WorldWideScience

Sample records for identifies hox cis-regulatory

  1. Dissection of cis-regulatory elements in the C. elegans Hox gene egl-5 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yingqi; Girard, Lisa; Ferreira, Henrique B; Sternberg, Paul W; Emmons, Scott W

    2004-12-15

    Hox genes are highly conserved segmental identity genes well known for their complex expression patterns and divergent targets. Here we present an analysis of cis-regulatory elements in the Caenorhabditis elegans Hox gene egl-5, which is expressed in multiple tissues in the posterior region of the nematode. We have utilized phylogenetic footprinting to efficiently identify cis-regulatory elements and have characterized these with gfp reporters and tissue-specific rescue experiments. We have found that the complex expression pattern of egl-5 is the cumulative result of the activities of multiple tissue or local region-specific activator sequences that are conserved both in sequence and near-perfect order in the related nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae. Two conserved regulatory blocks analyzed in detail contain multiple sites for both positively and negatively acting factors. One of these regions may promote activation of egl-5 in certain cells via the Wnt pathway. Positively acting regions are repressed in inappropriate tissues by additional negative pathways acting at other sites within the promoter. Our analysis has allowed us to implicate several new regulatory factors significant to the control of egl-5 expression.

  2. Identifying cis-regulatory sequences by word profile similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garmay Leung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recognizing regulatory sequences in genomes is a continuing challenge, despite a wealth of available genomic data and a growing number of experimentally validated examples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We discuss here a simple approach to search for regulatory sequences based on the compositional similarity of genomic regions and known cis-regulatory sequences. This method, which is not limited to searching for predefined motifs, recovers sequences known to be under similar regulatory control. The words shared by the recovered sequences often correspond to known binding sites. Furthermore, we show that although local word profile clustering is predictive for the regulatory sequences involved in blastoderm segmentation, local dissimilarity is a more universal feature of known regulatory sequences in Drosophila. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our method leverages sequence motifs within a known regulatory sequence to identify co-regulated sequences without explicitly defining binding sites. We also show that regulatory sequences can be distinguished from surrounding sequences by local sequence dissimilarity, a novel feature in identifying regulatory sequences across a genome. Source code for WPH-finder is available for download at http://rana.lbl.gov/downloads/wph.tar.gz.

  3. Overview Article: Identifying transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in animal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Halfon, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated through the activity of transcription factors and chromatin modifying proteins acting on specific DNA sequences, referred to as cis-regulatory elements. These include promoters, located at the transcription initiation sites of genes, and a variety of distal cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), the most common of which are transcriptional enhancers. Because regulated gene expression is fundamental to cell differentiation and acquisition of new cell fates, identifying, characterizing, and understanding the mechanisms of action of CRMs is critical for understanding development. CRM discovery has historically been challenging, as CRMs can be located far from the genes they regulate, have few readily-identifiable sequence characteristics, and for many years were not amenable to high-throughput discovery methods. However, the recent availability of complete genome sequences and the development of next-generation sequencing methods has led to an explosion of both computational and empirical methods for CRM discovery in model and non-model organisms alike. Experimentally, CRMs can be identified through chromatin immunoprecipitation directed against transcription factors or histone post-translational modifications, identification of nucleosome-depleted “open” chromatin regions, or sequencing-based high-throughput functional screening. Computational methods include comparative genomics, clustering of known or predicted transcription factor binding sites, and supervised machine-learning approaches trained on known CRMs. All of these methods have proven effective for CRM discovery, but each has its own considerations and limitations, and each is subject to a greater or lesser number of false-positive identifications. Experimental confirmation of predictions is essential, although shortcomings in current methods suggest that additional means of validation need to be developed. PMID:25704908

  4. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them.

  5. Comparative epigenomics in distantly related teleost species identifies conserved cis-regulatory nodes active during the vertebrate phylotypic period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Juan J.; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Vázquez-Marín, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Cross, Joe W.; Rigby, Peter W.J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L.; Martínez-Morales, Juan R.

    2014-01-01

    The complex relationship between ontogeny and phylogeny has been the subject of attention and controversy since von Baer’s formulations in the 19th century. The classic concept that embryogenesis progresses from clade general features to species-specific characters has often been revisited. It has become accepted that embryos from a clade show maximum morphological similarity at the so-called phylotypic period (i.e., during mid-embryogenesis). According to the hourglass model, body plan conservation would depend on constrained molecular mechanisms operating at this period. More recently, comparative transcriptomic analyses have provided conclusive evidence that such molecular constraints exist. Examining cis-regulatory architecture during the phylotypic period is essential to understand the evolutionary source of body plan stability. Here we compare transcriptomes and key epigenetic marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac) from medaka (Oryzias latipes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), two distantly related teleosts separated by an evolutionary distance of 115–200 Myr. We show that comparison of transcriptome profiles correlates with anatomical similarities and heterochronies observed at the phylotypic stage. Through comparative epigenomics, we uncover a pool of conserved regulatory regions (≈700), which are active during the vertebrate phylotypic period in both species. Moreover, we show that their neighboring genes encode mainly transcription factors with fundamental roles in tissue specification. We postulate that these regulatory regions, active in both teleost genomes, represent key constrained nodes of the gene networks that sustain the vertebrate body plan. PMID:24709821

  6. Mouse transgenesis identifies conserved functional enhancers and cis-regulatory motif in the vertebrate LIM homeobox gene Lhx2 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison P Lee

    Full Text Available The vertebrate Lhx2 is a member of the LIM homeobox family of transcription factors. It is essential for the normal development of the forebrain, eye, olfactory system and liver as well for the differentiation of lymphoid cells. However, despite the highly restricted spatio-temporal expression pattern of Lhx2, nothing is known about its transcriptional regulation. In mammals and chicken, Crb2, Dennd1a and Lhx2 constitute a conserved linkage block, while the intervening Dennd1a is lost in the fugu Lhx2 locus. To identify functional enhancers of Lhx2, we predicted conserved noncoding elements (CNEs in the human, mouse and fugu Crb2-Lhx2 loci and assayed their function in transgenic mouse at E11.5. Four of the eight CNE constructs tested functioned as tissue-specific enhancers in specific regions of the central nervous system and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, recapitulating partial and overlapping expression patterns of Lhx2 and Crb2 genes. There was considerable overlap in the expression domains of the CNEs, which suggests that the CNEs are either redundant enhancers or regulating different genes in the locus. Using a large set of CNEs (810 CNEs associated with transcription factor-encoding genes that express predominantly in the central nervous system, we predicted four over-represented 8-mer motifs that are likely to be associated with expression in the central nervous system. Mutation of one of them in a CNE that drove reporter expression in the neural tube and DRG abolished expression in both domains indicating that this motif is essential for expression in these domains. The failure of the four functional enhancers to recapitulate the complete expression pattern of Lhx2 at E11.5 indicates that there must be other Lhx2 enhancers that are either located outside the region investigated or divergent in mammals and fishes. Other approaches such as sequence comparison between multiple mammals are required to identify and characterize such enhancers.

  7. PlantPAN: Plant promoter analysis navigator, for identifying combinatorial cis-regulatory elements with distance constraint in plant gene groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hsien-Da

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elucidation of transcriptional regulation in plant genes is important area of research for plant scientists, following the mapping of various plant genomes, such as A. thaliana, O. sativa and Z. mays. A variety of bioinformatic servers or databases of plant promoters have been established, although most have been focused only on annotating transcription factor binding sites in a single gene and have neglected some important regulatory elements (tandem repeats and CpG/CpNpG islands in promoter regions. Additionally, the combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs is important in regulating the gene group that is associated with the same expression pattern. Therefore, a tool for detecting the co-regulation of transcription factors in a group of gene promoters is required. Results This study develops a database-assisted system, PlantPAN (Plant Promoter Analysis Navigator, for recognizing combinatorial cis-regulatory elements with a distance constraint in sets of plant genes. The system collects the plant transcription factor binding profiles from PLACE, TRANSFAC (public release 7.0, AGRIS, and JASPER databases and allows users to input a group of gene IDs or promoter sequences, enabling the co-occurrence of combinatorial transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs within a defined distance (20 bp to 200 bp to be identified. Furthermore, the new resource enables other regulatory features in a plant promoter, such as CpG/CpNpG islands and tandem repeats, to be displayed. The regulatory elements in the conserved regions of the promoters across homologous genes are detected and presented. Conclusion In addition to providing a user-friendly input/output interface, PlantPAN has numerous advantages in the analysis of a plant promoter. Several case studies have established the effectiveness of PlantPAN. This novel analytical resource is now freely available at http://PlantPAN.mbc.nctu.edu.tw.

  8. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  9. Genomic analysis reveals major determinants of cis-regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steige, Kim A; Laenen, Benjamin; Reimegård, Johan; Scofield, Douglas G; Slotte, Tanja

    2017-01-31

    Understanding the causes of cis-regulatory variation is a long-standing aim in evolutionary biology. Although cis-regulatory variation has long been considered important for adaptation, we still have a limited understanding of the selective importance and genomic determinants of standing cis-regulatory variation. To address these questions, we studied the prevalence, genomic determinants, and selective forces shaping cis-regulatory variation in the outcrossing plant Capsella grandiflora We first identified a set of 1,010 genes with common cis-regulatory variation using analyses of allele-specific expression (ASE). Population genomic analyses of whole-genome sequences from 32 individuals showed that genes with common cis-regulatory variation (i) are under weaker purifying selection and (ii) undergo less frequent positive selection than other genes. We further identified genomic determinants of cis-regulatory variation. Gene body methylation (gbM) was a major factor constraining cis-regulatory variation, whereas presence of nearby transposable elements (TEs) and tissue specificity of expression increased the odds of ASE. Our results suggest that most common cis-regulatory variation in C. grandiflora is under weak purifying selection, and that gene-specific functional constraints are more important for the maintenance of cis-regulatory variation than genome-scale variation in the intensity of selection. Our results agree with previous findings that suggest TE silencing affects nearby gene expression, and provide evidence for a link between gbM and cis-regulatory constraint, possibly reflecting greater dosage sensitivity of body-methylated genes. Given the extensive conservation of gbM in flowering plants, this suggests that gbM could be an important predictor of cis-regulatory variation in a wide range of plant species.

  10. Cdx is crucial for the timing mechanism driving colinear Hox activation and defines a trunk segment in the Hox cluster topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2017-02-15

    Cdx and Hox transcription factors are important regulators of axial patterning and are required for tissue generation along the vertebrate body axis. Cdx genes have been demonstrated to act upstream of Hox genes in midgestation embryos. Here, we investigate the role of Cdx transcription factors in the gradual colinear activation of the Hox clusters. We found that Hox temporally colinear expression is severely affected in epiblast stem cells derived from Cdx null embryos. We demonstrate that after initiation of 3' Hox gene transcription, Cdx activity is crucial for H3K27ac deposition and for accessibility of cis-regulatory elements around the central - or 'trunk' - Hox genes. We thereby identify a Cdx-responsive segment of HoxA, immediately 5' to the recently defined regulatory domain orchestrating initial transcription of the first Hox gene. We propose that this partition of HoxA into a Wnt-driven 3' part and the newly found Cdx-dependent middle segment of the cluster, forms a structural fundament of Hox colinearity of expression. Subsequently to initial Wnt-induced activation of 3' Hox genes, Cdx transcription factors would act as crucial effectors for activating central Hox genes, until the last gene of the cluster arrests the process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Shadow enhancers flanking the HoxB cluster direct dynamic Hox expression in early heart and endoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Christof; Jinks, Tim; Wang, Xinghao; Martinez Pastor, María Teresa; Krumlauf, Robb

    2013-11-01

    The products of Hox genes function in assigning positional identity along the anterior-posterior body axis during animal development. In mouse embryos, Hox genes located at the 3' end of HoxA and HoxB complexes are expressed in nested patterns in the progenitors of the secondary heart field during early cardiogenesis and the combined activities of both of these clusters are required for proper looping of the heart. Using Hox bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), transposon reporters, and transgenic analyses in mice, we present the identification of several novel enhancers flanking the HoxB complex which can work over a long range to mediate dynamic reporter expression in the endoderm and embryonic heart during development. These enhancers respond to exogenously added retinoic acid and we have identified two retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) within these control modules that play a role in potentiating their regulatory activity. Deletion analysis in HoxB BAC reporters reveals that these control modules, spread throughout the flanking intergenic region, have regulatory activities that overlap with other local enhancers. This suggests that they function as shadow enhancers to modulate the expression of genes from the HoxB complex during cardiac development. Regulatory analysis of the HoxA complex reveals that it also has enhancers in the 3' flanking region which contain RAREs and have the potential to modulate expression in endoderm and heart tissues. Together, the similarities in their location, enhancer output, and dependence on retinoid signaling suggest that a conserved cis-regulatory cassette located in the 3' proximal regions adjacent to the HoxA and HoxB complexes evolved to modulate Hox gene expression during mammalian cardiac and endoderm development. This suggests a common regulatory mechanism, whereby the conserved control modules act over a long range on multiple Hox genes to generate nested patterns of HoxA and HoxB expression during

  12. Evolution of anterior Hox regulatory elements among chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale Alfonso

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hox family of transcription factors has a fundamental role in segmentation pathways and axial patterning of embryonic development and their clustered organization is linked with the regulatory mechanisms governing their coordinated expression along embryonic axes. Among chordates, of particular interest are the Hox paralogous genes in groups 1-4 since their expression is coupled to the control of regional identity in the anterior nervous system, where the highest structural diversity is observed. Results To investigate the degree of conservation in cis-regulatory components that form the basis of Hox expression in the anterior nervous system, we have used assays for transcriptional activity in ascidians and vertebrates to compare and contrast regulatory potential. We identified four regulatory sequences located near the CiHox1, CiHox2 and CiHox4 genes of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis which direct neural specific domains of expression. Using functional assays in Ciona and vertebrate embryos in combination with sequence analyses of enhancer fragments located in similar positions adjacent to Hox paralogy group genes, we compared the activity of these four Ciona cis-elements with a series of neural specific enhancers from the amphioxus Hox1-3 genes and from mouse Hox paralogous groups 1-4. Conclusions This analysis revealed that Kreisler and Krox20 dependent enhancers critical in segmental regulation of the hindbrain appear to be specific for the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, neural enhancers that function as Hox response elements through the action of Hox/Pbx binding motifs have been conserved during chordate evolution. The functional assays reveal that these Hox response cis-elements are recognized by the regulatory components of different and extant species. Together, our results indicate that during chordate evolution, cis-elements dependent upon Hox/Pbx regulatory complexes, are responsible for key aspects of

  13. Statistical significance of cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming increasingly important for researchers to be able to scan through large genomic regions for transcription factor binding sites or clusters of binding sites forming cis-regulatory modules. Correspondingly, there has been a push to develop algorithms for the rapid detection and assessment of cis-regulatory modules. While various algorithms for this purpose have been introduced, most are not well suited for rapid, genome scale scanning. Results We introduce methods designed for the detection and statistical evaluation of cis-regulatory modules, modeled as either clusters of individual binding sites or as combinations of sites with constrained organization. In order to determine the statistical significance of module sites, we first need a method to determine the statistical significance of single transcription factor binding site matches. We introduce a straightforward method of estimating the statistical significance of single site matches using a database of known promoters to produce data structures that can be used to estimate p-values for binding site matches. We next introduce a technique to calculate the statistical significance of the arrangement of binding sites within a module using a max-gap model. If the module scanned for has defined organizational parameters, the probability of the module is corrected to account for organizational constraints. The statistical significance of single site matches and the architecture of sites within the module can be combined to provide an overall estimation of statistical significance of cis-regulatory module sites. Conclusion The methods introduced in this paper allow for the detection and statistical evaluation of single transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules. The features described are implemented in the Search Tool for Occurrences of Regulatory Motifs (STORM and MODSTORM software.

  14. Global reorganisation of cis-regulatory units upon lineage commitment of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Várnai, Csilla; Wingett, Steven W; Cairns, Jonathan; Collier, Amanda J; García-Vílchez, Raquel; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Osborne, Cameron S; Fraser, Peter; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2017-03-23

    Long-range cis-regulatory elements such as enhancers coordinate cell-specific transcriptional programmes by engaging in DNA looping interactions with target promoters. Deciphering the interplay between the promoter connectivity and activity of cis-regulatory elements during lineage commitment is crucial for understanding developmental transcriptional control. Here, we use Promoter Capture Hi-C to generate a high-resolution atlas of chromosomal interactions involving ~22,000 gene promoters in human pluripotent and lineage-committed cells, identifying putative target genes for known and predicted enhancer elements. We reveal extensive dynamics of cis-regulatory contacts upon lineage commitment, including the acquisition and loss of promoter interactions. This spatial rewiring occurs preferentially with predicted changes in the activity of cis-regulatory elements and is associated with changes in target gene expression. Our results provide a global and integrated view of promoter interactome dynamics during lineage commitment of human pluripotent cells.

  15. Parallel evolution of chordate cis-regulatory code for development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Doglio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Urochordates are the closest relatives of vertebrates and at the larval stage, possess a characteristic bilateral chordate body plan. In vertebrates, the genes that orchestrate embryonic patterning are in part regulated by highly conserved non-coding elements (CNEs, yet these elements have not been identified in urochordate genomes. Consequently the evolution of the cis-regulatory code for urochordate development remains largely uncharacterised. Here, we use genome-wide comparisons between C. intestinalis and C. savignyi to identify putative urochordate cis-regulatory sequences. Ciona conserved non-coding elements (ciCNEs are associated with largely the same key regulatory genes as vertebrate CNEs. Furthermore, some of the tested ciCNEs are able to activate reporter gene expression in both zebrafish and Ciona embryos, in a pattern that at least partially overlaps that of the gene they associate with, despite the absence of sequence identity. We also show that the ability of a ciCNE to up-regulate gene expression in vertebrate embryos can in some cases be localised to short sub-sequences, suggesting that functional cross-talk may be defined by small regions of ancestral regulatory logic, although functional sub-sequences may also be dispersed across the whole element. We conclude that the structure and organisation of cis-regulatory modules is very different between vertebrates and urochordates, reflecting their separate evolutionary histories. However, functional cross-talk still exists because the same repertoire of transcription factors has likely guided their parallel evolution, exploiting similar sets of binding sites but in different combinations.

  16. Computational identification of new structured cis-regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated region of human protein coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei Sylvia; Brown, Chris M

    2012-10-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acids (RNAs) contain a large number of cis-regulatory RNA elements that function in many types of post-transcriptional regulation. These cis-regulatory elements are often characterized by conserved structures and/or sequences. Although some classes are well known, given the wide range of RNA-interacting proteins in eukaryotes, it is likely that many new classes of cis-regulatory elements are yet to be discovered. An approach to this is to use computational methods that have the advantage of analysing genomic data, particularly comparative data on a large scale. In this study, a set of structural discovery algorithms was applied followed by support vector machine (SVM) classification. We trained a new classification model (CisRNA-SVM) on a set of known structured cis-regulatory elements from 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and successfully distinguished these and groups of cis-regulatory elements not been strained on from control genomic and shuffled sequences. The new method outperformed previous methods in classification of cis-regulatory RNA elements. This model was then used to predict new elements from cross-species conserved regions of human 3'-UTRs. Clustering of these elements identified new classes of potential cis-regulatory elements. The model, training and testing sets and novel human predictions are available at: http://mRNA.otago.ac.nz/CisRNA-SVM.

  17. Conserved cis-regulatory regions in a large genomic landscape control SHH and BMP-regulated Gremlin1 expression in mouse limb buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuniga Aimée

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse limb bud is a prime model to study the regulatory interactions that control vertebrate organogenesis. Major aspects of limb bud development are controlled by feedback loops that define a self-regulatory signalling system. The SHH/GREM1/AER-FGF feedback loop forms the core of this signalling system that operates between the posterior mesenchymal organiser and the ectodermal signalling centre. The BMP antagonist Gremlin1 (GREM1 is a critical node in this system, whose dynamic expression is controlled by BMP, SHH, and FGF signalling and key to normal progression of limb bud development. Previous analysis identified a distant cis-regulatory landscape within the neighbouring Formin1 (Fmn1 locus that is required for Grem1 expression, reminiscent of the genomic landscapes controlling HoxD and Shh expression in limb buds. Results Three highly conserved regions (HMCO1-3 were identified within the previously defined critical genomic region and tested for their ability to regulate Grem1 expression in mouse limb buds. Using a combination of BAC and conventional transgenic approaches, a 9 kb region located ~70 kb downstream of the Grem1 transcription unit was identified. This region, termed Grem1 Regulatory Sequence 1 (GRS1, is able to recapitulate major aspects of Grem1 expression, as it drives expression of a LacZ reporter into the posterior and, to a lesser extent, in the distal-anterior mesenchyme. Crossing the GRS1 transgene into embryos with alterations in the SHH and BMP pathways established that GRS1 depends on SHH and is modulated by BMP signalling, i.e. integrates inputs from these pathways. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed interaction of endogenous GLI3 proteins with the core cis-regulatory elements in the GRS1 region. As GLI3 is a mediator of SHH signal transduction, these results indicated that SHH directly controls Grem1 expression through the GRS1 region. Finally, all cis-regulatory regions within the Grem1

  18. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (human phenotypic variation.

  19. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (human phenotypic variation.

  20. A Cis-Regulatory Map of the Drosophila Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nègre, Nicolas; Brown, Christopher D.; Ma, Lijia; Bristow, Christopher Aaron; Miller, Steven W.; Wagner, Ulrich; Kheradpour, Pouya; Eaton, Matthew L.; Loriaux, Paul; Sealfon, Rachel; Li, Zirong; Ishii, Haruhiko; Spokony, Rebecca F.; Chen, Jia; Hwang, Lindsay; Cheng, Chao; Auburn, Richard P.; Davis, Melissa B.; Domanus, Marc; Shah, Parantu K.; Morrison, Carolyn A.; Zieba, Jennifer; Suchy, Sarah; Senderowicz, Lionel; Victorsen, Alec; Bild, Nicholas A.; Grundstad, A. Jason; Hanley, David; MacAlpine, David M.; Mannervik, Mattias; Venken, Koen; Bellen, Hugo; White, Robert; Russell, Steven; Grossman, Robert L.; Ren, Bing; Gerstein, Mark; Posakony, James W.; Kellis, Manolis; White, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic annotation of gene regulatory elements is a major challenge in genome science. Direct mapping of chromatin modification marks and transcriptional factor binding sites genome-wide 1,2 has successfully identified specific subtypes of regulatory elements 3. In Drosophila several pioneering studies have provided genome-wide identification of Polycomb-Response Elements 4, chromatin states 5, transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) 6–9, PolII regulation 8, and insulator elements 10; however, comprehensive annotation of the regulatory genome remains a significant challenge. Here we describe results from the modENCODE cis-regulatory annotation project. We produced a map of the Drosophila melanogaster regulatory genome based on more than 300 chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) datasets for eight chromatin features, five histone deacetylases (HDACs) and thirty-eight site-specific transcription factors (TFs) at different stages of development. Using these data we inferred more than 20,000 candidate regulatory elements and we validated a subset of predictions for promoters, enhancers, and insulators in vivo. We also identified nearly 2,000 genomic regions of dense TF binding associated with chromatin activity and accessibility. We discovered hundreds of new TF co-binding relationships and defined a TF network with over 800 potential regulatory relationships. PMID:21430782

  1. Changes in Cis-regulatory Elements during Morphological Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lee Paul

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available How have animals evolved new body designs (morphological evolution? This requires explanations both for simple morphological changes, such as differences in pigmentation and hair patterns between different Drosophila populations and species, and also for more complex changes, such as differences in the forelimbs of mice and bats, and the necks of amphibians and reptiles. The genetic changes and pathways involved in these evolutionary steps require identification. Many, though not all, of these events occur by changes in cis-regulatory (enhancer elements within developmental genes. Enhancers are modular, each affecting expression in only one or a few tissues. Therefore it is possible to add, remove or alter an enhancer without producing changes in multiple tissues, and thereby avoid widespread (pleiotropic deleterious effects. Ideally, for a given step in morphological evolution it is necessary to identify (i the change in phenotype, (ii the changes in gene expression, (iii the DNA region, enhancer or otherwise, affected, (iv the mutation involved, (v the nature of the transcription or other factors that bind to this site. In practice these data are incomplete for most of the published studies upon morphological evolution. Here, the investigations are categorized according to how far these analyses have proceeded.

  2. Using hexamers to predict cis-regulatory motifs in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibler Dennis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are short stretches of DNA that help regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. They have been found up to 1 megabase away from the genes they regulate and can be located upstream, downstream, and even within their target genes. Due to the difficulty of finding CRMs using biological and computational techniques, even well-studied regulatory systems may contain CRMs that have not yet been discovered. Results We present a simple, efficient method (HexDiff based only on hexamer frequencies of known CRMs and non-CRM sequence to predict novel CRMs in regulatory systems. On a data set of 16 gap and pair-rule genes containing 52 known CRMs, predictions made by HexDiff had a higher correlation with the known CRMs than several existing CRM prediction algorithms: Ahab, Cluster Buster, MSCAN, MCAST, and LWF. After combining the results of the different algorithms, 10 putative CRMs were identified and are strong candidates for future study. The hexamers used by HexDiff to distinguish between CRMs and non-CRM sequence were also analyzed and were shown to be enriched in regulatory elements. Conclusion HexDiff provides an efficient and effective means for finding new CRMs based on known CRMs, rather than known binding sites.

  3. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Zachary H; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F

    2014-11-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  4. The Role of cis Regulatory Evolution in Maize Domestication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Zachary H.; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues. PMID:25375861

  5. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary H Lemmon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem. Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  6. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary H Lemmon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem. Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  7. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  8. Evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks is associated with a cis-regulatory allele of Bmp6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleves, Phillip A; Ellis, Nicholas A; Jimenez, Monica T; Nunez, Stephanie M; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M; Miller, Craig T

    2014-09-23

    Developmental genetic studies of evolved differences in morphology have led to the hypothesis that cis-regulatory changes often underlie morphological evolution. However, because most of these studies focus on evolved loss of traits, the genetic architecture and possible association with cis-regulatory changes of gain traits are less understood. Here we show that a derived benthic freshwater stickleback population has evolved an approximate twofold gain in ventral pharyngeal tooth number compared with their ancestral marine counterparts. Comparing laboratory-reared developmental time courses of a low-toothed marine population and this high-toothed benthic population reveals that increases in tooth number and tooth plate area and decreases in tooth spacing arise at late juvenile stages. Genome-wide linkage mapping identifies largely separate sets of quantitative trait loci affecting different aspects of dental patterning. One large-effect quantitative trait locus controlling tooth number fine-maps to a genomic region containing an excellent candidate gene, Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (Bmp6). Stickleback Bmp6 is expressed in developing teeth, and no coding changes are found between the high- and low-toothed populations. However, quantitative allele-specific expression assays of Bmp6 in developing teeth in F1 hybrids show that cis-regulatory changes have elevated the relative expression level of the freshwater benthic Bmp6 allele at late, but not early, stages of stickleback development. Collectively, our data support a model where a late-acting cis-regulatory up-regulation of Bmp6 expression underlies a significant increase in tooth number in derived benthic sticklebacks.

  9. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P

    2007-11-09

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014s(-1). We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase.

  10. Cis-regulatory Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans Homeobox Gene Locus cog-1 Affect Neuronal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, M. Maggie; Bigelow, Henry; Flibotte, Stephane; Etchberger, John F.; Moerman, Donald G.; Hobert, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We apply here comparative genome hybridization as a novel tool to identify the molecular lesion in two Caenorhabditis elegans mutant strains that affect a neuronal cell fate decision. The phenotype of the mutant strains resembles those of the loss-of-function alleles of the cog-1 homeobox gene, an inducer of the fate of the gustatory neuron ASER. We find that both lesions map to the cis-regulatory control region of cog-1 and affect a phylogenetically conserved binding site for the C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor CHE-1, a previously known regulator of cog-1 expression in ASER. Identification of this CHE-1-binding site as a critical regulator of cog-1 expression in the ASER in vivo represents one of the rare demonstrations of the in vivo relevance of an experimentally determined or predicted transcription-factor-binding site. Aside from the mutationally defined CHE-1-binding site, cog-1 contains a second, functional CHE-1-binding site, which in isolation is sufficient to drive reporter gene expression in the ASER but in an in vivo context is apparently insufficient for promoting appropriate ASER expression. The cis-regulatory control regions of other ASE-expressed genes also contain ASE motifs that can promote ASE neuron expression when isolated from their genomic context, but appear to depend on multiple ASE motifs in their normal genomic context. The multiplicity of cis-regulatory elements may ensure the robustness of gene expression. PMID:19189954

  11. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field.

  12. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  13. Evolutionary processes acting on candidate cis-regulatory regions in humans inferred from patterns of polymorphism and divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara G Torgerson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of polymorphism and divergence in the non-coding portion of the human genome yields crucial information about factors driving the evolution of gene regulation. Candidate cis-regulatory regions spanning more than 15,000 genes in 15 African Americans and 20 European Americans were re-sequenced and aligned to the chimpanzee genome in order to identify potentially functional polymorphism and to characterize and quantify departures from neutral evolution. Distortions of the site frequency spectra suggest a general pattern of selective constraint on conserved non-coding sites in the flanking regions of genes (CNCs. Moreover, there is an excess of fixed differences that cannot be explained by a Gamma model of deleterious fitness effects, suggesting the presence of positive selection on CNCs. Extensions of the McDonald-Kreitman test identified candidate cis-regulatory regions with high probabilities of positive and negative selection near many known human genes, the biological characteristics of which exhibit genome-wide trends that differ from patterns observed in protein-coding regions. Notably, there is a higher probability of positive selection in candidate cis-regulatory regions near genes expressed in the fetal brain, suggesting that a larger portion of adaptive regulatory changes has occurred in genes expressed during brain development. Overall we find that natural selection has played an important role in the evolution of candidate cis-regulatory regions throughout hominid evolution.

  14. Prediction of Cis-Regulatory Elements Controlling Genes Differentially Expressed by Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongseok; Appukuttan, Binoy; Binek, Sierra J; Planck, Stephen R; Stout, J Timothy; Rosenbaum, James T; Smith, Justine R

    2008-01-01

    Cultured endothelial cells of the human retina and choroid demonstrate distinct patterns of gene expression. We hypothesized that differential gene expression reflected differences in the interactions of transcription factors and respective cis-regulatory motifs(s) in these two emdothelial cell subpopulations, recognizing that motifs often exist as modules. We tested this hypothesis in silico by using TRANSFAC Professional and CisModule to identify cis-regulatory motifs and modules in genes that were differentially expressed by human retinal versus choroidal endothelial cells, as identified by analysis of a microarray data set. Motifs corresponding to eight transcription factors were significantly (p < 0.05) differentially abundant in genes that were relatively highly expressed in retinal (i.e., GCCR, HMGIY, HSF1, p53, VDR) or choroidal (i.e., E2F, YY1, ZF5) endothelial cells. Predicted cis-regulatory modules were quite different for these two groups of genes. Our findings raise the possibility of exploiting specific cis-regulatory motifs to target therapy at the ocular endothelial cells subtypes responsible for neovascular age-related macular degeneration or proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  15. cis-Regulatory control of the initial neurogenic pattern of onecut gene expression in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julius C; Davidson, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the ciliated band (CB) of echinoid embryos executes three spatial functions essential for postgastrular organization. These are establishment of a band about 5 cells wide which delimits and bounds other embryonic territories; definition of a neurogenic domain within this band; and generation within it of arrays of ciliary cells that bear the special long cilia from which the structure derives its name. In Strongylocentrotus purpuratus the spatial coordinates of the future ciliated band are initially and exactly determined by the disposition of a ring of cells that transcriptionally activate the onecut homeodomain regulatory gene, beginning in blastula stage, long before the appearance of the CB per se. Thus the cis-regulatory apparatus that governs onecut expression in the blastula directly reveals the genomic sequence code by which these aspects of the spatial organization of the embryo are initially determined. We screened the entire onecut locus and its flanking region for transcriptionally active cis-regulatory elements, and by means of BAC recombineered deletions identified three separated and required cis-regulatory modules that execute different functions. The operating logic of the crucial spatial control module accounting for the spectacularly precise and beautiful early onecut expression domain depends on spatial repression. Previously predicted oral ectoderm and aboral ectoderm repressors were identified by cis-regulatory mutation as the products of goosecoid and irxa genes respectively, while the pan-ectodermal activator SoxB1 supplies a transcriptional driver function.

  16. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  17. Identification of Distal cis-Regulatory Elements at Mouse Mitoferrin Loci Using Zebrafish Transgenesis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Amigo, J. D.; Yu, M.; Troadec, M.-B.; Gwynn, B; Cooney, J. D.; Lambert, A.J.; Chi, N. C.; Weiss, M J; Peters, L. L.; Kaplan, J; Cantor, Alan B.; Paw, Barry Htin

    2011-01-01

    Mitoferrin 1 (Mfrn1; Slc25a37) and mitoferrin 2 (Mfrn2; Slc25a28) function as essential mitochondrial iron importers for heme and Fe/S cluster biogenesis. A genetic deficiency of Mfrn1 results in a profound hypochromic anemia in vertebrate species. To map the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) that control expression of the Mfrn genes, we utilized genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) datasets for the major erythroid transcription factor GATA-1. We identified the CRMs that faithfully dr...

  18. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty M Booker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing.

  19. Bounded search for de novo identification of degenerate cis-regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetani Radhika S

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of statistically overrepresented sequences in the upstream regions of coregulated genes should theoretically permit the identification of potential cis-regulatory elements. However, in practice many cis-regulatory elements are highly degenerate, precluding the use of an exhaustive word-counting strategy for their identification. While numerous methods exist for inferring base distributions using a position weight matrix, recent studies suggest that the independence assumptions inherent in the model, as well as the inability to reach a global optimum, limit this approach. Results In this paper, we report PRISM, a degenerate motif finder that leverages the relationship between the statistical significance of a set of binding sites and that of the individual binding sites. PRISM first identifies overrepresented, non-degenerate consensus motifs, then iteratively relaxes each one into a high-scoring degenerate motif. This approach requires no tunable parameters, thereby lending itself to unbiased performance comparisons. We therefore compare PRISM's performance against nine popular motif finders on 28 well-characterized S. cerevisiae regulons. PRISM consistently outperforms all other programs. Finally, we use PRISM to predict the binding sites of uncharacterized regulons. Our results support a proposed mechanism of action for the yeast cell-cycle transcription factor Stb1, whose binding site has not been determined experimentally. Conclusion The relationship between statistical measures of the binding sites and the set as a whole leads to a simple means of identifying the diverse range of cis-regulatory elements to which a protein binds. This approach leverages the advantages of word-counting, in that position dependencies are implicitly accounted for and local optima are more easily avoided. While we sacrifice guaranteed optimality to prevent the exponential blowup of exhaustive search, we prove that the error

  20. Are Interactions between cis-Regulatory Variants Evidence for Biological Epistasis or Statistical Artifacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Alexandra E; Capra, John A; Bush, William S

    2016-10-06

    The importance of epistasis-or statistical interactions between genetic variants-to the development of complex disease in humans has been controversial. Genome-wide association studies of statistical interactions influencing human traits have recently become computationally feasible and have identified many putative interactions. However, statistical models used to detect interactions can be confounded, which makes it difficult to be certain that observed statistical interactions are evidence for true molecular epistasis. In this study, we investigate whether there is evidence for epistatic interactions between genetic variants within the cis-regulatory region that influence gene expression after accounting for technical, statistical, and biological confounding factors. We identified 1,119 (FDR = 5%) interactions that appear to regulate gene expression in human lymphoblastoid cell lines, a tightly controlled, largely genetically determined phenotype. Many of these interactions replicated in an independent dataset (90 of 803 tested, Bonferroni threshold). We then performed an exhaustive analysis of both known and novel confounders, including ceiling/floor effects, missing genotype combinations, haplotype effects, single variants tagged through linkage disequilibrium, and population stratification. Every interaction could be explained by at least one of these confounders, and replication in independent datasets did not protect against some confounders. Assuming that the confounding factors provide a more parsimonious explanation for each interaction, we find it unlikely that cis-regulatory interactions contribute strongly to human gene expression, which calls into question the relevance of cis-regulatory interactions for other human phenotypes. We additionally propose several best practices for epistasis testing to protect future studies from confounding. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streelman J Todd

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may contribute to the adaptive evolution of gene expression, but functional alleles in these regions are difficult to identify without abundant genomic resources. Among African cichlid fishes, the differential expression of seven opsin genes has produced adaptive differences in visual sensitivity. Quantitative genetic analysis suggests that cis-regulatory alleles near the SWS2-LWS opsins may contribute to this variation. Here, we sequence BACs containing the opsin genes of two cichlids, Oreochromis niloticus and Metriaclima zebra. We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory sequences that influence cichlid opsin expression. Results We identified 20 conserved non-coding elements surrounding the opsins of cichlids and other teleosts, including one known enhancer and a retinal microRNA. Most conserved elements contained computationally-predicted binding sites that correspond to transcription factors that function in vertebrate opsin expression; O. niloticus and M. zebra were significantly divergent in two of these. Similarly, we found a large number of relevant transcription factor binding sites within each opsin's proximal promoter, and identified five opsins that were considerably divergent in both expression and the number of transcription factor binding sites shared between O. niloticus and M. zebra. We also found several microRNA target sites within the 3'-UTR of each opsin, including two 3'-UTRs that differ significantly between O. niloticus and M. zebra. Finally, we examined interspecific divergence among 18 phenotypically diverse cichlids from Lake Malawi for one conserved non-coding element, two 3'-UTRs, and five opsin proximal promoters. We found that all regions were highly conserved with some evidence of CRX transcription

  2. Cis-regulatory elements: molecular mechanisms and evolutionary processes underlying divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkopp, Patricia J; Kalay, Gizem

    2011-12-06

    Cis-regulatory sequences, such as enhancers and promoters, control development and physiology by regulating gene expression. Mutations that affect the function of these sequences contribute to phenotypic diversity within and between species. With many case studies implicating divergent cis-regulatory activity in phenotypic evolution, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for cis-regulatory divergence. Approaches include detailed functional analysis of individual cis-regulatory elements and comparing mechanisms of gene regulation among species using the latest genomic tools. Despite the limited number of mechanistic studies published to date, this work shows how cis-regulatory activity can diverge and how studies of cis-regulatory divergence can address long-standing questions about the genetic mechanisms of phenotypic evolution.

  3. The molecular signature and cis-regulatory architecture of a C. elegans gustatory neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchberger, John F.; Lorch, Adam; Sleumer, Monica C.; Zapf, Richard; Jones, Steven J.; Marra, Marco A.; Holt, Robert A.; Moerman, Donald G.; Hobert, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Taste receptor cells constitute a highly specialized cell type that perceives and conveys specific sensory information to the brain. The detailed molecular composition of these cells and the mechanisms that program their fate are, in general, poorly understood. We have generated serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries from two distinct populations of single, isolated sensory neuron classes, the gustatory neuron class ASE and the thermosensory neuron class AFD, from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. By comparing these two libraries, we have identified >1000 genes that define the ASE gustatory neuron class on a molecular level. This set of genes contains determinants of the differentiated state of the ASE neuron, such as a surprisingly complex repertoire of transcription factors (TFs), ion channels, neurotransmitters, and receptors, as well as seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR)-type putative gustatory receptor genes. Through the in vivo dissection of the cis-regulatory regions of several ASE-expressed genes, we identified a small cis-regulatory motif, the “ASE motif,” that is required for the expression of many ASE-expressed genes. We demonstrate that the ASE motif is a binding site for the C2H2 zinc finger TF CHE-1, which is essential for the correct differentiation of the ASE gustatory neuron. Taken together, our results provide a unique view of the molecular landscape of a single neuron type and reveal an important aspect of the regulatory logic for gustatory neuron specification in C. elegans. PMID:17606643

  4. Nucleotide sequence conservation of novel and established cis-regulatory sites within the tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Banerjee, Kasturi; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W

    2015-02-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis and its gene proximal promoter ( electromobility shift assays showed that brain-region specific complexes assemble on these motifs. These studies also identified a non-canonical CRE binding (CREB) protein recognition element in the proximal promoter. Together, these studies provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary conservation within the TH promoter and identify potential cis-regulatory motifs that underlie a core set of regulatory mechanisms in mammals.

  5. Creation of cis-regulatory elements during sea urchin evolution by co-option and optimization of a repetitive sequence adjacent to the spec2a gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Sandeep; Kiyama, Takae; Villinski, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Ning; Liang, Shuguang; Klein, William H

    2004-09-15

    The creation, preservation, and degeneration of cis-regulatory elements controlling developmental gene expression are fundamental genome-level evolutionary processes about which little is known. Here, we identify critical differences in cis-regulatory elements controlling the expression of the sea urchin aboral ectoderm-specific spec genes. We found multiple copies of a repetitive sequence element termed RSR in genomes of species within the Strongylocentrotidae family, but RSRs were not detected in genomes of species outside Strongylocentrotidae. spec genes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus are invariably associated with RSRs, and the spec2a RSR functioned as a transcriptional enhancer and displayed greater activity than did spec1 or spec2c RSRs. Single-base pair differences at two cis-regulatory elements within the spec2a RSR increased the binding affinities of four transcription factors, SpCCAAT-binding factor at one element and SpOtx, SpGoosecoid, and SpGATA-E at another. The cis-regulatory elements to which these four factors bound were recent evolutionary acquisitions that acted to either activate or repress transcription, depending on the cell type. These elements were found in the spec2a RSR ortholog in Strongylocentrotus pallidus but not in RSR orthologs of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis or Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. Our results indicated that a dynamic pattern of cis-regulatory element evolution exists for spec genes despite their conserved aboral ectoderm expression.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52 were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7 to 9.5×10(-89. The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Singarete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes.

  8. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singarete, Marina E.; Grizante, Mariana B.; Milograna, Sarah R.; Nery, Mariana F.; Kin, Koryu; Wagner, Günter P.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS) using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes. PMID:26500429

  9. cis-Regulatory control of three cell fate-specific genes in vulval organogenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirouac, Martha; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-05-01

    The great-grandprogeny of the Caenorhabditis elegans vulval precursor cells (VPCs) adopt one of the final vulA, B1, B2, C, D, E, and F cell fates in a precise spatial pattern. This pattern of vulval cell types is likely to depend on the cis-regulatory regions of the transcriptional targets of intercellular signals in vulval development. egl-17, zmp-1, and cdh-3 are expressed differentially in the developing vulva cells, providing a potential readout for different signaling pathways. To understand how such pathways interact to specify unique vulval cell types in a precise pattern, we have identified cis-regulatory regions sufficient to confer vulval cell type-specific regulation when fused in cis to the basal pes-10 promoter. We have identified the C. briggsae homologs of these three genes, with their corresponding control regions, and tested these regions in both C. elegans and C. briggsae. These regions of similarity in C. elegans and C. briggsae upstream of egl-17, zmp-1, and cdh-3 promote expression in vulval cells and the anchor cell (AC). By using the cis-regulatory analysis and phylogenetic footprinting, we have identified overrepresented sequences involved in conferring vulval and AC expression.

  10. Shared Enhancer Activity in the Limbs and Phallus and Functional Divergence of a Limb-Genital cis-Regulatory Element in Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Carlos R; Mihala, Alexandra G; Park, Sungdae; Wang, Jialiang S; Johnson, Kenji K; Lauderdale, James D; Menke, Douglas B

    2015-10-12

    The amniote phallus and limbs differ dramatically in their morphologies but share patterns of signaling and gene expression in early development. Thus far, the extent to which genital and limb transcriptional networks also share cis-regulatory elements has remained unexplored. We show that many limb enhancers are retained in snake genomes, suggesting that these elements may function in non-limb tissues. Consistent with this, our analysis of cis-regulatory activity in mice and Anolis lizards reveals that patterns of enhancer activity in embryonic limbs and genitalia overlap heavily. In mice, deletion of HLEB, an enhancer of Tbx4, produces defects in hindlimbs and genitalia, establishing the importance of this limb-genital enhancer for development of these different appendages. Further analyses demonstrate that the HLEB of snakes has lost hindlimb enhancer function while retaining genital activity. Our findings identify roles for Tbx4 in genital development and highlight deep similarities in cis-regulatory activity between limbs and genitalia.

  11. Computational methods for the detection of cis-regulatory modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loo, Peter; Marynen, Peter

    2009-09-01

    Metazoan transcription regulation occurs through the concerted action of multiple transcription factors that bind co-operatively to cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). The annotation of these key regulators of transcription is lagging far behind the annotation of the transcriptome itself. Here, we give an overview of existing computational methods to detect these CRMs in metazoan genomes. We subdivide these methods into three classes: CRM scanners screen sequences for CRMs based on predefined models that often consist of multiple position weight matrices (PWMs). CRM builders construct models of similar CRMs controlling a set of co-regulated or co-expressed genes. CRM genome screeners screen sequences or complete genomes for CRMs as homotypic or heterotypic clusters of binding sites for any combination of transcription factors. We believe that CRM scanners are currently the most advanced methods, although their applicability is limited. Finally, we argue that CRM builders that make use of PWM libraries will benefit greatly from future advances and will prove to be most instrumental for the annotation of regulatory regions in metazoan genomes.

  12. A primer on regression methods for decoding cis-regulatory logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debopriya; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-03-03

    The rapidly emerging field of systems biology is helping us to understand the molecular determinants of phenotype on a genomic scale [1]. Cis-regulatory elements are major sequence-based determinants of biological processes in cells and tissues [2]. For instance, during transcriptional regulation, transcription factors (TFs) bind to very specific regions on the promoter DNA [2,3] and recruit the basal transcriptional machinery, which ultimately initiates mRNA transcription (Figure 1A). Learning cis-Regulatory Elements from Omics Data A vast amount of work over the past decade has shown that omics data can be used to learn cis-regulatory logic on a genome-wide scale [4-6]--in particular, by integrating sequence data with mRNA expression profiles. The most popular approach has been to identify over-represented motifs in promoters of genes that are coexpressed [4,7,8]. Though widely used, such an approach can be limiting for a variety of reasons. First, the combinatorial nature of gene regulation is difficult to explicitly model in this framework. Moreover, in many applications of this approach, expression data from multiple conditions are necessary to obtain reliable predictions. This can potentially limit the use of this method to only large data sets [9]. Although these methods can be adapted to analyze mRNA expression data from a pair of biological conditions, such comparisons are often confounded by the fact that primary and secondary response genes are clustered together--whereas only the primary response genes are expected to contain the functional motifs [10]. A set of approaches based on regression has been developed to overcome the above limitations [11-32]. These approaches have their foundations in certain biophysical aspects of gene regulation [26,33-35]. That is, the models are motivated by the expected transcriptional response of genes due to the binding of TFs to their promoters. While such methods have gathered popularity in the computational domain

  13. Identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Cryptosporidium parvum by de novo pattern finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissinger Jessica C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptosporidium parvum is a unicellular eukaryote in the phylum Apicomplexa. It is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes diarrhea and is a significant AIDS-related pathogen. Cryptosporidium parvum is not amenable to long-term laboratory cultivation or classical molecular genetic analysis. The parasite exhibits a complex life cycle, a broad host range, and fundamental mechanisms of gene regulation remain unknown. We have used data from the recently sequenced genome of this organism to uncover clues about gene regulation in C. parvum. We have applied two pattern finding algorithms MEME and AlignACE to identify conserved, over-represented motifs in the 5' upstream regions of genes in C. parvum. To support our findings, we have established comparative real-time -PCR expression profiles for the groups of genes examined computationally. Results We find that groups of genes that share a function or belong to a common pathway share upstream motifs. Different motifs are conserved upstream of different groups of genes. Comparative real-time PCR studies show co-expression of genes within each group (in sub-sets during the life cycle of the parasite, suggesting co-regulation of these genes may be driven by the use of conserved upstream motifs. Conclusion This is one of the first attempts to characterize cis-regulatory elements in the absence of any previously characterized elements and with very limited expression data (seven genes only. Using de novo pattern finding algorithms, we have identified specific DNA motifs that are conserved upstream of genes belonging to the same metabolic pathway or gene family. We have demonstrated the co-expression of these genes (often in subsets using comparative real-time-PCR experiments thus establishing evidence for these conserved motifs as putative cis-regulatory elements. Given the lack of prior information concerning expression patterns and organization of promoters in C. parvum we

  14. Favorable genomic environments for cis-regulatory evolution: A novel theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeso, Ignacio; Tena, Juan J

    2016-09-01

    Cis-regulatory changes are arguably the primary evolutionary source of animal morphological diversity. With the recent explosion of genome-wide comparisons of the cis-regulatory content in different animal species is now possible to infer general principles underlying enhancer evolution. However, these studies have also revealed numerous discrepancies and paradoxes, suggesting that the mechanistic causes and modes of cis-regulatory evolution are still not well understood and are probably much more complex than generally appreciated. Here, we argue that the mutational mechanisms and genomic regions generating new regulatory activities must comply with the constraints imposed by the molecular properties of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) and the organizational features of long-range chromatin interactions. Accordingly, we propose a new integrative evolutionary framework for cis-regulatory evolution based on two major premises for the origin of novel enhancer activity: (i) an accessible chromatin environment and (ii) compatibility with the 3D structure and interactions of pre-existing CREs. Mechanisms and DNA sequences not fulfilling these premises, will be less likely to have a measurable impact on gene expression and as such, will have a minor contribution to the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, we discuss current comparative cis-regulatory data under the light of this new evolutionary model, and propose that the two most prominent mechanisms for the evolution of cis-regulatory changes are the overprinting of ancestral CREs and the exaptation of transposable elements.

  15. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  16. Brachyury, Foxa2 and the cis-Regulatory Origins of the Notochord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S José-Edwards

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A main challenge of modern biology is to understand how specific constellations of genes are activated to differentiate cells and give rise to distinct tissues. This study focuses on elucidating how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, an axial structure that provides support and patterning signals to embryos of humans and all other chordates. Although numerous notochord genes have been identified, the regulatory DNAs that orchestrate development and propel evolution of this structure by eliciting notochord gene expression remain mostly uncharted, and the information on their configuration and recurrence is still quite fragmentary. Here we used the simple chordate Ciona for a systematic analysis of notochord cis-regulatory modules (CRMs, and investigated their composition, architectural constraints, predictive ability and evolutionary conservation. We found that most Ciona notochord CRMs relied upon variable combinations of binding sites for the transcription factors Brachyury and/or Foxa2, which can act either synergistically or independently from one another. Notably, one of these CRMs contains a Brachyury binding site juxtaposed to an (AC microsatellite, an unusual arrangement also found in Brachyury-bound regulatory regions in mouse. In contrast, different subsets of CRMs relied upon binding sites for transcription factors of widely diverse families. Surprisingly, we found that neither intra-genomic nor interspecific conservation of binding sites were reliably predictive hallmarks of notochord CRMs. We propose that rather than obeying a rigid sequence-based cis-regulatory code, most notochord CRMs are rather unique. Yet, this study uncovered essential elements recurrently used by divergent chordates as basic building blocks for notochord CRMs.

