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Sample records for icu follow-up services

  1. Impact of follow-up consultations for ICU survivors on post-ICU syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J. F.; Thomsen, Thordis; Overgaard, D

    2015-01-01

    /unpublished trials. Randomized controlled trials investigating post-ICU consultations in adults with outcomes such as quality of life (QOL), anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), physical ability, cognitive function, and return to work were included. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed...... ratio 0.49, 95 % CI 0.26-0.95). There was no effect on other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence indicates that follow-up consultations might reduce symptoms of PTSD at 3-6 months after ICU discharge in ICU survivors, but without affecting QOL and other outcomes investigated. This review highlights...

  2. Mortality and functional status at one-year of follow-up in elderly patients with prolonged ICU stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, M C; Villa, P; Luján, J; Trascasa, M; Molina, R; González-García, N; de Pablo, R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate mortality and functional status at one year of follow-up in patients>75 years of age who survive Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission of over 14 days. A prospective observational study was carried out. A Spanish medical-surgical ICU. Patients over 75 years of age admitted to the ICU. ICU admission: demographic data, baseline functional status (Barthel index), baseline mental status (Red Cross scale of mental incapacity), severity of illness (APACHE II and SOFA), stay and mortality. One-year follow-up: hospital stay and mortality, functional and mental status, and one-year follow-up mortality. A total of 176 patients were included, of which 22 had a stay of over 14 days. Patients with prolonged stay did not show more ICU mortality than those with a shorter stay in the ICU (40.9% vs 25.3% respectively, P=.12), although their hospital (63.6% vs 33.8%, P<.01) and one-year follow-up mortality were higher (68.2% vs 41.2%, P=.02). Among the survivors, one-year mortality proved similar (87.5% vs 90.6%, P=.57). These patients presented significantly greater impairment of functional status at hospital discharge than the patients with a shorter ICU stay, and this difference persisted after three months. The levels of independence at one-year follow-up were never similar to baseline. No such findings were observed in relation to mental status. Patients over 75 years of age with a ICU stay of more than 14 days have high hospital and one-year follow-up mortality. Patients who survive to hospital admission did not show greater mortality, though their functional dependency was greater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. ICU service in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lu, Chin-Li; Chung, Yueh-Chih; Huang, Mei-Chen; Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Chen, Hsing-Min; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the current status of intensive care unit (ICU) in order to optimize the resources achieving the best possible care. The study analyzed the status of ICU settings based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance database between March 2004 and February 2009. A total of 1,028,364 ICU patients were identified. The age was 65 ± 18 years, and 61% of the patients were male. The total ICU bed occupancy rate was 83.8% which went up to 87.3% during winter. The ICU bed occupancy was 94.4% in major medical centers. The ICU stay was 6.5 ± 0.5 days, and the overall ICU mortality rate was 20.2%. The hospital stay was 16.4 ± 16.8 days, and the average cost of total hospital stay was approximately US$5,186 per patient. The rate of ICU bed occupancy was dependent on seasonal changes, and it reached near full capacity in major medical centers in Taiwan. The ICU beds were distributed based on the categories of hospitals in order to achieve a reasonable cost efficiency. ICU faces many challenges to maintain and improve quality care because of the increasing cost of state-of-the-art technologies and dealing with aging population.

  4. Follow-Up Study of Children Referred to Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Judith A.; Hebbeler, Kathleen M.

    Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC) provides in-depth medical and educational diagnostic services for children in Montgomery County, Maryland, who are under 6 years of age and who are suspected of having handicapping conditions in two or more areas of development. This follow-up study was designed to determine the progress of…

  5. Long term follow-up of a randomised controlled trial of services for urinary symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicola J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the extent and priority of urinary symptoms there is little evidence available to inform service provision in relation to the long term effects of interventions. This study aims to determine the long term (6 year clinical effectiveness and costs of a new continence nurse led service compared to standard care for urinary symptoms. Methods A long term follow-up study of a 2-arm, non-blinded randomised controlled trial that recruited from a community based population between 1998-2000 in Leicestershire and Rutland UK was undertaken. 3746 men and women aged 40 years and over were followed up from the original trial. The continence nurse practitioner (CNP intervention comprised a continence service provided by specially trained nurses delivering evidence-based interventions using pre-determined care pathways. The standard care (SC arm comprised access to existing primary care including General Practitioner and continence advisory services in the area. Primary outcome: Improvement in one or more symptom. Secondary outcomes included: a Leicester Impact scale; b patient perception of problem; c number of symptoms alleviated and cost-effectiveness; all were recorded at long term follow-up (average 6 years post-randomisation. Results Overall at long-term follow-up (average 6 years significantly more individuals in the CNP group (72% had improved (i.e had fewer symptoms compared to those in the SC group (67% (difference of 5% 95% (CI = 0.6 to 9;p = 0.02. Conclusion The differences in outcome between the two randomised groups shown immediately post treatment had decreased by half in terms of symptom improvement at long term follow-up. Although the difference was statistically significant, the clinical significance may not be, although the direction of the difference favoured the new CNP service.

  6. Young and midlife stroke survivors' experiences with the health services and long-term follow-up needs.

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    Martinsen, Randi; Kirkevold, Marit; Sveen, Unni

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore young and midlife stroke survivors' experiences with the health services and to identify long-term follow-up needs. Sixteen participants from two cohorts were interviewed in-depth. The interviews were analyzed applying a hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis. The participants struggled to gain access to follow-up health services. They felt that whether they were systematically followed up was more coincidental than planned. Young and midlife stroke survivors thus appear vulnerable to falling outside the follow-up system. Those participants who received some follow-up care perceived it as untailored to their specific needs. To be considered supportive, the follow-up programs must be in line with their long-term needs, take into account their particular challenges as young and midlife stroke survivors, and be planned in close collaboration with the individual patient. To secure systematic and follow-up health services tailored to the individual, knowledgeable and committed healthcare professionals should play a prominent role within the community health services.

  7. Telephone follow-up and self-performed urine pregnancy testing after early medical abortion: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna; Dewart, Helen; Johnstone, Anne; Burnside, Audrey

    2012-07-01

    Telephone follow-up with a self-performed low-sensitivity urine pregnancy (LSUP) test was introduced at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Scotland, as an alternative to routine ultrasonography for confirming successful abortion at 2 weeks following early medical abortion (ultrasound. A service evaluation was conducted of the first 8 months of telephone follow-up consisting of a review of the numbers choosing this method of follow-up, the proportion successfully contacted and the efficacy for detecting ongoing pregnancies. In the last 3 months of the study, women were surveyed about their satisfaction with this method of follow-up. Opting for telephone follow-up were 476 out of 619 women (77%). Four women (1%) attended the clinic before telephone follow-up because of pain or bleeding. A total of 410 (87%) of the remaining 472 women were successfully contacted by telephone. Sixty women (15%) screened 'positive', three of whom had ongoing pregnancies, and one woman falsely screened 'negative'. The sensitivity of the telephone follow-up was 75% [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.1-95.4], and specificity was 86% (95% CI 82.2-89). The negative predictive value was 99.7% (95% CI 98.4-99.9), and positive predictive value was 5% (95% CI 1.7-13.7). All women surveyed (n=75) would recommend telephone follow-up to a friend. A telephone follow-up and an LSUP test at 2 weeks are effective for detecting ongoing pregnancy, have good follow-up rates and are popular choices for women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Proposed Modified and Original Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Scores in Predicting ICU Mortality: A Prospective, Observational, Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Gholipour Baradari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score has been recommended to triage critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study aimed to compare the performance of our proposed MSOFA and original SOFA scores in predicting ICU mortality. Methods. This prospective observational study was conducted on 250 patients admitted to the ICU. Both tools scores were calculated at the beginning, 24 hours of ICU admission, and 48 hours of ICU admission. Diagnostic odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve were used to compare the two scores. Results. MSOFA and SOFA predicted mortality similarly with an area under the ROC curve of 0.837, 0.992, and 0.977 for MSOFA 1, MSOFA 2, and MSOFA 3, respectively, and 0.857, 0.988, and 0.988 for SOFA 1, SOFA 2, and SOFA 3, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MSOFA 1 in cut-off point 8 were 82.9% and 68.4%, respectively, MSOFA 2 in cut-off point 9.5 were 94.7% and 97.1%, respectively, and MSOFA 3 in cut-off point of 9.3 were 97.4% and 93.1%, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the MSOFA 1 and the SOFA 1 (r: 0.942, 24 hours (r: 0.972, and 48 hours (r: 0.960. Conclusion. The proposed MSOFA and the SOFA scores had high diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for predicting mortality.

  9. Comparison of Proposed Modified and Original Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Scores in Predicting ICU Mortality: A Prospective, Observational, Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Daneshiyan, Maryam; Aarabi, Mohsen; Talebiyan Kiakolaye, Yaser; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sadeghi, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score has been recommended to triage critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study aimed to compare the performance of our proposed MSOFA and original SOFA scores in predicting ICU mortality. Methods. This prospective observational study was conducted on 250 patients admitted to the ICU. Both tools scores were calculated at the beginning, 24 hours of ICU admission, and 48 hours of ICU admission. Diagnostic odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the two scores. Results. MSOFA and SOFA predicted mortality similarly with an area under the ROC curve of 0.837, 0.992, and 0.977 for MSOFA 1, MSOFA 2, and MSOFA 3, respectively, and 0.857, 0.988, and 0.988 for SOFA 1, SOFA 2, and SOFA 3, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MSOFA 1 in cut-off point 8 were 82.9% and 68.4%, respectively, MSOFA 2 in cut-off point 9.5 were 94.7% and 97.1%, respectively, and MSOFA 3 in cut-off point of 9.3 were 97.4% and 93.1%, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the MSOFA 1 and the SOFA 1 (r: 0.942), 24 hours (r: 0.972), and 48 hours (r: 0.960). Conclusion. The proposed MSOFA and the SOFA scores had high diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for predicting mortality. PMID:28116220

  10. Time Trend of the People lost follow up on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART Services in Nepal: A Epidemiological Modelling

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    Brijesh Sathian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The real state about the spread of the HIV epidemic in Nepal is not clear since the details available are on the basis of repeated integrated biological and behavioral surveillance. Objective To study the trends of People lost follow up on ART in future. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on the data collected from the Health ministry records of Nepal, between 2006 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and statistical modelling were used for the analysis and forecasting of data. Results: Including the constant term from the equation, the quadratic model was the best fit, for the forecasting of People lost follow up on ART. Using quadratic equation, it is estimated that 4331 reported number of People lost follow up on ART will be there in Nepal by the year 2020. Conclusion: The People lost follow up on ART in Nepal are having an increasing trend. Estimates of the total number of People lost follow up on ART attributable to the major routes of infection make an important contribution to public health policy. They can be used for the planning of healthcare services and for contributing to estimates of the future numbers with People lost follow up on ART used for planning health promotion programmes.

  11. Reducing pharmacy wait time to promote customer service: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowiak, Julie M; Huitema, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    The present study had 3 objectives: (1) to evaluate the effects of 2 different interventions (feedback regarding customer satisfaction with wait time and combined feedback and goal setting) on wait time in a hospital outpatient pharmacy; (2) to assess the extent to which the previously applied interventions maintained their effects; and (3) to evaluate the differences between the effects of the original study and those of the present follow-up study. Participants were 10 employees (4 pharmacists and 6 technicians) of an outpatient pharmacy. Wait times and customer satisfaction ratings were collected for "waiting customers." An ABCB within-subjects design was used to assess the effects of the interventions on both wait time and customer satisfaction, where A was the baseline (no feedback and no goal setting); B was the customer satisfaction feedback; and C was the customer satisfaction feedback, the wait time feedback, and the goal setting for wait time reduction. Wait time decreased after baseline when the combined intervention was introduced, and wait time increased with the reintroduction of satisfaction feedback (alone). The results of the replication study confirm the pattern of the results of the original study and demonstrate high sensitivity of levels of customer satisfaction with wait time. The most impressive result of the replication is the nearly 2-year maintenance of lower wait time between the end of the original study and the beginning (baseline) of the replication.

  12. A follow-up study of Eco Education's environmental service-learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, Thomas Milton

    The purpose of the study is to determine student views of the influence of the Eco Education Urban Stewards program's impact on their involvement in community environmental initiatives. Eco Education is a non-profit organization in St. Paul that facilitates an urban, environmental, year-long science curriculum delivered in middle schools in Minnesota. The year-long program ends with an urban, environmental service-learning project. Ten high school students from the Inter District Downtown School who had completed Urban Stewards in middle school took a survey and were interviewed and compared with ten high school students who had a more traditional middle school science experience. Semi-structured oral interviews were conducted with each student. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed and compared to the survey results. The survey results were tabulated and given numerical values to compare the Eco Education and non-Eco Education students. Common themes and differences were discovered when comparing the survey results and interview transcriptions of the two groups. Urban Stewards students demonstrated more awareness of environmental issues, concerns and community projects but not by a significant amount.

  13. Treatment, Services and Follow-up for Victims of Family Violence in Health Clinics in Maputo, Mozambique

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    Jetha, Eunice Abdul Remane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family violence (FV is a global health problem that not only impacts the victim, but the family unit, local community and society at large.Objective: To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the treatment and follow up provided to victims of violence amongst immediate and extended family units who presented to three health centers in Mozambique for care following violence.Methods: We conducted a verbally-administered survey to self-disclosed victims of FV who presented to one of three health units, each at a different level of service, in Mozambique for treatment of their injuries. Data were entered into SPSS (SPSS, version 13.0 and analyzed for frequencies. Qualitative short answer data were transcribed during the interview, coded and analyzed prior to translation by the principal investigator.Results: One thousand two hundred and six assault victims presented for care during the eight-week study period, of which 216 disclosed the relationship of the assailant, including 92 who were victims of FV. Almost all patients (90% waited less than one hour to be seen, with most patients (67% waiting less than 30 minutes. Most patients did not require laboratory or radiographic diagnostics at the primary (70% and secondary (93% health facilities, while 44% of patients received a radiograph at the tertiary care center. Among all three hospitals, only 10% were transferred to a higher level of care, 14% were not given any form of follow up or referral information, while 13% required a specialist evaluation. No victims were referred for psychological follow-up or support. Qualitative data revealed that some patients did not disclose violence as the etiology, because they believed the physician was unable to address or treat the violence-related issues and/or had limited time to discuss.Conclusion: Healthcare services for treating the physical injuries of victims of FV were timely and rarely required advanced levels of medical care, but there

  14. Community-based infant hearing screening in a developing country: parental uptake of follow-up services

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    Olusanya Bolajoko O

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universal newborn hearing screening is now considered an essential public health care for the early detection of disabling life-long childhood hearing impairment globally. However, like any health interventions in early childhood, parental support and participation is essential for achieving satisfactory uptake of services. This study set out to determine maternal/infant socio-demographic factors associated with follow-up compliance in community-based infant hearing screening programmes in a developing country. Methods After health educational/counselling sessions, infants attending routine childhood immunisation clinics at four primary care centres were enrolled into a two-stage infant hearing screening programme consisting of a first-stage screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and second-stage screening with automated auditory brainstem response. Infants referred after the second-stage screening were scheduled for diagnostic evaluation within three months. Maternal and infant factors associated with completion of the hearing screening protocol were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results No mother declined participation during the study period. A total of 285 out of 2,003 eligible infants were referred after the first-stage screening out of which 148 (51.9% did not return for the second-stage, while 32 (39.0% of the 82 infants scheduled for diagnostic evaluation defaulted. Mothers who delivered outside hospitals were significantly more likely to return for follow-up screening than those who delivered in hospitals (Odds ratio: 1.62; 95% confidence intervals: 0.98 – 2.70; p = 0.062. No other factors correlated with follow-up compliance for screening and diagnostic services. Conclusion Place of delivery was the only factor that correlated albeit marginally with infant hearing screening compliance in this population. The likely influence of issues such as the number of return visits

  15. Health-related services use and the onset of functional disability: 10 year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Min; Su, Yung-Yu; Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Mullan, Judy; Shi, Hon-Yi; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of health-related service use on the development of functional disability in an older adult Taiwanese cohort. The sample population consisted of 871 participants without Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) disabilities, 1061 participants without Activities of Daily Living (ADL) disabilities and 817 participants without IADL and ADL disabilities at baseline. The onset of IADL and ADL disabilities were estimated as the follow-up survey year that these functional disabilities were first noted, or the follow-up survey year that the participant was noted as having died. A Cox proportional hazards model, with time-dependent covariates, was used to analyze the association between the time of onset of the functional disabilities and the health-related service use, after controlling for age, gender, education, marital status and time varying chronic disease status. This study found that an increase in the number of services used by the participants resulted in fewer IADL and ADL disabilities. Furthermore, participants who attended recreational programs, regular health examinations, and who received the information assistance and meal preparation were significantly less likely to develop disabilities. Participants who used one or more services were 55-77% less likely to be IADL disabled, and were 54-81% less likely to be ADL disabled, and were also 59-89% less likely to develop IADL and ADL disabilities as compared to those who used none. In the present study therefore, as the number of health services used increased the likelihood of developing a functional disability decreased.

  16. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service: a prospective 8 years follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service. All posterior RC placed, in the PDHS clinics in the cities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg in Denmark between November 1998 and December 2002, in permanent teeth of children and adolescents up to 18 years, were evaluated in an up to 8 years follow up. The endpoint of each restoration was defined, when repair or replacement was performed. Survival analyses were performed between subgroups with Kaplan-Meier analysis. The individual contribution of different cofactors to predict the outcome was performed with Cox regression analysis. Totally 2881 children with a mean age of 13.7 years (5-18) received 4355 RC restorations placed by 115 dentists. Eighty percent were placed in molars and 49% were Class I. Two percent of restorations with base material and 1% of the restorations without base material showed postoperative sensitivity (n.s.). Replacements were made in 406 and repairs in 125 restorations. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a cumulative survival at 8 years of 84.3%, resulting in an annual failure rate of 2%. Lower patient age, more than one restoration per patient, placement of a base material and placement of RC: in molars, in cavities with high number of surfaces, in lower jaw teeth, showed all significant higher failure rates. Five variables had significant importance for the end point, replacement/repair of the resin composite restorations: age of patient, age of operator, jaw, tooth type and cavity size. Posterior RC restorations placed in children and adolescents in Public Dental Health clinics showed an acceptable durability with annual failure rates comparable with those of randomized controlled RC studies in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health promotion and information provision during long-term follow-up for childhood cancer survivors: A service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Jonathan; Brown, Morven C; Davies, Nicola; Skinner, Roderick

    2016-09-01

    Health promotion is an important component of long-term follow-up (LTFU) care for childhood cancer survivors (CCS). However, little information exists about how survivors perceive their own health promotion needs. As part of a service evaluation, 51 CCS who had previously attended the LTFU clinic took part in a single semistructured interview to seek their views on information they had received regarding late adverse effects (LAEs) of treatment, the purpose of LTFU, and the provision of health promotion information. Although most (93%) CCS were satisfied with the information received about LAEs, 37% desired further details. Over half (59%) believed that the purpose of LTFU was to screen for LAEs, whereas 31% felt that it was to check for relapse. No survivor reported health promotion to be an aim of LTFU; only 14% of CCS expected to receive healthy lifestyle advice, and fewer than 10% wanted dietary and physical activity advice. Most (88%) CCS felt that their hospital-based health care professional was best placed to give healthy lifestyle advice, but there was no consensus about the optimum timing for health promotion. CCS varied in their knowledge, needs, and wishes regarding LTFU care. The results of this evaluation strongly indicate that the profile of health promotion needs to be raised within our service and identifies issues that may be pertinent to similar services. Further research is needed to understand the views of CCS regarding health promotion and lifestyle behaviors, with the aim of tailoring and improving the delivery of effective health education to CCS.

  18. Randomised controlled trial of a new palliative care service: Compliance, recruitment and completeness of follow-up

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    Saleem Tariq

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care has been proposed for progressive non-cancer conditions but there have been few evaluations of service developments. We analysed recruitment, compliance and follow-up data of a fast track (or wait list control randomised controlled trial of a new palliative care service – a design not previously used to assess palliative care. Methods/Design An innovative palliative care service (comprising a consultant in palliative medicine, a clinical nurse specialist, an administrator and a psychosocial worker was delivered to people severely affected by multiple sclerosis (MS, and their carers, in southeast London. Our design followed the MRC Framework for the Evaluation of Complex Interventions. In phase II we conducted randomised controlled trial, of immediate referral to the service (fast-track versus a 12-week wait (standard best practice. Main outcome measures were: compliance (the extent the trial protocol was adhered to, recruitment (target 50 patients, attrition and missing data rates; trial outcomes were Palliative Care Outcome Scale and MS Impact Scale. Results 69 patients were referred, 52 entered the trial (26 randomised to each arm, 5 refused consent and 12 were excluded from the trial for other reasons, usually illness or urgent needs, achieving our target numbers. 25/26 fast track and 21/26 standard best practice patients completed the trial, resulting in 217/225 (96% of possible interviews completed, 87% of which took place in the patient's home. Main reasons for failure to interview and/or attrition were death or illness. There were three deaths in the standard best practice group and one in the fast-track group during the trial. At baseline there were no differences between groups. Missing data for individual questionnaire items were small (median 0, mean 1–5 items out of 56+ items per interview, not associated with any patient or carer characteristics or with individual questionnaires, but were

  19. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  20. Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members

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    Hooper Tomoko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association. Methods Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6% completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Results Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers. Conclusions These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment.

  1. Assessing Nonresponse Bias at Follow-up in a Large Prospective Cohort of Relatively Young and Mobile Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    follow-up assessment. - 4 - BACKGROUND Intragroup comparisons over time are a key strength of longitudinal cohort studies ; a major threat to...characteristics. Previously published Millennium Cohort studies [11-20] have included 1) an investigation of differences in early vs. late...inference; efforts to achieve and maintain high response rates are a worthwhile investment in this, and all prospective cohort studies . Abbreviations

  2. The contribution of the psychosocial work environment to sickness absence in human service workers : Results of a 3-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Karl B.; Borritz, Marianne; Villadsen, Ebbe; Bultmann, Ute; Kristensen, Tage S.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated to what extent psychosocial. work characteristics predict sickness absence in a cohort of 890 human service professionals (84% women), followed-up for 3 years. We measured 16 different psychosocial work characteristics at baseline and analysed their associations with number of sickne

  3. Can readmission after stroke be prevented? Results of a randomized clinical study: a postdischarge follow-up service for stroke survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H E; Schultz-Larsen, K; Kreiner, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: About 50% of stroke survivors are discharged to their homes with lasting disability. Knowledge, however, of the importance of follow-up services that targets these patients is sparse. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate 2 models of follow-up intervention after...... discharge. The study hypothesis was that intervention could reduce readmission rates and institutionalization and prevent functional decline. We report the results regarding readmission. METHODS: This randomized study included 155 stroke patients with persistent impairment and disability who, after...... that the effect of intervention was strongest for patients with a prolonged inpatient rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Readmission is common among disabled stroke survivors. Follow-up intervention after discharge seems to be a way of preventing readmission, especially for patients with long inpatient rehabilitation....

  4. The impact of critical illness on perceived health-related quality of life during ICU treatment, hospital stay, and after hospital discharge: A long-term follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Hofhuis (Jose); P.E. Spronk (Peter); H.F. van Stel (Henk); G.J.P. Schrijvers (Guus); J.H. Rommes (Johannes Hans); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The time course of changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following discharge from the ICU and during a general ward stay has not been studied. We therefore studied the immediate impact of critical illness on HRQOL and its recovery over time. Methods: In a prospect

  5. Determinants of mortality and loss to follow-up among adults enrolled in HIV care services in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronicah Mugisha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART improves morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV, however high rates of loss to follow-up (LTF and mortality have been documented in HIV care and treatment programs. METHODS: We analyzed routinely-collected data on HIV-infected patients ≥ 15 years enrolled at 41 healthcare facilities in Rwanda from 2005 to 2010. LTF was defined as not attending clinic in the last 12 months for pre-ART patients and 6 months for ART patients. For the pre-ART period, sub-distribution hazards models were constructed to estimate LTF and death to account for competing risks. Kaplan-Meier (KM and Cox proportional hazards models were used for patients on ART. RESULTS: 31,033 ART-naïve adults were included, 64% were female and 75% were WHO stage I or II at enrollment. 17,569 (56% patients initiated ART. Pre-ART competing risk estimates of LTF at 2 years was 11.2% (95%CI, 10.9-11.6% and 2.9% for death (95%CI 2.7-3.1%. Among pre-ART patients, male gender was associated with higher LTF (adjusted sub-hazard ratio (aSHR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.5 and death (aSHR 1.7, 95%CI 1.4-2.1. Low CD4 count (CD4<100 vs. ≥ 350 aSHR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1-0.3 and higher WHO stage (WHO stage IV vs. stage I aSHR 0.4, 95%CI 0.2-0.6 were protective against pre-ART LTF. KM estimates for LTF and death in ART patients at 2 years were 4.4% (95%CI 4.4-4.5% and 6.3% (95%CI 6.2-6.4%. In patients on ART, male gender was associated with LTF (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR 1.4, 95%CI 1.2-1.7 and death (AHR1.3, 95%CI 1.2-1.5. Mortality was higher for ART patients ≥ 40 years and in those with lower CD4 count at ART initiation. CONCLUSIONS: Low rates of LTF and death were founds among pre-ART and ART patients in Rwanda but greater efforts are needed to retain patients in care prior to ART initiation, particularly among those who are healthy at enrollment.

  6. Research of the follow-up service after the elderly health examination%老年人健康体检后的跟踪服务研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 张春民

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of the follow-up service by the family doctors and the inlfuence on their working system after the elderly health examination. Methods:Within the jurisdiction, 1 370 elderly people aged 60 and over who were found abnormal in the physical examination were selected from Jan. 2013 to Dec. 2014 and 540 of them were as the group of the follow-up service, and received the follow-up service, which included the interpretation of the medical report one to one, health education, health counseling, health risk factor analysis and guidance, disease management and others. Eight hundred and thirty were as the control group. The results of before and after the physical examination, improvement of the healthy life style, satisfaction for the physical examination and others were compared. Results:The difference in the blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and BMI had no statistical signiifcance in comparison of the physical examination data in two groups (P>0.05). In the control group of 830 people, 749 (90.2%) satisifed with the process of the physical examination, 150 (18.1%) comprehensively understood the physical examination reports, and 124 (14.9%) knew how to deal with the abnormal index. In the follow-up service group of 540 people, 100%satisifed with the physical examination, 360(66.7%) comprehensively understood the physical examination report, and 375(69.4%) knew how to deal with the abnormal index. The difference in comparison of the services before and after the follow-up service had the statistical signiifcance (P<0.05). Conclusion:The follow-up service plays an important role in the disease prevention and treatment and is conducive to the development of the family doctor service system.%目的:研究在老人体检后家庭医生跟踪服务效果及对家庭医生工作制的影响。方法:抽取2013年1月至2014年12月辖区内1370名体检发现有异常的60岁及以上老人,对其中540人作为跟踪服务组,进

  7. Follow-up Service after the Physical Examination in the Sanatorium%疗养院体检后续服务的探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜淑芳; 袁本敏; 张中; 何虹

    2014-01-01

    The follow-up service after the physical examination was introduced in the sanatorium as fol-lowing:Implementing the brand strategy;creating three special service system as the early warning system for dis-ease prevention , the intervention system for disease rehabilitation , and the health promotion system for health edu-cation;developing an information management platform supported by software companies ; establishing a expert team provide good service , opening the green service channel .%本文介绍某疗养院健康体检中心在开展检后服务方面的做法与经验:即实施品牌战略规划,创建三大特色的检后服务保障体系,即构建以预防保健为主体的疾病预警预测体系、构建以康复医疗为核心的健康干预体系、构建以健康教育为基点的健康促进体系;寻求软件公司合作,开发健康管理信息平台;加强复合型人才的培养,建立一支优秀的检后服务专家团队;强强合作,开通绿色就医通道。

  8. Dynamic composition of medical support services in the ICU: Platform and algorithm design details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristoskova, Anna; Moeyersoon, Dieter; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Verstichel, Stijn; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2010-12-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is an extremely data-intensive environment where each patient needs to be monitored 24/7. Bedside monitors continuously register vital patient values (such as serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure) which are recorded frequently in the hospital database (e.g. every 2 min in the ICU of the Ghent University Hospital), laboratories generate hundreds of results of blood and urine samples, and nurses measure blood pressure and temperature up to 4 times an hour. The processing of such large amount of data requires an automated system to support the physicians' daily work. The Intensive Care Service Platform (ICSP) offers the needed support through the development of medical support services for processing and monitoring patients' data. With an increased deployment of these medical support services, reusing existing services as building blocks to create new services offers flexibility to the developer and accelerates the design process. This paper presents a new addition to the ICSP, the Dynamic Composer for Web services. Based on a semantic description of the medical support services, this Composer enables a service to be executed by creating a composition of medical services that provide the needed calculations. The composition is achieved using various algorithms satisfying certain quality of service (QoS) constraints and requirements. In addition to the automatic composition the paper also proposes a recovery mechanism in case of unavailable services. When executing the composition of medical services, unavailable services are dynamically replaced by equivalent services or a new composition achieving the same result. The presented platform and QoS algorithms are put through extensive performance and scalability tests for typical ICU scenarios, in which basic medical services are composed to a complex patient monitoring service.

  9. Treatment and Follow Up

    Science.gov (United States)

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  10. [Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Zeni Drubi; Boa-Sorte, Ney; Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Kiya, Márcia Miyuki; Amorim, Tatiana; Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da

    2015-01-01

    To study breastfeeding history (BF) and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SS and SC hemoglobinopathies aged between 2 and 6 years old receiving regular follow-up at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS) between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and sex. The average (SD) age was 3.7 (1.1) years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SS hemoglobinopathy. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR) up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75) was 90.0 (24.0-180.0) days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75) was 360.0 (90.0-20.0) days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for an average duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01), and were weaned later (p<0.05). Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had SS hemoglobinopathy and were over 4 years of age. EBR time and weaning age were greater than found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBR and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. CONTRACT FOLLOW-UP

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    CFU is the program developed by AS division to follow the life cycle of procurement of supply and services for large amounts. The course is free of charge but registration is requested. Sessions scheduled: 27.11.2000 12.03.2001 15.12.2000 09.04.2001 12.01.2001 07.05.2001 12.02.2001 11.06.2001

  12. Homeless people's access to primary care physiotherapy services: an exploratory, mixed-method investigation using a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Jo; Deaton, Stuart; Greenwood, Nan

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to appraise referrals of homeless patients to physiotherapy services and explore perceptions of barriers to access. This exploratory mixed-method study used a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research design. Over 9 months, quantitative data were gathered from the healthcare records of homeless patients referred to physiotherapy by a general practitioner (GP) practice, including the number of referrals and demographic data of all homeless patients referred. Corresponding physiotherapy records of those people referred to physiotherapy were searched for the outcome of their care. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews, based on the quantitative findings, were carried out with staff involved with patient care from the referring GP practice and were used to expand insight into the quantitative findings. Two primary care sites provided data for this study: a GP practice dedicated exclusively to homeless people and the physiotherapy department receiving their referrals. Quantitative data from the healthcare records of 34 homeless patient referrals to physiotherapy were collected and analysed. In addition, five staff involved in patient care were interviewed. 34 referrals of homeless people were made to physiotherapy in a 9-month period. It was possible to match 25 of these to records from the physiotherapy department. Nine (36%) patients did not attend their first appointment; seven (28%) attended an initial appointment, but did not attend a subsequent appointment and were discharged from the service; five (20%) completed treatment and four patients (16%) had ongoing treatment. Semi-structured interviews revealed potential barriers preventing homeless people from accessing physiotherapy services, the complex factors being faced by those making referrals and possible ways to improve physiotherapy access. Homeless people with musculoskeletal problems may fail to access physiotherapy treatment, but opportunities

  13. What Contributes to the Regularity of Patients with Hypertension or Diabetes Seeking Health Services? A Pilot Follow-Up, Observational Study in Two Sites in Hubei Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Feng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Regular maintenance of non-communicable chronic diseases can constrain disease progression in diabetic and hypertensive patients. To identify the individual and social factors that are associated with positive health-seeking behaviors and regular maintenance of chronic diseases, we have conducted a follow up study in 2015 on diabetic and hypertensive patients in Hubei Province. We used binary logistic regression models to determine specific factors associated with diabetic and hypertensive patients that sought healthcare services for their conditions in accordance with current Chinese Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC guidelines. Our findings show that 42.16% of 510 people living with chronic conditions (PLCDs sought health services in line with existing guidelines. Findings also show a higher probability (8.418 times for PLCDs seeking healthcare services at higher-tiered hospitals (secondary and tertiary hospitals than for PLCDs seeking care at primary hospitals (odds ratio (OR = 8.418, 95% confidence interval (CI = 4.82, 14.27, p < 0.001. These analyses underscore the importance of having patient advocates who can provide support, where necessary, and encourage positive health-seeking behavior. The study also shows a negative impact on regular maintenance for PLCDs in households with high financial constraints. In contrast, the study shows positive impacts for increased household income, age, and residency in rural locations. In sum, this study underscores the importance of primary hospitals as key points of care and critical players in care coordination for PLCDs. The study provides more evidence for Chinese policymakers seeking to contain costs and improve population health. The findings also underscore the need for community-based interventions, specifically interventions that link local primary hospitals, friends/family members, and PLCDs.

  14. Breastfeeding and the anthropometric profile of children with sickle cell anemia receiving follow-up in a newborn screening reference service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeni Drubi Nogueira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the breastfeeding history (BF and the anthropometric status of children with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 357 children with SCD aged between 2 and 6 years, regularly followed at a Newborn Screening Reference Service (NSRS between November 2007 and January 2009. The outcome was anthropometric status and the exposures were: BF pattern, type of hemoglobinopathy and child's age and gender. RESULTS: The mean (SD age was 3.7 (1.1 years, 52.9% were boys and 53.5% had SCA (hemoglobin SS. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBR up to six months of age was 31.5%, the median EBR times (p25-p75 was 90.0 (24.0-180.0 days and the median weaning ages (p25-p75 was 360.0 (90.0-720.0 days respectively. Normal W/H children experienced EBR for a mean duration almost four times longer than malnourished children (p=0.01, and were weaned later (p<0.05. Height deficit was found in 5.0% of children, while all the children with severe short stature had had SCA (hemoglobin SS and were older than 4 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: EBF time and weaning age were greater than that found in the literature, which is a possible effect of the multidisciplinary follow-up. Duration of EBF and later weaning were associated with improved anthropometric indicators.

  15. Mental health service use by patients with dysthymic disorder: treatment use and dropout in a 7 1/2-year naturalistic follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Brian R; Klein, Daniel N

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about long-term treatment use among patients with dysthymia. This paper describes patterns of treatment use by 85 outpatients with dysthymic disorder and a comparison group of 36 outpatients with nonchronic (episodic) major depression in a naturalistic follow-up. Patients with dysthymia had higher rates of treatment use across 7 1/2 years compared with patients with episodic major depression. Baseline variables that predicted which patients with dysthymia dropped out of treatment before recovering from dysthymic disorder included age, ethnicity, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition Axis II pathology as obtained from informant reports, higher self-reported autonomy, and receiving psychotherapy alone as compared to receiving a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Dysthymic disorder places a significant burden on the mental health services system, yet many outpatients with dysthymia may be receiving inadequate treatment. Younger patients, ethnic minority patients, and patients with personality disorders may be at increased risk of dropping out from treatment for depression. Combination treatments may increase treatment retention.

  16. Knowledge and Awareness of MTCT and PMTCT Post-Natal Follow-up Services Among HIV Infected Mothers in the Mankweng Region, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoshaba, Refilwe; Sithole, Sello Levy

    2017-01-01

    The pandemic of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the most severe health challenge affecting children across the world. It is estimated that more than 90% of all HIV infections in children result from Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT). Poor knowledge and awareness of MTCT and Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) among HIV positive mothers and their babies is a major setback to the success of the PMTCT programmes. A qualitative approach and a cross-sectional design were applied in this study. The sample size of the study was 26 participants. Purposive sampling was used to select HIV infected mothers enrolled for PMTCT follow-up services and health care providers responsible for the implementation of the PMTCT programmes. In-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen HIV infected mothers at two health facilities. Two Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with eleven health workers at the two health facilities. Focus groups comprised of six participants from Mankweng Clinic and five participants from Mankweng Gateway Clinic. The findings from the study reveal that the majority of the respondents were aware of MTCT, but lacked knowledge and understanding about how a mother can transmit HIV to her child during pregnancy, labour and breastfeeding. The majority of the participants did not understand the risk of MTCT after birth and failed to mention breastfeeding as a mode of transmission. However, most of the participants were aware that MTCT can be prevented. The respondents were aware of the importance of treatment adherence as a prevention measure to avoid MTCT. Based on these findings, a number of recommendations were made. The first is that educational and awareness programmes need to be developed or strengthened on health risks. Mass campaign media should provide information on the importance of PMTCT activities through the use of community radio stations, Television, newsletters, bill boards etc. People need to know more about PMTCT

  17. The Registry and Follow-Up of Complex Pediatric Therapies Program of Western Canada: A Mechanism for Service, Audit, and Research after Life-Saving Therapies for Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M. T. Robertson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging health technologies are being developed to care for children with complex cardiac defects. Neurodevelopmental and childhood school-related outcomes are of great interest to parents of children receiving this care, care providers, and healthcare administrators. Since the 1970s, neonatal follow-up clinics have provided service, audit, and research for preterm infants as care for these at-risk children evolved. We have chosen to present for this issue the mechanism for longitudinal follow-up of survivors that we have developed for western Canada patterned after neonatal follow-up. Our program provides registration for young children receiving complex cardiac surgery, heart transplantation, ventricular assist device support, and extracorporeal life support among others. The program includes multidisciplinary assessments with appropriate neurodevelopmental intervention, active quality improvement evaluations, and outcomes research. Through this mechanism, consistently high (96% follow-up over two years is maintained.

  18. Mortality and loss-to-follow-up during the pre-treatment period in an antiretroviral therapy programme under normal health service conditions in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many HIV programmes in Africa, patients are assessed clinically and prepared for antiretroviral treatment over a period of 4–12 weeks. Mortality rates following initiation of ART are very high largely because patients present late with advanced disease. The rates of mortality and retention during the pre-treatment period are not well understood. We conducted an observational study to determine these rates. Methods HIV-infected subjects presenting at The AIDS Support Clinic in Jinja, SE Uganda, were assessed for antiretroviral therapy (ART. Eligible subjects were given information and counselling in 3 visits done over 4–6 weeks in preparation for treatment. Those who did not complete screening were followed-up at home. Survival analysis was done using poisson regression. Results 4321 HIV-infected subjects were screened of whom 2483 were eligible for ART on clinical or immunological grounds. Of these, 637 (26% did not complete screening and did not start ART. Male sex and low CD4 count were associated independently with not completing screening. At follow-up at a median 351 days, 181 (28% had died, 189 (30% reported that they were on ART with a different provider, 158 (25% were alive but said they were not on ART and 109 (17% were lost to follow-up. Death rates (95% CI per 100 person-years were 34 (22, 55 (n.18 within one month and 37 (29, 48 (n.33 within 3 months. 70/158 (44% subjects seen at follow-up said they had not started ART because they could not afford transport. Conclusion About a quarter of subjects eligible for ART did not complete screening and pre-treatment mortality was very high even though patients in this setting were well informed. For many families, the high cost of transport is a major barrier preventing access to ART.

  19. Simulating Service System and Estimating the Hospital Beds for ICU Patients of Behbahan Shahidzade Hospital in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Shahbazi Moghadam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital bed is one of the most important resources of a hospital. The optimal estimation of the future number of beds needed is one of the important and interesting subjects for the policy makers. The aim of the present study was to simulate the service system and estimate the hospital beds for the ICU patients. Method: This is a simulation and modeling study. Stochastic simulation method was used to model the services system of ICU. The initial research population was consisted of 560 patients hospitalized in the ICU of Shahidzadeh general hospital in Behbahan, Khuzestan. The beds needed in the future was estimated based on key and significant parameters and variables including length of stay, admissions rate, and discharges rate for 10000 days and 5000 patients simulated (admission rate, =2 Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and EXCEL 2010 software’s. Findings: the results showed that mean and median of the patients' length of stay were 5.4 9.3 and 3 days, respectively. Among the different variables, the patients' age, having diabetes, having dyslipidemia , the number of diagnostic tests, and the number of radiography services were the most important predictors of the patients' length of stay .The findings of simulation model showed that if the bed estimation is performed based on 10 and 20 initial beds , ICU will approximately encounter the shortage of bed up to the future 13 years (5000 days . If only the ICU works with 40 initial beds, it will need some additional hospital beds for 42.7 % of days (2135 days. Therefore, the ICU in the study can provide service for 57.3% of days (2865 days with the same existing 40 beds. Conclusion: we concluded that according to the existing beds and resources, the studied hospital will strongly face a shortage of ICU beds in most of the future days.

  20. The Effect of Liaison Nurse Service on Patient Outcomes after Discharging From ICU: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Tabanejad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent studies suggest that liaison nurse intervention might be effective to solve the gap between intensive care unit and wards, but little studies are known about the effect of this intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of liaison nurse service on patient outcomes after discharging from intensive care unit. Methods: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, a total of 80 patients were selected by convenience sampling method from two teaching hospitals located in Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received post-ICU care from a liaison nurse and patients in the control group received the routine care. After the intervention, patients’ vital signs, level of consciousness, length of hospital stay, need for re-hospitalization in ICU, and satisfaction with care were measure. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver.13 software. Results: None of the participants experienced ICU re-hospitalization. According to the result and there were no significant differences between the study groups regarding heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, post-ICU level of consciousness, satisfaction with care, and length of hospitalization in medical-surgical wards. However, the study groups differed significantly in terms of body temperature. Conclusion: Care services provided by an ICU liaison nurse has limited effects on patient outcomes. However, considering the contradictions among the studies, further studies are needed for providing clear evidence about the effectiveness of the liaison nurse strategy.

  1. The Effect of Liaison Nurse Service on Patient Outcomes after Discharging From ICU: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanejad, Zeinab; Pazokian, Marzieh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies suggest that liaison nurse intervention might be effective to solve the gap between intensive care unit and wards, but little studies are known about the effect of this intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of liaison nurse service on patient outcomes after discharging from intensive care unit. Methods: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, a total of 80 patients were selected by convenience sampling method from two teaching hospitals located in Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received post-ICU care from a liaison nurse and patients in the control group received the routine care. After the intervention, patients’ vital signs, level of consciousness, length of hospital stay, need for re-hospitalization in ICU, and satisfaction with care were measure. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver.13 software. Results: None of the participants experienced ICU re-hospitalization. According to the result and there were no significant differences between the study groups regarding heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, post-ICU level of consciousness, satisfaction with care, and length of hospitalization in medical-surgical wards. However, the study groups differed significantly in terms of body temperature. Conclusion: Care services provided by an ICU liaison nurse has limited effects on patient outcomes. However, considering the contradictions among the studies, further studies are needed for providing clear evidence about the effectiveness of the liaison nurse strategy. PMID:27752487

  2. An Assessment of Service-Learning in 34 US Schools of Pharmacy Follow Up on the 2001 Professional Affairs Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesselman, Lauren; Borrego, Matthew; Bloom, Timothy J; Mehta, Bella; Drobitch, Robert K; Smith, Thomas

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To determine if the service-learning components used at a convenience sample of schools and colleges of pharmacy meet the intent of the 2001 AACP Professional Affairs Committee (PAC) report. Methods. An online questionnaire was used to survey faculty members or staff involved with service-learning education at their school of pharmacy. Questions addressed aspects of service-learning including types of activities used, duration of student involvement with community partners, and association of learning objectives with service-learning activities. Results. The majority (85.3%) of respondents reported their institution used service-learning. Activities reported as part of service-learning ranged from working at health fairs to involvement with pharmacy school recruitment. More than half (64.3%) of service-learning activities involved long-term interactions with one community partner, and 74.1% of respondents indicated there was always an opportunity for student reflection on the service-learning activity. Conclusion. There is increasing though inconsistent application of PAC guidelines regarding service-learning.

