WorldWideScience

Sample records for icrp human respiratory

  1. New ICRP human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The new ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract is based on the premise that the large differences in radiation sensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they receive argue for calculating specific tissue doses rather than average lung doses. The model is also directly applicable to the worldwide population of both workers and the public. The requirement to describe intake, and deposition, clearance and dosimetry in each respiratory tract region, for a wide range of subjects at various levels of exercise necessarily means that the model is more complex than that of ICRP Publication 30. The widespread use of powerful personal computers, and the availability of user-friendly software to implement the model, however, will make it widely and readily accessible when the report is published. (Author)

  2. Practical application of the new ICRP Human Respiratory Tract Model (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, M.R.; Guilmette, R.A.; Jarvis, N.S.; Roy, M

    1998-07-01

    The ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) has been applied to calculate general-purpose dose coefficients using default values of parameters relating to the material and the subjects. The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing a 'Technical Document' giving guidance on application of the HRTM in situations where using specific information can improve dose assessment. It will include an analysis of the sensitivity of doses and bioassay quantities, lung retention and excretion rates, to relevant parameter values. Guidance will be given on characterising and sampling radioactive aerosols and on determining absorption rates. Examples will be given illustrating application of the HRTM in a wide range of situations. This paper provides a selective summary of the document at its current stage of development, with emphasis on determining absorption rates. (author)

  3. The revised International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1992-05-01

    A task group has revised the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used to calculate annual limits on intake of radionuclides. The revised model can be used to project respiratory tract doses for workers and members of the public from airborne radionuclides and to assess past exposures. Doses calculated for specific extrathoracic and thoracic tissues can be adjusted to account for differences in radiosensitivity and summed to yield two values of dose for the respiratory tract that are applicable to the ICRP tissue weighted dosimetry system

  4. Human respiratory tract model for radiological protection: A revision of the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) appointed a task group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. The model was originally published in 1966, modified slightly in Publication No. 19, and again in Publication No. 30 (in 1979). The task group concluded that research during the past 20 y suggested certain deficiencies in the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. Research has also provided sufficient information for a revision of the model. The task group's approach has been to review, in depth, morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract; deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract; clearance of deposited materials; and the nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled radioactive substances. This review has led to a redefinition of the regions of the respiratory tract for dosimetric purposes. The redefinition has a morphologic and physiological basis and is consistent with observed deposition and clearance of particles and with resultant pathology. Regions, as revised, are the extrathoracic (E-T) region, comprising the nasal and oral regions, the pharynx, larynx, and upper part of the trachea; the fast-clearing thoracic region (T[f]), comprising the remainder of the trachea and bronchi; and the slow-clearing thoracic region (T[s]), comprising the bronchioles, alveoli, and thoracic lymph nodes. A task group report will include models for calculating radiation doses to these regions of the respiratory tract following inhalation of representative alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting particulate and gaseous radionuclides. The models may be implemented as a package of computer codes available to a wide range of users

  5. A method for rapid estimation of internal dose to members of the public from inhalation of mixed fission products (based on the ICRP 1994 human respiratory tract model for radiological protection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jieli

    1999-01-01

    Based on the computing principle given in ICRP-30, a method had been given by the author for fast estimating internal dose from an intake of mixed fission products after nuclear accident. Following the ICRP-66 Human respiratory tract model published in 1994, the method was reconstructed. The doses of 1 Bq intake of mixed fission products (its AMAD = 1 μm, decay rate coefficient n = 0.2∼2.0) during the period of 1∼15 d after an accident were calculated. It is lower slightly based on ICRP 1994 respiratory tract model than that based on ICRP-30 model

  6. Innovative characteristics of the new dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract studied by the ICRP appointed Task Group of Committee 2

    CERN Document Server

    Melandri, C; Tarroni, G

    1991-01-01

    In 1984, the ICRP appointed a Task Group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the current lung dosimetric model. On the basis of the knowledge acquired during the past 20 years, the Task Group's approach has been to review, in depth, the morphology and physiology of the human respiratory tract, inspirability of aerosols and regional deposition of inhaled particles as functions of aerosol size and breathing parameters, clearance of deposited materials, nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory system caused by inhaled radioactive substances. In the proposed model, clearance from the three regions of the respiratory tract (extrathoracic ET, fast-clearing thoracic T sub f and slow-clearing thoracic T sub s , comprising lymph nodes) is described in terms of competition between the mechanical processes moving particles, which do not depend on the substances, and those of absorption into the blood, determined solely by the material. A Task Group report will also include models for calcula...