  17. Altered transmission of HOX and apoptotic SNPs identify a potential common pathway for clubfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Audrey R; Weymouth, Katelyn S; Burt, Amber; Wise, Carol A; Scott, Allison; Gurnett, Christina A; Dobbs, Matthew B; Blanton, Susan H; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2009-12-01

    Clubfoot is a common birth defect that affects 135,000 newborns each year worldwide. It is characterized by equinus deformity of one or both feet and hypoplastic calf muscles. Despite numerous study approaches, the cause(s) remains poorly understood although a multifactorial etiology is generally accepted. We considered the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as candidate genes because of their important roles in limb and muscle morphogenesis. Twenty SNPs from the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and 12 SNPs in IGFBP3 were genotyped in a sample composed of non-Hispanic white and Hispanic multiplex and simplex families (discovery samples) and a second sample of non-Hispanic white simplex trios (validation sample). Four SNPs (rs6668, rs2428431, rs3801776, and rs3779456) in the HOXA cluster demonstrated altered transmission in the discovery sample, but only rs3801776, located in the HOXA basal promoter region, showed altered transmission in both the discovery and validation samples (P = 0.004 and 0.028). Interestingly, HOXA9 is expressed in muscle during development. An SNP in IGFBP3, rs13223993, also showed altered transmission (P = 0.003) in the discovery sample. Gene-gene interactions were identified between variants in HOXA, HOXD, and IGFBP3 and with previously associated SNPs in mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic genes. The most significant interactions were found between CASP3 SNPS and variants in HOXA, HOXD, and IGFBP3. These results suggest a biologic model for clubfoot in which perturbation of HOX and apoptotic genes together affect muscle and limb development, which may cause the downstream failure of limb rotation into a plantar grade position.

  18. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Quin, Kelly E; Smith, Daniel; Naseer, Zan; Schulte, Jane; Engel, Samuel D; Loh, Yong-Hwee E; Streelman, J Todd; Boore, Jeffrey L; Carleton, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    .... We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory...

  19. HoxA Genes and the Fin-to-Limb Transition in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Leite-Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available HoxA genes encode for important DNA-binding transcription factors that act during limb development, regulating primarily gene expression and, consequently, morphogenesis and skeletal differentiation. Within these genes, HoxA11 and HoxA13 were proposed to have played an essential role in the enigmatic evolutionary transition from fish fins to tetrapod limbs. Indeed, comparative gene expression analyses led to the suggestion that changes in their regulation might have been essential for the diversification of vertebrates’ appendages. In this review, we highlight three potential modifications in the regulation and function of these genes that may have boosted appendage evolution: (1 the expansion of polyalanine repeats in the HoxA11 and HoxA13 proteins; (2 the origin of +a novel long-non-coding RNA with a possible inhibitory function on HoxA11; and (3 the acquisition of cis-regulatory elements modulating 5’ HoxA transcription. We discuss the relevance of these mechanisms for appendage diversification reviewing the current state of the art and performing additional comparative analyses to characterize, in a phylogenetic framework, HoxA11 and HoxA13 expression, alanine composition within the encoded proteins, long-non-coding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements.

  20. Separate elements of the TERMINAL FLOWER 1 cis-regulatory region integrate pathways to control flowering time and shoot meristem identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Fernández-Nohales, Pedro; Doménech, María J; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Bradley, Desmond; Madueño, Francisco

    2016-09-15

    TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is a key regulator of Arabidopsis plant architecture that responds to developmental and environmental signals to control flowering time and the fate of shoot meristems. TFL1 expression is dynamic, being found in all shoot meristems, but not in floral meristems, with the level and distribution changing throughout development. Using a variety of experimental approaches we have analysed the TFL1 promoter to elucidate its functional structure. TFL1 expression is based on distinct cis-regulatory regions, the most important being located 3' of the coding sequence. Our results indicate that TFL1 expression in the shoot apical versus lateral inflorescence meristems is controlled through distinct cis-regulatory elements, suggesting that different signals control expression in these meristem types. Moreover, we identified a cis-regulatory region necessary for TFL1 expression in the vegetative shoot and required for a wild-type flowering time, supporting that TFL1 expression in the vegetative meristem controls flowering time. Our study provides a model for the functional organisation of TFL1 cis-regulatory regions, contributing to our understanding of how developmental pathways are integrated at the genomic level of a key regulator to control plant architecture. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Ancient Pbx-Hox signatures define hundreds of vertebrate developmental enhancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Hugo J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation through cis-regulatory elements plays a crucial role in development and disease. A major aim of the post-genomic era is to be able to read the function of cis-regulatory elements through scrutiny of their DNA sequence. Whilst comparative genomics approaches have identified thousands of putative regulatory elements, our knowledge of their mechanism of action is poor and very little progress has been made in systematically de-coding them. Results Here, we identify ancient functional signatures within vertebrate conserved non-coding elements (CNEs through a combination of phylogenetic footprinting and functional assay, using genomic sequence from the sea lamprey as a reference. We uncover a striking enrichment within vertebrate CNEs for conserved binding-site motifs of the Pbx-Hox hetero-dimer. We further show that these predict reporter gene expression in a segment specific manner in the hindbrain and pharyngeal arches during zebrafish development. Conclusions These findings evoke an evolutionary scenario in which many CNEs evolved early in the vertebrate lineage to co-ordinate Hox-dependent gene-regulatory interactions that pattern the vertebrate head. In a broader context, our evolutionary analyses reveal that CNEs are composed of tightly linked transcription-factor binding-sites (TFBSs, which can be systematically identified through phylogenetic footprinting approaches. By placing a large number of ancient vertebrate CNEs into a developmental context, our findings promise to have a significant impact on efforts toward de-coding gene-regulatory elements that underlie vertebrate development, and will facilitate building general models of regulatory element evolution.

  2. Identification of distal cis-regulatory elements at mouse mitoferrin loci using zebrafish transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigo, Julio D; Yu, Ming; Troadec, Marie-Berengere; Gwynn, Babette; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Lambert, Amy J; Chi, Neil C; Weiss, Mitchell J; Peters, Luanne L; Kaplan, Jerry; Cantor, Alan B; Paw, Barry H

    2011-04-01

    Mitoferrin 1 (Mfrn1; Slc25a37) and mitoferrin 2 (Mfrn2; Slc25a28) function as essential mitochondrial iron importers for heme and Fe/S cluster biogenesis. A genetic deficiency of Mfrn1 results in a profound hypochromic anemia in vertebrate species. To map the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) that control expression of the Mfrn genes, we utilized genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) datasets for the major erythroid transcription factor GATA-1. We identified the CRMs that faithfully drive the expression of Mfrn1 during blood and heart development and Mfrn2 ubiquitously. Through in vivo analyses of the Mfrn-CRMs in zebrafish and mouse, we demonstrate their functional and evolutionary conservation. Using knockdowns with morpholinos and cell sorting analysis in transgenic zebrafish embryos, we show that GATA-1 directly regulates the expression of Mfrn1. Mutagenesis of individual GATA-1 binding cis elements (GBE) demonstrated that at least two of the three GBE within this CRM are functionally required for GATA-mediated transcription of Mfrn1. Furthermore, ChIP assays demonstrate switching from GATA-2 to GATA-1 at these elements during erythroid maturation. Our results provide new insights into the genetic regulation of mitochondrial function and iron homeostasis and, more generally, illustrate the utility of genome-wide ChIP analysis combined with zebrafish transgenesis for identifying long-range transcriptional enhancers that regulate tissue development.

  3. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  4. [Role of genes and their cis-regulatory elements during animal morphological evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boyuan; Tu, Jianbo; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2014-06-01

    Cis-regulatory hypothesis is one of the most important theories in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), which claims that evolution of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) plays a key role during evolution of morphology. However, an increasing number of experimental results show that cis-regulatory hypothesis alone is not far enough to explain the complexity of evo-devo processes. Other modifications, including mutations of protein coding, gene and genome duplications, and flexibility of homeodomains and CREs, also cause the morphological changes in animals. In this review, we retrospect the recent results of evolution of CREs and genes associated with CREs and discuss new methods and trends for research in evo-devo.

  5. A Simple Grammar Defines Activating and Repressing cis-Regulatory Elements in Photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. White

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors often activate and repress different target genes in the same cell. How activation and repression are encoded by different arrangements of transcription factor binding sites in cis-regulatory elements is poorly understood. We investigated how sites for the transcription factor CRX encode both activation and repression in photoreceptors by assaying thousands of genomic and synthetic cis-regulatory elements in wild-type and Crx−/− retinas. We found that sequences with high affinity for CRX repress transcription, whereas sequences with lower affinity activate. This rule is modified by a cooperative interaction between CRX sites and sites for the transcription factor NRL, which overrides the repressive effect of high affinity for CRX. Our results show how simple rearrangements of transcription factor binding sites encode qualitatively different responses to a single transcription factor and explain how CRX plays multiple cis-regulatory roles in the same cell.

  6. Characterization of Putative cis-Regulatory Elements in Genes Preferentially Expressed in Arabidopsis Male Meiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is essential for plant reproduction because it is the process during which homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and meiotic recombination occur. The meiotic transcriptome is difficult to investigate because of the size of meiocytes and the confines of anther lobes. The recent development of isolation techniques has enabled the characterization of transcriptional profiles in male meiocytes of Arabidopsis. Gene expression in male meiocytes shows unique features. The direct interaction of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory sequences forms the basis for the specificity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we identified putative cis-regulatory elements (CREs associated with male meiocyte-expressed genes using in silico tools. The upstream regions (1 kb of the top 50 genes preferentially expressed in Arabidopsis meiocytes possessed conserved motifs. These motifs are putative binding sites of TFs, some of which share common functions, such as roles in cell division. In combination with cell-type-specific analysis, our findings could be a substantial aid for the identification and experimental verification of the protein-DNA interactions for the specific TFs that drive gene expression in meiocytes.

  7. Cis-regulatory elements in the primate brain: from functional specialization to neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermunt, Marit W.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the noncoding part of the genome has been shown to harbour thousands of cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, that activate well-defined gene expression programs. Here, we charted active enhancers in a multiplicity of human brain regions to understand the role of

  8. Putative cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock genes activated during excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life

  9. An integrative and applicable phylogenetic footprinting framework for cis-regulatory motifs identification in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Fennell, Anne; Wang, Guanghui; Kang, Yu; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-08-09

    Phylogenetic footprinting is an important computational technique for identifying cis-regulatory motifs in orthologous regulatory regions from multiple genomes, as motifs tend to evolve slower than their surrounding non-functional sequences. Its application, however, has several difficulties for optimizing the selection of orthologous data and reducing the false positives in motif prediction. Here we present an integrative phylogenetic footprinting framework for accurate motif predictions in prokaryotic genomes (MP(3)). The framework includes a new orthologous data preparation procedure, an additional promoter scoring and pruning method and an integration of six existing motif finding algorithms as basic motif search engines. Specifically, we collected orthologous genes from available prokaryotic genomes and built the orthologous regulatory regions based on sequence similarity of promoter regions. This procedure made full use of the large-scale genomic data and taxonomy information and filtered out the promoters with limited contribution to produce a high quality orthologous promoter set. The promoter scoring and pruning is implemented through motif voting by a set of complementary predicting tools that mine as many motif candidates as possible and simultaneously eliminate the effect of random noise. We have applied the framework to Escherichia coli k12 genome and evaluated the prediction performance through comparison with seven existing programs. This evaluation was systematically carried out at the nucleotide and binding site level, and the results showed that MP(3) consistently outperformed other popular motif finding tools. We have integrated MP(3) into our motif identification and analysis server DMINDA, allowing users to efficiently identify and analyze motifs in 2,072 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. The performance evaluation indicated that MP(3) is effective for predicting regulatory motifs in prokaryotic genomes. Its application may enhance

  10. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  11. Global profiling of rice and poplar transcriptomes highlights key conserved circadian-controlled pathways and cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A Filichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks provide an adaptive advantage through anticipation of daily and seasonal environmental changes. In plants, the central clock oscillator is regulated by several interlocking feedback loops. It was shown that a substantial proportion of the Arabidopsis genome cycles with phases of peak expression covering the entire day. Synchronized transcriptome cycling is driven through an extensive network of diurnal and clock-regulated transcription factors and their target cis-regulatory elements. Study of the cycling transcriptome in other plant species could thus help elucidate the similarities and differences and identify hubs of regulation common to monocot and dicot plants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a combination of oligonucleotide microarrays and data mining pipelines, we examined daily rhythms in gene expression in one monocotyledonous and one dicotyledonous plant, rice and poplar, respectively. Cycling transcriptomes were interrogated under different diurnal (driven and circadian (free running light and temperature conditions. Collectively, photocycles and thermocycles regulated about 60% of the expressed nuclear genes in rice and poplar. Depending on the condition tested, up to one third of oscillating Arabidopsis-poplar-rice orthologs were phased within three hours of each other suggesting a high degree of conservation in terms of rhythmic gene expression. We identified clusters of rhythmically co-expressed genes and searched their promoter sequences to identify phase-specific cis-elements, including elements that were conserved in the promoters of Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that the cycling patterns of many circadian clock genes are highly conserved across poplar, rice, and Arabidopsis. The expression of many orthologous genes in key metabolic and regulatory pathways is diurnal and/or circadian regulated and phased to similar times of day. Our results confirm

  12. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs. It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Results Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. Conclusion The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  13. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Denis C; Bailey, Timothy L

    2008-04-29

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs). It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  14. Conserved Cis-Regulatory Modules Control Robustness in Msx1 Expression at Single-Cell Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Keith W.; Woodcock, Dan J.; Reid, John E.; Bretschneider, Till; Ott, Sascha; Koentges, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    The process of transcription is highly stochastic leading to cell-to-cell variations and noise in gene expression levels. However, key essential genes have to be precisely expressed at the correct amount and time to ensure proper cellular development and function. Studies in yeast and bacterial systems have shown that gene expression noise decreases as mean expression levels increase, a relationship that is controlled by promoter DNA sequence. However, the function of distal cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), an evolutionary novelty of metazoans, in controlling transcriptional robustness and variability is poorly understood. In this study, we used live cell imaging of transfected reporters combined with a mathematical modelling and statistical inference scheme to quantify the function of conserved Msx1 CRMs and promoters in modulating single-cell real-time transcription rates in C2C12 mouse myoblasts. The results show that the mean expression–noise relationship is solely promoter controlled for this key pluripotency regulator. In addition, we demonstrate that CRMs modulate single-cell basal promoter rate distributions in a graded manner across a population of cells. This extends the rheostatic model of CRM action to provide a more detailed understanding of CRM function at single-cell resolution. We also identify a novel CRM transcriptional filter function that acts to reduce intracellular variability in transcription rates and show that this can be phylogenetically separable from rate modulating CRM activities. These results are important for understanding how the expression of key vertebrate developmental transcription factors is precisely controlled both within and between individual cells. PMID:26342140

  15. HoxPred: automated classification of Hox proteins using combinations of generalised profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyns Luc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct identification of individual Hox proteins is an essential basis for their study in diverse research fields. Common methods to classify Hox proteins focus on the homeodomain that characterise homeobox transcription factors. Classification is hampered by the high conservation of this short domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is a widely used but time-consuming classification method. Results We have developed an automated procedure, HoxPred, that classifies Hox proteins in their groups of homology. The method relies on a discriminant analysis that classifies Hox proteins according to their scores for a combination of protein generalised profiles. 54 generalised profiles dedicated to each Hox homology group were produced de novo from a curated dataset of vertebrate Hox proteins. Several classification methods were investigated to select the most accurate discriminant functions. These functions were then incorporated into the HoxPred program. Conclusion HoxPred shows a mean accuracy of 97%. Predictions on the recently-sequenced stickleback fish proteome identified 44 Hox proteins, including HoxC1a only found so far in zebrafish. Using the Uniprot databank, we demonstrate that HoxPred can efficiently contribute to large-scale automatic annotation of Hox proteins into their paralogous groups. As orthologous group predictions show a higher risk of misclassification, they should be corroborated by additional supporting evidence. HoxPred is accessible via SOAP and Web interface http://cege.vub.ac.be/hoxpred/. Complete datasets, results and source code are available at the same site.

  16. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  17. Patterns of cis regulatory variation in diverse human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of gene expression variation has long been studied with the aim to understand the landscape of regulatory variants, but also more recently to assist in the interpretation and elucidation of disease signals. To date, many studies have looked in specific tissues and population-based samples, but there has been limited assessment of the degree of inter-population variability in regulatory variation. We analyzed genome-wide gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a total of 726 individuals from 8 global populations from the HapMap3 project and correlated gene expression levels with HapMap3 SNPs located in cis to the genes. We describe the influence of ancestry on gene expression levels within and between these diverse human populations and uncover a non-negligible impact on global patterns of gene expression. We further dissect the specific functional pathways differentiated between populations. We also identify 5,691 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs after controlling for both non-genetic factors and population admixture and observe that half of the cis-eQTLs are replicated in one or more of the populations. We highlight patterns of eQTL-sharing between populations, which are partially determined by population genetic relatedness, and discover significant sharing of eQTL effects between Asians, European-admixed, and African subpopulations. Specifically, we observe that both the effect size and the direction of effect for eQTLs are highly conserved across populations. We observe an increasing proximity of eQTLs toward the transcription start site as sharing of eQTLs among populations increases, highlighting that variants close to TSS have stronger effects and therefore are more likely to be detected across a wider panel of populations. Together these results offer a unique picture and resource of the degree of differentiation among human populations in functional regulatory variation and provide an estimate for

  18. Patterns of cis regulatory variation in diverse human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of gene expression variation has long been studied with the aim to understand the landscape of regulatory variants, but also more recently to assist in the interpretation and elucidation of disease signals. To date, many studies have looked in specific tissues and population-based samples, but there has been limited assessment of the degree of inter-population variability in regulatory variation. We analyzed genome-wide gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a total of 726 individuals from 8 global populations from the HapMap3 project and correlated gene expression levels with HapMap3 SNPs located in cis to the genes. We describe the influence of ancestry on gene expression levels within and between these diverse human populations and uncover a non-negligible impact on global patterns of gene expression. We further dissect the specific functional pathways differentiated between populations. We also identify 5,691 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs after controlling for both non-genetic factors and population admixture and observe that half of the cis-eQTLs are replicated in one or more of the populations. We highlight patterns of eQTL-sharing between populations, which are partially determined by population genetic relatedness, and discover significant sharing of eQTL effects between Asians, European-admixed, and African subpopulations. Specifically, we observe that both the effect size and the direction of effect for eQTLs are highly conserved across populations. We observe an increasing proximity of eQTLs toward the transcription start site as sharing of eQTLs among populations increases, highlighting that variants close to TSS have stronger effects and therefore are more likely to be detected across a wider panel of populations. Together these results offer a unique picture and resource of the degree of differentiation among human populations in functional regulatory variation and provide an estimate for

  19. Molecular evolution of the HoxA cluster in the three major gnathostome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-hua; Amemiya, Chris; Dewar, Ken; Kim, Chang-Bae; Ruddle, Frank H; Wagner, Günter P

    2002-04-16

    The duplication of Hox clusters and their maintenance in a lineage has a prominent but little understood role in chordate evolution. Here we examined how Hox cluster duplication may influence changes in cluster architecture and patterns of noncoding sequence evolution. We sequenced the entire duplicated HoxAa and HoxAb clusters of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and extended the 5' (posterior) part of the HoxM (HoxA-like) cluster of horn shark (Heterodontus francisci) containing the hoxa11 and hoxa13 orthologs as well as intergenic and flanking noncoding sequences. The duplicated HoxA clusters in zebrafish each house considerably fewer genes and are dramatically shorter than the single HoxA clusters of human and horn shark. We compared the intergenic sequences of the HoxA clusters of human, horn shark, zebrafish (Aa, Ab), and striped bass and found extensive conservation of noncoding sequence motifs, i.e., phylogenetic footprints, between the human and horn shark, representing two of the three gnathostome lineages. These are putative cis-regulatory elements that may play a role in the regulation of the ancestral HoxA cluster. In contrast, homologous regions of the duplicated HoxAa and HoxAb clusters of zebrafish and the HoxA cluster of striped bass revealed a striking loss of conservation of these putative cis-regulatory sequences in the 3' (anterior) segment of the cluster, where zebrafish only retains single representatives of group 1, 3, 4, and 5 (HoxAa) and group 2 (HoxAb) genes and in the 5' part of the clusters, where zebrafish retains two copies of the group 13, 11, and 9 genes, i.e., AbdB-like genes. In analyzing patterns of cis-sequence evolution in the 5' part of the clusters, we explicitly looked for evidence of complementary loss of conserved noncoding sequences, as predicted by the duplication-degeneration-complementation model in which genetic redundancy after gene duplication is resolved because of the fixation of complementary degenerative mutations. Our

  20. Expression-guided in silico evaluation of candidate cis regulatory codes for Drosophila muscle founder cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Philippakis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed "CodeFinder" that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells.

  1. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  2. Rapid evolution of cis-regulatory sequences via local point mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. R.; Wray, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the evolution of protein-coding sequences within genomes is well understood, the same cannot be said of the cis-regulatory regions that control transcription. Yet, changes in gene expression are likely to constitute an important component of phenotypic evolution. We simulated the evolution of new transcription factor binding sites via local point mutations. The results indicate that new binding sites appear and become fixed within populations on microevolutionary timescales under an assumption of neutral evolution. Even combinations of two new binding sites evolve very quickly. We predict that local point mutations continually generate considerable genetic variation that is capable of altering gene expression.

  3. Engineering Synthetic cis-Regulatory Elements for Simultaneous Recognition of Three Transcriptional Factors in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2015-12-18

    Recognition of cis-regulatory elements by transcription factors (TF) at target promoters is crucial to gene regulation in bacteria. In this process, binding of TFs to their cognate sequences depends on a set of physical interactions between these proteins and specific nucleotides in the operator region. Previously, we showed that in silico optimization algorithms are able to generate short sequences that are recognized by two different TFs of Escherichia coli, namely, CRP and IHF, thus generating an AND logic gate. Here, we expanded this approach in order to engineer DNA sequences that can be simultaneously recognized by three unrelated TFs (CRP, IHF, and Fis). Using in silico optimization and experimental validation strategies, we were able to obtain a candidate promoter (Plac-CFI1) regulated by only two TFs with an AND logic, thus demonstrating a limitation in the design. Subsequently, we modified the algorithm to allow the optimization of extended sequences, and were able to design two synthetic promoters (PCFI20-1 and PCFI22-5) that were functional in vivo. Expression assays in E. coli mutant strains for each TF revealed that while CRP positively regulates the promoter activities, IHF and Fis are strong repressors of both the promoter variants. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of in silico strategies in bacterial synthetic promoter engineering. Furthermore, the study also shows how small modifications in cis-regulatory elements can drastically affect the final logic of the resulting promoter.

  4. Plasticity of the cis-regulatory input function of a gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham E Mayo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription rate of a gene is often controlled by several regulators that bind specific sites in the gene's cis-regulatory region. The combined effect of these regulators is described by a cis-regulatory input function. What determines the form of an input function, and how variable is it with respect to mutations? To address this, we employ the well-characterized lac operon of Escherichia coli, which has an elaborate input function, intermediate between Boolean AND-gate and OR-gate logic. We mapped in detail the input function of 12 variants of the lac promoter, each with different point mutations in the regulator binding sites, by means of accurate expression measurements from living cells. We find that even a few mutations can significantly change the input function, resulting in functions that resemble Pure AND gates, OR gates, or single-input switches. Other types of gates were not found. The variant input functions can be described in a unified manner by a mathematical model. The model also lets us predict which functions cannot be reached by point mutations. The input function that we studied thus appears to be plastic, in the sense that many of the mutations do not ruin the regulation completely but rather result in new ways to integrate the inputs.

  5. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Barkoulas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change-less than 30%-in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression.

  6. Conservation of shh cis-regulatory architecture of the coelacanth is consistent with its ancestral phylogenetic position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern coelacanth (Latimeria is the extant taxon of a basal sarcopterygian lineage and sister group to tetrapods. Apart from certain apomorphic traits, its morphology is characterized by a high degree of retention of ancestral vertebrate structures and little morphological change. An insight into the molecular evolution that may explain the unchanged character of Latimeria morphology requires the analysis of the expression patterns of developmental regulator genes and their cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. Results We describe the comparative and functional analysis of the sonic hedgehog (shh genomic region of Latimeria menadoensis. Several putative enhancers in the Latimeria shh locus have been identified by comparisons to sarcopterygian and actinopterygian extant species. Specific sequence conservation with all known actinopterygian enhancer elements has been detected. However, these elements are selectively missing in more recently diverged actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. The functionality of the putative Latimeria enhancers was confirmed by reporter gene expression analysis in transient transgenic zebrafish and chick embryos. Conclusions Latimeria shh CRMs represent the ancestral set of enhancers that have emerged before the split of lobe-finned and ray-finned fishes. In contrast to lineage-specific losses and differentiations in more derived lineages, Latimeria shh enhancers reveal low levels of sequence diversification. High overall sequence conservation of shh conserved noncoding elements (CNE is consistent with the general trend of high levels of conservation of noncoding DNA in the slowly evolving Latimeria genome.

  7. A comparative analysis of the evolution, expression, and cis-regulatory element of polygalacturonase genes in grasses and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yu, Youjian; Cui, Jinlong; Lyu, Meiling; Xu, Liai; Cao, Jiashu

    2016-11-01

    Cell walls are a distinguishing characteristic of plants essential to their survival. The pectin content of primary cell walls in grasses and dicots is distinctly different. Polygalacturonases (PGs) can degrade pectins and participate in multiple developmental processes of plants. This study comprehensively compared the evolution, expression, and cis-regulatory element of PGs in grasses and dicots. A total of 577 PGs identified from five grasses and five dicots fell into seven clades. Evolutionary analysis demonstrated the distinct differences between grasses and dicots in patterns of gene duplication and loss, and evolutionary rates. Grasses generally contained much fewer clade C and F members than dicots. We found that this disparity was the result of less duplication and more gene losses in grasses. More duplications occurred in clades D and E, and expression analysis showed that most of clade E members were expressed ubiquitously at a high overall level and clade D members were closely related to male reproduction in both grasses and dicots, suggesting their biological functions were highly conserved across species. In addition to the general role in reproductive development, PGs of clades C and F specifically played roles in root development in dicots, shedding light on organ differentiation between the two groups of plants. A regulatory element analysis of clade C and F members implied that possible functions of PGs in specific biological responses contributed to their expansion and preservation. This work can improve the knowledge of PGs in plants generally and in grasses specifically and is beneficial to functional studies.

  8. A Generalized Linear Model for Decomposing Cis-regulatory, Parent-of-Origin, and Maternal Effects on Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Takada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint quantification of genetic and epigenetic effects on gene expression is important for understanding the establishment of complex gene regulation systems in living organisms. In particular, genomic imprinting and maternal effects play important roles in the developmental process of mammals and flowering plants. However, the influence of these effects on gene expression are difficult to quantify because they act simultaneously with cis-regulatory mutations. Here we propose a simple method to decompose cis-regulatory (i.e., allelic genotype, genomic imprinting [i.e., parent-of-origin (PO], and maternal [i.e., maternal genotype (MG] effects on allele-specific gene expression using RNA-seq data obtained from reciprocal crosses. We evaluated the efficiency of method using a simulated dataset and applied the method to whole-body Drosophila and mouse trophoblast stem cell (TSC and liver RNA-seq data. Consistent with previous studies, we found little evidence of PO and MG effects in adult Drosophila samples. In contrast, we identified dozens and hundreds of mouse genes with significant PO and MG effects, respectively. Interestingly, a similar number of genes with significant PO effect were detect in mouse TSCs and livers, whereas more genes with significant MG effect were observed in livers. Further application of this method will clarify how these three effects influence gene expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, and provide novel insight into the evolution of gene expression regulation.

  9. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding.

  10. SMCis: An Effective Algorithm for Discovery of Cis-Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haitao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is a challenging problem in computational biology. Limited by the difficulty of using an HMM to model dependent features in transcriptional regulatory sequences (TRSs), the probabilistic modeling methods based on HMMs cannot accurately represent the distance between regulatory elements in TRSs and are cumbersome to model the prevailing dependencies between motifs within CRMs. We propose a probabilistic modeling algorithm called SMCis, which builds a more powerful CRM discovery model based on a hidden semi-Markov model. Our model characterizes the regulatory structure of CRMs and effectively models dependencies between motifs at a higher level of abstraction based on segments rather than nucleotides. Experimental results on three benchmark datasets indicate that our method performs better than the compared algorithms. PMID:27637070

  11. Establishment of the methods for searching eukaryotic gene cis-regulatory modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Zhang, Zhen-shu; Liu, Yu-hu; Zheng, Guo-qing; Liu, Xiao-yi; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Gui-jun; Xu, An-long

    2004-02-01

    On the basis of the knowledge of eukaryotic gene regulation, we modified the method in three aspects: (1) Searching the cis-regulatory modules (CRM) according Fasta or Blast sequence with multiple sequence and low E value, followed by mutual scoring of these sequence with Smith-Waterman algorithms and finally by clustering analysis; (2) Searching the transcription factor-binding site using International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Position-Weight Matrix(PWM) and Dyed method; (3) Designing and implementation of data analysis based on the software in Windows 2000 and UNIX using object-oriented technology. The results of analysis of the major histocompatibility complex gene family show that this procedure may accurately locate the regions that contain some of the CRMs.

  12. A single three-dimensional chromatin compartment in amphioxus indicates a stepwise evolution of vertebrate Hox bimodal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acemel, Rafael D; Tena, Juan J; Irastorza-Azcarate, Ibai; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Diaz, Sergio G; Aldea, Daniel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Mangenot, Sophie; Holland, Peter W H; Devos, Damien P; Maeso, Ignacio; Escrivá, Hector; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    The HoxA and HoxD gene clusters of jawed vertebrates are organized into bipartite three-dimensional chromatin structures that separate long-range regulatory inputs coming from the anterior and posterior Hox-neighboring regions. This architecture is instrumental in allowing vertebrate Hox genes to pattern disparate parts of the body, including limbs. Almost nothing is known about how these three-dimensional topologies originated. Here we perform extensive 4C-seq profiling of the Hox cluster in embryos of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. We find that, in contrast to the architecture in vertebrates, the amphioxus Hox cluster is organized into a single chromatin interaction domain that includes long-range contacts mostly from the anterior side, bringing distant cis-regulatory elements into contact with Hox genes. We infer that the vertebrate Hox bipartite regulatory system is an evolutionary novelty generated by combining ancient long-range regulatory contacts from DNA in the anterior Hox neighborhood with new regulatory inputs from the posterior side.

  13. Massively parallel cis-regulatory analysis in the mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Susan Q; Myers, Connie A; Hughes, Andrew E O; Byrne, Leah C; Flannery, John G; Corbo, Joseph C

    2016-02-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs, e.g., promoters and enhancers) regulate gene expression, and variants within CREs can modulate disease risk. Next-generation sequencing has enabled the rapid generation of genomic data that predict the locations of CREs, but a bottleneck lies in functionally interpreting these data. To address this issue, massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) have emerged, in which barcoded reporter libraries are introduced into cells, and the resulting barcoded transcripts are quantified by next-generation sequencing. Thus far, MPRAs have been largely restricted to assaying short CREs in a limited repertoire of cultured cell types. Here, we present two advances that extend the biological relevance and applicability of MPRAs. First, we adapt exome capture technology to instead capture candidate CREs, thereby tiling across the targeted regions and markedly increasing the length of CREs that can be readily assayed. Second, we package the library into adeno-associated virus (AAV), thereby allowing delivery to target organs in vivo. As a proof of concept, we introduce a capture library of about 46,000 constructs, corresponding to roughly 3500 DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites, into the mouse retina by ex vivo plasmid electroporation and into the mouse cerebral cortex by in vivo AAV injection. We demonstrate tissue-specific cis-regulatory activity of DHSs and provide examples of high-resolution truncation mutation analysis for multiplex parsing of CREs. Our approach should enable massively parallel functional analysis of a wide range of CREs in any organ or species that can be infected by AAV, such as nonhuman primates and human stem cell-derived organoids.

  14. Evolution of metal hyperaccumulation required cis-regulatory changes and triplication of HMA4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanikenne, Marc; Talke, Ina N; Haydon, Michael J; Lanz, Christa; Nolte, Andrea; Motte, Patrick; Kroymann, Juergen; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2008-05-15

    Little is known about the types of mutations underlying the evolution of species-specific traits. The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri has the rare ability to colonize heavy-metal-polluted soils, and, as an extremophile sister species of Arabidopsis thaliana, it is a powerful model for research on adaptation. A. halleri naturally accumulates and tolerates leaf concentrations as high as 2.2% zinc and 0.28% cadmium in dry biomass. On the basis of transcriptomics studies, metal hyperaccumulation in A. halleri has been associated with more than 30 candidate genes that are expressed at higher levels in A. halleri than in A. thaliana. Some of these genes have been genetically mapped to broad chromosomal segments of between 4 and 24 cM co-segregating with Zn and Cd hypertolerance. However, the in planta loss-of-function approaches required to demonstrate the contribution of a given candidate gene to metal hyperaccumulation or hypertolerance have not been pursued to date. Using RNA interference to downregulate HMA4 (HEAVY METAL ATPASE 4) expression, we show here that Zn hyperaccumulation and full hypertolerance to Cd and Zn in A. halleri depend on the metal pump HMA4. Contrary to a postulated global trans regulatory factor governing high expression of numerous metal hyperaccumulation genes, we demonstrate that enhanced expression of HMA4 in A. halleri is attributable to a combination of modified cis-regulatory sequences and copy number expansion, in comparison to A. thaliana. Transfer of an A. halleri HMA4 gene to A. thaliana recapitulates Zn partitioning into xylem vessels and the constitutive transcriptional upregulation of Zn deficiency response genes characteristic of Zn hyperaccumulators. Our results demonstrate the importance of cis-regulatory mutations and gene copy number expansion in the evolution of a complex naturally selected extreme trait. The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies

  15. Alignment and prediction of cis-regulatory modules based on a probabilistic model of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Ling, Xu; Sinha, Saurabh

    2009-03-01

    Cross-species comparison has emerged as a powerful paradigm for predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and understanding their evolution. The comparison requires reliable sequence alignment, which remains a challenging task for less conserved noncoding sequences. Furthermore, the existing models of DNA sequence evolution generally do not explicitly treat the special properties of CRM sequences. To address these limitations, we propose a model of CRM evolution that captures different modes of evolution of functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and the background sequences. A particularly novel aspect of our work is a probabilistic model of gains and losses of TFBSs, a process being recognized as an important part of regulatory sequence evolution. We present a computational framework that uses this model to solve the problems of CRM alignment and prediction. Our alignment method is similar to existing methods of statistical alignment but uses the conserved binding sites to improve alignment. Our CRM prediction method deals with the inherent uncertainties of binding site annotations and sequence alignment in a probabilistic framework. In simulated as well as real data, we demonstrate that our program is able to improve both alignment and prediction of CRM sequences over several state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we used alignments produced by our program to study binding site conservation in genome-wide binding data of key transcription factors in the Drosophila blastoderm, with two intriguing results: (i) the factor-bound sequences are under strong evolutionary constraints even if their neighboring genes are not expressed in the blastoderm and (ii) binding sites in distal bound sequences (relative to transcription start sites) tend to be more conserved than those in proximal regions. Our approach is implemented as software, EMMA (Evolutionary Model-based cis-regulatory Module Analysis), ready to be applied in a broad biological context.

  16. Alignment and prediction of cis-regulatory modules based on a probabilistic model of evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-species comparison has emerged as a powerful paradigm for predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and understanding their evolution. The comparison requires reliable sequence alignment, which remains a challenging task for less conserved noncoding sequences. Furthermore, the existing models of DNA sequence evolution generally do not explicitly treat the special properties of CRM sequences. To address these limitations, we propose a model of CRM evolution that captures different modes of evolution of functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and the background sequences. A particularly novel aspect of our work is a probabilistic model of gains and losses of TFBSs, a process being recognized as an important part of regulatory sequence evolution. We present a computational framework that uses this model to solve the problems of CRM alignment and prediction. Our alignment method is similar to existing methods of statistical alignment but uses the conserved binding sites to improve alignment. Our CRM prediction method deals with the inherent uncertainties of binding site annotations and sequence alignment in a probabilistic framework. In simulated as well as real data, we demonstrate that our program is able to improve both alignment and prediction of CRM sequences over several state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we used alignments produced by our program to study binding site conservation in genome-wide binding data of key transcription factors in the Drosophila blastoderm, with two intriguing results: (i the factor-bound sequences are under strong evolutionary constraints even if their neighboring genes are not expressed in the blastoderm and (ii binding sites in distal bound sequences (relative to transcription start sites tend to be more conserved than those in proximal regions. Our approach is implemented as software, EMMA (Evolutionary Model-based cis-regulatory Module Analysis, ready to be applied in a broad biological context.

  17. In silico evolution of the hunchback gene indicates redundancy in cis-regulatory organization and spatial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrijchuk, Elizaveta A; Sabirov, Marat A; Holloway, David M; Spirov, Alexander V

    2014-04-01

    Biological development depends on the coordinated expression of genes in time and space. Developmental genes have extensive cis-regulatory regions which control their expression. These regions are organized in a modular manner, with different modules controlling expression at different times and locations. Both how modularity evolved and what function it serves are open questions. We present a computational model for the cis-regulation of the hunchback (hb) gene in the fruit fly (Drosophila). We simulate evolution (using an evolutionary computation approach from computer science) to find the optimal cis-regulatory arrangements for fitting experimental hb expression patterns. We find that the cis-regulatory region tends to readily evolve modularity. These cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) do not tend to control single spatial domains, but show a multi-CRM/multi-domain correspondence. We find that the CRM-domain correspondence seen in Drosophila evolves with a high probability in our model, supporting the biological relevance of the approach. The partial redundancy resulting from multi-CRM control may confer some biological robustness against corruption of regulatory sequences. The technique developed on hb could readily be applied to other multi-CRM developmental genes.

  18. Computational discovery of soybean promoter cis-regulatory elements for the construction of soybean cyst nematode inducible synthetic promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational methods offer great hope but limited accuracy in the prediction of functional cis-regulatory elements; improvements are needed to enable synthetic promoter design. We applied an ensemble strategy for de novo soybean cyst nematode (SCN)-inducible motif discovery among promoters of 18 co...

  19. In silico evolution of the hunchback gene indicates redundancy in cis-regulatory organization and spatial gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrijchuk, Elizaveta A.; Sabirov, Marat A.; Holloway, David M.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological development depends on the coordinated expression of genes in time and space. Developmental genes have extensive cis-regulatory regions which control their expression. These regions are organized in a modular manner, with different modules controlling expression at different times and locations. Both how modularity evolved and what function it serves are open questions. We present a computational model for the cis-regulation of the hunchback (hb) gene in the fruit fly (Drosophila). We simulate evolution (using an evolutionary computation approach from computer science) to find the optimal cis-regulatory arrangements for fitting experimental hb expression patterns. We find that the cis-regulatory region tends to readily evolve modularity. These cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) do not tend to control single spatial domains, but show a multi-CRM/multi-domain correspondence. We find that the CRM-domain correspondence seen in Drosophila evolves with a high probability in our model, supporting the biological relevance of the approach. The partial redundancy resulting from multi-CRM control may confer some biological robustness against corruption of regulatory sequences. The technique developed on hb could readily be applied to other multi-CRM developmental genes. PMID:24712536

  20. Network-Based Integration of GWAS and Gene Expression Identifies a HOX-Centric Network Associated with Serous Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Li, Qiyuan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified...... identified six networks centered on TF genes (HOXB2, HOXB5, HOXB6, HOXB7 at 17q21.32 and HOXD1, HOXD3 at 2q31) that were significantly enriched for genes from the risk-associated end of the ranked list (P ... (7,035 cases/21,693 controls). Genes underlying enrichment in the six networks were pooled into a combined network. CONCLUSION: We identified a HOX-centric network associated with serous EOC risk containing several genes with known or emerging roles in serous EOC development. IMPACT: Network analysis...

  1. Expression, subcellular localization, and cis-regulatory structure of duplicated phytoene synthase genes in melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoqiong; Coku, Ardian; Inoue, Kentaro; Tian, Li

    2011-10-01

    Carotenoids perform many critical functions in plants, animals, and humans. It is therefore important to understand carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation in plants. Phytoene synthase (PSY) catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in carotenoid biosynthesis. While PSY is present as a single copy gene in Arabidopsis, duplicated PSY genes have been identified in many economically important monocot and dicot crops. CmPSY1 was previously identified from melon (Cucumis melo L.), but was not functionally characterized. We isolated a second PSY gene, CmPSY2, from melon in this work. CmPSY2 possesses a unique intron/exon structure that has not been observed in other plant PSYs. Both CmPSY1 and CmPSY2 are functional in vitro, but exhibit distinct expression patterns in different melon tissues and during fruit development, suggesting differential regulation of the duplicated melon PSY genes. In vitro chloroplast import assays verified the plastidic localization of CmPSY1 and CmPSY2 despite the lack of an obvious plastid target peptide in CmPSY2. Promoter motif analysis of the duplicated melon and tomato PSY genes and the Arabidopsis PSY revealed distinctive cis-regulatory structures of melon PSYs and identified gibberellin-responsive motifs in all PSYs except for SlPSY1, which has not been reported previously. Overall, these data provide new insights into the evolutionary history of plant PSY genes and the regulation of PSY expression by developmental and environmental signals that may involve different regulatory networks.

  2. An arthropod cis-regulatory element functioning in sensory organ precursor development dates back to the Cambrian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Pat

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of publications demonstrate conservation of function of cis-regulatory elements without sequence similarity. In invertebrates such functional conservation has only been shown for closely related species. Here we demonstrate the existence of an ancient arthropod regulatory element that functions during the selection of neural precursors. The activity of genes of the achaete-scute (ac-sc family endows cells with neural potential. An essential, conserved characteristic of proneural genes is their ability to restrict their own activity to single or a small number of progenitor cells from their initially broad domains of expression. This is achieved through a process called lateral inhibition. A regulatory element, the sensory organ precursor enhancer (SOPE, is required for this process. First identified in Drosophila, the SOPE contains discrete binding sites for four regulatory factors. The SOPE of the Drosophila asense gene is situated in the 5' UTR. Results Through a manual comparison of consensus binding site sequences we have been able to identify a SOPE in UTR sequences of asense-like genes in species belonging to all four arthropod groups (Crustacea, Myriapoda, Chelicerata and Insecta. The SOPEs of the spider Cupiennius salei and the insect Tribolium castaneum are shown to be functional in transgenic Drosophila. This would place the origin of this regulatory sequence as far back as the last common ancestor of the Arthropoda, that is, in the Cambrian, 550 million years ago. Conclusions The SOPE is not detectable by inter-specific sequence comparison, raising the possibility that other ancient regulatory modules in invertebrates might have escaped detection.

  3. Nutritional control of gene expression in Drosophila larvae via TOR, Myc and a novel cis-regulatory element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grewal Savraj S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrient availability is a key determinant of eukaryotic cell growth. In unicellular organisms many signaling and transcriptional networks link nutrient availability to the expression of metabolic genes required for growth. However, less is known about the corresponding mechanisms that operate in metazoans. We used gene expression profiling to explore this issue in developing Drosophila larvae. Results We found that starvation for dietary amino acids (AA's leads to dynamic changes in transcript levels of many metabolic genes. The conserved insulin/PI3K and TOR signaling pathways mediate nutrition-dependent growth in Drosophila and other animals. We found that many AA starvation-responsive transcripts were also altered in TOR mutants. In contrast, although PI3K overexpression induced robust changes in the expression of many metabolic genes, these changes showed limited overlap with the AA starvation expression profile. We did however identify a strong overlap between genes regulated by the transcription factor, Myc, and AA starvation-responsive genes, particularly those involved in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. The consensus Myc DNA binding site is enriched in promoters of these AA starvation genes, and we found that Myc overexpression could bypass dietary AA to induce expression of these genes. We also identified another sequence motif (Motif 1 enriched in the promoters of AA starvation-responsive genes. We showed that Motif 1 was both necessary and sufficient to mediate transcriptional responses to dietary AA in larvae. Conclusions Our data suggest that many of the transcriptional effects of amino acids are mediated via signaling through the TOR pathway in Drosophila larvae. We also find that these transcriptional effects are mediated through at least two mechanisms: via the transcription factor Myc, and via the Motif 1 cis-regulatory element. These studies begin to elucidate a nutrient

  4. Cis-regulatory variants affect CHRNA5 mRNA expression in populations of African and European ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chyong Wang

    Full Text Available Variants within the gene cluster encoding α3, α5, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits are major risk factors for substance dependence. The strongest impact on risk is associated with variation in the CHRNA5 gene, where at least two mechanisms are at work: amino acid variation and altered mRNA expression levels. The risk allele of the non-synonymous variant (rs16969968; D398N primarily occurs on the haplotype containing the low mRNA expression allele. In populations of European ancestry, there are approximately 50 highly correlated variants in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster and the adjacent PSMA4 gene region that are associated with CHRNA5 mRNA levels. It is not clear which of these variants contribute to the changes in CHRNA5 transcript level. Because populations of African ancestry have reduced linkage disequilibrium among variants spanning this gene cluster, eQTL mapping in subjects of African ancestry could potentially aid in defining the functional variants that affect CHRNA5 mRNA levels. We performed quantitative allele specific gene expression using frontal cortices derived from 49 subjects of African ancestry and 111 subjects of European ancestry. This method measures allele-specific transcript levels in the same individual, which eliminates other biological variation that occurs when comparing expression levels between different samples. This analysis confirmed that substance dependence associated variants have a direct cis-regulatory effect on CHRNA5 transcript levels in human frontal cortices of African and European ancestry and identified 10 highly correlated variants, located in a 9 kb region, that are potential functional variants modifying CHRNA5 mRNA expression levels.

  5. Distinct functional constraints partition sequence conservation in a cis-regulatory element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Barrière

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different functional constraints contribute to different evolutionary rates across genomes. To understand why some sequences evolve faster than others in a single cis-regulatory locus, we investigated function and evolutionary dynamics of the promoter of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-47 gene. We found that this promoter consists of two distinct domains. The proximal promoter is conserved and is largely sufficient to direct appropriate spatial expression. The distal promoter displays little if any conservation between several closely related nematodes. Despite this divergence, sequences from all species confer robustness of expression, arguing that this function does not require substantial sequence conservation. We showed that even unrelated sequences have the ability to promote robust expression. A prominent feature shared by all of these robustness-promoting sequences is an AT-enriched nucleotide composition consistent with nucleosome depletion. Because general sequence composition can be maintained despite sequence turnover, our results explain how different functional constraints can lead to vastly disparate rates of sequence divergence within a promoter.

  6. Understanding the Dynamics of Gene Regulatory Systems; Characterisation and Clinical Relevance of cis-Regulatory Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Cowie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern genetic analysis has shown that most polymorphisms associated with human disease are non-coding. Much of the functional information contained in the non-coding genome consists of cis-regulatory sequences (CRSs that are required to respond to signal transduction cues that direct cell specific gene expression. It has been hypothesised that many diseases may be due to polymorphisms within CRSs that alter their responses to signal transduction cues. However, identification of CRSs, and the effects of allelic variation on their ability to respond to signal transduction cues, is still at an early stage. In the current review we describe the use of comparative genomics and experimental techniques that allow for the identification of CRSs building on recent advances by the ENCODE consortium. In addition we describe techniques that allow for the analysis of the effects of allelic variation and epigenetic modification on CRS responses to signal transduction cues. Using specific examples we show that the interactions driving these elements are highly complex and the effects of disease associated polymorphisms often subtle. It is clear that gaining an understanding of the functions of CRSs, and how they are affected by SNPs and epigenetic modification, is essential to understanding the genetic basis of human disease and stratification whilst providing novel directions for the development of personalised medicine.

  7. cis-regulatory elements involved in ultraviolet light regulation and plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, R; Röhrig, H; Höricke, C; Schell, J

    1990-10-01

    An elicitor-regulated transient expression system was established in soybean protoplasts that allowed the identification of cis-regulatory elements involved in plant defense. The 5' region of an ultraviolet (UV) light-inducible and elicitor-inducible chs gene (chs1) of soybean was subjected to deletion analysis with the help of chimeric chs-nptII/gus gene constructs. This analysis delimited the sequences necessary for elicitor inducibility to -175 and -134 of the chs1 promoter. The same soybean sequences were able to direct elicitor inducibility in parsley protoplasts, suggesting a conserved function of cis-acting elements involved in plant defense. In addition, this region of the soybean promoter also promotes UV light inducibility in parsley protoplasts. However, in contrast to the elicitor induction, correct regulation was not observed after UV light induction when sequences downstream of -75 were replaced by a heterologous minimal promoter. This result indicates that at least two cis-acting elements are involved in UV light induction.

  8. Analysis of mammalian cis-regulatory DNA elements by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiering, S; Bender, M A; Groudine, M

    1999-01-01

    The use of homologous recombination to modify and thereby functionally analyze cis-regulatory DNA elements in mammalian cells has become an important approach in mammalian gene expression research. We have emphasized the necessity of designing a system that allows the removal of selectable markers used in targeting and facilitates the further modification of the region under study. To perform these tasks, we presently favor making an initial HR-mediated replacement of the entire element under study with an active positive selectable marker in combination with either an inactive second positive selectable marker or an active negative selectable marker. The plug and socket system, in which an inactive selectable marker is complemented by HR, is the most dependable and well-characterized option for making secondary modifications. However, the double-replacement system has certain advantages, and the recently developed RMCE approach, which allows replacement of a negative selectable marker by site-specific recombinase-mediated insertion without using a positive selectable marker, will likely prove very valuable in future experiments. Each of the systems, or combinations thereof, should be considered in light of the specifics of any given experiment to select the most appropriate option. Although the emphasis of this article has been the analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements involved in transcription, these same approaches can be used to analyze other regulatory elements (e.g., origins of replication) and to make multiple subtle mutations in polypeptides.