  3. ICU-recovery in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Risom, Signe S; Thomsen, Thordis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe and compare models of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden to help inform clinicians regarding the establishment and continuation of ICU aftercare programmes....

  4. Effects of structured vocational services on job-search success in ex-offender veterans with mental illness: 3-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, James P; Washington, Edward L; Lewis, Avery A; Johnson, Kim E; Garcia-Rea, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    With the high number of incarcerated veterans with mental illness and substance dependence returning to the community annually, a significant need exists for technologies that will help them return to employment. This study evaluates three methods of assistance: (1) basic vocational services, (2) self-study of a vocational manual designed for formerly incarcerated veterans, and (3) a group led by vocational staff using the vocational manual. We evaluated 69 veterans to determine the number finding employment within 3 months after enrollment in the study. The group format was expected to be superior to self-study, and self-study was expected to be superior to basic services. Though the group format was found to be superior to both self-study and basic services, the results for self-study and basic services were statistically similar. Limitations and directions for future refinement are discussed.

  5. Health service use in adults 20-64 years with traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or pelvic fracture. A cohort study with 9-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bjarne; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the health service use over 9 years after the injury year for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and pelvic fracture (PF), and compare with non-injured.......To estimate the health service use over 9 years after the injury year for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and pelvic fracture (PF), and compare with non-injured....

  6. Does staff-patient agreement on needs for care predict a better mental health outcome? A 4-year follow-up in a community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, A; Bonetto, C; Tansella, M; Stefani, B; Ruggeri, M

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated in primary care settings report better mental outcomes when they agree with practitioners about the nature of their core presenting problems. However, no study has examined the impact of staff-patient agreement on treatment outcomes in specialist mental health services. We investigated whether a better staff-patient agreement on needs for care predicts more favourable outcome in patients receiving community-based psychiatric care. A 3-month prevalence cohort of 188 patients with the full spectrum of psychiatric conditions was assessed at baseline and at 4 years using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN), both staff (CAN-S) and patient versions (CAN-P), and a set of standardized outcome measures. Baseline staff-patient agreement on needs was included among predictors of outcome. Both clinician-rated (psychopathology, social disability, global functioning) and patient-rated (subjective quality of life and satisfaction with services) outcomes were considered. Controlling for the effect of sociodemographics, service utilization and changes in clinical status, better staff-patient agreement makes a significant additional contribution in predicting treatment outcomes not only on patient-rated but also on clinician-rated measures. Mental health care should be provided on the basis of a negotiation process involving both professionals and service users to ensure effective interventions; every effort should be made by services to implement strategies aiming to increase consensus between staff and patients.

  7. The effect of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU on quality of care in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph D; Green, Deborah M; Lau, Helena; Winter, Michael; Koyfman, Feliks; DeFusco, Christina M; Holsapple, James W; Kase, Carlos S

    2013-06-01

    Introduction of neurocritical care services to dedicated neuro-ICUs is associated with improved quality of care. The impact of a neurocritical care service without a dedicated neuro-ICU has not been studied. We retrospectively identified all patients admitted to our institution with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in two 12-month periods: immediately before the arrival of the first neurointensivist ("before") and after the neurocritical care service was established ("after"). There was no nursing team, ICU housestaff/physician extender team, or physical unit dedicated to the care of patients with critical neurologic illness during either period. Using an uncontrolled before-after design, we compared clinical outcomes and performance on quality metrics between groups. We included 74 patients with primary supratentorial ICH. Mortality, length of stay (LOS), proportion of patients with modified Rankin Score 0-3, and destination on discharge did not differ between groups when adjusted for confounders. Time to first two consecutive systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements neuro-ICU at our institution was associated with a trend toward longer ICU LOS and improvement in some key metrics of quality of care for patients with ICH.

  8. A prospective 8-year follow-up of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth of children and adolescents in Public Dental Health Service: reasons for replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Halken, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: the aim of the study was to investigate reasons for replacement and repair of posterior resin composite (RC) restorations placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service in Denmark. Material and method: all posterior RC placed consecutively...

  9. A Pragmatic Randomised, Controlled Trial of Intensive Care follow up programmes in improving Longer-term outcomes from critical illness. The PRACTICAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey Craig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of intensive care (ICU patients experience significant problems with physical, psychological, and social functioning for some time after discharge from ICU. These problems have implications not just for patients, but impose a continuing financial burden for the National Health Service. To support recovery, a number of hospitals across the UK have developed Intensive Care follow-up clinics. However, there is a lack of evidence base to support these, and this study aims to test the hypothesis that intensive care follow up programmes are effective and cost-effective at improving physical and psychological quality of life in the year after intensive care discharge. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Patients (n = 270 will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from three intensive care units in the UK, and randomised to one of two groups. The control group will receive standard in-hospital follow-up and the intervention group will participate in an ICU follow-up programme with clinic appointments 2–3 and 9 months after ICU discharge. The primary outcome measure is Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL 12 months after ICU discharge as measured by the Short Form-36. Secondary measures include: HRQoL at six months; Quality-adjusted life years using EQ-5D; posttraumatic psychopathology as measured by Davidson Trauma Scale; and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at both six and twelve months after ICU discharge. Contacts with health services in the twelve months after ICU discharge will be measured as part of the economic analysis. Discussion The provision of intensive care follow-up clinics within the UK has developed in an ad hoc manner, is inconsistent in both the number of hospitals offering such a service or in the type of service offered. This study provides the opportunity to evaluate such services both in terms of patient benefit and

  10. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  11. Public telesurveillance service for frail elderly living at home, outcomes and cost evolution: a quasi experimental design with two follow-ups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaudelin Isabelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telesurveillance is a technologically based modality that allows the surveillance of patients in the natural setting, mainly home. It is based on communication technologies to relay information between a patient and a central call center where services are coordinated. Different types of telesurveillance systems have been implemented, some being staffed with non-health professionals and others with health professional, mainly nurses. Up to now, only telesurveillance services staffed with non-health professionals have been shown to be effective and efficient. The objective of this study was to document outcomes and cost evolution of a nurse-staffed telesurveillance system for frail elderly living at home. Methods A quasi experimental design over a nine-month period was done. Patients (n = 38 and caregivers (n = 38 were selected by health professionals from two local community health centers. To be eligible, elders had to be over 65, live at home with a permanent physical, slight cognitive or motor disability or both and have a close relative (the caregiver willing to participate to the study. These disabilities had to hinder the accomplishment of daily life activities deemed essential to continue living at home safely. Three data sources were used: patient files, telesurveillance center's quarterly reports and personal questionnaires (Modified Mini-Mental State, Functional Autonomy Measurement System, Life Event Checklist, SF-12, Life-H, Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology, Caregiver Burden. The telesurveillance technology permitted, among various functionalities, bi-directional communication (speaker-receiver between the patient and the response center. Results A total of 957 calls for 38 registered clients over a 6-month period was recorded. Only 48 (5.0% of the calls were health-related. No change was reported in the elders' quality of life and daily activity abilities. Satisfaction was very

  12. Electronic Whiteboards and Intensive Care Unit follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Brandrup, Morten

    /collaboration and 2) information. However no literature has been found on how to maintain the communication and collaboration between wards when time of the respectively project has run out. Research on electronic whiteboards in hospital settings find that supporting communication between e.g. wards and the transfer......This paper is reviewing the existing literature on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outreach, in-hospital follow up 24 hours after the transition to a general ward from an ICU. It also touches upon the use of Electronic Whiteboards in a hospital setting and how the electronic whiteboards might support...... of information is optimized using an electronic whiteboard. Negative findings in the research on electronic whiteboards are present too e.g. it is crucial to have the same use language when sharing the same interface and reports on system in-flexibility; dash-board (standardized use of language) vs. open...

  13. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  14. 双侧输尿管皮肤造口患者出院后随访及护理干预%The follow-up services for patients receiving bilateral ureterostomy after discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许珊珊; 陈绵绵; 陈丹红; 谢碧兰

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the follow-up services for nine patients receiving bilateral ureterostomy after discharge.During follow-up,it was found that most of the patients couldn't adapt to the stoma and suffered from anxiety and self-abasement,seven patients couldn't change ostomy bags by themselves,one patient used the self-made ostomy bag,two patients used the old-style ostomy bags,and the other six patients used pasted two pieces ostomy bags.One patient had urate crystal,one patient's bilateral stomas had rebounded,two patients had dermatitis and one of them had urinary tract infection.Aimed at the problems,targeted nursing interventions were provided,including providing follow-up services to ensure the continuity of nursing care,correcting the patients' attitudes toward the stoma to prevent self-image disorders,teaching the patients about the stoma care skills to improve their self-care agency,guiding the patients to choose proper stoma care materials and observe complications to improve their self-confidence and reduce the incidence of complications.It is suggested that the follow-up services can improve the patients' quality of life and promote them to return to the society in a better way.%总结9例双侧输尿管皮肤造口患者出院后随访及护理干预.随访后发现本组对双侧输尿管造口不适应,普遍存在焦虑自卑的心理;7例不能自己更换造口袋;1例使用自制简易式造口袋,2例使用旧式一次性造口袋,6例使用质量较好的两件式粘贴型造口袋.1例出现尿酸盐结晶,1例出现双侧造口回缩,2例出现造口周围皮炎,其中1例出现尿路感染.通过建立随访机制,确保护理干预的延续性;提高患者造口认知水平,消除自我形象紊乱;传授造口护理技巧,提升患者的自理能力;正确选择造口护理用品,指导并发症的观察和处理等,提升了患者的自我护理能力,增强了自信心,减少了并发症的发生.认为出院后的随访及护理

  15. Supervised team management, with or without structured psychotherapy, in heavy users of a mental health service with borderline personality disorder: a two-year follow-up preliminary randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amianto Federico

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals affected by severe Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD are often heavy users of Mental Health Services (MHS. Short-term treatments currently used in BPD therapy are useful to target disruptive behaviors but they are less effective in reducing heavy MHS use. Therefore, alternative short-term treatments, less complex than long-term psychodynamic psychotherapies but specifically oriented to BPD core problems, need to be developed to reduce MHS overuse. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adding Sequential Brief Adlerian Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (SB-APP to Supervised Team Management (STM in BPD treatment compared to STM alone in a naturalistic group of heavy MHS users with BPD. Effectiveness was evaluated 6 times along a two-year follow-up. Methods Thirty-five outpatients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (STM = 17; SB-APP = 18 and then compared. Clinical Global Impression (CGI and CGI-modified (CGI-M for BPD, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI, and Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R were administered at T1, T3, T6, T12, T18 and T24. At T12 the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S was also completed. At the one-year follow-up, SB-APP group did not receive any additional individual psychological support. MHS team was specifically trained in BPD treatment and had regular supervisions. Results All patients improved on CGI, GAF, and STAXI scores after 6 and 12 months, independently of treatment received. SB-APP group showed better outcome on impulsivity, suicide attempts, chronic feelings of emptiness, and disturbed relationships. We found a good stabilization at the one year follow-up, even after the interruption of brief psychotherapy in the SB-APP group. Conclusions Although STM for BPD applied to heavy MHS users was effective in reducing symptoms and improving their global functioning, adding a time

  16. Impacto de un servicio de seguimiento farmacoterapéutico implementado a pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Impact of a pharmaceutical follow-up service implemented in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaily Lazo Roblejo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el impacto de un servicio de seguimiento farmacoterapéutico implementado a 30 pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, dispensarizados en la Farmacia Principal Municipal Santiago de Cuba, según la metodología Dáder, en el período comprendido desde enero del 2009 hasta enero de 2010. El índice de impacto de la estabilidad clínica de los pacientes resultó moderado, mientras que en las intervenciones farmacéuticas aceptadas y el nivel de satisfacción de los pacientes, los índices de impacto obtenidos fueron elevados, por lo que el impacto global del servicio de seguimiento farmacoterapéutico implementado para la atención de estos fue considerado alto.The impact of a pharmacotherapy follow-up service was assessed in 30 patients dispensarized in municipal main drugstore of Santiago de Cuba according to Dáder's methodology from January, 2009 to January, 2010. The level of the clinical stability impact of patients was qualified as moderate, whereas in the accepted pharmaceutical interventions and at level of patient's satisfaction, the rates of impact achieved were high thus; the global above mentioned service repercussion was also qualified as high.

  17. Experience from multidisciplinary follow-up on critically ill patients treated in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Rosendahl-Nielsen, Mette

    2015-05-01

    International literature describes that former intensive care unit (ICU) patients suffer considerable physical and neuropsychological complications. Systematic data on Danish ICU survivors are scarce as standardised follow-up after intensive care has yet to be described. This article describes and evaluates the knowledge gained from outpatient follow-up at a tertiary intensive care unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, during a three-year period. A total of 101 adult former ICU patients attended the outpatient clinic over a three-year period. Patients included were medical and surgical patients with a length of stay exceeding four days. Patients attended the clinic after discharge from hospital and for a minimum of two months from their discharge from the ICU. The patients were assessed for physical, neuropsychological and psychological problems and, if necessary, further treatment or rehabilitation was initiated. Reduced physical ability was seen in 82%. A total of 89% suffered a substantial weight loss. 83.2% had signs indicating acute brain dysfunction during the ICU stay, and approximately half of the patients still had cognitive problems. A total of 66 interventions were initiated. Our data confirmed that a large proportion of ICU survivors suffer considerable long-term physical and neuropsychological sequelae. Intensive care follow-up may contribute to address these specific problems and to initiate the needed interventions. Research is needed to determine whether specialised rehabilitation is required. not relevant. not relevant.

  18. 农业科技远程培训后续学习支持服务策略研究%Tactics of Follow-up Learning Support Services of Distance Training on Agricultural Science and Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡培良

    2011-01-01

    Distance training on agricultural science and technology has provided the opportunity of study for the broad masses of trainees.The distance training has become one of the important ways to raise the trainees ' standard of agricultural science and technology.But because of the trainees ' individual characteristic factors,there is a significant difference in trainees ' ability of gaining the agriculture knowledge and information,and in trainees ' understanding and applying agricultural science and technology.The purpose of studying follow-up learning support services of distance training on agricultural science and technology is to explore a way to provide the trainees with the continuous guarantee of study quality.The necessity of follow-up learning support services of distance training on agricultural science and technology has been described.The difference between distance training on agricultural science and technology and distance education has been analyzed.Taking the successful example of the distance training on rural practical technology in Fujian as enlightenment,the countermeasures and suggestions are presented and discussed of using the modern information technical superiority to provide the academic and non-academic follow-up learning support services for the trainees in view of the trainees ' individuality and disparity.%农业科技远程培训为广大的参训者提供了学习的机会,远程培训已成为提高参训者农业科技水平的重要途径之一。但是,由于参训者的个体特征因素,还存在着参训者在获取农业知识和信息能力方面,以及在理解和应用农业科学技术等方面存在着很大差异的现象。研究农业科技远程培训后续学习支持服务的目的是探索为参训者提供延伸的学习质量保障的途径。笔者叙述了农业科技远程培训后续学习支持服务的必要性,分析了"农业科技远程培训"与"远程教育"的不同之处,并以福

  19. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both...... that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets....

  20. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  1. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schooten, van Boris; Akker, op den Rieks

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  2. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  3. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  4. Application of follow-up service network platform In blood glucose management of diabetics%网络平台随访服务模式在糖尿病患者血糖管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀丽; 李萍; 侯铭

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the implementation of health management of diabetics through follow-up service network platform,and analyze the effect of this model on blood glucose level and behavior of diabetics.Methods 114 cases of diabetics were divided into two groups by random number table method:the control group ( n =56),which received traditional follow-up service,and the experimental group ( n =58 ),which received follow-up services through network platform.Before the intervention and 3 months after the intervention,the two groups were evaluated by diabetics-specific quality of life scale,diabetes knowledge questionnaire and self-management questionnaire.Biochemical parameters of the patients were also observed,including fasting blood glucose (FPG),2h postprandial blood glucose (PG2h) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).Results Before the intervention there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the blood glucose,lipid metabolism and scores of specific quality of life (P > 0.05).After 3 months,the scores of the experimental group in three latitudes of specific quality of life,namely psychological latitude ( - 1.34 ± 2.128 ),social latitude ( - 2.38 ± 1.554 ),treatment latitude (2.86 ± 1.701 ),were all lower than the scores of the control group [ ( - 2.11 + 1.765 ),( - 1.46 + 1.078 ),( 2.09±1.431 ),respectively ].The differences were statistically significant (t =-3.233,-3.663,2.621,respectively,P <0.05 ).The biochemical parameters of the experimental group,namely level of FPG [ (6.8 ± 2.0) mmol/L],PG2h [ ( 10.0 ±3.1 ) mmol/L]and HbA1c [(6.9± 1.2)%] all decreased compared with the control group [(8.7 ±3.1)mmol/L,(12.6 ±4.9)mmol/L,(7.9 t2.6)% ; respectively],and the differences were statistically significant (t =-2.56,-3.67,- 3.17,respectively; P < 0.05 ).Average cognitive score ( 6.50 ± 5.083 ) and behavior score ( - 2.05 ± 1.932 )of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group [ ( 4.62 ± 3

  5. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  6. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  7. 医院服务回访中不满意原因分析及对策%Cause Analysis and Countermeasures of Dissatisfaction on Hospital Service from Follow-up Visits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅; 叶阿琴; 谢枫; 汤珍珍; 林慧

    2016-01-01

    目的了解肿瘤住院患者不满意原因,通过服务回访对不满意事件协调处理,以提高患者对医院的满意度。方法2014年4月至2015年12月通过服务回访收集肿瘤住院患者不满意意见,针对投诉病例及诉求问题,进行沟通协调及慰问安抚工作,并将患者不满意原因归纳整理分析,提出改进措施。结果2014年、2015年收集患者不满意事件分别是205例、127例。患者不满意主要原因:服务态度差、沟通不畅、治疗效果差、就诊流程不便、等待时间长、医疗费用高等。经过回访沟通后,2014年协调成功102例,2015年协调成功65例,回访、协调效果明显。结论医院为提高患者满意度,应强化医务人员职业道德教育,畅通医患有效沟通平台,建立全程人文关怀的服务回访制度。%Objects To investigate the cause of dissatisfaction of inpatients with tumor.By the means offollow-up visits,coordinatedthese dissatisfaction issues to improve the satisfaction rate.Methods Feedback regarding dissatisfaction ofinpatients with tumor were collected via follow-up visits from April 2004 to December 2015. For thosecritical feedbacks, the hospital actively coordinatedwithpatientsandplacated them. Through summing up and sorting outthe causes of dissatisfaction, further analysis was conducted so as to put forward improvement measures.Results 205 and 127 critical feedbacks were received in 2014 and 2015 respectively. The causes of dissatisfaction were as follow, poor service attitude, poor communication, poor treatment effect, inconvenience of treatment process, long waiting time and high medical costs.Through coordination infollow-up visits, 102cases in 2014 and 65 casesin 2015 were coordinated successfully.Conclusion To improve patients' satisfaction, hospitals should strengthen professional ethics education on medical personnel, make the doctor-patient communication platform unimpeded and establish a

  8. Design and evaluation of a service oriented architecture for paperless ICU tarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurbaut, Kristof; Colpaert, Kirsten; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Steurbaut, Sabrina; Danneels, Chris; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2012-06-01

    The computerization of Intensive Care Units provides an overwhelming amount of electronic data for both medical and financial analysis. However, the current tarification, which is the process to tick and count patients' procedures, is still a repetitive, time-consuming process on paper. Nurses and secretaries keep track manually of the patients' medical procedures. This paper describes the design methodology and implementation of automated tarification services. In this study we investigate if the tarification can be modeled in service oriented architecture as a composition of interacting services. Services are responsible for data collection, automatic assignment of records to physicians and application of rules. Performance is evaluated in terms of execution time, cost evaluation and return on investment based on tracking of real procedures. The services provide high flexibility in terms of maintenance, integration and rules support. It is shown that services offer a more accurate, less time-consuming and cost-effective tarification.

  9. The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Azhar, M Z; Mohd Yunus, A; Azlan Hamzah, S A

    2005-08-01

    The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP) is a project where medical students choose a hospital in-ward patient during their clinical ward-based attachments and follow-up this patient's progress after discharge from the hospital. The students do a series of home visits and also accompany their patients for some of their follow-ups at the hospital, government clinics, general practitioners' clinics and even to the palliative care or social welfare centres. The students assess the physical, psychological and social impact of the illness on the patient, family and community. By following their patients from the time their patients were in the hospital and back to their homes and community, the students are able to understand in depth the problems faced by patients, the importance of communication skills in educating patients on their illness and the importance of good communication between primary, secondary and tertiary care.

  10. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Thomas N; Borucki, William J; Cochran, William D; Dunham, Edward W; Howell, Steve B; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geo? W; Buchhave, Lars A; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Furesz, Gabor; Isaacson, Howard; MacQueen, Phillip; Mandushev, Georgi; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both for identification of astrophysical phenomena that mimic planetary transits and for characterization of the true planets and planetary systems found by Kepler. We have developed techniques and protocols for detection of false planetary transits and are currently conducting observations on 177 Kepler targets that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets.

  11. Follow-up of erlotinib related uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indu; Ali, Kashif; Usman-Saeed, Muniba; Saeed, Muhammad Usman

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the follow-up of a 68-year-old lady with bilateral anterior uveitis secondary to erlotinib. Erlotinib was started and stopped after symptoms and signs suggestive of severe bilateral anterior uveitis were noted. The patient developed signs of a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, 12 days after stopping the erlotinib, and recovered without major problems. The patient also reported intermittent low-grade fever since starting erlotinib which resolved after stopping this drug. No further symptoms of uveitis were noted up to 6 month follow-up. The patient reported improved well being, resolution of ocular symptoms and intermittent low-grade fever at last follow-up (6 months after stopping erlotinib). PMID:22892235

  12. Prospective impact of panic disorder and panic-anxiety on asthma control, health service use, and quality of life in adult patients with asthma over a 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Helene; Bacon, Simon L; Labrecque, Manon; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-02-01

    Background Panic disorder (PD) is a common anxiety disorder among asthmatic patients with overlapping symptoms (e.g., hyperventilation). However, the longitudinal impact of PD on asthma control remains poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of PD and panic-anxiety on asthma control over a 4.3-year follow-up in 643 adult asthmatic patients. Methods Consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary asthma clinic underwent a sociodemographic, medical history, and psychiatric (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) interview and completed questionnaires including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) to assess panic-anxiety. At follow-up, patients completed the Asthma Control (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life (AQLQ) questionnaires and reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations during the follow-up. Results Baseline frequency of PD was 10% (n = 65). In fully adjusted models, analyses revealed that PD and ASI scores predicted worse follow-up ACQ total scores (β = 0.292, p = .037; β = 0.012, p = .003) but not AQLQ total scores. ASI scores also predicted greater nocturnal and waking symptoms, activity limitations, and bronchodilator use on the ACQ (β = 0.012-0.018, p anxiety sensitivity are prospectively associated with poorer asthma control and may be important targets for treatment.

  13. Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn › Stages › In Treatment Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation Originally published on November 10, 2009 Most recently ... will need to be monitored when treatment stops. Rehabilitation Therapist Either the tumor itself or the effects ...

  14. Giant Cholesteatoma : Recommendations for Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geven, Leontien I.; Mulder, Jef J. S.; Graamans, Kees

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the management of five patients who presented with giant recurrent or residual cholesteatoma after periods of 2 to 50 years. Their case histories are highly diverse, but all provide evidence of the need for long-term follow-up.

  15. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  16. A FOLLOW UP STUDY OF HYSTERIA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, N.N.; Mangalwedhe, K.; Bedi, Harminder; Murthy, R. Srinivas

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study undertook to examine the outcome of a group of cases who were diagnosed as hysteria, six or more years ago in a general hospital psychiatric unit and correlate various clinical factors with good or bad outcome. Of the 81 cases selected for the study, 57 (67%) could be located and followed up after a gap of 6-8 years. Majority of the cases (74%) had either no symptoms or symptoms less than before at the time of the follow up. In only 3 cases, there was evidence of an underlying organic illness which seemed to have been missed at the initial assessment. A new sub-classification of hysteria with glossary of terms used for this study is presented for future research work. PMID:21965899

  17. Radiological follow-up of inverted papilloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, P.; Vivarrat-Perrin, L.; Champsaur, P.; Juhan, V.; Chagnaud, C.; Vidal, V.; Gaubert, J.Y.; Bartoli, J.M.; Moulin, G. [Department of Radiology, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Dessi, P.; Zanaret, M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cross-sectional imaging features of recurrent papilloma of the nasal fossa and paranasal sinuses and to evaluate the role of MR and CT in the postoperative follow-up of this lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT of ten patients who presented recurrence of inverted papilloma were reviewed and correlated to initial imaging, endoscopy, and surgical reports. Imaging patterns of recurrent inverted papilloma are identical to those of initial tumors and recurrence location is closely related to the site of the former lesion. Magnetic resonance is more efficient than CT for the diagnosis and evaluation of extensions. Magnetic resonance supplies the deficiencies of endoscopy in case of extensions to the frontal sinus or the lateral recess of the antrum, especially if mucosal hyperplasia or sinusitis is associated. Magnetic resonance imaging is the first imaging modality to perform in the follow-up after removal of inverted papilloma. (orig.)

  18. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...... high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations...

  19. Radiologic findings and follow-up evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Cheol Hyun; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In esophageal perforation, fistulous tracts commonly occur between the esophagus and mediastinal or pleural spaces, but rarely between the esophagus and bronchi. The clinical manifestations and radiologic findings of esophageal perforation are nonspecfic, and diagnosis is the often delayed; esophagography is the standard technique for evaluation of its location and degree. CT is useful in demonstrating the extraluminal manifestations of esophageal perforation and for follow-up after medical treatment, and may depict the various manifestations of perforation, according to the causes.

  20. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  1. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  2. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  3. Erlang loss bounds for OT-ICU systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. van Dijk; N. Kortbeek

    2009-01-01

    In hospitals, patients can be rejected at both the operating theater (OT) and the intensive care unit (ICU) due to limited ICU capacity. The corresponding ICU rejection probability is an important service factor for hospitals. Rejection of an ICU request may lead to health deterioration for patients

  4. A follow up study on interstitial alveolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamat S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the benefits of steroid therapy in interstitial alveolitis. Method and Materials : One hundred five adult clinic patients were studied with clinical evaluation, chest radiography, CT scan, bronchoscopic lavage, pulmonary function studies and a regular follow up. They were put on daily prednisolone (in 19 on intravenous methyl prednisolone, for several months. Results: Only a few had no cough or dypnoea; 91 cases had atleast gr. III exertional breathlessness; 61(58% had been given steroids earlier and 32(31% were on a prior antitubercular treatment. Only 16% had GERD symptoms. On radiography, interstitial deposits were seen in 102 cases. While 53 cases belonged to idiopathic variety, 41 were sarcoidosis. A majority had poor lung function with a restrictive disability; but 50% showed a significant response (10%+ to bronchodilators. On follow up in 92 cases, 14 died, 8 went in remission; 32 had a fluctuating course. At some stage 66 had showed improvement. Conclusion : A large majority of our interstitial alveolitis cases are very disabled. They show clinical, functional, and radiographic improvement to long term oral prednisolone. In nonresponsive cases, intravenous steroids show an objective response.

  5. Follow-up Observations of WASP-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutra, Taylor; Boley, Aaron; Hughes, Anna; Hickson, Paul

    2017-06-01

    This ongoing work aims to provide follow-up observations of known transiting extrasolar planets using the 35-cm robotic telescope at The University of British Columbia's Southern Observatory (USO), located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The observations are part of a long-term effort to search for changes in transit signatures, such as transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs), which could indicate, for example, the presence of additional planets. To help characterize the USO for transit searches, we acquired I-band observations of WASP-36 spanning from 17 January 2017 to 27 February 2017. Three complete transits and one partial transit are included in the data. We present the analysis of these new observations and discuss potential future targets.

  6. The meaning of follow-up in intensive care: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, Sissel L; Lind, Ranveig

    2009-03-01

    The growing understanding of correlations between experiences and memories from a period of intensive care treatment and complaints of mental character has led to the development of various patient follow-up offers. Little, however, is known about what follow-up may mean to patients. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of patients' lived experience of being followed-up in a programme consisting of patient diaries, post-intensive care unit (ICU) conversations and visits back to the ICU. Field notes were made from encounters with patients (n = 10) during follow-up. Then they were interviewed twice, at about 6 months (n = 8) and at about 18 months (n = 6) after discharge from hospital. The first interview focused on the patients' experience during intensive care and on their reflections on the experience. The second interview had a particular focus on the meaning for each individual of the sources for understanding that they had been offered. The data was analysed by using a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. The study corroborated earlier research that found that patients seek to understand experiences they have undergone. They search for meaning in experiences and memories. It is realized that the diary as text and photos, in addition to conveying care and love, is important to induce postexperience reflections. It provided guideposts that follow-up conversations could pursue in the patient's quest for meaning. The conversation also provided an opening for, and could in itself be essential to, the patient's willingness to talk about experiences. It allowed the nurse to accompany the patient in his quest for meaning. The return visit appeared to be significant in the patient's quest for meaning. It was via 'feeling' the room that 'things' fell into place. The study is important in elucidating aspects that are beneficial in the patient's follow-up and which lay the basis for further development of existing and new follow-up offers.

  7. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity.

  8. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  9. Follow-up of Unmarried Adolescent Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Douglas F.; Raab, Rebecca Staude

    1978-01-01

    As more adolescent unmarried mothers decide to keep their babies, social service agencies need to reevaluate their programs to meet changing needs. This study examines the living situations, educational and employment status, and interpersonal relationships of 30 adolescent unmarried mothers to determine the services they themselves thought they…

  10. Therapeutic abortion follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, A J; Davison, L A; Hanson, K H; Loos, S A; Mikkelsen, C M

    1971-05-15

    To determine the long-range psychological effects of therapeutic abortion, 50 women (aged from 13-44 years), who were granted abortions between 1967 and 1968 Because of possible impairment of mental and/or physical health, were analyzed by use of demographic questionnaires, psychological tests, and interviews. Testing revealed that 44 women had psychiatric problems at time of abortion. 43 patients were followed for 3-6 months. The follow-up interviews revealed that 29 patients reacted positively after abortion, 10 reported no significant change and 4 reacted negatively. 37 would definitely repeat the abortion. Women under 21 years of age felt substantially more ambivalent and guilty than older patients. A study of 36 paired pre- and post-abortion profiles showed that 15 initially abnormal tests had become normal. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among the patients after the abortion, but 4 again became pregnant and 8 were apparently without consistent contraception. It is concluded that the abortions were therapeutic, but physicians are encouraged to be aware of psychological problems in abortion cases. Strong psychological and contraceptive counselling should be exercised.

  11. A study protocol for facility assessment and follow-up evaluations of the barriers to access, availability, utilization and readiness of contraception, abortion and postabortion services in Zika affected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moazzam; Folz, Rachel; Miller, Kelsey; Johnson, Brooke Ronald; Kiarie, James

    2017-02-02

    The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America has elicited official recommendations for women to delay or avoid pregnancy in affected countries, which has increased demand for family planning services. It is likely, however, that health facilities in areas where the population is most vulnerable to the disease lack the capacity to respond to the increased demand for family planning services. Our objectives are to perform facilities assessment and understand client perceptions in areas affected by Zika virus, and to track changes in these parameters over time. We will collaborate with local health authorities to map facilities that have the capacity to provide services in contraception and safe abortion, including induced abortion to the full extent of the law and post-abortion care for treatment of complications from unsafe abortion and post-abortion contraception. We then will carry out a survey of facilities to assess the availability of services and their readiness to provide contraception and safe abortion care. All facilities will be assessed for baseline readiness and availability of services, and a random subsample of surveyed facilities will be reassessed in second and third rounds of surveys. Focus group interviews with clients will be conducted as part of the facilities surveys in order to gain an understanding of the community's knowledge, needs and perceived barriers to healthcare in the context of the Zika virus epidemic. The findings of this study will aid the response to Zika virus ranging from the identification of healthcare facilities that can be potentially strengthened, to the formulation of interventions to reduce barriers and improve readiness of facilities to provide contraception and safe abortion services. Lessons learned from this study will help to build and strengthen health systems that are more prepared to consistently providing reproductive healthcare services in the context of health emergencies.

  12. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  13. Waterfowl Evaluation and Follow-up

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An evaluation of the Santee National Wildlife Refuge Waterfowl Management Program was conducted on December 15-16, 1987. Members of the review team included Refuge...

  14. Managing ICU throughput and understanding ICU census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Traditionally, hospitals have coped with chronically high ICU census by building more ICU beds, but this strategy is unlikely to be tenable under future financial models. Therefore, ICUs need additional tools to manage census, inflow, and throughput. Higher ICU census, without compensatory surges in nursing capacity, is associated with several adverse effects on patients and providers, but its relationship to mortality is uncertain. Providers also discharge patients more aggressively during times of high census. Little's Law (L = λ W), a cornerstone of queuing theory, provides an eminently practical basis for managing ICU census and throughput. One target for improving throughput is minimizing process steps that are without value to the patient, e.g., waiting for a bed at ICU discharge. Larger gains in ICU throughput can be found in ICU quality improvement. For example, spontaneous breathing trials, daily wake-ups, and early physical/occupational therapy programmes are all likely to improve throughput by reducing ICU length of stay. The magnitude of these interventions' effects on ICU census can be startling. ICUs should actively manage throughput and census. Operations management tools such as Little's Law can provide practical guidance about the relationship between census, throughput, and patient demand. Standard ICU quality improvement techniques can meaningfully affect both ICU census and throughput.

  15. Personnel Training Mode of Care Services for Disabled Elders and Its Ethical Follow-up%失能老人照护服务人才培养模式及其伦理跟进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    况成云; 邓平基; 马菊华; 杨琳; 况玉琴

    2012-01-01

    Providing care services for disabled elders requires professional personnel, so that it is imperative to strengthen the professional training. Personnel training mode of care services for disabled elders consists of full -time academic education, order education and certification training, mass media guide and so on. The professional responsibility, cooperation and mutual assistance, dedicated System, care and patience spirit of ethics are internal bases to improve the comprehensive quality of personnel who provide care services for disabled elders.%失能老人照护服务需要专业性和高素质的人才,加强专业人才培养势在必行.全日制学历教育、订单式学历教育与资格证培训、大众传媒导引等途径,构成了失能老人照护服务人才培养的基本模式.伦理学的职业责任、互助合作、敬业精业、关怀照顾与忍让精神等,是提升失能老人照护服务人才综合素质的内在基础.

  16. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. French

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However,there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 qualityimprovement (QI study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge,perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of thisQI program, repeated educational intervention (EI, and effectiveness of a new painmanagement standard operating procedure.Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two privateambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI andrepeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS runs withpain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were comparedto our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests.Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Usingthe same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significantimprovement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%, perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI6.5%, 11.9%, and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2% compared to 2001.Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%;95% CI 5.3%, 5.3% but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%;95% CI 3.9%, 9.0% and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%.Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, andmanagement of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educationalintervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggestingparamedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on thetopic of pain management.

  17. The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council; La mision follow-up de la IRRS al Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgi Ferrer, A. P.; Collet Campo, D.

    2011-07-01

    The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council. From January 25th to February 1st last the CSN headquarters hosted a follow-up to the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission carried out in January 2008. The objective of this follow-up has been to check the extent to which the suggestions and recommendations made by the original IRRS mission have been adopted by the audited regulator and, as a result, to verify its degree of adherence to the strictest international standards. (Author)

  18. A Case Study on Improving Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Services Reliability: By Using Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (PFMEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefinezhadi, Taraneh; Jannesar Nobari, Farnaz Attar; Goodari, Faranak Behzadi; Arab, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In any complex human system, human error is inevitable and shows that can’t be eliminated by blaming wrong doers. So with the aim of improving Intensive Care Units (ICU) reliability in hospitals, this research tries to identify and analyze ICU’s process failure modes at the point of systematic approach to errors. Methods: In this descriptive research, data was gathered qualitatively by observations, document reviews, and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) with the process owners in two selected ICUs in Tehran in 2014. But, data analysis was quantitative, based on failures’ Risk Priority Number (RPN) at the base of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) method used. Besides, some causes of failures were analyzed by qualitative Eindhoven Classification Model (ECM). Results: Through FMEA methodology, 378 potential failure modes from 180 ICU activities in hospital A and 184 potential failures from 99 ICU activities in hospital B were identified and evaluated. Then with 90% reliability (RPN≥100), totally 18 failures in hospital A and 42 ones in hospital B were identified as non-acceptable risks and then their causes were analyzed by ECM. Conclusions: Applying of modified PFMEA for improving two selected ICUs’ processes reliability in two different kinds of hospitals shows that this method empowers staff to identify, evaluate, prioritize and analyze all potential failure modes and also make them eager to identify their causes, recommend corrective actions and even participate in improving process without feeling blamed by top management. Moreover, by combining FMEA and ECM, team members can easily identify failure causes at the point of health care perspectives. PMID:27157162

  19. Loss to follow up within an HIV cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Wood

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BHIVA guidelines recommend that all ARV-naïve and stable on-treatment patients are monitored at least 6 monthly [1]. Studies have shown that loss to follow up (LFU not only worsens outcomes [2] but has increased potential for onward transmission. Case notes of 1275 HIV patients registered under our care up to January 2011 were examined for attendance within the previous 6 months. 788 (61% patients had not been seen within the previous 6 months. Reasons for non attendance were identified. These are outlined below: 76% of the 130 LFU whose demographics were further examined were of Black African ethnicity, 54% female, 51% of single marital status and 48% of patients had been taking ARVs at the time of LFU. Interestingly, 53% of patients were lost to follow up within 1 year of diagnosis. The LFU patients (88 that had a local GP and a registered current address were sent recall letters. A small number of patients reengaged with care as a result of this action, some having not attended for over 5 years. Partner notification led to a number of new diagnoses in these cases. Failure to respond led to subsequent letters inviting them to clinic and finally a letter to their GP informing them of non attendance. In September 2011, a new recall system using Lillie Electronic Patient Records (EPR was introduced to promptly recognise if a patient had not attended for care as planned. Prior to this, recall was a manual process carried out by the Health Advising Team. We conclude that within our cohort we had a particularly mobile group of patients; 455 (36% transferring care to another clinic within the UK, 54 (4% moving out of UK. 76% of the LFU group being of Black African ethnicity highlights the ongoing problem of retention of care in this group. Further exploration is needed to identify additional issues besides housing and immigration that lead to LFU. Furthermore, the disportionate number of patients (53% disengaging with services within 1 year of

  20. The process and outcomes of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, K; Dixon, L; Wakeman, C J; Robertson, G M; Eglinton, T W; Frizelle, F A

    2012-05-01

    Evidence suggests that follow-up after colorectal cancer improves survival. Colorectal cancer is so common that patient follow-up can overwhelm a service, affecting the ability to see new referrals and reassess patients seen previously who have new symptoms. In order to cope with this demand a nurse-led follow-up service was started in 2004. We aimed to review the results of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic. Between 1 December 2004 and 31 January 2011, patients who underwent resection for colorectal cancer were followed up by a nurse specialist according to a protocol determined by the colorectal surgeons in the unit. All patient details were recorded prospectively in a purpose designed database. Nine hundred and fifty patients were followed up over 7 years. Some 368 patients were discharged from the follow-up programme, 474 patients remain actively involved in the programme and 108 patients died. Of the patients discharged from the follow-up scheme 269 (73%) were discharged to their general practitioner free of disease after 5 years. Of the 108 who patients died, 98 were as a result of colorectal cancer. Twenty patients (2.1%) were identified with local (peri-anastomotic) disease recurrence and 93 patients (9.8%) were found to have developed distant metastatic disease. Of these, 65 patients (6.8%) were referred for palliative care and 28 (2.9%) had surgery for focal metastatic disease of whom 18 were still alive at the time of this analysis. This paper shows that a nurse-led clinic for colorectal cancer follow-up can achieve satisfactory results with detection rates of recurrent or metastatic disease comparable to consultant follow-up. A nurse-led clinic provides the benefits of follow-up without overwhelming the consultant colorectal surgical clinic practice. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Home/community monitoring using telephonic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; French, Louis; Janos, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Service members who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a war theatre [Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)] may have associated injuries far different and/or more complex (i.e., polytrauma) than injuries obtained outside the theatre of operation. This article expands on what has been learned from monitoring patients injured during peacetime to the newly injured war veterans being monitored in the home setting via routine telephonic follow-up. As Tanielian et al. state TBI, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression may occur during and following deployment/s which then pose a significant health risk to these veterans. This is particularly important as veterans of these two conflicts may incur these "invisible wounds of war". Thus, safe and effective monitoring of these veterans by nurses/case managers in the home/community setting becomes important in the recovery process.

  2. Post-surgical tympanostomy tube follow up with audiology: experience at the Freeman Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Husband, C R; Harker, C; Davison, T; Yates, P D

    2012-02-01

    Tympanostomy tube (grommet) insertion is a common procedure, with little guidance in the current literature regarding post-operative surveillance. Our institution implemented a protocol to follow up post-surgical grommet patients via audiology at six weeks. A retrospective audit of all patients less than 16 years old who had undergone grommet insertion during a three-month period. A total of 149 patients had grommets inserted. Exclusion criteria left a cohort of 123 individuals; 82 (67 per cent) were followed up by audiology. Of these, 13 (11 per cent) did not attend follow up, and were discharged; 53 (43 per cent) were discharged from audiology with normal thresholds; and 16 (13 per cent) were referred back to a consultant. Therefore, the overall reduction in patients followed up by an otolaryngologist was 54 per cent. We recommend a six-week follow up with audiology following grommet insertion, allowing for referral back to ENT services in the event of related complications.

  3. Large Regional Differences in Serological Follow-Up of Q Fever Patients in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morroy, Gabriëlla; Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Kruisbergen, Mandy J. B.; van der Hoek, Wim; Marcelis, Jan H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Wijkmans, Clementine J.; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. Methods Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198) were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM) in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. Results Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346) of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852) (OR 54, 95% CI 43–67). Although 80% (162/203) of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203) never requested it. Conclusions Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in national guidelines

  4. Large regional differences in serological follow-up of Q fever patients in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriëlla Morroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. METHODS: Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198 were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346 of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852 (OR 54, 95% CI 43-67. Although 80% (162/203 of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203 never requested it. CONCLUSIONS: Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in

  5. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, M.J.; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 ...

  6. Rural-Urban Differences in the Effect of Follow-Up Care on Postdischarge Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Matthew; Holmes, Mark; Van Houtven, Courtney; Toles, Mark; Weinberger, Morris; Silberman, Pam

    2017-08-01

    To assess rural-urban differences in quality of postdischarge care among Medicare beneficiaries, controlling for selection bias of postdischarge services. The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Cost and Use Files from 2000 to 2010, the Area Resource File, Provider of Services File, and the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. Retrospective analysis of 30- and 60-day hospital readmission, emergency department (ED) use, and mortality using two-stage residual inclusion; receipt of 14-day follow-up care was the main independent variable. We defined index admission from the MCBS as any admission without a previous admission within 60 days. Noninstrumental variables estimation was the preferred estimation strategy. Fourteen-day follow-up care reduced the risk of readmission, ED use, and mortality. There were no rural- urban differences in the effect of 14-day follow-up care on readmission and mortality. Rural beneficiaries experienced a greater effect of 14-day follow-up care on reducing 30-day ED use compared to urban beneficiaries. Follow-up care reduces 30- and 60-day readmission, ED use, and mortality. Rural and urban Medicare beneficiaries experience similar beneficial effects of follow-up care on the outcomes. Policies that improve follow-up care in rural settings may be beneficial. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Leisure of Opiate Addicts at Posttreatment Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of self-reported leisure showed an overall shift toward more positive, socially accepted leisure activities at follow-up. More free time was spent with family and friends who did not use drugs. Positive leisure at follow-up was related to favorable outcomes on drug use, criminality, and productive activities. (Author)

  8. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Follow-up. 1022.17 Section 1022.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in...