  7. Innovative characteristics of the new dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract studied by the ICRP appointed Task Group of Committee 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melandri, C.; Battisti, P.; Tarroni, G.

    1991-02-01

    In 1984, the ICRP appointed a Task Group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the current lung dosimetric model. On the basis of the knowledge acquired during the past 20 years, the Task Group's approach has been to review, in depth, the morphology and physiology of the human respiratory tract, inspirability of aerosols and regional deposition of inhaled particles as functions of aerosol size and breathing parameters, clearance of deposited materials, nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory system caused by inhaled radioactive substances. In the proposed model, clearance from the three regions of the respiratory tract (extrathoracic ET, fast-clearing thoracic T f and slow-clearing thoracic T s , comprising lymph nodes) is described in terms of competition between the mechanical processes moving particles, which do not depend on the substances, and those of absorption into the blood, determined solely by the material. A Task Group report will also include models for calculating radiation doses to tissues of the respiratory system following inhalation of α, β and γ emitting particulate and gaseous radionuclides. (author)

  8. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 μm, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated

  9. Comparison of the respiratory tract models of ICRP and US EPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao

    2000-01-01

    An index for the integral characterization of risk is necessary for improving risk management, comparing the effects of various practices on the environment and keeping risk as low as reasonably achievable while allowing economic development. Public health risk has been used as an index to compare and combine the risks from the presence of a variety of contaminants. In 1994, International Commission on Radiological Protection published the Publication 66 'Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection'. Meanwhile US EPA published 'Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry'. Basically the concept of Reference Concentration (RfC) is similar to that of DAC used in radiation protection. Both of them are derived from the deposited amount of interested contaminants in the respiratory tract. In an attempt to assess the public health risk by combining the ICRP model and the deposited amount corresponding to values of RfC, the main application, especially the fractional deposition, of the respiratory tract model of US EPA is compared with the new respiratory tract model of ICRP. For normal nose breather, when the AMADs of monodisperse aerosol are 0.5 η m, 1 η m, 2 η m, 3 η m, 5 η m, 7 η m and 10 η m, minute volume is 1.2m 3 /h (20L/mim), the corresponding total fractional depositions calculated by the model of the US EPA are 0.33, 0.50, 0.72, 0.85, 0.95, 0.97 and 0.93. With the same condition, the total fractional deposition calculated by the ICRP model is 0.35, 0.51, 0.70, 0.78, 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77. For polydisperse aerosol with default values of ICRP for occupational and environmental exposures, the fractional depositions calculated by US EPA model are 0.82 and 0.50 while that by ICRP are 0.82 and 0.47. In conclusion, (1) The ICRP model is more accurate than the US EPA model and has a wider application. (2) For monodisperse aerosol, when the AMAD of aerosol is less than 3 η m there is no

  10. The ICRP task group respiratory tract model - an age-dependent dosimetric model for general application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Human Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Protection has developed a revised dosimetric model for the respiratory tract. Papers outlining the model, and describing each aspect of it were presented at the Third International Workshop on Respiratory Tract Dosimetry (Albuquerque 1-3 July 1990), the Proceedings of which were recently published in Radiation Protection Dosimetry Volume 38 Nos 1-3 (1991). Since the model had not changed substantially since the Workshop at Albuquerque, only a summary of the paper presented at Schloss Elmau is included in these Proceedings. (author)