  9. Revisiting the origin of the vertebrate Hox14 by including its relict sarcopterygian members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Nathalie; Ericsson, Rolf; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2011-11-15

    Bilaterian Hox genes play pivotal roles in the specification of positional identities along the anteroposterior axis. Particularly in vertebrates, their regulation is tightly coordinated by tandem arrays of genes [paralogy groups (PGs)] in four gene clusters (HoxA-D). Traditionally, the uninterrupted Hox cluster (Hox1-14) of the invertebrate chordate amphioxus was regarded as an archetype of the vertebrate Hox clusters. In contrast to Hox1-13 that are globally regulated by the "Hox code" and are often phylogenetically conserved, vertebrate Hox14 members were only recently revealed to be present in an African lungfish, a coelacanth, chondrichthyans and a lamprey, and decoupled from the Hox code. In this study we performed a PCR-based search of Hox14 members from diverse vertebrates, and identified one in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri. Based on a molecular phylogenetic analysis, this gene was designated NfHoxA14. Our real-time RT-PCR suggested its hindgut-associated expression, previously observed also in cloudy catshark HoxD14 and lamprey Hox14α. It is likely that this altered expression scheme was established before the Hox cluster quadruplication, probably at the base of extant vertebrates. To investigate the origin of vertebrate Hox14, by including this sarcopterygian Hox14 member, we performed focused phylogenetic analyses on its relationship with other vertebrate posterior Hox PGs (Hox9-13) as well as amphioxus posterior Hox genes. Our results confirmed the hypotheses previously proposed by other studies that vertebrate Hox14 does not have any amphioxus ortholog, and that none of 1-to-1 pairs of vertebrate and amphioxus posterior Hox genes, based on their relative location in the clusters, is orthologous. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hox genes in the parasitic platyhelminthes Mesocestoides corti, Echinococcus multilocularis, and Schistosoma mansoni: evidence for a reduced Hox complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Uriel; Lalanne, Ana I; Castillo, Estela

    2009-02-01

    Little is known about the Hox gene complement in parasitic platyhelminthes (Neodermata). With the aim of identifying Hox genes in this group we performed two independent strategies: we performed a PCR survey with degenerate primers directed to the Hox homeobox in the cestode Mesocestoides corti, and we searched genomic assemblies of Echinococcus multilocularis and Schistosoma mansoni. We identified two Hox genes in M. corti, seven in E. multilocularis, and nine in S. mansoni (including five previously reported). The affinities of these sequences, and other previously reported Hox sequences from flatworms, were determined according to phylogenetic analysis, presence of characteristic parapeptide sequences, and unusual intron positions. Our results suggest that the last common ancestor of triclads and neodermatans had a Hox gene complement of at least seven genes, and that this was probably derived by gene loss from a larger ancestral Hox complement in lophotrochozoans.

  11. Hox cluster genomics in the horn shark, Heterodontus francisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C B; Amemiya, C; Bailey, W; Kawasaki, K; Mezey, J; Miller, W; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Wagner, G; Ruddle, F

    2000-02-15

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history of Hox cluster origins will lead to insights into the developmental and evolutionary significance of Hox gene clusters in vertebrate phylogeny and to their role in the origins of various vertebrate body plans. We have isolated two Hox clusters from the horn shark, Heterodontus francisci. These have been sequenced and compared with one another and with other chordate Hox clusters. The results show that one of the horn shark clusters (HoxM) is orthologous to the mammalian HoxA cluster and shows a structural similarity to the amphioxus cluster, whereas the other shark cluster (HoxN) is orthologous to the mammalian HoxD cluster based on cluster organization and a comparison with noncoding and Hox gene-coding sequences. The persistence of an identifiable HoxA cluster over an 800-million-year divergence time demonstrates that the Hox gene clusters are highly integrated and structured genetic entities. The data presented herein identify many noncoding sequence motifs conserved over 800 million years that may function as genetic control motifs essential to the developmental process.

  12. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James J; van der Burg, Karin R L; Mazo-Vargas, Anyi; Reed, Robert D

    2016-09-13

    Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  13. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Deb

    Full Text Available Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs, thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic

  14. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  15. Recurrent modification of a conserved cis-regulatory element underlies fruit fly pigmentation diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE, little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B and sex-determination (DSX transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages.

  16. cis-Regulatory Circuits Regulating NEK6 Kinase Overexpression in Transformed B Cells Are Super-Enhancer Independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in distal regulatory elements that control gene expression underlie many diseases, including cancer. Epigenomic analyses of normal and diseased cells have produced correlative predictions for connections between dysregulated enhancers and target genes involved in pathogenesis. However, with few exceptions, these predicted cis-regulatory circuits remain untested. Here, we dissect cis-regulatory circuits that lead to overexpression of NEK6, a mitosis-associated kinase, in human B cell lymphoma. We find that only a minor subset of predicted enhancers is required for NEK6 expression. Indeed, an annotated super-enhancer is dispensable for NEK6 overexpression and for maintaining the architecture of a B cell-specific regulatory hub. A CTCF cluster serves as a chromatin and architectural boundary to block communication of the NEK6 regulatory hub with neighboring genes. Our findings emphasize that validation of predicted cis-regulatory circuits and super-enhancers is needed to prioritize transcriptional control elements as therapeutic targets.

  17. cis-Regulatory Circuits Regulating NEK6 Kinase Overexpression in Transformed B Cells Are Super-Enhancer Independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Koues, Olivia I; Zhao, Jiang-Yang; Liu, Regina; Pyfrom, Sarah C; Payton, Jacqueline E; Oltz, Eugene M

    2017-03-21

    Alterations in distal regulatory elements that control gene expression underlie many diseases, including cancer. Epigenomic analyses of normal and diseased cells have produced correlative predictions for connections between dysregulated enhancers and target genes involved in pathogenesis. However, with few exceptions, these predicted cis-regulatory circuits remain untested. Here, we dissect cis-regulatory circuits that lead to overexpression of NEK6, a mitosis-associated kinase, in human B cell lymphoma. We find that only a minor subset of predicted enhancers is required for NEK6 expression. Indeed, an annotated super-enhancer is dispensable for NEK6 overexpression and for maintaining the architecture of a B cell-specific regulatory hub. A CTCF cluster serves as a chromatin and architectural boundary to block communication of the NEK6 regulatory hub with neighboring genes. Our findings emphasize that validation of predicted cis-regulatory circuits and super-enhancers is needed to prioritize transcriptional control elements as therapeutic targets.

  18. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan.

  19. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis Hani Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF binding sites (TFBSs. Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. Results We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was

  20. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  1. Prioritizing predicted cis-regulatory elements for co-expressed gene sets based on Lasso regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Roqueiro, Damian; Dai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Computational prediction of cis-regulatory elements for a set of co-expressed genes based on sequence analysis provides an overwhelming volume of potential transcription factor binding sites. It presents a challenge to prioritize transcription factors for regulatory functional studies. A novel approach based on the use of Lasso regression models is proposed to address this problem. We examine the ability of the Lasso model using time-course microarray data obtained from a comprehensive study of gene expression profiles in skin and mucosal wounds in mouse over all stages of wound healing.

  2. A transposon-based chromosomal engineering method to survey a large cis-regulatory landscape in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Chikara; Horie, Kyoji; Abe, Koichiro; Ikeda, Ryuji; Mizuno, Sumi; Uno, Yoshihiro; Ogiwara, Sanae; Ohtsuka, Masato; Isotani, Ayako; Okabe, Masaru; Imai, Kenji; Takeda, Junji

    2009-08-01

    A large cis-regulatory landscape is a common feature of vertebrate genomes, particularly at key developmental gene loci with finely tuned expression patterns. Existing genetic tools for surveying large genomic regions of interest spanning over hundreds of kilobases are limited. Here we propose a chromosomal engineering strategy exploiting the local hopping trait of the Sleeping Beauty transposon in the mouse genome. We generated embryonic stem cells with a targeted integration of the transposon vector, carrying an enhancer-detecting lacZ reporter and loxP cassette, into the developmentally critical Pax1 gene locus, followed by efficient local transpositions, nested deletion formation and derivation of embryos by tetraploid complementation. Comparative reporter expression analysis among different insertion/deletion embryos substantially facilitated long-range cis-regulatory element mapping in the genomic neighborhood and demonstrated the potential of the transposon-based approach as a versatile tool for exploration of defined genomic intervals of functional or clinical relevance, such as disease-associated microdeletions.

  3. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  4. Integrative modeling of eQTLs and cis-regulatory elements suggests mechanisms underlying cell type specificity of eQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Brown

    Full Text Available Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human

  5. Selective inhibition of class switching to IgG and IgE by recruitment of the HoxC4 and Oct-1 homeodomain proteins and Ku70/Ku86 to newly identified ATTT cis-elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, András; Kim, Edmund C; Wu, Xiaoping; Zan, Hong; Testoni, Lucia; Salamon, Szilvia; Cerutti, Andrea; Casali, Paolo

    2003-06-20

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching is central to the maturation of the antibody response as IgG, IgA, and IgE are endowed with more diverse biological effector functions than IgM. It is induced upon engagement of CD40 on B lymphocytes by CD40L expressed by activated CD4+ T cells and exposure of B cells to T cell-secreted cytokines including interleukin-4 and transforming growth factor-beta. It begins with germ line IH-CH transcription and unfolds through class switch DNA recombination (CSR). We show here that the HoxC4 and Oct-1 homeodomain proteins together with the Ku70/Ku86 heterodimer bind as a complex to newly identified switch (S) regulatory ATTT elements (SREs) in the Igamma and Iepsilon promoters and downstream regions to dampen basal germ line Igamma-Cgamma and Iepsilon-Cepsilon transcriptions and repress CSR to Cgamma and Cepsilon. This mechanism is inactive in the Calpha1/Calpha2 loci because of the lack of SREs in the Ialpha1/Ialpha2 promoters. Accordingly, in resting human IgM+IgD+ B cells, HoxC4, Oct-1, and Ku70/Ku86 can be readily identified as bound to the Igamma and Iepsilon promoters but not the Ialpha1/Ialpha2 promoters. CD40 signaling dissociates the HoxC4.Oct-1. Ku complex from the Igamma and Iepsilon promoter SREs, thereby relieving the IH-CH transcriptional repression and allowing CSR to unfold. Dissociation of HoxC4.Oct-1. Ku from DNA is hampered by CD153 engagement, a CD40-signaling inhibitor. Thus, these findings outline a HoxC4.Oct-1. Ku-dependent mechanism of selective regulation of class switching to IgG and IgE and further suggest distinct co-evolution and shared CSR activation pathways in the Cgamma and Cepsilon as opposed to the Calpha1/Calpha2 loci.

  6. MotifCombinator: a web-based tool to search for combinations of cis-regulatory motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunoda Tatsuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A combination of multiple types of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements is often required for gene expression in eukaryotes, and the combinatorial regulation confers specific gene expression to tissues or environments. To reveal the combinatorial regulation, computational methods are developed that efficiently infer combinations of cis-regulatory motifs that are important for gene expression as measured by DNA microarrays. One promising type of computational method is to utilize regression analysis between expression levels and scores of motifs in input sequences. This type takes full advantage of information on expression levels because it does not require that the expression level of each gene be dichotomized according to whether or not it reaches a certain threshold level. However, there is no web-based tool that employs regression methods to systematically search for motif combinations and that practically handles combinations of more than two or three motifs. Results We here introduced MotifCombinator, an online tool with a user-friendly interface, to systematically search for combinations composed of any number of motifs based on regression methods. The tool utilizes well-known regression methods (the multivariate linear regression, the multivariate adaptive regression spline or MARS, and the multivariate logistic regression method for this purpose, and uses the genetic algorithm to search for combinations composed of any desired number of motifs. The visualization systems in this tool help users to intuitively grasp the process of the combination search, and the backup system allows users to easily stop and restart calculations that are expected to require large computational time. This tool also provides preparatory steps needed for systematic combination search – i.e., selecting single motifs to constitute combinations and cutting out redundant similar motifs based on clustering analysis. Conclusion

  7. Aberrant Expression of Posterior HOX Genes in Well Differentiated Histotypes of Thyroid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Botti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13 in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers.

  8. Antagonism versus cooperativity with TALE cofactors at the base of the functional diversification of Hox protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Rivas

    Full Text Available Extradenticle (Exd and Homothorax (Hth function as positive transcriptional cofactors of Hox proteins, helping them to bind specifically their direct targets. The posterior Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B does not require Exd/Hth to bind DNA; and, during embryogenesis, Abd-B represses hth and exd transcription. Here we show that this repression is necessary for Abd-B function, as maintained Exd/Hth expression results in transformations similar to those observed in loss-of-function Abd-B mutants. We characterize the cis regulatory module directly regulated by Abd-B in the empty spiracles gene and show that the Exd/Hth complex interferes with Abd-B binding to this enhancer. Our results suggest that this novel Exd/Hth function does not require the complex to bind DNA and may be mediated by direct Exd/Hth binding to the Abd-B homeodomain. Thus, in some instances, the main positive cofactor complex for anterior Hox proteins can act as a negative factor for the posterior Hox protein Abd-B. This antagonistic interaction uncovers an alternative way in which MEIS and PBC cofactors can modulate Abd-B like posterior Hox genes during development.

  9. Exact p-value calculation for heterotypic clusters of regulatory motifs and its application in computational annotation of cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roytberg Mikhail A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cis-Regulatory modules (CRMs of eukaryotic genes often contain multiple binding sites for transcription factors. The phenomenon that binding sites form clusters in CRMs is exploited in many algorithms to locate CRMs in a genome. This gives rise to the problem of calculating the statistical significance of the event that multiple sites, recognized by different factors, would be found simultaneously in a text of a fixed length. The main difficulty comes from overlapping occurrences of motifs. So far, no tools have been developed allowing the computation of p-values for simultaneous occurrences of different motifs which can overlap. Results We developed and implemented an algorithm computing the p-value that s different motifs occur respectively k1, ..., ks or more times, possibly overlapping, in a random text. Motifs can be represented with a majority of popular motif models, but in all cases, without indels. Zero or first order Markov chains can be adopted as a model for the random text. The computational tool was tested on the set of cis-regulatory modules involved in D. melanogaster early development, for which there exists an annotation of binding sites for transcription factors. Our test allowed us to correctly identify transcription factors cooperatively/competitively binding to DNA. Method The algorithm that precisely computes the probability of simultaneous motif occurrences is inspired by the Aho-Corasick automaton and employs a prefix tree together with a transition function. The algorithm runs with the O(n|Σ|(m|ℋ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaat0uy0HwzTfgDPnwy1egaryqtHrhAL1wy0L2yHvdaiqaacqWFlecsaaa@3762@| + K|σ|K ∏i ki time complexity, where n is the length of the text, |Σ| is the alphabet size, m is the

  10. Ancient polymorphism and functional variation in the primate MHC-DQA1 5' cis-regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Dagan A; Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2006-10-31

    Precise regulation of MHC gene expression is critical to vertebrate immune surveillance and response. Polymorphisms in the 5' proximal promoter region of the human class II gene HLA-DQA1 have been shown to influence its transcriptional regulation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We investigated the evolutionary history of this cis-regulatory region by sequencing the DQA1 5' proximal promoter region in eight nonhuman primate species. We observed unexpectedly high levels of sequence variation and multiple strong signatures of balancing selection in this region. Specifically, the considerable DQA1 promoter region diversity was characterized by abundant shared (or trans-species) polymorphism and a pronounced lack of fixed differences between species. The majority of transcription factor binding sites in the DQA1 promoter region were polymorphic within species, and these binding site polymorphisms were commonly shared among multiple species despite evidence for negative selection eliminating a significant fraction of binding site mutations. We assessed the functional consequences of intraspecific promoter region diversity using a cell line-based reporter assay and detected significant differences among baboon DQA1 promoter haplotypes in their ability to drive transcription in vitro. The functional differentiation of baboon promoter haplotypes, together with the significant deviations from neutral sequence evolution, suggests a role for balancing selection in the evolution of DQA1 transcriptional regulation in primates.

  11. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  12. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lin; CHEN Zhijuan; XU Mingyu; LIN Shengguo; WANG Lu

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla.The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  13. Network discovery pipeline elucidates conserved time-of-day-specific cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd P Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Correct daily phasing of transcription confers an adaptive advantage to almost all organisms, including higher plants. In this study, we describe a hypothesis-driven network discovery pipeline that identifies biologically relevant patterns in genome-scale data. To demonstrate its utility, we analyzed a comprehensive matrix of time courses interrogating the nuclear transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under different thermocycles, photocycles, and circadian conditions. We show that 89% of Arabidopsis transcripts cycle in at least one condition and that most genes have peak expression at a particular time of day, which shifts depending on the environment. Thermocycles alone can drive at least half of all transcripts critical for synchronizing internal processes such as cell cycle and protein synthesis. We identified at least three distinct transcription modules controlling phase-specific expression, including a new midnight specific module, PBX/TBX/SBX. We validated the network discovery pipeline, as well as the midnight specific module, by demonstrating that the PBX element was sufficient to drive diurnal and circadian condition-dependent expression. Moreover, we show that the three transcription modules are conserved across Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. These results confirm the complex interplay between thermocycles, photocycles, and the circadian clock on the daily transcription program, and provide a comprehensive view of the conserved genomic targets for a transcriptional network key to successful adaptation.

  14. Systematic identification of cis-regulatory sequences active in mouse and human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Grskovic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the transcriptional regulation of pluripotent cells is of fundamental interest and will greatly inform efforts aimed at directing differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells or reprogramming somatic cells. We first analyzed the transcriptional profiles of mouse ES cells and primordial germ cells and identified genes upregulated in pluripotent cells both in vitro and in vivo. These genes are enriched for roles in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and DNA repair. We developed a novel computational algorithm, CompMoby, which combines analyses of sequences both aligned and non-aligned between different genomes with a probabilistic segmentation model to systematically predict short DNA motifs that regulate gene expression. CompMoby was used to identify conserved overrepresented motifs in genes upregulated in pluripotent cells. We show that the motifs are preferentially active in undifferentiated mouse ES and embryonic germ cells in a sequence-specific manner, and that they can act as enhancers in the context of an endogenous promoter. Importantly, the activity of the motifs is conserved in human ES cells. We further show that the transcription factor NF-Y specifically binds to one of the motifs, is differentially expressed during ES cell differentiation, and is required for ES cell proliferation. This study provides novel insights into the transcriptional regulatory networks of pluripotent cells. Our results suggest that this systematic approach can be broadly applied to understanding transcriptional networks in mammalian species.

  15. Interactions between glucocorticoid treatment and cis-regulatory polymorphisms contribute to cellular response phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Maranville

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs mediate physiological responses to environmental stress and are commonly used as pharmaceuticals. GCs act primarily through the GC receptor (GR, a transcription factor. Despite their clear biomedical importance, little is known about the genetic architecture of variation in GC response. Here we provide an initial assessment of variability in the cellular response to GC treatment by profiling gene expression and protein secretion in 114 EBV-transformed B lymphocytes of African and European ancestry. We found that genetic variation affects the response of nearby genes and exhibits distinctive patterns of genotype-treatment interactions, with genotypic effects evident in either only GC-treated or only control-treated conditions. Using a novel statistical framework, we identified interactions that influence the expression of 26 genes known to play central roles in GC-related pathways (e.g. NQO1, AIRE, and SGK1 and that influence the secretion of IL6.

  16. Extensive cis-regulatory variation robust to environmental perturbation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Francisco A; Stegle, Oliver; Grondin, Cécile; Canut, Matthieu; Tisné, Sébastien; Gy, Isabelle; Loudet, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    cis- and trans-acting factors affect gene expression and responses to environmental conditions. However, for most plant systems, we lack a comprehensive map of these factors and their interaction with environmental variation. Here, we examined allele-specific expression (ASE) in an F1 hybrid to study how alleles from two Arabidopsis thaliana accessions affect gene expression. To investigate the effect of the environment, we used drought stress and developed a variance component model to estimate the combined genetic contributions of cis- and trans-regulatory polymorphisms, environmental factors, and their interactions. We quantified ASE for 11,003 genes, identifying 3318 genes with consistent ASE in control and stress conditions, demonstrating that cis-acting genetic effects are essentially robust to changes in the environment. Moreover, we found 1618 genes with genotype x environment (GxE) interactions, mostly cis x E interactions with magnitude changes in ASE. We found fewer trans x E interactions, but these effects were relatively less robust across conditions, showing more changes in the direction of the effect between environments; this confirms that trans-regulation plays an important role in the response to environmental conditions. Our data provide a detailed map of cis- and trans-regulation and GxE interactions in A. thaliana, laying the ground for mechanistic investigations and studies in other plants and environments.

  17. Extensive cis-Regulatory Variation Robust to Environmental Perturbation in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Francisco A.; Stegle, Oliver; Grondin, Cécile; Canut, Matthieu; Tisné, Sébastien; Gy, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    cis- and trans-acting factors affect gene expression and responses to environmental conditions. However, for most plant systems, we lack a comprehensive map of these factors and their interaction with environmental variation. Here, we examined allele-specific expression (ASE) in an F1 hybrid to study how alleles from two Arabidopsis thaliana accessions affect gene expression. To investigate the effect of the environment, we used drought stress and developed a variance component model to estimate the combined genetic contributions of cis- and trans-regulatory polymorphisms, environmental factors, and their interactions. We quantified ASE for 11,003 genes, identifying 3318 genes with consistent ASE in control and stress conditions, demonstrating that cis-acting genetic effects are essentially robust to changes in the environment. Moreover, we found 1618 genes with genotype x environment (GxE) interactions, mostly cis x E interactions with magnitude changes in ASE. We found fewer trans x E interactions, but these effects were relatively less robust across conditions, showing more changes in the direction of the effect between environments; this confirms that trans-regulation plays an important role in the response to environmental conditions. Our data provide a detailed map of cis- and trans-regulation and GxE interactions in A. thaliana, laying the ground for mechanistic investigations and studies in other plants and environments. PMID:25428981

  18. Evidence for the role of transposons in the recruitment of cis-regulatory motifs during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chensi; Xu, Jiajia; Zheng, Guangyong; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-03-08

    C4 photosynthesis evolved from C3 photosynthesis and has higher light, water, and nitrogen use efficiencies. Several C4 photosynthesis genes show cell-specific expression patterns, which are required for these high resource-use efficiencies. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of cis-regulatory elements that control these cell-specific expression patterns remain elusive. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the cis-regulatory motifs related to C4 photosynthesis genes were recruited from non-photosynthetic genes and further examined potential mechanisms facilitating this recruitment. We examined 65 predicted bundle sheath cell-specific motifs, 17 experimentally validated cell-specific cis-regulatory elements, and 1,034 motifs derived from gene regulatory networks. Approximately 7, 5, and 1,000 of these three categories of motifs, respectively, were apparently recruited during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. In addition, we checked 1) the distance between the acceptors and the donors of potentially recruited motifs in a chromosome, and 2) whether the potentially recruited motifs reside within the overlapping region of transposable elements and the promoter of donor genes. The results showed that 7, 4, and 658 of the potentially recruited motifs might have moved via the transposable elements. Furthermore, the potentially recruited motifs showed higher binding affinity to transcription factors compared to randomly generated sequences of the same length as the motifs. This study provides molecular evidence supporting the hypothesis that transposon-driven recruitment of pre-existing cis-regulatory elements from non-photosynthetic genes into photosynthetic genes plays an important role during C4 evolution. The findings of the present study coincide with the observed repetitive emergence of C4 during evolution.

  19. Deletion hotspots in AMACR promoter CpG island are cis-regulatory elements controlling the gene expression in the colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase (AMACR regulates peroxisomal beta-oxidation of phytol-derived, branched-chain fatty acids from red meat and dairy products -- suspected risk factors for colon carcinoma (CCa. AMACR was first found overexpressed in prostate cancer but not in benign glands and is now an established diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. Aberrant expression of AMACR was recently reported in Cca; however, little is known about how this gene is abnormally activated in cancer. By using a panel of immunostained-laser-capture-microdissected clinical samples comprising the entire colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence, we show that deregulation of AMACR during colon carcinogenesis involves two nonrandom events, resulting in the mutually exclusive existence of double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 and deletion of CG12-16 in a newly identified CpG island within the core promoter of AMACR. The double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 was found to be a somatic lesion. It existed in histologically normal colonic glands and tubular adenomas with low AMACR expression and was absent in villous adenomas and all CCas expressing variable levels of AMACR. In contrast, deletion of CG12-16 was shown to be a constitutional allele with a frequency of 43% in a general population. Its prevalence reached 89% in moderately differentiated CCas strongly expressing AMACR but only existed at 14% in poorly differentiated CCas expressing little or no AMACR. The DNA sequences housing these deletions were found to be putative cis-regulatory elements for Sp1 at CG3 and CG10, and ZNF202 at CG12-16. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA knockdown, gel shift assay, ectopic expression, and promoter analyses supported the regulation by Sp1 and ZNF202 of AMACR gene expression in an opposite manner. Our findings identified key in vivo events and novel transcription factors responsible for AMACR regulation in CCas and suggested these AMACR deletions may have diagnostic/prognostic value for

  20. Characterization of the human HOX 7 cDNA and identification of polymorphic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padanilam, B J; Stadler, H S; Mills, K A; McLeod, L B; Solursh, M; Lee, B; Ramirez, F; Buetow, K H; Murray, J C

    1992-09-01

    cDNA clones for a human HOX 7 gene obtained with homologous clones of Drosophila were used in human gene mapping studies. The human cDNA clone was isolated from a library constructed from human embryonic craniofacial material. The sequence of the cDNA demonstrates significant homology with mouse HOX 7. A search for RFLPs identified MboII and BstEII variants. A CA dinucleotide repeat with 5 alleles was also identified and allowed placement of HOX 7 into a defined linkage map. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found with markers tested. These results place the human HOX 7 gene in a defined position on 4p.

  1. SNPs and Hox gene mapping in Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biffali Elio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tunicate Ciona intestinalis (Enterogona, Ascidiacea, a major model system for evolutionary and developmental genetics of chordates, harbours two cryptic species. To assess the degree of intra- and inter-specific genetic variability, we report the identification and analysis of C. intestinalis SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism markers. A SNP subset was used to determine the genetic distance between Hox-5 and -10 genes. Results DNA fragments were amplified from 12 regions of C. intestinalis sp. A. In total, 128 SNPs and 32 one bp indels have been identified within 8 Kb DNA. SNPs in coding regions cause 4 synonymous and 12 non-synonymous substitutions. The highest SNP frequency was detected in the Hox5 and Hox10 intragenic regions. In C. intestinalis, these two genes have lost their archetypal topology within the cluster, such that Hox10 is located between Hox4 and Hox5. A subset of the above primers was used to perform successful amplification in C. intestinalis sp. B. In this cryptic species, 62 SNPs were identified within 3614 bp: 41 in non-coding and 21 in coding regions. The genetic distance of the Hox-5 and -10 loci, computed combining a classical backcross approach with the application of SNP markers, was found to be 8.4 cM (Haldane's function. Based on the physical distance, 1 cM corresponds to 39.5 Kb. Linkage disequilibrium between the aforementioned loci was calculated in the backcross generation. Conclusion SNPs here described allow analysis and comparisons within and between C. intestinalis cryptic species. We provide the first reliable computation of genetic distance in this important model chordate. This latter result represents an important platform for future studies on Hox genes showing deviations from the archetypal topology.

  2. JAK/STAT and Hox Dynamic Interactions in an Organogenetic Gene Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro B Pinto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organogenesis is controlled by gene networks activated by upstream selector genes. During development the gene network is activated stepwise, with a sequential deployment of successive transcription factors and signalling molecules that modify the interaction of the elements of the network as the organ forms. Very little is known about the steps leading from the early specification of the cells that form the organ primordium to the moment when a robust gene network is in place. Here we study in detail how a Hox protein induces during early embryogenesis a simple organogenetic cascade that matures into a complex gene network through the activation of feedback and feed forward interaction loops. To address how the network organization changes during development and how the target genes integrate the genetic information it provides, we analyze in Drosophila the induction of posterior spiracle organogenesis by the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B. Initially, Abd-B activates in the spiracle primordium a cascade of transcription factors and signalling molecules including the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. We find that at later stages STAT activity feeds back directly into Abd-B, initiating the transformation of the Hox cascade into a gene-network. Focusing on crumbs, a spiracle downstream target gene of Abd-B, we analyze how a modular cis regulatory element integrates the dynamic network information set by Abd-B and the JAK/STAT signalling pathway during development. We describe how a Hox induced genetic cascade transforms into a robust gene network during organogenesis due to the repeated interaction of Abd-B and one of its targets, the JAK/STAT signalling cascade. Our results show that in this network STAT functions not just as a direct transcription factor, but also acts as a "counter-repressor", uncovering a novel mode for STAT directed transcriptional regulation.

  3. JAK/STAT and Hox Dynamic Interactions in an Organogenetic Gene Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro B.; Espinosa-Vázquez, Jose Manuel; Rivas, María Luísa; Hombría, James Castelli-Gair

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis is controlled by gene networks activated by upstream selector genes. During development the gene network is activated stepwise, with a sequential deployment of successive transcription factors and signalling molecules that modify the interaction of the elements of the network as the organ forms. Very little is known about the steps leading from the early specification of the cells that form the organ primordium to the moment when a robust gene network is in place. Here we study in detail how a Hox protein induces during early embryogenesis a simple organogenetic cascade that matures into a complex gene network through the activation of feedback and feed forward interaction loops. To address how the network organization changes during development and how the target genes integrate the genetic information it provides, we analyze in Drosophila the induction of posterior spiracle organogenesis by the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Initially, Abd-B activates in the spiracle primordium a cascade of transcription factors and signalling molecules including the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. We find that at later stages STAT activity feeds back directly into Abd-B, initiating the transformation of the Hox cascade into a gene-network. Focusing on crumbs, a spiracle downstream target gene of Abd-B, we analyze how a modular cis regulatory element integrates the dynamic network information set by Abd-B and the JAK/STAT signalling pathway during development. We describe how a Hox induced genetic cascade transforms into a robust gene network during organogenesis due to the repeated interaction of Abd-B and one of its targets, the JAK/STAT signalling cascade. Our results show that in this network STAT functions not just as a direct transcription factor, but also acts as a "counter-repressor", uncovering a novel mode for STAT directed transcriptional regulation. PMID:26230388

  4. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin.

  5. Evolution of echinoderms may not have required modification of the ancestral deuterostome HOX gene cluster: first report of PG4 and PG5 Hox orthologues in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne; Martinez, Pedro; Chen, Wei-Chung; Thorndyke, Michael; Byrne, Maria

    2003-11-01

    Is the extreme derivation of the echinoderm body plan reflected in a derived echinoderm Hox genotype? Building on previous work, we exploited the sequence conservation of the homeobox to isolate putative orthologues of several Hox genes from two asteroid echinoderms. The 5-peptide motif (LPNTK) diagnostic of PG4 Hox genes was identified immediately downstream of one of the partial homeodomains from Patiriella exigua. This constitutes the first unequivocal report of a PG4 Hox gene orthologue from an echinoderm. Subsequent screenings identified genes of both PG4 and PG4/5 in Asterias rubens. Although in echinoids only a single gene (PG4/5) occupies these two contiguous cluster positions, we conclude that the ancestral echinoderm must have had the complete deuterostome suite of medial Hox genes, including orthologues of both PG4 and PG4/5 (=PG5). The reported absence of PG4 in the HOX cluster of echinoids is therefore a derived state, and the ancestral echinoderm probably had a HOX cluster not dissimilar to that of other deuterostomes. Modification of the ancestral deuterostome Hox genotype may not have been required for evolution of the highly derived echinoderm body plan.

  6. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  7. Hox in hair growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2003-05-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Hox gene family of transcriptional regulators has originally been known for specifying positional identities along the longitudinal body axis of bilateral metazoans, including mouse and man. It is believed that subsequent to this archaic role, subsets of Hox genes have been co-opted for patterning functions in phylogenetically more recent structures, such as limbs and epithelial appendages. Among these, the hair follicle is of particular interest, as it is the only organ undergoing cyclical phases of regression and regeneration during the entire life span of an organism. Furthermore, the hair follicle is increasingly capturing the attention of developmental geneticists, as this abundantly available miniature organ mimics key aspects of embryonic patterning and, in addition, presents a model for studying organ renewal. The first Hox gene shown to play a universal role in hair follicle development is Hoxc13, as both Hoxc13-deficient and overexpressing mice exhibit severe hair growth and patterning defects. Differential gene expression analyses in the skin of these mutants, as well as in vitro DNA binding studies performed with potential targets for HOXC13 transcriptional regulation in human hair, identified genes encoding hair-specific keratins and keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) as major groups of presumptive Hoxc13 downstream effectors in the control of hair growth. The Hoxc13 mutant might thus serve as a paradigm for studying hair-specific roles of Hoxc13 and other members of this gene family, whose distinct spatio-temporally restricted expression patterns during hair development and cycling suggest discrete functions in follicular patterning and hair cycle control. The main conclusion from a discussion of these potential roles vis-à-vis current expression data in mouse and man, and from the perspective of the results obtained with the Hoxc13 transgenic models, is that members of the Hox family are likely to fulfill essential roles

  8. Rearrangements of 2.5 kilobases of noncoding DNA from the Drosophila even-skipped locus define predictive rules of genomic cis-regulatory logic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah-Ram Kim

    Full Text Available Rearrangements of about 2.5 kilobases of regulatory DNA located 5' of the transcription start site of the Drosophila even-skipped locus generate large-scale changes in the expression of even-skipped stripes 2, 3, and 7. The most radical effects are generated by juxtaposing the minimal stripe enhancers MSE2 and MSE3 for stripes 2 and 3 with and without small "spacer" segments less than 360 bp in length. We placed these fusion constructs in a targeted transformation site and obtained quantitative expression data for these transformants together with their controlling transcription factors at cellular resolution. These data demonstrated that the rearrangements can alter expression levels in stripe 2 and the 2-3 interstripe by a factor of more than 10. We reasoned that this behavior would place tight constraints on possible rules of genomic cis-regulatory logic. To find these constraints, we confronted our new expression data together with previously obtained data on other constructs with a computational model. The model contained representations of thermodynamic protein-DNA interactions including steric interference and cooperative binding, short-range repression, direct repression, activation, and coactivation. The model was highly constrained by the training data, which it described within the limits of experimental error. The model, so constrained, was able to correctly predict expression patterns driven by enhancers for other Drosophila genes; even-skipped enhancers not included in the training set; stripe 2, 3, and 7 enhancers from various Drosophilid and Sepsid species; and long segments of even-skipped regulatory DNA that contain multiple enhancers. The model further demonstrated that elevated expression driven by a fusion of MSE2 and MSE3 was a consequence of the recruitment of a portion of MSE3 to become a functional component of MSE2, demonstrating that cis-regulatory "elements" are not elementary objects.

  9. Network-Based Integration of GWAS and Gene Expression Identifies a HOX-Centric Network Associated with Serous Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kar, S.P.; Tyrer, J.P.; Li, Q.; Lawrenson, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Baker, H.; Bandera, E.V.; Bean, Y.T.; Beckmann, M.W.; Berchuck, A.; Bisogna, M.; Bjorge, L.; Bogdanova, N.; Brinton, L.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.; Carty, K.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chen, Y.A.; Chen, Z.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.; Cunningham, J.M.; Cybulski, C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Durst, M.; Eccles, D.; Easton, D.F.; Edwards, R.P.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Gao, Y.T.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.G.; Glasspool, R.; Goode, E.L.; Goodman, M.T.; Grownwald, J.; Harrington, P.; Harter, P.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Hillemanns, P.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.K.; Hosono, S.; Iversen, E.S.; Jakubowska, A.; Paul, J.; Jensen, A.; Ji, B.T.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kjaer, S.K.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kellar, M.; Kelley, J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Krakstad, C.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, A.W.; Lele, S.; Leminen, A.; Lester, J.; Levine, D.A.; Liang, D.; Lissowska, J.; Lu, K.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Massuger, L.F.; Matsuo, K.; McGuire, V.; McLaughlin, J.R.; McNeish, I.A.; Menon, U.; Modugno, F.; Moysich, K.B.; Narod, S.A.; Nedergaard, L.; Ness, R.B.; Nevanlinna, H.; Odunsi, K.; Olson, S.H.; Orlow, I.; Orsulic, S.; Weber, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified by co

  10. Hox genes from the Polystomatidae (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badets, Mathieu; Verneau, Olivier

    2009-11-01

    Hox genes form a multigenic family that play a fundamental role during the early stages of development. They are organised in a single cluster and share a 60 amino acid conserved sequence that corresponds to the DNA binding domain, i.e. the homeodomain. Sequence conservation in this region has allowed investigators to explore Hox diversity in the metazoan lineages. Within parasitic flatworms only homeobox sequences of parasite species from the Cestoda and Digenea have been reported. In the present study we surveyed species of the Polyopisthocotylea (Monogenea) in order to clarify Hox identification and diversification processes in the neodermatan lineage. From cloning of degenerative PCR products of the central region of the homeobox, we report one ParaHox and 25 new Hox sequences from 10 species of the Polystomatidae and one species of the Diclidophoridae, which extend Hox gene diversity from 46 to 72 within Neodermata. Hox sequences from the Polyopisthocotylea were annotated and classified from sequence alignments and Bayesian inferences of 178 Hox, ParaHox and related gene families recovered from all available parasitic platyhelminths and other bilaterian taxa. Our results are discussed in the light of the recent Hox evolutionary schemes. They may provide new perspectives to study the transition from turbellarians to parasitic flatworms with complex life-cycles and outline the first steps for evolutionary developmental biological approaches within platyhelminth parasites.

  11. Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus Milii) Provides Insights into the Evolution of Hox Gene Clusters in Gnathostomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vydianathan Ravi; Kevin Lam; Boon-Hui Tay; Alice Tay; Sydney Brenner; Byrappa Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    ...., 2 rounds of wholegenome duplication during the early evolution of vertebrates). Comparisons of noncoding sequences of the elephant shark and human Hox clusters have identified a large number of conserved noncoding elements (CNEs...

  12. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  13. HOX and TALE signatures specify human stromal stem cell populations from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchi, Jacopo; Trombi, Luisa; Spugnesi, Laura; Barachini, Serena; Maroni, Giorgia; Brodano, Giovanni Barbanti; Boriani, Stefano; Valtieri, Mauro; Petrini, Mario; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Human stromal stem cell populations reside in different tissues and anatomical sites, however a critical question related to their efficient use in regenerative medicine is whether they exhibit equivalent biological properties. Here, we compared cellular and molecular characteristics of stromal stem cells derived from the bone marrow, at different body sites (iliac crest, sternum, and vertebrae) and other tissues (dental pulp and colon). In particular, we investigated whether homeobox genes of the HOX and TALE subfamilies might provide suitable markers to identify distinct stromal cell populations, as HOX proteins control cell positional identity and, together with their co-factors TALE, are involved in orchestrating differentiation of adult tissues. Our results show that stromal populations from different sources, although immunophenotypically similar, display distinct HOX and TALE signatures, as well as different growth and differentiation abilities. Stromal stem cells from different tissues are characterized by specific HOX profiles, differing in the number and type of active genes, as well as in their level of expression. Conversely, bone marrow-derived cell populations can be essentially distinguished for the expression levels of specific HOX members, strongly suggesting that quantitative differences in HOX activity may be crucial. Taken together, our data indicate that the HOX and TALE profiles provide positional, embryological and hierarchical identity of human stromal stem cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that cell populations derived from different body sites may not represent equivalent cell sources for cell-based therapeutical strategies for regeneration and repair of specific tissues.

  14. Cis-regulatory element-based genome-wide identification of DREB1/CBF targets in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Zhao; Weizhong Liu; Yong Hu; Xianglin Liu; Yikun He

    2008-01-01

    Microarray analysis is used to identify transcriptional targets.However,the direct targets of transcription factors cannot be distin guished from indirect ones;further,genes with low-expression levels cannot be identified by this method.In the present study,we exploi the cis-element dehydration-responsive element(DRE)that is known to be responsible for the transcription of DRE binding factor](DREB1)targets in the promoter region of all Arabidopsis genes.Putative targets whose promoters contain the elements were verified by both microarray and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)analysis.Five new DREB 1/CBF direct targets were identified.Compared with traditional microarray analysis,our method is convenient and cost-effective for identifying the downstream targets of transcription factors.

  15. Anterior Hox Genes in Cardiac Development and Great Artery Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Laforest

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During early development, the heart tube grows by progressive addition of progenitor cells to the arterial and venous poles. These cardiac progenitor cells, originally identified in 2001, are located in the splanchnic mesoderm in a region termed the second heart field (SHF. Since its discovery, our view of heart development has been refined and it is well established that perturbation in the addition of SHF cells results in a spectrum of congenital heart defects. We have previously shown that anterior Hox genes, including Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3, are expressed in distinct subdomains of the SHF that contribute to atrial and subpulmonary myocardium. It is well known that Hox proteins exert their function through interaction with members of the TALE family, including Pbx and Meis factors. The expression profile of Pbx and Meis factors overlaps with that of anterior Hox factors in the embryonic heart, and recent data suggest that they may interact together during cardiac development. This review aims to bring together recent findings in vertebrates that strongly suggest an important function for Hox, Pbx and Meis factors in heart development and disease.

  16. The evolution of HoxD-11 expression in the bird wing: insights from Alligator mississippiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O Vargas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comparative morphology identifies the digits of the wing of birds as 1,2 and 3, but they develop at embryological positions that become digits 2, 3 and 4 in other amniotes. A hypothesis to explain this is that a homeotic frame shift of digital identity occurred in the evolution of the bird wing, such that digits 1,2 and 3 are developing from embryological positions 2, 3 and 4. Digit 1 of the mouse is the only digit that shows no late expression of HoxD-11. This is also true for the anterior digit of the bird wing, suggesting this digit is actually a digit 1. If this is the case, we can expect closer relatives of birds to show no HoxD-11 expression only in digit 1. To test this prediction we investigate HoxD-11 expression in crocodilians, the closest living relatives of birds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using degenerate primers we cloned a 606 nucleotide fragment of exon 1 of the alligator HoxD-11 gene and used it for whole-mount in-situ detection in alligator embryos. We found that in the pentadactyl forelimbs of alligator, as in the mouse, late expression of HoxD-11 is absent only in digit 1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ancestral condition for amniotes is that late-phase HoxD-11 expression is absent only in digit 1. The biphalangeal morphology and lack of HoxD-11 expression of the anterior digit of the wing is like digit 1 of alligator and mouse, but its embryological position as digit 2 is derived. HoxD-11 expression in alligator is consistent with the hypothesis that both digit morphology as well as HoxD-11 expression are shifted towards posterior in the bird wing.

  17. The Evolution of HoxD-11 Expression in the Bird Wing: Insights from Alligator mississippiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alexander O.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Fallon, John F.; VandenBrooks, John; Wagner, Günter P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative morphology identifies the digits of the wing of birds as 1,2 and 3, but they develop at embryological positions that become digits 2, 3 and 4 in other amniotes. A hypothesis to explain this is that a homeotic frame shift of digital identity occurred in the evolution of the bird wing, such that digits 1,2 and 3 are developing from embryological positions 2, 3 and 4. Digit 1 of the mouse is the only digit that shows no late expression of HoxD-11. This is also true for the anterior digit of the bird wing, suggesting this digit is actually a digit 1. If this is the case, we can expect closer relatives of birds to show no HoxD-11 expression only in digit 1. To test this prediction we investigate HoxD-11 expression in crocodilians, the closest living relatives of birds. Methodology/Principal Findings Using degenerate primers we cloned a 606 nucleotide fragment of exon 1 of the alligator HoxD-11 gene and used it for whole-mount in-situ detection in alligator embryos. We found that in the pentadactyl forelimbs of alligator, as in the mouse, late expression of HoxD-11 is absent only in digit 1. Conclusions/Significance The ancestral condition for amniotes is that late-phase HoxD-11 expression is absent only in digit 1. The biphalangeal morphology and lack of HoxD-11 expression of the anterior digit of the wing is like digit 1 of alligator and mouse, but its embryological position as digit 2 is derived. HoxD-11 expression in alligator is consistent with the hypothesis that both digit morphology as well as HoxD-11 expression are shifted towards posterior in the bird wing. PMID:18833328

  18. A cis-regulatory mutation in troponin-I of Drosophila reveals the importance of proper stoichiometry of structural proteins during muscle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Hena; Mohan, Jayaram; Naz, Sarwat; Arathi, Prabhashankar; Ramesh, Saraf R; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2015-05-01

    Rapid and high wing-beat frequencies achieved during insect flight are powered by the indirect flight muscles, the largest group of muscles present in the thorax. Any anomaly during the assembly and/or structural impairment of the indirect flight muscles gives rise to a flightless phenotype. Multiple mutagenesis screens in Drosophila melanogaster for defective flight behavior have led to the isolation and characterization of mutations that have been instrumental in the identification of many proteins and residues that are important for muscle assembly, function, and disease. In this article, we present a molecular-genetic characterization of a flightless mutation, flightless-H (fliH), originally designated as heldup-a (hdp-a). We show that fliH is a cis-regulatory mutation of the wings up A (wupA) gene, which codes for the troponin-I protein, one of the troponin complex proteins, involved in regulation of muscle contraction. The mutation leads to reduced levels of troponin-I transcript and protein. In addition to this, there is also coordinated reduction in transcript and protein levels of other structural protein isoforms that are part of the troponin complex. The altered transcript and protein stoichiometry ultimately culminates in unregulated acto-myosin interactions and a hypercontraction muscle phenotype. Our results shed new insights into the importance of maintaining the stoichiometry of structural proteins during muscle assembly for proper function with implications for the identification of mutations and disease phenotypes in other species, including humans.

  19. Combining computational prediction of cis-regulatory elements with a new enhancer assay to efficiently label neuronal structures in the medaka fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mongin

    Full Text Available The developing vertebrate nervous system contains a remarkable array of neural cells organized into complex, evolutionarily conserved structures. The labeling of living cells in these structures is key for the understanding of brain development and function, yet the generation of stable lines expressing reporter genes in specific spatio-temporal patterns remains a limiting step. In this study we present a fast and reliable pipeline to efficiently generate a set of stable lines expressing a reporter gene in multiple neuronal structures in the developing nervous system in medaka. The pipeline combines both the accurate computational genome-wide prediction of neuronal specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and a newly developed experimental setup to rapidly obtain transgenic lines in a cost-effective and highly reproducible manner. 95% of the CRMs tested in our experimental setup show enhancer activity in various and numerous neuronal structures belonging to all major brain subdivisions. This pipeline represents a significant step towards the dissection of embryonic neuronal development in vertebrates.

  20. Powerful identification of cis-regulatory SNPs in human primary monocytes using allele-specific gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers.

  1. Chordate Hox and ParaHox gene clusters differ dramatically in their repetitive element content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Peter W; Ferrier, David E K

    2010-02-01

    The ParaHox and Hox gene clusters control aspects of animal anterior-posterior development and are related as paralogous evolutionary sisters. Despite this relationship, it is not clear if the clusters operate in similar ways, with similar constraints. To compare clusters, we examined the transposable-element (TE) content of amphioxus and mammalian ParaHox and Hox clusters. Chordate Hox clusters are known to be largely devoid of TEs, possibly due to gene regulation and constraints on clustering in these animals. Here, we describe several novel amphioxus TEs and show that the amphioxus ParaHox cluster is a hotspot for TE insertion. TE contents of mammalian ParaHox loci are at background levels, in stark contrast to chordate Hox clusters. This marks a significant difference between Hox and ParaHox clusters. The presence of so many potentially disruptive elements implies selection constrains these ParaHox clusters as they have not dispersed despite 500 My of evolution for each lineage.

  2. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Yoav; Nitzan, Noa; Furley, Andrew J W; Kozlov, Serguei V; Klar, Avihu

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1) and Neurofascin (Nfasc) are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  3. Properties of non-coding DNA and identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Theileria parva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Xiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites in the genus Theileria cause lymphoproliferative diseases in cattle, resulting in enormous socio-economic losses. The availability of the genome sequences and annotation for T. parva and T. annulata has facilitated the study of parasite biology and their relationship with host cell transformation and tropism. However, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation in this genus, which may be key to understanding fundamental aspects of its parasitology, remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyze the evolution of non-coding sequences in the Theileria genome and identify conserved sequence elements that may be involved in gene regulation of these parasitic species. Results Intergenic regions and introns in Theileria are short, and their length distributions are considerably right-skewed. Intergenic regions flanked by genes in 5'-5' orientation tend to be longer and slightly more AT-rich than those flanked by two stop codons; intergenic regions flanked by genes in 3'-5' orientation have intermediate values of length and AT composition. Intron position is negatively correlated with intron length, and positively correlated with GC content. Using stringent criteria, we identified a set of high-quality orthologous non-coding sequences between T. parva and T. annulata, and determined the distribution of selective constraints across regions, which are shown to be higher close to translation start sites. A positive correlation between constraint and length in both intergenic regions and introns suggests a tight control over length expansion of non-coding regions. Genome-wide searches for functional elements revealed several conserved motifs in intergenic regions of Theileria genomes. Two such motifs are preferentially located within the first 60 base pairs upstream of transcription start sites in T. parva, are preferentially associated with specific protein functional categories, and have significant similarity to know

  4. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Hadas

    Full Text Available Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1 and Neurofascin (Nfasc are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  5. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4.

  6. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Rahul; Beer, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix) rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  7. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Karnik

    Full Text Available The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  8. The Hox gene complement of acoel flatworms, a basal bilaterian clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Charles E; Jiménez, Eva; Akam, Michael; Saló, Emili

    2004-01-01

    Several molecular data sets suggest that acoelomorph flatworms are not members of the phylum Platyhelminthes but form a separate branch of the Metazoa that diverged from all other bilaterian animals before the separation of protostomes and deuterostomes. Here we examine the Hox gene complement of the acoel flatworms. In two distantly related acoel taxa, we identify only three distinct classes of Hox gene: an anterior gene, a posterior gene, and a central class gene most similar to genes of Hox classes 4 and 5 in other Bilateria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes, together with the acoel caudal homologue, supports the basal position of the acoels. The similar gene sets found in two distantly related acoels suggest that this reduced gene complement may be ancestral in the acoels and that the acoels may have diverged from other bilaterians before elaboration of the 8- to 10-gene Hox cluster that characterizes most bilaterians.

  9. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  10. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  11. HOX genes in the skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Mei; LI Qing-feng; ZHANG Feng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Deep skin wounds heal by scar formation with a loss of its original appearance, structure and function.However, when the same damage occurs to the skin of an early gestational fetus, complete regeneration can be observed. Despite significant research in the field of skin regeneration, many mysteries remain, such as the loss of wound healing ability with maturity, the differences in healing at different parts of the body, and the presence of hypertrophic scars and keloids in some races but not in others. The finding of HOX genes in the skin provides new explanations to these conundrums.

  12. Rice Homeobox Transcription Factor HOX1a Positively Regulates Gibberellin Responses by Directly Suppressing EL1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-Qing Wen; Mei-Qing Xing; Hua Zhang Cheng Dai; Hong-Wei Xue

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors are involved in various aspects of plant development,including maintenance of the biosynthesis and signaling pathways of different hormones.However,few direct targets of homeobox proteins have been identified.We here show that overexpression of rice homeobox gene HOX1a resulted in enhanced gibberellin (GA) response,indicating a positive effect of HOX1a in GA signaling.HOX1a is induced by GA and encodes a homeobox transcription factor with transcription repression activity.In addition,HOX1a suppresses the transcription of early flowering1 (EL1),a negative regulator of GA signaling,and further electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that HOX1a directly bound to the promoter region of EL1 to suppress its expression and stimulate GA signaling.These results demonstrate that HOX1a functions as a positive regulator of GA signaling by suppressing EL1,providing informative hints on the study of GA signaling.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells from different organs are characterized by distinct topographic Hox codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackema, Karin B; Charité, Jeroen

    2008-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent cells found as part of the stromal compartment of the bone marrow and in many other organs. They can be identified in vitro as CFU-F (colony forming unit-fibroblast) based on their ability to form adherent colonies of fibroblast-like cells in culture. MSC expanded in vitro retain characteristics appropriate to their tissue of origin. This is reflected in their propensity for differentiating towards specific lineages, and their capacity to generate, upon retransplantation in vivo, a stroma supporting typical lineages of hematopoietic cells. Hox genes encode master regulators of regional specification and organ development in the embryo and are widely expressed in the adult. We investigated whether they could be involved in determining tissue-specific properties of MSC. Hox gene expression profiles of individual CFU-F colonies derived from various organs and anatomical locations were generated, and the relatedness between these profiles was determined using hierarchical cluster analysis. This revealed that CFU-F have characteristic Hox expression signatures that are heterogeneous but highly specific for their anatomical origin. The topographic specificity of these Hox codes is maintained during differentiation, suggesting that they are an intrinsic property of MSC. Analysis of Hox codes of CFU-F from vertebral bone marrow suggests that MSC originate over a large part of the anterioposterior axis, but may not originate from prevertebral mesenchyme. These data are consistent with a role for Hox proteins in specifying cellular identity of MSC.