  9. Shelf acetabuloplasty for Perthes' disease: 12-year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, I.C.M. van der; Kooijman, H.M.; Spruit, M.; Anderson, P.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2001-01-01

    The goal of all therapies for Perthes' disease is to achieve an optimal shape of the acetabulum and an optimal coverage of the femoral head. Thirty patients who were included in this follow-up study (mean follow-up 12 years) underwent a shelf acetabuloplasty for Catterall group III or IV. The mean I

  10. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... action plan to address each audit finding included in the current year auditor's reports. The corrective... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... reference numbers the auditor assigns to audit findings under § 41.510(c). Since the summary schedule may...

  11. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    . The conception of follow-up among physicians, patients, and their relatives therefore needs revision. Follow-up after treatment should have a clearly defined and evidence-based purpose. Based on the existing literature, this purpose should presently focus on other end points rather than early detection...

  12. Follow-up schedules after treatment for malignant melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francken, A. B.; Accortt, N. A.; Shaw, H. M.; Colman, M. H.; Wiener, M.; Soong, S. -J.; Hoekstra, H. J.; Thompson, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Existing follow-up guidelines after treatment for melanoma are based largely on dated literature and historical precedent. This study aimed to calculate recurrence rates and establish prognostic factors for recurrence to help redesign a follow-up schedule. Methods: Data were retrieved

  13. The Effects of Drug Education at Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents a one-year follow-up of a drug education course for 500 junior high school students. Analyses of variance and covariance were performed on class-level data collected at follow-up. None of the short-term effects of the course sustained. (JAC)

  14. Suporte informacional como elemento para orientação de pais de pré-termo: um guia para o serviço de acompanhamento do desenvolvimento no primeiro ano de vida Information support as an element for advising parents of preterm infants: a guide for development follow-up services during the first year of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CMS Martinez

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A literatura aponta o alto risco de distúrbios biológicos e psicossociais aos quais o bebê pré-termo está susceptível, necessitando de atenção diferenciada daquela dada ao bebê a termo. OBJETIVO: Elaborar um guia de orientação e acompanhamento do desenvolvimento no primeiro ano de vida para pais que freqüentam um serviço de acompanhamento do desenvolvimento de bebês. MÉTODO: Os critérios para inclusão dos participantes foram: ser pais de bebê pré-termo de zero a seis meses de idade corrigida que não apresentavam doença neurológica e não necessitaram de intervenção fisioterápica. O presente estudo, de caráter qualitativo, empregou, na etapa de coleta de dados, a observação direta e a entrevista, efetivadas com as mães e profissionais deste serviço de acompanhamento do desenvolvimento de bebês. A elaboração do Guia baseou-se nas análises das observações dos atendimentos no serviço, na freqüência das respostas das entrevistas com profissionais e mães sobre necessidades e dúvidas no manuseio e cuidado com o bebê e a associação com a literatura. RESULTADOS: Obteve-se um guia contendo informações sobre o desenvolvimento do bebê, distribuído nos quatro primeiros trimestres de vida, e o alerta sobre a importância de calcular a idade corrigida para o acompanhamento adequado dos marcos do desenvolvimento. CONCLUSÃO: A utilização deste guia pode ser feita por diferentes profissionais da saúde e por aqueles que desenvolvem atividades educativas para pais.INTRODUCTION: The literature shows that preterm infants are at high risk of biological and psychological disorders and consequently require a higher level of care than is provided for full-term infants. OBJECTIVE: To draw up a guide advising on development follow-up during the first year of life, for parents who attend a child development follow-up service. METHOD: The inclusion criteria were that participants should be parents of preterm

  15. The improvement of follow-up services for people living with HIV/AIDS in China from 2008 to 2014%2008-2014年中国艾滋病病毒感染者和艾滋病患者随访管理进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许娟; 韩晶; 汤后林; 李健; 毛宇嵘

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解2008-2014年我国艾滋病病毒感染者/艾滋病患者(HIV/AIDS)随访管理工作进展.方法 采用随访干预、CD4+T淋巴细胞(CD4)检测和配偶/固定性伴HIV抗体检测3个指标分析随访管理工作进展,利用艾滋病综合防治数据信息系统中2008-2014年数据库,分析指标变化情况.结果 全国HIV/AIDS的随访干预率由2008年的55.7%上升到2014年的94.7%,CD4检测率由2008年的48.4%上升到2014年的88.3%,配偶/固定性伴HIV抗体检测率由2008年的48.3%上升到2014年的91.1%.3项指标均逐年增长,经趋势x2检验均有统计学意义(随访干预:x2=180 466.733,P<0.01;CD4:x2=35 982.374,P<0.01;配偶检测:x2=43 108.270,P<0.01).注射吸毒途径HIV/AIDS随访干预率和配偶检测率较低,监管场所HIV/AIDS的3项指标均较低,感染途径不详者3项指标最低.结论 我国HIV/AIDS随访管理指标显著提高,HIV/AIDS得到有效随访管理服务.今后要加强注射吸毒途径感染以及监管场所HIV/AIDS的随访管理工作,首诊时加强个人信息的收集.%Objective This article endeavors to describe the key indicators of follow-up services for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China from 2008 to 2014.Methods All data were extracted from the National Comprehensive HIV/AIDS database and cleaned,based on three key indicators (proportion of follow-up of PLWHA,CD4 testing of PLWHA and HIV antibody testing of PLWHA' s spouse or partner) defined and developed by the National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention for case management.Both key indicators were analyzed and comparisons were performed annually from 2008 through 2014.Results The proportion of follow-up of PLWHA increased from 55.7% to 94.7% and the proportion ofPLWHA's CD4 testing increased from 48.4% to 88.3%.The proportion of HIV antibody testing among PLWHA' s spouse or partner increased from 48.3% to 91.1%,during this period.The three indicators showed an yearly

  16. Urological outcome after myelomeningocele: 20 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Cortes, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series)¿Level of Evidence 4 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the urological outcome in a long-term follow-up of individuals with myelomeningocele and relate the findings obtained to urodynamic variables in childhood. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Individuals with myelomeningocele born....... In childhood and at follow-up, kidney function was estimated with renography and isotope-glomerular filtration rate examinations. RESULTS: In total, 52 individuals (28 boys and 24 girls) aged 19-41 years (median, 29 years) had follow-up. Of these, 37 (71%) individuals had bilateral normal kidney function...

  17. Triage of Patients Consulted for ICU Admission During Times of ICU-Bed Shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Yeh, Angela; Fonseca, Xavier; Helm, Tanya; Butala, Ashvin; Morante, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for specialized medical services such as critical care often exceeds availability, thus rationing of intensive care unit (ICU) beds commonly leads to difficult triage decisions. Many factors can play a role in the decision to admit a patient to the ICU, including severity of illness and the need for specific treatments limited to these units. Although triage decisions would be based solely on patient and institutional level factors, it is likely that intensivists make different decisions when there are fewer ICU beds available. The objective of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of patients referred for ICU admission during times of limited beds availability. Methods A single center, prospective, observational study was conducted among consecutive patients in whom an evaluation for ICU admission was requested during times of ICU overcrowding, which comprised the months of April and May 2014. Results A total of 95 patients were evaluated for possible ICU admission during the study period. Their mean APACHE-II score was 16.8 (median 16, range 3 - 36). Sixty-four patients (67.4%) were accepted to ICU, 18 patients (18.9%) were triaged to SDU, and 13 patients (13.7%) were admitted to hospital wards. ICU had no beds available 24 times (39.3%) during the study period, and in 39 opportunities (63.9%) only one bed was available. Twenty-four patients (25.3%) were evaluated when there were no available beds, and eight of those patients (33%) were admitted to ICU. A total of 17 patients (17.9%) died in the hospital, and 15 (23.4%) expired in ICU. Conclusion ICU beds are a scarce resource for which demand periodically exceeds supply, raising concerns about mechanisms for resource allocation during times of limited beds availability. At our institution, triage decisions were not related to the number of available beds in ICU, age, or gender. A linear correlation was observed between severity of illness, expressed by APACHE-II scores, and the

  18. Check-up and follow-up of papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma in the department of nuclear medicine at Ibn Sina hospital Rabat; Bilan et surveillance des carcinomes papillaire et vesiculaire de la thyroide dans le service de medecine nucleaire de l'hopital Ibn Sina de Rabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Rais Aouad, N.; Ghfir, I.; Guerrouj, H.; Fellah, S.; Rahali, J.; Ksyar, R.; Missoum, F.; Bssis, A.; Azrak, S. [CHU Ibn Sina, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rabat (Morocco)

    2009-10-15

    In the department of nuclear medicine at Ibn Sina university hospital. Thyroid carcinoma follow-up strategy has been modified and includes cervical ultrasonography and thyroglobulin measurement. The role of radio-iodine scanning in the management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma is decreasing. Papillary and follicular carcinoma have good prognosis but late metastases exist and can lead to death. A lifelong follow-up is therefore mandatory. The main goal of follow-up is to detect earlier persistent or recurrent disease. (authors)

  19. A CLINICAL AND FOLLOW UP STUDY OF ATYPICAL PSYCHOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Sachdev, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Twenty-two cases who fulfilled the criteria of having atypical manifestation at any stage of illness and had minimum follow up of three years were studied in detail. Their family history and follow up was analysed. The findings of the present study suggest that the cases showing admixture of schizophrenic and affective symptoms are probably a variant of affective disorders although a possibility of their being a third independent psychosis cannot be ruled out. PMID:22065727

  20. Paradoxes of follow-up - health professionals' views on follow-up after surgical treatment in gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Lotte; Wittrup, Inge; Petersen, Lone Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    : A qualitative approach was undertaken with semi-structured focus group interviews. Three focus group interviews were conducted at neutral ground. One group with onco-gynecologists, one group with specialist nurses, and one mixed group. The main themes of the interviewguide were: Existing follow-up program, life...... and appraisal from the patients. A disadvantage was the inadequate use of the nurses' main competencies. Some dilemmas were described by the nurses as well as doctors: First, both groups were aware of the existing evidence that attendance of follow-up programs may not improve survival and yet, health...... that the existing follow-up regime contains several dilemmas. According to the health professionals, future follow-up must be more individualized, and a shift in focus is needed from relapse to quality of life after cancer....

  1. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  2. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  3. Follow-up care of children suffered from burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Александрович Афоничев

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of III-VI AB degree burns in children,regardless of the nature of treatment in the acute andrecovery period, are the development of scar contractures and deformities of the joints. However, thecorrect organization of follow-up care and rehabilitation treatment can significantly reduce the severity and facilitates the full recovery of the affected segment. Based on the analysis of their own material, the author defines the early stage of rehabilitation in these patients before full maturation of scar tissue or before the formation of functionally significant joint contractures, and later period, when there are indications for surgical rehabilitation. In the early period, follow-up care is recommended in 1 month after discharge and then on a quarterly basis, and with the appearance of deformities - at least once in 2 months. At the2nd stage of rehabilitation, older children and children of secondary school age are subject to follow-up care at least 1 time per year of primary school age - atleast once in 6 months, preschool children - every3 months. The proposed assessment of scar tissuehelps to determine the terms of follow-up care. Usingthis scheme of follow-up care and appropriate treatment allowed the author to obtain excellent and goodresults in 87-90 % of cases at the stages of rehabilitaion.

  4. Cohort follow-up: the 21st century procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Debra E; Hughes, Therese; Aldrich, Timothy E; Silver, Kenneth Z; Brion, Gall M

    2009-01-01

    The basic logic of designing an occupational cohort study has changed little since William R. Gaffey outlined the issues of follow-up, measurement of exposure, and analysis of data. However, many new avenues of tracking workers for epidemiological studies have been developed since Gaffey wrote his paper in 1973. Many disease registries also perform follow-up of subjects for vital status determination, so the procedures used with this process are common to the two applications. This article speaks to cohort construction for this occupational research as well as describes the 2007 methods for vital status follow-up. Rises in concern about work-related disease risks and the scientific resources for performing these studies coincided with the computer revolution. Government and private sources of data on vital status have changed in several ways over the 35 years since Gaffey's seminal paper. Some systems make the process of follow-up more rapid and productive, and some barriers have been imposed as societal concerns for privacy have risen. We describe the process of linking 5 sources of data to compile a roster of 6,820 workers employed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from 1953 to 2003. The record linkage processes achieved a final death cohort of 1672 deaths--the ascertainment of these deaths (by time period) was 1379 (1979-2003) and 293 (1953-1978); follow-up then was 100% for this cohort.

  5. Follow-Up Study of Dietetic Technician Graduates 1980-1982. Volume 12, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Henriette D.; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to evaluate and obtain externally required information about the dietetic technician program. Surveys were mailed to all 47 of the students who graduated from the program between 1980 and 1982 to obtain information on their employment status, job title, length of service,…

  6. Self-assessment of drinking on the Internet--3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski-Jännes, Anja; Cunningham, John; Tolonen, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to report on the results of a pilot study of a web-based self-assessment service (DHT) for Finnish drinkers (www.paihdelinkki.fi/testaa/juomatapatesti). During the 7-month recruitment period in 2004 altogether 22,536 anonymous self-assessments were recorded in the database of this service. The study sample was recruited from the 1598 service users who also participated to a survey evaluating the DHT. Those who consented by providing required baseline data and their e-mail address (n = 343) were sent a message asking them to fill in the follow-up questions 3, 6 and 12 months later. Their self-reported use of alcohol and drinking-related problems served as the main outcome variables in this single-group follow-up study. At 3, 6 and 12 months, 78%, 69% and 61% of the study participants, respectively, responded to the follow-up. The intention-to-treat (ITT) results revealed significant reductions (P < 0.001) in all the outcome measures. The reductions occurred during the first 3 months, after which the changes were non-significant. The results are in line with previous studies with mostly shorter follow-up periods suggesting that Internet-based self-assessment services can be useful tools in reducing excessive drinking. A randomized controlled trial would, however, increase our certainty about the causes of the observed changes.

  7. Efficacy and utility of phone call follow-up after pediatric general surgery versus traditional clinic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kevin; Hogan, Virginia; Jager, Alesha; von Allmen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Typical follow-up for surgical procedures consists of an interim history and brief focused physical examination. These appointments occupy clinic resources, require a time investment by the family, and rarely identify problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of a postoperative phone call. Compare a traditional in-person clinic postoperative visit with postoperative phone call follow-up regarding patient satisfaction, rate of successful follow-up, and clinic resource utilization in a large academic practice. A retrospective review of charts of patients who underwent select surgical procedures, along with a review of the clinic schedule for the same time period. Efficacy, patient/family satisfaction, and impact on the clinic. Families were contacted by telephone two weeks after select surgical procedures to assess for complications and questions. Cohorts of patients six months before and six months after implementation were assessed for main outcome measures. Before implementation, 55.5% of patients (427/769) who had one of the select surgical procedures were seen in the clinic postoperatively, and 62.6% (435/695) had a successful postoperative phone call follow-up. There were also 1090 overall scheduled postoperative appointments. Six months after implementation, overall postoperative appointments decreased 35.5% to 703. Overall, postoperative-scheduled visits decreased by 6% compared with new visits and other general follow-up visits, which each increased by 3%. A satisfaction survey revealed that 93% of patients (n = 231) were highly satisfied with the process. A hospital cost analysis suggested an 89% cost savings ($101.75 per patient for clinic visit vs $12.50 per patient for phone call follow-up). Postoperative phone call follow-up is an effective tool that improves patient and physician efficiency and satisfaction.

  8. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  9. Feasibility of telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perriera, Lisa K; Reeves, Matthew F; Chen, Beatrice A; Hohmann, Heather L; Hayes, Jennifer; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using telephone calls combined with high-sensitivity urine pregnancy testing as a primary method of follow-up after medical abortion. We enrolled 139 women up to 63 days of gestation to receive mifepristone 200 mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally or buccally, per their choice. Participants were contacted by phone one week after mifepristone administration and interviewed using standardized questions. If the subject or clinician thought the pregnancy was not expelled, the subject returned for an ultrasound examination. Otherwise, subjects performed high-sensitivity home urine pregnancy testing 30 days after the mifepristone and were called within 3 days of the test. Those with positive pregnancy tests returned for an ultrasound examination. Those with negative tests required no further follow-up. Six of the 139 (4.3%, 95% CI 1.6-9.1%) subjects presented prior to Phone Call 1 for an in-person visit. All 133 (100%, 95% CI 97.8-100%) subjects eligible for their first telephone follow-up were contacted. Eight of the 133 (6.1%, 95% CI 2.6-11.5%) women were asked to return for evaluation and all did so (100%, 95% CI 63.1-100%). Eight of the 133 women eligible for the 30 day phone call presented for an interim visit prior to the call. After 30 days, 116 of the 117 (99.1%, 95% CI 97.5-100%) eligible subjects were contacted. One subject was not reached for the day 30 phone call. Twenty-seven of the 116 (23.3%, 95% CI 15.6-31.0%) subjects had a positive pregnancy test and required follow-up. Two of these subjects (7.4%, 95% CI 1.0-24.2%) did not return for in-person follow-up. Two of the 116 (1.7%, 95% CI 0.2-6.1%) subjects had inconclusive pregnancy tests and were asked to return for follow-up. One of these subjects (50%, 95% CI 1.2-98.7%) did not return. Complete follow-up was achieved in 135 of the 139 subjects (97.1%, 95% CI 94.3-99.9%). None of the 26 women evaluated for a positive or inconclusive pregnancy

  10. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy - two years follow-up by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Ebner, F.; Flueckiger, F.; Justich, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Millner, M.M. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Paediatrische Klinik)

    1991-04-01

    A case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEM) followed-up by MRI for 2 1/2 y is presented. MRI showed gross, diffusely distributed white matter lesions in both hemispheres predominantly in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital locations a marked ventriculomegaly indicative of cerebral atrophy. Except a slight increase of the cerebral atrophy there were no changes in the follow-up examinations. There are no specific MRI findings in MEM, the diagnosis is established by the synopsis of MRI, laboratory data and muscle biopsy. (orig.).

  11. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition in the esophagus. Esophageal adenocarcinomas have the fastest increase of incidence of all solid tumors in the western world. BE is defined as areas with macroscopic visible columnar epithelium and intestinal metaplasia oral of the anatomical...... and it is not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the patients...

  12. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  13. Three-year follow-up of bibliotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N M; Floyd, M R; Scogin, F; Jamison, C S

    1997-04-01

    This study examined the durability of cognitive bibliotherapy for mild to moderately depressed adults by conducting a 3-year follow-up of participants from a previous study (C. Jamison & F. Scogin, 1995). The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory, and questions relating to participants' perceptions of the program were administered. Results indicated that treatment gains were maintained over the 3-year follow-up period and support the usefulness of cognitive bibliotherapy as an adjunct to traditional treatment modalities in a general adult population.

  14. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  15. Immigrant women living with HIV in Spain: a qualitative approach to encourage medical follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Guionnet, Anne; Navaza, Bárbara; Pizarro de la Fuente, Belén; Jesús Pérez-Elías, María; Dronda, Fernando; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Pérez-Molina, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immigrant women living with HIV generally have worse adherence to medical treatment and follow-up when compared to native women and immigrant or native men. The general aim of this study was to improve healthcare services for HIV-positive women and to better understand why some of them discontinue treatment. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore the barriers and facilitators to medical follow-up among women and (2) to use the findings to create a guide for healthcare profess...

  16. The Minnesota Couple Communication Program: A Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Karen Smith; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1980-01-01

    The Minnesota Couple Communication Program had a positive effect on the couple's use of open-style communication and on perceived quality of the couple's relationship immediately after training. Only the positive changes in perceived quality of relationship persisted at the follow-up. (Author)

  17. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual r...

  18. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  19. A Follow-Up Study of Former Student Health Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Student health advocates (SHAs) are high school students who, under the supervision of the school nurse, provide health education and health promotion activities to other students via a peer education model. This 3-year follow-up study explored how the SHA experience influences career choice and attitudes of the participants. It also examined what…

  20. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Derouet, Harry [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Defreyne, Luc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Gent (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  1. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  2. A Follow-Up Study of Dyslexic Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucci, Joan M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Over 500 men who attended an independent school for children with developmental dyslexia were followed up from one to 38 years after they left the school. Socioeconomic status and IQ were not predictive of adult outcome. Severity of reading problem upon entrance and academic and remedial progress while at school were predictive of adult…

  3. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  4. Transient Alert Follow-up Planned for CCAT

    CERN Document Server

    Jenness, Tim

    2014-01-01

    CCAT is a sub-millimeter telescope to be built on Cerro Chajnantor in Chile near the ALMA site. The remote location means that all observing will be done by remote observers with the future goal of fully autonomous observing using a dynamic scheduler. The fully autonomous observing mode provides a natural means for accepting transient alert notifications for immediate follow up.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Follow-up Assessment of Sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. METHODS We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial

  6. Treatment, follow-up and microbiota in acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.

    2015-01-01

    Er bestaat veel controverse rondom diverticulitis. Er is tegenstrijdigheid omtrent de beste behandeling van de verschillende stadia. Voor acute ongecompliceerde diverticulitis is het onzeker of antibiotica nodig zijn. De waarde van routine follow-up colonoscopie wordt betwijfeld. Er bestaat onduidel

  7. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  8. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  9. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  10. Morning Star Cycle Two: Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, L. V.

    Semi-structured telephone interviews were used to gather follow-up data on students who completed the 1977-1979 Morning Star cycle two program, a community-based Native teacher education program at the Blue Quills Native Education Centre leading to a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Alberta. Of the 24 students who completed…

  11. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  12. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-accident toxicological testing under this subpart are reported to the railroad's Medical Review Officer and... Medical Review Officer may not disclose to FRA the underlying physical condition for which any medication... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211...

  13. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36. Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36. Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury.

  14. ICU与非ICU MRSA医院感染患者特征分析%Analysis of MRSA nosocomial infections in ICU patients versus non-ICU patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁丽丽; 喻玲丽; 韦艳; 古力夏提; 王鹏

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨耐甲氧西林金葡菌(MRSA)医院感染患者的临床特征,为制订有效的MRSA感染控制方案提供参考和依据.方法 采用前瞻性调查方法,对2011年l-6月MRSA医院感染患者的临床资料进行调查分析.结果 重症监护病房(ICU) MRSA医院感染率高于非ICU,两者差异有统计学意义(P<0.05) ;ICU MRSA感染以下呼吸道感染(61.1%)和血流感染(27.8%)为主,而非ICU以皮肤软组织感染(66.7%)为主,不同科室MRSA感染疾病谱存在差异(P<0.05);ICU和非ICU MRSA感染患者在年龄、基础疾病、侵袭性操作、手术、疾病转归等方面差异均存在统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 ICU和非ICU MRSA感染存在差异,应采取针对性的控制措施.%Objective To study the clinical characteristics of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection for effective prevention of MRSA nosocomial infections. Methods The clinical data of the patients who were hospitalized from January 2011 to June 2011 and infected with MRSA were reviewed. The patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infection were followed up prospectively. Results The incidence of MRSA nosocomial infection was significantly higher in ICU patients than in non-ICU patients (P<0. 05). The MRSA infections in ICU patients were mainly lower respiratory tract (61. 1 %) and bloodstream infections (27. 8%). In the non-ICU patients, the primary MRSA infection was skin and soft tissue infection (66. 7%). The ICU patients with MRSA nosocomial infection were different from the corresponding non-ICU patients in terms of age, prognosis, underlying diseases, invasive procedure and outcomes (P<0. 05). Conclusions The MRSA nosocomial infections have different features between ICU patients and non-ICU patients. We should take appropriate control measures for the specific patients.

  15. Alternatives to ultrasound for follow-up after medication abortion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Daniel; Grindlay, Kate

    2011-06-01

    Requiring a follow-up visit with ultrasound evaluation to confirm completion after medication abortion can be a barrier to providing the service. The PubMed (including MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and POPLINE databases were systematically searched in October and November 2009 for studies related to alternative follow-up modalities after first-trimester medication abortion to diagnose ongoing pregnancy or retained gestational sac. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value compared with ultrasound or clinician's exam. We also calculated the proportion of cases in each study with a positive screening test. Our search identified eight articles. The most promising modalities included serum human chorionic gonadotropin measurements, standardized assessment of women's symptoms combined with low-sensitivity urine pregnancy testing and telephone consultation. These follow-up modalities had sensitivities ≥90%, negative predictive values ≥99% and proportions of "screen-positives" ≤33%. Alternatives to routine in-person follow-up visits after medication abortion are accurate at diagnosing ongoing pregnancy. Additional research is needed to demonstrate the accuracy, acceptability and feasibility of alternative follow-up modalities in practice, particularly of home-based urine testing combined with self-assessment and/or clinician-assisted assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A follow-up one and four years post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this follow-up one and four years post stroke was to find out whether the initial physiotherapy approach had had any long-term effects on mortality, motor function, postural control, activities of daily living, life quality, follow-up from community services and living conditions. A randomized controlled trial of first time ever stroke patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and group 2 (n = 28) had initial physiotherapy according to the Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath, respectively. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Berg Balance Scale were used. The following parameters were also registered: incidence of new strokes, other diseases, use of assistive devices, the patient's accommodation and use of services from the community. The mortality rates were similar in the two groups. In both groups the motor function, postural control and ADL had decreased rapidly, leaving many of the patients dependent and with a high risk of falling. Life quality had increased compared to the acute stage, but was still low in comparison with healthy persons. Patients in both groups lived at home, but were dependent on help from relatives and community services. Physiotherapy as follow-up service was seldom used. The initial physiotherapy approach did not seem to have a major influence on the patients' ability to cope in the long-term. This follow-up at one and four years post stroke showed no major influence of two different initial physiotherapy regimens on long-term function. The study confirmed a rapid deterioration of ADL and motor function and an increased dependence on relatives. The study reveals a gap between the intense treatment in the acute phase and little or no follow-up of physiotherapy treatment or other rehabilitation activities later.

  17. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  18. Long-term follow-up of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Laura E; Harting, Matthew T; Lally, Kevin P

    2017-06-01

    Increased survival of patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia has created a unique cohort of children, adolescent, and adult survivors with complex medical and surgical needs. Disease-specific morbidities offer the opportunity for multiple disciplines to unite together to provide long-term comprehensive follow-up, as well as an opportunity for research regarding late outcomes. These children can exhibit impaired pulmonary function, altered neurodevelopmental outcomes, nutritional insufficiency, musculoskeletal changes, and specialized surgical needs that benefit from regular monitoring and intervention, particularly in patients with increased disease severity. Below we aim to characterize the specific challenges that these survivors face as well as present an algorithm for a multidisciplinary long-term follow-up program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  1. Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome: a 20 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianetti, T M; Dall'Asta, L; Torroni, A; Gasparini, G; Pelo, S

    2014-07-01

    Trismus-Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome (TPS) is a rare autosomal syndrome characterised by the inability to open the mouth fully, pseudocamptodactyly, short stature and foot deformities. The maxillofacial feature entails hyperplasia of the coronoid processes which mechanically interfere with the zygomatic processes during mouth opening. A 22-year- old girl affected by a severe form of TPS was followed from the age of three years. Bone reossification was observed after two coronoidotomies of both hyperplasic coronoid processes. After the decision to perform a coronoidectomy, the four-year follow-up showed a favourable outcome. Meanwhile the patient developed an anterior open bite which was treated with a fourth orthognathic surgery. The follow-up underscores how the correction of malformation leads to the generation of EMG activity of the masticatory muscles after many years of passiveness.

  2. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EMCS Installation Follow-Up Study. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    were in progress at the time of this site visit. A post occupancy evaluation (POE) was performed on August 9 & 10. Copies of three documents related to...FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION SITE VISIT ATTACHMENTS I. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Field 1 Notes 2. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Additional... Post Occupancy Evaluation Comments 3. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Station Comments 4. Langley Air Force Base - F-i. F-2 POST

  5. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida; Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Paula Vanessa Pedron Oltramari-Navarro; Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira Conti; Ricardo de Lima Navarro; Karen Regina Siqueira de Souza

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been re...

  6. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, M J; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 to 1146 physicians who could be traced through the 1994 Medical Directory of the provincial college of physicians and surgeons; 25 questionnaires were returned because they could not be delivered. OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' opinions about (a) the morality of active euthanasia, (b) changes in the law to permit active euthanasia and (c) the practice of legalized euthanasia. RESULTS: Of the 1121 physicians sent a follow-up questionnaire 866 (77%) returned it completed. The responses of these same 866 physicians in 1991 provided a basis for comparison. Of the 866, 360 (42%) stated in the 1994 survey that it is sometimes right to practise active euthanasia; a similar proportion (384 [44%]) gave this response in 1991. However, other opinions changed significantly. In 1991, 250 of the respondents (29%) indicated that they would practise active euthanasia if it were legalized, as compared with 128 (15%) in 1994 (p euthanasia, as compared with 316 (37%) in 1994 (p euthanasia between 1991 and 1994, in both surveys at least 70% of those who responded to this question indicated that active euthanasia, if it were legalized, should be performed only by physicians and should be taught at medical sites. CONCLUSION: Alberta physicians' support for the practice and legalization of active euthanasia decreased considerably between 1991 and 1994. However, most physicians remain in favour of restricting active euthanasia, if it were legalized, to the medical profession. These results suggest a

  7. [Renal lithiasis. Biochemical changes in the follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivacow, Francisco R; del Valle, Elisa E; Zancheta, José R

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of assessing if biochemical changes occur in the follow up of patients with renal lithiasis, 237 patients were studied (115 women and 122 men, mean age 39 +/- 8 and 42 +/- 7 years, respectively) and controlled during 27.3 +/- 19.3 months. All of them had previously undergone metabolic evaluations at baseline and one or more than one control studies afterwards. Patients with a diagnosis of sponge kidney, renal tubular acidosis, primary hyperparathyroidism, anatomical malformations of the urinary tract, or urinary infections were not included. Two populations were identified: those who presented changes in the baseline diagnosis (139 patients, Group I) and those who presented no changes (98 patients, Group II). In these groups, no differences were observed in baseline metabolic diagnoses or in the follow-up period. Hypocitraturia was the additional diagnosis most frequently observed (43.1%), followed by Idiopatic hypercalciuria (20.8%) and abnormalities of uric acid (16.5%). In the group of 110 patients followed up for more than 3 years, 37 patients recurred (33%). Among the latter, 25 (23%) changed the baseline metabolic diagnosis vs. 12 (11%) that maintained the same diagnosis (p < 0.002). Changes in metabolic disorders were frequently observed in the follow up of patients with nephrolithiasis. These changes are not necessarily associated with the diet indicated or drug treatment. Hypocitraturia was the additional metabolic disorder most frequently found. In general, there is a higher recurrence rate in those patients who present changes in their biochemical parameters and undergo no treatment.

  8. A Follow-Up Study of 69 Discharged SARS Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩云; 庚慧; 冯维斌; 汤湘江; 欧爱华; 老膺荣; 许银姬; 林浩; 刘惠; 李咏文

    2003-01-01

    @@ Sixty-nine patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) discharged from Guangdong Provincial TCM Hospital were followed up from January to April 2003 during which the patients were asked to fill the questionnaire form and at the same time received blood routine examination, hepatic, renal,pulmonary and immune function tests, and spiral computerized tomography (CT) of the chest, color Bultrasonography of the heart with the collected data treated by descriptive analysis and deductive analysis.

  9. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  10. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (Pmanagement strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  11. Investigating follow-up outcome change using hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodniczuk, J S; Piper, W E; Joyce, A S

    2001-03-01

    Individual change in outcome during a one-year follow-up period for 98 patients who received either interpretive or supportive psychotherapy was examined using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This followed a previous study that had investigated average (treatment condition) change during follow-up using traditional methods of data analysis (repeated measures ANOVA, chi-square tests). We also investigated whether two patient personality characteristics-quality of object relations (QOR) and psychological mindedness (PM)-predicted individual change. HLM procedures yielded findings that were not detected using traditional methods of data analysis. New findings indicated that the rate of individual change in outcome during follow-up varied significantly among the patients. QOR was directly related to favorable individual change for supportive therapy patients, but not for patients who received interpretive therapy. The findings have implications for determining which patients will show long-term benefit following short-term supportive therapy and how to enhance it. The study also found significant associations between QOR and final outcome level.

  12. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  13. High Risk Infants Follow-Up: A Case Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A follow-up program for high risk infants was initiated in Alzahra Maternity Hospital in Tabriz city, Iran, in 2013. The aim of this paper is to give a brief report of the program. Material and Methods. Two groups of high risk neonates were studied. The first group comprising 509 infants received services in Alzahra Maternity Hospital implemented by the follow-up program. This included a full package for family to look after high risk infant and periodic clinical evaluation at two and four weeks after birth and then two, three, four, five, and six months later again. The second group including 131 infants in Taleqani Maternity Hospital received routine services after birth with no specific follow-up care. Results. Some anthropometric indices showed a significant improvement in the intervention hospital compared to control group. These included the following: head circumference at first and second months; weight in the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth months; and height in sixth month only. Clinical evaluation of infants showed an improvement for some of the medical conditions. Conclusion. Follow-up care program for a minimum of six months after discharge from maternity hospitals may help to avoid adverse and life threatening consequences in high risk infants.

  14. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  15. Nefropatia por IgA em portadores de espondiloartrites acompanhados no Serviço de Reumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da UFMG IgA nephropathy in patients with spondyloarthritis followed-up at the Rheumatology Service of Hospital das Clínicas/UFMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Castelo Azevedo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a frequência das glomerulonefrites nos pacientes espondiloartríticos acompanhados em Serviço de Reumatologia Brasileiro e avaliar variáveis clínicas correlacionadas. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Os pacientes foram avaliados quanto às características sociodemográfi cas, tipo de espondiloartrite, tempo e atividade da doença, uso de anti-infl amatórios não esteroides, presença do HLA-B27, níveis de creatinina e ureia séricas, presença de comorbidades e presença de hematúria e/ou proteinúria. Os pacientes com hematúria foram submetidos à pesquisa de dismorfi smo eritrocitário, e aqueles com proteinúria submeteram-se à quantifi cação da proteína na urina de 24 horas. Biópsia renal foi indicada para aqueles com hematúria de origem glomerular e/ou proteinúria maior que 3,5 g. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 76 pacientes. A alteração mais frequente no exame de urina de rotina foi a hematúria microscópica (44,7%, geralmente intermitente e em amostra isolada de urina durante o seguimento do paciente. Em oito (10,5% dos pacientes a hematúria sugeriu origem glomerular. A biópsia renal foi realizada em cinco deles, e mostrou nefropatia por IgA em quatro (5,3% e doença da membrana fi na em um paciente. CONCLUSÕES: Notou-se alta frequência de alterações no exame de urina desse subgrupo de pacientes, assim como alta prevalência de nefropatia por IgA. Apesar de mais estudos sobre o assunto serem necessários para melhor esclarecimento desses resultados, a realização periódica de exames de urina deveria ser recomendável.OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of glomerulonephritis in patients with spondyloarthritis followed-up at a Brazilian Rheumatology Service, and to evaluate the clinical variables associated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were assessed for sociodemographic characteristics, type of spondyloarthritis, time since diagnosis and disease activity, non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drug use, HLA

  16. Automated detection of follow-up appointments using text mining of discharge records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Kari L; Johnson, Matthew G; Liesinger, Juliette T; Grafft, Carrie A; Naessens, James M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether text mining can accurately detect specific follow-up appointment criteria in free-text hospital discharge records. Cross-sectional study. Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Inpatients discharged from general medicine services in 2006 (n = 6481). Textual hospital dismissal summaries were manually reviewed to determine whether the records contained specific follow-up appointment arrangement elements: date, time and either physician or location for an appointment. The data set was evaluated for the same criteria using SAS Text Miner software. The two assessments were compared to determine the accuracy of text mining for detecting records containing follow-up appointment arrangements. Agreement of text-mined appointment findings with gold standard (manual abstraction) including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). About 55.2% (3576) of discharge records contained all criteria for follow-up appointment arrangements according to the manual review, 3.2% (113) of which were missed through text mining. Text mining incorrectly identified 3.7% (107) follow-up appointments that were not considered valid through manual review. Therefore, the text mining analysis concurred with the manual review in 96.6% of the appointment findings. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 and 96.3%, respectively; and PPV and NPV were 97.0 and 96.1%, respectively. of individual appointment criteria resulted in accuracy rates of 93.5% for date, 97.4% for time, 97.5% for physician and 82.9% for location. Text mining of unstructured hospital dismissal summaries can accurately detect documentation of follow-up appointment arrangement elements, thus saving considerable resources for performance assessment and quality-related research.

  17. Electronic Whiteboards and Intensive Care Unit follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Brandrup, Morten

    of information is optimized using an electronic whiteboard. Negative findings in the research on electronic whiteboards are present too e.g. it is crucial to have the same use language when sharing the same interface and reports on system in-flexibility; dash-board (standardized use of language) vs. open....../collaboration and 2) information. However no literature has been found on how to maintain the communication and collaboration between wards when time of the respectively project has run out. Research on electronic whiteboards in hospital settings find that supporting communication between e.g. wards and the transfer......-ended dry-erase whiteboard (make-up-your-own-sentences). In conclusion the primary feature in the two subjects is to optimize communication/collaboration and information between ICU and general wards in the transition. To make it a long term solution the content of such a support would need involvement...

  18. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  19. Therapeutic follow-up in hospitalization: social inclusion, recovery of citizenship and respect for individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Fiorati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a psychiatric crisis hospitalization unit, with the aim of drawing up a proposal for implementing therapeutic follow-up as part of the therapeutic program at this unit. The concept of therapeutic follow-up was envisaged as an important resource to be included in psychosocial rehabilitation projects, with the following goals: linking users with extra-hospital services, avoiding re-hospitalization and achieving inclusion in social networks. The study consisted of an exploratory-descriptive case study with a qualitative approach to data. Participant observation and a field diary were the techniques used for gathering and recording data. The difficulties experienced were correlated with the spheres of social networks, family, institutional relationships and society. The results included heeding the patient's and the family's suffering and including users in social networks, extra-hospital services and community organizations.

  20. Determining the rate of follow-up after hospital emergency department visits for dental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Beau Meyer,1,2 Eric Adkins,3,4 Nathan M Finnerty,4 Fonda G Robinson5 1Division of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 3The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, 5Clinic Administration and Patient Care, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Emergency department (ED visits for dental reasons continue to impact EDs nationwide. This investigation determined the rate of follow-up in an emergency dental clinic (EDC after hospital ED visits for nontraumatic dental conditions. Methods: This prospective investigation reports the number of patients who presented to an ED for nontraumatic dental conditions and the rate of follow-up at an EDC. Upon ED discharge, patients were provided instructions to follow-up for low-cost care at the EDC. Telephone contact was attempted following failed referrals. Descriptive statistics were reported for comparing referral sources and demographic trends. Results: Two hundred and forty-seven referrals were made and 31% followed up for definitive treatment at the EDC. More referrals were made on weekends than on weekdays. Failed referrals were unreachable by telephone in 75% of cases. Tooth extraction was the most common treatment rendered in the EDC. Of the ED patients who accessed EDC care, 14% became comprehensive patients in the EDC's regular dental clinic. Conclusion: Less than one-third of ED referrals to the EDC followed up for definitive care when provided an opportunity to do so, and 75% of referrals were unreachable by telephone in the week following the ED dental visit. Keywords: emergencies, dental health services, health services accessibility, access to care, dental emergency treatment

  1. Colonic resection for colovesical fistula: 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. G; Anderson, J. H; Iskander, N; McKee, R. F; Finlay, I. G

    2002-07-01

    OBJECTIVES: The outcome of colovesical fistula management may be unsatisfactory; complications are reported in up to 45% of patients. Published studies are retrospective and tend to lack standardized management strategies and long-term follow-up. This cohort study assesses a policy of resection of colovesical fistulae in continuity with any distal colorectal stricture, and includes 5-year follow-up. METHOD: All patients undergoing surgery in our institution for colovesical fistula between February 1991 and April 1995 were entered into the study. The fistulae were resected in continuity with any distal bowel stricture, according to a standard single-stage operative protocol. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were recorded, and prospective review was undertaken at April 2000. RESULTS: Nineteen consecutive patients entered the study. The source of the fistula was diverticular disease (n = 14), colorectal cancer (n = 3), trauma (n = 1) or Crohn's (n = 1) disease. Thirteen patients had a colorectal stricture. One patient died due to ischaemic colitis within 30 days of surgery. Eleven other patients died of unrelated causes before April 2000, in whom there was no evidence of fistula recurrence before death at a median of 37 months after operation (range 2-95 months). At 5-year follow-up there was no evidence of fistula recurrence in the seven remaining patients. CONCLUSIONS: A policy of resection of the fistula and associated colorectal stricture with primary bowel anastomosis and bladder drainage, resulted in no recurrences and low morbidity. However comorbidity is important in this patient population, most of whom will die from unrelated causes within a few years.

  2. Cervical disc prosthesis: 2-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Pinto de Oliveira Bilhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the medical records of patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis after two years of postoperative follow-up, showing the basic epidemiological data, the technical aspects and the incidence of complications.METHODS: Medical records of seven patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis were reviewed after two years of follow-up, at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo.RESULTS: The average age of patients participating in this study was 43.86 years. Six patients (85.7% had one level approached while one patient (14.3% had two levels addressed. The level C5-C6 has been approached in one patient (14.3% while the C6-C7 level was addressed in five patients (71.4%. One patient (14.3% had these two levels being addressed, C5-C6 and C6-C7. The mean operative time was 164.29±40 minutes. Three patients were hospitalized for 2 days and four for 3 days making an average of 2.57±0.535 days. Two patients (28.6% underwent a new surgical intervention due to loosening of the prosthesis. The mean follow-up was 28.14±5.178 months (23-35 months.CONCLUSIONS: Although cervical arthroplasty appears to be a safe procedure and present promising results in our study as well as in many other studies, it requires long-term studies.

  3. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  4. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  5. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  6. ICU survivors show no decline in health-related quality of life after 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, José G M; van Stel, Henk F.; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; Rommes, Johannes H.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Severe critical illness requiring treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) may have a serious impact on patients and their families. However, optimal follow-up periods are not defined and data on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before ICU admission as well as those beyond 2 years f

  7. ICU visitation policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, A M

    1994-09-01

    Critically ill patients need their families more than ever, but rigid policies often restrict family visitation in ICU. Family visitation is not a "privilege" granted by hospitals, it is a necessary adjunct to the therapeutic regimen. Though changing outdated visitation policies can be difficult, it must be done. The clinical nurse specialist can play an important role in planning and implementing needed change.

  8. Adolescent suicide risk screening: the effect of communication about type of follow-up on adolescents' screening responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cheryl A; Hill, Ryan M; Wynne, Henry A; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effect of communication about type of screening follow-up (in-person follow-up vs. no in-person follow-up) on adolescents' responses to a self-report suicide risk screen. Participants were 245 adolescents (131 girls, 114 boys; ages 13-17; 80% White, 21.6% Black, 9.8% American Indian, 2.9% Asian) seeking medical emergency services. They were randomized to a screening follow-up condition. Screening measures assessed primary risk factors for suicidal behavior, including suicidal thoughts, depressive symptoms, alcohol use, and aggressive/delinquent behavior. There was no main effect of follow-up condition on adolescents' screening scores; however, significant interactions between follow-up condition and public assistance status were evident. Adolescents whose families received public assistance were less likely to report aggressive-delinquent behavior if assigned to in-person follow-up. Adolescents whose families did not receive public assistance reported significantly higher levels of suicidal ideation if assigned to in-person follow-up. Findings suggest that response biases impact some adolescents' responses to suicide risk screenings. Because national policy strongly recommends suicide risk screening in emergency settings, and because screening scores are used to make critical decisions regarding risk management and treatment recommendations, findings indicate the importance of improving the reliability and validity of suicide risk screening for adolescents.

