into the assembly of the cluster as a whole. In this project, we are working with the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) team (Boehringer et al 2007) to study BCGs in 33 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters, 0.055 < z < 0.183. We are imaging the BCGs in R band at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in Chile. In this poster, we discuss our methods and give preliminary measurements of the BCG magnitudes, morphology, and stellar mass. We compare these BCG properties with the properties of their host clusters, particularly of the X-ray emitting gas.

  12. Comparison of cluster-based and source-attribution methods for estimating transmission risk using large HIV sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vu, Stéphane; Ratmann, Oliver; Delpech, Valerie; Brown, Alison E; Gill, O Noel; Tostevin, Anna; Fraser, Christophe; Volz, Erik M

    2018-06-01

    Phylogenetic clustering of HIV sequences from a random sample of patients can reveal epidemiological transmission patterns, but interpretation is hampered by limited theoretical support and statistical properties of clustering analysis remain poorly understood. Alternatively, source attribution methods allow fitting of HIV transmission models and thereby quantify aspects of disease transmission. A simulation study was conducted to assess error rates of clustering methods for detecting transmission risk factors. We modeled HIV epidemics among men having sex with men and generated phylogenies comparable to those that can be obtained from HIV surveillance data in the UK. Clustering and source attribution approaches were applied to evaluate their ability to identify patient attributes as transmission risk factors. We find that commonly used methods show a misleading association between cluster size or odds of clustering and covariates that are correlated with time since infection, regardless of their influence on transmission. Clustering methods usually have higher error rates and lower sensitivity than source attribution method for identifying transmission risk factors. But neither methods provide robust estimates of transmission risk ratios. Source attribution method can alleviate drawbacks from phylogenetic clustering but formal population genetic modeling may be required to estimate quantitative transmission risk factors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Parallel FPGA Implementation for Real-Time 2D Pixel Clustering for the ATLAS Fast TracKer Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, C-L; The ATLAS collaboration; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The parallel 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors from inner ATLAS read out drivers (RODs) at full rate, for total of 760Gbs, as sent by the RODs after level-1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes, the first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, the second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. ...

  14. A Parallel FPGA Implementation for Real-Time 2D Pixel Clustering for the ATLAS Fast TracKer Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, C-L; The ATLAS collaboration; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Kordas, K; Nikolaidis, S; Petridou, C; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The parallel 2D pixel clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors from inner ATLAS read out drivers (RODs) at full rate, for total of 760Gbs, as sent by the RODs after level1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes, the first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing, the second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The cluster detection window size can be adjusted for optimizing the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. T...

  15. Manipulation of Microbubble Clusters Using Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hironobu; Osaki, Taichi; Kawaguchi, Kei; Unga, Johan; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Azuma, Takashi; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Takagi, Shu

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, microbubbles (MBs) are expected to be utilized for the ultrasound drug delivery system (DDS). For the MB-DDS, it is important to establish a method of controlling bubbles and bubble clusters using ultrasound field. The objective of this study is to clarify behaviors of bubble clusters with various physical conditions. MBs in the ultrasound field are subjected to the primary Bjerknes force. The force traps MBs at the focal region of the focused ultrasound field. The trapped MBs form a bubble cluster at the region. A bubble cluster continues growing with absorbing surrounding bubbles until it reaches a maximum size beyond which it disappears from the focal region. In the present study, two kinds of MBs are used for the experiment. One is Sonazoid with average diameter of 2.6 um and resonant frequency of 5 MHz. The other is developed by Teikyo Univ., with average diameter of 1.5 um and presumed resonant frequency of 4 MHz. The bubble cluster's behaviors are analyzed using the high-speed camera. Sonazoid clusters have larger critical size than the other in every frequency, and its cluster size is inversely proportional to the ultrasound frequency, while Teikyo-bubble clusters have different tendency. These results are discussed in the presentation.

  16. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  17. DNA-Protected Silver Clusters for Nanophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Gwinn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protected silver clusters (AgN-DNA possess unique fluorescence properties that depend on the specific DNA template that stabilizes the cluster. They exhibit peak emission wavelengths that range across the visible and near-IR spectrum. This wide color palette, combined with low toxicity, high fluorescence quantum yields of some clusters, low synthesis costs, small cluster sizes and compatibility with DNA are enabling many applications that employ AgN-DNA. Here we review what is known about the underlying composition and structure of AgN-DNA, and how these relate to the optical properties of these fascinating, hybrid biomolecule-metal cluster nanomaterials. We place AgN-DNA in the general context of ligand-stabilized metal clusters and compare their properties to those of other noble metal clusters stabilized by small molecule ligands. The methods used to isolate pure AgN-DNA for analysis of composition and for studies of solution and single-emitter optical properties are discussed. We give a brief overview of structurally sensitive chiroptical studies, both theoretical and experimental, and review experiments on bringing silver clusters of distinct size and color into nanoscale DNA assemblies. Progress towards using DNA scaffolds to assemble multi-cluster arrays is also reviewed.