  14. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  15. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  16. HoxA-11 and FOXO1A cooperate to regulate decidual prolactin expression: towards inferring the core transcriptional regulators of decidual genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the menstrual cycle, the ovarian steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone control a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs leading to a receptive state for blastocyst implantation and the establishment of pregnancy. A key marker gene of this decidualization process is the prolactin gene. Several transcriptional regulators have been identified that are essential for decidualization of ESCs, including the Hox genes HoxA-10 and HoxA-11, and the forkhead box gene FOXO1A. While previous studies have identified downstream target genes for HoxA-10 and FOXO1A, the role of HoxA-11 in decidualization has not been investigated. Here, we show that HoxA-11 is required for prolactin expression in decidualized ESC. While HoxA-11 alone is a repressor on the decidual prolactin promoter, it turns into an activator when combined with FOXO1A. Conversely, HoxA-10, which has been previously shown to associate with FOXO1A to upregulate decidual IGFBP-1 expression, is unable to upregulate PRL expression when co-expressed with FOXO1A. By co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate physical association of HoxA-11 and FOXO1A, and binding of both factors to an enhancer region (-395 to -148 relative to the PRL transcriptional start site of the decidual prolactin promoter. Because FOXO1A is induced upon decidualization, it serves to assemble a decidual-specific transcriptional complex including HoxA-11. These data highlight cooperativity between numerous transcription factors to upregulate PRL in differentiating ESC, and suggest that this core set of transcription factors physically and functionally interact to drive the expression of a gene battery upregulated in differentiated ESC. In addition, the functional non-equivalence of HoxA-11 and HoxA-10 with respect to PRL regulation suggests that these transcription factors regulate distinct sets of target genes during decidualization.

  17. Zebrafish hox clusters and vertebrate genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, A; Force, A; Yan, Y L; Joly, L; Amemiya, C; Fritz, A; Ho, R K; Langeland, J; Prince, V; Wang, Y L; Westerfield, M; Ekker, M; Postlethwait, J H

    1998-11-27

    HOX genes specify cell fate in the anterior-posterior axis of animal embryos. Invertebrate chordates have one HOX cluster, but mammals have four, suggesting that cluster duplication facilitated the evolution of vertebrate body plans. This report shows that zebrafish have seven hox clusters. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic mapping suggest a chromosome doubling event, probably by whole genome duplication, after the divergence of ray-finned and lobe-finned fishes but before the teleost radiation. Thus, teleosts, the most species-rich group of vertebrates, appear to have more copies of these developmental regulatory genes than do mammals, despite less complexity in the anterior-posterior axis.

  18. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  19. Extreme conservation of noncoding DNA near HoxD complex of vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Anshuman

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeotic gene complexes determine the anterior-posterior body axis in animals. The expression pattern and function of hox genes along this axis is colinear with the order in which they are organized in the complex. This 'chromosomal organization and functional correspondence' is conserved in all bilaterians investigated. Genomic sequences covering the HoxD complex from several vertebrate species are now available. This offers a comparative genomics approach to identify conserved regions linked to this complex. Although the molecular basis of 'colinearity' of Hox complexes is not yet understood, it is possible that there are control elements within or in the proximity of these complexes that establish and maintain the expression patterns of hox genes in a coordinated fashion. Results We have compared DNA sequence flanking the HoxD complex of several primate, rodent and fish species. This analysis revealed an unprecedented conservation of non-coding DNA sequences adjacent to the HoxD complex from fish to human. Stretches of hundreds of base pairs in a 7 kb region, upstream of HoxD complex, show 100% conservation across the vertebrate species. Using PCR primers from the human sequence, these conserved regions could be amplified from other vertebrate species, including other mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Our analysis of these sequences also indicates that starting from the conserved core regions, more sequences have been added on and maintained during evolution from fish to human. Conclusion Such a high degree of conservation in the core regions of this 7 kb DNA, where no variation occurred during ~500 million years of evolution, suggests critical function for these sequences. We suggest that such sequences are likely to provide molecular handle to gain insight into the evolution and mechanism of regulation of associated gene complexes.

  20. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette

    2010-01-01

    have been reported in ZRS, the underlying regulatory mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the effect on transcription factor binding of a novel ZRS point mutation (463T>G) in a Pakistani family with preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumb. Electrophoretical mobility shift assay......A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects...

  1. Japanese medaka Hox paralog group 2: insights into the evolution of Hox PG2 gene composition and expression in the Osteichthyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adam; Scemama, Jean-Luc; Stellwag, Edmund J

    2008-12-15

    Hox paralog group 2 (PG2) genes function to specify the development of the hindbrain and pharyngeal arch-derived structures in the Osteichthyes. In this article, we describe the cDNA cloning and embryonic expression analysis of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) Hox PG2 genes. We show that there are only two functional canonical Hox genes, hoxa2a and b2a, and that a previously identified hoxa2b gene is a transcribed pseudogene, psihoxa2b. The functional genes, hoxa2a and b2a, were expressed in developing rhombomeres and pharyngeal arches in a manner that was relatively well conserved compared with zebrafish (Danio rerio) but differed significantly from orthologous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genes, which, we suggest, may be owing to effects of post-genome duplication loss of a Hox PG2 gene in the medaka and zebrafish lineages. psihoxa2b was expressed at readily detectable levels in several noncanonical Hox expression domains, including the ventral aspect of the neural tube, the pectoral fin buds and caudal-most region of the embryonic trunk, indicative that regulatory control elements needed for spatio-temporal expression have diverged from their ancestral counterparts. Comparative expression analyses showed medaka hoxa2a and b2a expression in the 2nd pharyngeal arch (PA2) beyond the onset of chondrogenesis, which, according to previous hypotheses, suggests these genes function redundantly as selector genes of PA2 identity. We conclude that Hox PG2 gene composition and expression have diverged significantly during osteichthyan evolution and that this divergence in teleosts may be related to lineage-dependent differential gene loss following an actinopterygian-specific whole genome duplication.

  2. HOX genes: Major actors in resistance to selective endocrine response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kideok; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2016-04-01

    Long term treatment with therapies aimed at blocking the estrogen- (ER) or androgen receptor (AR) action often leads to the development of resistance to selective modulators of the estrogen receptor (SERMs) in ERα-positive breast cancer, or of the androgen receptor (SARMs) in AR-positive prostate cancer. Many underlying molecular events that confer resistance are known, but a unifying theme is yet to be revealed. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such EGFR, ERBB2 and IGF1R are major mediators that can directly alter cellular response to the SERM, tamoxifen, but the mechanisms underlying increased expression of RTKs are not clear. A number of HOX genes and microRNAs and non-coding RNAs residing in the HOX cluster, have been identified as important independent predictors of endocrine resistant breast cancer. Recently, convincing evidence has accumulated that several members belonging to the four different HOX clusters contribute to endocrine therapy resistant breast cancer, but the mechanisms remain obscure. In this article, we have reviewed recent progress in understanding of the functioning of HOX genes and regulation of their expression by hormones. We also discuss, in particular, the contributions of several members of the HOX gene family to endocrine resistant breast cancer.

  3. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Pace

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. Results In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. Conclusions The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to

  4. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  5. Hox genes pattern the anterior-posterior axis of the juvenile but not the larva in a maximally indirect developing invertebrate, Micrura alaskensis (Nemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Laurel S; Maslakova, Svetlana A

    2015-04-11

    The pilidium larva is a novel body plan that arose within a single clade in the phylum Nemertea - the Pilidiophora. While the sister clade of the Pilidiophora and the basal nemerteans develop directly, pilidiophorans have a long-lived planktotrophic larva with a body plan distinctly different from that of the juvenile. Uniquely, the pilidiophoran juvenile develops inside the larva from several discrete rudiments. The orientation of the juvenile with respect to the larval body varies within the Pilidiophora, which suggests that the larval and juvenile anteroposterior (AP) axes are patterned differently. In order to gain insight into the evolutionary origins of the pilidium larva and the mechanisms underlying this implied axial uncoupling, we examined the expression of the Hox genes during development of the pilidiophoran Micrura alaskensis. We identified sequences of nine Hox genes and the ParaHox gene caudal through a combination of transcriptome analysis and molecular cloning, and determined their expression pattern during development using in situ hybridization in whole-mounted larvae. We found that Hox genes are first expressed long after the pilidium is fully formed and functional. The Hox genes are expressed in apparently overlapping domains along the AP axis of the developing juvenile in a subset of the rudiments that give rise to the juvenile trunk. Hox genes are not expressed in the larval body at any stage of development. While the Hox genes pattern the juvenile pilidiophoran, the pilidial body, which appears to be an evolutionary novelty, must be patterned by some mechanism other than the Hox genes. Although the pilidiophoran juvenile develops from separate rudiments with no obvious relationship to the embryonic formation of the larva, the Hox genes appear to exhibit canonical expression along the juvenile AP axis. This suggests that the Hox patterning system can maintain conserved function even when widely decoupled from early polarity established in the

  6. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin

    2011-01-01

    -coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also...

  7. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liang

    Full Text Available Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  8. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Shen, Yong-Yi; Pan, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Tai-Cheng; Yang, Chao; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises) are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii) and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus) for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  9. Evolution of coding and non-coding genes in HOX clusters of a marsupial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hongshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HOX gene clusters are thought to be highly conserved amongst mammals and other vertebrates, but the long non-coding RNAs have only been studied in detail in human and mouse. The sequencing of the kangaroo genome provides an opportunity to use comparative analyses to compare the HOX clusters of a mammal with a distinct body plan to those of other mammals. Results Here we report a comparative analysis of HOX gene clusters between an Australian marsupial of the kangaroo family and the eutherians. There was a strikingly high level of conservation of HOX gene sequence and structure and non-protein coding genes including the microRNAs miR-196a, miR-196b, miR-10a and miR-10b and the long non-coding RNAs HOTAIR, HOTAIRM1 and HOXA11AS that play critical roles in regulating gene expression and controlling development. By microRNA deep sequencing and comparative genomic analyses, two conserved microRNAs (miR-10a and miR-10b were identified and one new candidate microRNA with typical hairpin precursor structure that is expressed in both fibroblasts and testes was found. The prediction of microRNA target analysis showed that several known microRNA targets, such as miR-10, miR-414 and miR-464, were found in the tammar HOX clusters. In addition, several novel and putative miRNAs were identified that originated from elsewhere in the tammar genome and that target the tammar HOXB and HOXD clusters. Conclusions This study confirms that the emergence of known long non-coding RNAs in the HOX clusters clearly predate the marsupial-eutherian divergence 160 Ma ago. It also identified a new potentially functional microRNA as well as conserved miRNAs. These non-coding RNAs may participate in the regulation of HOX genes to influence the body plan of this marsupial.

  10. MiR-10 represses HoxB1a and HoxB3a in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost M Woltering

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hox genes are involved in patterning the anterior-posterior axis. In addition to the protein coding Hox genes, the miR-10, miR-196 and miR-615 families of microRNA genes are conserved within the vertebrate Hox clusters. The members of the miR-10 family are located at positions associated with Hox-4 paralogues. No function is yet known for this microRNA family but the genomic positions of its members suggest a role in anterior-posterior patterning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sensor constructs, overexpression and morpholino knockdown, we show in Zebrafish that miR-10 targets HoxB1a and HoxB3a and synergizes with HoxB4 in the repression of these target genes. Overexpression of miR-10 also induces specific phenotypes related to the loss of function of these targets. HoxB1a and HoxB3a have a dominant hindbrain expression domain anterior to that of miR-10 but overlap in a weaker expression domain in the spinal cord. In this latter domain, miR-10 knockdown results in upregulation of the target genes. In the case of a HoxB3a splice variant that includes miR-10c within its primary transcript, we show that the microRNA acts in an autoregulatory fashion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We find that miR-10 acts to repress HoxB1a and HoxB3a within the spinal cord and show that this repression works cooperatively with HoxB4. As with the previously described interactions between miR-196 and HoxA7 and Hox-8 paralogues, the target genes are located in close proximity to the microRNA. We present a model in which we postulate a link between the clustering of Hox genes and post-transcriptional gene regulation. We speculate that the high density of transcription units and enhancers within the Hox clusters places constraints on the precision of the transcriptional control that can be achieved within these clusters and requires the involvement of post-transcriptional gene silencing to define functional domains of genes appropriately.

  11. Hox gene clusters in the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Esther G L; Lam, Kevin; Christoffels, Alan; Erdmann, Mark V; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2003-02-01

    The Hox genes encode transcription factors that play a key role in specifying body plans of metazoans. They are organized into clusters that contain up to 13 paralogue group members. The complex morphology of vertebrates has been attributed to the duplication of Hox clusters during vertebrate evolution. In contrast to the single Hox cluster in the amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae), an invertebrate-chordate, mammals have four clusters containing 39 Hox genes. Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) such as zebrafish and fugu possess more than four Hox clusters. The coelacanth occupies a basal phylogenetic position among lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii), which gave rise to the tetrapod lineage. The lobe fins of sarcopterygians are considered to be the evolutionary precursors of tetrapod limbs. Thus, the characterization of Hox genes in the coelacanth should provide insights into the origin of tetrapod limbs. We have cloned the complete second exon of 33 Hox genes from the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, by extensive PCR survey and genome walking. Phylogenetic analysis shows that 32 of these genes have orthologs in the four mammalian HOX clusters, including three genes (HoxA6, D1, and D8) that are absent in ray-finned fishes. The remaining coelacanth gene is an ortholog of hoxc1 found in zebrafish but absent in mammals. Our results suggest that coelacanths have four Hox clusters bearing a gene complement more similar to mammals than to ray-finned fishes, but with an additional gene, HoxC1, which has been lost during the evolution of mammals from lobe-finned fishes.

  12. Fat accumulation in differentiated brown adipocytes is linked with expression of Hox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Smita; Rajput, Yudhishthir S; Barui, Amit K; Sharma, Rajan; Datta, Tirtha K

    2016-03-01

    Homeobox (Hox) genes are involved in body plan of embryo along the anterior-posterior axis. Presence of several Hox genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) is indicative of involvement of Hox genes in adipogenesis. We propose that differentiation inducing agents viz. isobutyl-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), indomethacin, dexamethasone (DEX), triiodothyronine (T3) and insulin may regulate differentiation in brown adipose tissue through Hox genes. In vitro culture of brown fat stromalvascular fraction (SVF) in presence or absence of differentiation inducing agents was used for establishing relationship between fat accumulation in differentiated adipocytes and expression of Hox genes. Relative expression of Pref1, UCP1 and Hox genes was determined in different stages of adipogenesis. Presence or absence of IBMX, indomethacin and DEX during differentiation of proliferated pre-adipocytes resulted in marked differences in expression of Hox genes and lipid accumulation. In presence of these inducing agents, lipid accumulation as well as expression of HoxA1, HoxA5, HoxC4 &HoxC8 markedly enhanced. Irrespective of presence or absence of T3, insulin down regulates HoxA10. T3 results in over expression of HoxA5, HoxC4 and HoxC8 genes, whereas insulin up regulates expression of only HoxC8. Findings suggest that accumulation of fat in differentiated adipocytes is linked with expression of Hox genes.

  13. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Schwager, Evelyn E; Extavour, Cassandra G; Wheeler, Ward C

    2014-10-07

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions.

  14. A ChIP-on-chip tiling array approach detects functional histone-free regions associated with boundaries at vertebrate HOX genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Srivastava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes impart segment identity to body structures along the anterior–posterior axis and are crucial for proper development. A unique feature of the Hox loci is the collinearity between the gene position within the cluster and its spatial expression pattern along the body axis. However, the mechanisms that regulate collinear patterns of Hox gene expression remain unclear, especially in higher vertebrates. We recently identified novel histone-free regions (HFRs that can act as chromatin boundary elements demarcating successive murine Hox genes and help regulate their precise expression domains (Srivastava et al., 2013. In this report, we describe in detail the ChIP-chip analysis strategy associated with the identification of these HFRs. We also provide the Perl scripts for HFR extraction and quality control analysis for this custom designed tiling array dataset.

  15. A ChIP-on-chip tiling array approach detects functional histone-free regions associated with boundaries at vertebrate HOX genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Surabhi; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Garapati, Hita Sony; Puri, Deepika; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2014-12-01

    Hox genes impart segment identity to body structures along the anterior-posterior axis and are crucial for proper development. A unique feature of the Hox loci is the collinearity between the gene position within the cluster and its spatial expression pattern along the body axis. However, the mechanisms that regulate collinear patterns of Hox gene expression remain unclear, especially in higher vertebrates. We recently identified novel histone-free regions (HFRs) that can act as chromatin boundary elements demarcating successive murine Hox genes and help regulate their precise expression domains (Srivastava et al., 2013). In this report, we describe in detail the ChIP-chip analysis strategy associated with the identification of these HFRs. We also provide the Perl scripts for HFR extraction and quality control analysis for this custom designed tiling array dataset.

  16. Hox and ParaHox Genes in Evolution, Development and Genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E.K. Ferrier

    2011-01-01

    @@ The discovery of the homeobox motif and its presence in each gene of the Hox clusters revolutionized the fields of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (1, 2), providing a rapid entrance into investigating the mechanisms of development of almost any animal taxon as well as dramatically altering conceptions on the extent of genetic conservation across the animal kingdom.

  17. Hox cluster organization in the jawless vertebrate Petromyzon marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Allan; Amores, Angel; Postlethwait, John H

    2002-04-15

    Large-scale gene amplifications may have facilitated the evolution of morphological innovations that accompanied the origin of vertebrates. This hypothesis predicts that the genomes of extant jawless fish, scions of deeply branching vertebrate lineages, should bear a record of these events. Previous work suggests that nonvertebrate chordates have a single Hox cluster, but that gnathostome vertebrates have four or more Hox clusters. Did the duplication events that produced multiple vertebrate Hox clusters occur before or after the divergence of agnathan and gnathostome lineages? Can investigation of lamprey Hox clusters illuminate the origins of the four gnathostome Hox clusters? To approach these questions, we cloned and sequenced 13 Hox cluster genes from cDNA and genomic libraries in the lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. The results suggest that the lamprey has at least four Hox clusters and support the model that gnathostome Hox clusters arose by a two-round-no-cluster-loss mechanism, with tree topology [(AB)(CD)]. A three-round model, however, is not rigorously excluded by the data and, for this model, the tree topologies [(D(C(AB))] and [(C(D(AB))] are most parsimonious. Gene phylogenies suggest that at least one Hox cluster duplication occurred in the lamprey lineage after it diverged from the gnathostome lineage. The results argue against two or more rounds of duplication before the divergence of agnathan and gnathostome vertebrates. If Hox clusters were duplicated in whole-genome duplication events, then these data suggest that, at most, one whole genome duplication occurred before the evolution of vertebrate developmental innovations.

  18. Analyses of fugu hoxa2 genes provide evidence for subfunctionalization of neural crest cell and rhombomere cis-regulatory modules during vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEllin, Jennifer A; Alexander, Tara B; Tümpel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Krumlauf, Robb

    2016-01-15

    Hoxa2 gene is a primary player in regulation of craniofacial programs of head development in vertebrates. Here we investigate the evolution of a Hoxa2 neural crest enhancer identified originally in mouse by comparing and contrasting the fugu hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes with their orthologous teleost and mammalian sequences. Using sequence analyses in combination with transgenic regulatory assays in zebrafish and mouse embryos we demonstrate subfunctionalization of regulatory activity for expression in hindbrain segments and neural crest cells between these two fugu co-orthologs. hoxa2a regulatory sequences have retained the ability to mediate expression in neural crest cells while those of hoxa2b include cis-elements that direct expression in rhombomeres. Functional dissection of the neural crest regulatory potential of the fugu hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes identify the previously unknown cis-element NC5, which is implicated in generating the differential activity of the enhancers from these genes. The NC5 region plays a similar role in the ability of this enhancer to mediate reporter expression in mice, suggesting it is a conserved component involved in control of neural crest expression of Hoxa2 in vertebrate craniofacial development.

  19. Integration of bioinformatics and synthetic promoters leads to the discovery of novel elicitor-responsive cis-regulatory sequences in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Jeannette; Machens, Fabian; Becker, Marlies; Niemeyer, Julia; Schulze, Jutta; Bülow, Lorenz; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    A combination of bioinformatic tools, high-throughput gene expression profiles, and the use of synthetic promoters is a powerful approach to discover and evaluate novel cis-sequences in response to specific stimuli. With Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray data annotated to the PathoPlant database, 732 different queries with a focus on fungal and oomycete pathogens were performed, leading to 510 up-regulated gene groups. Using the binding site estimation suite of tools, BEST, 407 conserved sequence motifs were identified in promoter regions of these coregulated gene sets. Motif similarities were determined with STAMP, classifying the 407 sequence motifs into 37 families. A comparative analysis of these 37 families with the AthaMap, PLACE, and AGRIS databases revealed similarities to known cis-elements but also led to the discovery of cis-sequences not yet implicated in pathogen response. Using a parsley (Petroselinum crispum) protoplast system and a modified reporter gene vector with an internal transformation control, 25 elicitor-responsive cis-sequences from 10 different motif families were identified. Many of the elicitor-responsive cis-sequences also drive reporter gene expression in an Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection assay in Nicotiana benthamiana. This work significantly increases the number of known elicitor-responsive cis-sequences and demonstrates the successful integration of a diverse set of bioinformatic resources combined with synthetic promoter analysis for data mining and functional screening in plant-pathogen interaction.

  20. Hox genes and evolution [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Hrycaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hox proteins are a deeply conserved group of transcription factors originally defined for their critical roles in governing segmental identity along the antero-posterior (AP axis in Drosophila. Over the last 30 years, numerous data generated in evolutionarily diverse taxa have clearly shown that changes in the expression patterns of these genes are closely associated with the regionalization of the AP axis, suggesting that Hox genes have played a critical role in the evolution of novel body plans within Bilateria. Despite this deep functional conservation and the importance of these genes in AP patterning, key questions remain regarding many aspects of Hox biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent reports that have provided novel insight into the origins of the mammalian Hox cluster, the role of Hox genes in the generation of a limbless body plan, and a novel putative mechanism in which Hox genes may encode specificity along the AP axis. Although the data discussed here offer a fresh perspective, it is clear that there is still much to learn about Hox biology and the roles it has played in the evolution of the Bilaterian body plan.

  1. Directed neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells is a sensitive system for the identification of novel Hox gene effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bami, Myrto; Episkopou, Vasso; Gavalas, Anthony; Gouti, Mina

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors plays fundamental roles in regulating cell specification along the anterior posterior axis during development of all bilaterian animals by controlling cell fate choices in a highly localized, extracellular signal and cell context dependent manner. Some studies have established downstream target genes in specific systems but their identification is insufficient to explain either the ability of Hox genes to direct homeotic transformations or the breadth of their patterning potential. To begin delineating Hox gene function in neural development we used a mouse ES cell based system that combines efficient neural differentiation with inducible Hoxb1 expression. Gene expression profiling suggested that Hoxb1 acted as both activator and repressor in the short term but predominantly as a repressor in the long run. Activated and repressed genes segregated in distinct processes suggesting that, in the context examined, Hoxb1 blocked differentiation while activating genes related to early developmental processes, wnt and cell surface receptor linked signal transduction and cell-to-cell communication. To further elucidate aspects of Hoxb1 function we used loss and gain of function approaches in the mouse and chick embryos. We show that Hoxb1 acts as an activator to establish the full expression domain of CRABPI and II in rhombomere 4 and as a repressor to restrict expression of Lhx5 and Lhx9. Thus the Hoxb1 patterning activity includes the regulation of the cellular response to retinoic acid and the delay of the expression of genes that commit cells to neural differentiation. The results of this study show that ES neural differentiation and inducible Hox gene expression can be used as a sensitive model system to systematically identify Hox novel target genes, delineate their interactions with signaling pathways in dictating cell fate and define the extent of functional overlap among different Hox

  2. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2 kb deletion located ~240 kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype.

  3. The nuclear OXPHOS genes in insecta: a common evolutionary origin, a common cis-regulatory motif, a common destiny for gene duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When orthologous sequences from species distributed throughout an optimal range of divergence times are available, comparative genomics is a powerful tool to address problems such as the identification of the forces that shape gene structure during evolution, although the functional constraints involved may vary in different genes and lineages. Results We identified and annotated in the MitoComp2 dataset the orthologs of 68 nuclear genes controlling oxidative phosphorylation in 11 Drosophilidae species and in five non-Drosophilidae insects, and compared them with each other and with their counterparts in three vertebrates (Fugu rubripes, Danio rerio and Homo sapiens and in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, taking into account conservation of gene structure and regulatory motifs, and preservation of gene paralogs in the genome. Comparative analysis indicates that the ancestral insect OXPHOS genes were intron rich and that extensive intron loss and lineage-specific intron gain occurred during evolution. Comparison with vertebrates and cnidarians also shows that many OXPHOS gene introns predate the cnidarian/Bilateria evolutionary split. The nuclear respiratory gene element (NRG has played a key role in the evolution of the insect OXPHOS genes; it is constantly conserved in the OXPHOS orthologs of all the insect species examined, while their duplicates either completely lack the element or possess only relics of the motif. Conclusion Our observations reinforce the notion that the common ancestor of most animal phyla had intron-rich gene, and suggest that changes in the pattern of expression of the gene facilitate the fixation of duplications in the genome and the development of novel genetic functions.

  4. Polymer models of the hierarchical folding of the Hox-B chromosomal locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziatella, Carlo; Chiariello, Andrea M.; Bianco, Simona; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    As revealed by novel technologies, chromosomes in the nucleus of mammalian cells have a complex spatial organization that serves vital functional purposes. Here we use models from polymer physics to identify the mechanisms that control their three-dimensional spatial organization. In particular, we investigate a model of the Hox-B locus, an important genomic region involved in embryo development, to expose the principles regulating chromatin folding and its complex behaviors in mouse embryonic stem cells. We reconstruct with high accuracy the pairwise contact matrix of the Hox-B locus as derived by Hi-C experiments and investigate its hierarchical folding dynamics. We trace back the observed behaviors to general scaling properties of polymer physics.

  5. HOX gene analysis in the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wha Chae

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts during osteogenesis. Several studies attempted to identify osteogenesis-related genes in hMSCs. Although HOX genes are known to play a pivotal role in skeletogenesis, their function in the osteogenesis of hMSCs has not yet been investigated in detail. Our aim was to characterize the expression of 37 HOX genes by multiplex RT-PCR to identify the ones most probably involved in osteogenic differentiation. The results showed that the expression patterns of four HOX genes were altered during this process. In particular, the expression levels of HOXC13 and HOXD13 were dramatically changed. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were performed in order to further analyze the expression of HOXC13 and HOXD13 . The qRT-PCR results showed that transcription of HOXC13 was up-regulated by up to forty times, whereas that of HOXD13 was down-regulated by approximately five times after osteogenic differentiation. The Western blot results for the HOXC13 and HOXD13 proteins also corresponded well with the real-time PCR result. These findings suggest that HOXC13 and HOXD13 might be involved in the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  6. Gene expression profiling of cultured human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes reveals downregulation of a transcriptional cis-regulatory network mediating activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucneau, Joachim; De Schepper, Sofie; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Van Hummelen, Paul; Naeyaert, Jean-Marie; Lambert, Jo

    2005-08-01

    One of the major primary features of the neurocutaneous genetic disorder Neurofibromatosis type 1 are the hyperpigmentary café-au-lait macules where disregulation of melanocyte biology is supposed to play a key etiopathogenic role. To gain better insight into the possible role of the tumor suppressor gene NF1, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed on human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes of a Neurofibromatosis type 1 patient and NF1 wild type (NF1+/+) melanocytes of a healthy control patient, both cultured from normally pigmented skin and hyperpigmented lesional café-au-lait skin. From the magnitude of gene effects, we found that gene expression was affected most strongly by genotype and less so by lesional type. A total of 137 genes had a significant twofold or more up- (72) or downregulated (65) expression in NF1+/- melanocytes compared with NF1+/+ melanocytes. Melanocytes cultured from hyperpigmented café-au-lait skin showed 37 upregulated genes whereas only 14 were downregulated compared with normal skin melanocytes. In addition, significant genotype xlesional type interactions were observed for 465 genes. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in regulating cell proliferation and cell adhesion. A high number of transcription factor genes, among which a specific subset important in melanocyte lineage development, were downregulated in the cis-regulatory network governing the activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene. Although the results presented have been obtained with a restricted number of patients (one NF1 patient and one control) and using cDNA microarrays that may limit their interpretation, the data nevertheless addresses for the first time the effect of a heterozygous NF1 gene on the expression of the human melanocyte transcriptome and has generated several interesting candidate genes helpful in elucidating the etiopathology of café-au-lait macules in NF1 patients.

  7. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W. Currie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Results Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior–posterior “zones” of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Conclusions Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior–posterior axis of adult planarians.

  8. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  9. An Overview of Hox Genes in Lophotrochozoa: Evolution and Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Barucca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes are regulators of animal embryonic development. Changes in the number and sequence of Hox genes as well as in their expression patterns have been related to the evolution of the body plan. Lophotrochozoa is a clade of Protostomia characterized by several phyla which show a wide morphological diversity. Despite that the works summarized in this review emphasize the fragmentary nature of the data available regarding the presence and expression of Hox genes, they also offer interesting insight into the evolution of the Hox cluster and the role played by Hox genes in several phyla. However, the number of genes involved in the cluster of the lophotrochozoan ancestor is still a question of debate. The data presented here suggest that at least nine genes were present while two other genes, Lox4 and Post-2, may either have been present in the ancestor or may have arisen as a result of duplication in the Brachiopoda-Mollusca-Annelida lineage. Spatial and temporal collinearity is a feature of Hox gene expression which was probably present in the ancestor of deuterostomes and protostomes. However, in Lophotrochozoa, it has been detected in only a few species belonging to Annelida and Mollusca.

  10. Evolution of a pentameral body plan was not linked to translocation of anterior Hox genes: the echinoderm HOX cluster revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Maria; Martinez, Pedro; Morris, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Echinodermata is a large phylum of marine invertebrates characterized by an adult, pentameral body plan. This morphology is clearly derived as all members of Deuterostomia (the superphylum to which they belong) have a bilateral body plan. The origin of the pentameral plan has been the subject of intense debate. It is clear that the ancestor of Echinodermata had a bilateral plan but how this ancestor transformed its body "architecture" in such a drastic manner is not clear. Data from the fossil record and ontogeny are sparse and, so far, not very informative. The sequencing of the sea urchin genome a decade ago opened the possibility that the pentameral body plan was a consequence of a broken Hox cluster and a series of papers dwelt on the putative relationship between Hox gene arrangements in the chromosomes and the origin of pentamery. This relationship, sound as it was, is challenged by the revelation that the sea star HOX cluster is, in fact, intact, thus falsifying the hypothesis of a direct relationship between HOX cluster arrangement and the origin of the pentameral body plan. Here, we explore the relationship between Hox gene arrangements and echinoderm body "architecture," the expression of Hox genes in development and alternative scenarios for the origin of pentamery, with putative roles for signaling centers in generating multiple axes.

  11. MicroRNAs located in the Hox gene clusters are implicated in huntington's disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hoss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional dysregulation has long been recognized as central to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs represent a major system of post-transcriptional regulation, by either preventing translational initiation or by targeting transcripts for storage or for degradation. Using next-generation miRNA sequencing in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 9 of twelve HD and nine controls, we identified five miRNAs (miR-10b-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p, miR-615-3p and miR-1247-5p up-regulated in HD at genome-wide significance (FDR q-value<0.05. Three of these, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p and miR-615-3p, were expressed at near zero levels in control brains. Expression was verified for all five miRNAs using reverse transcription quantitative PCR and all but miR-1247-5p were replicated in an independent sample (8HD/8C. Ectopic miR-10b-5p expression in PC12 HTT-Q73 cells increased survival by MTT assay and cell viability staining suggesting increased expression may be a protective response. All of the miRNAs but miR-1247-5p are located in intergenic regions of Hox clusters. Total mRNA sequencing in the same samples identified fifteen of 55 genes within the Hox cluster gene regions as differentially expressed in HD, and the Hox genes immediately adjacent to the four Hox cluster miRNAs as up-regulated. Pathway analysis of mRNA targets of these miRNAs implicated functions for neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, cell death and survival. In regression models among the HD brains, huntingtin CAG repeat size, onset age and age at death were independently found to be inversely related to miR-10b-5p levels. CAG repeat size and onset age were independently inversely related to miR-196a-5p, onset age was inversely related to miR-196b-5p and age at death was inversely related to miR-615-3p expression. These results suggest these Hox-related miRNAs may be involved in neuroprotective response in HD. Recently, miRNAs have shown promise as

  12. Establishment of Hox vertebral identities in the embryonic spine precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Tadahiro; Denans, Nicolas; Pourquié, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    The vertebrate spine exhibits two striking characteristics. The first one is the periodic arrangement of its elements-the vertebrae-along the anteroposterior axis. This segmented organization is the result of somitogenesis, which takes place during organogenesis. The segmentation machinery involves a molecular oscillator-the segmentation clock-which delivers a periodic signal controlling somite production. During embryonic axis elongation, this signal is displaced posteriorly by a system of traveling signaling gradients-the wavefront-which depends on the Wnt, FGF, and retinoic acid pathways. The other characteristic feature of the spine is the subdivision of groups of vertebrae into anatomical domains, such as the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and caudal regions. This axial regionalization is controlled by a set of transcription factors called Hox genes. Hox genes exhibit nested expression domains in the somites which reflect their linear arrangement along the chromosomes-a property termed colinearity. The colinear disposition of Hox genes expression domains provides a blueprint for the regionalization of the future vertebral territories of the spine. In amniotes, Hox genes are activated in the somite precursors of the epiblast in a temporal colinear sequence and they were proposed to control their progressive ingression into the nascent paraxial mesoderm. Consequently, the positioning of the expression domains of Hox genes along the anteroposterior axis is largely controlled by the timing of Hox activation during gastrulation. Positioning of the somitic Hox domains is subsequently refined through a crosstalk with the segmentation machinery in the presomitic mesoderm. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of the embryonic mechanisms that establish vertebral identities during vertebrate development.

  13. Related genetics mechanisms of "Hox" function in mammalian limb and gut development

    OpenAIRE

    Zacchetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Durant le développement de vertébrés, les gènes "Hox" sont exprimés de manière colinéaire au niveau de l'axe principal du corps et des membres. La coordination, spatiale et temporelle, de l'expression des gènes qui appartiennent aux complexes "HoxA", "HoxB", "HoxC" et "HoxD" contribue à la spécification des régions du corps, suite à l'activité différentielle de facteurs de transcription homeotiques produits par chacun des 39 gènes "Hox". Jusqu'à présent la fonction des gènes "HoxA" et "HoxD" ...

  14. No more than 14: the end of the amphioxus Hox cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hox gene cluster has been a key paradigm for a generation of developmental and evolutionary biologists. Since its discovery in the mid-1980's, the identification, genomic organization, expression, colinearity, and regulation of Hox genes have been immediate targets for study in any new model organism, and metazoan genome projects always refer to the structure of the particular Hox cluster(s. Since the early 1990's, it has been dogma that vertebrate Hox clusters are composed of thirteen paralogous groups. Nonetheless, we showed that in the otherwise prototypical cephalochordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae, the Hox cluster contains a fourteenth Hox gene, and very recently, a 14th Hox paralogous group has been found in the coelacanth and the horn shark, suggesting that the amphioxus cluster was anticipating the finding of Hox 14 in some vertebrate lineages. In view of the pivotal place that amphioxus occupies in vertebrate evolution, we thought it of considerable interest to establish the limits of its Hox gene cluster, namely resolution of whether more Hox genes are present in the amphioxus cluster (e.g., Hox 15. Using two strategies, here we report the completion and characterization of the Hox gene content of the single amphioxus Hox cluster, which encompasses 650 kb from Hox1 to Evx. Our data have important implications for the primordial Hox gene cluster of chordates: the prototypical nature of the single amphioxus Hox cluster makes it unlikely that additional paralogous groups will be found in any chordate lineage. We suggest that 14 is the end.

  15. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen, Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, Kevin J.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-01-01

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and...

  16. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  17. Towards Resolving the Enigma of HOX Gene Collinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyros

    2014-12-01

    The development of normal patterns along the primary and secondary vertebrate axes depends on the regularity of the early HOX gene expressions. During the initial developmental stages these expressions form a sequential pattern of partially overlapping domains along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo in coincidence with the 3' to 5' order of the genes in the chromosome (spatial collinearity). In addition, the HOX genes are activated one after the other in the same 3' to 5' order (temporal collinearity). Genetic engineering experiments were performed in order explore the mechanism responsible for these remarkable collinearity phenomena. Several biomolecular models were proposed explaining some of the experimental findings. A biophysical model has been also proposed which is based on the hypothesis that physical forces are created which act on the Hox cluster. This cluster is initially inactive, located inside the chromosome territory. The physical forces translocate sequentially the Hox genes one after the other from inside the chromosome territory towards the interchromosome domain where they are activated in the area of the transcription factories. The above biophysical model mechanism has been strongly supported by recent experimental evidence and some evolutionary considerations. In this model realization, pulling forces are created between the `negatively' charged Hox cluster and its `positively' charged chromatin environment.

  18. Phylogeny of the Insect Homeobox Gene (Hox) Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangeeta Dhawan; K. P. Gopinathan

    2005-01-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes form an evolutionarily conserved family encoding transcription factors that play major roles in segmental identity and organ specification across species. The canonical grouping of Hox genes present in the HOM-C cluster of Drosophila or related clusters in other organisms includes eight "typical" genes,which are localized in the order labial (lab), proboscipedia (pb), Deformed (Dfd),Sex combs reduced ( Scr), Antennapedia (Antp), Ultrabithorax (Ubx), abdominalA (abdA), and AbdominalB (AbdB). The members of Hox cluster are expressed in a distinct anterior to posterior order in the embryo. Analysis of the relatedness of different members of the Hox gene cluster to each other in four evolutionarily diverse insect taxa revealed that the loci pb/Dfd and AbdB, which are farthest apart in linkage, had a high degree of evolutionary relatedness, indicating that pb/Dfd type anterior genes and AbdB are closest to the ancestral anterior and posterior Hox genes, respectively. The greater relatedness of other posterior genes Ubx and abdA to the more anterior genes such as Antp and Scr suggested that they arose by gene duplications in the more anterior members rather than the posterior AbdB.

  19. Topographic patterns of vascular disease: HOX proteins as determining factors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; P; Visconti; Alexander; Awgulewitsch

    2015-01-01

    Steadily increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic diversities in the vascular bed are, in addition to hemodynamic influences, a major contributing factor in determining region-specific cardiovascular disease susceptibility. Members of the phylogenetically highly conserved Hox gene family of developmental regulators have to be viewed as prime candidates for determining these regional genetic differences in the vasculature. During embryonic patterning, the regionally distinct and precisely choreographed expression patterns of HOX transcription factors are essential for the correct specification of positional identities. Apparently, these topographic patterns are to some degree retained in certain adult tissues, including the circulatory system. While an understanding of the functional significance of these localized Hox activities in adult blood vessels is only beginning to emerge, an argument can be made for a role of Hox genes in the maintenance of vessel wall homeostasis and functional integrity on the one hand, and in regulating the development and progression of regionally restricted vascular pathologies, on the other. Initial functional studies in animal models, as well as data from clinical studies provide some level of support for this view. The data suggest that putative genetic regulatory networks of Hox-dependent cardiovascular disease processes include genes of diverse functional categories(extracellular matrix remodeling, transmembrane signaling, cell cycle control, inflammatory response, transcriptional control, etc.), as potential targets in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as cell populations residing in the adventitia.

  20. Hox in frogs : xenopus reveals novel functions for vertebrate hoz genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardine, Nabila

    2008-01-01

    Hox genes are a very important family of transcription factors during development of vertebrate and invertebrates. This family of genes contains up to 39 Hox gene members organized in 4 clusters in the genome. The main function of Hox genes is the establishment of the anteroposterior axis of the emb

  1. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  2. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwang Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2–b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  3. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity.

  4. Designing Inhibitors against HOX domain mutations of PDX-1 and studying its association in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam Appa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus was formally known as IDDM, type I, or juvenile onset diabetes. Type 1 DM can occur at any age. In this study,we analyzed the involvement of HOX domain of PDX-1 protein.The homeodomain transcription factor, pancreas duodenum homeobox (PDX-1, encoded by PDX-1 gene, which is a transcriptional activator of several genes, including insulin, somatostatin, glucokinase, islet amyloid polypeptide, and glucose transporter type 2 and essential for pancreas development, insulin production, and glucose homeostasis.[1,13]. HOX domain has a length of 63aa and control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting positive or negative regulators[4,9,16]. Different approached had been applied to identify the mutational hot spot region of HOX domain and calculate mutational frequency of the amino acids which resides in the hotspot region. Binding site of the domain had been identified and found that THR208, GLN246 ,VAL247, ASN253 involved in interaction with ligand. Potential Inhibitors had been screened on the basis of various criteria and bioactivity score had been calculated. Energy optimization was done by applying AMBER force field and steepest descent method. Docking was performed by CCDC GOLD, Molegro, HEX, and Argus lab to find the best potent inhibitor and increase the accuracy of the docking process. Sitagliptin showed satisfactory result on both docking and bioactivity analysis. It showed a GOLD fitness score of 49.8386 and had a moldock score of -122.919 with a ligand efficiency -4.33692. Compound had a bioactivity score of 0.56 for protease inhibitor. Sitagliptin showed good binding affinity to the target, which helps to work the pancreas in proper way and to secret insulin.

  5. A general scenario of Hox gene inventory variation among major sarcopterygian lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes are known to play a key role in shaping the body plan of metazoans. Evolutionary dynamics of these genes is therefore essential in explaining patterns of evolutionary diversity. Among extant sarcopterygians comprising both lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods, our knowledge of the Hox genes and clusters has largely been restricted in several model organisms such as frogs, birds and mammals. Some evolutionary gaps still exist, especially for those groups with derived body morphology or occupying key positions on the tree of life, hindering our understanding of how Hox gene inventory varied along the sarcopterygian lineage. Results We determined the Hox gene inventory for six sarcopterygian groups: lungfishes, caecilians, salamanders, snakes, turtles and crocodiles by comprehensive PCR survey and genome walking. Variable Hox genes in each of the six sarcopterygian group representatives, compared to the human Hox gene inventory, were further validated for their presence/absence by PCR survey in a number of related species representing a broad evolutionary coverage of the group. Turtles, crocodiles, birds and placental mammals possess the same 39 Hox genes. HoxD12 is absent in snakes, amphibians and probably lungfishes. HoxB13 is lost in frogs and caecilians. Lobe-finned fishes, amphibians and squamate reptiles possess HoxC3. HoxC1 is only present in caecilians and lobe-finned fishes. Similar to coelacanths, lungfishes also possess HoxA14, which is only found in lobe-finned fishes to date. Our Hox gene variation data favor the lungfish-tetrapod, turtle-archosaur and frog-salamander relationships and imply that the loss of HoxD12 is not directly related to digit reduction. Conclusions Our newly determined Hox inventory data provide a more complete scenario for evolutionary dynamics of Hox genes along the sarcopterygian lineage. Limbless, worm-like caecilians and snakes possess similar Hox gene inventories to animals with

  6. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  7. A Simple Model of Hox Genes: Bone Morphology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaefsky, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Visual demonstrations of abstract scientific concepts are effective strategies for enhancing content retention (Shmaefsky 2004). The concepts associated with gene regulation of growth and development are particularly complex and are well suited for teaching with visual models. This demonstration provides a simple and accurate model of Hox gene…

  8. Primitive duplicate Hox clusters in the European eel's genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan V Henkel

    Full Text Available The enigmatic life cycle and elongated body of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L., 1758 have long motivated scientific enquiry. Recently, eel research has gained in urgency, as the population has dwindled to the point of critical endangerment. We have assembled a draft genome in order to facilitate advances in all provinces of eel biology. Here, we use the genome to investigate the eel's complement of the Hox developmental transcription factors. We show that unlike any other teleost fish, the eel retains fully populated, duplicate Hox clusters, which originated at the teleost-specific genome duplication. Using mRNA-sequencing and in situ hybridizations, we demonstrate that all copies are expressed in early embryos. Theories of vertebrate evolution predict that the retention of functional, duplicate Hox genes can give rise to additional developmental complexity, which is not immediately apparent in the adult. However, the key morphological innovation elsewhere in the eel's life history coincides with the evolutionary origin of its Hox repertoire.

  9. Hox genes and regional patterning of the vertebrate body plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallo, M.; Wellik, D.M.; Deschamps, J.

    2010-01-01

    Several decades have passed since the discovery of Hox genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Their unique ability to regulate morphologies along the anteroposterior (AP) axis (Lewis, 1978) earned them well-deserved attention as important regulators of embryonic development. Phenotypes due

  10. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne Seifert; David F Werheid; Silvana M Knapp; Edda Tobiasch

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved genefamily. They determine the anterior-posterior body axisin bilateral organisms and influence the developmentalfate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoidof any Hox gene expression, but these transcriptionfactors are activated in varying spatial and temporalpatterns defining the development of various bodyregions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among othersresponsible for driving the differentiation of tissuestem cells towards their respective lineages in order torepair and maintain the correct function of tissues andorgans. Due to their involvement in the embryonic andadult body, they have been suggested to be useable forimproving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo .In many studies Hox genes have been found as drivingfactors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis,in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainlychondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascularlineages including endothelial and smooth muscle celldifferentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancyis rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continuesto increase. Stem cells have become an increasinglypopular choice for creating therapies in regenerativemedicine due to their self-renewal and differentiationpotential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are usedmore and more frequently due to their easy handlingand accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicityand little ethical concerns. This review therefore intendsto summarize to date known correlations betweennatural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissuesand during the differentiation of various stem cellstowards their respective lineages with a major focus onmesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overviewshall help to understand the complex interactions of Hoxgenes and differentiation processes all over the bodyas well as in vitro for further improvement of stem celltreatments in future regenerative medicine approaches.

  11. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Ackermann

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: We have determined the genetic landscape of human α- and β-cells based on chromatin accessibility and transcript levels, which allowed for detection of novel α- and β-cell signature genes not previously known to be expressed in islets. Using fine-mapping of open chromatin, we have identified thousands of potential cis-regulatory elements that operate in an endocrine cell type-specific fashion.

  12. Cdx is crucial for the timing mechanism driving colinear Hox activation and defines a trunk segment in the Hox cluster topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Cdx and Hox transcription factors are important regulators of axial patterning and are required for tissue generation along the vertebrate body axis. Cdx genes have been demonstrated to act upstream of Hox genes in midgestation embryos. Here, we investigate the role of Cdx transcription factors in

  13. Cdx is crucial for the timing mechanism driving colinear Hox activation and defines a trunk segment in the Hox cluster topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Cdx and Hox transcription factors are important regulators of axial patterning and are required for tissue generation along the vertebrate body axis. Cdx genes have been demonstrated to act upstream of Hox genes in midgestation embryos. Here, we investigate the role of Cdx transcription factors in

  14. Cdx is crucial for the timing mechanism driving colinear Hox activation and defines a trunk segment in the Hox cluster topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Cdx and Hox transcription factors are important regulators of axial patterning and are required for tissue generation along the vertebrate body axis. Cdx genes have been demonstrated to act upstream of Hox genes in midgestation embryos. Here, we investigate the role of Cdx transcription factors in t

  15. Identification of Hox genes and rearrangements within the single homeobox (Hox) cluster (192.8 kb) of the cyclopoid copepod (Paracyclopina nana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui-Su; Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Bo-Young; Souissi, Sami; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-03-01

    We report the first identification of the entire complement of the eight typical homeobox (hox) genes (lab, pb, Dfd, scr, antp, ubx, Abd-A, and Abd-B) and the ftz gene in a 192.8 kb region in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana. A Hox3 gene ortholog was not present in the P. nana hox gene cluster, while the P. nana Dfd gene was transcribed in the opposite direction to the Daphnia pulex Dfd gene, but in the same direction as the Dfd genes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. The location of the lab and pb genes was switched in the P. nana hox cluster, while the order of the remaining hox genes was generally conserved with those of other arthropods. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. To Be Specific or Not: The Critical Relationship Between Hox And TALE Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Mann, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Hox proteins are key regulatory transcription factors that act in different tissues of the embryo to provide specific spatial and temporal coordinates to each cell. These patterning functions often depend on the presence of the TALE-homeodomain class cofactors, which form cooperative DNA-binding complexes with all Hox proteins. How this family of cofactors contributes to the highly diverse and specific functions of Hox proteins in vivo remains an important unsolved question. We review here the most recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying Hox-TALE function. In particular, we discuss the role of DNA shape, DNA-binding affinity, and protein-protein interaction flexibility in dictating Hox-TALE specificity. We propose several models to explain how these mechanisms are integrated with each other in the context of the many distinct functions that Hox and TALE factors carry out in vivo.

  17. Genomic organisation of the seven ParaHox genes of coelacanths

    OpenAIRE

    Mulley, John F; Holland, Peter WH

    2013-01-01

    Human and mouse genomes contain six ParaHox genes implicated in gut and neural patterning. In coelacanths and cartilaginous fish, an additional ParaHox gene exists—Pdx2—that dates back to the genome duplications in early vertebrate evolution. Here we examine the genomic arrangement and flanking genes of all ParaHox genes in coelacanths, to determine the full complement of these genes. We find that coelacanths have seven ParaHox genes in total, in four chromosomal locations, revealing that fiv...

  18. The role of Hox genes during vertebrate limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakany, Jozsef; Duboule, Denis

    2007-08-01

    The potential role of Hox genes during vertebrate limb development was brought into focus by gene expression analyses in mice (P Dolle, JC Izpisua-Belmonte, H Falkenstein, A Renucci, D Duboule, Nature 1989, 342:767-772), at a time when limb growth and patterning were thought to depend upon two distinct and rather independent systems of coordinates; one for the anterior-to-posterior axis and the other for the proximal-to-distal axis (see D Duboule, P Dolle, EMBO J 1989, 8:1497-1505). Over the past years, the function and regulation of these genes have been addressed using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches in chick and mice. The use of multiple mutations either in cis-configuration in trans-configuration or in cis/trans configurations, has confirmed that Hox genes are essential for proper limb development, where they participate in both the growth and organization of the structures. Even though their molecular mechanisms of action remain somewhat elusive, the results of these extensive genetic analyses confirm that, during the development of the limbs, the various axes cannot be considered in isolation from each other and that a more holistic view of limb development should prevail over a simple cartesian, chess grid-like approach of these complex structures. With this in mind, the functional input of Hox genes during limb growth and development can now be re-assessed.