  9. Dr. Leary's Concord Prison Experiment: a 34-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblin, R

    1998-01-01

    This study is a long-term follow-up to the Concord Prison Experiment, one of the best-known studies in the psychedelic psychotherapy literature. The Concord Prison Experiment was conducted from 1961 to 1963 by a team of researchers at Harvard University under the direction of Timothy Leary. The original study involved the administration of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy to 32 prisoners in an effort to reduce recidivism rates. This follow-up study involved a search through the state and federal criminal justice system records of 21 of the original 32 subjects, as well as personal interviews with two of the subjects and three of the researchers: Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Gunther Weil. The results of the follow-up study indicate that published claims of a treatment effect were erroneous. This follow-up study supports the emphasis in the original reports on the necessity of embedding psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy with inmates within a comprehensive treatment plan that includes post-release, nondrug group support programs. Despite substantial efforts by the experimental team to provide post-release support, these services were not made sufficiently available to the subjects in this study. Whether a new program of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy and post-release programs would significantly reduce recidivism rates is an empirical question that deserves to be addressed within the context of a new experiment.

  10. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A 13-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Antonio Guerrero-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thumbs, frontal bossing and fine hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned 12 years later with palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions, short stature, disseminated poikiloderma and sparse scalp hair, with absence of eyelashes and eyebrows. Radiographic analysis showed radial ray defect, absence of the thumb and three wrist carpal bones, and reduced bone density. Gene sequencing for the RECQL4 helicase gene revealed a mutation on each allele. RTS is a rare disease, and in this patient we observed the evolution of her skin lesions and other clinical features, which were important for the classification of type II RTS. The next years will provide even more information on this rare disease.

  11. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  12. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cold urticaria: a 20-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S V; Mullins, R J

    2016-12-01

    Chronic cold urticaria results in significant morbidity, yet information on its natural history is limited. We examined the natural history of chronic cold urticaria and its impact on quality of life. We analysed the characteristics of patients diagnosed with cold urticaria at a community-based specialist allergy practice in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) between 1995 and 2015. Follow-up data were obtained using a mailed questionnaire. Possible predictive factors of disease severity and symptom duration were evaluated. A total of 99 patients were assessed with a median age of 42 (range 5-81 years); 63% were female and the median age of onset of symptoms was 22 years. Of 41 questionnaire responders (14 ± 10.9 years follow-up; median 12 years), 5- and 10-year resolution rates were 17.9% ± 6.2% and 24.5% ± 7.2%, respectively. Whereas 22% reported resolution and 23% described improvement, the remaining 55% reported stable or worsening disease. Most individuals relied on lifestyle modification to ameliorate symptoms rather than medication. Risk factors for persistent disease were intercurrent atopic disease (P = 0.025) and those with longer duration of symptoms at the time of initial assessment (P urticaria were identified in only two patients, both with B-cell malignancy. In a subset of patients, cold urticaria has low rates of spontaneous resolution and results in lifestyle changes and impaired quality of life. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Souza, Karen Regina Siqueira de

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  15. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program, and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  16. THE FOLLOW-UP STUDY IN α-KETOADIPIC ACIDURIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To follow up study on α-ketoadipic aciduria , which is a rare inborn error of metabolism of L-ly sine, hydroxy-L-lysine, and L-tryptophan. Methods The case with α-ketoadipic aciduria was investigated clinically and metabolites were detected by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques during a period of 15 years (9months~ 15years). Results The case had growth retardation at the onset but later grew normally. The urinary metabolites showed persisent abnormality compatible with α-ketoadipic aciduria. The concentrations of α-ketoadipate , α-aminoadipate and α-hy droxyadipate were 33mmol/mol creatinine, 92~266mmol/mol creatinine and 17~28mmol/mol creatinine , respectively. Glutarate also increased in their urine. Conclusion The study suggested the clinical course of a-ketoadipic aciduria is benign and the clinical manifestations are various. The follow-up study on this case with α-ketoadipic aciduria must be continued.

  17. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  18. Early Identification Referral and Follow-up (EIRF) Individual Form

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The EIRF dataset contains information about each individual youth who was identified and referred for mental or non-mental health related services as part of a...

  19. [Obesity surgery--useful knowledge in indication and follow up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiwiller, A; Sykora, M

    2009-10-07

    In the last years, obesity has become one of the main problems of health care systems in Western countries. Among morbid obese patients, four out of five will develop comorbidities doubling the mortality risk in women and increase the numbers in men at a threefold risk. According to evidence based guidelines, nowadays surgery is the best and most effective treatment resulting in excellent long-term weight loss, reduction of comorbidities while extending expectation of life. A sound indication is the most important step for successful surgery. In this paper we focus on Swiss regulations and some special indications which have to be taken into consideration. After bariatric surgery clinical follow up on a regular basis is also of great importance. Furthermore, we explain typical mechanical and nutritional complications after different types of surgery and give some recommendations.

  20. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne;

    2016-01-01

    -15 years and children with symptoms of CP aged 0-5 years. MAIN VARIABLES: In the follow-up program, the children are offered examinations throughout their childhood by orthopedic surgeons, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and pediatricians. Examinations of gross and fine motor function, manual...... ability, muscle tone, passive range of motion, use of orthotics, and assistive devices are performed once a year; radiographic examination of the hips is planned based on the child's age and gross motor function; and the diagnosis is performed once before the age of 5 years. Six indicators were developed...... based on scientific literature and consensus in the steering committee, and their calculation is based on the following four main variables: radiographic examination of the hip, gross motor function, manual ability, and diagnosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The 2014 annual report includes results of the quality...

  1. Spheroid degeneration of conjunctiva and cornea. Two years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1980-10-01

    Twenty-six subjects with spheroid degeneration were followed up after two years. The number of colourless conjunctival droplets was seen to have increased by on an average 46% (2 alpha = 0.05) and that of autofluorescent conjunctival droplets by 223% (2 alpha less than 0.01). Counting within the individual sites sites disclosed that some droplets will disappear (not less than 30 and 21% respectivelY), while recently formed will constitute at least 76 and 243%. The number of areas with band-shaped keratopathy was found to rise from 3 to 26 (P less than 0.001) out of 104 possibilities, (nasally and temporally of right and left eye). Vital staining (fluorescein, rose bengal, tetrazolium, alcian blue) showed the epithelium above the droplets to be intact, and the droplet-containing eyes were found not to be abnormally dry (break up time, tear production).

  2. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  3. MANDIBULAR INCISOR EXTRACTION: A 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir BEYCAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents the mandibular incisor extraction treatment of a patient with dental Class I malocclusion and lower crowding, in whom one mandibular incisor extraction was selected as the treatment of choice to improve the dental occlusion. A 19-year-old male patient’s chief complaint was the crowding of lower incisors. He had a straight profile with normal upper and lower lip projection. Upper and lower dental midlines were coincident with the facial midline. The patient had Class I molar and canine relationships on both sides. He had Class I skeletal relationship, low angle vertical pattern, and proclined upper and lower incisors. The treatment plan included the extraction of lower right central incisor to resolve the crowding. At the end of 16-month active fixed treatment, lower dental crowding was resolved. At the 5-year follow-up, the patient had a stable occlusion, with the results of the orthodontic treatment maintained.

  4. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 2): Procedure and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation requires more than just interventional radiology skills. Patients must be selected carefully, and the acts that need to be done before, during, and after the procedure must be coordinated. To guarantee patient safety, radiologists need to know the variants of the technique, the precautions that must be taken, the complications that can occur, and the risks involved. Early differentiation between tumor tissue and normal changes secondary to treatment on imaging tests will make it possible to repeat the treatment without delays, and this will increase survival. This article describes how to coordinate and carry out pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, the complications of the technique, and the current evidence in follow-up. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  7. Role of imaging in glaucoma diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizzeri Gianmarco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to provide an update on the role of imaging devices in the diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma with an emphasis on techniques for detecting glaucomatous progression and the newer spectral domain optical coherence tomography instruments. Imaging instruments provide objective quantitative measures of the optic disc and the retinal nerve fiber layer and are increasingly utilized in clinical practice. This review will summarize the recent enhancements in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, and optical coherence tomography with an emphasis on how to utilize these techniques to manage glaucoma patients and highlight the strengths and limitations of each technology. In addition, this review will briefly describe the sophisticated data analysis strategies that are now available to detect glaucomatous change overtime.

  8. Facilitation of DDD follow-up using the DDT mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, W; Nitschke, M; Gutschker, A; Worzewski, W

    1992-11-01

    To facilitate follow-up, modern dual chamber pacemakers provide a variety of diagnostic features like ECG interpretation channels and intracardiac electrograms. For evaluation of the sensing performance at rest and during exercise, for assessment of the presence of crosstalk, and for measurement of the retrograde conduction time, dual chamber triggered pacing, particularly the DDT mode, can be used alternatively or additionally in pacemakers equipped with this option. In contrast to ECG interpretation channels, ECG documentation is not required for evaluation of the sensing performance, because the triggered pulses serving as markers for sense events can also be seen on the monitor. Selection of the DDT mode not only as temporary but also as permanent program serves to facilitate pacemaker ECG interpretation for exercise tests and Holter recordings as well.

  9. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bussmann, Shane [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 BERNARDO Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: jingwen.wu@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  10. Male sexual dysfunctions and multimedia immersion therapy (follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Marin, Silvia; Pastore, Massimiliano; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency, after 1 year, of combined use of psychodynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual reality (VR) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature ejaculation (PE) in 160 heterosexual males who had neither any prior sexual therapy nor had made use (either before, during or after therapy) of any specific pharmaceuticals for the treatment of primary sexual dysfunction. All subjects had given their informed consent. After a clinical diagnosis in an andrologic center, 50 presumably psychological ED (average age 43.7 years), 60 mixed ED (53.9 years) and 50 primary PE (39 years) who suffered these problems over 6 months were undergoing a cycle of 12 sessions, over a 25-week period, of psychotherapy, integrating an audio CD and helmet with miniature television screens that projected specially designed CD-ROM program on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity. The clinical follow up was done after 6 and 12 months after the cycle. After one year, the overall partial (two times out of three) and complete positive response rate for psychological ED was 75%, for mixed ED was 47% and for PE was 54%. We considered drop-out cases as only before the 7th session of the treatment cycle, the drop-outs after session 7 and the patients that did not show up for follow-up are counted as negative results. Two patients reported nausea and one, vertigo during the first 15-min virtual reality experience. Considering the particular way that full-immersion virtual reality involves the subject who experiences it, we hypothesized that this methodological approach could speed up the therapeutic process. The evidence that positive results persist over time allows us to hypothesize that certain changes in cerebral function can be possible and that these changes are correlated to favorable sexual performance in the male.

  11. Rectal leiomyosarcoma, three-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Alves Figueiredo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rectal leiomyosarcomas are rare tumors originated from smooth muscle cells. Differential diagnosis includes gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, leiomyomas or schwannomas, and the differentiation of these tumors is usually made through immunohistochemistry. Due to its rarity, the standard treatment has not been defined. The purpose of this study was to present the follow-up of a patient with leiomyosarcoma of medium rectum submitted to exclusive operative treatment. The tumor size was 6 cm and it had a high mitotic index. The patient remains with good urinary function and good sphincter function, and free of the disease after a three-year follow-up.Os leiomiossarcomas retais são tumores raros e originários de células de músculo liso. O diagnóstico diferencial inclui tumores estromais do trato gastrointestinal (GIST, leiomiomas ou schwannomas, e a diferenciação desses tumores normalmente é feita por imunohistoquímica. Devido a sua raridade, o tratamento-padrão ainda não está bem definido. O objetivo deste relato foi mostrar o seguimento de um paciente com leiomiossarcoma de reto médio submetido a tratamento operatório exclusivo. O paciente se manteve com bom controle urinário e boa função evacuatória. O tumor tinha alto índice mitótico e tamanho de 6 cm, mas não há sinais de recidiva após três anos da operação.

  12. Long-term follow-up of elite controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Kristen A.; Rikhtegaran Tehrani, Zahra; Saadat, Saman; Ebadi, Maryam; Redfield, Robert R.; Sajadi, Mohammad M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To estimate the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the development of complications and progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease among HIV-infected elite controllers. Single-center retrospective cohort. Kaplan–Meier methods, prevalence ratios, and Cox proportional-hazards models were used. In all, 55 HIV-infected elite controllers were included in this study. Among them, 45% were HIV/HCV coinfected and 55% were HIV mono-infected. Median follow-up time for the cohort was 11 years. Twenty-five patients experienced a complication and 16 lost elite controller status during the study period. HCV coinfected patients were 4.78 times (95% confidence interval 1.50–15.28) more likely to develop complications compared with HIV mono-infected patients. There was no association between HCV coinfection status and loss of elite control (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.27–2.06). Hepatitis C virus coinfection was significantly associated with the risk of complications even after controlling for sex, injecting drug use, and older age. HCV coinfected patients had higher levels of cellular activation while also having similar levels of lipopolysaccharide and soluble CD14. HCV coinfection was not associated with loss of elite controller status. Taken together, this suggests that HCV coinfection does not directly affect HIV replication dynamics or natural history, but that it may act synergistically with HIV to produce a greater number of associated complications. Continued follow-up will be needed to determine whether HCV cure through the use of direct-acting antivirals among HIV/HCV coinfected elite controllers will make the risk for complications among these patients similar to their HIV mono-infected counterparts. PMID:28658155

  13. The Iowa follow-up of chemically sensitive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D W; Okiishi, C; Schlosser, S

    2001-03-01

    Clinical symptoms and self-reported health status in persons reporting multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) are presented from a 9-year follow-up study. Eighteen (69%) subjects from a sample of 26 persons originally interviewed in 1988 were followed up in 1997 and given structured interviews and self-report questionnaires. In terms of psychiatric diagnosis, 15 (83%) met DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime mood disorder, 10 (56%) for a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 10 (56%) for a lifetime somatoform disorder. Seven (39%) of subjects met criteria for a personality disorder using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-IV. Self-report data from the Illness Behavior Questionnaire and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised show little change from 1988. The 10 most frequent complaints attributed to MCS were headache, memory loss, forgetfulness, sore throat, joint aches, trouble thinking, shortness of breath, back pain, muscle aches, and nausea. Global assessment showed that 2 (11%) had "remitted", 8 (45%) were "much" or "very much" improved, 6 (33%) were "improved", and 2 (11%) were "unchanged/worse". Mean scores on the SF-36 health survey showed that, compared to U.S. population means, subjects reported worse physical functioning, more bodily pain, worse general health, worse social functioning, and more emotional-role impairment; self-reported mental health was better than the U.S. population mean. All subjects maintained a belief that they had MCS; 16 (89%) acknowledged that the diagnosis was controversial. It is concluded that the subjects remain strongly committed to their diagnosis of MCS. Most have improved since their original interview, but many remain symptomatic and continue to report ongoing lifestyle changes.

  14. Detailed Follow-up Study of Pediatric Orofacial Granulomatosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaramo, Anu; Alapulli, Heikki; Aine, Liisa; Saarnisto, Ulla; Tuokkola, Jetta; Ruuska, Tarja; Sipponen, Taina; Pitkäranta, Anne; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2017-10-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the orofacial area. Its connection to Crohn disease (CD) is debated. Our aim was to describe a cohort of pediatric patients with OFG in detail, study the long-term behavior of OFG, and evaluate factors predicting CD in patients with OFG. We invited patients diagnosed with OFG at 2 university hospitals, Finland for a follow-up appointment. Patients (n = 29) were examined by a dentist and an otorhinolaryngologist using a structural schema. Orofacial findings were also recorded using digital photographing. Patients filled in questionnaires about general health and special diets. Patients' nutrition was evaluated from food records. The findings were compared between patients with OFG only and OFG with CD. Patients with CD had more findings in the orofacial area (total score for orofacial findings median 11) compared to patients with OFG only (total score median 7.5). There was no statistically significant difference in the type of lesions between these groups, except the upper lip was more often affected in patients with CD (n = 11) than in patients with OFG only (n = 0). Most of the patients had normal otorhinolaryngological findings. All patients with elevated anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody A levels had CD (n = 6) and they presented with more orofacial findings (total score) than patients with normal levels of anti-S cerevisiae antibody A (P = 0.0311). Long-term follow-up of pediatric-onset patients with OFG shows good prognosis. Patients with OFG do not seem to have otorhinolaryngological comorbidity. Anti-S cerevisiae antibody A may serve as a factor to indicate the possible presence of underlying CD in patients with OFG, but further studies are requested.

  15. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  16. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Safaei Asl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, Diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1, and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73% and 12 (27% of the cases, res-pectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO in 20 (44.5%, VUR in 10 (22.2%, ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %, posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %, UPJO with VUR in two (4.4% and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%. During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5% required operative intervention while seven (15.5% improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management.

  17. A feasibility study of functional status and follow-up clinic preferences of patients at high risk of post intensive care syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, K J; Eastwood, G M; Bellomo, R

    2016-05-01

    After prolonged mechanical ventilation patients may experience the 'post intensive care syndrome' (PICS) and may be candidates for post-discharge follow-up clinics. We aimed to ascertain the incidence and severity of PICS symptoms in patients surviving prolonged mechanical ventilation and to describe their views regarding follow-up clinics. In a teaching hospital, we conducted a cohort study of all adult patients discharged alive after ventilation in ICU for ≥7 days during 2013. We administered the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) via telephone interview and asked patients their views about the possible utility of a follow-up clinic. We studied 48 patients. At follow-up (average 19.5 months), seven (15%) patients had died and 14 (29%) did not participate (eight declined; two were non-English speakers; four were non-contactable). Among the 27 responders, 16 (59%) reported at least moderate problems in ≥1 EQ-5D dimension; 10 (37%) in ≥2 dimensions, and 8 (30%) in ≥3 dimensions. Moreover, 10 (37%) patients reported marked psychological symptoms; six (22%) scored borderline or abnormal on the HADS for both anxiety and depression; and four (15%) scored borderline or abnormal for one component. Finally, 21/26 (81%) patients stated that an ICU follow-up clinic would have been beneficial. At long-term follow-up, the majority of survivors of prolonged mechanical ventilation reported impaired quality of life and significant psychological symptoms. Most believed that a follow-up clinic would have been beneficial.

  18. The Tripler LE3AN Program: a two-year follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Page, H; Noce, M; Brown, J; Britton, C

    1999-06-01

    This paper provides a review of 2-year follow-up data on the Tripler Army Medical Center LE3AN Program. The LE3AN Program (emphasizing healthy Lifestyles, reasonable Exercise, realistic Expectations, Emotions, and Attitudes, and Nutrition) provides active duty service members a treatment strategy that involves a reasonable low-intensity exercise regimen, behavior modification, intensive nutritional counseling healthy meal planing, relapse prevention strategies, cognitive coping strategies, and healthy lifestyle principals to lose weight and maintain weight loss. Based on the 2-year data and additional clinical findings, we expand upon earlier preliminary reports. The 2-year follow-up data suggest that the program is a safe and efficacious treatment program.

  19. Recovery post ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Many ICU patients struggle to recovery following critical illness and may be left with physical, cognitive and psychological problems, which have a negative impact on their quality of life. Gross muscle mass loss and weakness can take some months to recover after the patients' Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge, in addition critical illness polyneuropathies can further complicate physical recovery. Psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common and have an negative impact on the patients' ability to engage in rehabilitation after ICU discharge. Finally cognitive deficit affecting memory can be a significant problem. The first step in helping patients to recover from such a devastating illness is to recognise those who have the greatest need and target interventions. Research now suggests that there are interventions that can accelerate physical recovery and reduce the incidence of psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and PTSD. Cognitive rehabilitation, however, is still in its infancy. This review will look at the research into patients' recovery and what can be done to improve this where needed.

  20. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  1. Long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadbeck, B; Pruellage, J; Roggenbuck, U; Hirche, H; Janssen, O E; Mann, K; Hoermann, R

    2002-10-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are common in iodine deficient countries. Although many recent studies have addressed the molecular basis and short-term outcome of treatment in nodular thyroid disease, data on the long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth are widely lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term behaviour of benign thyroid nodules growth. We followed 109 consecutive patients seen at yearly intervals in our Outpatient Clinic for at least 3 years (range 3-12 years, mean 4.9 +/- 2.6 years) presenting with 139 benign nodules in uni- or multinodular goiters. The size of the nodules and thyroid glands was analysed retrospectively. The study included a spectrum of benign thyroid nodules, 86 functioning and 53 non-functioning. 27 patients were treated with levothyroxine, 8 with iodide and 16 with a combination of both. 58 patients were not treated mainly because of thyroid functional autonomy. Patients with overt hyperthyroidism or suspected malignancy by fine-needle aspiration were excluded from the study. The nodules and glands were assessed by ultrasonography at yearly intervals and documented by photoprints. Relevant growth was defined as an increase in nodule volume of at least 30%. For statistical analyses, Cox Proportional Hazard Model and life-table analyses according to Kaplan-Meier were performed. Most thyroid nodules grew slowly but continuously during follow-up. After about 3 years, half of the nodules had increased their volume by at least 30%. Growth of the nodules was significantly faster than of the corresponding thyroid glands (p < 0.0001). Age and sex of the patients and size or function of the nodules at initial presentation were not significantly related to their growth. Suppression of TSH did not affect growth of the nodules irrespective of the source of thyroid hormones, endogenous or by administration of levothyroxine. In conclusion, benign thyroid nodules have a slow intrinsic growth potential, which is apparently

  2. Congenital hypothyroidism: follow up of a case for 13 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children. The prognosis of infants detected by neonatal screening and started on treatment early is excellent, with intelligence quotients similar to sibling or classmate without the disease. Setting: Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, KVG Medical College, Sullia. 1Case report: A 15 year old boy came with history of head ache, generalized body ache and lack of concentration in school. He was a case of congenital hypothyroidism and was on irregular treatment for the last 13 years. Intervention: The patient was advised strictly to continue the oral l-thyroxine 100μg one hour before food and come for regular follow-up. Conclusion: Definite intellectual deterioration is seen if oral l-thyroxine is not started within 50 days of life and the deterioration is irreversible. So in India newborn screening programs should be implemented as a national program as it is very important to diagnose and treatcongenital hypothyroidism as soon as possible and to treat it effectively.

  3. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer.

  4. Follow-up Sonography after Sonoguided Renal Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To assess ultrasonographic findings and clinical significance after renal biopsy. 174 cases of post-biopsy sonography were studied retrospectively. We classified post-biopsy hematoma on the basis of their size as small (thickness less than 1 cm, length less than 3cm), medium (thickness less than 1cm, length greater than 3 cm), large (thickness greater than 1 cm, length greater than 3 cm). We also compared bleeding parameters (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time) and renal function in both cases which had hematoma or not. Total 33 hematomas were found (19%). Small hematoma was observed in 14 cases, medium hematoma in 16 cases, large hematoma in 3 cases. Severe complications requiring prompt therapy occurred in 1 case(0.6%). In 6 cases hematocrit fell by more than 4%, all of these hematomas were observed on US. Severe complications after sonoguided renal biopsy were rare. There was poor correlation between prebiopsybleeding parameter, renal function and post-biopsy hematomas. And sonography is considered as adequate method for follow up of post-biopsy hematoma

  5. [Follow-up and counselling after pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derniaux, E; Lucereau-Barbier, M; Graesslin, O

    2012-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be responsible for infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Treatment of acute PID is very important as it can reduce the risk of sequelae. However, follow-up, partner treatment and counselling are also useful to reduce the reinfection rate. Few weeks after PID, clinical evaluation as well as transvaginal and transabdominal sonography must be performed. The interest of systematic bacteriological tests is not proved. Hysterosalpingography and second-look laparoscopy should be considered only for women with infertility and severe infection. Use of condom is advisable in this population in order to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STD) including HIV and to decrease rate of recurrence, associated to contraceptive pill, which is also a good option. In selected cases, intrauterine devices can be used in patients with history of PID if the infection is resolved and no significant risk factors for STD exist. Infertility and chronic pelvic pain are the most common sequelae in the population of young women with severe and recurrent infection. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is higher for these women and must be kept in mind. Counselling and risk-reduction interventions decreased significatively the rate of recurrence and sequelae in PID. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. A long-term follow-up of postpartum thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, S; Phillips, D I; Parkes, A B; Richards, C J; Harris, B; Fung, H; Darke, C; John, R; Hall, R; Lazarus, J H

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT), 43 patients with PPT and 171 control women were evaluated 3.5 (range 2-4) years postpartum. Ten (23%) PPT patients were hypothyroid compared to none of the controls (P less than 0.001). Factors associated with the development of hypothyroidism were high antimicrosomal antibody titre measured at 16 weeks gestation (P less than 0.01), severity of hypothyroid phase of PPT, multiparity, and a previous history of spontaneous abortion. The presence of microsomal antibody but no PPT in one pregnancy did not prevent the occurrence of PPT in the next pregnancy in two patients and a further five patients had PPT in two successive pregnancies. There was no association between HLA haplotype, family history of thyroid disease, smoking or frequency of oral contraception, and the development of long-term hypothyroidism after PPT. It is concluded that permanent hypothyroidism is an important sequel to PPT and patients with PPT should be followed up appropriately.

  7. Long-term follow-up of trigonoplasty antireflux operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Mahmoudnejad, Nastaran; Kashi, Amir H; Ramezani, Mehdi H; Narouie, Behzad

    2017-02-03

    Open trigonoplasty antireflux operation has been associated with promising results. However, its success in controlling reflux has not been evaluated in the long term. All patients who underwent trigonoplasty for vesicoureteral reflux by one surgeon from 2004 to 2014 were included. Preoperative evaluations included direct radionuclide cystography (DRNC) or voiding cystourethrography, urine analysis and culture and abdominal sonography. Urodynamic study and cystoscopy was performed in selected patients. Trigonoplasty was done by a modified Gil-Verent method. The latest available patients' DRNCs were used to judge for reflux relapse. Ninety-one patients, 142 refluxing units; median (range) age, 10.5 (1-45) years; M/F, (11/80) were followed for 18 to 135 months. Reflux resolution rate was 73.6% for patients and 75.4% for refluxing units. Relapse was associated with reflux grade (67% in grade V), ureteral orifice appearance (40% in golf hole/stadium), and patients with a history of pyelonephritis. Multivariable model based on the above variables had less than 10% sensitivity in predicting relapse. Trigonoplasty success rate can decrease with long-term follow-up.

  8. Banked cadaveric fascia lata: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S H M; Gregório, E P; Rodrigues, M A F; Grando, J P S; Moreira, H A; Fraga, F C

    2004-05-01

    Autologous fascial and synthetic materials have been widely used to repair the stress form of urinary incontinence (SUI) as well as pelvic floor prolapse. The safety and long-term durability of cadaveric fascia lata in orthopedic and ophthalmologic surgery have encouraged urogynecologists to use this material for a sling material. The rationale of placement of a sling from cadaveric fascia lata is based upon decreasing the complication rates caused by autologous and synthetic materials. However, the high costs of the commercially available tissues in Brazil have limited its use in public health. In our institution we developed a cadaveric fascia lata bank, harvesting the material according to the Brazilian Transplantation Legislation and storing it at -70 degrees C. The safety of the tissue is achieved by 25-kGy irradiation. Since 1999, 30 patients have undergone surgery using material from five donors in repairs for stress urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse at a mean of 34 months' follow-up (ranging from 30 to 40 months), there was no evidence of rejection. Therefore, we have shown the safety of cadaveric fascia lata harvested and treated as described above in our group of patients.

  9. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  10. Follow-up of MARVELS Brown Dwarf Candidates using EXPERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bo; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Thomas, Neil; Wang, Ji; De Lee, Nathan

    2013-02-01

    The SDSS-III MARVELS survey is a comprehensive radial velocity survey of 3,300 nearby F-K stars, between 7.6 < V < 12.0 in 2008-2012. All of the survey data for 2580 FGK stars from the first two and half years have been processed with the latest data pipeline. A total of 26 new brown dwarfs (BD) candidates have been identified in the processed RV data. We expect to have 8 more BD candidates from the ~800 stars currently under processing, which will make a total of 34 BD candidates. This proposal requests KPNO 2.1m telescope time with the EXPERT instrument, to follow up all of these BD candidates to confirm the detections and characterize the orbits. The results will be used to (1) reveal the overall distribution of the new BDs in the parameter space; (2) measure the occurrence rate of BD around FGK type stars; (3) measure dryness of the brown dwarf desert around stars with different mass and metallicity; (4) constrain theoretical models regarding the formation of brown dwarfs; (5) confirm the discovery of `desert in the brown dwarf desert'; (6) identify additional companions associated with the detected systems.

  11. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  12. [Surgery for phimosis with Plastibell. A follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M K

    1998-06-22

    Fifty-three boys were interviewed 11 years (9-14 years) after an operation for phimosis using the Plastibell technique. The interview concentrated on the cosmetic result, sexual function and late complications. Seventeen patients (31%) experienced cosmetic complications, and 11 patients (21%) claimed to have experienced psycho-social problems due to the appearance of the penis after the operation. Nonetheless an overall of 44 patients (83%) were fully satisfied/satisfied with the cosmetic result. Four patients (8%) claimed to have pain or discomfort on erection or intercourse. One patient (2%) was re-operated three years after the primary operation because of a recurrence of the symptoms. Overall 48 patients (91%) were fully satisfied or satisfied with the result after the operation. In conclusion we find the Plastibell procedure to be a safe and reliable method in treating phimosis. There are some minor technical pitfalls that have to be addressed in learning the technique, but performed in trained hands, the technique offers a very high satisfaction rate at long term follow-up.

  13. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  14. Patients’ follow-up using biomechanical analysis of rehabilitation exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bonnechère

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the evolution of game controllers video games are becoming more and more popular in physical rehabilitation. The integration of serious games in rehabilitation has been tested for various pathologies. Parallel to this clinical research, a lot of studies have been done in order to validate the use of these game controllers for simple biomechanical evaluation. Currently, it is thus possible to record the motions performed by the patients during serious gaming exercises for later analysis. Therefore, data collected during the exercises could be used for monitoring the evolution of the patients during long term rehabilitation. Before using the parameters extracted from the games to assess patients’ evolution two important aspects must be verified: the reproducibility of measurement and a possible effect of learning of the task to be performed. Ten healthy adults played 9 sessions of specific games developed for rehabilitation over a 3-weeks period. Nineteen healthy children played 2 sessions to study the influence of age. Different parameters were extracted from the games: time, range of motion, reaching area. Results of this study indicates that it is possible to follow the evolution of the patients during the rehabilitation process. The majority of the learning effect occurred during the very first session. Therefore, in order to allow proper regular monitoring, the results of this first session should not be included in the follow-up of the patient.

  15. Intensity of follow-up after pancreatic cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Jason A; Merchant, Nipun B

    2014-03-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal. Of the 15-20 % of patients who are candidates for potentially curative resection, 66-92 % will develop recurrent disease. Although guidelines for surveillance in the postoperative setting exist, they are not evidence based, and there is wide variability of strategies utilized. Current surveillance guidelines as suggested by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) include routine history and physical, measurement of serum cancer-associated antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels, and computed tomographic imaging at 3- to 6-month intervals for the first 2 years, and annually thereafter. However, the lack of prospective clinical data examining the efficacy of different surveillance strategies has led to a variability of the intensity of follow-up and a lack of consensus on its necessity and efficacy. Recent therapeutic advances may have the potential to significantly alter survival after recurrence, but a careful consideration of current surveillance strategies should be undertaken to optimize existing approaches in the face of high recurrence and low survival rates.

  16. Influence of setting carnations service post on nurse patient relationship in ICU%重症监护病房设置康乃馨服务岗对护患关系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓霞; 朱英; 王晓玲

    2014-01-01

    [目的]设立康乃馨服务岗,改善重症监护病房护患关系,提高护理质量。[方法]于2012年11月开始设立康乃馨服务岗,成立康乃馨小组,对重症监护室病人根据访谈提纲进行回访,针对影响护患关系的主要因素进行护理,比较设岗前后4个月的病人满意度及护患纠纷发生情况。[结果]设立康乃馨服务岗后病人满意度为98.33%,护患纠纷发生率0.83%,明显优于设立前(P<0.05)。[结论]重症监护病房设立康乃馨服务岗,可有效改善护患关系。%Obj ective:To establish the carnations service post,improve ICU nurse patient relationship and improve quality of care.Methods:Carna-tions service post was began to set up in November 2012 and carnation group was founded;ICU patients were visited based on interviews outline;nursing care was conducted aiming at main factors influencing nurse pa-tient relationship;patients’satisfaction and the occurrence of nursing dis-putes were compared in four months before and after setting post.Results:After the establishment of carnations service post,patients'satisfaction was 98.33%,and incidence of nursing disputes was 0.83%,which was signifi-cantly better than that before the establishment(P<0.05).Conclusion:Setting up carnations service post in ICU can effectively improve the nurse patient relationship.

  17. Diagnosis and 10-year follow-up of a community-based hepatitis C cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Gazzuola, Liliana; Kim, W Ray

    2002-02-01

    To determine the health care follow-up and treatment associated with physician-diagnosed hepatitis C (HCV) in a community-based population. We conducted a retrospective medical record review using records from all providers in Olmsted County, Minnesota. The study incorporated all Olmsted County residents with physician-diagnosed hepatitis C from 1990 through 1999. We assessed demographic and health status information as well as health services use in subjects with physician-diagnosed HCV. Physicians diagnosed hepatitis C in 355 subjects (219 men [62%], 136 women [38%]), mean age 43 years, in the 10-year period studied. About half of diagnoses (45%, n = 159) were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction or liver biopsies. Identified risk factors included IV drug use (50%), multiple sex partners (36%), and blood transfusion (30%). Follow-up assessment with aspartate aminotransferase/amino alanine transferase (AST/ALT) tests occurred in about half (49%) of subjects, while 202 subjects (60%) were referred for gastrointestinal (GI) specialist evaluation and 49 patients (14% of all, 25% of those referred to a GI specialist) had specific treatment for hepatitis C. Although well over half of patients (60%) had possible contraindications to HCV treatment, including heavy alcohol use, few were referred for chemical dependency therapy. In this community, follow-up and treatment related to HCV were limited. Attention to prevention of disease-accelerating co- infections was only modest. Referral or documented recommendations for treatment of alcoholism or heavy chronic alcohol ingestion were minimal.

  18. Psychiatric Assessment and Follow-up of Young People after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    often are suspicious of services and as a result do not open up to talk about their .... the young people following discharge and liaise with the local. CAMHS team .... dynamics, coping vulnerabilities, life-time psychopathology, cognitions, and ...

  19. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  20. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  1. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N. [Univ. of Muenster (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e. trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.

  2. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Cancer mortality among German aircrew: second follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Langner, Ingo; Schafft, Thomas; Bennack, Sabrina; Blettner, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Aircrew members are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors. In a previous analysis of a large cohort of German aircrew, no increase in cancer mortality or dose-related effects was observed. In the present study, the follow-up of this cohort of 6,017 cockpit and 20,757 cabin crew members was extended by 6 years to 2003. Among male cockpit crew, the resulting all-cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) (n = 127) is 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8), while for brain tumors it is 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-3.9). The cancer risk is significantly raised (RR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) among cockpit crew members employed 30 years or more compared to those employed less than 10 years. Among both female and male cabin crew, the all-cancer SMR and that for most individual cancers are close to 1. The SMR for breast cancer among female crew is 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8). Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma among male cabin crew is increased (SMR 4.2; 95% CI 1.3-10.8). However, cancers associated with radiation exposure are not raised in the cohort. It is concluded that among cockpit crew cancer mortality is low, particularly for lung cancer. The positive trend of all cancer with duration of employment persists. The increased brain cancer SMR among cockpit crew requires replication in other cohorts. For cabin crew, cancer mortality is generally close to population rates. Cosmic radiation dose estimates will allow more detailed assessments, as will a pooling of updated aircrew studies currently in planning.

  4. [Delirium in elderly inpatients. An 18 month follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Fernando J; Benchimol, Javier; Giunta, Diego; Cafferata, Carlos; Freixas, Antonio; Vallone, Marcelo; Andresik, Diego; Pollan, Javier; Aprile, Ana; Lorenzo, Jimena; Waisman, Gabriel; Camera, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Delirium usually hardens care during hospitalization and increases morbidity during hospital stay and after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of delirium in elderly inpatients in a Buenos Aires hospital, its morbidity and mortality during hospital stay and the next 18 month follow-up. Patients aged 70 or older admitted to internal medicine unit between September 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled. Delirium was assessed with the Spanish version of Confusion Assessment Method. Demographic data, cause of admition and length of stay, destination after discharge and mortality were registered. A new evaluation was made 18 months after discharge. We evaluated 194 patients and 74 were excluded. Of the 120 included, 52 (43.3%) presented delirium. We found significant differences between patients with and without delirium in previous placement in nursing home (17.3% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.002), dementia (40.4% vs. 8.8%; p < 0.001), median activity of daily living (5 vs. 6; p < 0.001), length-of-stay (7 vs. 5; p = 0.04) and mortality rate (21.2% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.001). Evaluation 18 months later showed differences between patients with and without delirium in median of activity of daily living (1/6 vs. 5/6), patients living in nursing homes (27.5% vs. 7.9%), estimated survival 35.3% (CI 95%: 24-49%) at day 569 and 49% (CI 95%: 32.9-65.4%) at day 644. The difference between survival curves was statistically significant (p = 0.027). Delirium increases morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. Elderly with delirium are at risk of worsening disability and of becoming dependent after discharge and it is a risk factor for higher mortality during the following months after discharge.

  5. Outcome of ICU survivors: a comprehensive review. The role of patient-reported outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, C; Amaro, A; Dias, C; Costa-Pereira, A

    2012-10-01

    Problems survivors face after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge begin while they are still in the ward, where many of their specific problems may run unrecognized, but they assume a heavy weight when they arrive at their homes and face several kind of limitations, from being unable to climb stairs because of weight loss, asthenia, dyspnea or joint stiffness to anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Follow-up consultations have given us a better understanding of these specific problems, and the information gained has been used to improve intensive care itself and promote a quality service for patients and relatives. The aim of this article is to provide an overview on adult ICU outcome studies and discuss how they have influenced and improved the delivery of intensive care. We will explain how we went from real patients to outcome studies and what we have learned concerning the consequences of critical illness and critical care. Development of outcome studies, what we have learned through them and our own experience will be outlined focusing mainly in four topics: mortality, physical disability, neuropsychological disability and health-related quality of life. Interventions to improve outcome on these main topics will be presented, and we will explain how we went from outcome studies to clinical interventions, focusing on the most recent proposals of intervention to improve outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  6. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  7. Health related quality of life in trauma patients. Data from a one-year follow up study compared with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogstad Laila

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma patients have impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL after trauma. The aim of the study was to assess HRQOL during the first year after trauma and hospital stay in trauma patients admitted to an intensive-care unit (ICU for >24 hours compared with non-ICU trauma patients and the general population, and to identify predictors of HRQOL. Methods A prospective one-year follow-up study of 242 trauma patients received by the trauma team of a trauma referral centre in Norway was performed. HRQOL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 at 3 and 12 months. Results The mean age of the cohort was 42.3 years (95% CI, 40.4-44.3 years. The median Injury Severity Score (ISS was 10, interquartile range 16. The HRQOL improved significantly from the 3 to the 12 months follow up in the trauma patients. However their scores were significantly lower for most subscales of SF-36 compared to the general population. Significant differences between ICU and non-ICU patients at 12 months were observed only for physical functioning and role physical subscales. Optimism was an independent predictor of good HRQOL at 12 months, in all dimensions (beta, 0.95-2.45. A higher depression score at baseline predicted lower HRQOL in four of eight dimensions (beta -1.1 to -1.70. In addition, better physical functioning was predicted by lower age (beta, -0.20, and having head injury (reference as the most severe injury vs. spine or extremity injuries (beta, -9.49 and -10.85, and better mental health by higher age (beta, 0.21 and being employed or studying before the trauma (beta, 12.27. In addition to optimism good general health was predicted by lower score for post-traumatic stress (PTS symptoms at baseline (beta, -0.27 and lower ISS score (beta -10.59. Conclusions The HRQOL improved significantly from the 3 to the 12 months follow up in our sample. However their scores were significantly lower for most subscales of SF-36

  8. Follow-up consultations for cervical cancer patients in a Mexican cancer center. Comparison with NCCN guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Olvera, Alberto; Cetina, Lucely; Coronel, Jaime; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the patterns of follow-up visits for cervix cancer in a national cancer center in Mexico. The National Cancer Institute of Mexico is cancer center with 119 beds that mostly cares for an underserved and socially disadvantaged population. The medical records of cases of cervical cancer that had at least one year of clinical follow-up after being in complete response at the end of primary treatment were analyzed. We recorded the numbers of total and yearly follow-up visits and these were compared with the number of follow-up visits recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2013, version 2 for cervical cancer. Between March and June 2007, the medical records of 96 consecutive patients were reviewed. Twenty (21%) of these met inclusion criteria and were selected. In the first year the median number of visits was 11 (4-20). In the ensuing years, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th, the number of analyzed patients remaining in follow-up decreased to 17, 14, 13 and 9 respectively. There were 462 follow-up visits to primary treating services (Gynecology Oncology, Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology) as compared to 220 suggested by the NCCN guidelines (X2 test pcervical cancer patients once treatment is completed.

  9. Nutritional rehabilitation after ICU - does it happen: a qualitative interview and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriweather, Judith; Smith, Pam; Walsh, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    To compare and contrast current nutritional rehabilitation practices against recommendations from National Institute for Health and Excellence guideline Rehabilitation after critical illness (NICE) (2009, http://www.nice.org.uk/cg83). Recovery from critical illness has gained increasing prominence over the last decade but there is remarkably little research relating to nutritional rehabilitation. The study is a qualitative study based on patient interviews and observations of ward practice. Seventeen patients were recruited into the study at discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) of a large teaching hospital in central Scotland in 2011. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on transfer to the ward and weekly thereafter. Fourteen of these patients were followed up at three months post-ICU discharge, and a semi-structured interview was carried out. Observations of ward practice were carried out twice weekly for the duration of the ward stay. Current nutritional practice for post-intensive care patients did not reflect the recommendations from the NICE guideline. A number of organisational issues were identified as influencing nutritional care. These issues were categorised as ward culture, service-centred delivery of care and disjointed discharge planning. Their influence on nutritional care was compounded by the complex problems associated with critical illness. The NICE guideline provides few nutrition-specific recommendations for rehabilitation; however, current practice does not reflect the nutritional recommendations that are detailed in the rehabilitation care pathway. Nutritional care of post-ICU patients is problematic and strategies to overcome these issues need to be addressed in order to improve nutritional intake. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Endotracheal intubation in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2015-06-17

    Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a high-risk procedure, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Up to 40% of cases are associated with marked hypoxemia or hypotension. The ICU patient is physiologically very different from the usual patient who undergoes intubation in the operating room, and different intubation techniques should be considered. The common operating room practice of sedation and neuromuscular blockade to facilitate intubation may carry significant risk in the ICU patient with a marked oxygenation abnormality, particularly when performed by the non-expert. Preoxygenation is largely ineffective in these patients and oxygen desaturation occurs rapidly on induction of anesthesia, limiting the time available to secure the airway. The ICU environment is less favorable for complex airway management than the operating room, given the frequent lack of availability of additional equipment or additional expert staff. ICU intubations are frequently carried out by trainees, with a lesser degree of airway experience. Even in the presence of a non-concerning airway assessment, these patients are optimally managed as a difficult airway, utilizing an awake approach. Endotracheal intubation may be achieved by awake direct laryngoscopy in the sick ICU patient whose level of consciousness may be reduced by sepsis, hypercapnia or hypoxemia. As the patient's spontaneous respiratory efforts are not depressed by the administration of drugs, additional time is available to obtain equipment and expertise in the event of failure to secure the airway. ICU intubation complications should be tracked as part of the ICU quality improvement process.

  11. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  12. Enhancing the validity of foster care follow-up studies through multiple alumni location strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; McWilliams, Alisa; Mainieri, Tina; Pecora, Peter J; La Belle, Karin

    2006-01-01

    While family-based placement prevention services, family reunification programs, subsidized guardianship, and aggressive adoption programs are reducing the numbers of children spending long periods of time in substitute care, a significant number of America's children will come of age in foster care. Agencies and policymakers should use research and evaluation to assess the effectiveness of foster care in nurturing healthy adults and to explore ways to improve services. Outcome studies that have focused on locating and interviewing young or middle-aged adults emancipated from foster care have been hampered by modest response rates, limiting the field's ability to evaluate the efficacy of foster care programs. This article describes a set of strategies that were used to achieve higher response rates in two recent follow-up studies.