  18. Cluster-cluster correlations in the two-dimensional stationary Ising-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassmann, A.

    1997-01-01

    In numerical integration of the Cahn-Hillard equation, which describes Oswald rising in a two-phase matrix, N. Masbaum showed that spatial correlations between clusters scale with respect to the mean cluster size (itself a function of time). T. B. Liverpool showed by Monte Carlo simulations for the Ising model that the analogous correlations have a similar form. Both demonstrated that immediately around each cluster there is some depletion area followed by something like a ring of clusters of the same size as the original one. More precisely, it has been shown that the distribution of clusters around a given cluster looks like a sinus-curve decaying exponentially with respect to the distance to a constant value

  19. Cluster analysis and its application to healthcare claims data: a study of end-stage renal disease patients who initiated hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Minlei; Li, Yunfeng; Kianifard, Farid; Obi, Engels; Arcona, Stephen

    2016-03-02

    Cluster analysis (CA) is a frequently used applied statistical technique that helps to reveal hidden structures and "clusters" found in large data sets. However, this method has not been widely used in large healthcare claims databases where the distribution of expenditure data is commonly severely skewed. The purpose of this study was to identify cost change patterns of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who initiated hemodialysis (HD) by applying different clustering methods. A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted using the Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases. Patients aged ≥18 years with ≥2 ESRD diagnoses who initiated HD between 2008 and 2010 were included. The K-means CA method and hierarchical CA with various linkage methods were applied to all-cause costs within baseline (12-months pre-HD) and follow-up periods (12-months post-HD) to identify clusters. Demographic, clinical, and cost information was extracted from both periods, and then examined by cluster. A total of 18,380 patients were identified. Meaningful all-cause cost clusters were generated using K-means CA and hierarchical CA with either flexible beta or Ward's methods. Based on cluster sample sizes and change of cost patterns, the K-means CA method and 4 clusters were selected: Cluster 1: Average to High (n = 113); Cluster 2: Very High to High (n = 89); Cluster 3: Average to Average (n = 16,624); or Cluster 4: Increasing Costs, High at Both Points (n = 1554). Median cost changes in the 12-month pre-HD and post-HD periods increased from $185,070 to $884,605 for Cluster 1 (Average to High), decreased from $910,930 to $157,997 for Cluster 2 (Very High to High), were relatively stable and remained low from $15,168 to $13,026 for Cluster 3 (Average to Average), and increased from $57,909 to $193,140 for Cluster 4 (Increasing Costs, High at Both Points). Relatively stable costs after starting HD were associated with more stable scores

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF MEMBERS IN THE CENTRAL AND OUTER REGIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Ana Laura; Diaferio, Antonaldo

    2013-01-01

    The caustic technique measures the mass of galaxy clusters in both their virial and infall regions and, as a byproduct, yields the list of cluster galaxy members. Here we use 100 galaxy clusters with mass M 200 ≥ 10 14 h –1 M ☉ extracted from a cosmological N-body simulation of a ΛCDM universe to test the ability of the caustic technique to identify the cluster galaxy members. We identify the true three-dimensional members as the gravitationally bound galaxies. The caustic technique uses the caustic location in the redshift diagram to separate the cluster members from the interlopers. We apply the technique to mock catalogs containing 1000 galaxies in the field of view of 12 h –1 Mpc on a side at the cluster location. On average, this sample size roughly corresponds to 180 real galaxy members within 3r 200 , similar to recent redshift surveys of cluster regions. The caustic technique yields a completeness, the fraction of identified true members, f c = 0.95 ± 0.03, within 3r 200 . The contamination, the fraction of interlopers in the observed catalog of members, increases from f i =0.020 +0.046 -0.015 at r 200 to f i =0.08 +0.11 -0.05 at 3r 200 . No other technique for the identification of the members of a galaxy cluster provides such large completeness and small contamination at these large radii. The caustic technique assumes spherical symmetry and the asphericity of the cluster is responsible for most of the spread of the completeness and the contamination. By applying the technique to an approximately spherical system obtained by stacking the individual clusters, the spreads decrease by at least a factor of two. We finally estimate the cluster mass within 3r 200 after removing the interlopers: for individual clusters, the mass estimated with the virial theorem is unbiased and within 30% of the actual mass; this spread decreases to less than 10% for the spherically symmetric stacked cluster.