  19. TALE factors poise promoters for activation by Hox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Seong-Kyu; Ladam, Franck; Sagerström, Charles G

    2014-01-27

    Hox proteins form complexes with TALE cofactors from the Pbx and Prep/Meis families to control transcription, but it remains unclear how Hox:TALE complexes function. Examining a Hoxb1b:TALE complex that regulates zebrafish hoxb1a transcription, we find maternally deposited TALE proteins at the hoxb1a promoter already during blastula stages. These TALE factors recruit histone-modifying enzymes to promote an active chromatin profile at the hoxb1a promoter and also recruit RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and P-TEFb. However, in the presence of TALE factors, RNAPII remains phosphorylated on serine 5 and hoxb1a transcription is inefficient. By gastrula stages, Hoxb1b binds together with TALE factors to the hoxb1a promoter. This triggers P-TEFb-mediated transitioning of RNAPII to the serine 2-phosphorylated form and efficient hoxb1a transcription. We conclude that TALE factors access promoters during early embryogenesis to poise them for activation but that Hox proteins are required to trigger efficient transcription.

  20. Effect of increased HoxB4 on human megakaryocytic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sullenbarger, Brent [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lasky, Larry C., E-mail: Lasky.4@osu.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} HoxB4 overexpression in human TF1 cells increased the expression of CD61 and CD41a. {yields} HoxB4 fusion protein enhanced megakaryocytic development of CD34{sup +} cord blood cells. {yields} Ectopic HoxB4 increased Tpo receptor expression and decreased c-Myb expression. {yields} HoxB4 RNA silencing increased c-Myb expression and decreased Fli-1 expression. -- Abstract: In order to produce clinically useful quantities of platelets ex vivo we may need to firstly enhance early self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and/or megakaryocyte (Mk) progenitors. The homeodomain transcription factor HoxB4 has been shown to be an important regulator of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis; however, its effect on megakaryopoiesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of HoxB4 overexpression or RNA silencing on megakaryocytic development in the human TF1 progenitor cell line; we then used recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein to study the effect of exogenous HoxB4 on megakaryocytic development of human CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells. We found that ectopic HoxB4 in TF1 cells increased the antigen expression of CD61and CD41a, increased the gene expression of thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR), Scl-1, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it decreased c-Myb expression. HoxB4 RNA silencing in TF1 cells decreased the expression of CD61 and CD41a and decreased Fli-1 expression while it increased the expression of c-Myb. Recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the percentages and absolute numbers of CD41a and CD61 positive cells during megakaryocytic differentiation of CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells and increased the numbers of colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk). Adding tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the gene expression of TpoR, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it inhibited c-Myb expression. Our data suggest that increased HoxB4 enhanced early megakaryocytic development in human TF1 cells and CD34

  1. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  2. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  3. Cdx and Hox Genes Differentially Regulate Posterior Axial Growth in Mammalian Embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Teddy; Rowland, Jennifer Elizabeth; van de Ven, Cesca; Bialecka, Monika; Novoa, Ana; Carapuco, Marta; van Nes, Johan; de Graaff, Wim; Duluc, Isabelle; Freund, Jean-Noel; Beck, Felix; Mallo, Moises; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Hox and Cdx transcription factors regulate embryonic positional identities. Cdx mutant mice display posterior body truncations of the axial skeleton, neuraxis, and caudal urorectal structures. We show that trunk Hox genes stimulate axial extension, as they can largely rescue these Cdx mutant

  4. Polarized regulatory landscape and Wnt responsiveness underlie Hox activation in embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Tan, Sander; Creyghton, Menno P; de Laat, Wouter; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Sequential 3'-to-5' activation of the Hox gene clusters in early embryos is a most fascinating issue in developmental biology. Neither the trigger nor the regulatory elements involved in the transcriptional initiation of the 3'-most Hox genes have been unraveled in any organism. We demonstrate that

  5. Polarized regulatory landscape and Wnt responsiveness underlie Hox activation in embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijts, R.; Amin, Shilu; Van Rooijen, E. M H C; Tan, Sander; Creyghton, Menno P.; De Laat, Wouter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/169934497; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Sequential 3′-to-5′ activation of the Hox gene clusters in early embryos is a most fascinating issue in developmental biology. Neither the trigger nor the regulatory elements involved in the transcriptional initiation of the 3′-most Hox genes have been unraveled in any organism. We demonstrate that

  6. Cdx and Hox Genes Differentially Regulate Posterior Axial Growth in Mammalian Embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Teddy; Rowland, Jennifer Elizabeth; van de Ven, Cesca; Bialecka, Monika; Novoa, Ana; Carapuco, Marta; van Nes, Johan; de Graaff, Wim; Duluc, Isabelle; Freund, Jean-Noel; Beck, Felix; Mallo, Moises; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Hox and Cdx transcription factors regulate embryonic positional identities. Cdx mutant mice display posterior body truncations of the axial skeleton, neuraxis, and caudal urorectal structures. We show that trunk Hox genes stimulate axial extension, as they can largely rescue these Cdx mutant phenoty

  7. Toward a new twist in Hox and TALE DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2015-02-09

    Hox proteins gain specificity by interacting with TALE-class cofactors. In a recent issue of Cell and in this issue of Developmental Cell, Crocker et al. (2015) and Amin et al. (2015), respectively, demonstrate that non-canonical Hox/TALE binding sequences play a major role in the regionalized regulation of target gene expression in vivo.

  8. Evidence of duplicated Hox genes in the most recent common ancestor of extant scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Santiago, Marc A; González-Santillán, Edmundo; Monod, Lionel; Wheeler, Ward C

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions (order Scorpiones) are unusual among arthropods, both for the extreme heteronomy of their bauplan and for the high gene family turnover exhibited in their genomes. These phenomena appear to be correlated, as two scorpion species have been shown to possess nearly twice the number of Hox genes present in most arthropods. Segmentally offset anterior expression boundaries of a subset of Hox paralogs have been shown to correspond to transitions in segmental identities in the scorpion posterior tagmata, suggesting that posterior heteronomy in scorpions may have been achieved by neofunctionalization of Hox paralogs. However, both the first scorpion genome sequenced and the developmental genetic data are based on exemplars of Buthidae, one of 19 families of scorpions. It is therefore not known whether Hox paralogy is limited to Buthidae or widespread among scorpions. We surveyed 24 high throughput transcriptomes and the single whole genome available for scorpions, in order to test the prediction that Hox gene duplications are common to the order. We used gene tree parsimony to infer whether the paralogy was consistent with a duplication event in the scorpion common ancestor. Here we show that duplicated Hox genes in non-buthid scorpions occur in six of the ten Hox classes. Gene tree topologies and parsimony-based reconciliation of the gene trees are consistent with a duplication event in the most recent common ancestor of scorpions. These results suggest that a Hox paralogy, and by extension the model of posterior patterning established in a buthid, can be extended to non-Buthidae scorpions.

  9. Isolation of Hox cluster genes from insects reveals an accelerated sequence evolution rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hadrys

    Full Text Available Among gene families it is the Hox genes and among metazoan animals it is the insects (Hexapoda that have attracted particular attention for studying the evolution of development. Surprisingly though, no Hox genes have been isolated from 26 out of 35 insect orders yet, and the existing sequences derive mainly from only two orders (61% from Hymenoptera and 22% from Diptera. We have designed insect specific primers and isolated 37 new partial homeobox sequences of Hox cluster genes (lab, pb, Hox3, ftz, Antp, Scr, abd-a, Abd-B, Dfd, and Ubx from six insect orders, which are crucial to insect phylogenetics. These new gene sequences provide a first step towards comparative Hox gene studies in insects. Furthermore, comparative distance analyses of homeobox sequences reveal a correlation between gene divergence rate and species radiation success with insects showing the highest rate of homeobox sequence evolution.

  10. Glimpse into Hox and tale regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá-Esteban, Nuria; Spagnoli, Francesca M

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, cells become gradually restricted in their developmental potential and start elaborating lineage-specific transcriptional networks to ultimately acquire a unique differentiated state. Hox genes play a central role in specifying regional identities, thereby providing the cell with critical information on positional value along its differentiation path. The exquisite DNA-binding specificity of the Hox proteins is frequently dependent upon their interaction with members of the TALE family of homeodomain proteins. In addition to their function as Hox-cofactors, TALE homeoproteins control multiple crucial developmental processes through Hox-independent mechanisms. Here, we will review recent findings on the function of both Hox and TALE proteins in cell differentiation, referring mostly to vertebrate species. In addition, we will discuss the direct implications of this knowledge on cell plasticity and cell reprogramming.

  11. [Recent advances of studies on abnormal HOX gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Yan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    HOX gene encodes a group of homeodomain transcription factors which are highly conserved. The caudal-type homeobox (CDX) , ten-eleven translocation (TET) genes and polycomb group (PcG) , trithorax group (TrxG) proteins act as upstream regulators of HOX genes that manipulate the targeted gene expression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The abnormal expression of HOX genes and their fusions contribute to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation and NUP98-HOX translocation serve as molecular mediators of dysfunction in MDS which can be used for the evaluation of biology and therapy. This article provides an overview of recent advances of studies on HOX gene and its abnormal molecular mechanisms, as well as potential correlation with MDS.

  12. Calcisponges have a ParaHox gene and dynamic expression of dispersed NK homeobox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Leininger, Sven; Liu, Jing; Ferrier, David E K; Adamska, Maja

    2014-10-30

    Sponges are simple animals with few cell types, but their genomes paradoxically contain a wide variety of developmental transcription factors, including homeobox genes belonging to the Antennapedia (ANTP) class, which in bilaterians encompass Hox, ParaHox and NK genes. In the genome of the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, no Hox or ParaHox genes are present, but NK genes are linked in a tight cluster similar to the NK clusters of bilaterians. It has been proposed that Hox and ParaHox genes originated from NK cluster genes after divergence of sponges from the lineage leading to cnidarians and bilaterians. On the other hand, synteny analysis lends support to the notion that the absence of Hox and ParaHox genes in Amphimedon is a result of secondary loss (the ghost locus hypothesis). Here we analysed complete suites of ANTP-class homeoboxes in two calcareous sponges, Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that these calcisponges possess orthologues of bilaterian NK genes (Hex, Hmx and Msx), a varying number of additional NK genes and one ParaHox gene, Cdx. Despite the generation of scaffolds spanning multiple genes, we find no evidence of clustering of Sycon NK genes. All Sycon ANTP-class genes are developmentally expressed, with patterns suggesting their involvement in cell type specification in embryos and adults, metamorphosis and body plan patterning. These results demonstrate that ParaHox genes predate the origin of sponges, thus confirming the ghost locus hypothesis, and highlight the need to analyse the genomes of multiple sponge lineages to obtain a complete picture of the ancestral composition of the first animal genome.

  13. Lampreys, the jawless vertebrates, contain only two ParaHox gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huixian; Ravi, Vydianathan; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Pillai, Nisha E; Prasad, Aravind; Lin, Qiang; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2017-08-22

    ParaHox genes (Gsx, Pdx, and Cdx) are an ancient family of developmental genes closely related to the Hox genes. They play critical roles in the patterning of brain and gut. The basal chordate, amphioxus, contains a single ParaHox cluster comprising one member of each family, whereas nonteleost jawed vertebrates contain four ParaHox genomic loci with six or seven ParaHox genes. Teleosts, which have experienced an additional whole-genome duplication, contain six ParaHox genomic loci with six ParaHox genes. Jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the most ancient group of vertebrates and are crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of vertebrate gene families. We have previously shown that lampreys contain six Hox gene loci. Here we report that lampreys contain only two ParaHox gene clusters (designated as α- and β-clusters) bearing five ParaHox genes (Gsxα, Pdxα, Cdxα, Gsxβ, and Cdxβ). The order and orientation of the three genes in the α-cluster are identical to that of the single cluster in amphioxus. However, the orientation of Gsxβ in the β-cluster is inverted. Interestingly, Gsxβ is expressed in the eye, unlike its homologs in jawed vertebrates, which are expressed mainly in the brain. The lamprey Pdxα is expressed in the pancreas similar to jawed vertebrate Pdx genes, indicating that the pancreatic expression of Pdx was acquired before the divergence of jawless and jawed vertebrate lineages. It is likely that the lamprey Pdxα plays a crucial role in pancreas specification and insulin production similar to the Pdx of jawed vertebrates.

  14. Functional Investigation of a Cotton Fiber HOX Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xue-ying; SHANGGUAN Xiao-xia; WANG Shui; WANG Ling-jian; CHEN Xiao-ya

    2008-01-01

    @@ Most of the plant homeodomain-containing proteins play important roles in regulating cell differentiation and organ development,and Arabidopsis GLABRA2 (GL2),a member of the class IV homeodomain-Leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) proteins,is a trichome and non-root hair cell regulator.We have analyzed several cotton homeodomain-containing proteins that belong to the class IV HD-ZIP family.One of them,GaHOX1,shows a high sequence identity to Arabidopsis GL2 (95% in the homeodomain and 64% overall).

  15. Regulation of the Caenorhabditis elegans posterior Hox gene egl-5 by microRNA and the polycomb-like gene sop-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Emmons, Scott W

    2009-03-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the domains of Hox gene expression are controlled by the novel global regulatory gene sop-2. We identified a region located 3' of the Hox gene egl-5 that promotes ectopic expression of an egl-5 reporter gene in a sop-2 mutant. SOP-2 could directly block positive regulatory factors acting in this region, or it could block their expression. We identified three possible miRNA binding sites within the egl-5 3' untranslated region (UTR). Cognate microRNAs are expressed in relevant tissues and can block egl-5 expression when expressed from a transgene. Mutation of the putative binding sites in the egl-5 3'UTR resulted in a modest degree of misexpression of a minimal egl-5 reporter gene, suggesting that microRNAs may contribute to the tight restriction of egl-5 expression to particular cell lineages.

  16. HOx Radical Behavior in Urban, Biogenic and Mixed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Schardt, N.; Mukherjee, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of HOx radicals in tropospheric chemistry is well-recognized. These roles include control of the lifetimes of a wide variety of trace gases, and control of photochemical ozone formation. The continued advance in understanding comes from laboratory investigations and field observations especially as part of comprehensive measurement campaigns. We participated in two recent observational campaigns aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft platform: NOMADSS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) and FRAPPE (Front Range Atmospheric Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment). During these studies, a wide varieties of air masses were sampled ranging from fresh urban to rural both without and without biogenic influence to marine, and including the impacts of emissions from oil and gas extraction and animal production. Among the wide variety of parameters and species related to tropospheric chemistry that were measured, our group made observations of HOx and related species: OH, HO2, HO2+RO2, H2SO4, and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) using selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The paper discusses the functional dependence of these species on other measures of the chemical environment (e.g. NO, VOCs, j-values) as well as comparison of model estimates with the observations.

  17. Molecular insights into the origin of the Hox-TALE patterning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Bruno; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Volovik, Yael; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Dard, Amélie; Frank, Dale; Technau, Ulrich; Merabet, Samir

    2014-03-18

    Despite tremendous body form diversity in nature, bilaterian animals share common sets of developmental genes that display conserved expression patterns in the embryo. Among them are the Hox genes, which define different identities along the anterior-posterior axis. Hox proteins exert their function by interaction with TALE transcription factors. Hox and TALE members are also present in some but not all non-bilaterian phyla, raising the question of how Hox-TALE interactions evolved to provide positional information. By using proteins from unicellular and multicellular lineages, we showed that these networks emerged from an ancestral generic motif present in Hox and other related protein families. Interestingly, Hox-TALE networks experienced additional and extensive molecular innovations that were likely crucial for differentiating Hox functions along body plans. Together our results highlight how homeobox gene families evolved during eukaryote evolution to eventually constitute a major patterning system in Eumetazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01939.001.

  18. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung after exposure to fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Razieh; Taghipour, Zahra; Karimi, Akbar; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Taghavi, Mohammad Mohsen; Shariati, Mahdi; Shabanizadeh, Ahmad; Jafari Naveh, Hamid Reza; Bidaki, Reza; Aminzadeh, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of pregnant women suffer from pregnancy-associated depression. Fluoxetine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is being employed as a therapy for depressive disorders. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine on neonatal lung development. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats (weighing 200-250 g) were treated daily with 7 mg/kg fluoxetine from gestation day 0 to gestation day 21, via gavage. The control group received a similar volume of distilled water only. Following delivery, the newborns and their lungs were immediately weighed in both of the groups. The right lung was fixed for histological assessments while the left lung was used for evaluation of the expression of SPC and HoxB5 by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Results have indicated that even though the body weight and the number of neonatal rats in both groups were the same, the lung weight of neonates exposed to fluoxetine was significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.05). Expression of both genes was increased, nonetheless, only elevation of HoxB5 was significant (P<0.05). Histological studies demonstrated that lung tissue in the fluoxetine treatment group morphologically appears to be similar to the pseudoglandular phase, whereas the control group lungs experienced more development. According to the upregulated expression of HoxB5 concerning histological findings, results of the present study showed that fluoxetine can influence lung growth and may in turn lead to delay in lung development. So establishment of studies to identify the effects of antidepressant drugs during pregnancy is deserved.

  19. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  20. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung at exposure to fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh R

    2016-11-01

    histological findings, results of the present study showed that fluoxetine can influence lung growth and may in turn lead to delay in lung development. So establishment of studies to identify the effects of antidepressant drugs during pregnancy is deserved. Keywords: fluoxetine, rat, lung, HoxB5, SPC

  1. Hox Proteins Display a Common and Ancestral Ability to Diversify Their Interaction Mode with the PBC Class Cofactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Bruno; Remacle, Sophie; Delfini, Marie-Claire; Rezsohazy, René; Graba, Yacine; Merabet, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Hox transcription factors control a number of developmental processes with the help of the PBC class proteins. In vitro analyses have established that the formation of Hox/PBC complexes relies on a short conserved Hox protein motif called the hexapeptide (HX). This paradigm is at the basis of the vast majority of experimental approaches dedicated to the study of Hox protein function. Here we questioned the unique and general use of the HX for PBC recruitment by using the Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assay. This method allows analyzing Hox-PBC interactions in vivo and at a genome-wide scale. We found that the HX is dispensable for PBC recruitment in the majority of investigated Drosophila and mouse Hox proteins. We showed that HX-independent interaction modes are uncovered by the presence of Meis class cofactors, a property which was also observed with Hox proteins of the cnidarian sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Finally, we revealed that paralog-specific motifs convey major PBC-recruiting functions in Drosophila Hox proteins. Altogether, our results highlight that flexibility in Hox-PBC interactions is an ancestral and evolutionary conserved character, which has strong implications for the understanding of Hox protein functions during normal development and pathologic processes. PMID:22745600

  2. Hox proteins display a common and ancestral ability to diversify their interaction mode with the PBC class cofactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hudry

    Full Text Available Hox transcription factors control a number of developmental processes with the help of the PBC class proteins. In vitro analyses have established that the formation of Hox/PBC complexes relies on a short conserved Hox protein motif called the hexapeptide (HX. This paradigm is at the basis of the vast majority of experimental approaches dedicated to the study of Hox protein function. Here we questioned the unique and general use of the HX for PBC recruitment by using the Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC assay. This method allows analyzing Hox-PBC interactions in vivo and at a genome-wide scale. We found that the HX is dispensable for PBC recruitment in the majority of investigated Drosophila and mouse Hox proteins. We showed that HX-independent interaction modes are uncovered by the presence of Meis class cofactors, a property which was also observed with Hox proteins of the cnidarian sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Finally, we revealed that paralog-specific motifs convey major PBC-recruiting functions in Drosophila Hox proteins. Altogether, our results highlight that flexibility in Hox-PBC interactions is an ancestral and evolutionary conserved character, which has strong implications for the understanding of Hox protein functions during normal development and pathologic processes.

  3. CONVERSION RATES OF SURFACE HOx RADICALS IN BEIJING CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xin-rong; WANG Li-xin; WANG Hui-xiang; MIAO Guo-fang

    2004-01-01

    Surface OH radical concentration in Beijing City was measured by impregnated filter trapping technique-high performance liquid chromatography (IFT-HPLC). The observed concentration of OH radical showed obvious diurnal and seasonal variations, with maximum readings at noon or afternoon, ~80×106OH/cm3 in summer and ~20×106-40×106OH/cm3 in fall. On the basis of measured data, the reaction rates related to the photochemical process of Hox (OH+HO2) were derived and characteristics of atmospheric chemical processes in the city were analyzed. The results showed that conversion rates of atmospheric OH and HO2 in the summer of Beijing City were air of the city mainly originated from the photolysis of the gaseous HNO2, and the main sink of OH were the photochemical reactions with VOCs, NO2, HCHO and CO. It was different from the clean area.

  4. Hox genes and the parasitic flatworms: new opportunities, challenges and lessons from the free-living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P D

    2008-03-01

    Research into the roles played by Hox and related homeotic gene families in the diverse and complex developmental programmes exhibited by parasitic flatworms (Platyhelminthes) can hardly be said to have begun, and thus presents considerable opportunity for new research. Although featured in some of the earliest screens for homeotic genes outside Drosophila and mice, surveys in parasitic flatworms are few in number and almost nothing is yet known of where or when the genes are expressed during ontogeny. This contrasts sharply with a significant body of literature concerning Hox genes in free-living flatworms which have long served as models for the study of regeneration and the maintenance of omnipotent cell lines. Nevertheless, available information suggests that the complement of Hox genes and other classes of homeobox-containing genes in parasitic flatworms is typical of their free-living cousins and of other members of the Lophotrochozoa. Recent work on Schistosoma combined with information on Hox gene expression in planarians indicates that at least some disruption of the clustered genomic arrangement of the genes, as well as of the strict spatial and temporal colinear patterns of expression typical in other groups, may be characteristic of flatworms. However, available data on the genomic arrangement and expression of flatworm Hox genes is so limited at present that such generalities are highly tenuous. Moreover, a basic underlying pattern of colinearity is still observed in their spatial expression patterns making them suitable as cell or region-specific markers. I discuss a number of fundamental developmental questions and some of the challenges to addressing them in relation to each of the major parasitic lineages. In addition, I present newly characterized Hox genes from the model tapeworm Hymenolepis and analyze these by Bayesian inference together with >100 Hox and ParaHox homeodomains of flatworms and select lophotrochozoan taxa, providing a

  5. Evolution of the snake body form reveals homoplasy in amniote Hox gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jason J; Polly, P David

    2015-04-02

    Hox genes regulate regionalization of the axial skeleton in vertebrates, and changes in their expression have been proposed to be a fundamental mechanism driving the evolution of new body forms. The origin of the snake-like body form, with its deregionalized pre-cloacal axial skeleton, has been explained as either homogenization of Hox gene expression domains, or retention of standard vertebrate Hox domains with alteration of downstream expression that suppresses development of distinct regions. Both models assume a highly regionalized ancestor, but the extent of deregionalization of the primaxial domain (vertebrae, dorsal ribs) of the skeleton in snake-like body forms has never been analysed. Here we combine geometric morphometrics and maximum-likelihood analysis to show that the pre-cloacal primaxial domain of elongate, limb-reduced lizards and snakes is not deregionalized compared with limbed taxa, and that the phylogenetic structure of primaxial morphology in reptiles does not support a loss of regionalization in the evolution of snakes. We demonstrate that morphometric regional boundaries correspond to mapped gene expression domains in snakes, suggesting that their primaxial domain is patterned by a normally functional Hox code. Comparison of primaxial osteology in fossil and modern amniotes with Hox gene distributions within Amniota indicates that a functional, sequentially expressed Hox code patterned a subtle morphological gradient along the anterior-posterior axis in stem members of amniote clades and extant lizards, including snakes. The highly regionalized skeletons of extant archosaurs and mammals result from independent evolution in the Hox code and do not represent ancestral conditions for clades with snake-like body forms. The developmental origin of snakes is best explained by decoupling of the primaxial and abaxial domains and by increases in somite number, not by changes in the function of primaxial Hox genes.

  6. A Hox regulatory network of hindbrain segmentation is conserved to the base of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Hugo J; Bronner, Marianne E; Krumlauf, Robb

    2014-10-23

    A defining feature governing head patterning of jawed vertebrates is a highly conserved gene regulatory network that integrates hindbrain segmentation with segmentally restricted domains of Hox gene expression. Although non-vertebrate chordates display nested domains of axial Hox expression, they lack hindbrain segmentation. The sea lamprey, a jawless fish, can provide unique insights into vertebrate origins owing to its phylogenetic position at the base of the vertebrate tree. It has been suggested that lamprey may represent an intermediate state where nested Hox expression has not been coupled to the process of hindbrain segmentation. However, little is known about the regulatory network underlying Hox expression in lamprey or its relationship to hindbrain segmentation. Here, using a novel tool that allows cross-species comparisons of regulatory elements between jawed and jawless vertebrates, we report deep conservation of both upstream regulators and segmental activity of enhancer elements across these distant species. Regulatory regions from diverse gnathostomes drive segmental reporter expression in the lamprey hindbrain and require the same transcriptional inputs (for example, Kreisler (also known as Mafba), Krox20 (also known as Egr2a)) in both lamprey and zebrafish. We find that lamprey hox genes display dynamic segmentally restricted domains of expression; we also isolated a conserved exonic hox2 enhancer from lamprey that drives segmental expression in rhombomeres 2 and 4. Our results show that coupling of Hox gene expression to segmentation of the hindbrain is an ancient trait with origin at the base of vertebrates that probably led to the formation of rhombomeric compartments with an underlying Hox code.

  7. Multiple chromosomal rearrangements structured the ancestral vertebrate Hox-bearing protochromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While the proposal that large-scale genome expansions occurred early in vertebrate evolution is widely accepted, the exact mechanisms of the expansion--such as a single or multiple rounds of whole genome duplication, bloc chromosome duplications, large-scale individual gene duplications, or some combination of these--is unclear. Gene families with a single invertebrate member but four vertebrate members, such as the Hox clusters, provided early support for Ohno's hypothesis that two rounds of genome duplication (the 2R-model occurred in the stem lineage of extant vertebrates. However, despite extensive study, the duplication history of the Hox clusters has remained unclear, calling into question its usefulness in resolving the role of large-scale gene or genome duplications in early vertebrates. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the vertebrate Hox clusters and several linked genes (the Hox "paralogon" and show that different phylogenies are obtained for Dlx and Col genes than for Hox and ErbB genes. We show that these results are robust to errors in phylogenetic inference and suggest that these competing phylogenies can be resolved if two chromosomal crossover events occurred in the ancestral vertebrate. These results resolve conflicting data on the order of Hox gene duplications and the role of genome duplication in vertebrate evolution and suggest that a period of genome reorganization occurred after genome duplications in early vertebrates.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serano, Julia M; Martin, Arnaud; Liubicich, Danielle M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; La, Konnor; Browne, William E; Grimwood, Jane; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play crucial roles in establishing regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis in bilaterian animals, and have been implicated in generating morphological diversity throughout evolution. Here we report the identification, expression, and initial genomic characterization of the complete set of Hox genes from the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. Parhyale is an emerging model system that is amenable to experimental manipulations and evolutionary comparisons among the arthropods. Our analyses indicate that the Parhyale genome contains a single copy of each canonical Hox gene with the exception of fushi tarazu, and preliminary mapping suggests that at least some of these genes are clustered together in the genome. With few exceptions, Parhyale Hox genes exhibit both temporal and spatial colinearity, and expression boundaries correlate with morphological differences between segments and their associated appendages. This work represents the most comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in a crustacean to date, and provides a foundation for functional studies aimed at elucidating the role of Hox genes in arthropod development and evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Hox complex - an interview with Denis Duboule. Interviewed by Richardson, Michael K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboule, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Denis Duboule is one of the most influential and highly-cited scientists in developmental biology. Born in Geneva in 1955, he holds dual Swiss and French nationality. His undergraduate studies in biology at the University of Geneva included research on mouse embryology. He later learned molecular techniques in the laboratory of Pierre Chambon, becoming a major player in characterising the newly-discovered vertebrate Hox genes. He helped discover their genomic clustering, realising that they had arisen by trans duplication. With Gaunt and Sharpe, he proposed that vertebrate Hox clusters might show spatial colinearity, and subsequently extended this concept to the timing of gene activation (temporal colinearity). Along with the Krumlauf laboratory, he reported the structural and functional conservation of the homeotic systems in flies and vertebrates. His lab was the first to describe nested patterns of Hox gene expression in the developing mouse limb, and later showed that digit-associated Hoxd gene expression was lacking in zebrafish paired fin development. His concept of phylotypic progression helps explain major evolutionary developmental phenomena in terms of Hox gene regulatory networks. His research helped reveal that the genital tubercle may, like the limb, be patterned by Hox genes. His lab developed targeted meiotic recombination (TAMERE), using it to make profound advances in our understanding of Hox gene regulation. Remote enhancers linked to digit patterning have been uncovered, together with a likely mechanism for colinearity. Denis lives in Geneva with his wife Brigitte Galliot, also a scientist, with their four children.

  10. Evidence for a myotomal Hox/Myf cascade governing nonautonomous control of rib specification within global vertebral domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Tânia; Moncaut, Natalia; Carapuço, Marta; Nóvoa, Ana; Bom, Joana; Mallo, Moisés

    2010-04-20

    Hox genes are essential for the patterning of the axial skeleton. Hox group 10 has been shown to specify the lumbar domain by setting a rib-inhibiting program in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). We have now produced mice with ribs in every vertebra by ectopically expressing Hox group 6 in the PSM, indicating that Hox genes are also able to specify the thoracic domain. We show that the information provided by Hox genes to specify rib-containing and rib-less areas is first interpreted in the myotome through the regional-specific control of Myf5 and Myf6 expression. This information is then transmitted to the sclerotome by a system that includes FGF and PDGF signaling to produce vertebrae with or without ribs at different axial levels. Our findings offer a new perspective of how Hox genes produce global patterns in the axial skeleton and support a redundant nonmyogenic role of Myf5 and Myf6 in rib formation.

  11. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: a dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákány, J; Fromental-Ramain, C; Warot, X; Duboule, D

    1997-12-09

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose-response is observed in the morphogenesis of the penian bone, the baculum, which further suggests that digits and external genitalia share this genetic control mechanism. A progressive reduction in the dose of Hox gene products led first to ectrodactyly, then to olygodactyly and adactyly. Interestingly, this transition between the pentadactyl to the adactyl formula went through a step of polydactyly. We propose that in the distal appendage of polydactylous short-digited ancestral tetrapods, such as Acanthostega, the HoxA complex was predominantly active. Subsequent recruitment of the HoxD complex contributed to both reductions in digit number and increase in digit length. Thus, transition through a polydactylous limb before reaching and stabilizing the pentadactyl pattern may have relied, at least in part, on asynchronous and independent changes in the regulation of HoxA and HoxD gene complexes.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  13. Close Sequence Comparisons are Sufficient to Identify Humancis-Regulatory Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2005-12-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons, due to the lack of a universal metric for sequence conservation, and also the paucity of empirically defined benchmark sets of cis-regulatory elements. To address this problem, we developed a general-purpose algorithm (Gumby) that detects slowly-evolving regions in primate, mammalian and more distant comparisons without requiring adjustment of parameters, and ranks conserved elements by P-value using Karlin-Altschul statistics. We benchmarked Gumby predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci, and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using reporter-gene assays in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity and specificity by comparison with 1-5 other eutherian mammals or 6 other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole genome comparative analysis, which explains some of these findings. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for testing at embryonic time points.

  14. Hox gene function and interaction in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus (Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, David R; Liu, Paul Z; Hughes, Cynthia L; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2005-11-15

    Studies in genetic model organisms such as Drosophila have demonstrated that the homeotic complex (Hox) genes impart segmental identity during embryogenesis. Comparative studies in a wide range of other insect taxa have shown that the Hox genes are expressed in largely conserved domains along the anterior-posterior body axis, but whether they are performing the same functions in different insects is an open question. Most of the Hox genes have been studied functionally in only a few holometabolous insects that undergo metamorphosis. Thus, it is unclear how the Hox genes are functioning in the majority of direct-developing insects and other arthropods. To address this question, we used a combination of RNAi and in situ hybridization to reveal the expression, functions, and regulatory interactions of the Hox genes in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. Our results reveal many similarities and some interesting differences compared to Drosophila. We find that the gene Antennapedia is required for the identity of all three thoracic segments, while Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B cooperate to pattern the abdomen. The three abdominal genes exhibit posterior prevalence like in Drosophila, but apparently via some post-transcriptional mechanism. The functions of the head genes proboscipedia, Deformed, and Sex combs reduced were shown previously, and here we find that the complex temporal expression of pb in the labium is like that of other insects, but its regulatory relationship with Scr is unique. Overall, our data reveal that the evolution of insect Hox genes has included many small changes within general conservation of expression and function, and that the milkweed bug provides a useful model for understanding the roles of Hox genes in a direct-developing insect.

  15. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14. Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem–atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16, while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2, and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity

  16. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vibha Rani

    2007-12-01

    The formation of diverse cell types from an invariant set of genes is governed by biochemical and molecular processes that regulate gene activity. A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the major function of genomics. Computational genomics is a rapidly emerging area for deciphering the regulation of metazoan genes as well as interpreting the results of high-throughput screening. The integration of computer science with biology has expedited molecular modelling and processing of large-scale data inputs such as microarrays, analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes. Many bioinformaticians have developed various algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from the sequence, gene expression and interaction data. This review contains compiled information of various computational methods adopted to dissect gene expression pathways.

  17. Hox genes, homeosis and the evolution of segment identity: no need for hopeless monsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akam, M

    1998-01-01

    Significant changes have occurred in the developmental role of Hox genes, even within groups of arthropods that already have complex body plans and many different segment types. This is hard to reconcile with the 'selector gene' model for Hox gene function. Selector genes act as stable binary switches that direct lineages of cells to adopt alternative developmental fates. This model suggests that the regulation of selector genes can only evolve through mutations that alter the identity of whole developmental compartments -in the case of Hox genes, whole segments. Once segments have evolved distinct morphology and function, such mutations will result in dramatic homeotic transformations that are unlikely to be tolerated by natural selection. Thus we would expect the developmental role of these "master control genes" to become frozen as body plans become more complex. I argue for a revised model for the role and regulation of the Hox genes. This provides alternative mechanisms for evolutionary change, that may lead to incremental changes in segment morphology. The summation of such changes over long periods of time would result in differences in Hox gene function between taxa comparable to the effects of gross homeotic mutations, without the need to invoke the selective advantage of hopeful monsters.

  18. Deep time perspective on turtle neck evolution: chasing the Hox code by vertebral morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Christine; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2017-08-21

    The unparalleled ability of turtle neck retraction is possible in three different modes, which characterize stem turtles, living side-necked (Pleurodira), and hidden-necked (Cryptodira) turtles, respectively. Despite the conservatism in vertebral count among turtles, there is significant functional and morphological regionalization in the cervical vertebral column. Since Hox genes play a fundamental role in determining the differentiation in vertebra morphology and based on our reconstruction of evolutionary genetics in deep time, we hypothesize genetic differences among the turtle groups and between turtles and other land vertebrates. We correlated anterior Hox gene expression and the quantifiable shape of the vertebrae to investigate the morphological modularity in the neck across living and extinct turtles. This permitted the reconstruction of the hypothetical ancestral Hox code pattern of the whole turtle clade. The scenario of the evolution of axial patterning in turtles indicates shifts in the spatial expression of HoxA-5 in relation to the reduction of cervical ribs in modern turtles and of HoxB-5 linked with a lower morphological differentiation between the anterior cervical vertebrae observed in cryptodirans. By comparison with the mammalian pattern, we illustrate how the fixed count of eight cervical vertebrae in turtles resulted from the emergence of the unique turtle shell.

  19. The vertebrate Hox gene regulatory network for hindbrain segmentation: Evolution and diversification: Coupling of a Hox gene regulatory network to hindbrain segmentation is an ancient trait originating at the base of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Hugo J; Bronner, Marianne E; Krumlauf, Robb

    2016-06-01

    Hindbrain development is orchestrated by a vertebrate gene regulatory network that generates segmental patterning along the anterior-posterior axis via Hox genes. Here, we review analyses of vertebrate and invertebrate chordate models that inform upon the evolutionary origin and diversification of this network. Evidence from the sea lamprey reveals that the hindbrain regulatory network generates rhombomeric compartments with segmental Hox expression and an underlying Hox code. We infer that this basal feature was present in ancestral vertebrates and, as an evolutionarily constrained developmental state, is fundamentally important for patterning of the vertebrate hindbrain across diverse lineages. Despite the common ground plan, vertebrates exhibit neuroanatomical diversity in lineage-specific patterns, with different vertebrates revealing variations of Hox expression in the hindbrain that could underlie this diversification. Invertebrate chordates lack hindbrain segmentation but exhibit some conserved aspects of this network, with retinoic acid signaling playing a role in establishing nested domains of Hox expression. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Nunes, Andreia; Woltering, Joost M.; Casaca, Ana; Nóvoa, Ana; Vinagre, Tânia; Hunter, Margaret E.; Duboule, Denis; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-01-01

    Patterning of the vertebrate skeleton requires the coordinated activity of Hox genes. In particular, Hox10 proteins are essential to set the transition from thoracic to lumbar vertebrae because of their rib-repressing activity. In snakes, however, the thoracic region extends well into Hox10-expressing areas of the embryo, suggesting that these proteins are unable to block rib formation. Here, we show that this is not a result of the loss of rib-repressing properties by the snake proteins, but rather to a single base pair change in a Hox/Paired box (Pax)-responsive enhancer, which prevents the binding of Hox proteins. This polymorphism is also found in Paenungulata, such as elephants and manatees, which have extended rib cages. In vivo, this modified enhancer failed to respond to Hox10 activity, supporting its role in the extension of rib cages. In contrast, the enhancer could still interact with Hoxb6 and Pax3 to promote rib formation. These results suggest that a polymorphism in the Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer may have played a role in the evolution of the vertebrate spine by differently modulating its response to rib-suppressing and rib-promoting Hox proteins.

  1. Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Nunes, Andreia; Woltering, Joost M; Casaca, Ana; Nóvoa, Ana; Vinagre, Tânia; Hunter, Margaret E; Duboule, Denis; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-06-25

    Patterning of the vertebrate skeleton requires the coordinated activity of Hox genes. In particular, Hox10 proteins are essential to set the transition from thoracic to lumbar vertebrae because of their rib-repressing activity. In snakes, however, the thoracic region extends well into Hox10-expressing areas of the embryo, suggesting that these proteins are unable to block rib formation. Here, we show that this is not a result of the loss of rib-repressing properties by the snake proteins, but rather to a single base pair change in a Hox/Paired box (Pax)-responsive enhancer, which prevents the binding of Hox proteins. This polymorphism is also found in Paenungulata, such as elephants and manatees, which have extended rib cages. In vivo, this modified enhancer failed to respond to Hox10 activity, supporting its role in the extension of rib cages. In contrast, the enhancer could still interact with Hoxb6 and Pax3 to promote rib formation. These results suggest that a polymorphism in the Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer may have played a role in the evolution of the vertebrate spine by differently modulating its response to rib-suppressing and rib-promoting Hox proteins.

  2. Drosophila Grainyhead specifies late programmes of neural proliferation by regulating the mitotic activity and Hox-dependent apoptosis of neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Caterina; Gould, Alex P

    2005-09-01

    The Drosophila central nervous system is generated by stem-cell-like progenitors called neuroblasts. Early in development, neuroblasts switch through a temporal series of transcription factors modulating neuronal fate according to the time of birth. At later stages, it is known that neuroblasts switch on expression of Grainyhead (Grh) and maintain it through many subsequent divisions. We report that the function of this conserved transcription factor is to specify the regionalised patterns of neurogenesis that are characteristic of postembryonic stages. In the thorax, Grh prolongs neural proliferation by maintaining a mitotically active neuroblast. In the abdomen, Grh terminates neural proliferation by regulating the competence of neuroblasts to undergo apoptosis in response to Abdominal-A expression. This study shows how a factor specific to late-stage neural progenitors can regulate the time at which neural proliferation stops, and identifies mechanisms linking it to the Hox axial patterning system.

  3. Are Cirripedia hopeful monsters? Cytogenetic approach and evidence for a Hox gene cluster in the cirripede crustacean Sacculina carcini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géant, Elodie; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Deutsch, Jean S

    2006-01-01

    The "hopeful monster" has haunted evolutionary thinking since Richard Goldschmidt coined the phrase in 1933. The phrase is directly related to genetic mechanisms in development and evolution. Cirripedes are peculiar crustaceans in that they all lack abdomens as adults. In a previous study aimed at describing the repertoire of Hox genes of the Cirripedia, we failed to isolate the abdominal-A gene in three species representative of all three cirripede orders. To address the question of whether the cirripede ancestor could have been a "hopeful monster" arising from a rearrangement of the Hox complex, we have performed a cytogenetic analysis of the Hox complex of the cirripede Sacculina carcini. We present here molecular and cytogenetic evidence for the grouping of the Hox genes on a single chromosome. This is the first direct evidence reported for the grouping of Hox genes on the same chromosome in a non-insect arthropod species.

  4. The evolution and maintenance of Hox gene clusters in vertebrates and the teleost-specific genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Meyer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Hox genes are known to specify spatial identities along the anterior-posterior axis during embryogenesis. In vertebrates and most other deuterostomes, they are arranged in sets of uninterrupted clusters on chromosomes, and are in most cases expressed in a "colinear" fashion, in which genes closer to the 3-end of the Hox clusters are expressed earlier and more anteriorly and genes close to the 5-end of the clusters later and more posteriorly. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how Hox gene clusters have been modified from basal lineages of deuterostomes to diverse taxa of vertebrates. Our parsimony reconstruction of Hox cluster architecture at various stages of vertebrate evolution highlights that the variation in Hox cluster structures among jawed vertebrates is mostly due to secondary lineage-specific gene losses and an additional genome duplication that occurred in the actinopterygian stem lineage, the teleost-specific genome duplication (TSGD).

  5. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M de Jong

    Full Text Available Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids

  6. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Danielle M; Seaver, Elaine C

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids, planarians and acoel

  7. On the "ozone deficit problem": what are Ox and HOx catalytic cycles for ozone depletion hiding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varandas, António J C

    2002-05-17

    Studies on the role of vibrational excitation in the reactants for the O2 + O2, OH + O2, and HO2 + O2 reactions show that they can be important sources of ozone in the stratosphere, particularly at conditions of local thermodynamic disequilibrium. The results suggest that the Ox and HOx cycles commonly viewed as catalytic sinks of ozone may actually lead to its production, and hence help to clarify the "ozone deficit problem". This paper also presents an explanation for the general overestimation of the OH abundance in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere through standard HOx chemistry.

  8. Developmental roles of pufferfish Hox clusters and genome evolution in ray-fin fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Angel; Suzuki, Tohru; Yan, Yi-Lin; Pomeroy, Jordan; Singer, Amy; Amemiya, Chris; Postlethwait, John H

    2004-01-01

    The pufferfish skeleton lacks ribs and pelvic fins, and has fused bones in the cranium and jaw. It has been hypothesized that this secondarily simplified pufferfish morphology is due to reduced complexity of the pufferfish Hox complexes. To test this hypothesis, we determined the genomic structure of Hox clusters in the Southern pufferfish Spheroides nephelus and interrogated genomic databases for the Japanese pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (fugu). Both species have at least seven Hox clusters, including two copies of Hoxb and Hoxd clusters, a single Hoxc cluster, and at least two Hoxa clusters, with a portion of a third Hoxa cluster in fugu. Results support genome duplication before divergence of zebrafish and pufferfish lineages, followed by loss of a Hoxc cluster in the pufferfish lineage and loss of a Hoxd cluster in the zebrafish lineage. Comparative analysis shows that duplicate genes continued to be lost for hundreds of millions of years, contrary to predictions for the permanent preservation of gene duplicates. Gene expression analysis in fugu embryos by in situ hybridization revealed evolutionary change in gene expression as predicted by the duplication-degeneration-complementation model. These experiments rule out the hypothesis that the simplified pufferfish body plan is due to reduction in Hox cluster complexity, and support the notion that genome duplication contributed to the radiation of teleosts into half of all vertebrate species by increasing developmental diversification of duplicate genes in daughter lineages.

  9. Chemistry of hydrogen oxide radicals (HOx in the Arctic troposphere in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jaeglé

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We use observations from the April 2008 NASA ARCTAS aircraft campaign to the North American Arctic, interpreted with a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, to better understand the sources and cycling of hydrogen oxide radicals (HOx≡H+OH+peroxy radicals and their reservoirs (HOy≡HOx+peroxides in the springtime Arctic atmosphere. We find that a standard gas-phase chemical mechanism overestimates the observed HO2 and H2O2 concentrations. Computation of HOx and HOy gas-phase chemical budgets on the basis of the aircraft observations also indicates a large missing sink for both. We hypothesize that this could reflect HO2 uptake by aerosols, favored by low temperatures and relatively high aerosol loadings, through a mechanism that does not produce H2O2. We implemented such an uptake of HO2 by aerosol in the model using a standard reactive uptake coefficient parameterization with γ(HO2 values ranging from 0.02 at 275 K to 0.5 at 220 K. This successfully reproduces the concentrations and vertical distributions of the different HOx species and HOy reservoirs. HO2 uptake by aerosol is then a major HOx and HOy sink, decreasing mean OH and HO2 concentrations in the Arctic troposphere by 32% and 31% respectively. Better rate and product data for HO2 uptake by aerosol are needed to understand this role of aerosols in limiting the oxidizing power of the Arctic atmosphere.

  10. Long Noncoding RNAs in Development: Solidifying the Lncs to Hox Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S. Dasen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are pervasively expressed in mammals, although their functions during development remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Reports, Delpretti et al. and Li et al. suggest essential roles for lncRNAs in coordinating Hox gene expression.

  11. ParaHox genes in pancreatic cell cultures: effects on the insulin promoter regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosanas-Urgell, Jordi Garcia-Fernàndez, Gemma Marfany

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding PDX1 (pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1, the main transcription factor regulating the glucose-dependent transactivation of the insulin promoter in pancreatic β-cells, clusters with two closely related homeobox genes (Gsh1 and Cdx2/3, all of them belonging to the ParaHox gene family. The ParaHox gene evolutionary history in the vertebrate lineage involved duplications of the cluster and subsequent loss of some members, so that eventually, the human and murine genomes contain only 6 ParaHox genes. The crucial role of PDX1 in pancreas development, beta-cell formation and insulin transcription regulation has long been established. There is some data on CDX2/3 function in α-cells, but remarkably, nothing is known on the role of the other ParaHox genes, which are also expressed in the endocrine pancreas. Homeobox transcription factors that belong to the same family show high conservation of the homeodomain and share similar target sites and oligomeric partners, and thus may act redundantly, synergistically or antagonistically on the same promoters. Therefore, we explored the effects of the Parahox proteins (GSH1, GSH2, CDX1, CDX2/3 and CDX4 on the regulation of the insulin promoter in transfected α- and β- cultured cell lines at different glucose concentrations and compared them to those of PDX1. Noticeably, several ParaHox transcription factors are able to transactivate or inhibit the insulin promoter, depending on the cell type and glucose concentration, thus suggesting their possible participation in the regulation of similar target genes, such as insulin, either by silencing or activating them, in the absence of PDX1.

  12. The RNA-binding protein ELAV regulates Hox RNA processing, expression and function within the Drosophila nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Picao-Osorio, Joao; Villava, Casandra; Patraquim, Pedro; Lafuente, Elvira; Aspden, Julie; Thomsen, Stefan; Technau, Gerhard M; Alonso, Claudio R

    2014-05-01

    The regulated head-to-tail expression of Hox genes provides a coordinate system for the activation of specific programmes of cell differentiation according to axial level. Recent work indicates that Hox expression can be regulated via RNA processing but the underlying mechanisms and biological significance of this form of regulation remain poorly understood. Here we explore these issues within the developing Drosophila central nervous system (CNS). We show that the pan-neural RNA-binding protein (RBP) ELAV (Hu antigen) regulates the RNA processing patterns of the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) within the embryonic CNS. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and imaging approaches we demonstrate that ELAV binds to discrete elements within Ubx RNAs and that its genetic removal reduces Ubx protein expression in the CNS leading to the respecification of cellular subroutines under Ubx control, thus defining for the first time a specific cellular role of ELAV within the developing CNS. Artificial provision of ELAV in glial cells (a cell type that lacks ELAV) promotes Ubx expression, suggesting that ELAV-dependent regulation might contribute to cell type-specific Hox expression patterns within the CNS. Finally, we note that expression of abdominal A and Abdominal B is reduced in elav mutant embryos, whereas other Hox genes (Antennapedia) are not affected. Based on these results and the evolutionary conservation of ELAV and Hox genes we propose that the modulation of Hox RNA processing by ELAV serves to adapt the morphogenesis of the CNS to axial level by regulating Hox expression and consequently activating local programmes of neural differentiation.

  13. Genetic interactions between Shox2 and Hox genes during the regional growth and development of the mouse limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Stanley J; Wang, Fan; Cobb, John

    2014-11-01

    The growth and development of the vertebrate limb relies on homeobox genes of the Hox and Shox families, with their independent mutation often giving dose-dependent effects. Here we investigate whether Shox2 and Hox genes function together during mouse limb development by modulating their relative dosage and examining the limb for nonadditive effects on growth. Using double mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single embryos, we first show that Shox2 and Hox genes have associated spatial expression dynamics, with Shox2 expression restricted to the proximal limb along with Hoxd9 and Hoxa11 expression, juxtaposing the distal expression of Hoxa13 and Hoxd13. By generating mice with all possible dosage combinations of mutant Shox2 alleles and HoxA/D cluster deletions, we then show that their coordinated proximal limb expression is critical to generate normally proportioned limb segments. These epistatic interactions tune limb length, where Shox2 underexpression enhances, and Shox2 overexpression suppresses, Hox-mutant phenotypes. Disruption of either Shox2 or Hox genes leads to a similar reduction in Runx2 expression in the developing humerus, suggesting their concerted action drives cartilage maturation during normal development. While we furthermore provide evidence that Hox gene function influences Shox2 expression, this regulation is limited in extent and is unlikely on its own to be a major explanation for their genetic interaction. Given the similar effect of human SHOX mutations on regional limb growth, Shox and Hox genes may generally function as genetic interaction partners during the growth and development of the proximal vertebrate limb.

  14. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: A dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications

    OpenAIRE

    Zákány, József; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Warot, Xavier; Duboule, Denis

    1997-01-01

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose–response is o...