  13. Intrahospital teleradiology: ER to the ICU connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattner, Stefanie; Herron, John M.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Towers, Jeffrey D.; Thaete, F. Leland; Gur, David

    1994-05-01

    Availability of initial radiographic images acquired in the Emergency Department (ED) for patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has been a problem in our operations. It is not uncommon that images from the ED are delivered to the appropriate ICU several hours after admission, and this problem is typically magnified `off hours'. We installed a film digitizer in the ED and required technologists to digitize all chest radiographs as they came out of the film processor. These images are archived and transmitted to a workstation located near one of our busier medical ICUs. The system has been operational for eight months, and it provides reliable timely access to such images. Careful review of a large number of cases clearly demonstrated that such a system is not only feasible, but extremely effective in improving both perceptions and actual quality of radiology services in this difficult environment. Image quality was found to be acceptable for this purpose.

  14. Project Follow-Up and Change Management Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia CARSTEA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The managers have to understand the technological impact and the informatics applications upon the business they lead; taking into account the fact that IT assures them the necessary information. Today's businesses are more and more organized, lead and automatized around the series of processes and the relations established among them. These processes involve developments and the products and services, the interactions with the clients and the support of those processes and of human resources. Thereby, we suggest the identification of the solutions for the successful planning of the specific IS activities and their management in accordance with the company strategy, as well as the evaluation and control of main lines of work in accordance with: the following information criteria: efficiency, effectiveness, availability, integrity, confidentiality, accord, safety and the financial and human resources through a flexible system of evaluation.

  15. Is training in psychosocial interventions worthwhile? Report of a psychosocial intervention trainee follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Saul, Carol; Robinson, Jeannie; King, Jenny; Dudley, Mike

    2003-09-01

    A follow-up study of psychosocial intervention (PSI) trainees from the Sheffield and Maudsley training centres was undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1, 141 students, at two PSI training centres, were sent a simple postal questionnaire to elicit career trajectory following PSI training. A response rate of 82% was achieved. The sub-group, who had been trained and who still engaged in clinical practice were identified and followed-up in more detail (n=96). The effect of PSI training in a range of domains was investigated. The impact of training may not be to equip students with formal technical skills in CBT and family work. What is more likely is that trainees acquired proficiency in: working effectively using a case management model; conveying 'therapeutic optimism'; enabling users to meet their own goals and helping them to develop better coping strategies; using 'stress vulnerability' and formal outcome measures as means of structuring this approach. The secondary aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the barriers that impede the effective implementation of PSI skills in routine service settings. For the second phase of the survey the response rate was again 82%. This group's service managers were identified and surveyed for the same information and 59% responded. The aim was to gather information about implementation issues from both the clinical and service perspectives. The results of the survey indicate that PSI training has a positive impact on the development of services for people with serious mental health problems although there are serious organisational hurdles for managers, trainees and organisations to overcome if PSI skills are to be properly implemented. Key factors that impact upon faithful implementation are related to resource issues (caseload size), organisational factors (the existence of an implementation plan and training strategy), and the extent to which the trainee's team is supportive.

  16. Schizophrenia and quality of life: a one-year follow-up in four EU countries

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    Lacalmontie Elisabeth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article systematically monitors the quality of life (QOL of patients with schizophrenia from seven different sites across four European countries: France, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. Methods A one-year prospective cohort study was carried out. Inclusion criteria for patients were: a clinical lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 (F20 diagnostic criteria for research, age between 18 and 65 years and at least one contact with mental health services in 1993. Data concerning QOL were recorded in seven sites from four countries: France, Portugal, Ireland and Spain, and were obtained using the Baker and Intagliata scale. At baseline, 339 patients answered the QOL questionnaire. At one-year follow-up, Spain could not participate, so only 263 patients were contacted and 219 agreed to take part. QOL was compared across centres by areas and according to a global index. QOL was correlated with presence of clinical and social problems, needs for care and interventions provided during the one-year follow-up. Results We did not find any link between gender and QOL. There were some significant differences between centres concerning many items. What is more, these differences were relative: in Lisbon where the lowest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were satisfied with food but highly dissatisfied with finances, whereas in St Etienne, where the highest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were less satisfied with food when they were more satisfied with finances. The evolution in one year among those respondents who took part in the follow-up (excluding the subjects from Granada showed different patterns depending on the items. Conclusion The four countries have different resources and patients live in rather different conditions. However, the main differences as far as their QOL is concerned very much depend on extra-psychiatric variables, principally marital status and income.

  17. Schizophrenia and quality of life: a one-year follow-up in four EU countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article systematically monitors the quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia from seven different sites across four European countries: France, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. METHODS: A one-year prospective cohort study was carried out. Inclusion criteria for patients were: a clinical lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 (F20) diagnostic criteria for research, age between 18 and 65 years and at least one contact with mental health services in 1993. Data concerning QOL were recorded in seven sites from four countries: France, Portugal, Ireland and Spain, and were obtained using the Baker and Intagliata scale. At baseline, 339 patients answered the QOL questionnaire. At one-year follow-up, Spain could not participate, so only 263 patients were contacted and 219 agreed to take part. QOL was compared across centres by areas and according to a global index. QOL was correlated with presence of clinical and social problems, needs for care and interventions provided during the one-year follow-up. RESULTS: We did not find any link between gender and QOL. There were some significant differences between centres concerning many items. What is more, these differences were relative: in Lisbon where the lowest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were satisfied with food but highly dissatisfied with finances, whereas in St Etienne, where the highest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were less satisfied with food when they were more satisfied with finances. The evolution in one year among those respondents who took part in the follow-up (excluding the subjects from Granada) showed different patterns depending on the items. CONCLUSION: The four countries have different resources and patients live in rather different conditions. However, the main differences as far as their QOL is concerned very much depend on extra-psychiatric variables, principally marital status and income.

  18. Feasibility of a Team Approach to Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up: Early Experience of a Combined Cardiology/Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorna, Olena; Baldwin, H Scott; Neumaier, Jamie; Gogliotti, Shirley; Powers, Deborah; Mouvery, Amanda; Bichell, David; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2016-07-01

    Infants with complex congenital heart disease are at high risk for poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, implementation of dedicated congenital heart disease follow-up programs presents important infrastructure, personnel, and resource challenges. We present the development, implementation, and retrospective review of 1- and 2-year outcomes of a Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up program. This program was a synergistic approach between the Pediatric Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Intensive Care, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up teams to provide a feasible and responsible utilization of existing infrastructure and personnel, to develop and implement a program dedicated to children with congenital heart disease. Trained developmental testers administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire-3 over the phone to the parents of all referred children at least once between 6 and 12 months' corrected age. At 18 months' corrected age, all children were scheduled in the Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Follow-Up Clinic for a visit with standardized neurological exams, Bayley III, multidisciplinary therapy evaluations and continued follow-up. Of the 132 patients identified in the Cardiothoracic Surgery database and at discharge from the hospital, a total number of 106 infants were reviewed. A genetic syndrome was identified in 23.4% of the population. Neuroimaging abnormalities were identified in 21.7% of the cohort with 12.8% having visibly severe insults. As a result, 23 (26.7%) received first-time referrals for early intervention services, 16 (13.8%) received referrals for new services in addition to their existing ones. We concluded that utilization of existing resources in collaboration with established programs can ensure targeted neurodevelopmental follow-up for all children with complex congenital heart disease.

  19. The future for follow-up of gynaecological cancer in Europe. Summary of available data and overview of ongoing trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeson, Simon C.; Beaver, Kinta; Ezendam, Nicole P.M.

    2017-01-01

    is currently in progress in Europe, in order to make tentative recommendations for a model of follow-up. The evidence base for traditional hospital based follow-up is limited. Alternative models have been reported for other cancer types but there are few evaluations of alternative approaches for gynaecological...... cancers. We identified five ongoing European studies; four were focused on endometrial cancer patients and one feasibility study included all gynaecological cancers. Only one study had reached the reporting stage. Alternative models included nurse-led telephone follow-up and comparisons of more intensive...... versus less intensive regimes. Outcomes included survival, quality of life, psychological morbidity, patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of service. More work is needed on alternative strategies for all gynaecological cancer types. New models will be likely to include risk stratification...

  20. Effects of medical education on attitudes towards mental illness among medical students: a five-year follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino Y

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the effects of medical education on attitudes towards mental illness among medical students, a follow-up study was conducted. All 100 students entering Kochi Medical School in 1988 were subjects. The initial questionnaire survey was conducted in 1988, and followed up in 1993. Response rate was 69% in the initial survey, and 83% in the follow-up study. By the time of the follow-up, all of the students had completed their medical education, including courses in psychiatry and mental health. Results were as follows: At the follow-up study, 1 a significantly higher percentage of students replied that they accepted the mentally ill as co-workers; 2 significantly favorable changes were observed in attitudes towards psychiatric services; 3 optimism about the effectiveness of treatment for mental illness at an early stage and prevention of mental illness had decreased; and 4 no change was observed in attitudes toward human rights of the mentally ill, except in the case of one item stating that the mentally ill should not have children in order to avoid hereditary handicaps, with which a lower percentage agreed. Conclusively, medical education can play an important role in attitudes towards mental illness.

  1. Exploring outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up intervention: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Christie, Sandra; Singal, Rohit K

    2013-09-01

    To describe and compare the outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up model of care with the standard model of primary care provider follow-up for coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients. Advances in healthcare have had a favourable impact on length of stay following cardiac surgery; however, the shorter length of stay has not been accompanied by enhanced support to bridge the gap between acute care and the community setting. Prospective (2009-2010) randomized study. Elective cardiac surgery patients (N = 200) were randomly assigned to the nurse practitioner follow-up intervention or to the standard model of follow-up care. The main outcomes were health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction, symptoms, and health resource use. Outcome data were elicited via telephone interviews at 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge. Baseline differences between the two groups were non-significant; however, at 2 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group reported significantly fewer symptoms and higher physical functioning status. At 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group was significantly more satisfied with the amount of help, as well as the quality of the services received. Differences in healthcare resource use were not statistically significant. This evidence suggests that the nurse practitioner-managed model of follow-up care effectively bridges the gap between institutional and primary care in the cardiac surgery population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Mortality of workers exposed to ethylene oxide: extended follow up of a British cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, D; Harris, E C; Poole, J; Palmer, K T

    2004-04-01

    To obtain further information about the risks of cancer associated with occupational exposure to ethylene oxide Follow up was extended by 13 years for a cohort of 2876 men and women with definite or potential exposure to ethylene oxide in the chemical industry or in hospital sterilising units. Subjects were traced through National Health Service and social security records, and their mortality was compared with that expected from rates in the national population by the person-years method. Analysis was based on 565 deaths, of which 339 had occurred during the additional period of follow up. Mortality was close to or below expectation for all causes (565 deaths v 607.6 expected), all cancers (188 v 184.2), and for all specific categories of malignancy including stomach cancer (10 v 11.6), breast cancer (11 v 13.2), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (7 v 4.8), and leukaemia (5 v 4.6). All five deaths from leukaemia occurred in the subset of subjects with greatest potential for exposure to ethylene oxide, but even in this group the excess of deaths was small (2.6 expected). The balance of evidence from this and other epidemiological investigations indicates that any risk of human cancer from ethylene oxide is low, particularly at the levels of occupational exposure that have occurred in Britain over recent decades. This may reflect the capacity of human cells to repair DNA damage caused by the chemical, which is a potent genotoxin and animal carcinogen.

  3. Feasibility of epilepsy follow-up care through telemedicine: a pilot study on the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Nizamuddin; Mann, Carly; Sinclair, D Barry; Heino, Angela; Iskiw, Blayne; Quigley, Daphne; Ohinmaa, Arto

    2008-04-01

    Cost analysis and patient satisfaction with telemedicine in epilepsy care. This controlled study included out-of-town epilepsy patients coming to follow-up at the University of Alberta hospital epilepsy clinic. After an informed consent, patients were randomized to either conventional (n = 18) or telemedicine (n = 23) clinics. Patients or caregivers filled patient satisfaction and travel cost questionnaires in both alternatives. Cost per visit analysis included costs of traveling, lodging, and lost productivity. Average age of the population was 41 years (range 19-73; 45% women). Eighty-three percent of patients preferred their next visit through telemedicine. About 90% of patients indicated a need for companion travel (mainly by car) to conventional clinic. For the conventional group patients the value of lost productivity was CAD $201, hotel cost CAD $8.50, and the value of car mileage CAD $256.50, totaling about CAD $466.00. Patient costs for telemedicine were CAD $35.85. Telemedicine production costs are similar to the patients' savings in traveling and lost productivity. About 90% of patients in both groups were satisfied with the quality of the service. Telemedicine can play a role in follow-up care of epilepsy patients, reduce patient costs, and improve patient satisfaction. This is the first full-time epilepsy telemedicine clinic in Western Canada.

  4. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary care follow-up of radical prostatectomy patients: A regional New Zealand experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Yassaie

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study identified that follow-up by GPs after RP is insufficient. Accordingly, there is a requirement for formal educational programs if primary care is to take a greater role in follow-up of these patients.

  6. The impact of phone calls on follow-up rates in an online depression prevention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Muñoz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Adding phone call contacts to email reminders and monetary incentives did increase follow-up rates. However, the rate of response to follow-up was low and the number of phone calls required to achieve one completed follow-up raises concerns about the utility of adding phone calls. We also discuss difficulties with using financial incentives and their implications.

  7. What Does Depression Mean for Korean American Elderly?: A Qualitative Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Han, Haera; Lee, Hochang B.; Gallo, Joseph J.; Joo, Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Korean American Elderly (KAE) have high rates of depression but underuse mental health services. The purpose of this study was to assess the meaning of depression and help seeking among KAE residing in the United States who have clinically significant depressive symptoms. Methods As a follow up to the Memory and Aging Study of Koreans (MASK; n=1,118), a descriptive epidemiological study which showed that only one in four of KAE with clinically significant depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9≥10) used mental health services, we conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with participants with clinically significant depressive symptoms regarding the meaning of depression and beliefs about help seeking. Ten participants with clinically significant depressive symptoms were approached and 8 were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Results KAE did not identify themselves as depressed though experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms. They associated depression with social discrimination, social isolation, and suicide in the extreme circumstance. They attributed depression to not achieving social and material success in America and strained relationships with their children. Participants attempted to self-manage distress without telling others in their social network. However, KAE were willing to consult with mental health professionals if the services were bilingual, affordable, and confidential. Conclusion KAE with clinically significant depressive symptoms are a vulnerable group with need and desire for linguistically and culturally relevant mental health services who are isolated due to a complex array of psychological and social factors.

  8. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK...

  9. Postoperative Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery: Effect on Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Kasten, Kevin R; Celio, Adam; Burruss, Matthew B; Pories, Walter J

    2016-04-01

    While adherence to long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery is a mandate for center of excellence certification, the effect of attrition on weight loss is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of postoperative follow-up on 12-month weight loss using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) dataset. Patients with complete follow-up (3, 6, and 12 months) were compared to patients who had one or more prior missed visits. There were 51,081 patients with 12-month follow-up data available. After controlling for baseline characteristics, complete follow-up was independently associated with excess weight loss ≥50%, and total weight loss ≥30%. Adherence to postoperative follow-up is independently associated with improved 12-month weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric programs should strive to achieve complete follow-up for all patients.

  10. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    : This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK......INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS......) completed a structured interview. RESULTS: A total of 97% patients found follow-up useful. Continuity and consistency were important. One third of patients felt some degree of pre follow-up anxiety. The number of anxious MM patients was significantly greater than that of NMSC patients. No significant...

  11. Social functioning and survival: A 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arve, Seija; Lavonius, Sirkku; Savikko, Niina; Lehtonen, Aapo; Isoaho, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Although otherwise extensively researched, one aspect of social functioning in older people that has received less attention is its association with staying at home for as long as possible. This 10-year follow-up examines factors of social functioning that support older people's independent living in their own homes and that reduce the risk of mortality. The data were collected in 1991 by a postal questionnaire that was sent to all residents of Turku, Finland, born in 1920. A physical examination was also conducted. Ten years later, in 2001, the mortality rate of this population was determined. The data were examined statistically. Female gender reduced the risk of mortality. In addition, daily outdoor activities, and not needing help (from different sources) were associated with a reduced risk of mortality. No need for help and a more positive attitude towards life reduced the risk of mortality of women. There were found only non-significant trends for men. Having plans for the future also reduced the risk of mortality. The findings of this study offer useful clues for planning the services provided by home health care personnel. In planning these services it is important that home health care workers take into account the differences between women and men customers: men may need and want different things from the home health care service than women do.

  12. Patients lost to follow-up in acromegaly: results of the ACROSPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delemer, B; Chanson, Ph; Foubert, L; Borson-Chazot, F; Chabre, O; Tabarin, A; Weryha, G; Cortet-Rudelli, C; Raingeard, I; Reznik, Y; Reines, C; Bisot-Locard, S; Castinetti, F

    2014-05-01

    The complex management of acromegaly has transformed this disease into a chronic condition, with the risk of patients being lost to follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of acromegalic patients lost to follow-up in France and to determine the impact that abandoning follow-up has on the disease and its management. ACROSPECT was a French national, multicentre, cross-sectional, observational study. Acromegalic patients were considered lost to follow-up if no new information had been entered in their hospital records during the previous 2 years. They were traced where possible, and data were collected by means of a recall visit or questionnaire. In the study population, 21% of the 2392 acromegalic patients initially followed in 25 tertiary endocrinology centres were lost to follow-up. At their last follow-up visit, 30% were uncontrolled, 33% were receiving medical therapy and 53% had residual tumour. Of the 362 traced, 62 had died and 77% were receiving follow-up elsewhere; the leading reason for abandoning follow-up was that they had not been informed that it was necessary. Our analysis of the questionnaires suggests that they were not receiving optimal follow-up. This study underlines the need to better inform acromegalic patients of the need for long-term follow-up, the absence of which could be detrimental to patients' health, and to develop shared care for what must now be regarded as a chronic disease.

  13. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  14. Feasibility and safety of surgical wound remote follow-up by smart phone in appendectomy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Rivero-Belenchón, Inés; Pino-Díaz, Verónica; Rodríguez Sánchez, María Cristina; Pareja-Ciuró, Felipe; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Rosa María

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the safety and feasibility of the use of telemedicine-based services for surgical wound care and to measure patient satisfaction with telemedicine-based follow-up. 24 patients were included, they were provided with a corporate mail address. On day 7 after surgery patients sent, via email, an image of their surgical wound together with a completed questionnaire in order to obtain an early diagnosis. Two independent physicians studied this information and the histologic analysis of the specimen. On day 8, all patients underwent face-to-face office examination by a third physician and all of them completed a satisfaction questionnaire at the end of the study. The use of telemedicine-based services showed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.6%, a positive predictive value of 75% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Degree of concordance between the two physicians, as regards the necessity of face-to-face follow-up yielded a kappa coefficient of 0.42 (standard error 0.25 and confidence interval 95% (0.92-0.08), which means a moderate agreement between the two evaluations. 94% of patients were satisfied with telemedicine-based follow-up and 93% showed their preference for this procedure over conventional methods. The telemedicine-based follow-up, has proven to be feasible and safe for the evaluation of early postoperative complications. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the procedure. Telemedicine-based follow-up could become standard practice with the development of a specific mobile application.

  15. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon2,3 1Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney Local Health District and University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of

  16. Comparison of remote and in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Sheila; Panjwani, Dilzayn; Gupta, Melini; Meaney, Christopher; Morgan, Rebecca; Feuerstein, Erika

    2015-09-01

    This study compared adherence to follow-up and clinical outcomes between standard in-clinic and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion. This nonrandomized trial recruited women requesting medical abortion at two sexual health clinics in Toronto, Canada. Women received methotrexate 50 mg/m(2) followed 3-7 days later by 800 mcg of misoprostol self-administered vaginally. For Day 15, follow-up participants could choose standard in-clinic follow-up with ultrasound and assessment or remote telephone follow-up with serum β-hCG performed at a community laboratory and symptom checklist. Standard and remote follow-up groups were compared for adherence, defined as completing follow-up within 7 days of the scheduled time, and clinical outcomes. Characteristics associated with adherence were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Of 129 women, 86 (67%) chose remote follow-up. Nonadherence rates for remote (28%) and standard (23%) follow-up groups did not differ in univariate (p=.57) or multivariable analysis (odds ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-3.01). Rates of emergency/hospital visits were 3% and 9% for remote and standard groups, respectively (p=.22), and complete loss to follow was 6% and 14% in remote and standard groups (p=.18). Nonadherent women were more likely to be undecided about their contraception (65% vs. 28%; p=.002), and this difference persisted in the multivariable analysis. Given a choice of remote or in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion, most women chose remote follow-up. Rates of adherence to follow-up, adverse outcomes and complete loss to follow-up were similar for women choosing remote and standard follow-up. Since standard and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion are associated with similar adherence to follow-up and similar safety profiles, women should be offered their choice of follow-up method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 社区精神分裂症患者实施居家康复措施1年的随访观察%Follow-up study of one year implementation of home-based rehabilitation service for patients with schizophrenia in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永俐

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨居家康复措施对社区精神分裂症患者社会功能改善的效果.方法 筛选符合入组标准的精神分裂症患者78例,随机平分为实验组和对照组.对实验组患者实施入户康复指导干预,每周2次;对照组患者不提供康复指导.采用简明精神病评定量表(BPRS)及社会功能缺陷筛选量表(SDSS)分别于干预前、后对两组患者病情进行评估,并统计其再住院率.结果 干预前,两组患者BPRS、SDSS总分比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).干预后,两组患者BPRS、SDSS总分比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),实验组BPRS、SDSS总分明显低于干预前(P<0.05),对照组BPRS、SDSS总分均有升高趋势;实验组和对照组的再住院率分别为7.69%和28.21%.结论 居家康复措施可改善社区精神分裂症患者的社会功能,促进其病情稳定.%Objective To explore the effect of home based rehabilitation service on improving social function of patients with schizophrenia in community. Methods 78 patients with schizophrenia in community who met inclusion criteria were selected,and randomly and equally divided into experimental group and control group. Patients in experimental group were conducted intervention of home rehabilitation guidance twice a week, and this home rehabilitation guidance did not cover patients in control group. Brief psychiatric rating scale(BPRS) and social disability screening schedule(SDSS) were used to assess patients' condition before and after intervention,and their rehospitalization rates were calculated. Results Before intervention, difference of total scores of BPRS and SDSS of patients between two groups showed no statistically significant(P>0.05). After intervention, their difference showed statistically significant(P<0. 05) ,and the total scores of BPRS and SDSS in experimental group were markedly lower than those before intervention(P<0.05), while in control group they had increasing trends. The

  18. A Decade of GRB Follow-Up by BOOTES in Spain (2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jelínek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in a previous article and are here reviewed and updated, and additional detection data points are included as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  19. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, T.D.; Abernathy, M.R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.X.; Adya, V.B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P.A.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M.C.; Arceneaux, C.C.; Areeda, J.S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K.G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S.M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M.K.M.; Baker, P.T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.W.; Barayoga, J.C.; Barclay, S.E.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A.S.; Bell, C.J.; Berger, B.K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C.P.L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I.A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M.A.; Blackburn, J.K.; Blair, C.D.; Blair, D.G.; Blair, R.M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T.P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B.A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P.R.; Braginsky, V.B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A.F.; Brown, D.A.; Brown, D.D.; Brown, N.M.; Buchanan, C.C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R.L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J.C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J.B.; Cannon, K.C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J.C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.B.; Baiardi, L.C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; 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K; Kalaghatgi, C.V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J.B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M.S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J.S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E.A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.M.; King, E.J.; King, P.J.; Kinzel, D.L.; Kissel, J.S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S.M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W.Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B.D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P.D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, H.M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J.R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.M.; Li, T.G.F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T.B.; Lockerbie, N.A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A.L.; Lord, J.E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A.P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D.M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I.W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D.V.; Marx, J.N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T.J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D.E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S.C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D.J.; McWilliams, S.T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G.D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R.A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P.M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E.E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V.P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S.R.P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C.J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S.R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C.M.; Mueller, C.L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A.W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nielsen, A.B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M.E.N.; Nuttall, L.K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G.H.; Oh, J.J.; Oh, S.H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D.J.; Ottens, R.S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B.J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.A.; Palamos, J.R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B.C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M.A.; Paris, H.R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B.L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I.M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L.R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G.A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F.J.; Rabeling, D.S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C.M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D.H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S.D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N.A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.G.; Roma, V.J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J.H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J.R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B.S.; Saulson, P.R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R.L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; R. Schilling$^; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B.F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S.M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D.A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M.S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D.H.; Shoemaker, D.M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A.D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A.M.; Slagmolen, B.J.J.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R.J.E.; Son, E.J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A.K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B.C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K.A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N.A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A.L.; Summerscales, T.Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P.J.; Swinkels, B.L.; Szczepanczyk, M.J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D.B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S.P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M.P.; Thomas, E.G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K.A.; Thorne, K.S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K.V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; C.V. Torres$^; Torrie, C.I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M.C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Urban, A.L.; Usman, S.A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D.C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J.V.; van Veggel, A.A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D.J.; Vinet, J.Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W.D.; Vyatchanin, S.P.; Wade, A.R.; Wade, L.E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R.L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J.T.; White, D.J.; Whiting, B.F.; Williams, R.D.; Williamson, A.R.; Willis, J.L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C.C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C.C.; Yap, M.J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X.J.; Zucker, M.E.; Zuraw, S.E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A.P.; Edwards, P.G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R.J.; Voronkov, M.A.; Whiting, M.T.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J.C.; Oates, S.R.; Zhang, B.B.; Hu, Y.D.; Kubanek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellon, A.; Garcia-Cerezo, A.; Munoz, V.F.; Perez, C.; Castillo-Carrion, S.; Castro, J.M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-Garcia, M.D.; Pata, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J.A.; Konig, S.; Rendon, F.; de J. Mateo, T.; Fernandez-Munoz, R.; Yock, P.C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W.H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I.H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W.H.; Claret, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Pandey, S.B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T.M.C.; Abdalla, F.B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R.A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F.J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P.S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.E.; D'Andrea, C.B.; da Costa, L.N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H.T.; Dietrich, J.P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M.R.; Eifler, T.F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D.A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R.J.; Fong, W.F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D.B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C.L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.W.; Goldstein, D.A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.J.; Johnson, M.D.; Johnson, M.W.G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.G.; Kind, M.C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T.S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M.A.G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B.D.; Miller, C.J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R.C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A.K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A.C.; Rykoff, E.S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R.C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.E.C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R.C.; Tucker, D.L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A.R.; Wechsler, R.H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M.S.; Zhang, B.B.; Hui, C.M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M.M.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R.M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P.A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L.R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S.W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E.C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G.A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I.A.; Grove, J.E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A.K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.W.; Hill, A.B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M.N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M.N.; McEnery, J.E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A.A.; Monzani, M.E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J.S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T.A.; Racusin, J.L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.M.; Sgro, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E.J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D.J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J.B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D.F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T.M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K.S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L.A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J.P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Singer, L.P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A.A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S.V.; Aptekar, R.L.; Frederiks, D.D.; Svinkin, D.S.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D.M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K.S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D.F.; Bode, M.F.; Collins, C.A.; Copperwheat, C.M.; Darnley, M.J.; Galloway, D.K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C.G.; Piascik, A.S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I.A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J.W.; Fender, R.P.; Jonker, P.G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B.W.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N.M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T.M.O.; Gaensler, B.M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D.L.; Morales, M.F.; Tingay, S.J.; Wayth, R.B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S.J.; Chambers, K.C.; Smith, K.W.; Huber, M.E.; Young, D.R.; Wright, D.E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E.A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C.W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J.P.; Botticella, M.T.; Chen, T.W.; Valle, M.D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J.D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cwiek, A.; Cwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Onken, C.A.; Scalzo, R.A.; Schmidt, B.P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P.A.; Kennea, J.A.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S.B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F.E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Racusin, J.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Penuela, T.; Macri, L.M.; Oelkers, R.J.; Lambas, D.G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J.L.; DePoy, D.L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N.A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A.J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C.G.; McMahon, R.G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de U. Postigo, A.; Thoene, C.C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  20. A decade of GRB follow-up by BOOTES in Spain (2003-2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Jelínek, Martin; Cunniffe, Ronan; Gorosabel, Javier; Vítek, Stanislav; Kubánek, Petr; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Guziy, Sergey; Tello, Juan C; Páta, Petr; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén; Oates, Samantha; Jeong, Soomin; Štrobl, Jan; Castillo-Carrión, Sebastián; Sanguino, Tomás Mateo; Rabaza, Ovidio; Pérez-Ramírez, Dolores; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Carretero, Benito A de la Morena; Hudec, René; Reglero, Víctor; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2016-01-01

    This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in the previous article, and are here reviewed, updated, and include additional detection data points as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  1. Lost to follow-up: reasons and outcomes following tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin F; Sietsema, Debra L; Jones, Clifford B

    2016-12-01

    Different reasons for lost to follow-up are assumed. Besides "objective" reasons, "subjective" reasons and satisfaction contribute to treatment adherence. Retrospective studies usually lack the possibility of acquisition of additional outcome information. Purpose of this study was to determine outcome and factors for patients not returning for follow-up. Between 2002 and 2009, 380 patients underwent internal fixation for tibial plateau fractures. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) was collected at 6, 12, and 24 months as long as patients returned for follow-up. Pain and range of motion were measured. Records were studied for reasons of termination of follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed comparing lost to follow-up versus continued office visits regarding demographics, contributing factors, and SMFA. Two hundred fifty-nine patients were followed until treatment was completed (PRN), while 120 patients (32 %) terminated further follow-up. Patients in the 12- and 24-month follow-up groups were older (p = 0.02; p leaving treatment untimely and those being released from office visits. Follow-up remains important to obtain as much up-to-date information as possible. The current study does not support the assumption that patients lost to follow-up have a different SMFA outcome than patients returning until PRN. III.

  2. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    -up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... follow-up, or because of organizational aspects of the screening program, where communication regarding test results can fail either in content or with delay.This study will evaluate two interventions designed to increase follow-up: 1) A letter with the test result and potential recommendation for follow...

  3. Experience of Carrying out High Quality Nursing Service in ICU%浅谈ICU开展优质护理服务体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章敏

    2015-01-01

    目的探讨优质护理服务在重症监护病房应用中的体会和具体实施措施。方法让护士转变观念,主动服务,实行大包干责任制及实施床边工作制,制定切实可行的基础护理工作时间表,规范护理服务行为,明确各岗位职责。结果自开展优质护理服务以来,护理质量及患者满意度明显提高。结论开展优质护理服务可以提高护理工作质量及患者满意度。%Objective To investigate the experience of high quality nursing service in the application in the intensive care unit and the specific implementation measures.Methods The implementation of al-round responsibility system and the implementation of bedside work system,formulate feasible basic nursing work schedule,standardized nursing behaviors,clear job responsibilities.Results Since car ying out high quality nursing service,nursing quality and patient satisfaction improved significantly.Conclusion to car y out high-quality care can improve the nursing quality and patients satisfaction.

  4. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-04-17

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  5. [Impact of follow-up loss over visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila; Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros Razo

    2013-01-01

    Open-globe ocular trauma causes visual deficiency; calculating the magnitude of the latter often misses the estimation in patients without follow-up. to identify the modification of the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma, which would introduce considering the proportion estimated in patients without follow-up. Non-interventional, retrospective, longitudinal, analytical study. Visual outcome in eyes with open-globe trauma, with and without follow-up, was calculated using the Ocular Trauma Score. The observed postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was identified in eyes with follow-up; in eyes without follow-up, the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was estimated using an analysis of scenarios: best (Ocular Trauma Score), mean (that of eyes with follow-up) and worst (last observation/no visual improvement). The estimated proportion of visual deficiency was added to that observed in eyes with follow-up, and the resulting proportion was compared with that expected in the sample, using the Ocular Trauma Score (χ(2)). 104 eyes, 70 without follow-up and 34 without it. In eyes with follow-up the expected proportion of visual deficiency was 58.6%, and the observed one was 71.4% (p = 0.1); the estimated proportion of visual deficiency in eyes without follow-up was 76.5%. The resulting postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in the sample would be 73.1%, which would overcome that expected by the Ocular Trauma Score (59.6%, p = 0.04). In open-globe ocular trauma, the efficacy of surgery to reduce the proportion of visual deficiency would decrease with regard to the standard expected by the Ocular Trauma Score, if the deficiency estimated in eyes without follow-up were considered.

  6. Patient satisfaction with nurse-led telephone follow-up after curative treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirksen Carmen D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current frequent follow-up after treatment for breast cancer does not meet its intended aims, but does depend on expensive and scarce specialized knowledge for routine history taking and physical examinations. The study described in this paper compared patient satisfaction with a reduced follow-up strategy, i.e. nurse-led telephone follow-up, to satisfaction with traditional hospital follow-up. Methods Patient satisfaction was assessed among patients (n = 299 who were participants of a randomized controlled trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of several follow-up strategies in the first year after treatment for breast cancer. Data on patient satisfaction were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months after treatment, using the Dutch version of Ware's Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III (PSQ III. In addition to general satisfaction, the PSQ III reports on satisfaction scores for technical competence, interpersonal aspects, and access of care. Regression analysis was used to predict satisfaction scores from whether or not nurse-led telephone follow-up was received. Results Nurse-led telephone follow-up had no statistically significant influence on general patient satisfaction (p = 0.379, satisfaction with technical competence (p = 0.249, and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects (p = 0.662. Regarding access of care, patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher for patients receiving telephone follow-up (p = 0.015. However, a mean difference at 12 months of 3.1 points was judged to be not clinically relevant. Conclusions No meaningful differences were found in satisfaction scores between nurse-led telephone and hospital follow-up in the first year after breast cancer treatment. With high satisfaction scores and the potential to substantially reduce clinic visits, nurse-led telephone follow-up may be an acceptable alternative to traditional hospital follow-up. Trial registration number ISRCTN 74071417.

  7. Profile and pattern of follow-ups of psychiatry outpatients at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Singla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: As psychiatric illness requires long-term treatment, some patients are lost to follow-up. Aims: The present study aimed to find the follow-up pattern of psychiatric patients attending psychiatry outpatient department (OPD and to determine the correlation of follow-up with socio-demographic profile and diagnosis, if any. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective data analysis study carried out at the OPD of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Subjects and Methods: New cases attending the OPD from April 2010 to March 2011 were included in this study. The data were scrutinized 1 year after the initial assessment. Socio-demographic data, diagnosis and follow-up information were obtained from the files. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and P value. Results: 53.1% of the patients dropped out after first visit, 29.4% patients had 1-3 follow-up, 14.9% had 4-10 follow-ups and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow-ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables such as age, gender, place of living or distance from hospital, occupation, religion and marital status was not statistically significant. It was, however, seen that cognitive disorders, conversion disorder, mental retardation, and patients in which diagnosis was deferred, had more dropout rate after first visit. Conclusions: In our study 53.1% of the patients did not attend follow-up at all and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables was not statistically significant. Patients in which diagnosis was deferred had more drop out rate than patients who had a diagnosis and the difference was statistically significant.

  8. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypertension Screening and Follow-up Management by Primary Health Care System among Chinese Population Aged 35 Years and Above

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ya Jing; WANG Hui Cheng; LI Yi Chong; ZHAO Wen Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe hypertension screening and follow-up management among Chinese population aged 35 years and above within the primary health care system. Methods Data from 2010 China Chronic Disease and Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. We investigated previous hypertension diagnosis, screening, and follow-up assessments within the primary health care system. The prevalence of self-reported and criterion-based hypertension, screening rates, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics associated with screening, and patterns of follow-up assessments were recorded. The SAS software system was used for statistical analyses. Results About 17.1% reported a previous hypertension diagnosis. The rate difference between the two measures of prevalence was 27.2%. Among those without self-reported hypertension, 27.7%reported never visiting a clinic during the past 1 year and 60.4%of those attending a clinic reported ever being screened. Younger age group was associated with lower screening proportion;odds ratios of 35-, 45-, 55-, and≥65 years were 1.7 (95%CI:1.5-1.9), 1.5 (95%CI:1.3-1.7), 1.3 (95%CI:1.2-1.4), and 1.0, respectively. About 35.1% of the patients had undergone follow-up assessments four or more times during the past 1 year. Conclusion Majority of the Chinese population aged 35 years and above, particularly the less educated, elderly population, and rural residents were unaware of that they were suffering from hypertension. Most patients did not receive enough management services by the primary health care system. Thus, strengthening both the screening and follow-up management is needed.

  10. Smartphone Application WeChat for Clinical Follow-up of Discharged Patients with Head and Neck Tumors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xing Lyu; Jing Zhao; Bin Wang; Guan-Xia Xiong; Wei-Qiang Yang; Qi-Hong Liu; Xiao-Lin Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Nowadays,social media tools such as short message service,Twitter,video,and web-based systems are more and more used in clinical follow-up,making clinical follow-up much more time-and cost-effective than ever before.However,as the most popular social media in China,little is known about the utility of smartphone WeChat application in follow-up.In this study,we aimed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of WeChat application in clinical follow-up.Methods:A total of 108 patients diagnosed with head and neck tumor were randomized to WeChat follow-up (WFU) group or telephone follow-up (TFU) group for 6-month follow-up.The follow-ups were delivered by WeChat or telephone at 2 weeks,1,2,3,and 6 months to the patients after being discharged.The study measurements were time consumption for follow-up delivery,total economic cost,lost-to-follow-up rate,and overall satisfaction for the follow-up method.Results:Time consumption in WFU group for each patient (23.36 ± 6.16 min) was significantly shorter than that in TFU group (42.89 ± 7.15 min) (P < 0.001);total economic cost in WFU group (RMB 90 Yuan) was much lower than that in TFU group (RMB 196 Yuan).Lost-to-follow-up rate in the WFU group was 7.02% (4/57) compared with TFU group,9.80% (5/51),while no significance was observed (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.176-2.740;P =0.732).The overall satisfaction rate in WFU group was 94.34% (50/53) compared with 80.43% (37/46) in TFU group (95% CI:0.057-0.067;P =0.034).Conclusions:The smartphone WeChat application was found to be a viable option for follow-up in discharged patients with head and neck tumors.WFU was time-effective,cost-effective,and convenient in communication.This doctor-led follow-up model has the potential to establish a good physician-patient relationship by enhancing dynamic communications and providing individual health instructions.

  11. Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160482.html Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU About one- ... of former intensive care unit (ICU) patients have depression, a new review finds. Each year, more than ...

  12. What does being on a community treatment orders entail? A 3-year follow-up of the OCTET CTO cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugkåsa, Jorun; Yeeles, Ksenija; Koshiaris, Constantinos; Burns, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Community Treatment Orders lack evidence of effectiveness. Very little is known about how they are used in practice and over time in terms of what it obliges patients to do and the judicial threshold for remaining on an order. To investigate CTO implementation in England in terms of the use of specified conditions, and judicial hearings; whether these change over time, and; the level of continued coercion. 36-month observational prospective study of patients on CTO in the OCTET follow-up study. The number of CTO conditions remained stable over time but consolidated around medication adherence and remaining in contact with services. Ten percent of Mental Health Tribunal Hearings and only 1 percent of Hospital Managers Hearings resulted in discharge. Twenty-seven percent of patients experienced more than one CTO episode and eighteen percent remained under compulsion until the end of follow-up. CTOs seem to be used primarily to oblige patients to take medication and stay in contact with services. There is agreement between clinical and legal judgements about their appropriateness and threshold for use. A pattern of continuous coercion for a significant group of patients raises concerns. If CTOs are to be continued to be imposed, their use should be carefully monitored with further cohort studies with long-term follow-up.

  13. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated cardio

  14. Long-term follow-up after urethral injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel for female stress incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Lone; Lose, Gunnar; Møller-Bek, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Urethral injection therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence has been in use for years, but only a few long-term follow-up studies have been published. Twenty-five women, injected with polyacrylamide hydrogel 8 years earlier, were invited for follow-up. Twenty-four could be contacted; ...

  15. How Do Mode and Timing of Follow-up Surveys Affect Evaluation Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koundinya, Vikram; Klink, Jenna; Deming, Philip; Meyers, Andrew; Erb, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the analysis of evaluation methods used in a well-designed and comprehensive evaluation effort of a significant Extension program. The evaluation data collection methods were analyzed by questionnaire mode and timing of follow-up surveys. Response rates from the short- and long-term follow-ups and different questionnaire…

  16. Follow Up Study of Non College Bound Somerset County High School Graduates June 1990, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.

    A follow-up study sought to determine what happened to the 1990 noncollege-bound graduates of all the high schools in Somerset County, New Jersey. Data were gathered through a mailed survey and telephone follow-up (approximately 45 percent response) of the 408 graduates of the 12 of 13 high schools providing names. Some of the findings from…

  17. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  18. PERMANENT CARDIAC PACING IN CHILDREN - MORBIDITY AND EFFICACY OF FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERSTJENSFREDERIKSE, MWS; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; DEJONGSTE, MJL; VANDERHEIDE, JNH

    1991-01-01

    The data from 50 permanently paced children [mean standard deviation follow-up 5.3 +/- 3.7 years] were reviewed, with special attention being paid to the cause of complications and the efficacy of follow-up. The 5-year survival (SD) of the patients was 78 +/- 6%; mortality was mainly due to the unde

  19. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual prospect

  20. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  1. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  2. Routine follow-up after laryngeal cancer treatment : the assessment of pre-symptomatic recurrence detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri Christine

    2007-01-01

    The principal goal of the follow-up program as formulated for patients with laryngeal carcinoma is the pre-symptomatic detection of local and regional recurrences. Different studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiviness of this follow-up protocol. The first study comprised 402 patients with s

  3. Effective follow-up consultations : the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agen

  4. Long-term follow-up results of primary and recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspoor, F.G.; Zee, A.A.; Hannink, G.; Geest, I.C. van der; Veth, R.P.H.; Schreuder, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adequate documentation of the outcome of treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is sparse. Available case series show relatively short follow-up times and often combine locations or subtypes to increase patient numbers. This article describes the long-term follow-up of a sin

  5. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Requiring Neurological Intensive Care Unit Follow-up: Review with Nine Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gamze Bülbül

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening clinical manifestation induced by neuroleptic medication. Although NMS is regarded as a psychiatric diagnosis, its treatment requires a systematic approach and thus intensive care follow-up. In this paper, we report nine cases with NMS followed up in our Neurology Intensive Care Unit over the last three years.

  6. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  7. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  8. Individual Risk Profiling For Breast Cancer Recurrence: Towards Tailored Follow-Up Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraeima, J.; Vliegen, I.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current international guidelines for breast cancer follow-up are not specific to individual risk of local regional recurrences. Instead, for personalised follow-up it is required to have more precise estimates of local regional recurrence probability as a function of time. The objective o

  9. Clinical and radiological long-term follow-up after embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2005-01-01

    . Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO(2) and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment...

  10. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Birgelen, von C.; Lam, M.K.; Lowik, M.; Houwelingen, van G.; Stoel, M.; Louwerenburg, H.; Man, de F.H.; Hartmann, M.; Doggen, C.J.; Til, van J.A.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  11. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Marlies M.; Birgelen, von Clemens; Lam, Ming Kai; Löwik, Marije M.; Houwelingen, van K. Gert; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; Man, de Frits H.A.F.; Hartmann, Marc; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Til, van Janine A.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  12. The clinical value and the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalma, W A A; van Dam, P A; Makar, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients. A literature review was performed regarding the studies that addressed routine follow-up of endometrial cancer. For each published study, the costs of the follow-up program were calculated according to Belgium standards. A mean total of 13% relapsed. Symptomatology and clinical examination detected over 83% of the recurrences. The follow-up cost in euro after 5 and 10 years ranged between 127.68 and 2,028.78 and between 207.48 and 2,353.48, respectively. Based on the available data, there is little evidence of routine follow-up improving survival rates. Multiple protocols are used in practice without an evidence base. There is an urgent need for prospective randomized studies to evaluate the value of the current so-called 'standard medical practice of follow-up.' It is to be expected that the cost of follow-up could be reduced considerably, for instance, by tailoring to low- and high-risk groups, or by abandoning routine follow-up. Symptomatic patients, however, should be evaluated immediately. A reduction in the number of visits and examinations would mean an enormous reduction in costs. This economic benefit would be warmly welcomed in the times of increased health costs and decreased budgets.