  11. Comparison of old and new ICRP models for respiratory tract dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the historical development and application of respiratory tract dosimetry models by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, ICRP, for health protection from inhaled radioactive aerosols. Three different models are discussed, those that were included in ICRP recommendations published in 1960 and 1979, and the new ICRP Publication 66. Basic features of these models are compared and contrasted. These features include model structure, sites and frequencies of particle deposition, processes and rates of clearance of the deposited material from the respiratory tract, and consideration of the parameters involved in these processes and how various factors can influence these parameters. All three models lead to the calculation of absorbed radiation doses with differing degrees of regional and local specificity. These calculations are achieved using different tools ranging from quick hand calculations to sophisticated computerized modeling approaches. A side-by-side review of these models indicates several important trends in respiratory tract dosimetry models, the most obvious of which is the increased complexity of each new model over the past 30+ years. These increases reflect both the increasing size of the knowledge base derived from studies in laboratory animals and in human subjects and the need for models more broadly applicable for both occupational and environmental exposures. It is likely that future research will be directed to those key aspects of the new model having the largest uncertainties. The detailed design of the new model and its associated software provide excellent means of identifying useful research areas and using the resulting new information in organized and productive ways

  12. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations; Nuovo modello polmonare della ICRP per radioprotezione (ICRP 66)azioni e confronti con la modellistica precedenteIl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.; Luciani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 {mu}m, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated.

  13. Application of the new ICRP respiratory tract model to inhaled plutonium nitrate using experimental biokinetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchall, A.; Bailey, M.R.; Jarvis, N.S. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the new ICRP respiratory tract model with particular reference to inhaled plutonium nitrate. The model is used to determine the absorption rates to blood for plutonium nitrate which when combined with the plutonium excretion functions were used to predict urinary excretion in man. The implications of the new model for radiological protection are discussed. (UK).

  14. Simulation of The ICRP-30 Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, T.; Atia, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Matlab was used to write a simulation program (ACID1) to simulate the ICRP-30 dosimetric model for the respiratory tract. The program (a new version of the one presented at the sixth Arab conference held in Cairo 2002) calculates a series of dosimetric quantities for the reference man as a result of the inhalation of any radionuclide. The program also plots the variation of activity with time for all organs and provided with a graphical user interface to make it friendly user. The results obtained by this program was compared with similar results obtained by other source and found to be very close. (Authors)

  15. Implementation of the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model: example of occupational exposure to uranium oxides formed in a new laser enrichment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Hodgson, A.; Stradling, G.N.; Birchall, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new uranium enrichment facility using laser isotopic separation generates aerosols consisting of U metal + UO 2 : with traces of UPON. Results of lung absorption to blood showed that the U metal + UO 2 transportability was appreciably greater than for other industrial forms of UO 2 . Taking into account the new ICRP human respiratory tract model, the data were used as a basis for assessing the dose coefficient, for the dust sampled at the workplace. (author)

  16. Simulation of the respiratory model of tract of Publication 66 of the ICRP and their use in biological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta, A.

    2001-01-01

    The International Commission Radiological Protection, ICRP in its publications 67, 68, 69 and 71 provides the loss of systematic activity of the radioactive materials by the routes of excretion and recirculation, as well as effective dose by incorporation unit coefficient, using the model of respiratory tract proposed by the ICRP, in its Publication 66, but it does not provide information on as these models in biological analysis are used. There are some specific studies for inhalation of uranium compounds made by Bertelli and collaborators using the new model of the lung. In this work it have been done a simulation of the model of respiratory tract of ICRP 66 of such form that it can be used in-vitro and in-vivo biological analysis. In order to verify the simulation were used systemic models for adult of planuin, lead, uranium, bismuth and their respective descendants and the comparison with the coefficients of dose provided by the ICRP. Finally, it shows the estimation of the temporary distribution of activity in devices and the excrete of these radionuclides and in addition the model for gases and steam in the conditions is verified that the ICRP proposes

  17. LUDEP 1. 0, a personal computer program to implement the new ICRP respiratory tract model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, N.S.; Birchall, A. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently approved a new model of the human respiratory tract. This model has been designed to represent realistically the deposition and biokinetic behaviour of inhaled radionuclides, and to calculate doses to the respiratory tract. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the new model, a Personal Computer program has been developed. LUDEP 1.0 is a user-friendly program for the IBM-compatible PC which enables the user to calculate doses to the respiratory tract and to other organs. (author).