  15. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: A dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákány, József; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Warot, Xavier; Duboule, Denis

    1997-01-01

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose–response is observed in the morphogenesis of the penian bone, the baculum, which further suggests that digits and external genitalia share this genetic control mechanism. A progressive reduction in the dose of Hox gene products led first to ectrodactyly, then to olygodactyly and adactyly. Interestingly, this transition between the pentadactyl to the adactyl formula went through a step of polydactyly. We propose that in the distal appendage of polydactylous short-digited ancestral tetrapods, such as Acanthostega, the HoxA complex was predominantly active. Subsequent recruitment of the HoxD complex contributed to both reductions in digit number and increase in digit length. Thus, transition through a polydactylous limb before reaching and stabilizing the pentadactyl pattern may have relied, at least in part, on asynchronous and independent changes in the regulation of HoxA and HoxD gene complexes. PMID:9391088

  16. Hox C6 expression during development and regeneration of forelimbs in larval Notophthalmus viridescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, P A; Tsilfidis, C; Liversage, R A

    1999-06-01

    A central theme concerning the epimorphic regenerative potential of urodele amphibian appendages is that limb regeneration in the adult parallels larval limb development. Results of previous research have led to the suggestion that homeobox containing genes are "re-expressed" during the epimorphic regeneration of forelimbs of adult Notophthalmus viridescens in patterns which retrace larval limb development. However, to date no literature exists concerning expression patterns of any homeobox containing genes during larval development of this species. The lack of such information has been a hindrance in exploring the similarities as well as differences which exist between limb regeneration in adults and limb development in larvae. Here we report the first such results of the localization of Hox C6 (formerly, NvHBox-1) in developing and regenerating forelimbs of N. viridescens larvae as demonstrated by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Inasmuch as the pattern of Hox C6 expression is similar in developing forelimb buds of larvae and epimorphically regenerating forelimb blastemata of both adults and larvae, our results support the paradigm that epimorphic regeneration in adult newts parallels larval forelimb development. However, in contrast with observations which document the presence of Hox C6 in both intact, as well as regenerating hindlimbs and tails of adult newts, our results reveal no such Hox C6 expression during larval development of hindlimbs or the tail. As such, our findings indicate that critical differences in larval hindlimb and tail development versus adult expression patterns of this gene in these two appendages may be due primarily to differences in gene regulation as opposed to gene function. Thus, the apparent ability of urodeles to regulate genes in such a highly co-ordinated fashion so as to replace lost, differentiated, appendicular structures in adult animals may assist, at least in part, in better elucidating the phenomenon of epimorphic

  17. Functional similarity in appendage specification by the Ultrabithorax and abdominal-A Drosophila HOX genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Casares, F.; Calleja, M.; Sánchez-Herrero, E

    1996-01-01

    In Drosophila, the Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B HOX genes of the bithorax complex determine the identity of part of the thorax and the whole abdomen. Either the absence of these genes or their ectopic expression transform segments into the identity of different ones along the antero-posterior axis. Here we show that misexpression of Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and, to some extent, Abdominal-B genes cause similar transformations in some of the fruitfly appendages: antennal tissue ...

  18. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation.

  19. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Di Bonito

    Full Text Available Rhombomeres (r contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN, and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  20. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonito, Maria; Narita, Yuichi; Avallone, Bice; Sequino, Luigi; Mancuso, Marta; Andolfi, Gennaro; Franzè, Anna Maria; Puelles, Luis; Rijli, Filippo M; Studer, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    Rhombomeres (r) contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN), and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  1. HOX Gene Promoter Prediction and Inter-genomic Comparison: An Evo-Devo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla A. Endriga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes direct the anterior-posterior axis of the body plan in eukaryotic organisms. Promoter regions upstream of the Hox genes jumpstart the transcription process. CpG islands found within the promoter regions can cause silencing of these promoters. The locations of the promoter regions and the CpG islands of Homeo sapiens sapiens (human, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee, Mus musculus (mouse, and Rattus norvegicus (brown rat are compared and related to the possible influence on the specification of the mammalian body plan. The sequence of each gene in Hox clusters A-D of the mammals considered were retrieved from Ensembl and locations of promoter regions and CpG islands predicted using Exon Finder. The predicted promoter sequences were confirmed via BLAST and verified against the Eukaryotic Promoter Database. The significance of the locations was determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Among the four clusters, only promoter locations in cluster B showed significant difference. HOX B genes have been linked with the control of genes that direct the development of axial morphology, particularly of the vertebral column bones. The magnitude of variation among the body plans of closely-related species can thus be partially attributed to the promoter kind, location and number, and gene inactivation via CpG methylation.

  2. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  3. An insight into the phylogenetic history of HOX linked gene families in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzeschik Karl-Heinz

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human chromosomes 2q, 7, 12q and 17q show extensive intra-genomic homology, containing duplicate, triplicate and quadruplicate paralogous regions centered on the HOX gene clusters. The fact that two or more representatives of different gene families are linked with HOX clusters is taken as evidence that these paralogous gene sets might have arisen from a single chromosomal segment through block or whole chromosome duplication events. This would imply that the constituent genes including the HOX clusters reflect the architecture of a single ancestral block (before vertebrate origin where all of these genes were linked in a single copy. Results In the present study we have employed the currently available set of protein data for a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate genomes to analyze the phylogenetic history of 11 multigene families with three or more of their representatives linked to human HOX clusters. A topology comparison approach revealed four discrete co-duplicated groups: group 1 involves the genes from GLI, HH, INHB, IGFBP (cluster-1, and SLC4A families; group 2 involves ERBB, ZNFN1A, and IGFBP (cluster-2 gene families; group 3 involves the HOX clusters and the SP gene family; group 4 involves the integrin beta chain and myosine light chain families. The distinct genes within each co-duplicated group share the same evolutionary history and are duplicated in concert with each other, while the constituent genes of two different co-duplicated groups may not share their evolutionary history and may not have duplicated simultaneously. Conclusion We conclude that co-duplicated groups may themselves be remnants of ancient small-scale duplications (involving chromosomal segments or gene-clusters which occurred at different time points during chordate evolution. Whereas the recent combination of genes from distinct co-duplicated groups on different chromosomal regions (human chromosomes 2q, 7, 12q, and 17q is

  4. Evolution of the Hox gene complex from an evolutionary ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Walter J; Kloter, Urs; Suga, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we consider the question of how the ordered clusters of Hox genes arose during evolution. Since ordered Hox clusters are found in all major superphyla, we have to assume that the Hox clusters arose before the Cambrian "explosion" giving rise to all of these taxa. Based on his studies of the bithorax complex (BX-C) in Drosophila Lewis considered the ground state to be the mesothoracic segment (T2) since the deletion of all of the genes of the BX-C leads to a transformation of all segments from T3 to A8/9 (the last abdominal segment) into T2 segments. We define the developmental ground state genetically, by assuming that loss-of-function mutants lead to transformations toward the ground state, whereas gain-of-function mutants lead to homeotic transformations away from the ground state. By this definition, T2 also represents the developmental ground state, if one includes the anterior genes, that is, those of the Antennapedia complex. We have reconstructed the evolution of the Hox cluster on the basis of known genetic mechanisms which involve unequal crossover and lead from an urhox gene, first to an anterior and a posterior gene and subsequently to intermediate genes which are progressively inserted, between the anterior and posterior genes. These intermediate genes are recombinant due to unequal crossover, whereas the anterior and posterior genes are not affected and therefore had the longest time to diverge from the urhox gene. The molecular phylogenetic analysis strongly supports this model. We consider the ground state to be both developmental and evolutionary and to represent the prototypic body segment. It corresponds to T2 and is specified by Antennapedia or Hox6, respectively. Experiments in the mouse also suggest that the ground state is a thoracic segment. Evolution leads from the prototypic segment to segmental divergence in both the anterior and posterior direction. The most anterior head and tail segments are specified by homeobox genes

  5. 猪繁殖候选基因HoxA10的克隆及表达分析%Cloning and expression analysis of HoxA10,a candidate gene influencing reproduction traits in pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓宁; 方梅霞; 何小梅; 聂庆华; 张细权

    2011-01-01

    同源异形盒A10基因(Homeobox 10 gene,HoxA10)是Hox基因家族中重要一员,与子宫形态的发生,生育期子宫内膜的周期性形态发育密切相关,是与猪繁殖性状相关的重要候选基因.以长白猪为材料,采用RT-PCR方法,克隆了猪HoxA10基因,并用Real-Time PCR测定该基因在猪各组织器官中的表达.结果表明,从猪子宫组织中克隆获得HoxA10基因cDNA长538 bp,包括1个285 bp的开放阅读框,编码合成94个氨基酸残基,与人和小鼠的HoxA序列同源性分别为98.9%和97.9%;在猪各组织中,前肌是HoxA10基因表达量最高的组织,其次为肾、子宫、后肌、输卵管、大肠、腹脂等组织,在垂体、大脑、小脑、丘脑、卵巢、肺、胃、小肠、背肌、背膘中,HoxA10的表达很低或基本无表达.%As a key member of Hox gene family, the Homeobox A1O gene (HoxA1O) is an important candidate gene influencing reproduction traits in pigs, which plays important roles in embryonic development and cell differentiation. In this paper, HoxA1O gene was cloned from a Landrace pig by RT-PCR, and different tissues from the pig were tested by real-time PCR to determine the tissue-specific expression pattern of HoxA1O. Results showed that the cloned HoxA1OcDNA of pig was 538 bp long, and it contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 285 bp encoding a peptide of 94 amino acid residues which showed 98.9% and 97.9% sequence identity to that of human and mouse respectively. In all tested pig tissues, HoxA1O expressed predominantly in forward leg muscle, followed by kidney, uterus, back leg muscle, oviduct,large intestine and abdominal fat. And little or no Expression of HoxA1O was detected in hypothalamus, cerebrum,cerebellum, thalamus, ovary, lung, stomach, small intestine, dorsal muscles and back fat.

  6. Comparative analyses of vertebrate posterior HoxD clusters reveal atypical cluster architecture in the caecilian Typhlonectes natans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amemiya Chris T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posterior genes of the HoxD cluster play a crucial role in the patterning of the tetrapod limb. This region is under the control of a global, long-range enhancer that is present in all vertebrates. Variation in limb types, as is the case in amphibians, can probably not only be attributed to variation in Hox genes, but is likely to be the product of differences in gene regulation. With a collection of vertebrate genome sequences available today, we used a comparative genomics approach to study the posterior HoxD cluster of amphibians. A frog and a caecilian were included in the study to compare coding sequences as well as to determine the gain and loss of putative regulatory sequences. Results We sequenced the posterior end of the HoxD cluster of a caecilian and performed comparative analyses of this region using HoxD clusters of other vertebrates. We determined the presence of conserved non-coding sequences and traced gains and losses of these footprints during vertebrate evolution, with particular focus on amphibians. We found that the caecilian HoxD cluster is almost three times larger than its mammalian counterpart. This enlargement is accompanied with the loss of one gene and the accumulation of repeats in that area. A similar phenomenon was observed in the coelacanth, where a different gene was lost and expansion of the area where the gene was lost has occurred. At least one phylogenetic footprint present in all vertebrates was lost in amphibians. This conserved region is a known regulatory element and functions as a boundary element in neural tissue to prevent expression of Hoxd genes. Conclusion The posterior part of the HoxD cluster of Typhlonectes natans is among the largest known today. The loss of Hoxd-12 and the expansion of the intergenic region may exert an influence on the limb enhancer, by having to bypass a distance seven times that of regular HoxD clusters. Whether or not there is a correlation with the

  7. Reverse Genetic Analysis of Transcription FactorOsHox9, a Member of Homeobox Family, in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Li-ping; SHEN Ao; GAO Zhi-chao; LI Zheng-long; SUN Qiong-lin; LI Ying-ying; LUAN Wei-jiang

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors participate in the growth and development of plants by regulating cell differentiation, morphogenesis and environmental signal response. To reveal the functions of these transcription factors in rice, we constructed the RNAi vectors ofOsHox9, a member of homeobox family, and analyzed the function ofOsHox9 using reverse genetics. The plant height and tillering number of RNAi transgenic plants decreased compared with those of wild-type plants. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed thatOsHox9 expression reduced in the transgenic plants with phenotypic variance, whereas that in the transgenic plants without phenotypic variance was similar to that in the wild-type plants. This result suggests that the phenotypes of the transgenic plants were caused by RNAi effects. The tissue-specificity ofOsHox9 expression indicated that it was expressed in different organs, with high expression in stem apical meristem and young panicles. Subcelular location ofOsHox9 demonstrated that it was localized on the cell membrane.

  8. Conservation and phylogeny of a novel family of non-Hox genes of the Antp class in Demospongiae (porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richelle-Maurer, Evelyn; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Itskovich, Valeria B; Manuel, Michaël; Pomponi, Shirley A; Van de Vyver, Gisèle; Borchiellini, Carole

    2006-08-01

    A survey across the most basal animal phylum, the Porifera, for the presence of homeobox-containing genes led to the isolation of 24 partial or complete homeobox sequences from 21 sponge species distributed in 15 families and 6 orders of Demospongiae. All the new sequences shared a high identity/similarity with EmH-3 (Ephydatia muelleri), a non-Hox gene from the Antp class. The Demox sequences, EmH-3, and related homeodomains formed a well-supported clade with no true affinity with any known bilaterian family, including the Tlx/Hox11 family, suggesting that the EmH-3 family of genes, comprising 31 members, represents a novel family of non-Hox genes, called the Demox family, widespread among Demospongiae. The presence of the Tlx/Hox11 specific signature in the Demox family and common regulatory elements suggested that the Demox and Tlx/Hox11 families are closely related. In the phylogenetic analyses, freshwater Haplosclerida appeared as monophyletic, and Haplosclerida and Halichondrida as polyphyletic, with a clade comprising Agelas species and Axinella corrugata. As for their expression, high levels of Demox transcripts were found in adult tissues. Our data add to the number of published poriferan homeobox sequences and provide independent confirmation of the current Demospongiae phylogenies.

  9. Clustering of tissue-specific sub-TADs accompanies the regulation of HoxA genes in developing limbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soizik Berlivet

    Full Text Available HoxA genes exhibit central roles during development and causal mutations have been found in several human syndromes including limb malformation. Despite their importance, information on how these genes are regulated is lacking. Here, we report on the first identification of bona fide transcriptional enhancers controlling HoxA genes in developing limbs and show that these enhancers are grouped into distinct topological domains at the sub-megabase scale (sub-TADs. We provide evidence that target genes and regulatory elements physically interact with each other through contacts between sub-TADs rather than by the formation of discreet "DNA loops". Interestingly, there is no obvious relationship between the functional domains of the enhancers within the limb and how they are partitioned among the topological domains, suggesting that sub-TAD formation does not rely on enhancer activity. Moreover, we show that suppressing the transcriptional activity of enhancers does not abrogate their contacts with HoxA genes. Based on these data, we propose a model whereby chromatin architecture defines the functional landscapes of enhancers. From an evolutionary standpoint, our data points to the convergent evolution of HoxA and HoxD regulation in the fin-to-limb transition, one of the major morphological innovations in vertebrates.

  10. The HOX-5 and surfeit gene clusters are linked in the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, L; Huxley, C; Hogan, B; Evans, T; Fried, M; Duboule, D; Lehrach, H

    1990-04-01

    Using an interspecies backcross, we have mapped the HOX-5 and surfeit (surf) gene clusters within the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2. While the HOX-5 cluster of homeobox-containing genes has been localized to chromosome 2, bands C3-E1, by in situ hybridization, its more precise position relative to the genes and cloned markers of chromosome 2 was not known. Surfeit, a tight cluster of at least six highly conserved "housekeeping" genes, has not been previously mapped in mouse, but has been localized to human chromosome 9q, a region of the human genome with strong homology to proximal mouse chromosome 2. The data presented here place HOX-5 in the vicinity of the closely linked set of developmental mutations rachiterata, lethargic, and fidget and place surf close to the proto-oncogene Abl, near the centromere of chromosome 2.

  11. EGL-20/Wnt and MAB-5/Hox Act Sequentially to Inhibit Anterior Migration of Neuroblasts in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Josephson

    Full Text Available Directed neuroblast and neuronal migration is important in the proper development of nervous systems. In C. elegans the bilateral Q neuroblasts QR (on the right and QL (on the left undergo an identical pattern of cell division and differentiation but migrate in opposite directions (QR and descendants anteriorly and QL and descendants posteriorly. EGL-20/Wnt, via canonical Wnt signaling, drives the expression of MAB-5/Hox in QL but not QR. MAB-5 acts as a determinant of posterior migration, and mab-5 and egl-20 mutants display anterior QL descendant migrations. Here we analyze the behaviors of QR and QL descendants as they begin their anterior and posterior migrations, and the effects of EGL-20 and MAB-5 on these behaviors. The anterior and posterior daughters of QR (QR.a/p after the first division immediately polarize and begin anterior migration, whereas QL.a/p remain rounded and non-migratory. After ~1 hour, QL.a migrates posteriorly over QL.p. We find that in egl-20/Wnt, bar-1/β-catenin, and mab-5/Hox mutants, QL.a/p polarize and migrate anteriorly, indicating that these molecules normally inhibit anterior migration of QL.a/p. In egl-20/Wnt mutants, QL.a/p immediately polarize and begin migration, whereas in bar-1/β-catenin and mab-5/Hox, the cells transiently retain a rounded, non-migratory morphology before anterior migration. Thus, EGL-20/Wnt mediates an acute inhibition of anterior migration independently of BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox, and a later, possible transcriptional response mediated by BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox. In addition to inhibiting anterior migration, MAB-5/Hox also cell-autonomously promotes posterior migration of QL.a (and QR.a in a mab-5 gain-of-function.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis Reveals Versatile Roles of Hox Genes in Crustacean Limb Specification and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Serano, Julia M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; Wang, Jennifer; Ray, Shagnik; Barker, Carryn A; O'Connell, Liam C; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-11

    Crustaceans possess a diverse array of specialized limbs. Although shifts in Hox gene expression domains have been postulated to play a role in generating this limb diversity, little functional data have been provided to understand the precise roles of Hox genes during crustacean development. We used a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis and RNAi knockdown to decipher the function of the six Hox genes expressed in the developing mouth and trunk of the amphipod Parhyale hawaiensis. These experimentally manipulated animals display specific and striking homeotic transformations. We found that abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) are required for proper posterior patterning, with knockout of Abd-B resulting in an animal with thoracic type legs along what would have been an abdomen, and abd-A disruption generating a simplified body plan characterized by a loss of specialization in both abdominal and thoracic appendages. In the thorax, Ubx is necessary for gill development and for repression of gnathal fate, and Antp dictates claw morphology. In the mouth, Scr and Antp confer the part-gnathal, part-thoracic hybrid identity of the maxilliped, and Scr and Dfd prevent antennal identity in posterior head segments. Our results allow us to define the role Hox genes play in specifying each appendage type in Parhyale, including the modular nature by which some appendages are patterned by Hox gene inputs. In addition, we define how changes in Hox gene expression have generated morphological differences between crustacean species. Finally, we also highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9-based somatic mutagenesis in emerging model organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Divergent role of the Hox gene Antennapedia in spiders is responsible for the convergent evolution of abdominal limb repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadjeh, Sara; Turetzek, Natascha; Pechmann, Matthias; Schwager, Evelyn E; Wimmer, Ernst A; Damen, Wim G M; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2012-03-27

    Evolution often results in morphologically similar solutions in different organisms, a phenomenon known as convergence. However, there is little knowledge of the processes that lead to convergence at the genetic level. The genes of the Hox cluster control morphology in animals. They may also be central to the convergence of morphological traits, but whether morphological similarities also require similar changes in Hox gene function is disputed. In arthropods, body subdivision into a region with locomotory appendages ("thorax") and a region with reduced appendages ("abdomen") has evolved convergently in several groups, e.g., spiders and insects. In insects, legs develop in the expression domain of the Hox gene Antennapedia (Antp), whereas the Hox genes Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal-A mediate leg repression in the abdomen. Here, we show that, unlike Antp in insects, the Antp gene in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum represses legs in the first segment of the abdomen (opisthosoma), and that Antp and Ubx are redundant in the following segment. The down-regulation of Antp in A. tepidariorum leads to a striking 10-legged phenotype. We present evidence from ectopic expression of the spider Antp gene in Drosophila embryos and imaginal tissue that this unique function of Antp is not due to changes in the Antp protein, but likely due to divergent evolution of cofactors, Hox collaborators or target genes in spiders and flies. Our results illustrate an interesting example of convergent evolution of abdominal leg repression in arthropods by altering the role of distinct Hox genes at different levels of their action.

  14. Multiple transcription factors directly regulate Hox gene lin-39 expression in ventral hypodermal cells of the C. elegans embryo and larva, including the hypodermal fate regulators LIN-26 and ELT-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ju; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Eisenmann, David M

    2014-05-13

    Hox genes encode master regulators of regional fate specification during early metazoan development. Much is known about the initiation and regulation of Hox gene expression in Drosophila and vertebrates, but less is known in the non-arthropod invertebrate model system, C. elegans. The C. elegans Hox gene lin-39 is required for correct fate specification in the midbody region, including the Vulval Precursor Cells (VPCs). To better understand lin-39 regulation and function, we aimed to identify transcription factors necessary for lin-39 expression in the VPCs, and in particular sought factors that initiate lin-39 expression in the embryo. We used the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) method to screen for factors that bound to 13 fragments from the lin-39 region: twelve fragments contained sequences conserved between C. elegans and two other nematode species, while one fragment was known to drive reporter gene expression in the early embryo in cells that generate the VPCs. Sixteen transcription factors that bind to eight lin-39 genomic fragments were identified in yeast, and we characterized several factors by verifying their physical interactions in vitro, and showing that reduction of their function leads to alterations in lin-39 levels and lin-39::GFP reporter expression in vivo. Three factors, the orphan nuclear hormone receptor NHR-43, the hypodermal fate regulator LIN-26, and the GATA factor ELT-6 positively regulate lin-39 expression in the embryonic precursors to the VPCs. In particular, ELT-6 interacts with an enhancer that drives GFP expression in the early embryo, and the ELT-6 site we identified is necessary for proper embryonic expression. These three factors, along with the factors ZTF-17, BED-3 and TBX-9, also positively regulate lin-39 expression in the larval VPCs. These results significantly expand the number of factors known to directly bind and regulate lin-39 expression, identify the first factors required for lin-39 expression in the embryo, and hint at a

  15. The genetics of murine Hox loci: TAMERE, STRING, and PANTHERE to engineer chromosome variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Patrick; Duboule, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Following their duplications at the base of the vertebrate clade, Hox gene clusters underwent remarkable sub- and neo-functionalization events. Many of these evolutionary innovations can be associated with changes in the transcriptional regulation of their genes, where an intricate relationship between the structure of the gene cluster and the architecture of the surrounding genomic landscape is at play. Here, we report on a portfolio of in vivo genome engineering strategies in mice, which have been used to probe and decipher the genetic and molecular underpinnings of the complex regulatory mechanisms implemented at these loci.

  16. The Adult Body Plan of Indirect Developing Hemichordates Develops by Adding a Hox-Patterned Trunk to an Anterior Larval Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Paul; Uhlinger, Kevin R; Lowe, Christopher J

    2017-01-09

    Many animals are indirect developers with distinct larval and adult body plans [1]. The molecular basis of differences between larval and adult forms is often poorly understood, adding a level of uncertainty to comparative developmental studies that use data from both indirect and direct developers. Here we compare the larval and adult body plans of an indirect developing hemichordate, Schizocardium californicum [2]. We describe the expression of 27 transcription factors with conserved roles in deuterostome ectodermal anteroposterior (AP) patterning in developing embryos, tornaria larvae, and post-metamorphic juveniles and show that the tornaria larva of S. californicum is transcriptionally similar to a truncated version of the adult. The larval ectoderm has an anterior molecular signature, while most of the trunk, defined by the expression of hox1-7, is absent. Posterior ectodermal activation of Hox is initiated in the late larva prior to metamorphosis, in preparation for the transition to the adult form, in which the AP axis converges on a molecular architecture similar to that of the direct developing hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii. These results identify a molecular correlate of a major difference in body plan between hemichordate larval and adult forms and confirm the hypothesis that deuterostome larvae are "swimming heads" [3]. This will allow future comparative studies with hemichordates to take into account molecular differences caused by early life history evolution within the phylum. Additionally, comparisons with other phyla suggest that a delay in trunk development is a feature of indirect development shared across distantly related phyla. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete HOX cluster characterization of the coelacanth provides further evidence for slow evolution of its genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Chris T; Powers, Thomas P; Prohaska, Sonja J; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Dickson, Mark; Miyake, Tsutomu; Schoenborn, Michael A; Myers, Richard M; Ruddle, Francis H; Stadler, Peter F

    2010-02-23

    The living coelacanth is a lobe-finned fish that represents an early evolutionary departure from the lineage that led to land vertebrates, and is of extreme interest scientifically. It has changed very little in appearance from fossilized coelacanths of the Cretaceous (150 to 65 million years ago), and is often referred to as a "living fossil." An important general question is whether long-term stasis in morphological evolution is associated with stasis in genome evolution. To this end we have used targeted genome sequencing for acquiring 1,612,752 bp of high quality finished sequence encompassing the four HOX clusters of the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis. Detailed analyses were carried out on genomic structure, gene and repeat contents, conserved noncoding regions, and relative rates of sequence evolution in both coding and noncoding tracts. Our results demonstrate conclusively that the coelacanth HOX clusters are evolving comparatively slowly and that this taxon should serve as a viable outgroup for interpretation of the genomes of tetrapod species.

  18. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  19. Hox6 genes modulate in vitro differentiation of mESCs to insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Brian M; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Newman, Micaleah; Lukacs, Derek T; Spence, Jason R; Wellik, Deneen M

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation of glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells from ESCs in vitro is promising as a cellular therapy for the treatment of diabetes, a devastating and common disease. Pancreatic β-cells are derived from the endoderm in vivo and therefore most current protocols attempt to generate a pure population of first endoderm, then pancreas epithelium, and finally insulin-producing cells. Despite this, differentiation protocols result in mixed populations of cells that are often poorly defined, but also contain mesoderm. Using an in vitro mESC-to-β cell differentiation protocol, we show that expression of region-specific Hox genes is induced. We also show that the loss of function of the Hox6 paralogous group, genes expressed only in the mesenchyme of the pancreas (not epithelium), affect the differentiation of insulin-producing cells in vitro. This work is consistent with the important role for these mesoderm-specific factors in vivo and highlights contribution of supporting mesenchymal cells in in vitro differentiation.

  20. Evaluation of p53, HoxD10, and E-Cadherin Status in Breast Cancer and Correlation with Histological Grade and Other Prognostic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Sekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Study of tumor molecular characteristics is necessary to understand both the risk of breast cancer recurrence and the response to therapy. Aims. To evaluate p53, HoxD10, and E-cadherin status in breast cancer and to correlate with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Material and Methods. The study was conducted in 60 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma NOS with 20 cases belonging to each grade and evaluation of p53 was done by IHC and that of HoxD10 and E Cadherin status by PCR and correlation was done with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Result. p53 expression was seen in 71.67% (43/60 of the tumors. HoxD10 gene was downregulated in 46.67% (28/60 of the tumors. p53 overexpression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels showed statistically significant association higher histological grade of the tumor (P<0.05. CDH1 gene mutation was seen in 60% (15/25 of the tumors. No significant association was found between p53 expression, HoxD10 gene, CDH1 gene mutation, and other prognostic factors. Conclusion. p53 over expression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels were found to be significantly associated with higher grade tumours. This suggests that p53 and HoxD10 gene play an important tumor suppressor role and the loss of which results in breast cancer progression.

  1. A negative regulatory loop between microRNA and Hox gene controls posterior identities in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongying Zhao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been found to regulate gene expression across eukaryotic species, but the function of most miRNA genes remains unknown. Here we describe how the analysis of the expression patterns of a well-conserved miRNA gene, mir-57, at cellular resolution for every minute during early development of Caenorhabditis elegans provided key insights in understanding its function. Remarkably, mir-57 expression shows strong positional bias but little tissue specificity, a pattern reminiscent of Hox gene function. Despite the minor defects produced by a loss of function mutation, overexpression of mir-57 causes dramatic posterior defects, which also mimic the phenotypes of mutant alleles of a posterior Hox gene, nob-1, an Abd homolog. More importantly, nob-1 expression is found in the same two posterior AB sublineages as those expressing mir-57 but with an earlier onset. Intriguingly, nob-1 functions as an activator for mir-57 expression; it is also a direct target of mir-57. In agreement with this, loss of mir-57 function partially rescues the nob-1 allele defects, indicating a negative feedback regulatory loop between the miRNA and Hox gene to provide positional cues. Given the conservation of the miRNA and Hox gene, the regulatory mechanism might be broadly used across species. The strategy used here to explore mir-57 function provides a path to dissect the regulatory relationship between genes.

  2. Extremely slow rate of evolution in the HOX cluster revealed by comparison between Tanzanian and Indonesian coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higasa, Koichiro; Nikaido, Masato; Saito, Taro L; Yoshimura, Jun; Suzuki, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Nishihara, Hidenori; Aibara, Mitsuto; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Kalombo, Hassan W J; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Okada, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    Coelacanths are known as "living fossils" because their morphology has changed very little from that in the fossil record. To elucidate why coelacanths have evolved so slowly is thus of primary importance in evolutionary biology. In the present study, we determined the entire sequence of the HOX cluster of the Tanzanian coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and compared it with that of the Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis), which was available in the literature. The most intriguing result was the extremely small genetic divergence between the two coelacanths. The synonymous divergence of the HOX coding region between the two coelacanths was estimated to be 0.07%, which is ~11-fold smaller than that of human-chimp. When we applied the estimated divergence time of the two coelacanths of 6 million years ago (MYA) and 30 MYA, which were proposed in independent mitochondrial DNA analyses, the synonymous substitution rate of the coelacanth HOX cluster was estimated to be ~11-fold and 56-fold smaller than that of human-chimp, respectively. Thus, the present study implies that the reduction of the nucleotide substitution rate in coelacanth HOX genes may account for the conservation of coelacanth morphology during evolution.

  3. [Expression of HoxB5, SPC and AQP5 in neonatal rats with hyperoxia-induced chronic lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar epithelium impairment is one of pathological changes associated with chronic lung disease (CLD). Hoxb5 is one of the few homeobox genes strongly expressed in the developing lung. This study investigated the expression of HoxB5, SPC and AQP5 in rats with CLD in order to explore the role of Hoxb-5 in impairment and reparation of alveolar epithelium. Eighty neonatal rats were randomly exposed to hyperoxia (model group) or to room air (control group) (n=40 each). The CLD model was induced by hyperoxia exposure. The expression of HoxB5, SPC and AQP5 protein and mRNA in the lung tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after exposure. In the model group HoxB5 expression significantly decreased 7, 14 and 21 days after hyperoxia exposure. SPC expression decreased 3 days after hyperoxia exposure but increased significantly 7, 14 and 21 days after hyperoxia exposure as compared to the control group. AQP5 expression was progressively reduced with prolonged hyperoxia exposure. Hyperoxia exposure may lead to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) damage in neonatal rats. The increased SPC expression and decreased AQP5 expression suggested that the ability of differentiation and transformation of AECII into AECI decreased in neonatal rats with CLD. The decreased HoxB5 expression following hyperoxia exposure might contribute to a decreased ability of differentiation of AECII.

  4. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut

  5. Negative effect of Hox gene expression on the development of the neural crest-derived facial skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuzet, Sophie; Couly, Gérard; Vincent, Christine; Le Douarin, Nicole M

    2002-09-01

    Diencephalic, mesencephalic and metencephalic neural crest cells are skeletogenic and derive from neural folds that do not express Hox genes. In order to examine the influence of Hox gene expression on skull morphogenesis, expression of Hoxa2, Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 in conjunction with that of the green fluorescent protein has been selectively targeted to the Hox-negative neural folds of the avian embryo prior to the onset of crest cell emigration. Hoxa2 expression precludes the development of the entire facial skeleton. Transgenic Hoxa2 embryos such as those from which the Hox-negative domain of the cephalic neural crest has been removed have no upper or lower jaws and no frontonasal structures. Embryos subjected to the forced expression of Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 show severe defects in the facial skeleton but not a complete absence of facial cartilage. Hoxa3 prevents the formation of the skeleton derived from the first branchial arch, but allows the development (albeit reduced) of the nasal septum. Hoxb4, by contrast, hampers the formation of the nasal bud-derived skeleton, while allowing that of a proximal (but not distal) segment of the lower jaw. The combined effect of Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 prevents the formation of facial skeletal structures, comparable with Hoxa2. None of these genes impairs the formation of neural derivatives of the crest. These results suggest that over the course of evolution, the absence of Hox gene expression in the anterior part of the chordate embryo was crucial in the vertebrate phylum for the development of a face, jaws and brain case, and, hence, also for that of the forebrain.

  6. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 1. Neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The structural and the magnetic ordering in thin-film HoxPr1-x alloys have been studied using neutron-and x-ray-diffraction techniques. As the concentration of Ho decreases the alloys adopt hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), Sm, and double hexagonal-close-packed (dhcp) crystal structures. The results...... show enhanced occupation of the cubic sites by Pr in the Sm and dhcp phases. The magnetic behavior is found to be very different in the three crystalline phases. The hcp samples form basal-plane spirals and the alloys with the Sm structure form a commensurate magnetic structure with the same...... periodicity as the magnetic order on the hexagonal sites in Sm metal, but the moments are confined to the basal plane. At low temperatures both Ho and Pr are found to adopt their full saturation moments in these phases. A Pr thin film is found to order with a similar magnetic structure to bulk Pr. However...

  7. Evolution of a derived protein-protein interaction between HoxA11 and Foxo1a in mammals caused by changes in intramolecular regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, Kathryn J; Lynch, Vincent J; Wagner, Günter P

    2011-08-09

    Current models of developmental evolution suggest changes in gene regulation underlie the evolution of morphology. Despite the fact that protein complexes regulate gene expression, the evolution of regulatory protein complexes is rarely studied. Here, we investigate the evolution of a protein-protein interaction (PPI) between Homeobox A11 (HoxA11) and Forkhead box 01A (Foxo1a). Using extant and "resurrected" ancestral proteins, we show that the physical interaction between HoxA11 and Foxo1a originated in the mammalian stem lineage. Functional divergence tests and coimmunoprecipitation with heterologous protein pairs indicate that the evolution of interaction was attributable to changes in HoxA11, and deletion studies demonstrate that the interaction interface is located in the homeodomain region of HoxA11. However, there are no changes in amino acid sequence in the homeodomain region during this time period, indicating that the origin of the derived PPI was attributable to changes outside the binding interface. We infer that the amino acid substitutions in HoxA11 altered Foxo1a's access to the conserved binding interface at the HoxA11 homeodomain. We also found an expansion in the number of paired Hox/Fox binding sites in the genomes of mammalian lineage species suggesting the complex has a biological function. Our data indicate that the physical interaction between HoxA11 and Foxo1a evolved through noninterface changes that facilitate the PPI, which prevents inappropriate interactions, rather than through the evolution of a novel binding interface. We speculate that evolutionary changes of intramolecular regulation have limited pleiotropic effects compared with changes to interaction domains themselves.

  8. Distinct mechanisms for opposite functions of homeoproteins Cdx2 and HoxB7 in double-strand break DNA repair in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Christine; Martin, Elisabeth; Duluc, Isabelle; Dantzer, Françoise; Vanier, Marie; Gross, Isabelle; Freund, Jean-Noël; Domon-Dell, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Homeobox genes, involved in embryonic development and tissues homeostasis in adults, are often deregulated in cancer, but their relevance in pathology is far from being fully elucidated. In colon cancers, we report that the homeoproteins HoxB7 and Cdx2 exhibit different heterogeneous patterns, Cdx2 being localized in moderately altered neoplasic glands in contrast to HoxB7 which predominates in poorly-differentiated areas; they are coexpressed in few cancer cells. In human colon cancer cells, both homeoproteins interact with the DNA repair factor KU70/80, but functional studies reveal opposite effects: HoxB7 stimulates DNA repair and cell survival upon etoposide treatment, whereas Cdx2 inhibits both processes. The stimulatory effect of HoxB7 on DNA repair requires the transactivation domain linked to the homeodomain involved in the interaction with KU70/80, whereas the transactivation domain of Cdx2 is dispensable for its inhibitory function, which instead needs the homeodomain to interact with KU70/80 and the C-terminal domain. Thus, HoxB7 and Cdx2 respectively use transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms to stimulate and inhibit DNA repair. In addition, in cells co-expressing both homeoproteins, Cdx2 lessens DNA repair activity through a novel mechanism of inhibition of the transcriptional function of HoxB7, whereby Cdx2 forms a molecular complex with HoxB7 and prevents it to recognize its target in the chromatin. These results point out the complex interplay between the DSB DNA repair activity and the homeoproteins HoxB7 and Cdx2 in colon cancer cells, making the balance between these factors a determinant and a potential indicator of the efficacy of genotoxic drugs.

  9. Reptin and Pontin function antagonistically with PcG and TrxG complexes to mediate Hox gene control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bertaux, Karine; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sarkeshik, Ali; Goirand, Benjamin; Aragnol, Denise; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Cole, Michael D; Pradel, Jacques; Yates, John R; Mishra, Rakesh K; Graba, Yacine; Saurin, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Pontin (Pont) and Reptin (Rept) are paralogous ATPases that are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. They are recruited in multiprotein complexes that function in various aspects of DNA metabolism. They are essential for viability and have antagonistic roles in tissue growth, cell signalling and regulation of the tumour metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, indicating that the balance of Pont and Rept regulates epigenetic programmes critical for development and cancer progression. Here, we describe Pont and Rept as antagonistic mediators of Drosophila Hox gene transcription, functioning with Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group proteins to maintain correct patterns of expression. We show that Rept is a component of the PRC1 PcG complex, whereas Pont purifies with the Brahma complex. Furthermore, the enzymatic functions of Rept and Pont are indispensable for maintaining Hox gene expression states, highlighting the importance of these two antagonistic factors in transcriptional output. PMID:18259215

  10. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendi...

  11. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths. Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria, with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  12. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Carter, Jean-Michel; Taylor, William R; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J; Holland, Peter W H

    2014-10-01

    Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes) has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina) plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus) to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths). Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria), with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  13. Targeted inversion of a polar silencer within the HoxD complex re-allocates domains of enhancer sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmita, M; Kondo, T; Duboule, D

    2000-12-01

    Mammalian Hox genes are clustered at four genomic loci. During development, neighbouring genes are coordinately regulated by global enhancer sequences, which control multiple genes at once, as exemplified by the expression of series of contiguous Hoxd genes in either limbs or gut. The link between vertebrate Hox gene transcription and their clustered distribution is poorly understood. Experimental and comparative approaches have revealed that various mechanisms, such as gene clustering or global enhancer sequences, might have constrained this genomic organization and stabilized it throughout evolution. To understand what restricts the effect of a particular enhancer to a precise set of genes, we generated a loxP/Cre-mediated targeted inversion within the HoxD cluster. Mice carrying the inversion showed a reciprocal re-assignment of the limb versus gut regulatory specificities, suggesting the presence of a silencer element with a unidirectional property. This polar silencer appears to limit the number of genes that respond to one type of regulation and thus indicates how separate regulatory domains may be implemented within intricate gene clusters.

  14. The function of Hox and appendage-patterning genes in the development of an evolutionary novelty, the Photuris firefly lantern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Matthew S; Moczek, Armin P

    2014-05-01

    Uncovering the mechanisms underlying the evolution of novel traits is a central challenge in biology. The lanterns of fireflies are complex traits that lack even remote homology to structures outside luminescent beetle families. Representing unambiguous novelties by the strictest definition, their developmental underpinnings may provide clues to their origin and offer insights into the mechanisms of innovation in developmental evolution. Lanterns develop within the context of abdominal Hox expression domains, and we hypothesized that lantern formation may be instructed in part by these highly conserved transcription factors. We show that transcript depletion of Abdominal-B in Photuris fireflies results in extensive disruption of the adult lantern, suggesting that the evolution of adult lanterns involved the acquisition of a novel regulatory role for this Hox gene. Using the same approach, we show that the Hox gene abdominal-A may control important secondary aspects of lantern development. Lastly, we hypothesized that lantern evolution may have involved the recruitment of dormant abdominal appendage-patterning domains; however, transcript depletion of two genes, Distal-less and dachshund, suggests that they do not contribute to lantern development. Our results suggest that complex novelties can arise within the confines of ancestral regulatory landscapes through acquisition of novel targets without compromising ancestral functions.

  15. Drosophila Hox and sex-determination genes control segment elimination through EGFR and extramacrochetae activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Foronda

    Full Text Available The formation or suppression of particular structures is a major change occurring in development and evolution. One example of such change is the absence of the seventh abdominal segment (A7 in Drosophila males. We show here that there is a down-regulation of EGFR activity and fewer histoblasts in the male A7 in early pupae. If this activity is elevated, cell number increases and a small segment develops in the adult. At later pupal stages, the remaining precursors of the A7 are extruded under the epithelium. This extrusion requires the up-regulation of the HLH protein Extramacrochetae and correlates with high levels of spaghetti-squash, the gene encoding the regulatory light chain of the non-muscle myosin II. The Hox gene Abdominal-B controls both the down-regulation of spitz, a ligand of the EGFR pathway, and the up-regulation of extramacrochetae, and also regulates the transcription of the sex-determining gene doublesex. The male Doublesex protein, in turn, controls extramacrochetae and spaghetti-squash expression. In females, the EGFR pathway is also down-regulated in the A7 but extramacrochetae and spaghetti-squash are not up-regulated and extrusion of precursor cells is almost absent. Our results show the complex orchestration of cellular and genetic events that lead to this important sexually dimorphic character change.

  16. Proneural and abdominal Hox inputs synergize to promote sensory organ formation in the Drosophila abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Lisa M; Witt, Lorraine M; Gresser, Amy L; Burns, Kevin A; Cook, Tiffany A; Gebelein, Brian

    2010-12-15

    The atonal (ato) proneural gene specifies a stereotypic number of sensory organ precursors (SOP) within each body segment of the Drosophila ectoderm. Surprisingly, the broad expression of Ato within the ectoderm results in only a modest increase in SOP formation, suggesting many cells are incompetent to become SOPs. Here, we show that the SOP promoting activity of Ato can be greatly enhanced by three factors: the Senseless (Sens) zinc finger protein, the Abdominal-A (Abd-A) Hox factor, and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. First, we show that expression of either Ato alone or with Sens induces twice as many SOPs in the abdomen as in the thorax, and do so at the expense of an abdomen-specific cell fate: the larval oenocytes. Second, we demonstrate that Ato stimulates abdominal SOP formation by synergizing with Abd-A to promote EGF ligand (Spitz) secretion and secondary SOP recruitment. However, we also found that Ato and Sens selectively enhance abdominal SOP development in a Spitz-independent manner, suggesting additional genetic interactions between this proneural pathway and Abd-A. Altogether, these experiments reveal that genetic interactions between EGF-signaling, Abd-A, and Sens enhance the SOP-promoting activity of Ato to stimulate region-specific neurogenesis in the Drosophila abdomen.

  17. Resenha da obra "Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharlene Davantel Valarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A obra “Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade” constitui-se como o volume 26 da coleção “Materiais didácticos”, do Instituto de Ciências da Educação, da Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, organizada pelas professoras e pesquisadoras Isabel Mociño González e Blanca-Ana Roig Rechou. Em sua essência, reúne resenhas e outros textos sobre obras infantis e juvenis traduzidas ou por traduzir para a língua galega publicados no período de 2010 a 2015 no jornal “El correo galego”, de Santiago de Compostela. O objetivo da obra é apresentar livros estrangeiros que tragam avanços para o sistema literário da Galícia, principalmente, na formação do jovem leitor. É indicada para mediadores de leitura, professores, bibliotecários e pais, constituindo-se em uma contribuição para a divulgação da Literatura Infantil e Juvenil, visto que tanto as obras revisitadas (tidas como clássicas quanto as mais atuais se encontram apresentadas e discutidas ao longo dos textos que compõem a obra, formando um panorama das publicações mais contundentes.

  18. Comprehensive expression profiling of highly homologous 39 hox genes in 26 different human adult tissues by the modified systematic multiplex RT-pCR method reveals tissue-specific expression pattern that suggests an important role of chromosomal structure in the regulation of hox gene expression in adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Takai, Daisaku; Yamamoto, Fumiya; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2003-01-01

    Homeobox genes play a crucial role as molecular address labels in early embryogenesis by conferring cell fate and establishing regional identity in tissues. Homeobox gene expression is not restricted to the early development, but it is also observed in the differentiated cells in adult tissues. To have a better understanding of the functionality of homeobox gene expression in adult tissues in physiological and pathological phenomena, it is important to determine the expression profiles of Hox genes. We established a system to study the expression of 39 human Hox genes by the modified Systematic Multiplex RT-PCR method. Using this system, we have systematically examined their expression in 26 different adult tissues. The results showed tissue-specific differential expression. They also revealed that the posterior tissues generally express more Hox genes than the anterior tissues and that the genes located centrally in the Hox Gene Complexes are expressed in more tissues than the genes located at the 5' or 3' end of the complexes. Instead of similar expression patterns among paralogous genes, we found that several neighboring Hox genes on the same chromosomes exhibited similar tissue-specific expression pattern, which may suggest that the regulation of Hox gene expression may be more dependent on chromosomal structure in adult tissues.

  19. Analysis of the DNA-binding profile and function of TALE homeoproteins reveals their specialization and specific interactions with Hox genes/proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkov, Dmitry; Mateos San Martín, Daniel; Fernandez-Díaz, Luis C; Rosselló, Catalina A; Torroja, Carlos; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Warnatz, H J; Sultan, Marc; Yaspo, Marie L; Gabrieli, Arianna; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Brendolan, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Torres, Miguel

    2013-04-25

    The interactions of Meis, Prep, and Pbx1 TALE homeoproteins with Hox proteins are essential for development and disease. Although Meis and Prep behave similarly in vitro, their in vivo activities remain largely unexplored. We show that Prep and Meis interact with largely independent sets of genomic sites and select different DNA-binding sequences, Prep associating mostly with promoters and housekeeping genes and Meis with promoter-remote regions and developmental genes. Hox target sequences associate strongly with Meis but not with Prep binding sites, while Pbx1 cooperates with both Prep and Meis. Accordingly, Meis1 shows strong genetic interaction with Pbx1 but not with Prep1. Meis1 and Prep1 nonetheless coregulate a subset of genes, predominantly through opposing effects. Notably, the TALE homeoprotein binding profile subdivides Hox clusters into two domains differentially regulated by Meis1 and Prep1. During evolution, Meis and Prep thus specialized their interactions but maintained significant regulatory coordination.

  20. Hox genes require homothorax and extradenticle for body wall identity specification but not for appendage identity specification during metamorphosis of Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank W; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-11-01

    The establishment of segment identity is a key developmental process that allows for divergence along the anteroposterior body axis in arthropods. In Drosophila, the identity of a segment is determined by the complement of Hox genes it expresses. In many contexts, Hox transcription factors require the protein products of extradenticle (exd) and homothorax (hth) as cofactors to perform their identity specification functions. In holometabolous insects, segment identity may be specified twice, during embryogenesis and metamorphosis. To glean insight into the relationship between embryonic and metamorphic segmental identity specification, we have compared these processes in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, which develops ventral appendages during embryogenesis that later metamorphose into adult appendages with distinct morphologies. At metamorphosis, comparisons of RNAi phenotypes indicate that Hox genes function jointly with Tc-hth and Tc-exd to specify several region-specific aspects of the adult body wall. On the other hand, Hox genes specify appendage identities along the anteroposterior axis independently of Tc-hth/Tc-exd and Tc-hth/Tc-exd specify proximal vs. distal identity within appendages independently of Hox genes during this stage. During embryogenesis, Tc-hth and Tc-exd play a broad role in the segmentation process and are required for specification of body wall identities in the thorax; however, contrasting with results from other species, we did not obtain homeotic transformations of embryonic appendages in response to Tc-hth or Tc-exd RNAi. In general, the homeotic effects of interference with the function of Hox genes and Tc-hth/Tc-exd during metamorphosis did not match predictions based on embryonic roles of these genes. Comparing metamorphic patterning in T. castaneum to embryonic and post-embryonic development in hemimetabolous insects suggests that holometabolous metamorphosis combines patterning processes of both late embryogenesis and

  1. Transcriptional repression of Hox genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Studencka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1 and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2 and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5, which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males.

  2. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Durvalina Bomtorin

    Full Text Available Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx, whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  3. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  4. Evaluation of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements for stable gene expression in chicken cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hee W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent successes in biotechnological application of birds are based on their unique physiological traits such as unlimited manipulability onto developing embryos and simple protein constituents of the eggs. However it is not likely that target protein is produced as kinetically expected because various factors affect target gene expression. Although there have been various attempts to minimize the silencing of transgenes, a generalized study that uses multiple cis-acting elements in chicken has not been made. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether various cis-acting elements can help to sustain transgene expression in chicken fibroblasts. Results We investigated the optimal transcriptional regulatory elements for enhancing stable transgene expression in chicken cells. We generated eight constructs that encode enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP driven by either CMV or CAG promoters (including the control, containing three types of key regulatory elements: a chicken lysozyme matrix attachment region (cMAR, 5'-DNase I-hypersensitive sites 4 (cHS4, and the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE. Then we transformed immortalized chicken embryonic fibroblasts with these constructs by electroporation, and after cells were expanded under G418 selection, analyzed mRNA levels and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. We found that the copy number of each construct significantly decreased as the size of the construct increased (R2 = 0.701. A significant model effect was found in the expression level among various constructs in both mRNA and protein (P cis-acting elements decreased the level of gene silencing as well as the coefficient of variance of eGFP-expressing cells (P Conclusions Our current data show that an optimal combination of cis-acting elements and promoters/enhancers for sustaining gene expression in chicken cells is suggested. These results provide important information for avian transgenesis and gene function studies in poultry.

  5. Characterization of "cis"-regulatory elements ("c"RE) associated with mammary gland function

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bos taurus genome assembly has propelled dairy science into a new era; still, most of the information encoded in the genome has not yet been decoded. The human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has spearheaded the identification and annotation of functional genomic elements in the hu...

  6. On the mechanistic nature of epistasis in a canonical cis-regulatory element

    OpenAIRE

    Lagator, Mato; Paix?o, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H; Bollback, Jonathan P.; Guet, C?lin C.

    2017-01-01

    eLife digest Mutations are changes to DNA that provide the raw material upon which evolution can act. Therefore, to understand evolution, we need to know the effects of mutations, and how those mutations interact with each other (a phenomenon referred to as epistasis). So far, few mathematical models allow scientists to predict the effects of mutations, and even fewer are able to predict epistasis. Biological systems are complex and consist of many proteins and other molecules. Genes are the ...

  7. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  8. Evaluation of phylogenetic footprint discovery for predicting bacterial cis-regulatory elements and revealing their evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of conserved motifs in promoters of orthologous genes (phylogenetic footprints has become a common strategy to predict cis-acting regulatory elements. Several software tools are routinely used to raise hypotheses about regulation. However, these tools are generally used as black boxes, with default parameters. A systematic evaluation of optimal parameters for a footprint discovery strategy can bring a sizeable improvement to the predictions. Results We evaluate the performances of a footprint discovery approach based on the detection of over-represented spaced motifs. This method is particularly suitable for (but not restricted to Bacteria, since such motifs are typically bound by factors containing a Helix-Turn-Helix domain. We evaluated footprint discovery in 368 Escherichia coli K12 genes with annotated sites, under 40 different combinations of parameters (taxonomical level, background model, organism-specific filtering, operon inference. Motifs are assessed both at the levels of correctness and significance. We further report a detailed analysis of 181 bacterial orthologs of the LexA repressor. Distinct motifs are detected at various taxonomical levels, including the 7 previously characterized taxon-specific motifs. In addition, we highlight a significantly stronger conservation of half-motifs in Actinobacteria, relative to Firmicutes, suggesting an intermediate state in specificity switching between the two Gram-positive phyla, and thereby revealing the on-going evolution of LexA auto-regulation. Conclusion The footprint discovery method proposed here shows excellent results with E. coli and can readily be extended to predict cis-acting regulatory signals and propose testable hypotheses in bacterial genomes for which nothing is known about regulation.