  13. Effect on Mail Survey Return Rates of Including Questionnaires With Follow-Up Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, Charles M.; Lamb, Charles W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents allocated among seven treatments. Controls received an initial mailing (questionnaire and cover letter) only. The remaining six treatments varied by number of follow-up mailings and whether another questionnaire copy was included. Results suggest more than one follow-up letter with a…

  14. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual

  15. Long-term follow-up of surgical treatment for thumb duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, M; Nicolai, JPA

    2005-01-01

    There are few long-term follow-up reports concerning the treatment of thumb duplication. We reviewed the treatment of 19 of 74 patients treated at our institution between 1956 and 2002. The average follow-up was 22 (range, 7 years to 35 years) years. Satisfactory function was achieved in 18 thumbs a

  16. Individual Risk Profiling For Breast Cancer Recurrence: Towards Tailored Follow-Up Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraeima, J.; Vliegen, I.; Siesling, Sabine; Klaase, J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current international guidelines for breast cancer follow-up are not specific to individual risk of local regional recurrences. Instead, for personalised follow-up it is required to have more precise estimates of local regional recurrence probability as a function of time. The objective

  17. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  18. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  19. Patient's needs and preferences in routine follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; Zwaan, RE; de Velde, CJH; Kievit, J; Stiggelbout, AM

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the needs of women who participated in a routine follow-up programme after treatment for primary breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire among women without any sign of relapse during the routine follow-up period. The

  20. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck : the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Bart M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; Van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  1. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck: the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  2. Role of Psychosocial Care on ICU Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Usha Chivukula; Meena Hariharan; Suvashisa Rana; Marlyn Thomas; Sunayana Swain

    2014-01-01

    Context: Patients treated in intensive care units (ICU) though receive the best medical attention are found to suffer from trauma typically attributed to the ICU environment. Biopsychosocial approach in ICUs is found to minimize ICU trauma. Aims: This study investigates the role of psychosocial care on patients in ICU after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Settings and Design: The study included 250 post-operative CABG patients from five corporate hospitals. The combination of between sub...

  3. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  4. Nurse-Led Follow-Up at Home vs. Conventional Medical Outpatient Clinic Follow-Up in Patients With Incurable Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Uitdehaag (Madeleen); P.G. van Putten (Paul); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.M.L. Verschuur (Els); A. van der Gaast (Ate); C.J. Pek (Chulja); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); R.A. de Man (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); C. Laheij (Claudia); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient cli

  5. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth, E-mail: sappiah@bama.ua.edu [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 230 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Bryan, Hobson C. [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 330 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  6. Effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for discharged patients treated with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurse-led telephone follow-up is effective in meeting information and psycho-social needs. We explored the potential effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for patients treated with chemotherapy in China. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was employed in the research. 300 cases of cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in Beijing during July-October 2012 were selected by convenience sampling. To compare the satisfaction and response regarding to chemotherapy adverse side effects, patients who discharged on Monday and Friday were provided with telephone follow-up. Patients who discharged on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday received routine care. Results: Via telephone follow-up, patient satisfaction relating to nursing care increased. Moreover, their response to chemotherapy adverse side effects showed a significant difference. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by specialist nurses may be a feasible option. It was well received by patients, with no physical or psychological disadvantage.

  7. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years....... The focus for this study is to evaluate the follow-up program in fulfilling the purpose for early diagnosis of recurrence while reminding and concerning women, who we consider healthy after surgery, 10 times during five years. Already politicians are focusing on the subject due to the socioeconomic...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics...

  8. A Comparative Study of Nurses as Case Manager and Telephone Follow-up on Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Severe Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Mottaghipour, Yasaman; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Kangrani, Hamed Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Providing community-based mental health services is crucial and is an agreed plan between the Iranian Mental Health Office and the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean (affiliated with WHO). The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of home-visit clinical case-management services on the hospitalization rate and other clinical outcomes in patients with severe mental illness. A total of 182 patients were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, home-visit (n=60), telephone follow-up (n=61) and as-usual care (n=61) groups. Trained nurses as clinical case-managers provided home-visit services and the telephone follow-up tasks. Hospitalization rate as a measure of recurrence, as well as burden, knowledge, general health condition of caregivers with positive/negative symptoms, satisfaction, quality of life, and social skills of the consumers were assessed as the main and secondary outcomes, respectively. Most clinical variables were improved in both intervention groups compared with the control group. During the one year follow-up, the rate of rehospitalization for the telephone follow-up and as-usual groups were respectively 1.5 and 2.5 times higher than the home-visit group. Trained clinical case-managers are capable of providing continuous care services to patients with severe mental illness. The telephone follow-up services could also have beneficiary outcome for the consumers, their caregivers, and the health system network.

  9. Psychosocial work characteristics as predictors for burnout: findings from 3-year follow up of the PUMA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borritz, Marianne; Bültmann, Ute; Rugulies, Reiner

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of psychosocial work characteristics on burnout. METHODS: A total of 1772 participants in different human service sector organizations were eligible for the cross-sectional analyses (baseline) and 952 for the prospective analyses....... We measured 14 psychosocial work characteristics and three types of burnout. Linear regression models were used for analyzing associations between psychosocial work characteristics at baseline and burnout at baseline and at 3 years of follow up. RESULTS: Low possibilities for development, high...... meaning of work, low predictability, high quality of leadership, low role clarity, and high role conflicts predicted burnout at 3 years of follow up after the psychosocial work characteristics were adjusted for each other, potential confounders, and burnout level at baseline. CONCLUSION: Psychosocial work...

  10. Gynaecological cancer follow-up: national survey of current practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Simon; Stuart, Nick; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Hall, Liz; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    To establish a baseline of national practice for follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. Questionnaire survey. Gynaecological cancer centres and units. Members of the British Gynaecological Cancer Society and the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses. A questionnaire survey. To determine schedules of follow-up, who provides it and what routine testing is used for patients who have had previous gynaecological cancer. A total of 117 responses were obtained; 115 (98%) reported hospital scheduled regular follow-up appointments. Two involved general practitioners. Follow-up was augmented or replaced by telephone follow-up in 29 responses (25%) and patient-initiated appointments in 38 responses (32%). A total of 80 (68%) cancer specialists also offered combined follow-up clinics with other specialties. Clinical examinations for hospital-based follow-up were mainly performed by doctors (67% for scheduled regular appointments and 63% for patient-initiated appointments) while telephone follow-up was provided in the majority by nurses (76%). Most respondents (76/117 (65%)) provided routine tests, of which 66/76 (87%) reported carrying out surveillance tests for ovarian cancer, 35/76 (46%) for cervical cancer, 8/76 (11%) for vulval cancer and 7/76 (9%) for endometrial cancer. Patients were usually discharged after 5 years (82/117 (70%)), whereas three (3%) were discharged after 4 years, nine (8%) after three years and one (1%) after 2 years. Practice varied but most used a standard hospital-based protocol of appointments for 5 years and routine tests were performed usually for women with ovarian cancer. A minority utilised nurse-led or telephone follow-up. General practitioners were rarely involved in routine care. A randomised study comparing various models of follow-up could be considered.

  11. Early discharge care with ongoing follow-up support may reduce hospital readmissions in COPD.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Maria

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Early discharge care and self-management education, although effective in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), do not typically reduce hospital re-admission rates for exacerbations of the disease. We hypothesized that a respiratory outreach programme that comprises early discharge care followed by continued rapid-access out-patient support would reduce the need for hospital readmission in these patients. METHODS: Two hundred and forty-six patients, acutely admitted with exacerbations of COPD, were recruited to the respiratory outreach programme that included early discharge care, follow-up education, telephone support and rapid future access to respiratory out-patient clinics. Sixty of these patients received self-management education also. Emergency department presentations and admission rates were compared at six and 12 months after, compared to prior to, participation in the programme for the same patient cohort. RESULTS: The frequency of both emergency department presentations and hospital admissions was significantly reduced after participation in the programme. CONCLUSIONS: Provision of a respiratory outreach service that includes early discharge care, followed by education, telephone support and ongoing rapid access to out-patient clinics is associated with reduced readmission rates in COPD patients.

  12. A 3-year clinical follow-up study of a ceramic (Optec) inlay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, M; Karlsson, S

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical quality of ceramic (Optec) inlays, the inlay production of 10 dentists, served by 3 dental laboratories, was examined independently by 2 calibrated examiners. Of the 57 patients with 205 inlays participating in the first examination, 47 patients with 145 remaining inlays participated in the 3-year follow-up reexamination. For 14 of the participants in the reexamination, altogether 21 inlays had fractured. The mean time in service before fracture was 26.4 months (range, 12-53 months). The inlays were rated using the California Dental Association (CDA) quality evaluation system. This examination showed that the mismatch of color had increased from the first examination to the reexamination and registered slightly roughened surfaces. As to anatomic form, a reduced number of inlays did not receive an excellent CDA rating at the reexamination. Visible evidence of ditching along the margin had increased by almost 50%, and an apparent discoloration of the margin between the restoration and the tooth structure was seen in 73% of the reexamined inlays, compared with 7% at the first examination.

  13. [Follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Coordinated management and criteria for referral between healthcare levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The correct management of osteoarthritis requires an accurate diagnosis, evaluation of its spread and functional repercussions, and the application of comprehensive and effective individually-tailored treatment aimed at relieving pain and improving physical function with a consequent improvement in quality of life; treatment should also aim to prevent or delay disease progression and its effects. In the National Health Service, primary care is the basic level and the first point of access to healthcare; this level guarantees the continuity of care, coordinates patients, and regulates clinical workflow. Family physicians coordinate the healthcare processes related to chronic diseases and are responsible for the management, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The clinical practice guidelines internationally accepted as the standard of care for the management of osteoarthritis should be adapted by both Spanish health planning strategies and clinical practice guidelines to the Spanish healthcare setting. The comprehensive assessment of osteoarthritis includes evaluation of its effects on the patient's physical function and quality of life; formulating a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and adapted to his or her comorbidities; providing advice on basic treatments and their risks and benefits; and carrying out an individually-tailored periodic review. Referral criteria are based on diagnostic confirmation, poor treatment response, and surgical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. CMS proposes prioritizing patient preferences, linking patients to follow-up care in discharge planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Hospital providers voice concerns about a proposed rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that would require providers to devote more resources to discharge planning. The rule would apply to inpatients as well as emergency patients requiring comprehensive discharge plans as opposed to discharge instructions. CMS states that the rule would ensure the prioritization of patient preferences and goals in the discharge planning process, and also would prevent avoidable complications and readmissions. However, hospital and emergency medicine leaders worry that community resources are not yet in place to facilitate the links and follow-up required in the proposed rule, and that the costs associated with implementation would be prohibitive. The proposed rule would apply to acute care hospitals, EDs, long-term care facilities, inpatient rehabilitation centers, and home health agencies. Regardless of the setting, though, CMS is driving home the message that patient preferences should be given more weight during the discharge planning process. Under the rule, hospitals or EDs would need to develop a patient-centered discharge plan within 24 hours of admission or registration, and complete the plan prior to discharge or transfer to another facility. Under the rule, emergency physicians would determine which patients require a comprehensive discharge plan. Both the American Hospital Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians worry that hospitals will have to take on more staff, invest in training, and make changes to their electronic medical record systems to implement the provisions in the proposed rule.

  15. Longer-Term Follow-Up of Kenyan Men Circumcised Using the ShangRing Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Feldblum

    Full Text Available To ascertain clinical sequelae, client satisfaction and sexual behavior 2+ years after male circumcision using the ShangRing device.We enrolled 199 men from the Kenya sites (Homa Bay district participating in a 2012 study of the ShangRing device used in routine male circumcision services (N = 552. We enrolled men who had had the ShangRing placed successfully, and over-sampled men who had had an adverse event and/or were HIV-positive during the field study. In the present study, each participant was examined and interviewed by a study clinician, and penile photographs were taken to document longer-term cosmetic results and any abnormal findings.194 men were included in the analysis. The mean and median times between circumcision and the longer-term follow-up visit in this study were 31.8 and 32 months, respectively. Four men (2.1% had signs/symptoms of a sexually transmitted infection (STI. Virtually all (99.5% of the men were very satisfied with the appearance of their circumcised penis, and all would recommend a ShangRing circumcision to friends or family members. The most prevalent reported advantage of the circumcision was the ease of bathing and enhanced cleanliness of the penis (75.8%. 94.3% of the men did not cite a single negative feature of their circumcision. 87.5% of men reported more sexual pleasure post-MC, the most common reason being more prolonged intercourse. The majority of men (52.6% reported one sexual partner post-MC, but more than a quarter of the men (28.1% reported an increased number of partners post-MC. Less than half of the men (44.3% reported using condoms half of the time or more, but the great majority of condom users stated that condom use was much easier post-MC, and 76.9% of users said they used condoms more after circumcision than before.This study supports the safety and acceptability of ShangRing male circumcision during 2-3 years of follow-up. It should allay worries that the ShangRing procedure could lead to

  16. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Joslin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6% athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80% consented to participate in the study and 17 (61% were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65% of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29% confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12% sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12% of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations.

  17. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jarem B.; Copeli, Nikoli

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY) who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6%) athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80%) consented to participate in the study and 17 (61%) were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65%) of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29%) confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12%) sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12%) of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations. PMID:28203462

  18. Can follow-up examination of tuberculosis patients be simplified? A study in Chhattisgarh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Kundu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Each follow-up during the course of tuberculosis treatment currently requires two sputum examinations. However, the incremental yield of the second sputum sample during follow-up of different types of tuberculosis patients has never been determined precisely. OBJECTIVES: To assess the incremental yield of the second sputum sample in the follow-up of tuberculosis patients under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP in Chhattisgarh, India. METHODOLOGY: A record review of tuberculosis (TB patients registered in 2009 using a structured proforma from two sources, Tuberculosis and Laboratory Register, was undertaken in the six districts of Chhattisgarh, India. RESULTS: In smear positive cases, of 10,048 follow-up examinations, 45 (0.5% were found to be smear positive only on the second sputum when the result of the first sample was negative. In smear negative pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB patients, of 6,206 follow-up smear examinations, 11(0.2% were found to be smear positive. CONCLUSIONS: The incremental yield of a second smear examination was very low, indicating that examination of one sputum sample is enough during follow-up among TB patients. There is insufficient yield to support sputum smear microscopy for monitoring smear negative pulmonary TB and extra pulmonary TB patients. These results indicate that the follow-up smear microscopy can be substantially simplified with favourable resource implications.

  19. Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Gerner Hansen, Niels-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm in accor...... is that management of the follow-up of small nodules did improve in 2008-2009, but adherence to the guidelines was still limited. We will now implement a prospective program for monitoring the adherence to the follow-up CTs.......Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm...... in the four year period 2006-2009. In 72 cases, 19 in 2006-2007 and 51 in 2008-2009, one or more small nodules, with diameter ≤ 10 mm, were detected on CT in patients with no known recent malignant disease. For these patients follow-up was suggested, either with CT or PET-CT. One of the 70 patients from 2008...

  20. Passive versus active follow-up to investigate the efficacy of primary prevention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Högel, Josef

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Before general application of a primary prevention program its efficacy has to be demonstrated. For this purpose a randomized controlled trial with active or passive follow-up may be conducted. In the last 5 years, the ratio of controlled trials with passive versus those with active follow-up was 1:13. However, under certain circumstances a passive follow-up may be more appropriate and useful to overcome the drawbacks of an active follow-up, as e.g. high costs and many drop-outs. In a randomized controlled trial, a passive follow-up is based on the reporting of cases by physicians or hospitals instead of actively following up all study participants individually. The statistical evaluation can be carried out using a one-sample chi2-test. Advantages and limitations are discussed. A passive follow-up may be advantageous in situations with low incidence, large number of participants, complete ascertainment of conditions with obligatory notification or effective disease registries and should be preferred in such a context.

  1. Language barriers, location of care, and delays in follow-up of abnormal mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Ma, Lin; Hofmann, Michael; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Retrospective cohort study of women at 3 mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997 to 2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 d), facility B (18%; 14 d), and facility C (51%; 41 d). Most mammography examinations (67%) had breast imaging and reporting data system 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up, 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up examination compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (Planguage; compared with English speakers and adjusting for education, non-English speakers had twice the odds ratio of >30-day delay in follow-up (odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.9). There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients.

  2. Language Barriers, Location of Care and Delays in Follow-up of Abnormal Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, LS; Ma, L; Hofmann, M; Kerlikowske, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. Objectives We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of women at three mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry (SFMR) with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997-2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Results Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4,027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English-speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 days), facility B (18%; 14 days), facility C (51%; 41 days). Most (67%) mammography examinations had BIRADS 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up exam compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (p30 day delay in follow-up (OR 2.3; 95 CI 1.4-3.9). Conclusions There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, in order to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients. PMID:21993060

  3. A Facebook Follow-Up Strategy for Rural Drug-Using Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Megan F; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Smith, Kirsten E; Leukefeld, Carl; Webster, J Matthew; Oser, Carrie B

    2017-06-01

    Facebook (FB) use has grown exponentially over the past decade, including in rural areas. Despite its popularity, FB has been underutilized as a research follow-up approach to maintain contact with research participants and may have advantages in less densely populated areas and among more hard-to-reach, at-risk groups. The overall goal of this study was to examine FB as a supplemental follow-up approach to other follow-up strategies with rural drug-using women. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with randomly selected women who completed baseline interviews in 3 rural jails in 1 state. Analyses focus on participants who were released from jail and were eligible for 3-month follow-up (n = 284). Bivariate analyses were used to examine differences between FB users and nonusers, and multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of 3-month follow-up participation and being located for follow-up using FB. About two-thirds (64.4%) of participants were regular FB users. Bivariate analyses indicated that FB users were younger, more educated, and more likely to have used alcohol in the 30 days before incarceration but less likely to have a chronic health problem. Regression analyses indicated that rural FB users had more than 5 times the odds of being located for the 3-month follow-up interview, even after controlling for other variables. There were no significant predictors of being followed up using FB. Findings suggest that FB is widely used and well accepted among rural drug-using women. Among hard-to-reach populations, including those in rural, geographically isolated regions, FB serves as a method to improve participant follow-up. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Preoperative predictors of adherence to multidisciplinary follow-up care postbariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjani, Soroush; Spivak, Israel; Hao Guo, Ming; Aliarzadeh, Babak; Wang, Wei; Robinson, Sandra; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Aarts, Mary-Anne

    2016-02-01

    Long-term multidisciplinary care after bariatric surgery is important for weight maintenance and management of co-morbidities. Despite this, the rate of attendance to follow-up appointments is universally low. To identify patient factors that contribute to adherence to follow-up care after bariatric surgery. Three university-affiliated hospitals in Canada A cohort study of 388 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from January 2011 to December 2011 was performed. This program mandates multidisciplinary follow-up care at 3, 6, and 12 months, and annually thereafter. Patients' socioeconomic, psychosocial, and medical and psychiatric co-morbidities were recorded prospectively. Adherence to follow-up care was defined as having attended the majority of clinic visits (3 or 4 out of 4); all other patients were considered nonadherent. The mean age of patients was 45.0 years, 81.2% were female, and the majority underwent a gastric bypass (91.8%) versus a sleeve gastrectomy (8.2%); 62.1% of patients were adherent to follow-up appointments. Patients older than 25 years had a higher adherence rate than those who were younger (63.2% versus 37.5%, P = .040). Patients with full-time or part-time employment had a significantly higher adherence rate than those who were unemployed or retired (65.6% versus 50.0%, P = .017, odds ratio 1.9). Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before surgery had higher follow-up adherence than those without OSA (62.2% versus 37.8%, P = .044). In multivariate analysis, employment remained an independent predictor of follow-up adherence (P = .017). Employment was the strongest predictor of attendance to follow-up clinic. Patients with OSA and older patients were also more likely to return consistently for scheduled follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of ICU-bed availability on ICU admission decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, René; Coudroy, Rémi; Ragot, Stéphanie; Lesieur, Olivier; Runge, Isabelle; Souday, Vincent; Desachy, Arnaud; Gouello, Jean-Paul; Hira, Michel; Hamrouni, Mouldi; Reignier, Jean

    2015-12-01

    The potential influence of bed availability on triage to intensive care unit (ICU) admission is among the factors that may influence the ideal ratio of ICU beds to population: thus, high bed availability (HBA) may result in the admission of patients too well or too sick to benefit, whereas bed scarcity may result in refusal of patients likely to benefit from ICU admission. Characteristics and outcomes of patient admitted in four ICUs with usual HBA, defined by admission refusal rate less than 11 % because of bed unavailability, were compared to patients admitted in six ICUs with usual low bed availability (LBA), i.e., an admission refusal rate higher than 10 % during a 90-day period. Over the 90 days, the mean number of days with no bed available was 30 ± 16 in HBA units versus 48 ± 21 in LBA units (p Bed availability affected triage decisions. Units with HBA trend to admit patients too sick or too well to benefit.

  6. Kyoto Conference Dinner Speech: Follow-up in the age of surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Future big surveys are going to provide many targets of rare compact binary populations that will require photometric and spectroscopic follow-up to use them to answer questions on the formation and evolution of compact binaries, their space densities and the connection to other astrophysical phenomena such as Supernovae Type Ia and the populations of gravitational wave emitters. Now is the time to start preparing efficient follow-up strategies for upcoming static and synoptic surveys. The proposal is to develop a standard photometer that will facilitate a homogeneous multi-band follow-up strategy.

  7. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... with 4-year follow-up in general practice. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the influence of risk factors on nursing home placement. RESULTS: A total 758 non-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted the General Practitioners in October and November 2002 of whom 50...

  8. Pi of the Sky involvement in LSC-Virgo electromagnetic follow-up project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZadroŻny, Adam; Sokołowski, Marcin; Mankiewicz, Lech; Żarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2016-09-01

    Pi of the Sky took part in LSC-Virgo's Electromagnetic (EM) Follow-up project during first science run of Advanced LIGO detectors between September 2015 and January 2016. More than 60 astronomical teams have signed Memorandum-of-Understanding with LSC-Virgo for EM Follow-up project. LSC-Virgo's EM Follow-up is aimed for searching electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave transient candidates. Observing an event both in EM and gravitational wave band might be a important step forward to multi-messenger astronomy. The aim of this paper is to show algorithms used by Pi of the Sky for analysing data taken during the science runs.

  9. Long-term follow-up of echolalia and question answering.

    OpenAIRE

    Foxx, R M; Faw, G D

    1990-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of echolalia and correct question answering was conducted for 6 subjects from three previously published studies. The follow-up periods ranged from 26 to 57 months. In a training site follow-up, subjects were exposed to baseline/posttraining conditions in which the original trainer and/or a novel person(s) presented trained and untrained questions. Four subjects displayed echolalia below baseline levels, and another did so in some assessments. Overall, echolalia was lowe...

  10. Follow-up research of moose and other wild animals at Pernaja European Highway E18

    OpenAIRE

    Vare, Seija

    2001-01-01

    The follow up study at Pernaja has continued now for nearly three years. The follow up research has been started before the road was built, it continued during the construction period 1995 -1998. The amounts of animals and the traces of animals were examined. The semi -motorway was opened to traffic in the year 1998, and then started the follow - up research at under passages. At the road there were 11 under passages, which were built for local traffic, but they were suitable also for animals...

  11. The family economic status and outcome of people with schizophrenia in Xinjin, Chengdu, China: 14-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Yang, Lawrence H; Liu, Yu-Jun; Huang, Debbie; Mao, Wen-Jun; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Jie; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about whether family economic status might influence the long-term (e.g. over 10 years) outcome of persons with schizophrenia in the community. To examine the differences in outcome at 14-year follow-up of persons with schizophrenia from high versus low family economic status backgrounds in a Chinese rural area. A prospective 14-year follow-up study was conducted in six townships in Xinjin County, Chengdu, China. All participants with schizophrenia ( n = 510) were identified in an epidemiological investigation of 123,572 people aged 15 years and older and followed up from 1994 to 2008. Individuals from low family economic status (family economic status (⩾mean; 3.2% and 76.6%, respectively). Individuals from low family economic status had significantly lower rates of marriage and complete remission, higher mean scores on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and lower mean score on Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) than those from high family economic status in 2008. The predictors of low family economic status of individuals in 2008 encompassed the baseline low family economic status, poor families' attitude toward the patient, younger age, older age of first onset and longer duration of illness. Low family economic status is a predictive factor of poor long-term outcome of persons with schizophrenia in the rural community. Individuals' family economic status should be considered in making mental health policy and providing community-based mental health services.

  12. Nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients: what is known and what is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Jacqueline; Larsson, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Traditionally, cancer patient follow-up has focused on disease surveillance and detecting recurrence. However, an increasing number of patients who have survived cancer acknowledge the importance of cancer rehabilitation issues and the need for more patient-oriented models of care by reporting their unmet physical, emotional, and social needs. Nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients fulfills this need and has been developing gradually for various cancer diagnoses and prognoses. A growing body of evidence suggests that these services provide high-quality care that is both safe and efficient. Furthermore, patients benefit from the continuity of care and easy access to support for their multitude of needs, provided by such organized care. In this paper, we review the literature published in the past 5 years regarding nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients in order to provide input and opinion for future research, clinical practice development, and nursing leadership. We pay special attention to head and neck cancer patients, a group that has been largely understudied and hence underreported in the literature. These patients have specific needs with respect to information and education regarding their cancer and potential treatment side-effects as well as a particular need for long-term psychosocial support and practical advice.

  13. Warning! fire in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Fabio; Iannuzzi, Michele; De Robertis, Edoardo; Piazza, Ornella; Servillo, Giuseppe; Tufano, Rosalba

    2014-06-01

    At 5:30 pm on December 17, 2010, shortly after a power failure, smoke filled the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Federico II University Hospital in Naples, Italy, triggering the hospital emergency alarm system. Immediately, staff began emergency procedures and alerted rescue teams. All patients were transferred without harm. The smoke caused pharyngeal and conjunctival irritation in some staff members. After a brief investigation, firefighters discovered the cause of the fire was a failure of the Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS).

  14. Patient follow up screening evaluations. Examples with regard to congenital hip dislocation and congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Juttmann (Rikard); J. Hess (Jakob); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G.J. van Oortmarssen (Gerrit)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To discuss the merits of the patient follow up study design for the evaluation of some specific mass screening programmes. DESIGN: Theoretical evaluation illustrated by two examples. SETTING: Department of Public Health Erasmus University

  15. Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery in a national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thereaux, J; Lesuffleur, T; Païta, M; Czernichow, S; Basdevant, A; Msika, S; Millat, B; Fagot-Campagna, A

    2017-09-01

    Lifelong medical follow-up is mandatory after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year follow-up after bariatric surgery in a nationwide cohort of patients. All adult obese patients who had undergone primary bariatric surgery in 2009 in France were included. Data were extracted from the French national health insurance database. Medical follow-up (medical visits, micronutrient supplementation and blood tests) during the first 5 years after bariatric surgery was assessed, and compared with national and international guidelines. Some 16 620 patients were included in the study. The percentage of patients with at least one reimbursement for micronutrient supplements decreased between the first and fifth years for iron (from 27.7 to 24.5 per cent; P bariatric surgery is poor, especially for young men with poor early follow-up. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Parental education on asthma severity in the emergency department and primary care follow-up rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelli W; Word, Carolyn; Streck, Maria R; Titus, M Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic condition affecting children and a common chief complaint in emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to improve parents' understanding of their child's asthma severity on accessing our pediatric ED for an acute asthma exacerbation. A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine outpatient follow-up rates from our ED in 2010-2011. In an attempt to educate parents at ED discharge about their child's asthma severity at presentation, we included a visual severity scale on their discharge instructions. Postdischarge telephone interviews were completed to determine postintervention follow-up rates. Asthma follow-up rates at 1 week improved from 20.8% to 50% after intervention. This difference was statistically significant after controlling for age and clinical asthma score with logistic regression (P education about a child's initial asthma severity is a simple intervention that significantly improved follow-up rates for children seen in the ED for asthma exacerbation.

  17. Benefits of and barriers to SEA follow-up - Theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gachechiladze-Bozhesku, M., E-mail: mayagachechiladze@gmail.com [Center for Environment and Security, Central European University, Nador ut. 9, Budapest 1051 (Hungary); Fischer, T.B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, 4imPiAct research team, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    If SEA is to facilitate 'strategic' changes, it needs to focus on shaping the ways in which strategic initiatives are implemented, not just formulated. This is why follow-up which refers to postdecisional activities of SEA and strategic initiatives is increasingly seen as crucial. However, to date follow-up has only received limited attention in the SEA literature, as well as in practical guidance. The key reasons for why post decision activities are often overlooked are the lack of understanding of its actual benefits and purportedly multiple problems with its accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive literature review and an international e-survey on the topic, as well as an in-depth analysis of six SEA follow-up cases from England and Canada. Practically encountered and perceived benefits of, and obstacles to SEA follow-up are identified and discussed.

  18. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie;

    2010-01-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients....

  19. [Feasibility of following up a representative sample of the adult population in Barcelona (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Fu, Marcela; Sureda, Xisca; Ballbè, Montse; Riccobene, Anna; Fernández, Esteve

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the feasibility of following up a representative sample of the adult population of Barcelona 8 years after the baseline study. We selected a random sample (n=100) of the 1161 participants who consented to be re-contacted. We contacted 66 participants: 52 (78.8%) agreed to participate in the follow-up, three (4.5%) had died, four (6.1%) had moved, and seven (10.6%) declined to participate in the follow-up. The participation rate in the feasibility study was 52%. In conclusion, the results of our study show a good feasibility of conducting a follow-up study 8 years after the baseline study. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6-month follow-up results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jung Choo

    2014-10-01

    Initial ultrasonographic evaluation reflected the unique structure of each VCD, with most of them being easily distinguishable. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed various changes in the affected vessels.

  1. Postoperative follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct using hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirobe, Seiichi; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Yasufumi; Mizuno, Dai; Yano, Tsunehiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children`s Hospital (Japan); Ishii, Katsumi

    1995-03-01

    Follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were done in 20 cases ranging 3 to 20 years after operation. Operative cholangiography had shown dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in 15 patients (75%), of these, 7 patients had cystic dilatation. Five cases of these 7 patients showed prolonged stasis of the nuclide in the cystic dilated intrahepatic bile ducts by {sup 99m}Tc-PMT hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the follow-up studies even at 10 years after operation. But none of 20 cases had complication such as intrahepatic lithiasis, cholangitis, and liver dysfunction. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy could provide moderate anatomic and excellent functional information which were useful for these follow-up studies and careful follow-up should be done in the case of cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. (author).

  2. Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in a Danish youth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Trine Nøhr; Andersen, Johan H; Labriola, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in the Danish youth cohort Vestliv could introduce selection bias of the measured risk estimates. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of initial non-participation and loss to follow-up on the validity of descriptive measures and selected...... better school abilities and came more often from homes with two adults, higher income or higher educational level. These differences increased at subsequent follow-ups. The effect of initial non-participation on the ORs was modest with most RORs being close to one. Loss to follow-up led to larger...... variations in the RORs ranging from 0.77 to 1.62 although for most estimates, the bias was minor. None of the measured RORs were statistically different from one indicating no significant bias. CONCLUSIONS: Although certain characteristics were related to those who initially chose to participate...

  3. Chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin. Case report with 18-month follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamburrini, O.; Bartolomeo-De Iuri, A.; Di Guglielmo, G.L.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of warfarin during pregnancy may cause a rare syndrome characterized by nasal hypoplasia, usually associated with stippled epiphyseal and extraepiphyseal calcifications ressembling chondrodysplasia punctata. A case of chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin with 18 months follow-up is reported.

  4. Two-year follow-up of self-examination therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; McKendree-Smith, Nancy; Bailey, Elaine; Stump, Jamie; Scogin, Forrest; Bowman, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving self-examination therapy (SET) [Bowman, D. (1995). Innovations in clinical practice: a source book. Professional Resource Press.] for generalized anxiety disorder. A 2-year follow-up of 16 participants from Bowman, Scogin, Floyd, Patton, and Gist [J. Counsel. Psychol. 44 (1997) 267] was conducted by comparing pre- and post-treatment measures with follow-up measures from the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale-Revised (HARS-R), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the SET quiz. Results indicated treatment gains from baseline to the 2-year follow-up period were maintained on all measures, and there was not a significant decline from post-treatment to follow-up on the HARS-R and STAI. These results suggest that SET for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) may be effective in both the immediate and long-term reduction of GAD symptoms.

  5. Use of mobile phones to improve post-hospitalisation follow-up of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... suggest that a substantial proportion of re-admissions are preventable through effective discharge planning and close patient follow up. ... Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Siaya County Health facilities, in Nyanza province, Kenya.

  6. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  7. Suicide risk in schizophrenia – a follow-up study after 20 years ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suicide risk in schizophrenia – a follow-up study after 20 years. ... South African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT ... Crosstabulations were then performed to identify factors associated with increased suicide risk. For those subjects ...

  8. Final results of a long-term, clinical follow-up in fatty liver patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, Sanne; Becker, Ulrik; Franzmann, Maria-Benedicte

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing focus on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of the present study was to conduct a long-term clinical follow-up of patients with biopsy-confirmed fatty liver without inflammation or significant fibrosis (pure fatty liver), to analyse for potential risk....... All admissions, discharge diagnoses and causes of death during follow-up were collected. All surviving patients were invited to a clinical follow-up. RESULTS: The follow-up period was 20.4 and 21.0 years, respectively, for the NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) groups. Two NAFLD patients...... of death. Patients with AFLD died primarily from cirrhosis and other alcohol-related disorders, whereas in patients with NAFLD the main causes of death were cardiovascular disease and cancer. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with pure non-alcoholic fatty liver, survival was good and independent...

  9. Echocardiographic Follow-up of Robotic Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Regurgitation due to Degenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Robotic MV repair for MR due to degenerative disease is associated with a low rate of recurrent MR, and a significant improvement in MR grade, LAD, and LVEDD, but a significant decrease in LVEF at echocardiographic follow-up.

  10. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Sidsel S; Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Erik S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treate...

  11. Long-Term follow up after intra-Uterine transfusionS; the LOTUS study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verduin, Esther P; Lindenburg, Irene T M; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van Klink, Jeanine M M; Schonewille, Henk; van Kamp, Inge L; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J; Kanhai, Humphrey H H; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Lopriore, Enrico; Brand, Anneke

    2010-01-01

    .... We set up a large long-term observational follow-up study (LOTUS study), in cooperation with the Sanquin Blood Supply Foundation and the LUMC departments of Obstetrics, Neonatology and ImmunoHematology...

  12. Assessing factors for loss to follow-up of HIV infected patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Pernille Bejer; Engell-Sørensen, Thomas; Jespersen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    to face or by phone by a field assistant and patients were asked why they had not shown up for the scheduled appointment. Patients were included by date of HIV testing and risk factors for LTFU were assessed using Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Among 561 patients (69.5 % HIV-1, 18.0 % HIV-2......Purpose: The objective of this study was to ascertain vital status of patients considered lost to follow-up at an HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau, and describe reasons for loss to follow-up (LTFU). Methods: This study was a cross-sectional sample of a prospective cohort, carried out between May 15......, 2013, and January 31, 2014. Patients lost to follow-up, who lived within the area of the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site (DSS), were eligible for inclusion. Active follow-up was attempted by telephone and tracing by a field assistant. Semi-structured interviews were done face...

  13. Nurse-led telephone follow-up after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szöts, Kirsten; Konradsen, Hanne; Solgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To generate information on how telephone follow-up consultations, structured by nursing status according to the VIPS-model, functioned after total knee arthroplasty. The objectives were to unfold the content of the telephone follow-ups according to the structure for nursing...... status and to explore the patients' views of the telephone follow-ups. BACKGROUND: The length of stay in hospital following total knee arthroplasty has fallen markedly, and patients now have to be responsible for their recovery from a very early stage. After discharge, patients may experience a variety...... Telephone follow-up was valued by total knee arthroplasties patients as representing a holistic approach and providing adequate information, counselling and support after discharge to home. Three categories were identified with regard to the patients' views: 'A means for reflection and provision of adequate...

  14. Patent foramen ovale closure following cryptogenic stroke or transient ischaemic attack: Long-term follow-up of 301 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaali, Mikaeil; Dooley, Maureen; Wynne, Dylan; Cooter, Nina; Lee, Lorraine; Haworth, Peter; Saha, Romi; Gainsborough, Nicola; Hildick-Smith, David

    2015-11-15

    Patent foramen ovale has been identified as a conduit for paradoxical embolism resulting in cryptogenic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We aimed to establish rates of death, recurrent stroke or TIA among patients undergoing PFO closure for stroke or TIA at our unit. A retrospective analysis of all PFO closure patients was performed between May 2004 and January 2013. Follow up was performed by mortality tracing using the Medical Research Information Service of the Office of National Statistics. With regard to stroke or TIA recurrence, written consent forms and questionnaires were mailed with follow up telephone calls. Medical notes and imaging records were consulted where adverse events were noted. 301 patients aged 48.6 ± 11.0 years, 54.4% male, with ≥1 thromboembolic neurovascular event had percutaneous PFO closure with one of eight devices, with successful implantation in 99% of cases. Follow-up duration was 40.2 ± 26.2 months (range 1.3-105.3); complete in 301 patients for mortality (100%) and 283 patients (94.0%) for neurovascular events. Two patients died during follow-up (respiratory failure n = 1; road traffic accident n = 1). Recurrent stroke (MRI or CT confirmed) was observed in five patients (0.5%; 0.55 per 100 person-years) and TIA in 9 (1.1%; 0.98 per 100 person-years). Atrial fibrillation requiring treatment was documented in 14 patients (1.7%). Percutaneous PFO closure in patients with cryptogenic stroke or TIA is a safe treatment with a low incidence of procedural complications and recurrent neurovascular events. Registry data like these may help to demonstrate the utility of PFO closure in stroke.

  15. Course of adolescent headache: 4-year annual face-to-face follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Karlı, Necdet; Bican, Aylin; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the course of the diagnosis and characteristics of headache in 12- to 17-year-old adolescents during a follow-up period of 4 years. Headache prevalence and characteristics, and even the type of headache show important changes during adolescence. The course of adolescent headache might reveal important insight into the pathophysiology of headache. Subjects who received a single headache diagnosis were invited to participate in a follow-up study con...

  16. Outcome of knee injuries in general practice: 1-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background Knee injuries may lead to pain and to functional limitations in the activities of daily living. Patients with knee injuries are frequently seen in general practice; however, the outcome and management in these patients is not known. Aim To assess the outcome and management of knee injuries at 12 months' follow-up in general practice. Design of study A prospective observational cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. Setting. Primary health care. Method Adult patients consulting their...

  17. Planning for Long-Term Follow-Up: Strategies Learned from Longitudinal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Karl G; Woodward, Danielle; Woelfel, Tiffany; Hawkins, J David; Green, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Preventive interventions are often designed and tested with the immediate program period in mind, and little thought that the intervention sample might be followed up for years or even decades beyond the initial trial. However, depending on the type of intervention and the nature of the outcomes, long-term follow-up may well be appropriate. The advantages of long-term follow-up of preventive interventions are discussed and include the capacity to examine program effects across multiple later life outcomes, the ability to examine the etiological processes involved in the development of the outcomes of interest, and the ability to provide more concrete estimates of the relative benefits and costs of an intervention. In addition, researchers have identified potential methodological risks of long-term follow-up such as inflation of type 1 error through post hoc selection of outcomes, selection bias, and problems stemming from attrition over time. The present paper presents a set of seven recommendations for the design or evaluation of studies for potential long-term follow-up organized under four areas: Intervention Logic Model, Developmental Theory and Measurement Issues; Design for Retention; Dealing with Missing Data; and Unique Considerations for Intervention Studies. These recommendations include conceptual considerations in the design of a study, pragmatic concerns in the design and implementation of the data collection for long-term follow-up, as well as criteria to be considered for the evaluation of an existing intervention for potential for long-term follow-up. Concrete examples from existing intervention studies that have been followed up over the long term are provided.

  18. What Happens Next? Follow-Up from the Children's Toddler School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class,…

  19. Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Anna S. Urrila; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Strandholm, Thea; Marttunen, Mauri; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up. Methods A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13–19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings...

  20. Bilateral Ovarian Torsion during Follow-up for Antenatally Detected Ovarian Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Bozidar; Baskovic, Marko; Sovic, Ljudevit; Habek, Dubravko

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian torsion is a surgical emergency demanding timely diagnosis and treatment to prevent loss of the ovaries which if happens may result in functional and emotional consequences. Simple (less than 5cm in size) ovarian cysts require follow-up for potential self-resolution. We describe a case of antenatally detected bilateral ovarian cysts that developed bilateral ovarian torsions on follow-up, postnatally.

  1. Electronic Detection of Delayed Test Result Follow-Up in Patients with Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ashley N D; Murphy, Daniel R; Al-Mutairi, Aymer; Sittig, Dean F; Wei, Li; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-01

    Delays in following up abnormal test results are a common problem in outpatient settings. Surveillance systems that use trigger tools to identify delayed follow-up can help reduce missed opportunities in care. To develop and test an electronic health record (EHR)-based trigger algorithm to identify instances of delayed follow-up of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) results in patients being treated for hypothyroidism. We developed an algorithm using structured EHR data to identify patients with hypothyroidism who had delayed follow-up (>60 days) after an abnormal TSH. We then retrospectively applied the algorithm to a large EHR data warehouse within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), on patient records from two large VA networks for the period from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011. Identified records were reviewed to confirm the presence of delays in follow-up. During the study period, 645,555 patients were seen in the outpatient setting within the two networks. Of 293,554 patients with at least one TSH test result, the trigger identified 1250 patients on treatment for hypothyroidism with elevated TSH. Of these patients, 271 were flagged as potentially having delayed follow-up of their test result. Chart reviews confirmed delays in 163 of the 271 flagged patients (PPV = 60.1%). An automated trigger algorithm applied to records in a large EHR data warehouse identified patients with hypothyroidism with potential delays in thyroid function test results follow-up. Future prospective application of the TSH trigger algorithm can be used by clinical teams as a surveillance and quality improvement technique to monitor and improve follow-up.

  2. The Experience of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey of Patients in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Janine Mitchell; Peta Callaghan; Jackie Street; Susan Neuhaus; Taryn Bessen

    2014-01-01

    Investigating patients’ reports on the quality and consistency of melanoma follow-up care in Australia would assist in evaluating if this care is effective and meeting patients’ needs. The objective of this study was to obtain and explore the patients’ account of the technical and interpersonal aspects of melanoma follow-up care received. An online survey was conducted to acquire details of patients’ experience. Participants were patients treated in Australia for primary melanoma. Qualitative...

  3. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal can...