  1. Electronic shell structure in multiply charged silver clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandler, O.; Athanassenas, K.; Echt, O.; Kreisle, D.; Leisner, T.; Recknagel, E.

    1991-01-01

    Silver clusters are generated by standard laser vaporization technique and ionized via multiphoton ionization. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals singly, doubly and triply charged clusters, Ag n z+ (z=1, 2, 3). The spectra show, for all charge states, intensity variations, indicating enhanced stabilities for cluster sizes with closed electronic configurations in accord with the spherical jellium model. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic behavior of clusters of ferromagnetic transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanna, S. N.; Linderoth, Søren

    1991-01-01

    The effective magnetic moments of small iron and cobalt clusters have been calculated by assuming that the clusters undergo superparamagnetic relaxation. The effective moments per atom are found to be much below the bulk values, even at low temperatures (100 K). They increase with particle size a...... moments in small clusters compared to bulk as being due to melting of surface spins....

  3. Low-energy irradiation effects of gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houzumi, Shingo; Takeshima, Keigo; Mochiji, Kozo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2007-01-01

    A cluster-ion irradiation system with cluster-size selection has been developed to study the effects of the cluster size for surface processes using cluster ions. A permanent magnet with a magnetic field of 1.2 T is installed for size separation of large cluster ions. Trace formations at HOPG surface by the irradiation with size-selected Ar-cluster ions under acceleration energy of 30 keV were investigated by a scanning tunneling microscopy. Generation behavior of the crater-like traces is strongly affected by the number of constituent atoms (cluster size) of the irradiating cluster ion. When the incident cluster ion is composed of 100-3000 atoms, crater-like traces are observed on the irradiated surfaces. In contrast, such traces are not observed at all with the irradiation of the cluster-ions composed of over 5000 atoms. Such the behavior is discussed on the basis of the kinetic energy per constituent atom of the cluster ion. To study GCIB irradiation effects against macromolecule, GCIB was irradiated on DNA molecules absorbed on graphite surface. By the GCIB irradiation, much more DNA molecules was sputtered away as compared with the monomer-ion irradiation. (author)

  4. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  5. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cards One 3-ounce (84 grams) serving of fish is a checkbook One-half cup (40 grams) ... for the smallest size. By eating a small hamburger instead of a large, you will save about 150 calories. ...

  6. Scalable Density-Based Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    For knowledge discovery in high dimensional databases, subspace clustering detects clusters in arbitrary subspace projections. Scalability is a crucial issue, as the number of possible projections is exponential in the number of dimensions. We propose a scalable density-based subspace clustering...... method that steers mining to few selected subspace clusters. Our novel steering technique reduces subspace processing by identifying and clustering promising subspaces and their combinations directly. Thereby, it narrows down the search space while maintaining accuracy. Thorough experiments on real...... and synthetic databases show that steering is efficient and scalable, with high quality results. For future work, our steering paradigm for density-based subspace clustering opens research potential for speeding up other subspace clustering approaches as well....

  7. Diversity among galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, M.F.; Rood, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The classification of galaxy clusters is discussed. Consideration is given to the classification scheme of Abell (1950's), Zwicky (1950's), Morgan, Matthews, and Schmidt (1964), and Morgan-Bautz (1970). Galaxies can be classified based on morphology, chemical composition, spatial distribution, and motion. The correlation between a galaxy's environment and morphology is examined. The classification scheme of Rood-Sastry (1971), which is based on clusters's morphology and galaxy population, is described. The six types of clusters they define include: (1) a cD-cluster dominated by a single large galaxy, (2) a cluster dominated by a binary, (3) a core-halo cluster, (4) a cluster dominated by several bright galaxies, (5) a cluster appearing flattened, and (6) an irregularly shaped cluster. Attention is also given to the evolution of cluster structures, which is related to initial density and cluster motion

  8. Hot Zone Identification: Analyzing Effects of Data Sampling on Spam Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasib Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Email is the most common and comparatively the most efficient means of exchanging information in today's world. However, given the widespread use of emails in all sectors, they have been the target of spammers since the beginning. Filtering spam emails has now led to critical actions such as forensic activities based on mining spam email. The data mine for spam emails at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is considered to be one of the most prominent resources for mining and identifying spam sources. It is a widely researched repository used by researchers from different global organizations. The usual process of mining the spam data involves going through every e