  9. Evolution of metal hyperaccumulation required cis-regulatory changes and triplication of HMA4

    OpenAIRE

    Hanikenne, Marc; Talke, Ina N.; Haydon, Michael J.; Lanz, Christa; Nolte, Andrea; Motte, Patrick; Kroymann, Juergen; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the types of mutations underlying the evolution of species-specific traits. The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri has the rare ability to colonize heavy-metal-polluted soils, and, as an extremophile sister species of Arabidopsis thaliana, it is a powerful model for research on adaptation. A. halleri naturally accumulates and tolerates leaf concentrations as high as 2.2% zinc and 0.28% cadmium in dry biomass. On the basis of transcriptomics studies, metal hyperac...

  10. Cis-regulatory underpinnings of human GLI3 expression in embryonic craniofacial structures and internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amir A; Minhas, Rashid; Schmidt, Ansgar; Koch, Sabine; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2013-10-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Gli3 is an important mediator of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. During early embryonic development Gli3 participates in patterning and growth of the central nervous system, face, skeleton, limb, tooth and gut. Precise regulation of the temporal and spatial expression of Gli3 is crucial for the proper specification of these structures in mammals and other vertebrates. Previously we reported a set of human intronic cis-regulators controlling almost the entire known repertoire of endogenous Gli3 expression in mouse neural tube and limbs. However, the genetic underpinning of GLI3 expression in other embryonic domains such as craniofacial structures and internal organs remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in a transgenic mice assay the potential of a subset of human/fish conserved non-coding sequences (CNEs) residing within GLI3 intronic intervals to induce reporter gene expression at known regions of endogenous Gli3 transcription in embryonic domains other than central nervous system (CNS) and limbs. Highly specific reporter expression was observed in craniofacial structures, eye, gut, and genitourinary system. Moreover, the comparison of expression patterns directed by these intronic cis-acting regulatory elements in mouse and zebrafish embryos suggests that in accordance with sequence conservation, the target site specificity of a subset of these elements remains preserved among these two lineages. Taken together with our recent investigations, it is proposed here that during vertebrate evolution the Gli3 expression control acquired multiple, independently acting, intronic enhancers for spatiotemporal patterning of CNS, limbs, craniofacial structures and internal organs.

  11. Finding cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila using phylogenetic hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    of the increasing availability of comparative genomic data. RESULTS: We develop a method for finding regulatory modules in Eukaryotic species using phylogenetic data. Using computer simulations and analysis of real data, we show that the use of phylogenetic hidden Markov model can lead to an increase in accuracy...

  12. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  13. Subfunctionalization of duplicated zebrafish pax6 genes by cis-regulatory divergence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleinjan, Dirk A; Bancewicz, Ruth M; Gautier, Philippe; Dahm, Ralf; Schonthaler, Helia B; Damante, Giuseppe; Seawright, Anne; Hever, Ann M; Yeyati, Patricia L; van Heyningen, Veronica; Coutinho, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary divergence. In most vertebrates a single PAX6 gene encodes a transcription factor required for eye, brain, olfactory system, and pancreas development...

  14. Landscape of histone modifications in a sponge reveals the origin of animal cis-regulatory complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiti, Federico; Jindrich, Katia; Fernandez-Valverde, Selene L; Roper, Kathrein E; Degnan, Bernard M; Tanurdžić, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Combinatorial patterns of histone modifications regulate developmental and cell type-specific gene expression and underpin animal complexity, but it is unclear when this regulatory system evolved. By analysing histone modifications in a morphologically-simple, early branching animal, the sponge Amphimedonqueenslandica, we show that the regulatory landscape used by complex bilaterians was already in place at the dawn of animal multicellularity. This includes distal enhancers, repressive chromatin and transcriptional units marked by H3K4me3 that vary with levels of developmental regulation. Strikingly, Amphimedon enhancers are enriched in metazoan-specific microsyntenic units, suggesting that their genomic location is extremely ancient and likely to place constraints on the evolution of surrounding genes. These results suggest that the regulatory foundation for spatiotemporal gene expression evolved prior to the divergence of sponges and eumetazoans, and was necessary for the evolution of animal multicellularity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22194.001 PMID:28395144

  15. TRA-1/GLI controls the expression of the Hox gene lin-39 during C. elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Hargitai, Balázs; Regos, Agnes; Tihanyi, Borbála; Barna, János; Borsos, Eva; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Vellai, Tibor

    2009-06-15

    The vulva of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite develops from a subset of six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) by the combined effect of the Ras, Wingless and Notch signaling cascades, and of three redundant synMuv (synthetic Multivulva) pathways grouped into classes A, B and C. Here we show that signaling via the GLI- (Glioma-associated protein) like transcription factor TRA-1, which is the terminal regulator of the C. elegans sex determination cascade, is a newly discovered pathway specifying vulval cell fates. We found that TRA-1 accumulates in, and regulates the fusion process of, cells (including the VPCs and hypodermal cells) involved in vulval patterning. TRA-1 also influenced the expression of the Hox gene lin-39, a central regulator of vulval development. Furthermore, inactivation of tra-1, which transforms animals with hermaphrodite-specific karyotype into males, promoted vulval induction in synMuv A, but not in synMuv B, mutant background. This implies that TRA-1 interacts with the class B synMuv genes, many of which are involved in chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression of cell proliferation. These results may help to understand how compromised GLI activity in humans leads to cancer. Together, we suggest that the GLI protein family involved in several key developmental processes in both invertebrates and vertebrates regulates somatic cell fates through influencing, at least in part, the expression of specific Hox genes.

  16. Mutations in paralogous Hox genes result in overlapping homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton: evidence for unique and redundant function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, G S; Kovàcs, E N; Behringer, R R; Featherstone, M S

    1995-05-01

    Hoxd-4 (previously known as Hox-4.2 and -5.1) is a mouse homeobox-containing gene homologous to the Drosophila homeotic gene Deformed. During embryogenesis, Hoxd-4 is expressed in the presumptive hindbrain and spinal cord, prevertebrae, and other tissues. In the adult, Hoxd-4 transcripts are expressed predominantly in the testis and kidney, and to a lesser extent in intestine and heart. To understand the role of Hoxd-4 during mouse embryogenesis, we generated Hoxd-4 mutant mice. Mice heterozygous or homozygous for the Hoxd-4 mutation exhibit homeotic transformations of the second cervical vertebrae (C2) to the first cervical vertebrae (C1) and malformations of the neural arches of C1 to C3 and of the basioccipital bone. The phenotype was incompletely penetrant and showed variable expressivity on both an F2 hybrid and 129 inbred genetic background. The mutant phenotype was detected in the cartilaginous skeleton of 14.5-day (E14.5) mutant embryos but no apparent differences were detected in the somites of E9.5 mutant embryos, suggesting that the abnormalities develop after E9.5 perhaps during or after resegmentation of the somites to form the prevertebrae. These results suggest that Hoxd-4 plays a role in conferring position information along the anteroposterior axis in the skeleton. The phenotypic similarities and differences between Hoxd-4 and previously reported Hoxa-4 and Hoxb-4 mutant mice suggest that Hox gene paralogs have both redundant and unique functions.

  17. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domainsNathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*1Unit of Developme...

  18. Concerted involvement of Cdx/Hox genes and Wnt signaling in morphogenesis of the caudal neural tube and cloacal derivatives from the posterior growth zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, C.; Bialecka, M.; Neijts, R.; Young, T.; Rowland, J.E.; Stringer, E.J.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Meijlink, F.; Novoa, A.; Freund, J.N.; Mallo, M.; Beck, F.; Deschamps, J.

    2011-01-01

    Decrease in Cdx dosage in an allelic series of mouse Cdx mutants leads to progressively more severe posterior vertebral defects. These defects are corrected by posterior gain of function of the Wnt effector Lef1. Precocious expression of Hox paralogous 13 genes also induces vertebral axis truncation

  19. Segmental variations in the patterns of somatic muscles: what roles for Hox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Jonathan; Vincent, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Textbook drawings of human anatomy illustrate the diversity of body muscles that are essential for coordinated movements. The genetic and molecular bases of this muscle diversity remain, however, largely unknown. The rather simple Drosophila larval musculature--every (hemi)-segment of the Drosophila larva contains about 30 different somatic muscles, each composed of a single multinucleate syncitial fibre--makes it an ideal model to study this process. Each muscle displays its own identity which can be described as its specific position and orientation with respect to the dorso-ventral (D/V) and antero-posterior (A/P) axes, size (number of nuclei), attachment sites to the epidermis and innervations. Muscle specification is a multi-step process. Each muscle is seeded by a founder cell (FC). FCs display the unique property of being able to undergo multiple rounds of fusion with fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs). The current view is that muscle identity reflects the expression by each FC of a specific combination of "identity" transcription factors (iTFs) (reviews by [4, 5]). The transcriptional identity is propagated from the FC to nuclei of FCM recruited by the growing myofibre during the fusion process. FCs are born from the asymmetric division of progenitor cells which are themselves selected by Notch (N)-mediated lateral inhibition from promuscular clusters (equivalence groups of cells) specified at fixed positions within the somatic mesoderm; see Fig.2). The abdominal (A) A2 to A7 segments of the Drosophila embryo present the same muscle pattern, the thoracic (T) T2-T3 and A1 segments show variations of this pattern and the first thoracic segment (T1) and the eighth abdominal segment (A8) present fewer and more diversified muscles. While it is has long been shown that this diversification of the muscle pattern is determined by the autonomous function of homeotic genes in the mesoderm, the step at which segment-specific information carried by Hox proteins is

  20. Impacts of mechanistic changes on HOx formation and recycling in the oxidation of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Jenkin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported model-measurement discrepancies for the concentrations of the HOx radical species (OH and HO2 in locations characterized by high emission rates of isoprene have indicated possible deficiencies in the representation of OH recycling and formation in isoprene mechanisms currently employed in numerical models; particularly at low levels of NOx. Using version 3.1 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 as a base mechanism, the sensitivity of the system to a number of detailed mechanistic changes is examined for a wide range of NOx levels, using a simple box model. These studies place emphasis on processes for which experimental or theoretical evidence has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, in addition to examining the impact of an intrinsic simplification in the MCM v3.1 chemistry. Although all the considered mechanistic changes lead to simulated increases in the concentrations of OH at low NOx levels, the greatest impact is achieved by implementation of a recently postulated mechanism involving isomerisation of the δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomers, formed from the sequential addition of OH and O2 to isoprene. In conjunction with necessary rapid photolysis of the resultant hydroperoxyaldehyde products, this mechanism yields approximately a factor of three increase in the simulated OH concentration at low NOx, and is the only considered mechanism which achieves enhancements which approach those necessary to explain the reported model-measurement discrepancies. Combination of all the considered mechanistic changes has an effect which is approximately additive, yielding an overall enhancement of about a factor of 3.2 in the simulated OH concentration at the lowest NOx input rate considered, with the simulated mean NOx mixing ratios at this input rate being 42 ppt and 29 ppt with the base case and modified mechanisms respectively. A parameterized representation of the mechanistic changes is optimized and

  1. TILLING in the two-rowed barley cultivar 'Barke' reveals preferred sites of functional diversity in the gene HvHox1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsuda Takao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic importance of cereals such as barley, and the demand for improved yield and quality require a better understanding of the genetic components that modulate biologically and commercially relevant traits. While Arabidopsis thaliana is the premiere model plant system, the spectrum of its traits cannot address all of the fundamental questions of crop plant development. Unlike Arabidopsis, barley is both a crop and a model system for scientific research, and it is increasingly being used for genetic and molecular investigations into the conserved biological processes of cereals. A common challenge in genetic studies in plants with large genomes arises from the very time-consuming work of associating mutant phenotypes with gene sequence information, especially if insertion mutagenesis is not routine, as in barley. Reverse genetics based on chemical mutagenesis represents the best solution to this obstacle. Findings In barley, we generated a new TILLING (Targeting Local Lesions IN Genomes resource comprising 10,279 M2 mutants in the two-rowed malting cultivar 'Barke,' which has been used in the generation of other genomic resources in barley (~150,000 ESTs, DH mapping population. The value of this new resource was tested using selected candidate genes. An average frequency of approximately one mutation per 0.5 Mb was determined by screening ten fragments of six different genes. The ethyl methanesulphonate (EMSmutagenesis efficiency was studied by recording and relating the mutagenesis-dependent effects found in the three mutant generations (M1-M3. A detailed analysis was performed for the homeodomain-leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP gene HvHox1. Thirty-one mutations were identified by screening a 1,270-bp fragment in 7,348 M2 lines. Three of the newly identified mutants exhibited either a six-rowed or an intermedium-spike phenotype, and one mutant displayed a significantly altered spikelet morphology compared to that of the 'Barke

  2. NUP98/NSD1 characterizes a novel poor prognostic group in acute myeloid leukemia with a distinct HOX gene expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollink, Iris H I M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T C J M; Pratcorona, Marta; Abbas, Saman; Kuipers, Jenny E; van Galen, Janneke F; Beverloo, H Berna; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gert-Jan J L; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Zimmermann, Martin; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; Pieters, Rob; Valk, Peter J M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2011-09-29

    Translocations involving nucleoporin 98kD (NUP98) on chromosome 11p15 occur at relatively low frequency in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but can be missed with routine karyotyping. In this study, high-resolution genome-wide copy number analyses revealed cryptic NUP98/NSD1 translocations in 3 of 92 cytogenetically normal (CN)-AML cases. To determine their exact frequency, we screened > 1000 well-characterized pediatric and adult AML cases using a NUP98/NSD1-specific RT-PCR. Twenty-three cases harbored the NUP98/NSD1 fusion, representing 16.1% of pediatric and 2.3% of adult CN-AML patients. NUP98/NSD1-positive AML cases had significantly higher white blood cell counts (median, 147 × 10⁹/L), more frequent FAB-M4/M5 morphology (in 63%), and more CN-AML (in 78%), FLT3/internal tandem duplication (in 91%) and WT1 mutations (in 45%) than NUP98/NSD1-negative cases. NUP98/NSD1 was mutually exclusive with all recurrent type-II aberrations. Importantly, NUP98/NSD1 was an independent predictor for poor prognosis; 4-year event-free survival was < 10% for both pediatric and adult NUP98/NSD1-positive AML patients. NUP98/NSD1-positive AML showed a characteristic HOX-gene expression pattern, distinct from, for example, MLL-rearranged AML, and the fusion protein was aberrantly localized in nuclear aggregates, providing insight into the leukemogenic pathways of these AMLs. Taken together, NUP98/NSD1 identifies a previously unrecognized group of young AML patients, with distinct characteristics and dismal prognosis, for whom new treatment strategies are urgently needed.

  3. Concerted involvement of Cdx/Hox genes and Wnt signaling in morphogenesis of the caudal neural tube and cloacal derivatives from the posterior growth zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Cesca; Bialecka, Monika; Neijts, Roel; Young, Teddy; Rowland, Jennifer E; Stringer, Emma J; Van Rooijen, Carina; Meijlink, Frits; Nóvoa, Ana; Freund, Jean-Noel; Mallo, Moises; Beck, Felix; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    Decrease in Cdx dosage in an allelic series of mouse Cdx mutants leads to progressively more severe posterior vertebral defects. These defects are corrected by posterior gain of function of the Wnt effector Lef1. Precocious expression of Hox paralogous 13 genes also induces vertebral axis truncation by antagonizing Cdx function. We report here that the phenotypic similarity also applies to patterning of the caudal neural tube and uro-rectal tracts in Cdx and Wnt3a mutants, and in embryos precociously expressing Hox13 genes. Cdx2 inactivation after placentation leads to posterior defects, including incomplete uro-rectal septation. Compound mutants carrying one active Cdx2 allele in the Cdx4-null background (Cdx2/4), transgenic embryos precociously expressing Hox13 genes and a novel Wnt3a hypomorph mutant all manifest a comparable phenotype with similar uro-rectal defects. Phenotype and transcriptome analysis in early Cdx mutants, genetic rescue experiments and gene expression studies lead us to propose that Cdx transcription factors act via Wnt signaling during the laying down of uro-rectal mesoderm, and that they are operative in an early phase of these events, at the site of tissue progenitors in the posterior growth zone of the embryo. Cdx and Wnt mutations and premature Hox13 expression also cause similar neural dysmorphology, including ectopic neural structures that sometimes lead to neural tube splitting at caudal axial levels. These findings involve the Cdx genes, canonical Wnt signaling and the temporal control of posterior Hox gene expression in posterior morphogenesis in the different embryonic germ layers. They shed a new light on the etiology of the caudal dysplasia or caudal regression range of human congenital defects.

  4. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 2. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigliante, A.; Christensen, M.J.; Hill, J.P.;

    1998-01-01

    X-ray-scattering techniques have been used to study the crystal and magnetic structures of HoxPr1-x alloys in the form of thin films. Three distinct crystal structures are found as a function of concentration x, each of which has a characteristic magnetic structure. For x greater than or equal to 0.......6 a hexagonal-close-packed phase is found with the magnetic moments ordered in a basal-plane helix, whereas for 0.4 less than or equal to x... hexagonal-close-packed and remain nonmagnetic down to the lowest temperatures studied. Using x-ray magnetic resonance scattering techniques, we demonstrate that a small, static spin-density wave is induced within the alloy 5d band at both the Pr and Ho sites in both of the magnetically ordered phases...

  5. Nighttime observation and chemistry of HOx in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Oebel, A.; Dlugi, R.; Hu, M.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nighttime HOx chemistry was investigated in two ground-based field campaigns (PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006) in summer 2006 in China by comparison of measured and modeled concentration data of OH and HO2. The measurement sites were located in a rural environment in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) under urban influence and in a suburban area close to Beijing, respectively. In both locations, significant nighttime concentrations of radicals were observed under conditions with high total OH reactivities of about 40-50 s-1 in PRD and 25 s-1 near Beijing. For OH, the nocturnal concentrations were within the range of (0.5-3) × 106 cm-3, implying a significant nighttime oxidation rate of pollutants on the order of several ppb per hour. The measured nighttime concentration of HO2 was about (0.2-5) × 108 cm-3, containing a significant, model-estimated contribution from RO2 as an interference. A chemical box model based on an established chemical mechanism is capable of reproducing the measured nighttime values of the measured peroxy radicals and kOH, but underestimates in both field campaigns the observed OH by about 1 order of magnitude. Sensitivity studies with the box model demonstrate that the OH discrepancy between measured and modeled nighttime OH can be resolved, if an additional ROx production process (about 1 ppb h-1) and additional recycling (RO2 → HO2 → OH) with an efficiency equivalent to 1 ppb NO is assumed. The additional recycling mechanism was also needed to reproduce the OH observations at the same locations during daytime for conditions with NO mixing ratios below 1 ppb. This could be an indication that the same missing process operates at day and night. In principle, the required primary ROx source can be explained by ozonolysis of terpenoids, which react faster with ozone than with OH in the nighttime atmosphere. However, the amount of these highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) would require a strong local source, for which

  6. Impacts of mechanistic changes on HOx formation and recycling in the oxidation of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Derwent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported model-measurement discrepancies for the concentrations of the HOx radical species (OH and HO2 in locations characterized by high emission rates of isoprene have indicated possible deficiencies in the representation of OH recycling and formation in isoprene mechanisms currently employed in numerical models; particularly at low levels of NOx. Using version 3.1 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 as a base mechanism, the sensitivity of the system to a number of detailed mechanistic changes is examined for a wide range of NOx levels, using a simple box model. The studies consider sensitivity tests in relation to three general areas for which experimental and/or theoretical evidence has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, as follows: (1 implementation of propagating channels for the reactions of HO2 with acyl and β-oxo peroxy radicals with HO2, with support from a number of studies; (2 implementation of the OH-catalysed conversion of isoprene-derived hydroperoxides to isomeric epoxydiols, as characterised by Paulot et al.~(2009a; and (3 implementation of a mechanism involving respective 1,5 and 1,6 H atom shift isomerisation reactions of the β-hydroxyalkenyl and cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomers, formed from the sequential addition of OH and O2 to isoprene, based on the theoretical study of Peeters et al. (2009. All the considered mechanistic changes lead to simulated increases in the concentrations of OH, with (1 and (2 resulting in respective increases of up to about 7% and 16%, depending on the level of NOx. (3 is found to have potentially much greater impacts, with enhancements in OH concentrations of up to a factor of about 3.3, depending on the level of NOx, provided the (crucial rapid photolysis of the hydroperoxy-methyl-butenal products of the cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomerisation reactions is represented, as also postulated by Peeters et al.~(2009. Additional tests suggest that

  7. Adaptive evolution of 5'HoxD genes in the origin and diversification of the cetacean flipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Lihong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zuo, Xueguo; Ru, Binghua; Zhong, Hui; Han, Naijian; Jones, Gareth; Jepson, Paul D; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-03-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 control digit patterning and limb formation in tetrapods. Both show strong expression in the limb bud during embryonic development, are highly conserved across vertebrates, and show mutations that are associated with carpal, metacarpal, and phalangeal deformities. The most dramatic evolutionary reorganization of the mammalian limb has occurred in cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which the hind limbs have been lost and the forelimbs have evolved into paddle-shaped flippers. We reconstructed the phylogeny of digit patterning in mammals and inferred that digit number has changed twice in the evolution of the cetacean forelimb. First, the divergence of the early cetaceans from their even-toed relatives coincided with the reacquisition of the pentadactyl forelimb, whereas the ancestors of tetradactyl baleen whales (Mysticeti) later lost a digit again. To test whether the evolution of the cetacean forelimb is associated with positive selection or relaxation of Hoxd12 and Hoxd13, we sequenced these genes in a wide range of mammals. In Hoxd12, we found evidence of Darwinian selection associated with both episodes of cetacean forelimb reorganization. In Hoxd13, we found a novel expansion of a polyalanine tract in cetaceans compared with other mammals (17/18 residues vs. 14/15 residues, respectively), lengthening of which has previously been shown to be linked to synpolydactyly in humans and mice. Both genes also show much greater sequence variation among cetaceans than across other mammalian lineages. Our results strongly implicate 5'HoxD genes in the modulation of digit number, web forming, and the high morphological diversity of the cetacean manus.

  8. Synthesis and Electrical Properties of New Solid State Electrolyte Materials Ce6-xHoxMoO15-δ(0.0≤x≤1.2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU De-feng; XIA Yan-jie; MENG Jian

    2009-01-01

    Ce6-xHoxMoO15-δ(0.0≤x≤1.2) was synthesized by modified sol-gel method and characterized by diffe-rential X-ray diffraction(XRD), Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) methods. The oxide ionic con-ductivity of the samples was investigated by AC impedance spectroscopy. It shows that all the samples are single phase with a cubic fluorite structure. The solid solution Ce6-xHoxMoO15-δ(x=0.6) was detected to be the best con-ducting phase with the highest conductivity(σt=1.05×10-2 S/cm) at 800 ℃ and the lowest activation energy(Ea=1.09eV). These properties suggest that this kind of material has a potential application in intermediate-low temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. A conditional piggyBac transposition system for genetic screening in mice identifies oncogenic networks in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Roland; Rad, Lena; Wang, Wei; Strong, Alexander; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bronner, Iraad F; Mayho, Matthew; Steiger, Katja; Weber, Julia; Hieber, Maren; Veltkamp, Christian; Eser, Stefan; Geumann, Ulf; Öllinger, Rupert; Zukowska, Magdalena; Barenboim, Maxim; Maresch, Roman; Cadiñanos, Juan; Friedrich, Mathias; Varela, Ignacio; Constantino-Casas, Fernando; Sarver, Aaron; Ten Hoeve, Jelle; Prosser, Haydn; Seidler, Barbara; Bauer, Judith; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Krug, Anne; Ehmer, Ursula; Schneider, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Rümmele, Petra; Aust, Daniela; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ning, Zemin; Wessels, Lodewyk; Schmid, Roland M; Quail, Michael A; Vassiliou, George; Esposito, Irene; Liu, Pentao; Saur, Dieter; Bradley, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.

  10. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Profile and Function of TALE Homeoproteins Reveals Their Specialization and Specific Interactions with Hox Genes/Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Penkov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of Meis, Prep, and Pbx1 TALE homeoproteins with Hox proteins are essential for development and disease. Although Meis and Prep behave similarly in vitro, their in vivo activities remain largely unexplored. We show that Prep and Meis interact with largely independent sets of genomic sites and select different DNA-binding sequences, Prep associating mostly with promoters and housekeeping genes and Meis with promoter-remote regions and developmental genes. Hox target sequences associate strongly with Meis but not with Prep binding sites, while Pbx1 cooperates with both Prep and Meis. Accordingly, Meis1 shows strong genetic interaction with Pbx1 but not with Prep1. Meis1 and Prep1 nonetheless coregulate a subset of genes, predominantly through opposing effects. Notably, the TALE homeoprotein binding profile subdivides Hox clusters into two domains differentially regulated by Meis1 and Prep1. During evolution, Meis and Prep thus specialized their interactions but maintained significant regulatory coordination.

  11. The Histone Methyltransferase Gene Absent, Small, or Homeotic Discs-1 Like Is Required for Normal Hox Gene Expression and Fertility in Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Geister, Krista A.; Jones, Morgan; Waqas, Meriam; Maillard, Ivan; Camper, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling influences gene expression in developing and adult organisms. Active and repressive marks of histone methylation dictate the embryonic expression boundaries of developmentally regulated genes, including the Hox gene cluster. Drosophila ash1 (absent, small or homeotic discs 1) gene encodes a histone methyltransferase essential for regulation of Hox gene expression that interacts genetically with other members of the trithorax group (TrxG). While mammalian members of the mixed lineage leukemia (Mll) family of TrxG genes have roles in regulation of Hox gene expression, little is known about the expression and function of the mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila ash1 gene, Ash1-like (Ash1l). Here we report the expression of mouse Ash1l gene in specific structures within various organs and provide evidence that reduced Ash1l expression has tissue-specific effects on mammalian development and adult homeostasis. Mutants exhibit partially penetrant postnatal lethality and failure to thrive. Surviving mutants have growth insufficiency, skeletal transformations, and infertility associated with developmental defects in both male and female reproductive organs. Specifically, expression of Hoxa11 and Hoxd10 are altered in the epididymis of Ash1l mutant males and Hoxa10 is reduced in the uterus of Ash1l mutant females. In summary, we show that the histone methyltransferase Ash1l is important for the development and function of several tissues and for proper expression of homeotic genes in mammals. PMID:26333994

  12. An early role for WNT signaling in specifying neural patterns of Cdx and Hox gene expression and motor neuron subtype identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Nordström

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between extrinsic signaling, progenitor cell specification and neuronal subtype identity is central to the developmental organization of the vertebrate central nervous system. In the hindbrain and spinal cord, distinctions in the rostrocaudal identity of progenitor cells are associated with the generation of different motor neuron subtypes. Two fundamental classes of motor neurons, those with dorsal (dMN and ventral (vMN exit points, are generated over largely non-overlapping rostrocaudal domains of the caudal neural tube. Cdx and Hox genes are important determinants of the rostrocaudal identity of neural progenitor cells, but the link between early patterning signals, neural Cdx and Hox gene expression, and the generation of dMN and vMN subtypes, is unclear. Using an in vitro assay of neural differentiation, we provide evidence that an early Wnt-based program is required to interact with a later retinoic acid- and fibroblast growth factor-mediated mechanism to generate a pattern of Cdx and Hox profiles characteristic of hindbrain and spinal cord progenitor cells that prefigure the generation of vMNs and dMNs.

  13. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  14. A biophysical model for identifying splicing regulatory elements and their interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wen

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA is a crucial step in the expression of most eukaryotic genes. Splicing factors (SFs play an important role in AS regulation by binding to the cis-regulatory elements on the pre-mRNA. Although many splicing factors (SFs and their binding sites have been identified, their combinatorial regulatory effects remain to be elucidated. In this paper, we derive a biophysical model for AS regulation that integrates combinatorial signals of cis-acting splicing regulatory elements (SREs and their interactions. We also develop a systematic framework for model inference. Applying the biophysical model to a human RNA-Seq data set, we demonstrate that our model can explain 49.1%-66.5% variance of the data, which is comparable to the best result achieved by biophysical models for transcription. In total, we identified 119 SRE pairs between different regions of cassette exons that may regulate exon or intron definition in splicing, and 77 SRE pairs from the same region that may arise from a long motif or two different SREs bound by different SFs. Particularly, putative binding sites of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F/H and E/K are identified as interacting SRE pairs, and have been shown to be consistent with the interaction models proposed in previous experimental results. These results show that our biophysical model and inference method provide a means of quantitative modeling of splicing regulation and is a useful tool for identifying SREs and their interactions. The software package for model inference is available under an open source license.

  15. Dissection of thousands of cell type-specific enhancers identifies dinucleotide repeat motifs as general enhancer features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Cuna, J Omar; Arnold, Cosmas D; Stampfel, Gerald; Boryń, Lukasz M; Gerlach, Daniel; Rath, Martina; Stark, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Gene expression is determined by genomic elements called enhancers, which contain short motifs bound by different transcription factors (TFs). However, how enhancer sequences and TF motifs relate to enhancer activity is unknown, and general sequence requirements for enhancers or comprehensive sets of important enhancer sequence elements have remained elusive. Here, we computationally dissect thousands of functional enhancer sequences from three different Drosophila cell lines. We find that the enhancers display distinct cis-regulatory sequence signatures, which are predictive of the enhancers' cell type-specific or broad activities. These signatures contain transcription factor motifs and a novel class of enhancer sequence elements, dinucleotide repeat motifs (DRMs). DRMs are highly enriched in enhancers, particularly in enhancers that are broadly active across different cell types. We experimentally validate the importance of the identified TF motifs and DRMs for enhancer function and show that they can be sufficient to create an active enhancer de novo from a nonfunctional sequence. The function of DRMs as a novel class of general enhancer features that are also enriched in human regulatory regions might explain their implication in several diseases and provides important insights into gene regulation.

  16. Re-programming of C. elegans male epidermal precursor fates by Wnt, Hox, and LIN-12/Notch activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Seah, Adeline; Sternberg, Paul W

    2010-09-01

    In Caenorhabditiselegans males, different subsets of ventral epidermal precursor (Pn.p) cells adopt distinct fates in a position-specific manner: three posterior cells, P(9-11).p, comprise the hook sensillum competence group (HCG) with three potential fates (1 degrees , 2 degrees , or 3 degrees ), while eight anterior cells, P(1-8).p, fuse with the hyp7 epidermal syncytium. Here we show that activation of the canonical BAR-1 beta-catenin pathway of Wnt signaling alters the competence of P(3-8).p and specifies ectopic HCG-like fates. This fate transformation requires the Hox gene mab-5. In addition, misexpression of mab-5 in P(1-8).p is sufficient to establish HCG competence among these cells, as well as to generate ectopic HCG fates in combination with LIN-12 or EGF signaling. While increased Wnt signaling induces predominantly 1 degrees HCG fates, increased LIN-12 or EGF signaling in combination with MAB-5 overexpression promotes 2 degrees HCG fates in anterior Pn.p cells, suggesting distinctive functions of Wnt, LIN-12, and EGF signaling in specification of HCG fates. Lastly, wild-type mab-5 function is necessary for normal P(9-11).p fate specification, indicating that regulation of ectopic HCG fate formation revealed in anterior Pn.p cells reflect mechanisms of pattern formation during normal hook development.

  17. Hox, Wnt, and the evolution of the primary body axis: insights from the early-divergent phyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxevanis Andreas D

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subkingdom Bilateria encompasses the overwhelming majority of animals, including all but four early-branching phyla: Porifera, Ctenophora, Placozoa, and Cnidaria. On average, these early-branching phyla have fewer cell types, tissues, and organs, and are considered to be significantly less specialized along their primary body axis. As such, they present an attractive outgroup from which to investigate how evolutionary changes in the genetic toolkit may have contributed to the emergence of the complex animal body plans of the Bilateria. This review offers an up-to-date glimpse of genome-scale comparisons between bilaterians and these early-diverging taxa. Specifically, we examine these data in the context of how they may explain the evolutionary development of primary body axes and axial symmetry across the Metazoa. Next, we re-evaluate the validity and evolutionary genomic relevance of the zootype hypothesis, which defines an animal by a specific spatial pattern of gene expression. Finally, we extend the hypothesis that Wnt genes may be the earliest primary body axis patterning mechanism by suggesting that Hox genes were co-opted into this patterning network prior to the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Open peer review Reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Gáspár Jékely, and L Aravind. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  18. Large magnetocaloric effect of HoxEr1-xNi (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X. Q.; Zhang, B.; Wu, H.; Hu, F. X.; Huang, Q. Z.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-10-01

    A secondary magnetic transition (spin reorientation transition) below Curie temperature in ErNi was observed via different characterization techniques. Ho-substitution for Er atoms has a great impact on the magnetic property and magnetocaloric effect. The two magnetic transitions change close to each other with 10% of Ho-substitution at the Er site. It is also found that 10% of Ho-substitution contributes up to ˜14.9% of enhancement on the maximal magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) and ˜21.9% of enhancement on the maximal adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad). The maximum value of ΔSM and ΔTad for Ho0.1Er0.9Ni compound is as high as 34 J/kg K and 8.9 K, respectively, under a field change of 0-5 T. The relationship between the maximal ΔSM and the refrigerant temperature width (δTFWHM) for HoxEr1-xNi (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compounds is analyzed. The enhancement of MCE for Ho0.1Er0.9Ni compound is considered to be resulted from the tendency of merging of spin reorientation transition and ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition.

  19. The influence of cloud chemistry on HOx and NOx in the Marine Boundary Layer: a 1-D modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Dentener

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D marine stratocumulus cloud model has been supplemented with a comprehensive and up-to-date aqueous phase chemical mechanism for the purpose of assessing the impact that the presence of clouds and aerosols has on gas phase HOx, NOx and O3 budgets in the marine boundary layer. The simulations presented here indicate that cloud may act as a heterogeneous source of HONOg via the conversion of HNO4(g at moderate pH (~4.5. The photolysis of nitrate (NO3- has also been found to contribute to this simulated increase in HONOg by ~5% and also acts as a minor source of NO2(g. The effect of introducing deliquescent aerosol on the simulated increase of HONOg is negligible. The most important consequences of this elevation in HONOg are that, in the presence of cloud, gas phase concentrations of NOx species increase by a factor of 2, which minimises the simulated decrease in O3(g, and results in a regeneration of OHg. This partly compensates for the removal of OHg by direct phase transfer into the cloud and has important implications regarding the oxidising capacity of the marine boundary layer. The findings presented here also suggest that previous modelling studies, which neglect the heterogeneous HNO4(g reaction cycle, may have over-estimated the role of clouds as a sink for OHg and O3(gin unpolluted oceanic regions, by ~10% and ~2%, respectively.

  20. Modelling simulations of NOx and HOx in the middle and upper atmosphere using a 3D Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model with D region ion-neutral chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.; Kovacs, T.; Chipperfield, M.; Marsh, D. R.; Smith, A. K.; Verronen, P. T.; Newnham, D.; Clilverd, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    In the middle and upper atmosphere, the distributions of odd nitrogen NOx (NO, NO2) and odd hydrogen HOx (OH, HO2) are controlled by transport processes and chemistry. Energetic particle precipitation (of protons and electrons) produces NOx and HOx through ion-molecule chemistry, and this can play an important role in the chemistry of the mesosphere. There is also increasing evidence that the descent of NOx can destroy stratospheric O3 at high latitudes. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the importance of their production/loss rates, horizontal/vertical transport to advance our knowledge in the evolution of NOx and HOx as well as other related chemical species (e.g. HNO3, ClNO3, O and O3). Recently, we have developed a new coupled ion-neutral chemical model for the ionospheric D region (altitudes 50 - 90 km) based on the Sodankylä Ion and neutral Chemistry (SIC) model and 3D Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), termed WACCM-SIC (Kovacs et al., 2016). An extra 306 ion-neutral and ion-recombination reactions of neutral species, positive and negative ions, and electrons have been added to the standard chemistry in WACCM. WACCM-SIC simulations have been performed to explore the relative contributions to mesospheric NO from auroral and medium energetic electrons, during the period 2013-2015. The modelled simulations are also compared with the available satellite measurements (e.g., temperature, O, H, and O3 from SABER, and NO from AIM) and ground-based microwave radiometer observations of mesospheric NO at Halley station (75oS). The interannual and inter-hemisphere differences will also be discussed.

  1. Nonautonomous Roles of MAB-5/Hox and the Secreted Basement Membrane Molecule SPON-1/F-Spondin in Caenorhabditis elegans Neuronal Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Matthew P; Miltner, Adam M; Lundquist, Erik A

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system development and circuit formation requires neurons to migrate from their birthplaces to specific destinations.Migrating neurons detect extracellular cues that provide guidance information. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Q right (QR) and Q left (QL) neuroblast descendants migrate long distances in opposite directions. The Hox gene lin-39 cell autonomously promotes anterior QR descendant migration, and mab-5/Hox cell autonomously promotes posterior QL descendant migration. Here we describe a nonautonomous role of mab-5 in regulating both QR and QL descendant migrations, a role masked by redundancy with lin-39 A third Hox gene, egl-5/Abdominal-B, also likely nonautonomously regulates Q descendant migrations. In the lin-39 mab-5 egl-5 triple mutant, little if any QR and QL descendant migration occurs. In addition to well-described roles of lin-39 and mab-5 in the Q descendants, our results suggest that lin-39, mab-5, and egl-5 might also pattern the posterior region of the animal for Q descendant migration. Previous studies showed that the spon-1 gene might be a target of MAB-5 in Q descendant migration. spon-1 encodes a secreted basement membrane molecule similar to vertebrate F-spondin. Here we show that spon-1 acts nonautonomously to control Q descendant migration, and might function as a permissive rather than instructive signal for cell migration. We find that increased levels of MAB-5 in body wall muscle (BWM) can drive the spon-1 promoter adjacent to the Q cells, and loss of spon-1 suppresses mab-5 gain of function. Thus, MAB-5 might nonautonomously control Q descendant migrations by patterning the posterior region of the animal to which Q cells respond. spon-1 expression from BWMs might be part of the posterior patterning necessary for directed Q descendant migration.

  2. Hox paralog group 2 genes control the migration of mouse pontine neurons through slit-robo signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Geisen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pontine neurons (PN represent a major source of mossy fiber projections to the cerebellum. During mouse hindbrain development, PN migrate tangentially and sequentially along both the anteroposterior (AP and dorsoventral (DV axes. Unlike DV migration, which is controlled by the Netrin-1/Dcc attractive pathway, little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding PN migration along the AP axis. Here, we show that Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 are required both intrinsically and extrinsically to maintain normal AP migration of subsets of PN, by preventing their premature ventral attraction towards the midline. Moreover, the migration defects observed in Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 mutant mice were phenocopied in compound Robo1;Robo2, Slit1;Slit2, and Robo2;Slit2 knockout animals, indicating that these guidance molecules act downstream of Hox genes to control PN migration. Indeed, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we further demonstrated that Robo2 is a direct target of Hoxa2 in vivo and that maintenance of high Robo and Slit expression levels was impaired in Hoxa2 mutant mice. Lastly, the analysis of Phox2b-deficient mice indicated that the facial motor nucleus is a major Slit signaling source required to prevent premature ventral migration of PN. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular control of neuronal migration from transcription factor to regulation of guidance receptor and ligand expression. Specifically, they address the question of how exposure to multiple guidance cues along the AP and DV axes is regulated at the transcriptional level and in turn translated into stereotyped migratory responses during tangential migration of neurons in the developing mammalian brain.

  3. Identifying Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  4. Deep Feature Selection: Theory and Application to Identify Enhancers and Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2016-05-01

    Sparse linear models approximate target variable(s) by a sparse linear combination of input variables. Since they are simple, fast, and able to select features, they are widely used in classification and regression. Essentially they are shallow feed-forward neural networks that have three limitations: (1) incompatibility to model nonlinearity of features, (2) inability to learn high-level features, and (3) unnatural extensions to select features in a multiclass case. Deep neural networks are models structured by multiple hidden layers with nonlinear activation functions. Compared with linear models, they have two distinctive strengths: the capability to (1) model complex systems with nonlinear structures and (2) learn high-level representation of features. Deep learning has been applied in many large and complex systems where deep models significantly outperform shallow ones. However, feature selection at the input level, which is very helpful to understand the nature of a complex system, is still not well studied. In genome research, the cis-regulatory elements in noncoding DNA sequences play a key role in the expression of genes. Since the activity of regulatory elements involves highly interactive factors, a deep tool is strongly needed to discover informative features. In order to address the above limitations of shallow and deep models for selecting features of a complex system, we propose a deep feature selection (DFS) model that (1) takes advantages of deep structures to model nonlinearity and (2) conveniently selects a subset of features right at the input level for multiclass data. Simulation experiments convince us that this model is able to correctly identify both linear and nonlinear features. We applied this model to the identification of active enhancers and promoters by integrating multiple sources of genomic information. Results show that our model outperforms elastic net in terms of size of discriminative feature subset and classification accuracy.

  5. Activation Thermodynamics and H/D Kinetic Isotope Effect of the Hox to HredH+ Transition in [FeFe] Hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Paul W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ratzloff, Michael W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mulder, David W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lubner, Carolyn E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brown, Katherine A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilker, Molly B. [University of Colorado; Hamby, Hayden [University of Colorado; Dukovic, Gordana [University of Colorado

    2017-08-29

    Molecular complexes between CdSe nanocrystals and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe] hydrogenase I (CaI) enabled light-driven control of electron transfer for spectroscopic detection of redox intermediates during catalytic proton reduction. Here we address the route of electron transfer from CdSe->CaI and activation thermodynamics of the initial step of proton reduction in CaI. The electron paramagnetic spectroscopy of illuminated CdSe:CaI showed how the CaI accessory FeS cluster chain (F-clusters) functions in electron transfer with CdSe. The Hox->HredH+ reduction step measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed an enthalpy of activation of 19 kJ mol-1 and a ~2.5-fold kinetic isotope effect. Overall these results support electron injection from CdSe into CaI involving F-clusters, and that the Hox->HredH+ step of catalytic proton reduction in CaI proceeds by a proton-dependent process.

  6. Heterogeneous production and loss of HOx by airborne TiO2 particles and implications for climate change mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, D. R.; Heard, D. E.; Ingham, T.; Chipperfield, M.; Seakins, P. W.; Baeza Romero, M. T. T.; Taverna, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    It is suggested that injection of TiO2 particles into the stratosphere to back-scatter solar radiation maybe an effective measure to mitigate the effects of global warming. TiO2 particles are well suited to this application because of their high refractive index.1 However, the effect of such a measure on stratospheric chemistry is not fully understood. HO2 is a key atmospheric species in both the troposphere and the stratosphere and is responsible for 40% of ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.2 In addition to this, application of TiO2 coatings to surfaces within the urban environment are used to abate ambient levels of NO2 and for their self-cleaning properties. This study investigates the heterogeneous reaction between airborne sub-micron TiO2 particles and HO2 radicals using an aerosol flow tube and the FAGE (fluorescence assay by gas expansion) technique to monitor HO2 uptake. The dependence of the uptake coefficient (γHO2) to relative humidity (RH) has been determined. Experiments performed in dark conditions at the most stratospherically relevant RH (11.1%) determined γHO2 = (2.08 ± 0.11) × 10-2. A positive dependence of γHO2 with RH was observed which showed a correlation between γHO2 and the number of monolayers of water adsorbed on the particle surface. Experiments illuminated with near-UV light (365 nm) were performed and showed significant production of HO2 from the aerosols into the gas phase. The concentrations were dependent on light flux, RH and total particle surface area. While the production of HOx in the gas phase has been observed close to TiO2 surfaces in the presence of H2O23,4 it is believed that this phenomena has not been observed from airborne TiO2 particles and parameterized in this way before. Emissions of HO2 from the surface of TiO2 particles in the stratosphere could rule out the application of TiO2 particles for use within solar-radiation management schemes. The TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model was used to predict

  7. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamprini G Kalampoki

    Full Text Available Coup-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor super family, has a fundamental role in the development of metazoan embryos. The study of the gene's regulatory circuit in the sea urchin embryo will facilitate the placement of this transcription factor in the well-studied embryonic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN. The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ genomic clones, containing three exons and upstream sequences of PlCoup-TF, were isolated from a genomic library. The transcription initiation site was determined and 5' deletions and individual segments of a 1930 bp upstream region were placed ahead of a GFP reporter cassette and injected into fertilized P.lividus eggs. Module a (-532 to -232, was necessary and sufficient to confer ciliary band expression to the reporter. Comparison of P.lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus upstream Coup-TF sequences, revealed considerable conservation, but none within module a. 5' and internal deletions into module a, defined a smaller region that confers ciliary band specific expression. Putative regulatory cis-acting elements (RE1, RE2 and RE3 within module a, were specifically bound by proteins in sea urchin embryonic nuclear extracts. Site-specific mutagenesis of these elements resulted in loss of reporter activity (RE1 or ectopic expression (RE2, RE3. It is proposed that sea urchin transcription factors, which bind these three regulatory sites, are necessary for spatial and quantitative regulation of the PlCoup-TF gene at pluteus stage sea urchin embryos. These findings lead to the future identification of these factors and to the hierarchical positioning of PlCoup-TF within the embryonic GRN.

  8. The contribution of cis-regulatory elements to head-to-head gene pairs’ co-expression pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transcription regulation is one of the most critical pipelines in biological process,in which cis-elements play the role as gene expression regulators.We attempt to deduce the principles underlying the co-expression of "head-to-head" gene pairs by analyzing activities or behaviors of the shared cis-elements.A network component analysis was performed to estimate the impact of cis-elements on gene promoters and their activities under different conditions.Our discoveries reveal how biological system uses those regulatory elements to control the expression pattern of "head-to-head" gene pairs and the whole transcription regulation system.

  9. Kinetics of transcription initiation directed by multiple cis-regulatory elements on the glnAp2 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-12-15

    Transcription initiation is orchestrated by dynamic molecular interactions, with kinetic steps difficult to detect. Utilizing a hybrid method, we aim to unravel essential kinetic steps of transcriptional regulation on the glnAp2 promoter, whose regulatory region includes two enhancers (sites I and II) and three low-affinity sequences (sites III-V), to which the transcriptional activator NtrC binds. By structure reconstruction, we analyze all possible organization architectures of the transcription apparatus (TA). The main regulatory mode involves two NtrC hexamers: one at enhancer II transiently associates with site V such that the other at enhancer I can rapidly approach and catalyze the σ(54)-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. We build a kinetic model characterizing essential steps of the TA operation; with the known kinetics of the holoenzyme interacting with DNA, this model enables the kinetics beyond technical detection to be determined by fitting the input-output function of the wild-type promoter. The model further quantitatively reproduces transcriptional activities of various mutated promoters. These results reveal different roles played by two enhancers and interpret why the low-affinity elements conditionally enhance or repress transcription. This work presents an integrated dynamic picture of regulated transcription initiation and suggests an evolutionarily conserved characteristic guaranteeing reliable transcriptional response to regulatory signals. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. A cis-regulatory antisense RNA represses translation in Vibrio cholerae through extensive complementarity and proximity to the target locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Howard; Replogle, John Michael; Vather, Naomi; Tsao-Wu, Maya; Mistry, Ronak; Liu, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    As with all facultative pathogens, Vibrio cholerae must optimize its cellular processes to adapt to different environments with varying carbon sources and to environmental stresses. More specifically, in order to metabolize mannitol, V. cholerae must regulate the synthesis of MtlA, a mannitol transporter protein produced exclusively in the presence of mannitol. We previously showed that a cis-acting small RNA (sRNA) expressed by V. cholerae, MtlS, appears to post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of mtlA and is produced in the absence of mannitol. We hypothesized that since it is complementary to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mtlA mRNA, MtlS may affect synthesis of MtlA by forming an mtlA-MtlS complex that blocks translation of the mRNA through occlusion of its ribosome binding site. To test this hypothesis, we used in vitro translation assays in order to examine the role MtlS plays in mtlA regulation and found that MtlS is sufficient to suppress translation of transcripts harboring the 5' UTR of mtlA. However, in a cellular context, the 5' UTR of mtlA is not sufficient for targeted repression by endogenous MtlS; additional segments from the coding region of mtlA play a role in the ability of the sRNA to regulate translation of mtlA mRNA. Additionally, proximity of transcription sites between the sRNA and mRNA significantly affects the efficacy of MtlS.

  11. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, E.; Della Pina, S.; Castel, R.; Souer, E.; Koes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than

  12. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong Mei; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C.; Einstein, Francine H.; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here, we purify human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate “poised” enhancers, and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure. PMID:25327398

  13. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, E.; Della Pina, S.; Castel, R.; Souer, E.; Koes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than ch

  14. The Role of Cis-Regulatory Motifs and Genetical Control of Expression in the Divergence of Yeast Duplicate Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leach, Lindsey J; Zhang, Ze; Lu, Chenqi; Kearsey, Michael J; Luo, Zewei

    2007-01-01

    Expression divergence of duplicate genes is widely believed to be important for their retention and evolution of new function, although the mechanism that determines their expression divergence remains unclear...

  15. A Survey of 6,300 Genomic Fragments for cis-Regulatory Activity in the Imaginal Discs of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Jory

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 6,000 fragments from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed for their ability to drive expression of GAL4 reporter genes in the third-instar larval imaginal discs. About 1,200 reporter genes drove expression in the eye, antenna, leg, wing, haltere, or genital imaginal discs. The patterns ranged from large regions to individual cells. About 75% of the active fragments drove expression in multiple discs; 20% were expressed in ventral, but not dorsal, discs (legs, genital, and antenna, whereas ∼23% were expressed in dorsal but not ventral discs (wing, haltere, and eye. Several patterns, for example, within the leg chordotonal organ, appeared a surprisingly large number of times. Unbiased searches for DNA sequence motifs suggest candidate transcription factors that may regulate enhancers with shared activities. Together, these expression patterns provide a valuable resource to the community and offer a broad overview of how transcriptional regulatory information is distributed in the Drosophila genome.

  16. Genome-wide profiling of p63 DNA-binding sites identifies an element that regulates gene expression during limb development in the 7q21 SHFM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn N Kouwenhoven

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in p63 are associated with split hand/foot malformations (SHFM, orofacial clefting, and ectodermal abnormalities. Elucidation of the p63 gene network that includes target genes and regulatory elements may reveal new genes for other malformation disorders. We performed genome-wide DNA-binding profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in primary human keratinocytes, and identified potential target genes and regulatory elements controlled by p63. We show that p63 binds to an enhancer element in the SHFM1 locus on chromosome 7q and that this element controls expression of DLX6 and possibly DLX5, both of which are important for limb development. A unique micro-deletion including this enhancer element, but not the DLX5/DLX6 genes, was identified in a patient with SHFM. Our study strongly indicates disruption of a non-coding cis-regulatory element located more than 250 kb from the DLX5/DLX6 genes as a novel disease mechanism in SHFM1. These data provide a proof-of-concept that the catalogue of p63 binding sites identified in this study may be of relevance to the studies of SHFM and other congenital malformations that resemble the p63-associated phenotypes.