  4. Recorded interactive seminars and follow-up discussions as an effective method for distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth T; Hannum, Wallace M; Proffit, William R

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, although orthodontic residents prefer to be live and interactive in a seminar, they learn almost as much when watching a previously recorded interactive seminar and following up with live discussion. Our objective was to test the effectiveness and acceptability of using previously recorded interactive seminars and different types of live follow-up discussions. Residents at schools participating from a distance completed preseminar readings and at their convenience watched streaming video of some or all recordings of 4 interactive seminar sequences consisting of 6 seminars each. Afterward, distant residents participated in 1 of 4 types of interaction: local follow-up discussion, videoconference, teleconference, and no discussion. The effectiveness of the seminar sequences was tested by pretest and posttest scores. Acceptability was evaluated from ratings of aspects of the seminar and discussion experience. Open-ended questions allowed residents to express what they liked and to suggest changes in their experiences. In each seminar sequence, test scores of schools participating through recordings and follow-up discussions improved more than those participating live and interactive. After viewing, residents preferred local follow-up discussion, which was not statistically different from participating live and interactive both locally and from a distance. Videoconference and teleconference discussions were both more acceptable to residents than no follow-up discussion, which was found to be significantly below all methods tested. When residents are live and interactive in a seminar, there does not appear to be a significant difference between being local vs at a distance. Recorded interactive seminars with follow-up discussions are also an effective and acceptable method of distance learning. Residents preferred local follow-up discussion, but, at a distance, they preferred videoconference to both teleconference and no discussion

  5. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Irreversible Electroporation of Malignant Hepatic Tumors--Alterations in Venous Structures at Subacute Follow-Up and Evolution at Mid-Term Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Dollinger

    Full Text Available To evaluate risk factors associated with alterations in venous structures adjacent to an ablation zone after percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE of hepatic malignancies at subacute follow-up (1 to 3 days after IRE and to describe evolution of these alterations at mid-term follow-up.43 patients (men/women, 32/11; mean age, 60.3 years were identified in whom venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone at subacute follow-up after IRE of 84 hepatic lesions (primary/secondary hepatic tumors, 31/53. These vessels were retrospectively evaluated by means of pre-interventional and post-interventional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography or both. Any vascular changes in flow, patency, and diameter were documented. Correlations between vascular change (yes/no and characteristics of patients, lesions, and ablation procedures were assessed by generalized linear models.191 venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone: 55 (29% were encased by the ablation zone, 78 (41% abutted the ablation zone, and 58 (30% were located between 0.1 and 1.0 cm from the border of the ablation zone. At subacute follow-up, vascular changes were found in 19 of the 191 vessels (9.9%, with partial portal vein thrombosis in 2, complete portal vein thrombosis in 3, and lumen narrowing in 14 of 19. At follow-up of patients with subacute vessel alterations (mean, 5.7 months; range, 0 to 14 months thrombosis had resolved in 2 of 5 cases; vessel narrowing had completely resolved in 8 of 14 cases, and partly resolved in 1 of 14 cases. The encasement of a vessel by ablation zone (OR = 6.36, p<0.001, ablation zone being adjacent to a portal vein (OR = 8.94, p<0.001, and the usage of more than 3 IRE probes (OR = 3.60, p = 0.035 were independently associated with post-IRE vessel alterations.Venous structures located in close proximity to an IRE ablation zone remain largely

  7. Palliative Care Needs Assessment in the Neuro-ICU: Effect on Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Hanna, Marina G; Cheever, C Sherry; Lele, Abhijit V; Spiekerman, Charles; Engelberg, Ruth A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-07-11

    Examine the association of a daily palliative care needs checklist on outcomes for family members of patients discharged from the neurosciences intensive care unit (neuro-ICU). We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in a single, thirty-bed neuro-ICU in a regional comprehensive stroke and level 1 trauma center. One of two neuro-ICU services that admit patients to the same ICU on alternating days used a palliative care needs checklist during morning work rounds. Between March and October, 2015, surveys were mailed to family members of patients discharged from the neuro-ICU. Nearly half of surveys (n = 91, 48.1%) were returned at a median of 4.7 months. At the time of survey completion, mean Modified rankin scale score (mRS) of neuro-ICU patients was 3.1 (SD 2). Overall ratings of quality of care were relatively high (82.2 on a 0-100 scale) with 32% of family members meeting screening criteria for depressive syndrome. The primary outcome measuring family satisfaction, consisting of eight items from the Family Satisfaction in the ICU questionnaire, did not differ significantly between families of patients from either ICU service nor did family ratings of depression (PHQ-8) and post-traumatic stress (PCL-17). Among families of patients discharged from the neuro-ICU, the daily use of a palliative care needs checklist had no measurable effect on family satisfaction scores or long-term psychological outcomes. Further research is needed to identify optimal interventions to meet the palliative care needs specific to family members of patients treated in the neuro-ICU.

  8. Four years follow-up of 101 children with melamine-related urinary stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wen, Jian Guo; Wen, Jian Jun; Su, Zhi Qiang; Zhu, Wen; Huang, Chen Xu; Yu, Si Long; Guo, Zhan

    2013-06-01

    The melamine-contaminated milk powder incidence occurred in China in 2008. Many studies have been published regarding the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of melamine-related urinary stones. The objective of this study is to follow-up the effects of melamine-contaminated milk powder consumption on kidney and body growth in children with melamine-related urinary stones 4 years ago. One hundred and one children with melamine-related urinary stones were followed up by urinalysis, renal function tests and urinary ultrasonography. The data of body weight and height, clinical signs and complications were collected. Eighty normal children without the history of consuming melamine-contaminated milk powder were collected as controls. Eighty-one children with melamine-related urinary stones were successfully followed up. Of 45 cases with melamine-related urinary stones treated conservatively after discharge, 34 disappeared completely, 6 dissolved partially, 1 increased in size and 4 did not change at 4 years follow-up. The percentages of under-height and under-weight infants were significantly higher in melamine-related urinary stones group compared to the controls, respectively (p urinary stones on kidney and bladder was found at 4 years follow-up. However, whether or not melamine-related urinary stones had effect on body growth needs follow-up in future.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors: Four-Year Follow-Up Results in 47 Patients

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    Kim, Soo Dong; Yoon, Seong Guk; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the intermediate results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of small renal masses (SRMs). Percutaneous or laparoscopic RFA was performed on 48 renal tumors in 47 patients. The follow-up studies included a physical examination, chest radiography, creatinine level, and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. To confirm the pathologic criteria of complete ablation, 35 patients underwent a follow-up biopsy. Recurrence was defined as contrast enhancement on imaging studies after 3 months, lesion growth at subsequent imaging, or viable cancer cells on follow-up biopsy. Technical success was achieved in 43 (89.6%) of 48 renal tumors. The mean tumor size was 2.3 cm and the mean follow-up period was 49.6 months. Repeated RFA was necessary in 5 tumors due to incomplete ablation. The overall complication rate was 35.8%, of which 96.2% were mild complications. Serum creatinine levels at 12 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA (1.28 vs. 1.36 mg/dL). Four patients were found to have recurrence at various follow-up intervals, and distant metastasis was not found in any cases. RFA appears to be a useful treatment for selected patients with SRMs. Our 4-year follow-up results disclose an excellent therapeutic outcome with RFA, while achieving effective local tumor control.

  10. Cohort profile of the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study at final follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Koji; Sakata, Kiyomi; Mori, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Shogo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sakauchi, Fumio; Motohashi, Yutaka; Tsuji, Ichiro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Mikami, Haruo; Kurosawa, Michiko; Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu; Tanabe, Naohito; Tamakoshi, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Tokudome, Shinkan; Hashimoto, Shuji; Wada, Yasuhiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Tsuneharu; Date, Chigusa; Kurozawa, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Shibata, Akira; Okamoto, Naoyuki; Shio, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was established in the late 1980s to evaluate the risk impact of lifestyle factors and levels of serum components on human health. During the 20-year follow-up period, the results of the study have been published in almost 200 original articles in peer-reviewed English-language journals. However, continued follow-up of the study subjects became difficult because of the retirements of principal researchers, city mergers throughout Japan in the year 2000, and reduced funding. Thus, we decided to terminate the JACC Study follow-up at the end of 2009. As a final point of interest, we reviewed the population registry information of survivors. A total of 207 (0.19%) subjects were ineligible, leaving 110 585 eligible participants (46 395 men and 64 190 women). Moreover, errors in coding date of birth and sex were found in 356 (0.32%) and 59 (0.05%) cases, respectively, during routine follow-up and final review. Although such errors were unexpected, their impact is believed to be negligible because of the small numbers relative to the large total study population. Here, we describe the final cohort profile at the end of the JACC Study along with selected characteristics of the participants and their status at the final follow-up. Although follow-up of the JACC Study participants is finished, we will continue to analyze and publish study results.

  11. Reimbursement for Living Kidney Donor Follow-Up Care: How Often Does Donor Insurance Pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Ajay; Rodrigue, James; Ajaimy, Maria; Wasilewski, Marcy; Ladin, Keren; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, many transplantation centers do not follow former living kidney donors on a long-term basis. Several potential barriers have been identified to provide this follow-up of former living kidney donors, including concerns that donor insurance will not reimburse transplantation centers or primary care physicians for this care. Here, we report the rates at which different insurance companies reimbursed our transplantation center for follow-up visits of living donors. Methods We collected data on all yearly follow-up visits of living donors billed from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010, representing 82 different donors. Concurrent visits of their recipients were available for 47 recipients and were used as a control group. Results We find that most bills for follow-up visits of living kidney donors were paid by insurance companies, at a rate similar to the reimbursement for recipient follow-up care. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, for former donors with insurance, inadequate reimbursement should not be a barrier in providing follow-up care. PMID:23060280

  12. Reimbursement for living kidney donor follow-up care: how often does donor insurance pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Ajay; Rodrigue, James; Ajaimy, Maria; Wasilewski, Marcy; Ladin, Keren; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2012-11-27

    Currently, many transplantation centers do not follow former living kidney donors on a long-term basis. Several potential barriers have been identified to provide this follow-up of former living kidney donors, including concerns that donor insurance will not reimburse transplantation centers or primary care physicians for this care. Here, we report the rates at which different insurance companies reimbursed our transplantation center for follow-up visits of living donors. We collected data on all yearly follow-up visits of living donors billed from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010, representing 82 different donors. Concurrent visits of their recipients were available for 47 recipients and were used as a control group. We find that most bills for follow-up visits of living kidney donors were paid by insurance companies, at a rate similar to the reimbursement for recipient follow-up care. Our findings suggest that, for former donors with insurance, inadequate reimbursement should not be a barrier in providing follow-up care.

  13. Role of psychosocial care on ICU trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Patients treated in intensive care units (ICU though receive the best medical attention are found to suffer from trauma typically attributed to the ICU environment. Biopsychosocial approach in ICUs is found to minimize ICU trauma. Aims: This study investigates the role of psychosocial care on patients in ICU after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Settings and Design: The study included 250 post-operative CABG patients from five corporate hospitals. The combination of between subject and correlation design was used. Materials and Methods: The ICU psychosocial care scale (ICUPCS and ICU trauma scale (ICUTS were used to measure the psychosocial care and trauma. Statistical Analysis: ANOVA and simple and multiple regression were applied. Results: Hospitals significantly differed in psychosocial care provided in ICUs. Higher the psychosocial care in ICU, lower was the ICU trauma experienced and vice versa. Psychosocial care was a significant major predictor of ICU trauma. Conclusions: The study suggests emphasis on psychosocial aspects in ICU care for optimizing prognosis.

  14. Health correlates of workplace bullying: a 3-wave prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie; Grynderup, Matias; Persson, Roger; Hogh, Annie; Willert, Morten Vejs; Kaerlev, Linda; Rugulies, Reiner; Kolstad, Henrik A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the course of workplace bullying and health correlates among Danish employees across a four-year period. In total, 7502 public service and private sector employees participated in a 3-wave study from 2006 through 2011. Workplace bullying over the past 6-12 months and data on health characteristics were obtained by self-reports. We identified major depression using Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry interviews and the Major Depression Inventory. We performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of outcomes according to self-labelled bullying at baseline using logistic regression. Reports of bullying were persistent across four years in 22.2% (57/257) of employees who initially reported bullying. Baseline associations between self-labelled bullying and sick-listing, poor self-rated health, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms were significant with adjusted odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.8 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-2.4] for poor sleep quality among those bullied "now and then" to 6.9 (95% CI 3.9-12.3) for depression among those reporting being bullied on a daily to monthly basis. In longitudinal analyses adjusting for bullying during follow-up, all health correlates except poor sleep quality persisted up to four years. Self-reported health correlates of workplace bullying including sick-listing, poor self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and a diagnosis of depression tend to persist for several years regardless of whether bullying is discontinued or not. Independent measures of bullying and outcomes are needed to learn whether these findings reflect long lasting health consequences of workplace bullying or whether self-labelled workplace bullying and health complaints are correlated because of common underlying factors.

  15. Treatment and follow up of children with chronic hepatitis C in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velmishi Virtut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of Hepatitis C in children has a better outcome than in adults, and for this reason the treatment had different views. However, in pediatric age hepatitis C is seen to have an evolution towards chronicity. Today is a normal option to treat chronic hepatitis C as early as possible according to certain criteria. The aim of this study is to show the results of treatment with interferon and ribavirin and the follow-up of children diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C in our service. Patients and methods This is a prospective study which has included children 3 up to 15 years old (13 boys and 4 girls diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C. All patients underwent a certain protocol, including liver biopsy prior to treatment. Treatment consisted in use for 48 weeks of INF α-2b, 3 MIU/m2 three times a week s/c and ribavirin 15 mg/kg orally divided bid. Two patients were treated with PEGINF α-2b with dose 1.5 mcg/kg once a week s/c and ribavirin 15 mg/kg. After the treatment all patients have stayed under our control for an average period of 24 weeks. Results At the end of the treatment we detected a patient with HCV-RNA positive. End Treatment Viral Response was 94%. Six months later we found three patients who showed relapse of disease. Sustained Viral Response was approximately 83% Conclusion The combination therapy of interferon with Ribavirin in treatment of children with chronic hepatitis C provides a higher SVR when treatment is initiated at the earliest stages of hepatic changes. Side effects of therapy are insignificant in comparison with results obtained

  16. Information-seeking behaviour and information needs of LGBTQ health professionals: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Martin; Roberto, K R

    2016-09-01

    Except for one study in 2004, the literature has no data on the information-seeking behaviour of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) health professionals. After a decade of change for LGBTQ people, and the growth of electronic information sources and social networks, it is appropriate to revisit this subject. To gain an updated understanding of the information-seeking behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals and of how medical libraries can provide a culturally competent service to such users. A mixed-methods approach was adopted combining a Web-based questionnaire with email follow-up discussions. One hundred and twenty-three complete responses were received, mostly from the USA and Canada, between November 2012 and October 2013. LGBTQ health professionals remain more comfortable seeking LGBTQ health information from a medical librarian whom they know to be LGBTQ because they perceive LGBTQ librarians as more likely to have specialist knowledge, or through concern that non-LGBTQ librarians may be more likely to react in a stigmatising or discriminatory way. The study also provides evidence suggesting that online chat has marginal appeal for respondents seeking LGBTQ health information, despite its anonymity. Medical libraries seeking to demonstrate their cultural competency should provide visible evidence of this, such as through the creation of dedicated resource lists, promotion of LGBTQ literature on the library's website, and display of other symbols or statements supporting diversity. Opportunities exist for LGBTQ health professionals and medical librarians to work together to ensure that medical libraries are culturally competent and welcoming spaces for LGBTQ patrons, that library collections match their needs, and in the creation of guides to ensure maximum access to the results of LGBTQ health research. Medical libraries should also consider nominating and, if necessary, training a specialist in LGBTQ health information. Such

  17. Preparing for LSST with the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) provides an ideal platform for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the LCOGT telescope network in addition to a web-based system developed to perform prioritized target selection, scheduling, and data reduction to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs.In order to determine how to maximize our NEO follow-up efforts, we must first define our goals for the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network. This means answering the following questions. Should we follow-up all objects brighter than some magnitude limit? Should we only focus on the brightest objects or push to the limits of our capabilities by observing the faintest objects we think we can see and risk not finding the objects in our data? Do we (and how do we) prioritize objects somewhere in the middle of our observable magnitude range? If we want to push to faint objects, how do we minimize the amount of data in which the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to see the object? And how do we find a balance between performing follow-up and characterization observations?To help answer these questions, we have developed a LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network simulator that allows us to test our prioritization algorithms for target selection, confirm signal-to-noise predictions, and determine ideal block lengths and exposure times for observing NEO candidates. We will present our results from the simulator and progress on our NEO follow-up efforts.In the era of LSST, developing/utilizing infrastructure, such as the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network and our web-based platform for selecting, scheduling, and reducing NEO observations, capable of handling the large number of detections expected to be produced on a daily basis by LSST will be critical to follow-up efforts. We hope our

  18. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL HYPOVENTILATION USING NOCTURNAL CAPNOGRAPHY IN MECHANICALLY VENTILATED NEUROMUSCULAR PATIENTS: A 5 YEARS FOLLOW-UP STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ogna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRestrictive respiratory failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neuromuscular diseases (NMD. Home mechanical ventilation (HMV is used to treat hypoventilation, and its efficiency is mostly assessed by daytime blood gases or nocturnal oxygen saturation monitoring (SpO2. Non-invasive transcutaneous measure of CO2 (TcCO2 allows to directly assess nocturnal hypercapnia and to detect residual hypoventilation with a higher sensitivity than SpO2.We aimed to compare the prognostic value of nocturnal SpO2 and TcCO2 in ventilated adult NMD patients. MethodsAll consecutive capno-oximetries performed between 2010 and 2011 in ventilated adult NMD patients were analysed retrospectively. Concomitant blood gas analysis and lung function data were collected. Patients on oxygen therapy were excluded. Nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia (using 4 different definitions at baseline were compared in their ability to predict mortality and respiratory events requiring ICU admission during follow-up. ResultsData from 55 patients were analysed (median age 28 IQR 25 - 36.5 years; 71% Duchenne muscular dystrophy; vital capacity 12 7 - 27 % of predicted; 51% tracheostomy.Capno-oxymetry showed hypoxemia in 14.5% and hypercapnia in 12.7 to 41.8%, according to the used definition.Over a follow-up lasting up to 5 years (median 4.0 3.6 - 4.5 years, we observed 12 deaths and 20 respiratory events requiring ICU admission. Hypercapnia was significantly associated with the study outcomes, with TcCO2 >49 mmHg during ≥10% of the time being the best definition, whilst hypoxemia was not.ConclusionsOur data show for the first time that residual hypoventilation, assessed by capnometry, is significantly associated with negative outcomes in adult ventilated NMD patients, whilst oximetry is not. Accordingly, we suggest capnometry to be included in the systematic assessment of HMV efficiency in NMD patients.

  19. Options for early breast cancer follow-up in primary and secondary care - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taggart Frances

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both incidence of breast cancer and survival have increased in recent years and there is a need to review follow up strategies. This study aims to assess the evidence for benefits of follow-up in different settings for women who have had treatment for early breast cancer. Method A systematic review to identify key criteria for follow up and then address research questions. Key criteria were: 1 Risk of second breast cancer over time - incidence compared to general population. 2 Incidence and method of detection of local recurrence and second ipsi and contra-lateral breast cancer. 3 Level 1–4 evidence of the benefits of hospital or alternative setting follow-up for survival and well-being. Data sources to identify criteria were MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, ZETOC, Health Management Information Consortium, Science Direct. For the systematic review to address research questions searches were performed using MEDLINE (2011. Studies included were population studies using cancer registry data for incidence of new cancers, cohort studies with long term follow up for recurrence and detection of new primaries and RCTs not restricted to special populations for trials of alternative follow up and lifestyle interventions. Results Women who have had breast cancer have an increased risk of a second primary breast cancer for at least 20 years compared to the general population. Mammographically detected local recurrences or those detected by women themselves gave better survival than those detected by clinical examination. Follow up in alternative settings to the specialist clinic is acceptable to women but trials are underpowered for survival. Conclusions Long term support, surveillance mammography and fast access to medical treatment at point of need may be better than hospital based surveillance limited to five years but further large, randomised controlled trials are needed.

  20. Automated telecommunication to obtain longitudinal follow-up in a multicenter cross-sectional COPD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey I; Moyle, Sarah; Criner, Gerard J; Wilson, Carla; Tanner, Ron; Bowler, Russell P; Crapo, James D; Zeldin, Robert K; Make, Barry J; Regan, Elizabeth A; For The Copdgene Investigators

    2012-08-01

    It can be challenging to maintain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in clinical studies. COPDGene is a multicenter, observational study designed to identify genetic factors associated with COPD and to characterize COPD-related phenotypes. To obtain follow-up data on patient's vital status and outcomes, the COPDGene Longitudinal Follow-up (LFU) Program was developed to supplement its parent study. We used a telecommunication system that employed automated telephone contact or web-based questions to obtain longitudinal follow-up data in our subjects. A branching questionnaire asked about exacerbations, new therapies, smoking status, development of co-morbid conditions, and general health status. Study coordinators contacted subjects who did not respond to one of the automated methods. We enrolled 10,383 subjects in the COPDGene study. As of August 29, 2011, 7,959 subjects completed 19,955 surveys. On the first survey, 68.8% of subjects who completed their survey did so by electronic means, while 31.3% required coordinator phone follow-up. On each subsequent survey the number of subjects who completed their survey by electronic means increased, while the number of subjects who required coordinator follow-up decreased. Despite many of the patients in the cohort being chronically ill and elderly, there was broad acceptance of the system with over half the cohort using electronic response methods. The COPDGene LFU Study demonstrated that telecommunications was an effective way to obtain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in a large multicenter study. Web-based and automated phone contacts are accepted by research subjects and could serve as a model for LFU in future studies.

  1. Does routine ultrasound change management in the follow-up of patients with vesicoureteral reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzinski, Jan K; Weber, Bryce; Wildgoose, Petra; Lorenzo, Armando; Bagli, Darius; Farhat, Walid; Harvey, Elizabeth; Salle, Joao Luiz Pippi

    2013-01-01

    Children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) usually need a renal ultrasound (RUS). There is little data on the role of follow-up RUS in VUR. We evaluated the impact of follow-up RUS on the change in clinical management in patients with VUR. We prospectively analyzed children with a previous diagnosis of VUR seen in the outpatient clinic with a routine follow-up RUS within 4 months. Variables collected included: demographic data, VUR history, dysfunctional voiding symptoms and concurrent ultrasound findings. Change in management was defined as addition of new medication, nurse counselling, surgery or further investigations. The study included 114 consecutive patients. The mean patient age was 4.5 years old, mean age of VUR diagnosis was 1.7 years, with average follow-up of 2.8 years. A change in management with stable RUS occurred in 14 patients, in which the change included ordering a DMSA in 9, nurse counselling for dysfunctional voiding in 3, and booking surgery in 2 patients. Change on RUS was seen in 4 patients. Multivariable analysis showed that history of urinary tract infection (UTI) since the last follow-up visit was more significant than RUS findings. The RUS findings in most patients followed for VUR remain stable or with minimal changes. The variable showing a significant effect on change in management in our study was history of UTI since the last follow-up visit rather than RUS findings. The value of follow-up RUS for children with VUR may need to be revisited.

  2. A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedberg, Petra; Svensson, Bengt; Hansson, Lars; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2014-08-01

    BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR). The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments. The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals. Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.

  3. Value of early follow-up CT in paediatric tuberculous meningitis

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    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Wieselthaler, Nicky; Smith, Bruce; Douis, Hassan [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Fieggen, A. Graham; Toorn, Ronald van; Wilmshurst, Jo [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2005-11-01

    The value of CT in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children is well reported. Follow-up CT scanning for these patients is, however, not well described and, in particular, the value of early follow-up CT has not been addressed for children with TBM. To assess the value of early follow-up CT in children with TBM in identifying diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutically relevant features of TBM. A retrospective 4-year review of CT scans performed within 1 week and 1 month of initial CT in children with proven (CSF culture-positive) and probable TBM (CSF profile-positive but culture-negative) and comparison with initial CT for the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic CT features of TBM. The CT scans of 50 children were included (19 ''definite'' TBM; 31 ''probable'' TBM). Of these, 30 had CT scans performed within 1 week of the initial CT. On initial CT, 44 patients had basal enhancement. Only 24 patients had contrast medium-enhanced follow-up scans. Important findings include: 8 of 29 patients (who were not shunted) developed new hydrocephalus. New infarcts developed in 24 patients; 45% of those who did not have infarction initially developed new infarcts. Three of the six patients who did not show basal enhancement on initial scans developed this on the follow-up scans, while in seven patients with pre-existing basal enhancement this became more pronounced. Two patients developed hyperdensity in the cisterns on non-contrast medium scans. Eight patients developed a diagnostic triad of features. Three patients developed CT features of TBM where there was none on the initial scans. Early follow-up CT is useful in making a diagnosis of TBM by demonstrating features that were not present initially and by demonstrating more sensitive, obvious or additional features of TBM. In addition, follow-up CT is valuable as a prognostic indicator as it demonstrates additional infarcts which may have developed or become more

  4. Communication skills in ICU and adult hospitalisation unit nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso-Murillo, D; Colomer-Sánchez, A; Herrera-Peco, I

    In this study researchers are trying to analyse the personality factors related to social skills in nurses who work in: Intensive Care Units, ICU, and Hospitalisation units. Both groups are from the Madrid Health Service (SERMAS). The present investigation has been developed as a descriptive transversal study, where personality factors in ICU nurses (n=29) and those from Hospitalisation units (n=40) were compared. The 16PF-5 questionnaire was employed to measure the personality factors associated with communication skills. The comparison of the personality factors associated to social skills, communication, in both groups, show us that nurses from ICU obtain in social receptivity: 5,6 (A+), 5,2 (C-), 6,2 (O+), 5,1 (H-), 5,3 (Q1-), and emotional control: 6,1 (B+), 5,9 (N+). Meanwhile the data doesn't adjust to the expected to emotional and social expressiveness, emotional receptivity and social control, there are not evidence. The personality factors associated to communication skills in ICU nurses are below those of hospitalisation unit nurses. The present results suggest the necessity to develop training actions, focusing on nurses from intensive care units to improve their communication social skills. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E; Berry, Gerard T; Burlina, Alberto B; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Spencer, Jessica B; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P; Van Calcar, Sandra C; Waisbren, Susan E; Bosch, Annet M

    2017-03-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.

  6. Patient attendance in a recall program after prosthodontic rehabilitation: a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfart, Stefan; Weyer, Nils; Kern, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the recall attendance and maintenance for a patient population after prosthodontic treatment in undergraduate student courses. Four hundred ninety-three patients who received fixed restorations (FRs; crowns or fixed partial dentures) or removable partial dentures (RPDs; conical crown-retained or precision attachment-retained dental prostheses) were included in a recall program. The number of patients attending regularly scheduled follow-up visits every 6 months was recorded. On the basis of the complexity of the performed treatment, all follow-up interventions were assigned to the categories minimal, moderate, or extensive. After 60 months, a cumulative follow-up attendance rate between 63% (RPD) and 74% (FR) was evident and not gender related. Altogether, 399 patients (193 FR, 206 RPD) regularly attended the follow-up visits. Between 61.9% (RPD) and 93.8% (FR) of these patients did not need any extensive treatment; however, only 19.2% (RPD) to 85.6% (FR) did not need any moderate or extensive treatment between follow-up visits. Patients treated with FRs showed a higher recall attendance than patients treated with RPDs. Further, patients with RPDs needed more extensive and moderate treatments than patients with FRs. This difference should be taken into consideration during prosthetic planning and patient consultation.

  7. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Al Chalabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32–88 and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  8. Six-year experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Chalabi, Hasan; O'Riordan, James M; Richardson, Alex; Flannery, Delia; O'Connor, Katrina; Stuart, Charlotte; Larkin, John; McCormick, Paul; Mehigan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32-88) and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  9. Long-Term Ultrasound Follow-Up of Thyroid Colloid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to assess the interval changes of thyroid colloid cysts (TCCs by performing long-term ultrasound (US follow-up examinations. Methods. From 2007 to 2008, 437 patients underwent a lobectomy for the treatment of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Among them, 268 patients underwent 4 or more postoperative US follow-ups after surgery. This study investigated the prevalence and interval changes of TCCs ≥3 mm by using US follow-ups. Results. Among 268 patients, 35 (13.1% had TCCs ≥3 mm by a preoperative thyroid US, and 6 (2.2% had newly detected TCCs at a US follow-up. Through long-term US follow-up, the interval changes for TCCs were classified as follows: no interval change (n=8, gradual increase (n=8, gradual decrease (n=5, positive fluctuation (n=3, negative fluctuation (n=6, disappearance (n=5, and new detection (n=6. None of the TCC cases had a TCC that was ≥10 mm at its largest diameter, and no patient complained of any relevant symptoms pertaining to the TCCs. Conclusions. In this study, TCCs demonstrated various interval changes, but no abrupt increase was found or acute onset of symptoms occurred.

  10. Congenital arterioportal fistulas: radiological treatment and color Doppler US follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplisky, Dario; Tincani, Eliana Uruena; Lipsich, Jose; Sierre, Sergio [Department of Interventional Radiology, Pichincha 1890, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-11-15

    Congenital intrahepatic arterioportal fistulas (APFs) are a rare cause of portal hypertension in children. Doppler US is a useful diagnostic imaging modality. Transarterial embolization is a minimally invasive and effective therapy allowing occlusion of the fistula and restoration of liver hemodynamics. To describe the clinical and radiologic findings, percutaneous treatment and role of D-US in the postembolization follow-up of children with APF. Between 2002 and 2011, four children with APF were treated. Initial diagnosis and follow-up was performed with D-US and confirmed by arteriography, followed by endovascular embolization in all patients. D-US demonstrated abnormal arterioportal communications in all patients. Six endovascular procedures were performed in these four children. In two children, no residual fistula was seen on D-US after the first procedure and symptoms resolved. In the other two children, D-US demonstrated residual flow through the fistula, with resolution of pathological D-US findings and symptoms after the second endovascular procedure. All four children were successfully treated and asymptomatic at the end of follow-up. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Interventional radiology has a key role in the treatment of congenital APF. D-US is a noninvasive and effective tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac surgery patients' evaluation of the quality of theatre nurse postoperative follow-up visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2009-06-01

    Theatre nurses at the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery in Orebro, Sweden, have since 2001 routinely conducted a follow-up visit to postoperative cardiac patients. A model with a standardized information part and an individual-caring conversation including both a retrospective and a prospective part designed the visit. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of the postoperative follow-up visit conducted by the theatre nurses and find out if the quality was related to gender or type of admission. The method was prospective and explorative, including 74 cardiac surgery patients who had had a postoperative follow-up visit by a theatre nurse in Sweden. The instrument measuring quality, from the patient's perspective, measured the quality of the visit, and consisted of 16 items modified to suit the study. The results showed an overall high quality rating, with statistically significant higher scores for six items between patients who had undergone emergency surgery, in comparison with elective patients. When comparing gender, women had statistically significant higher scores in two items. In conclusion, this postoperative follow-up visit by the theatre nurse was a valuable and useful tool especially for the patients who had undergone emergency surgery. In the follow-up visit the theatre nurse creates a caring relationship by meeting the patient as an individual with his/her own experience and needs for information about the surgery, intra and postoperative care, and recovery.

  12. The truth about nutrition in the ICU.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    For the critically ill patient who is expected to remain more than 48 h in the intensive care unit (ICU), the need for nutrition is an accepted standard of care. The traditional screening tools used to identify malnutrition on the hospital ward are not adequate for use in the ICU because critically ill patients cannot communicate verbally to provide diet histories. Due to their high catabolic state, all ICU patients are at risk of developing malnutrition if not fed adequately. Since criticall...

  13. Renal replacement therapy in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and managing critically ill patients with renal dysfunction is a part of the daily routine of an intensivist. Acute kidney insufficiency substantially contributes to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT not only does play a significant role in the treatment of patients with renal failure, acute as well as chronic, but also has spread its domains to the treatment of many other disease conditions such as myaesthenia gravis, septic shock and acute on chronic liver failure. This article briefly outlines the role of renal replacement therapy in ICU.

  14. The Research Agenda in ICU Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas S.; Lilly, Craig M.; Angus, Derek C.; Jacobi, Judith; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.; Sales, Anne E.; Scales, Damon C.; Mathers, James A. L.

    2011-01-01

    ICU telemedicine uses audiovisual conferencing technology to provide critical care from a remote location. Research is needed to best define the optimal use of ICU telemedicine, but efforts are hindered by methodological challenges and the lack of an organized delivery approach. We convened an interdisciplinary working group to develop a research agenda in ICU telemedicine, addressing both methodological and knowledge gaps in the field. To best inform clinical decision-making and health policy, future research should be organized around a conceptual framework that enables consistent descriptions of both the study setting and the telemedicine intervention. The framework should include standardized methods for assessing the preimplementation ICU environment and describing the telemedicine program. This framework will facilitate comparisons across studies and improve generalizability by permitting context-specific interpretation. Research based on this framework should consider the multidisciplinary nature of ICU care and describe the specific program goals. Key topic areas to be addressed include the effect of ICU telemedicine on the structure, process, and outcome of critical care delivery. Ideally, future research should attempt to address causation instead of simply associations and elucidate the mechanism of action in order to determine exactly how ICU telemedicine achieves its effects. ICU telemedicine has significant potential to improve critical care delivery, but high-quality research is needed to best inform its use. We propose an agenda to advance the science of ICU telemedicine and generate research with the greatest potential to improve patient care. PMID:21729894

  15. Conceptualising patient empowerment in cancer follow-up by combining theory and qualitative data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Eskildsen, Nanna Bjerg; Thomsen, Thora Grothe

    2017-01-01

    and sensitive questionnaire for this population. Material and Methods: A theoretical model of PE was made, based on Zimmerman’s theory of psychological empowerment. Patients who were in follow-up after first line treatment for their cancer (n = 16) were interviewed about their experiences with follow......-up. A deductive thematic analysis was conducted to contextualise the theory and find concrete manifestations of empowerment. Data were analysed to find situations that expressed empowerment or lack of empowerment. Then we analysed what abilities these situations called for and we further analysed how...... these abilities fitted Zimmermann’s theory. Results: In all, 16 patients from two different hospitals participated in the interviews. PE in cancer follow-up was conceptualised as : I) The perception that one had the possibility of mastering treatment and care (e.g. the possibility of ‘saying no’ to treatment...

  16. Hepatic pseudoaneurysm after traumatic liver injury; is CT follow-up warranted?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerballe, Lene; Helgstrand, Frederik; Axelsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic pseudoaneurysm (HPA) is a rare complication after liver trauma, yet it is potentially fatal, as it can lead to sudden severe haemorrhage. The risk of developing posttraumatic HPA is one of the arguments for performing follow-up CT of patients with liver injuries. The aim...... no treatment failures. There was no correlation between the severity of the liver injury and development of HPA. 5 out of 7 patients were asymptomatic and would have been discharged without treatment if the protocol did not include a default follow-up CT. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study shows that HPA...... is not correlated to the severity of liver injury and it develops in 4% of patients after traumatic liver injury. In order to avoid potentially life-threatening haemorrhage from a post trauma hepatic pseudoaneurysm, it seems appropriate to do follow-up CT as part of the conservative management of blunt...

  17. Reactive attachment disorder in maltreated twins follow-up: from 18 months to 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Boris, Neil W; Fuselier, Sarah-Hinshaw; Page, Timothy; Koren-Karie, Nina; Miron, Devi

    2006-03-01

    The best means for the diagnosis and treatment of reactive attachment disorder of infancy and early childhood have not been established. Though some longitudinal data on institutionalized children is available, reports of maltreated young children who are followed over time and assessed with measures of attachment are lacking. This paper presents the clinical course of a set of maltreated fraternal twins who were assessed and treated from 19 months to 30 months of age and then seen in follow-up at 3 and 8 years of age. A summary of the early assessment and course is provided and findings from follow-up assessments of the cognitive, behavioral, and interpersonal functioning of each child is analysed. Follow-up measures, chosen to capture social-cognitive processing of these children from an attachment perspective, are highlighted. Finally, findings from the case are discussed from nosological and theoretical perspectives.

  18. Role of human papillomavirus testing and cytology in follow-up after conization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Camilla F; Huusom, Lene D; Deltour, Isabelle;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adequate follow-up of women who have undergone conization for high-grade cervical lesions is crucial in cervical cancer screening programs. We evaluated the performance of testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, cytology alone, and combined testing in predicting cervical...... after conization is more sensitive than ASCUS+ cytology for identifying women at risk for relapse of CIN2+ within 2 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether HPV testing could be a stand-alone test in follow up after conization....... detection of high-risk HPV. The women were passively followed until 2 years after first follow-up visit by linkage to the nationwide Pathology Data Bank. RESULTS: At first visit after conization (median time, 3.4 months), 20.4% were HPV-positive and 17.2% had atypical squamous intraepithelial lesions...

  19. Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines on the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Gillberg, L

    2007-01-01

    advice concerning follow-up procedures is provided. In addition, an algorithm is included with advice on how to manage patients with previous suspected anaphylaxis during anaesthesia. Lastly, Appendix 2 provides an overview of the incidence, mechanisms and possibilities for follow-up for some common drug......The present approach to the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia varies in the Scandinavian countries. The main purpose of these Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines is to increase the awareness about anaphylaxis during anaesthesia amongst anaesthesiologists....... It is hoped that increased focus on the subject will lead to prompt diagnosis, rapid and correct treatment, and standardised management of patients with anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia across Scandinavia. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence in the literature, which, owing...

  20. A new era of sub-millimeter GRB afterglow follow-ups with the Greenland Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Asada, Keiichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calcul...

  1. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Four Cases Required Caution during Long-Term Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increased prevalence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, difficult cases and unexpected events have become more common during long-term follow-up. Herein we reported four cases that exhibited poor progress during long-term follow-up. All the cases were diagnosed with PTC and treated with total thyroidectomy before several years, and the patients had been newly diagnosed with recurrent and metastatic PTC. These four cases included recurred PTC with invasion of large blood vessels, a concomitant second malignancy, malignant transformation, and refractoriness to treatment. Physicians should closely monitor patients to promptly address unforeseen circumstances during PTC follow-up, including PTC recurrence and metastasis. Furthermore, we suggest that the development of a management protocol for refractory or terminal PTC is also warranted.

  2. Slow-growing labyrinthine masses: contribution of MRI to diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, J.F.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Tubiana, J.M. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France). Service de Radiology; Ouayoun, M.; Meyer, B. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Saint-Antoine, 184 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, F-75012 Paris (France); Tran Ba Huy, P. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Lariboisiere, 2 rue Ambroise Pare, F-75010 Paris (France); Sterkers, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    We report the use of MRI in the diagnosis, follow-up and therapeutic management of three cases of intralabyrinthine Schwannoma. The diagnosis was based on the history and initial and follow-up MRI findings. The main feature suggesting the diagnosis was a nodular intralabyrinthine mass of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and high or isointense signal on T1-weighted images (relative to cerebrospinal fluid), which showed contrast enhancement. Follow-up imaging showed growth of the tumour in one patient. One patient underwent surgery for severe tinnitus. To detect these lesions, MRI should be focussed on the inner ear, using thin-section T2-weighted and T1-weighted images before and after contrast medium. MRI allowed informed surgical planning. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  3. Optimal Control of the Lost to Follow Up in a Tuberculosis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Emvudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of optimal control for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis (TB. A TB model that considers the existence of a new class (mainly in the African context is considered: the lost to follow up individuals. Based on the model formulated and studied in the work of Plaire Tchinda Mouofo, (2009, the TB control is formulated and solved as an optimal control theory problem using the Pontryagin's maximum principle (Pontryagin et al., 1992. This control strategy indicates how the control of the lost to follow up class can considerably influence the basic reproduction ratio so as to reduce the number of lost to follow up. Numerical results show the performance of the optimization strategy.

  4. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Revascularized Immature Necrotic Tooth Evaluated by CBCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. L. She

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study reports the successful treatment of an immature upper premolar with periapical pathosis and sinus tract using revascularization technique. Clinical and radiographic examination demonstrated the recovery of vitality, continued root development, and periapical healing at the 7-month follow-up. In addition, severe calcification of the canal was noted at the 36-month follow-up. At the 66-month follow-up, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT revealed complete periapical healing, apical closure, increase in root length and thickness of dentin, and severe calcification of the root canal. Even though the nature of tissue within the root canal is unknown, revascularization appears to give good clinical and radiographic success. This case report highlights that severe calcification of the canal is one of the long-term outcomes of revascularized root canals.

  5. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Revascularized Immature Necrotic Tooth Evaluated by CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, C. M. L.; Cheung, G. S. P.; Zhang, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    This case study reports the successful treatment of an immature upper premolar with periapical pathosis and sinus tract using revascularization technique. Clinical and radiographic examination demonstrated the recovery of vitality, continued root development, and periapical healing at the 7-month follow-up. In addition, severe calcification of the canal was noted at the 36-month follow-up. At the 66-month follow-up, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed complete periapical healing, apical closure, increase in root length and thickness of dentin, and severe calcification of the root canal. Even though the nature of tissue within the root canal is unknown, revascularization appears to give good clinical and radiographic success. This case report highlights that severe calcification of the canal is one of the long-term outcomes of revascularized root canals. PMID:26949550

  6. Ameloblastic fibroma: a rare case report with 7-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Leonardo de Araújo; Barros, Adna Conceição; Sardinha, Sandra de Cássia Santana; Cerqueira, Arlei; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibroma (AF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that usually occurs in the fi two decades of life. It affects adolescents and young adults and is found in the mandible and with a high frequency in the posterior region of this segment. There are rare case reports with a long-term follow-up. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with extensive ameloblastic fibroma in the man ble. Treatment consisted of enucleation and bone curettage, with the preservation of permanent teE adjacent to the tumor. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of the patient over a period of 7 years show no signs of recurrence or malignant transformation. Patients with AF should be under follow-up for prolonged periods of time, even in ca! exhibiting a low proliferation index, because of the potential for recurrence and malignant transformation of this tumor.

  7. Ameloblastic fibroma: A rare case report with 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Araújo Melo Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ameloblastic fibroma (AF is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that usually occurs in the first two decades of life. It affects adolescents and young adults and is found in the mandible and with a higher frequency in the posterior region of this segment. There are rare case reports with a long-term follow-up. Case Outline. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with extensive ameloblastic fibroma in the mandible. Treatment consisted of enucleation and bone curettage, with the preservation of permanent teeth adjacent to the tumor. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of the patient over a period of 7 years showed no signs of recurrence or malignant transformation. Conclusion. Patients with AF should be under follow-up for prolonged periods of time, even in cases exhibiting a low proliferation index, because of the potential for recurrence and malignant transformation of this tumor.

  8. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow......-up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... will be of great importance to the future organisation of cervical and colorectal cancer screening programmes in Denmark, but will also have international interest because of their similar challenges....

  9. [Neurodevelopmental follow-up of premature children in Lausanne and Geneva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickle Graz, M; Cevey-Macherel, M; Forcada-Guex, M; Truttmann, A; Ha-Vinh Leuchter, R; Sizonenko, S; Huppi, P S; Borradori Tolsa, C

    2011-02-23

    Preterm children born before 32 weeks of gestation represent 1% of the annual births in Switzerland, and are the most at risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities. A neurological surveillance is thus implemented in the neonatal units, and multidisciplinary neurodevelopmental follow-up is offered to all our preterm patients. The follow-up clinics of the University hospitals in Lausanne and Geneva follow the Swiss guidelines for follow-up. An extended history and neurological examination is taken at each appointment, and a standardized test of development is performed. These examinations, which take place between the ages of 3 months and 9 years old, allow the early identification and treatment of developmental disorders frequent in this population, such as motor, cognitive or behavioral disorders, as well as the monitoring of the quality of neonatal care.

  10. [Testicular cancer: a model to optimize the radiological follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebler, V; Pauchard, B; Schmidt, S; Valerio, M; De Bari, B; Berthold, D

    2015-05-20

    Despite being rare cancers, testicular seminoma and non-seminoma play an important role in oncology: they represent a model on how to optimize radiological follow-up, aiming at a lowest possible radiation exposure and secondary cancer risk. Males diagnosed with testicular cancer undergo frequently prolonged follow-up with CT-scans with potential toxic side effects, in particular secondary cancers. To reduce the risks linked to ionizing radiation, precise follow-up protocols have been developed. The number of recommended CT-scanners has been significantly reduced over the last 10 years. The CT scanners have evolved technically and new acquisition protocols have the potential to reduce the radiation exposure further.