  17. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    model are within ±25 % for OH exposure and within ±60 % for other parameters. These uncertainties are small relative to the dynamic range of outputs. Uncertainty analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis rates of O3, O2, and H2O and reactions of OH and HO2 with themselves or with some abundant species, i.e., O3 and H2O2. OHexp calculated from direct integration and estimated from SO2 decay in the model with laminar and measured residence time distributions (RTDs) are generally within a factor of 2 from the plug-flow OHexp. However, in the models with RTDs, OHexp estimated from SO2 is systematically lower than directly integrated OHexp in the case of significant SO2 consumption. We thus recommended using OHexp estimated from the decay of the species under study when possible, to obtain the most appropriate information on photochemical aging in the OFR. Using HOx-recycling vs. destructive external OH reactivity only leads to small changes in OHexp under most conditions. Changing the identity (rate constant) of external OH reactants can result in substantial changes in OHexp due to different reductions in OH suppression as the reactant is consumed. We also report two equations for estimating OH exposure in OFR254. We find that the equation estimating OHexp from measured O3 consumption performs better than an alternative equation that does not use it, and thus recommend measuring both input and output O3 concentrations in OFR254 experiments. This study contributes to establishing a firm and systematic understanding of the gas-phase HOx and Ox chemistry in these reactors, and enables better experiment planning and interpretation as well as improved design of future reactors.

  18. Genome wide association identifies PPFIA1 as a candidate gene for acute lung injury risk following major trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Christie

    Full Text Available Acute Lung Injury (ALI is a syndrome with high associated mortality characterized by severe hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates in patients with critical illness. We conducted the first investigation to use the genome wide association (GWA approach to identify putative risk variants for ALI. Genome wide genotyping was performed using the Illumina Human Quad 610 BeadChip. We performed a two-stage GWA study followed by a third stage of functional characterization. In the discovery phase (Phase 1, we compared 600 European American trauma-associated ALI cases with 2266 European American population-based controls. We carried forward the top 1% of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at p<0.01 to a replication phase (Phase 2 comprised of a nested case-control design sample of 212 trauma-associated ALI cases and 283 at-risk trauma non-ALI controls from ongoing cohort studies. SNPs that replicated at the 0.05 level in Phase 2 were subject to functional validation (Phase 3 using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analyses in stimulated B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL in family trios. 159 SNPs from the discovery phase replicated in Phase 2, including loci with prior evidence for a role in ALI pathogenesis. Functional evaluation of these replicated SNPs revealed rs471931 on 11q13.3 to exert a cis-regulatory effect on mRNA expression in the PPFIA1 gene (p = 0.0021. PPFIA1 encodes liprin alpha, a protein involved in cell adhesion, integrin expression, and cell-matrix interactions. This study supports the feasibility of future multi-center GWA investigations of ALI risk, and identifies PPFIA1 as a potential functional candidate ALI risk gene for future research.

  19. Expression of Hox, Cdx, and Six3/6 genes in the hoplonemertean Pantinonemertes californiensis offers insight into the evolution of maximally indirect development in the phylum Nemertea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Laurel S; Maslakova, Svetlana A

    2015-01-01

    Maximally indirect development via a pilidium larva is unique to the pilidiophoran clade of phylum Nemertea. All other nemerteans have more or less direct development. The origin of pilidial development with disjunct invaginated juvenile rudiments and catastrophic metamorphosis remains poorly understood. While basal members of the phylum, the Palaeonemertea, do not appear to have ever had a pilidium, certain similarity exists in the development of the Pilidiophora and the sister clade, the Hoplonemertea. It is unclear whether this similarity represents the homology and whether pilidial development evolved before or after pilidiophorans diverged from hoplonemerteans. To gain insight into these questions, we examined the expression of Hox, Cdx, and Six3/6 genes in the development of the hoplonemertean Pantinonemertes californiensis and expression of Six3/6 in the pilidium of Micrura alaskensis. To further characterize the function of larval structures showing expression of these genes, we examined the serotonergic nervous system and cell proliferation in P. californiensis. We show that Hox and Cdx genes, which pattern the pilidial imaginal discs giving rise to the juvenile trunk, are expressed in paired posterior epidermal invaginations in P. californiensis larvae. We also show that Six3/6 patterns both the pilidial cephalic discs, which give rise to the juvenile head, and a pair of anterior epidermal invaginations in hoplonemertean development. We show that anterior invaginations in larval P. californiensis are associated with a pair of serotonergic neurons, and thus may have a role in the development of the juvenile nervous system. This is similar to the role of cephalic discs in pilidiophoran development. Finally, we show that four zones of high cell proliferation correspond to the paired invaginations in P. californiensis, suggesting that these invaginations may play a similar role in the development of the hoplonemertean juvenile to the role of imaginal discs in

  20. RNAi analysis of Deformed, proboscipedia and Sex combs reduced in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus: novel roles for Hox genes in the hemipteran head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C L; Kaufman, T C

    2000-09-01

    Insects have evolved a large variety of specialized feeding strategies, with a corresponding variability in mouthpart morphology. We have, however, little understanding of the developmental mechanisms that underlie this diversity. Until recently it was difficult to perform any analysis of gene function outside of the genetic model insects Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum. In this paper, we report the use of dsRNA-mediated interference (RNAi) to dissect gene function in the development of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, which has specialized suctorial mouthparts. The Hox genes Deformed (Dfd), proboscipedia (pb) and Sex combs reduced (Scr) have previously been shown to be expressed in the gnathal appendages of this species. Strikingly, the milkweed bug was found to have an unusual expression pattern of pb. Here, by analyzing single and combination RNAi depletions, we find that Dfd, pb and Scr are used in the milkweed bug to specify the identity of the mouthparts. The exact roles of the genes, however, are different from what is known in the two genetic model insects. The maxillary appendages in the bug are determined by the activities of the genes Dfd and Scr, rather than Dfd and pb as in the fly and beetle. The mandibular appendages are specified by Dfd, but their unique morphology in Oncopeltus suggests that Dfd's target genes are different. As in flies and beetles, the labium is specified by the combined activities of pb and Scr, but again, the function of pb appears to be different. Additionally, the regulatory control of pb by the other two genes seems to be different in the bug than in either of the other species. These novelties in Hox function, expression pattern and regulatory relationships may have been important for the evolution of the unique Hemipteran head.

  1. 鱼类Hox基因簇结构、表达和进化方面研究进展%A Review of Composition, Expression, and Evolution in Fish Hox Gene Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿波; 孙效文

    2012-01-01

    Hox基因(horneobox genes,同源异型盒基因)是一类含有同源框、参与动物早期胚胎发育的关键基因。其在胚胎发育中的表达水平对组织和器官的形成有重要的调控作用。脊索动物如文昌鱼(Branchiostoma floridae)有1个Hox基因簇,包括15个基因;哺乳动物有4个基因簇,各含有约13个Hox基因,位于4条染色体上;硬骨鱼类的连锁群更多,如斑马鱼(拉丁名)基因组中有7个Hox基因连锁群。分析不同鱼类的同源框基因家族(Homobox gene familv,Hox)的结构组成,揭示Hox基因家族在不同进化时间的进化动态和规律,以更好地阐释在新基因形成、物种分化以及维持遗传系统稳定性等作用,探讨DNA序列的同源性和不同物种间的亲缘关系,这对于保护生物多样性,尤其是遗传多样性、揭示生物进化历程及其机理具有参考意义。%The Hox genes as a large family of DNA-binding transcription factors are organized into clusters that are strikingly collinear with their spatial and temporal expression patterns, with each cluster containing no more than 13 different genes, and that appear to play key roles in the body plans of a wide range of metazoan species. The genes order in the cluster is highly conserved through a long evolution terms, suggesting a selective pressure on the entire cluster. A single Hox cluster containing 15 Hox genes is found in chor- date such as amphioxus (Branchiostomafloridae), four Hox clusters distributing on 4 chromosomes are shown in mammals and more than four Hox clusters ray in teleosts, 7 Hox clusters being in zebrafish. Study on Hox genes of fishes will help to understand the evolu- tionary dynamics and patterns of Hox genes family in the short, medium and long evolutionary time, and to explain the formation of new genes, species and genetic differentiation to maintain system stability and other aspects of the role. Therefore, evaluation of DNA

  2. 转录因子OsHOX4过量表达及T1代转基因植株中纯合系鉴定%Overexpression of Transcription Factor Oshox4 from Rice and Determination of Homozygosis Plants in T1 Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玉山江·麦麦提; 张云华; Kurniawan Rudi Trijatmiko; 郭立华; Inez Hortense Slamet-Loedin; 邱德文

    2012-01-01

    OsHOX4基因是属于水稻植物同源结构域(HD-Zip)转录因子家族的一个成员.本研究利用农杆菌介导法将OsHOX4基因转入籼稻(Oryza sativa ssp.indica) IR64中,获得54株过量表达植株.我们利用southern杂交分析确定了各个株系的拷贝数后,利用TAIL-PCR方法对4个不同的单拷贝株系进行了研究,并在其中找出T-DNA在3个单拷贝株系染色体上的插入位点(分别为染色体5,8,10).根据T-DNA在各个株系的插入位点分别设计特异性引物,从T1代转基因株系里鉴定出纯合的植株.我们观察到OsHOX4过量表达植株的分蘖数明显高于野生型,株高比野生型明显的变矮,在同一个株系的纯合和杂合的转基因植株表型也有很大的差异.在TAIL-PCR分析基础上,为从T1代转基因作物中鉴定出纯合的植株提供了方法和理论依据.%0sH0X4 gene is a member of plant homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family of transcription factors. In this study, 0sH0X4 gene was introduced into rice IR64 variety withalgrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, and obtained 54 0sH0X4 over expressed independent lines. After the copy numbers of these transgenic plants were confirmed with southern blotting analysis, four independent single copy lines were analyzed with the TAIL-PCR technique, and from them T-DNA insert positions in the chromosome of three lines were identified (in chromosome 10, 5, 8 respectively). Depending on T-DNA insert position in chromosome of each transgenic single copy line, specific primers were designed, and homozygous plants from T! transgenic lines were easily identified. We observed that the tiller number of 0sH0X4 over expressed transgenic plants is higher than that of wild type, but plant height is shorter than that of wild type, and between homozygous transgenic plants and heterozygous transgenic plants in same line, there are also big phenotype differences. Depending on TAIL-PCR technique, our research provides a easy

  3. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-to-teleost comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M.; Campbell, Michael S.; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J.; Mulley, John F.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P.; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E. G.; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J.; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H.; Litman, Gary W.; Litman, Ronda T.; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F.; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S.; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W. H.; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H.; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before the teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization, and development (e.g., Hox, ParaHox, and miRNA genes). Numerous conserved non-coding elements (CNEs, often cis-regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles of such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the sum of expression domains and levels from duplicated teleost genes often approximate patterns and levels of gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes, and the function of human regulatory sequences. PMID:26950095

  4. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-teleost comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R; Smith, Jeramiah J; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M; Campbell, Michael S; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J; Mulley, John F; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E G; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H; Litman, Gary W; Litman, Ronda T; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M J; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H

    2016-04-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome has conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization and development (mediated, for example, by Hox, ParaHox and microRNA genes). Numerous conserved noncoding elements (CNEs; often cis regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles for such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses showed that the sums of expression domains and expression levels for duplicated teleost genes often approximate the patterns and levels of expression for gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes and the function of human regulatory sequences.

  5. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Amanda M; Wang, Zhiping; Schug, Jonathan; Naji, Ali; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-03-01

    human α- and β-cells based on chromatin accessibility and transcript levels, which allowed for detection of novel α- and β-cell signature genes not previously known to be expressed in islets. Using fine-mapping of open chromatin, we have identified thousands of potential cis-regulatory elements that operate in an endocrine cell type-specific fashion.

  6. Comparative analysis of chromatin binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and other polycomb group repressors at a Drosophila Hox gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L; Ketel, Carrie S; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets.

  7. MGMT-independent temozolomide resistance in pediatric glioblastoma cells associated with a PI3-kinase-mediated HOX/stem cell gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Nathalie; Marshall, Lynley; Perryman, Lara; Bax, Dorine A; Little, Suzanne E; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Sharp, Swee Y; Vassal, Gilles; Pearson, Andrew D J; Reis, Rui M; Hargrave, Darren; Workman, Paul; Jones, Chris

    2010-11-15

    Sensitivity to temozolomide is restricted to a subset of glioblastoma patients, with the major determinant of resistance being a lack of promoter methylation of the gene encoding the repair protein DNA methyltransferase MGMT, although other mechanisms are thought to be active. There are, however, limited preclinical data in model systems derived from pediatric glioma patients. We screened a series of cell lines for temozolomide efficacy in vitro, and investigated the differential mechanisms of resistance involved. In the majority of cell lines, a lack of MGMT promoter methylation and subsequent protein overexpression were linked to temozolomide resistance. An exception was the pediatric glioblastoma line KNS42. Expression profiling data revealed a coordinated upregulation of HOX gene expression in resistant lines, especially KNS42, which was reversed by phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway inhibition. High levels of HOXA9/HOXA10 gene expression were associated with a shorter survival in pediatric high-grade glioma patient samples. Combination treatment in vitro of pathway inhibition and temozolomide resulted in a highly synergistic interaction in KNS42 cells. The resistance gene signature further included contiguous genes within the 12q13-q14 amplicon, including the Akt enhancer PIKE, significantly overexpressed in the KNS42 line. These cells were also highly enriched for CD133 and other stem cell markers. We have thus shown an in vitro link between phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated HOXA9/HOXA10 expression, and a drug-resistant, progenitor cell phenotype in MGMT-independent pediatric glioblastoma.

  8. About Contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in the Stratospheric Ozone Depletion in the XXIst Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Igor

    2017-04-01

    Based on the previously proposed algorithm of calculation of limiting stages of the reaction prolongations in stratospheric ozone depletion cycles* a contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in ozone destruction at the end of the XXIst century at the latitude of 50° N for different seasons have been calculated. Calculations have been performed using a two-dimensional interactive model SOCRATES, and data on the concentrations of the main greenhouse gases listed in the scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) RCP 4.5, according to which the stabilization of radiative forcing to occur by the end of the XXIst century. The work presents data on the absolute rates of ozone destruction in the cycles and their relative contribution to the destruction of ozone in 1995 and 2100 respectively in the altitude range 15-55 km for March, June, September, and December at 50° N. * Igor Larin. On the Chain Length and Rate of Ozone Depletion in the Main Stratospheric Cycles//Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (2013) №8. P. 141-149. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/acs.2013.31016

  9. Comparison of MAPK specificity across the ETS transcription factor family identifies a high-affinity ERK interaction required for ERG function in prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Kedage, Vivekananda; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2015-02-19

    The RAS/MAPK signaling pathway can regulate gene expression by phosphorylating and altering the function of some, but not all, ETS transcription factors. ETS family transcription factors bind similar DNA sequences and can compete for genomic binding sites. However, MAPK regulation varies across the ETS family. Therefore, changing the ETS factor bound to a cis-regulatory element can alter MAPK regulation of gene expression. To understand RAS/MAPK regulated gene expression programs, comprehensive knowledge of the ETS family members that are MAPK targets and relative MAPK targeting efficiency across the family is needed. An in vitro kinase assay was used to rank-order 27 human ETS family transcription factors based on phosphorylation by ERK2, JNK1, and p38α. Many novel MAPK targets and specificities were identified within the ETS family, including the identification of the prostate cancer oncoprotein ERG as a specific target of ERK2. ERK2 phosphorylation of ERG S215 required a DEF docking domain and was necessary for ERG to activate transcription of cell migration genes and promote prostate cell migration. The ability of ERK2 to bind ERG with higher affinity than ETS1 provided a potential molecular explanation for why ERG overexpression drives migration of prostate cells with low levels of RAS/ERK signaling, while ETS1 has a similar function only when RAS/ERK signaling is high. The rank ordering of ETS transcription factors as MAPK targets provides an important resource for understanding ETS proteins as mediators of MAPK signaling. This is emphasized by the difference in rank order of ERG and ETS1, which allows these factors to have distinct roles based on the level of RAS/ERK signaling present in the cell.

  10. Divergence of conserved non-coding sequences: rate estimates and relative rate tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Günter P; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-11-01

    In many eukaryotic genomes only a small fraction of the DNA codes for proteins, but the non-protein coding DNA harbors important genetic elements directing the development and the physiology of the organisms, like promoters, enhancers, insulators, and micro-RNA genes. The molecular evolution of these genetic elements is difficult to study because their functional significance is hard to deduce from sequence information alone. Here we propose an approach to the study of the rate of evolution of functional non-coding sequences at a macro-evolutionary scale. We identify functionally important non-coding sequences as Conserved Non-Coding Nucleotide (CNCN) sequences from the comparison of two outgroup species. The CNCN sequences so identified are then compared to their homologous sequences in a pair of ingroup species, and we monitor the degree of modification these sequences suffered in the two ingroup lineages. We propose a method to test for rate differences in the modification of CNCN sequences among the two ingroup lineages, as well as a method to estimate their rate of modification. We apply this method to the full sequences of the HoxA clusters from six gnathostome species: a shark, Heterodontus francisci; a basal ray finned fish, Polypterus senegalus; the amphibian, Xenopus tropicalis; as well as three mammalian species, human, rat and mouse. The results show that the evolutionary rate of CNCN sequences is not distinguishable among the three mammalian lineages, while the Xenopus lineage has a significantly increased rate of evolution. Furthermore the estimates of the rate parameters suggest that in the stem lineage of mammals the rate of CNCN sequence evolution was more than twice the rate observed within the placental amniotes clade, suggesting a high rate of evolution of cis-regulatory elements during the origin of amniotes and mammals. We conclude that the proposed methods can be used for testing hypotheses about the rate and pattern of evolution of putative

  11. 节旋藻(Arthrospira)3个样品镍铁氢化酶 hoxY基因的克隆与测序%CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF THE HOXY GENES IN THREE SAMPLES OF ARTHROSPIRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王越; 邰丽华; 谢岳飞; 恩和巴雅尔

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the hoxY gene of hydrogenase in Arthrospira were cloned and sequenced, which Arthrospira platensis from Alkaline Lakes in the Ordos Plateau, A. platensis from Lake Chad in Africa and A. maxima from Lake Texcoco in Mexico. And their homology and genetic relationship were also analysed, in the hope of providing elementary data and theoretical bases for the research of diversity of Arthrospira from Alkaline Lakes in the Ordos Plateau. The results showed that the partial sequence of hoxY gene in Arthrospira contained 479 bp. There was a high degree of sequence homology between A. platensis from Ordos and A. platensis from Lake Chad, A. maxima which were 99. 5% and 99. 9 % respectively. The genetic relationship between A. platensis and A. maxima were closer than that from A. platensis from Ordos. Conclusion:The gene hox Y had a high conservation, in which sequence of the different samples among the same genera had low variation. However, gene sequence of the same species of Arthrospira which grew in different environments has variation.%目的:为鄂尔多斯高原碱湖节旋藻的多样性研究提供基础资料和理论依据。方法:本文对鄂尔多斯高原碱湖钝顶节旋藻( Arthrospira platensis)、乍得湖钝顶节旋藻( A. platensis)及极大节旋藻( A. maxima)的镍铁氢化酶小亚基hoxY基因进行了克隆与测序,并进行同源性及亲缘关系的分析。结果:3个节旋藻样品hoxY基因部分序列长均为479 bp。鄂尔多斯高原碱湖钝顶节旋藻 hoxY基因与不同来源的钝顶节旋藻的同源性高达99.5%,与极大节旋藻的同源性达99.9%。 A. maxima与非洲乍得湖A. platensis间的亲缘关系更近,而鄂尔多斯高原碱湖钝顶节旋藻与乍得湖钝顶节旋藻的亲缘关系相对远。结论:hoxY基因保守性高,属内不同样品间序列变化很小。同种不同来源的钝顶节旋藻由于不同环境条件等因素的影响导致基因序列上碱基发生一定的差异。

  12. Measurements of HOx radicals and the total OH reactivity (kOH) in the planetary boundary layer over southern Finland aboard the Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch, Sebastian; Gomm, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Bachner, Mathias; Bohn, Birger; Häseler, Rolf; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank; Li, Xin; Lohse, Insa; Rohrer, Franz; Thayer, Mitchell; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The concentration of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals (also named HOx) and the total OH reactivity were measured over southern Finland and during transfer flights over Germany, Denmark and Sweden aboard the Zeppelin NT airship within the framework of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) field campaign in 2013. The measurements were performed with a remotely controlled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument which was installed on top of the airship. Together with a comprehensive set of trace gas (O3, CO, NO, NO2, HCHO, HONO, VOCs), photolysis frequencies and aerosol measurements as well as the measurement of meteorological parameters, these data provide the possibility to test the current understanding of the chemical processes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over different landscapes and in different chemical regimes. The unique flight performance of the Zeppelin NT allowed us to measure transects at a constant altitude as well as vertical profiles within the range of 80 m to 1000 m above ground. The transect flights show changes in the HOx distribution and kOH while crossing different chemical regimes on the way from Friedrichshafen, Germany to Jämijärvi, Finland over Germany, Denmark and Sweden. Vertical profile flights over the boreal forest close to Jämijärvi and Hyytiälä (both Finland) gave the opportunity to investigate the layering of the PBL and with that the vertical distribution of HOx and kOH with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Gradients in the HOx concentration and kOH were measured between the different layers during the early morning hours. The maximum radical concentrations found during the campaign were 1.0 x 107 cm-3 for OH and 1.0 x 109 cm-3 for HO2. The total OH reactivity measured in Finland was much lower than what was reported before in the literature from ground based measurements and ranged from 1 s-1 to 6 s-1. Acknowledgement: PEGASOS project funded by the European

  13. Coupled evolution of BrOx-ClOx-HOx-NOx chemistry during bromine-catalyzed ozone depletion events in the arctic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Atlas, E.; Cantrell, C. A.; Eisele, F.; Flocke, F.; Fried, A.; Mauldin, R. L.; Ridley, B. A.; Wert, B.; Talbot, R.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Snow, J.; Walega, J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Dibb, J.

    2003-02-01

    Extensive chemical characterization of ozone (O3) depletion events in the Arctic boundary layer during the TOPSE aircraft mission in March-May 2000 enables analysis of the coupled chemical evolution of bromine (BrOx), chlorine (ClOx), hydrogen oxide (HOx) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) radicals during these events. We project the TOPSE observations onto an O3 chemical coordinate to construct a chronology of radical chemistry during O3 depletion events, and we compare this chronology to results from a photochemical model simulation. Comparison of observed trends in ethyne (oxidized by Br) and ethane (oxidized by Cl) indicates that ClOx chemistry is only active during the early stage of O3 depletion (O3 > 10 ppbv). We attribute this result to the suppression of BrCl regeneration as O3 decreases. Formaldehyde and peroxy radical concentrations decline by factors of 4 and 2 respectively during O3 depletion and we explain both trends on the basis of the reaction of CH2O with Br. Observed NOx concentrations decline abruptly in the early stages of O3 depletion and recover as O3 drops below 10 ppbv. We attribute the initial decline to BrNO3 hydrolysis in aerosol, and the subsequent recovery to suppression of BrNO3 formation as O3 drops. Under halogen-free conditions we find that HNO4 heterogeneous chemistry could provide a major NOx sink not included in standard models. Halogen radical chemistry in the model can produce under realistic conditions an oscillatory system with a period of 3 days, which we believe is the fastest oscillation ever reported for a chemical system in the atmosphere.

  14. Multiple recent co-options of Optix associated with novel traits in adaptive butterfly wing radiations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Arnaud; McCulloch, Kyle J; Patel, Nipam H; Briscoe, Adriana D; Gilbert, Lawrence E; Reed, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    .... Identifying the genetic drivers of this crucible of evolution is now within reach, as it was recently shown that cis-regulatory variation of the optix transcription factor explains red pattern...

  15. Radical chemistry at night: comparisons between observed and modelled HOx, NO3 and N2O5 during the RONOCO project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The RONOCO aircraft campaign during July 2010 and January 2011 made observations of OH, HO2, NO3, N2O5 and a number of supporting measurements at night over the UK, and reflects the first simultaneous airborne measurement of these species. We compare the observed concentrations of these short-lived species with those calculated by a box model, constrained by the concentrations of the longer lived species, using a detailed chemical scheme. OH concentrations were below the limit of detection, consistent with the model predictions. The model systematically underpredicts HO2 by a factor of ~2 and overpredicts NO3 and N2O5 by factors of around 75% and 50%, respectively. Cycling between NO3 and N2O5 is fast and thus we define the NO3x (NO3x = NO3 + N2O5 family. Production of NO3x is overwhelmingly dominated by the reaction of NO2 with O3, whereas its loss is dominated by aerosol uptake of N2O5, with NO3 + VOCs and NO3 + RO2 playing smaller roles. The production of HOx and ROx radicals is mainly due to the reaction of NO3 with VOCs. The loss of these radicals occurs through a combination of HO2 + RO2 reactions, heterogeneous processes and production of HNO3 from OH + NO2, with radical propagation primarily achieved through reactions of NO3 with peroxy radicals. Thus NO3 at night plays a similar role to both OH and NO during the day in that it both initiates ROx radical production and acts to propagate the oxidation chain. Model sensitivity to the N2O5 aerosol uptake coefficient (γN2O5 is discussed, and we find that a value of γN2O5 = 0.05 improves model simulations for NO3 and N2O5, but that these improvements are at the expense of model success for HO2. Improvements to model simulations for HO2, NO3 and N2O5 can be realised simultaneously on inclusion of additional unsaturated volatile organic compounds, however the nature of these compounds is extremely uncertain.

  16. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes.

  17. Epigenomic study identifies a novel mesenchyme homeobox2-GLI1 transcription axis involved in cancer drug resistance, overall survival and therapy prognosis in lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-López, Leonel; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Arrieta, Oscar; de Alba, Enrique Guzman; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Santillán-Doherty, Patricio; Christiani, David C.; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Ávila-Moreno, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Several homeobox-related gene (HOX) transcription factors such as mesenchyme HOX-2 (MEOX2) have previously been associated with cancer drug resistance, malignant progression and/or clinical prognostic responses in lung cancer patients; however, the mechanisms involved in these responses have yet to be elucidated. Here, an epigenomic strategy was implemented to identify novel MEOX2 gene promoter transcription targets and propose a new molecular mechanism underlying lung cancer drug resistance and poor clinical prognosis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays derived from non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) hybridized on gene promoter tiling arrays and bioinformatics analyses were performed, and quantitative, functional and clinical validation were also carried out. We statistically identified a common profile consisting of 78 gene promoter targets, including Hedgehog-GLI1 gene promoter sequences (FDR≤0.1 and FDR≤0.2). The GLI-1 gene promoter region from −2,192 to −109 was occupied by MEOX2, accompanied by transcriptionally active RNA Pol II and was epigenetically linked to the active histones H3K27Ac and H3K4me3; these associations were quantitatively validated. Moreover, siRNA genetic silencing assays identified a MEOX2-GLI1 axis involved in cellular cytotoxic resistance to cisplatinum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as cellular migration and proliferation. Finally, Kaplan-Maier survival analyses identified significant MEOX2-dependent GLI-1 protein expression associated with clinical progression and poorer overall survival using an independent cohort of NSCLC patients undergoing platinum-based oncological therapy with both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-non-mutated and EGFR-mutated status. In conclusion, this is the first study to investigate epigenome-wide MEOX2-transcription factor occupation identifying a novel overexpressed MEOX2-GLI1 axis and its clinical association with platinum-based cancer drug resistance and EGFR

  18. Analysing Java Identifier Names

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Identifier names are the principal means of recording and communicating ideas in source code and are a significant source of information for software developers and maintainers, and the tools that support their work. This research aims to increase understanding of identifier name content types - words, abbreviations, etc. - and phrasal structures - noun phrases, verb phrases, etc. - by improving techniques for the analysis of identifier names. The techniques and knowledge acquired can be appl...

  19. Identifiability in stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The problem of identifiability is basic to all statistical methods and data analysis, occurring in such diverse areas as Reliability Theory, Survival Analysis, and Econometrics, where stochastic modeling is widely used. Mathematics dealing with identifiability per se is closely related to the so-called branch of ""characterization problems"" in Probability Theory. This book brings together relevant material on identifiability as it occurs in these diverse fields.

  20. Long-range enhancer-promoter interactions in the Scr-Antp interval of the Drosophila Antennapedia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Vincent C; Levine, Michael

    2003-08-19

    Long-range enhancer-promoter interactions are commonly seen in complex genetic loci such as Hox genes and globin genes. In the case of the Drosophila Antennapedia complex, the T1 enhancer bypasses the neighboring ftz gene and interacts with the distant Scr promoter to activate expression in posterior head segments. Previous studies identified a 450-bp promoter-proximal sequence, the tethering element, which is essential for T1-Scr interactions. To obtain a more comprehensive view of how individual enhancers selectively interact with appropriate target genes, we used bioinformatic methods to identify new cis-regulatory DNAs in the approximately 50-kb Scr-Antp interval. Three previously uncharacterized regulatory elements were identified: a distal T1 tethering sequence mapping >40 kb from the proximal tethering sequence, a repressor element that excludes activation of Scr by inappropriate enhancers, and a new ftz enhancer that directs expression within the limits of stripes 1 and 5. Many of the regulatory DNAs in the Scr-Antp interval are transcribed, including the proximal and distal tethering elements. We suggest that homotypic interactions between the tethering elements stabilize long-range T1-Scr interactions during development.

  1. A variant in a Cis-regulatory element enhances claudin-14 expression and is associated with pediatric-onset hypercalciuria and kidney stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ure, Megan E; Heydari, Emma; Pan, Wanling

    2017-01-01

    The greatest risk factor for kidney stones is hypercalciuria, the etiology of which is largely unknown. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) linked hypercalciuria and kidney stones to a claudin-14 (CLDN14) risk haplotype. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was not delineated. Re...

  2. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Chunmei; Cheng, Jingfei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  3. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF, a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1. In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN. This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs, including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  4. spatially identifying vulnerable areas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System (SMDSS) to identify factors that make forest and game reserves vulnerable .... involve the creation of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Slope Settlement and ... Feature). Spatial. Analyst Tool. (Slope). Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool.

  5. Identifying Knowledge and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coutinho Lourenço de Lima

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I discuss how the principle of identifying knowledge which Strawson advances in ‘Singular Terms and Predication’ (1961, and in ‘Identifying Reference and Truth-Values’ (1964 turns out to constrain communication. The principle states that a speaker’s use of a referring expression should invoke identifying knowledge on the part of the hearer, if the hearer is to understand what the speaker is saying, and also that, in so referring, speakers are attentive to hearers’ epistemic states. In contrasting it with Russell’s Principle (Evans 1982, as well as with the principle of identifying descriptions (Donnellan 1970, I try to show that the principle of identifying knowledge, ultimately a condition for understanding, makes sense only in a situation of conversation. This allows me to conclude that the cooperative feature of communication (Grice 1975 and reference (Clark andWilkes-Gibbs 1986 holds also at the understanding level. Finally, I discuss where Strawson’s views seem to be unsatisfactory, and suggest how they might be improved.

  6. Global Microbial Identifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielinga, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    microbial identifier (GMI) initiative, aims to build a database of whole microbial genome sequencing data linked to relevant metadata, which can be used to identify microorganisms, their communities and the diseases they cause. It would be a platform for storing whole genome sequencing (WGS) data......) will likely also enable a much better understanding of the pathogenesis of the infection and the molecular basis of the host response to infection. But the full potential of these advances will only transpire if the data in this area become transferable and thereby comparable, preferably in open......-source systems. There is therefore an obvious need to develop a global system of whole microbial genome databases to aggregate, share, mine and use microbiological genomic data, to address global public health and clinical challenges, and most importantly to identify and diagnose infectious diseases. The global...

  7. Identifying learning styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Grace

    2016-12-14

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article explored different learning styles and outlined some of the models that can be used to identify them. It discussed the limitations of these models, indicating that although they can be helpful in identifying a student's preferred learning style, this is not 'fixed' and might change over time. Learning is also influenced by other factors, such as culture and age.

  8. Identifying and Managing Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Janice M.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the college or university chief financial officer in institutional risk management is (1) to identify risk (physical, casualty, fiscal, business, reputational, workplace safety, legal liability, employment practices, general liability), (2) to develop a campus plan to reduce and control risk, (3) to transfer risk, and (4) to track and…

  9. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  10. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  11. Ultraconservation identifies a small subset of extremely constrained developmental enhancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Visel, Axel; Prabhakar, Shyam; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Shoukry, Malak; Lewis, Keith D.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-10-01

    While experimental studies have suggested that non-coding ultraconserved DNA elements are central nodes in the regulatory circuitry that specifies mammalian embryonic development, the possible functional relevance of their>200bp of perfect sequence conservation between human-mouse-rat remains obscure 1,2. Here we have compared the in vivo enhancer activity of a genome-wide set of 231 non-exonic sequences with ultraconserved cores to that of 206 sequences that are under equivalently severe human-rodent constraint (ultra-like), but lack perfect sequence conservation. In transgenic mouse assays, 50percent of the ultraconserved and 50percent of the ultra-like conserved elements reproducibly functioned as tissue-specific enhancers at embryonic day 11.5. In this in vivo assay, we observed that ultraconserved enhancers and constrained non-ultraconserved enhancers targeted expression to a similar spectrum of tissues with a particular enrichment in the developing central nervous system. A human genome-wide comparative screen uncovered ~;;2,600 non-coding elements that evolved under ultra-like human-rodent constraint and are similarly enriched near transcriptional regulators and developmental genes as the much smaller number of ultraconserved elements. These data indicate that ultraconserved elements possessing absolute human-rodent sequence conservation are not distinct from other non-coding elements that are under comparable purifying selection in mammals and suggest they are principal constituents of the cis-regulatory framework of mammalian development.

  12. A robust approach to identifying tissue-specific gene expression regulatory variants using personalized human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hyuk Lee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal variation in gene expression due to regulatory polymorphisms is often masked by biological and experimental noise. In addition, some regulatory polymorphisms may become apparent only in specific tissues. We derived human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from adult skin primary fibroblasts and attempted to detect tissue-specific cis-regulatory variants using in vitro cell differentiation. We used padlock probes and high-throughput sequencing for digital RNA allelotyping and measured allele-specific gene expression in primary fibroblasts, lymphoblastoid cells, iPS cells, and their differentiated derivatives. We show that allele-specific expression is both cell type and genotype-dependent, but the majority of detectable allele-specific expression loci remains consistent despite large changes in the cell type or the experimental condition following iPS reprogramming, except on the X-chromosome. We show that our approach to mapping cis-regulatory variants reduces in vitro experimental noise and reveals additional tissue-specific variants using skin-derived human iPS cells.

  13. CTDGFinder: A Novel Homology-Based Algorithm for Identifying Closely Spaced Clusters of Tandemly Duplicated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Juan F; Rokas, Antonis

    2017-01-01

    Closely spaced clusters of tandemly duplicated genes (CTDGs) contribute to the diversity of many phenotypes, including chemosensation, snake venom, and animal body plans. CTDGs have traditionally been identified subjectively as genomic neighborhoods containing several gene duplicates in close proximity; however, CTDGs are often highly variable with respect to gene number, intergenic distance, and synteny. This lack of formal definition hampers the study of CTDG evolutionary dynamics and the discovery of novel CTDGs in the exponentially growing body of genomic data. To address this gap, we developed a novel homology-based algorithm, CTDGFinder, which formalizes and automates the identification of CTDGs by examining the physical distribution of individual members of families of duplicated genes across chromosomes. Application of CTDGFinder accurately identified CTDGs for many well-known gene clusters (e.g., Hox and beta-globin gene clusters) in the human, mouse and 20 other mammalian genomes. Differences between previously annotated gene clusters and our inferred CTDGs were due to the exclusion of nonhomologs that have historically been considered parts of specific gene clusters, the inclusion or absence of genes between the CTDGs and their corresponding gene clusters, and the splitting of certain gene clusters into distinct CTDGs. Examination of human genes showing tissue-specific enhancement of their expression by CTDGFinder identified members of several well-known gene clusters (e.g., cytochrome P450s and olfactory receptors) and revealed that they were unequally distributed across tissues. By formalizing and automating CTDG identification, CTDGFinder will facilitate understanding of CTDG evolutionary dynamics, their functional implications, and how they are associated with phenotypic diversity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  14. Digital Identifier Systems: Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Khedmatgozar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifier is one of the main elements in identifying an object in digital environment. Digital identifier systems were developed followed by a lot of problems such as violation of persistency and uniqueness of physical identifiers and URL in digital environment. These identifiers try to guarantee uniqueness and persistency of hostnames by using indirect names for Domain Name System (DNS. The main objective of this research is to identify qualified digital identifier system among other systems. To achieve the research objective, researchers have considered two major steps: first, identifying main criteria for distinguishing digital identifier based on literature review and focus group interview; and second, performing a comparative evaluation on common identifier systems in the world. Findings of first step demonstrated seven main criteria in three domains for distinguishing digital identifier systems: identifier uniqueness and persistency in the identifier features domain, digital identification, digital uniqueness, digital persistency and digital actionability in the digital coverage domain, and globality in the comprehensiveness of scope domain. In the second step, results of the comparative evaluation on common identifier systems indicated that six identifier systems, included, DOI, Handle, UCI, URN, ARK and PURL, are appropriate choices for using as a digital identifier system. Also, according to these results, three identification systems Including NBN, MARIAM and ISNI were identified as suitable choices for digital identification in certain specialized fields. According to many benefits of using these identifiers in important applied fields, such as, digital content chains and networks integration, digital right management, cross referencing, digital libraries and citation analysis, results of this study can help digital environment experts to diagnose digital identifier and their effective use in applied fields.

  15. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  16. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  17. New criteria to identify spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Arne; Krishna, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self-adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest....

  18. New Criteria to Identify Spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jensen; M Krishna

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self-adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest.

  19. Refined physical map of the human PAX2/HOX11/NFKB2 cancer gene region at 10q24 and relocalization of the HPV6AI1 viral integration site to 14q13.3-q21.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Tomas

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome band 10q24 is a gene-rich domain and host to a number of cancer, developmental, and neurological genes. Recurring translocations, deletions and mutations involving this chromosome band have been observed in different human cancers and other disease conditions, but the precise identification of breakpoint sites, and detailed characterization of the genetic basis and mechanisms which underlie many of these rearrangements has yet to be resolved. Towards this end it is vital to establish a definitive genetic map of this region, which to date has shown considerable volatility through time in published works of scientific journals, within different builds of the same international genomic database, and across the differently constructed databases. Results Using a combination of chromosome and interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, BAC end-sequencing and genomic database analysis we present a physical map showing that the order and chromosomal orientation of selected genes within 10q24 is CEN-CYP2C9-PAX2-HOX11-NFKB2-TEL. Our analysis has resolved the orientation of an otherwise dynamically evolving assembly of larger contigs upstream of this region, and in so doing verifies the order and orientation of a further 9 cancer-related genes and GOT1. This study further shows that the previously reported human papillomavirus type 6a DNA integration site HPV6AI1 does not map to 10q24, but that it maps at the interface of chromosome bands 14q13.3-q21.1. Conclusions This revised map will allow more precise localization of chromosome rearrangements involving chromosome band 10q24, and will serve as a useful baseline to better understand the molecular aetiology of chromosomal instability in this region. In particular, the relocation of HPV6AI1 is important to report because this HPV6a integration site, originally isolated from a tonsillar carcinoma, was shown to be rearranged in other HPV6a-related malignancies

  20. Author Identifiers in Scholarly Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Simeon

    2010-01-01

    Bibliometric and usage-based analyses and tools highlight the value of information about scholarship contained within the network of authors, articles and usage data. Less progress has been made on populating and using the author side of this network than the article side, in part because of the difficulty of unambiguously identifying authors. I briefly review a sample of author identifier schemes, and consider use in scholarly repositories. I then describe preliminary work at arXiv to implement public author identifiers, services based on them, and plans to make this information useful beyond the boundaries of arXiv.

  1. Identifiability, exchangeability and confounding revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Greenland, Sander; Robins, James Matthew

    2009-01-01

    In 1986 the International Journal of Epidemiology published "Identifiability, Exchangeability and Epidemiological Confounding". We review the article from the perspective of a quarter century after it was first drafted and relate it to subsequent developments on confounding, ignorability, and collapsibility.

  2. Identifying discharge practice training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, L; Emmerson, K

    A training needs analysis tool was developed to identify nurses' discharge training needs and to improve discharge practice. The tool includes 49 elements of discharge practice subdivided into four areas: corporate, operational, clinical and nurse-led discharge. The tool was disseminated to 15 wards on two hospital sites with assistance from the practice development team. Analysis of discharge training is important to assess discharge training needs and to identify staff who may assist with training.

  3. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-01

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  4. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

  5. Football refereeing: Identifying innovative methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza MohammadKazemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to identify the potentials innovation in football industry. Data were collected from 10 national and international referees, assistant referees and referees’ supervisors in Iran. In this study, technological innovations are identified that assist better refereeing performances. The analysis revealed a significant relationship between using new technologies and referees ‘performance. The results indicate that elite referees, assistant referees and supervisors agreed to use new technological innovations during the game. According to their comments, this kind of technology causes the referees’ performance development.

  6. Locally identifying coloring of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Esperet, Louis; Montassier, Mickael; Ochem, Pascal; Parreau, Aline

    2010-01-01

    A vertex-coloring of a graph G is said to be locally identifying if for any pair (u,v) of adjacent vertices of G, with distinct closed neighborhood, the set of colors that appears in the closed neighborhoods of u and v are distinct. In this paper, we give several bounds on the minimum number of colors needed in such a coloring for different families of graphs (planar graphs, some subclasses of perfect graphs, graphs with bounded maximum degree) and prove that deciding whether a subcubic bipartite graph with large girth has a locally identifying coloring with 3 colors is an NP-complete problem.

  7. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC DATA USED FOR IDENTIFYING ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to unique social and demographic characteristics, various segments of the population may experience exposures different from those of the general population, which, in many cases, may be greater. When risk assessments do not characterize subsets of the general population, the populations that may experience the greatest risk remain unidentified. When such populations are not identified, the social and demographic data relevant to these populations is not considered when preparing exposure estimates, which can underestimate exposure and risk estimates for at-risk populations. Thus, it is necessary for risk or exposure assessors characterizing a diverse population, to first identify and then enumerate certain groups within the general population who are at risk for greater contaminant exposures. The document entitled Sociodemographic Data Used for Identifying Potentially Highly Exposed Populations (also referred to as the Highly Exposed Populations document), assists assessors in identifying and enumerating potentially highly exposed populations. This document presents data relating to factors which potentially impact an individual or group's exposure to environmental contaminants based on activity patterns (how time is spent), microenvironments (locations where time is spent), and other socio-demographic data such as age, gender, race and economic status. Populations potentially more exposed to various chemicals of concern, relative to the general population

  8. Identifying the Gifted Child Humorist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Tami L.

    1991-01-01

    This study attempted to identify gifted child humorists among 1,204 children in grades 3-6. Final identification of 13 gifted child humorists was determined through application of such criteria as funniness, originality, and exemplary performance or product. The influence of intelligence, development, social factors, sex differences, family…

  9. SNP interaction pattern identifier (SIPI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Hui-Yi; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Huang, Po-Yu

    2016-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Testing SNP-SNP interactions is considered as a key for overcoming bottlenecks of genetic association studies. However, related statistical methods for testing SNP-SNP interactions are underdeveloped. RESULTS: We propose the SNP Interaction Pattern Identifier (SIPI), which tests 45...

  10. Identifying high-risk medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sædder, Eva; Brock, Birgitte; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    salicylic acid, and beta-blockers; 30 drugs or drug classes caused 82 % of all serious MEs. The top ten drugs involved in fatal events accounted for 73 % of all drugs identified. CONCLUSION: Increasing focus on seven drugs/drug classes can potentially reduce hospitalizations, extended hospitalizations...

  11. Distributed Persistent Identifiers System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Golodoniuc

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to identify both digital and physical objects is ubiquitous in our society. Past and present persistent identifier (PID systems, of which there is a great variety in terms of technical and social implementation, have evolved with the advent of the Internet, which has allowed for globally unique and globally resolvable identifiers. PID systems have, by in large, catered for identifier uniqueness, integrity, and persistence, regardless of the identifier’s application domain. Trustworthiness of these systems has been measured by the criteria first defined by Bütikofer (2009 and further elaborated by Golodoniuc 'et al'. (2016 and Car 'et al'. (2017. Since many PID systems have been largely conceived and developed by a single organisation they faced challenges for widespread adoption and, most importantly, the ability to survive change of technology. We believe that a cause of PID systems that were once successful fading away is the centralisation of support infrastructure – both organisational and computing and data storage systems. In this paper, we propose a PID system design that implements the pillars of a trustworthy system – ensuring identifiers’ independence of any particular technology or organisation, implementation of core PID system functions, separation from data delivery, and enabling the system to adapt for future change. We propose decentralisation at all levels — persistent identifiers and information objects registration, resolution, and data delivery — using Distributed Hash Tables and traditional peer-to-peer networks with information replication and caching mechanisms, thus eliminating the need for a central PID data store. This will increase overall system fault tolerance thus ensuring its trustworthiness. We also discuss important aspects of the distributed system’s governance, such as the notion of the authoritative source and data integrity

  12. Identifying patient risks during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Ferreira Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risks reported at a public institution andto know the main patient risks from the nursing staff point of view.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive and exploratory study. Thesurvey was developed at a hospital in the city of Taboão da Serra, SãoPaulo, Brazil. The study included all nurses working in care areas whoagreed to participate in the study. At the same time, sentinel eventsoccurring in the period from July 2006 to July 2007 were identified.Results: There were 440 sentinel events reported, and the main risksincluded patient falls, medication errors and pressure ulcers. Sixty-fivenurses were interviewed. They also reported patient falls, medicationerrors and pressure ulcers as the main risks. Conclusions: Riskassessment and implementation of effective preventive actions arenecessary to ensure patient’s safety. Involvement of a multidisciplinaryteam is one of the steps for a successful process.

  13. Sparse Linear Identifiable Multivariate Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider sparse and identifiable linear latent variable (factor) and linear Bayesian network models for parsimonious analysis of multivariate data. We propose a computationally efficient method for joint parameter and model inference, and model comparison. It consists of a fully...... Bayesian hierarchy for sparse models using slab and spike priors (two-component δ-function and continuous mixtures), non-Gaussian latent factors and a stochastic search over the ordering of the variables. The framework, which we call SLIM (Sparse Linear Identifiable Multivariate modeling), is validated...... and bench-marked on artificial and real biological data sets. SLIM is closest in spirit to LiNGAM (Shimizu et al., 2006), but differs substantially in inference, Bayesian network structure learning and model comparison. Experimentally, SLIM performs equally well or better than LiNGAM with comparable...

  14. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  15. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...... to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...

  16. Identifying the health conscious consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, F B; Goodell, P W

    1993-01-01

    Individuals who lead a "wellness-oriented" lifestyle are concerned with nutrition, fitness, stress, and their environment. They accept responsibility for their health and are excellent customers for health-related products and services. Those who lack a wellness orientation are identified as higher health risks and become candidates for health promotion program intervention. The authors report a new scale by which to measure the wellness-oriented lifestyle. Scale development procedures are detailed, followed by information from five studies that support its validity. The authors suggest ways health care marketers may use the Wellness Scale to segment and target potential customers and position their products and services.

  17. Featured Image: Identifying Weird Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    Hoags Object, an example of a ring galaxy. [NASA/Hubble Heritage Team/Ray A. Lucas (STScI/AURA)]The above image (click for the full view) shows PanSTARRSobservationsof some of the 185 galaxies identified in a recent study as ring galaxies bizarre and rare irregular galaxies that exhibit stars and gas in a ring around a central nucleus. Ring galaxies could be formed in a number of ways; one theory is that some might form in a galaxy collision when a smaller galaxy punches through the center of a larger one, triggering star formation around the center. In a recent study, Ian Timmis and Lior Shamir of Lawrence Technological University in Michigan explore ways that we may be able to identify ring galaxies in the overwhelming number of images expected from large upcoming surveys. They develop a computer analysis method that automatically finds ring galaxy candidates based on their visual appearance, and they test their approach on the 3 million galaxy images from the first PanSTARRS data release. To see more of the remarkable galaxies the authors found and to learn more about their identification method, check out the paper below.CitationIan Timmis and Lior Shamir 2017 ApJS 231 2. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/aa78a3

  18. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulski Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. Results We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7 with a PRE from the vestigial (vg gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT that is essential for silencing. Conclusions This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  19. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  20. A de novo 1.58 Mb deletion, including MAP2K6 and mapping 1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9, identified in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Marta; Roeder, Elizabeth; Cheung, Sau Wai; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2015-08-01

    Defects of long-range regulatory elements of dosage-sensitive genes represent an under-recognized mechanism underlying genetic diseases. Haploinsufficiency of SOX9, the gene essential for development of testes and differentiation of chondrocytes, results in campomelic dysplasia, a skeletal malformation syndrome often associated with sex reversal. Chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints mapping up to 1.6 Mb up- and downstream to SOX9, and disrupting its distant cis-regulatory elements, have been described in patients with milder forms of campomelic dysplasia, Pierre Robin sequence, and sex reversal. We present an ∼1.58 Mb deletion mapping ∼1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9 that encompasses its putative long-range cis-regulatory element(s) and MAP2K6 in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures. Low bone mass panel testing using massively parallel sequencing of 23 nuclear genes, including COL1A1 and COL1A2 was negative. Based on the previous mouse model of Map2k6, suggesting that Sox9 is likely a downstream target of the p38 MAPK pathway, and our previous chromosome conformation capture-on-chip (4C) data showing potential interactions between SOX9 promoter and MAP2K6, we hypothesize that deletion of MAP2K6 might have affected SOX9 expression and contributed to our patient's phenotype.

  1. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR's sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. The identification process is currently being implemented and tested for the first time. The findings and outcome will be evaluated by the ELIXIR Scientific Advisory Board in March 2017. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure.

  2. Conserved stem-loop structures in the HIV-1 RNA region containing the A3 3' splice site and its cis-regulatory element: possible involvement in RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquenet, S; Ropers, D; Bilodeau, P S; Damier, L; Mougin, A; Stoltzfus, C M; Branlant, C

    2001-01-15

    The HIV-1 transcript is alternatively spliced to over 30 different mRNAs. Whether RNA secondary structure can influence HIV-1 RNA alternative splicing has not previously been examined. Here we have determined the secondary structure of the HIV-1/BRU RNA segment, containing the alternative A3, A4a, A4b, A4c and A5 3' splice sites. Site A3, required for tat mRNA production, is contained in the terminal loop of a stem-loop structure (SLS2), which is highly conserved in HIV-1 and related SIVcpz strains. The exon splicing silencer (ESS2) acting on site A3 is located in a long irregular stem-loop structure (SLS3). Two SLS3 domains were protected by nuclear components under splicing condition assays. One contains the A4c branch points and a putative SR protein binding site. The