  11. Reasons for women’s non-participation in follow-up screening after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard Nielsen, Jane; Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. Early detection can prevent or delay the onset of late complications, for which follow-up screening is important. This study investigated the extent...... of participation in follow-up screening and the possible consequences of nonattendance in the Region of North Jutland, Denmark. METHOD: In Danish national registers covering the years 1994-2011 we identified 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by first-time gestational diabetes. Control visits...... to general practitioners and biochemical departments after giving birth were charted. Following national guidelines we defined four intervals for assessment of participation in follow-up screening. Diagnosis of diabetes or treatment with glucose-lowering agents after giving birth were also identified...

  12. Associations between follow-up screening after gestational diabetes and early detection of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Hyldgaard Nielsen, Jane; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. Early detection can prevent or delay the onset of late complications, for which follow-up screening is important. This study investigated the extent...... of participation in follow-up screening and the possible consequences of nonattendance in the Region of North Jutland, Denmark. METHOD: In Danish national registers covering the years 1994-2011 we identified 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by first-time gestational diabetes. Control visits...... to general practitioners and biochemical departments after giving birth were charted. Following national guidelines we defined four intervals for assessment of participation in follow-up screening. Diagnosis of diabetes or treatment with glucose-lowering agents after giving birth were also identified...

  13. Proposed follow up programme after curative resection for lower third oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyes LH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has risen throughout the Western world over the last three decades. The prognosis remains poor as many patients are elderly and present with advanced disease. Those patients who are suitable for resection remain at high risk of disease recurrence. It is important that cancer patients take part in a follow up protocol to detect disease recurrence, offer psychological support, manage nutritional disorders and facilitate audit of surgical outcomes. Despite the recognition that regular postoperative follow up plays a key role in ongoing care of cancer patients, there is little consensus on the nature of the process. This paper reviews the published literature to determine the optimal timing and type of patient follow up for those after curative oesophageal resection.

  14. Socio-demographic factors associated with loss to follow-up of HIV-infected women attending a private sector PMTCT program in Maharashtra, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panditrao, Mayuri; Darak, Shrinivas; Kulkarni, Vinay; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; Parchure, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Currently, 40% of HIV-infected women enrolled in national prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program in India are loss to follow-up (LTF) before they can receive single dose Nevirapine. To date no study from India has examined the reasons for inadequate utilization of PMTCT services.

  15. 75 FR 77880 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; GuLF Worker Study: Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study for Oil...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... excessive heat, and possibly to stress due to widespread economic and lifestyle disruption. Exposures range... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; GuLF Worker Study: Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study for Oil Spill Clean-Up Workers and Volunteers SUMMARY: Under...

  16. Clinical features and follow-up of Chinese patients with symptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia in infancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Ji-hong; ZHU Jian-xing; ZHU Xiao-dong; CHEN Tong-xin

    2009-01-01

    hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy;follow-upBackground Hypogammaglobulinemia is common in infant humoral immunodeficiencies and has complicated causes and outcomes.We aimed to determine the clinical manifestations,immunological changes and outcomes of Shanghai infants with hypogammaglobulinemia.Methods Patients under 2 years old,having one or more warning signs of primary immunodeficiency disorders,serum immunoglobulin levels below the lower limit of reference range per age,and with normal numbers for lymphocyte subsets,were analyzed and followed up for 2 to 3 years.Results A total of 91 children (male-to-female ratio:2.25:1) participated in the study.Initial clinical presentation was recurrent upper respiratory tract infection (46%),invasive infection (3%),atopic disease (32%).IgA reduction (77%) was prevalent;34% patients had more than one isotype reduced.During follow-up,51 of 62 patients (82.25%) had immunoglobulins normalized at the age between 12-48 months; these were diagnosed as transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI).Long-term follow-up may reveal a diagnosis for the remaining 11 infants with persistent lower immunoglobulin levels,who did not have antibody titers measured.Earlier onset was correlated with higher rates of normalization.More patients were diagnosed with isolated hypogammaglobulinemia in 2006 compared with the previous 4 years (2002-2005).Conclusions The awareness of immunodeficiency among pediatricians has been greatly improved.Recurrent otitis media was not a major infection in our patients.THI is a relatively common condition associated with infant hypogammaglobulinemia.In the absence of specific antibody titers,the diagnosis of THI can be confirmed retrospectively with lg levels normalized in follow-up visits.Therefore,long-term follow-up and frequent re-evaluation of these patients are necessary to distinguish them from true primary immunodeficiency.

  17. The NANOS short stem in total hip arthroplasty: a mid term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Max; Ettinger, Peter; Lerch, Matthias; Radtke, Kerstin; Budde, Stefan; Ezechieli, Marco; Becher, Christoph; Thorey, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    A number of short stems for total hip arthroplasty have been introduced during the last decade. We describe our experience with the NANOS prosthesis (Smith and Nephew, Marl, Germany). The potential increase of bone mass around a femoral short stem using bone densitometry may be an indicator for secondary ingrowth. We report the outcome of 72 NANOS short stems in 65 patients between March 2003 and October 2007. The mean follow-up was 5.2±0.7 years and the mean age of the patients was 63±8.3 years. Along with demographic data and co-morbidities, the Harris Hip Score, the Merle d'Aubigné mobility score, and a patient-centred questionnaire were evaluated pre-operatively and during follow-up. The Mean Harris Hip Score increased from 47.3±12.2 pre-operatively to 97.6±0.6 at the final follow-up. The Merle d'Aubigné mobility score increased from 7.6±1.4 pre-operatively to 11.8±0.3 at the final follow-up. None of the 72 stems were revised, providing a survival rate of 100%. Radiolucent lines were visible rasiographically in two patients during follow-up. The NANOS short stem demonstrated a satisfactory outcome at mid term follow-up. The clinical and radiological results support to the principle of metaphyseal anchorage of a short stem prosthesis. Long term evaluation will be of interest to determine if these encouraging trends are reflected by prolonged survivorship.

  18. Overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data in 32 diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Makoto; Nagai, Akiko; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Yamagata, Zentaro; Kubo, Michiaki; Muto, Kaori; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Mushiroda, Taisei; Murakami, Yoshinori; Yuji, Koichiro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Yozo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We established a patient-oriented biobank, BioBank Japan, with information on approximately 200,000 patients, suffering from any of 47 common diseases. This follow-up survey focused on 32 diseases, potentially associated with poor vital prognosis, and collected patient survival information, including cause of death. We performed a survival analysis for all subjects to get an overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data. A total of 141,612 participants were included. The survival data were last updated in 2014. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed after categorizing subjects according to sex, age group, and disease status. Relative survival rates were estimated using a survival-rate table of the Japanese general population. Of 141,612 subjects (56.48% male) with 1,087,434 person-years and a 97.0% follow-up rate, 35,482 patients died during follow-up. Mean age at enrollment was 64.24 years for male subjects and 63.98 years for female subjects. The 5-year and 10-year relative survival rates for all subjects were 0.944 and 0.911, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 8.40 years. Patients with pancreatic cancer had the least favorable prognosis (10-year relative survival: 0.184) and patients with dyslipidemia had the most favorable prognosis (1.013). The most common cause of death was malignant neoplasms. A number of subjects died from diseases other than their registered disease(s). This is the first report to perform follow-up survival analysis across various common diseases. Further studies should use detailed clinical and genomic information to identify predictors of mortality in patients with common diseases, contributing to the implementation of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Obese patients lose weight independently of nutritional follow-up after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Helena Tess

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: to examine the association between preoperative body weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional follow-up, length of postoperative period, and weight loss during the first 18 months among adults who have undergone bariatric surgery. Methods: a retrospective cohort study was conducted on 241 consecutive patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP from January 2006 to December 2008, in a teaching hospital in São Paulo (Brazil. Data were collected through hospital records review and the variables analyzed included sex, age, immediate preoperative weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional visits and length of postoperative period. Proportional body weight reductions during the 18-month follow-up period were examined using generalized estimating equations. Results: 81% (n=195 of participants were female, with overall mean age of 44.4 ± 11.6 years, mean preoperative weight of 123.1± 21.2 kg and mean preoperative body mass index of 47.2± 6.2 kg/m2. The overall adherence to postoperative follow- up schedule was 51% (95%CI: 44.5-57.5%. Preoperative body weight and adherence were not associated with proportional weight reduction (Wald’s test p > 0.18. Weight loss leveled off at the end of the 18-month follow-up period for both compliant and non-compliant patients (Wald’s test p = 0.00. Conclusions: our study showed that weight loss occurred steadily over the first 18 months after RYGBP, leveling off at around 40% weight reduction. It was associated with neither presurgical weight, nor nutritional follow-up and it may be primarily dependent on the surgical body alterations themselves. This finding may have implications for intervention strategies aimed at motivating patients to comply with early postsurgical and life-long follow-up.

  20. Reappraisal of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy for follow up in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Eriko; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Nakada, Kunihiro; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Koyanagi, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Itoh, Kazuo

    1999-12-01

    We reviewed Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in order to assess whether repeated Tc-99m DMSA scans are necessary for the follow up of these patients. Ninety-seven children who were followed up for more than one year (1-7.4 years, average 2.8 years) after the first DMSA scan were included in the study. Fifty-one patients had been diagnosed as primary VUR and 46 as secondary VUR. Age at the first examination ranged from 0 to 14 years (average 5.1 years). Planar images were taken 2 hours after injection. The % renal uptake per injected dose (% RU) was calculated from posterior images. Kidneys in 11 patients (11.3%) changed morphologically during the follow up. Of these, new photon deficient areas (PD) were detected in only 4 patients (4.1%). All of these 4 patients had neurogenic bladder and were managed with self-catheterization. Of the remaining 7 patients, cortical thinning progressed in 5 patients (5.2%) and PDs resolved in 3 patients (3.1%). In one of these 7 patients, PD resolved in one kidney and cortical thinning progressed in the contralateral kidney. Of 97 patients reviewed, % RU decreased more than 20% during the follow up in 6 patients (6.2%). All were diagnosed as secondary VUR due to neurogenic bladder. % RU decreased only in the contracted kidneys at the initial scan. Two of them underwent renal transplantation because of severe renal failure. In conclusion, new PD rarely developed and % RU decreased in only a few patients during the follow up of children with VUR. Repeated Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy therefore seems to have little benefit in the follow up of children with VUR. It should be performed in selected patients with high risk of urinary tract infection or renal failure. (author)

  1. Association of black race with follow-up of an abnormal prostate-specific antigen test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barbara J; Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Delayed evaluation after a clearly abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) result may contribute to more advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis in black men. In 46 primary care practices over a period of 4.5 years, we studied men aged more than 50 years without known prostate cancer who had a PSA of at least 10.0 ng/mL for the first time. PSA follow-up included: a urology appointment, a new prostate diagnosis, or repeat PSA test. Cox proportional hazards models assessed time to follow-up, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and health care factors with censoring at a time that represents excessive delay (200 days). Among all 724 study men (27% black), delay until PSA follow-up averaged 115.2 days (+/- 79.7 d) and the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for follow-up was shorter for black men than nonblack men (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51). However, black men were more likely to have had prior urology care and had higher index PSA levels than other men; both factors were associated with shorter follow-up. After adjustment, delay did not differ for black vs nonblack race (HR, 1.05; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.43) but men aged at least 75 years had a longer delay than men aged 74 years or less (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89). Despite black men having greater risk of advanced prostate disease at diagnosis and better linkage to urologic care, follow-up was delayed, on average, by more than 3 months and did not differ by race. These results reveal a potentially important, remediable factor to improve prostate cancer prevention and care for black men.

  2. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis: a 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie; Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Haahr, Ulrik; Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, Hans; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Simonsen, Erik; Vaglum, Per; McGlashan, Thomas; Friis, Svein

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. A total of 299 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were assessed for depressive symptoms with PANSS depression item (g6) at baseline, and 1, 2, 5 and 10 years of follow up. At 10 years, depressive symptoms were also assessed with Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A PANSS g6 ≥ 4 and CDSS score ≥ 6 were used as a cut-off score for depression. A total of 122 (41%) patients were scored as depressed at baseline, 75 (28%) at 1 year, 50 (20%) at 2 years, 33 (16%) at 5 years, and 35 (19%) at 10 years of follow up. Poor childhood social functioning and alcohol use at baseline predicted depression at 10 years of follow up. Thirty-eight patients were depressed at both baseline and 1 year follow up. This group had poorer symptomatic and functional outcome in the follow-up period compared to a group of patients with no depression in the first year of treatment. Depressive symptoms are frequent among FEP patients at baseline but decrease after treatment because their general symptoms have been initiated. Patients with poor social functioning in childhood and alcohol use at baseline are more prone to have depressive symptoms at 10 years of follow up. Patients struggling with depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment should be identified as having poorer long-term prognosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Effect of Language Barriers on Follow-up Appointments After an Emergency Department Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Joshua; Baker, David W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether patients who encountered language barriers during an emergency department visit were less likely to be referred for a follow-up appointment and less likely to complete a recommended appointment. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING Public hospital emergency department. PARTICIPANTS English- and Spanish-speaking patients (N =714) presenting with nonemergent medical problems. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Patients were interviewed to determine sociodemographic information, health status, whether an interpreter was used, and whether an interpreter should have been used. The dependent variables were referral for a follow-up appointment after the emergency department visit and appointment compliance, as determined by chart review and the hospital information system. The proportion of patients who received a follow-up appointment was 83% for those without language barriers, 75% for those who communicated through an interpreter, and 76% for those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not (P =.05). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for not receiving a follow-up appointment was 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 3.33) for patients who had an interpreter and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.00 to 3.23) for patients who said an interpreter should have been used (compared with patients without language barriers). Appointment compliance rates were similar for patients who communicated through an interpreter, those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not, and those without language barriers (60%, 54%, and 64%, respectively; P =.78). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers may decrease the likelihood that a patient is given a follow-up appointment after an emergency department visit. However, patients who experienced language barriers were equally likely to comply with follow-up appointments. PMID:10760001

  4. Current organisation of follow-up does not meet cancer patients' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Cecilie; Sandager, Mette; Jensen, Henry; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2014-06-01

    For cancer patients, traditional follow-up care is considered unsuitable and unsustainable. The patient perspective seems often to be absent in the ongoing debate about alternative strategies for follow-up care. Based on a national survey from 2012, the objective of this study was to examine cancer patients' support needs regarding physiological and emotional problems during follow-up and to identify factors associated with their needs and any unmet needs. Patients diagnosed with cancer in the period from April to September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 4,401 patients responded (response rate = 64%). The risks in terms of prevalence rate ratios of having needs and unmet needs for both physiological and emotional problems were estimated using the Poisson regression. The study showed that 60% of the patients had needs for support regarding physiological and emotional problems, and half of the patients reported unmet needs. Younger patients and patients with co-morbidity were more likely to report needs and unmet needs for physiological and emotional support. Treatment complexity and setting of follow-up were not associated with unmet needs. The study underlines that the current organisation of follow-up does not meet cancer patients' needs. Several factors are associated with both needs and unmet needs. Hence, a more sustainable approach for follow-up care may consist in stratification tailored to the patients' different needs. In such an approach, more focus should be on age-specific needs and the impact of co-morbidity. The study is funded by the Danish Cancer Society. The study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (J. no. 2010-41-4694). According to the Danish Act on Research Ethics Review of Health Research Projects (S. 8(3) of Act No. 402 of 28 May 2003), no ethical approval was needed.

  5. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  6. Tarlov cysts: long-term follow-up after microsurgical inverted plication and sacroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Ralf; Polemikos, Manolis; Uksul, Nesrin; Krauss, Joachim K

    2016-11-01

    Surgical treatment of Tarlov cysts is still a matter of debate. Published literature thus far includes mainly small case series with retrospective evaluation and short-term follow-up. We present a novel microsurgical technique that combines the decompression of the nerve fibers with the prevention of recurrence. The long-term follow-up is provided. The indication for surgery was incapacitating pain refractory to medical therapy for at least 6 months. The surgical technique consisted in microsurgical opening of the cyst, relief of CSF followed by secured inverted plication of the cyst wall, packing of remnant space with fat graft, and sacroplasty. Pain and neurological deficits were evaluated according to a modified Barrow National Institute score (BNI score, 0-5) and the Departmental Neuro Score (DNS score, 0-20). A total of 13 patients (9 women, 4 men) were operated and followed up to 14 years (mean FU 5.3 years). Mean age at surgery was 51.8 (±14) years. Pain and neurological deficits improved significantly in 11/13 patients (BNI score pre-OP 5 vs 3.1 ± 1.2 at 1-year-FU, and 2.8 ± 1.2 at last follow-up visit; DNS score pre-OP 5.5 ± 1.5 vs 2.8 ± 2.1 at 1-year follow-up, and 2.6 ± 2.2 at last follow-up visit. Two patients needed revision surgery due to reoccurrence of the cyst. One patient suffered deterioration of preexisting neurological deficit. The inverted plication technique combined with sacroplasty is a promising technique. It improves pain and neurological deficits on the long term in the majority of patients with symptomatic Tarlov cysts.

  7. The organization and on-site follow-up of the electrical installation work for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vairo, A

    2003-01-01

    The activity of the EL-WO section has two main purposes: manage the on-site installation works and carry out complete commissioning tests for all the new electrical installations, including those for the LHC accelerator. The management of installation works covers several aspects as: logistic, safety, coordination with other non-electrical works, follow-up of the planning. The testing of all the installation before the commissioning involves a close collaboration with the exploitation service and with the project leaders. This document describes the way of operating of the section and how these activities are carried out within the mainframe of the global ST division organization. It also describes the interfaces to the others actors of the LHC installation, such as: the contractors, the LHC installation working group, the ST/EL project leaders and the exploitation service of the electrical network.

  8. Long-term follow up of renal anastomosing hemangioma mimicking renal angiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Schäfer, Georg; Zelger, Bernhard; Zelger, Bettina; Aigner, Friedrich; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Anastomosing hemangioma of the kidney is a very rare neoplasm, currently 19 cases have been reported in the literature. First described in 2009, histopathologically anastomosing hemangioma is similar to aggressive angiosarcoma. No long-term follow-up data of anastomosing hemangioma have been described yet. Here, we present the case of a healthy 56-year-old man diagnosed in 2002 with a 7 × 5-cm anastomosing hemangioma mimicking an aggressive renal angiosarcoma. The patient underwent nephrectomy and has been followed up disease free for 13 years.

  9. [Peculiarities of social adaptation in adolescents with schizoid personality disorder: a follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, D Iu

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 63 adolescents with schizoid personality disorder, aged 15-17 years, 58 males and 5 females, was followed up for a period of 3-8 years and re-examined at the age of 20-25. The patients were examined in a psychoneurologic out-patient center due to social maladaptation. The follow-up study revealed the improvement of social adaptation with an extremely low percent (5%) of schizophrenia manifestations. A number of clinical factors significant for the future social functioning of schizoid adolescents was found. A strategy of psychocorrection and sociotherapeutic care for the patients is worked out.

  10. Neurocognitive development in first episode psychosis 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity, as meas......Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity...

  11. Stereotactic irradiation of angiomas: scintigraphic follow-up. Irradiation stereotaxique des angiomes: suivi scintigraphique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebtahi, R.; Meder, J.F.; Kerviler, E. de; Piketty, M.L.; Berenger, N.; Habert, M.O.; Missir, O.; Merienne, L.; Askienazy, S. (Hopital Sainte-Anne, 75 - Paris (France))

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation increases the rate of thrombolie obliteration of the angioma. The long latency before the onset of thrombo-obliteration means that there is a considerable delay in treatment. Cerebral angiography is considered the gold standard in he follow-up of angiomas in this study, HM scintigraphy was positive in all cases when cerebral angiography showed no radiological improvement, negative when complete obliteration of the angioma occurred, but negative in 5 cases with incomplete obliteration. This preliminary study shows the place of HM scintigraphy in the follow-up of angioma irradiation, in which it revealed the incomplete effect of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  12. [Poor results in 183 threaded acetabular cups at a mean 7 years follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecestre, P; Poilbout, P; Dambreville, A; Vial, D

    1995-12-01

    We reviewed 183 threaded rings at a mean 7 years follow-up. Poor résults are frequent: 34 % had been revised and 50 % have radiographic migration, essentially with proximal migration of the cup. Generally, we reoperated with other cememtless implants. The type of threaded cup does not matter (spheric or conic). Only the duration of follow up seems significant. We think that biomecanical strains, rather than physiology, explain these numerous migrations. We have therefore abandoned threaded cups in favour of porous-coated impacted cups.

  13. MRI of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis: report of two cases with follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellerini, M.; Gabbrielli, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Clinical Pathophysiology; Maddali Bongi, S.; Cammelli, D. [Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Univ. of Florence (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis with 1 year follow-up in two patients. MRI of the head enabled noninvasive diagnosis of both the meningeal abnormality and its complications, consisting of hypertensive hydrocephalus and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, respectively. Dural sinus thrombosis, very uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis, was confirmed by phase-contrast MRA. Worsening of the pachymeningitis at follow-up was observed in both patients despite regression or stability of the clinical picture and long-term therapy. (orig.)

  14. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat......To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  15. Maturogenesis of Two Maxillary Central Incisors: A Case Report with 10 Years of Follow Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Ghorbanzadeh, Atiyeh

    2015-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of two immature maxillary central incisors in a 7-year-old female patient. She suffered complicated crown fracture because of trauma, and the root formation was incomplete. White mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was selected as the pulp-capping material after cervical pulpotomy to preserve the pulp tissue vitality and achieve maturogenesis. Follow-up evaluations showed successful treatment in terms of preservation of pulp vitality and demonstrated marked continuous physiological root development. During 10 years of follow-up, both teeth were clinically asymptomatic, and radiographic evaluations showed apparent root regeneration with apical root-end closure without pulp or periapical pathosis.

  16. Determination of Maximum Follow-up Speed of Electrode System of Resistance Projection Welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2004-01-01

    the weld process settings for the stable production and high quality of products. In this paper, the maximum follow-up speed of electrode system was tested by using a special designed device which can be mounted to all types of machine and easily to be applied in industry, the corresponding mathematical......The maximum follow-up speed of electrode system represents the dynamic mechanical response capacity of resistance projection welding machines, which is important to make the diffrernce from one machine to the other and to consider the individual behavior of machines in designing or optimizing...

  17. Incomplete Follow-up After Growth Modulation Surgery: Incidence and Associated Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, John W; Hood, Kenneth A; Roocroft, Joanna H; Schlechter, John A; Edmonds, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Extraperiosteal tension plates have become the predominant method for angular deformity correction in skeletally immature patients, with some surgeons using them in very young children with the intent of removing the implants once the correction is complete. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of incomplete follow-up and to assess the outcomes of children who were lost to follow-up with retained implants. A quality initiative survey was performed at 2 institutions on children treated with extraperiosteal tension plates around the knee because of sentinel events that occurred at each institution. Compliance with follow-up was noted, and children with open perigenicular physes on latest radiograph with retained implants were identified with attempts to reestablish care. Subsequent review of those children was performed, including clinical results, radiographic results, and the need for second deformity surgery. A total of 200 children treated with tension plates were identified (116 at institution #1, 84 at institution #2). The most common indication for surgery was genu valgum (54%), and the mean age at initial surgery was 11.7 years (range, 3.1 to 16.8 y). A high rate of retained implants with incomplete follow-up was identified at both institutions, where a total of 23 patients (12%) were lost with implants still in place. Only 7 of 23 patients returned for evaluation: 3 reached skeletal maturity with no complications, but 4 overcorrected creating the opposite angular deformity. Two of those children required osteotomies to remedy their overcorrection. Two additional patients were reachable, but failed to return for follow-up and the remaining patients were unreachable. The incidence of incomplete follow-up was significant at both institutions (12% combined incidence). Of those who were found for follow-up, nearly one third required a surgery beyond simple implant removal. Incomplete follow-up among this cohort was identified as a significant

  18. Conservative surgical management of in situ subungual melanoma: long-term follow-up*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda-Juárez, Mariana Catalina De; Martínez-Velasco, María Abril; Fonte-Ávalos, Verónica; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Subungual melanoma represents 20% of all melanomas in Hispanic population. Here, we report the outcome of 15 patients with in situ subungual melanoma treated with resection of the nail unit with a 5-mm margin without amputation, followed up for 55.93 ± 43.08 months. The most common complications included inclusion cysts and nail spicules. We found no evidence of local or distant recurrences at the last visit of our follow up. Functional outcome was good, with only one patient reporting persistent mild pain. These results support functional, non-amputative surgical management of in situ subungual melanomas. PMID:28099619

  19. White mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies: Two case reports with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Tunc Emine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the partial pulpotomy treatment of complicated crown fractures of two cases by using white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA with long-term follow-up. In the cases presented here, to injured incisor teeth were open apices and the pulp exposure site was large, so it was decided to perform vital pulpotomy with WMTA. Long-term follow-up examinations revealed that the treatment preserved pulpal vitality with continued root development and apex formation. WMTA may be considered as an alternative option for the treatment of traumatized immature permanent teeth.

  20. Planck early results. IX. XMM-Newton follow-up for validation of Planck cluster candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton follow-up for confirmation of Planck cluster candidates. Twenty-five candidates have been observed to date using snapshot (∼10 ks) exposures, ten as part of a pilot programme to sample a low range of signal-to-noise ratios (4 ... of variable quality). The new clusters span the redshift range 0.09 ≲ z ≲ 0.54, with a median redshift of z ∼ 0.37. A first determination is made of their X-ray properties including the characteristic size, which is used to improve the estimate of the SZ Compton parameter, Y 500. The follow-up validation...

  1. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up.

  2. Schnitzler's syndrome: 3-year radiological follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Feydy, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris (France); Belmatoug, N.; Fantin, B. [Hopital Beaujon, Department of Internal Medicine, Clichy (France)

    2007-02-15

    Schnitzler's syndrome comprises urticaria, monoclonal gammapathy, inflammatory signs (fever, enlarged lymph nodes, hyperleukocytosis), and bone lesions. We report the imaging findings and follow-up of a new case with extensive osteosclerosis of the iliac bone, associated with inflammatory signal changes on MRI and foci of increased uptake on bone scintigraphy. When a diagnosis of Schnitzler's syndrome is established, treatment should be towards symptoms only; a long follow-up is warranted, as a delayed evolution towards a lymphoproliferative syndrome is possible. (orig.)

  3. Early goal-directed nutrition in ICU patients (EAT-ICU) protocol for a randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Wiis, Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    %). Secondary outcomes include energy- and protein balances, metabolic control, new organ failure, use of life support, nosocomial infections, ICU- and hospital length of stay, mortality and cost analyses. CONCLUSION: The optimal nutrition strategy for ICU patients remains unsettled. The EAT-ICU trial...

  4. Early goal-directed nutrition in ICU patients (EAT-ICU)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Wiis, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    %). Secondary outcomes include energy- and protein balances, metabolic control, new organ failure, use of life support, nosocomial infections, ICU- and hospital length of stay, mortality and cost analyses. CONCLUSION: The optimal nutrition strategy for ICU patients remains unsettled. The EAT-ICU trial...

  5. Early goal-directed nutrition in icU patients (EAT-ICU)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Wiis, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    %). Secondary outcomes include energy- and protein balances, metabolic control, new organ failure, use of life support, nosocomial infections, ICU- and hospital length of stay, mortality and cost analyses. CONCLUSION: The optimal nutrition strategy for ICU patients remains unsettled. The EAT-ICU trial...

  6. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  7. Trabeculectomy with double low dose of mitomycin C – two years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errico D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Donato Errico1, Francesca Scrimieri1, Roberta Riccardi1, Romolo Fedeli1, Giancarlo Iarossi21Opthalmology Unit, Glaucoma Service, Azienda Ospedaliera, Cardinale G Panìco, Tricase (Le, Italy; 2Department of Opthalmology, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a surgical technique in which classic trabeculectomy ab externo is performed with a double application of low-dose mitomycin C (MMC in uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma (OAG patients.Method: A consecutive series of 43 white patients (43 eyes with uncontrolled primary OAG underwent trabeculectomy surgery. A double application of MMC (0.1% was performed: the first under the Tenon's capsule for 3 minutes, and the second below the scleral flap for 1 or 2 minutes, according to the risk factors. Complete success was defined as intraocular pressure (IOP <14 mmHg without any additional glaucoma surgery or medication. Qualified success was defined as IOP <14 mmHg with additional needling revision.Results: Mean preoperative IOP was 29.9 mmHg (SD 3.8 for all eyes evaluated. At 1 day postoperative, mean IOP was 6.7 mmHg (SD 1.26. At the end of the first 2 weeks postoperative, mean IOP was 8.6 mmHg (SD 1.7, at 12 months mean IOP was 11.3 mmHg (SD 1.4; P < 0.0001 and at 24 months mean IOP was 11.4 mmHg (SD 1.5; P < 0.0001. At 3 months, two eyes (5.4% underwent needling of the bleb for cystic blebs formation.Conclusion: In this study we presented the results after 2 years of follow-up of OAG undergoing trabeculectomy with dual administration of MMC (0.1 mg/mL. After 24 months, complete success was achieved in 93% of patients and a qualified success in 100% of patients.Keywords: glaucoma, trabeculectomy, mitomycin C

  8. Two-year follow-up study of elderly residents in S. Paulo, Brazil: methodology and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Luiz R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown a high prevalence of chronic disease and disability among the elderly. Given Brazil's rapid aging process and the obvious consequences of the growing number of old people with chronic diseases and associated disabilities for the provision of health services, a need was felt for a study that would overcome the limitations of cross-sectional data and shed some light on the main factors determining whether a person will live longer and free of disabling diseases, the so-called successful aging. The methodology of the first follow-up study of elderly residents in Brazil is presented. METHOD: The profile of the initial cohort is compared with previous cross-sectional data and an in-depth analysis of nonresponse is carried out in order to assess the validity of future longitudinal analysis. The EPIDOSO (`Epidemiologia do Idoso' Study conducted a two-year follow-up of 1,667 elderly people (65+, living in S. Paulo. The study consisted of two waves, each consisting of household, clinical, and biochemical surveys. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In general, the initial cohort showed a similar profile to previous cross-sectional samples in S. Paulo. There was a majority of women, mostly widows, living in multigenerational households, and a high prevalence of chronic illnesses, psychiatric disturbances, and physical disabilities. Despite all the difficulties inherent in follow-up studies, there was a fairly low rate of nonresponse to the household survey after two years, which did not actually affect the representation of the cohort at the final household assessment, making unbiased longitudinal analysis possible. Concerning the clinical and blood sampling surveys, the respondents tended to be younger and less disabled than the nonrespondents, limiting the use of the clinical and laboratory data to longitudinal analysis aimed at a healthier cohort. It is worth mentioning that gender, education, family

  9. Do loss to follow-up and death rates from ART care vary across primary health care facilities and hospitals in south Ethiopia? A retrospective follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome W

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wondu Teshome,1 Mehretu Belayneh,1 Mathewos Moges,1 Emebet Mekonnen,2 Misganu Endrias,2 Sinafiksh Ayele,2 Tebeje Misganaw,2 Mekonnen Shiferaw,2 Tigist Tesema2 1School of Public and Environmental Health, Hawassa University, 2Health Research and Technology Transfer Support Process, Southern Nations Nationalities and Peoples' Regional Health Bureau, Hawassa, Ethiopia Background: Decentralization and task shifting has significantly improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Many studies conducted to determine the attrition rate in Ethiopia have not compared attrition rates between hospitals and health centers in a relatively recent cohort of patients. This study compared death and loss to follow-up (LTFU rates among ART patients in hospitals and health centers in south Ethiopia. Methods: Data routinely collected from patients aged older than 15 years who started ART between July 2011 and August 2012 in 20 selected health facilities (12 being hospitals were analyzed. The outcomes of interest were LTFU and death. The data were entered, cleaned, and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 and Stata version 12.0. Competing-risk regression models were used. Results: The service years of the facilities were similar (median 8 and 7.5 for hospitals and health centers, respectively. The mean patient age was 33.7±9.6 years. The median baseline CD4 count was 179 (interquartile range 93–263 cells/mm3. A total of 2,356 person-years of observation were made with a median follow-up duration of 28 (interquartile range 22–31 months; 24.6% were either dead or LTFU, resulting in a retention rate of 75.4%. The death rates were 3.0 and 1.5 and the LTFU rate were 9.0 and 10.9 per 100 person-years of observation in health centers and hospitals, respectively. The competing-risk regression model showed that the gap between testing and initiation of ART, body mass index, World Health Organization clinical stage, isoniazid prophylaxis

  10. Premarital Cohabitation vs. Traditional Courtship and Subsequent Marital Adjustment: A Replication and Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roy E. L.; DeMeo, Peter W.

    1987-01-01

    Replicated earlier study of couples in first year of marriage. Conducted follow-up study of couples in fourth year of marriage who had participated in original or replication studies. Concludes that premarital relationships of the couples, whether cohabitation or traditional courtship, does not appear to have had long-term effect on marital…

  11. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); I.M. Koster (Ingrid); J.H.J. Hensen; S.S. Boks (Simone); H.P.A. Wagemakers (Harry); B.W. Koes (Bart); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. Methods: We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40

  12. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  13. A Four-Year Follow-Up Study of Underachieving College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    1976-01-01

    A four-year follow-up study of underachieving college freshmen measured changes in the self-concept of those still in college and those who had dropped out. Significant differences generally favored college seniors. Findings also indicate that dropping out of college may be a positive experience. (Author)

  14. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population Correction (FPC) is applied when the sample is drawn from a population of one to 5,000 youth, because the sample is more...

  15. Violence-Related Content in the Nursing Curriculum: A Follow-up National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodtli, M. Anne; Breslin, Eileen T.

    2002-01-01

    A 1999 survey of 408 nursing programs followed up on a 1995 survey (n=298). Most current respondents included content on abuse of women, children, and the elderly; 63% reported no faculty development on violence issues; 67% had not evaluated violence-related curriculum since 1995; only 39% felt that the curriculum adequately addressed violence,…

  16. Loneliness, Social Networks, and Mortality: 18 Years of Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Stessman, Jochanan

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influence of changes in loneliness and social support networks upon mortality during 18 years of follow-up among an elderly cohort and determined the gender-specific nature of this relationship. The study is based on data collected from the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study (1990-2008), which has followed a representative sample of 605…

  17. Follow-up of a Case of Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy Over an 8-year Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhou Huang; Lezheng Wu; Feng Wen; Guangwei Luo; Futian Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To show the follow-up of a case of vitelliform mac-ular dystrophy with morphological and visual functional tests over an 8-year period. Methods:.Retrospective review of medical records..The mor-phological examination included color photography,.fluores-cein angiography, and ocular coherence tomography (OCT). The visual functional tests included visual acuity, electro-ocu-logram (EOG) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). The patient was observed for 8 years, from 2003 to 2011. Results:.During the follow-up,.the improvement of sensory retinal detachment and reduction of yellow-white deposit were observed with color photography and fluorescein angiography. OCT revealed a decrease in sensory retinal detachment and subretinal hyper-reflective deposits; both of these morphologi-cal changes were correspondent. Visual acuity was maintained throughout the follow-up..The Arden ratio of EOG was de-creased. The amplitudes of mfERG were decreased but slightly increased during the follow-up. Conclusion:.The retinal morphological changes and visual function slightly improved in this case of vitelliform macu-lopathy. The prognosis is good. (Eye Science 2014; 29:165-169)

  18. Psychiatric severity and mortality in substance abusers. A 15 year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridell, Mats; Hesse, Morten

    2006-01-01

    on the Symptom Checklist 90 [SCL-90] Global Severity Index, lower meaningfulness on the Sense of Coherence scale, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF] scores at 5-year follow-up. By contrast, there were no associations between baseline drug use and antisocial personality disorder diagnoses...

  19. Randomized Trial of Treatment for Children with Sexual Behavior Problems: Ten-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Melissa Y.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study prospectively follows 135 children 5-12 years of age with sexual behavior problems from a randomized trial comparing a 12-session group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with group play therapy and follows 156 general clinic children with nonsexual behavior problems. Ten-year follow-up data on future juvenile and adult arrests and…

  20. A medical follow-up of 137 Cs Goiania radiation accident: un update (1990-1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Oliveira, Alexandre Rodrigues de [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Farina, Rosana [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to describe the main aftereffects of the 137 Cs accident in the last two years, giving emphasis on clinical, hematological, radiological and psychological aspects. A medical follow-up protocol was established by CNEN and the Leide das Neves Ferreira Foundation of the State of Goias, in order to prospectively follow more than 150 victims. (author). 6 refs.

  1. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Follow-Up Study of Psychosocial Adjustment and Community Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Borisova, Ivelina Ivanova; Williams, Timothy Philip; Brennan, Robert T.; Whitfield, Theodore H.; de la Soudiere, Marie; Williamson, John; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first prospective study to investigate psychosocial adjustment in male and female former child soldiers (ages 10-18; n = 156, 12% female). The study began in Sierra Leone in 2002 and was designed to examine both risk and protective factors in psychosocial adjustment. Over the 2-year period of follow-up, youth who had wounded or killed…

  2. Intranasal LH-RH treatment of cryptorchidism. A clinical trial and 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Mauritzen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intranasal LH-RH on cryptorchidism was investigated in 45 prepubertal boys with 68 undescended testes. A daily dose of 1.2 mg LH-RH was given for 4 weeks. A total of 16 testes (24%) descended. Follow-up examination 5 years later showed that relapse had occurred in two cases. Fifty-t...

  3. New psycho-pedagogic approach to obesity treatment: a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buclin-Thiébaud, Sévrine; Pataky, Zoltan; Bruchez, Vanessa; Golay, Alain

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the body weight evolution in obese patients admitted for a 2-week residential program and followed-up on ambulatory basis, as well as to evaluate factors having impact on weight evolution after 5 years. Thirty-nine obese patients participated in a 2-week structured interdisciplinary weight loss program, involving individual and group therapies, and including physical activity, nutritional education and standard cognitive-behavioral techniques. Patients were then followed-up regularly by their general practitioners for 5 years. After 5 years, 33 subjects completed the study. Seventy percent of the patients lost weight or maintained their weight loss. Total score for dietary structure, eating behavior disorders, dietary surveillance and weight management strategies, as evaluated by a validated questionnaire, was significantly lower in the weight loss group (22.4+/-4.3) as compared to maintenance group (24.4+/-6.1, pactivity (p<0.05) that the regain group. The present study demonstrated that an initial multidimensional and multidisciplinary in-hospital program with a consecutive long-term ambulatory follow-up may lead to a significant weight loss (55%) and/or weight maintenance (15%). A multidisciplinary and well-designed initial treatment and long-term follow-up program is mandatory for obesity management. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurements of Wide Tycho Double Stars in Orion - Follow Up Canis Minor and Columba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ross; Knapp, Wilfried

    2016-10-01

    As follow up to our report "Visual Observation and Measurements of some Tycho Double Stars" we decided to have a look at some more wider TDS objects in other constellations but to replace the hapless visual observation task by counterchecking with existing Sky Survey images

  5. Emetic and Electric Shock Alcohol Aversion Therapy: Six- and Twelve-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Dale S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    1981-01-01

    Follow-up data are presented for 6- and 12-months on male alcoholics (N=20) who received either a multifaceted inpatient alcoholism treatment program alone (controls) or emetic or shock aversion therapy in addition to that program. Both emetic and control subjects compiled more days of abstinence than shock subjects. (Author)

  6. Pemphigus with characteristics of dermatitis herpetiformis. A long-term follow-up of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, A; Feuerman, E J

    1986-11-01

    Five patients had a form of pemphigus which in its early stages resembled dermatitis herpetiform, although the immunofluorescent findings were typical of pemphigus. Potassium iodide tests, performed for the first time in such patients, showed positive results in two patients. Follow-ups ranging from 5 to 14 years have shown a benign course with low to absent dosages of steroids.

  7. Employer Follow-Up Survey: Employer Assessment of 1983-84 Forest Park Graduates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapraun, E. Daniel; Nienkamp, Roger L.

    An employer follow-up study was conducted to gather information from the employers of 1983-84 graduates of St. Louis Community College at Forest Park regarding the preparation and performance of these graduates. A previous survey of the 1983-84 graduates had identified 221 of their employers, who were mailed a questionnaire asking for ratings of…

  8. Long-term cardiac follow-up in survivors of a malignant bone tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, C. A. J.; Gietema, J. A.; van den Berg, M. P.; Bink-Boelkens, M. T. E.; Elzenga, N. J.; Haaksma, J.; Kamps, W. A.; Vonk, J. M.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Postma, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal studies of cardiac function in long-term childhood cancer survivors are scarce and frequently concern a median follow-up shorter than 13 years. Patients and methods: Cardiac assessment was performed in 22 doxorubicin-treated long-term survivors of a malignant bone tumour at

  9. Effects of Stimulant Medication on Growth Rates across 3 Years in the MTA Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James M.; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Wigal, Timothy; Arnold, L. Eugene; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hechtman, Lily; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Pelham, William E.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Wells, Karen C.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Hur, Kwan; Stehli, Annamarie; Davies, Mark; March, John S.; Conners, C. Keith; Caron, Mark; Volkow, Nora D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hypothesis of stimulant medication effect on physical growth in the follow-up phase of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. Method: Naturalistic subgroups were established based on patterns of treatment with stimulant medication at baseline, 14-, 24-, and 36-month assessments: not medicated (n = 65),…

  10. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in the follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habers, G.E.; Brussel, M. Van; Bhansing, K.J.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Janssen, A.J.; Royen-Kerkhof, A. Van; Pillen, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). METHODS: Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT)

  11. Pulmonary function and autoantibodies in a long-term follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Pernille Raasthøj; Buchvald, Frederik Fouirnaies; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Pulmonary disease is a rare complication in JDM, described in only a few studies. This long-term follow-up study aimed to (i) describe pulmonary involvement in a national cohort of JDM patients estimated by conventional spirometry, (ii) compare pulmonary impairment with overall JDM ou...

  12. QUANTITATIVE MUSCLE ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN THE FOLLOW-UP OF JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habers, G. Esther A.; van Brussel, Marco; Bhansing, Kavish J.; Hoppenreijs, Esther P.; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Pillen, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods: Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT)

  13. Smith-Petersen Vitallium mould arthroplasty: a 62-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, J F

    2011-09-01

    A variety of materials were used for early hip prostheses. The introduction of Vitallium by Smith-Petersen represented a further advance in this surgical field. We present the longest known follow-up of a Smith-Petersen Vitallium mould arthroplasty.

  14. Teacher Education Program Evaluation and Follow-Up Studies: A Collection of Current Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Shirley M., Ed.; Hall, Gene E., Ed.

    Presented is a collection of papers which describe follow-up studies designed to evaluate the effectiveness of some teacher education programs at six colleges and universities. Institutions represented are Western Kentucky University, Weber State College, University of Oregon, The Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University, and the…

  15. Characteristics and follow-up of postmarketing studies of conditionally authorized medicines in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Jarno; Klamer, Thea T.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.; Leufkens, Hubert G M; De Bruin, Marie L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to provide an insight into the characteristics and follow-up of postmarketing studies of medicines that were conditionally authorized in the European Union (EU). Methods: We compiled a list of all postmarketing studies attached as specific obligations to the lic

  16. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ...; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery... Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act... Information for Green Jobs and Health ] Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act Grants....

  17. Long-term Follow-up with AlloDerm in Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Baxter, MD, FACS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Little is known about the long-term fate of acellular dermal matrices in breast implant surgery. A 12-year follow-up case with tissue analysis of AlloDerm in revision breast reconstruction reveals retention of graft volume and integration with an organized collagen structure, minimal capsule formation, and little or no indication of inflammation.

  18. Subjective quality of life in first-episode psychosis. A ten year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Friis, Svein;

    2016-01-01

    patients with a first episode psychotic disorder was included from 1997 through 2000. At 10year follow-up 186 patients participated. QoL was measured by the Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to investigate longitudinal effects of baseline psychiatric symptoms...

  19. A Comparison of Community College Responders and Nonresponders to the VEDS Student Follow-Up Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifio, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of respondents and nonrespondents to the Vocational Education Data System's follow-up survey of Massachusetts community college graduates was designed to measure response bias. The survey investigated employment patterns, wages, and degree of job relatedness. Results suggest original data was biased, if at all, toward underestimation, not…

  20. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...