  18. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  19. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F.; Chang, I.

    1995-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny (∼ 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 μm. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar

  20. Simulation of the respiratory model of tract of Publication 66 of the ICRP and their use in biological analysis; Simulacion del modelo de tracto respiratorio de la Publicacion 66 de la ICRP y su utilizacion en bioanalisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerta, A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias. Dept. de Fisica; Bertelli, L.; Lipsztein, J. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    The International Commission Radiological Protection, ICRP in its publications 67, 68, 69 and 71 provides the loss of systematic activity of the radioactive materials by the routes of excretion and recirculation, as well as effective dose by incorporation unit coefficient, using the model of respiratory tract proposed by the ICRP, in its Publication 66, but it does not provide information on as these models in biological analysis are used. There are some specific studies for inhalation of uranium compounds made by Bertelli and collaborators using the new model of the lung. In this work it have been done a simulation of the model of respiratory tract of ICRP 66 of such form that it can be used in-vitro and in-vivo biological analysis. In order to verify the simulation were used systemic models for adult of planuin, lead, uranium, bismuth and their respective descendants and the comparison with the coefficients of dose provided by the ICRP. Finally, it shows the estimation of the temporary distribution of activity in devices and the excrete of these radionuclides and in addition the model for gases and steam in the conditions is verified that the ICRP proposes.

  1. An empirical model describing the postnatal growth of organs in ICRP reference humans: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical model is presented for describing the postnatal mass growth of lungs in ICRP reference humans. A combined exponential and logistic function containing six parameters is fitted to ICRP 23 lung data using a weighted non-linear least squares technique. The results indicate that the model delineates the data well. Further analysis shows that reference male lungs attain a higher pubertal peak velocity (PPV) and adult mass size than female lungs, although the latter reach their PPV and adult mass size first. Furthermore, the model shows that lung growth rates in infants are two to three orders of magnitude higher than those in mature adults. This finding is important because of the possible association between higher radiation risks in infants' organs that have faster cell turnover rates compared to mature adult organs. The significance of the model for ICRP dosimetric purposes will be discussed. (author)

  2. ICRP 's view on protection of non-human species from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing its existing recommendations for radiological protection. Up till now, it has not published any recommendations as to how assessment or management of radiation effects in non-human organisms should be carried out. The Commission set up a Task Group in the year 2000 to address this issue, and recently adopted the Task Group's report. The report addresses the role that ICRP could play in this important and developing area, building on the approach that has been developed for human protection. ICRP will develop a small set of Reference Fauna and Flora, plus their relevant databases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. The concept of Reference Fauna and Flora is similar to that of Reference Man used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decision-making. The decision by the Commission to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species has not been driven by any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. It has rather been developed to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection, and to clarify how ICRP can contribute to the attainment of society's goals of environmental protection by developing a protection policy based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles. (author)

  3. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K.; Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G.; Gehr, P.

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Particle deposition and clearance of atmospheric particles in the human respiratory tract during LACE 98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundke, U.; Hänel, G.

    2003-04-01

    During the LACE 98footnote{Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment, (Germany) 1998} experiment microphysical, chemical and optical properties of atmospheric particles were measured by several groups. (Bundke et al.). The particle deposition and clearance of the particles in the human respiratory tract was calculated using the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) deposition and clearance model (ICRP 1994). Particle growth as function of relative humidity outside the body was calculated from measurement data using the model introduced by Bundke et al.. Particle growth inside the body was added using a non-equilibrium particle growth model. As a result of the calculations, time series of the total dry particle mass and -size distribution were obtained for all compartments of the human respiratory tract defined by ICRP 1994. The combined ICRP deposition and clearance model was initialized for different probationers like man, woman, children of different ages and several circumstances like light work, sitting, sleeping etc. Keeping the conditions observed during LACE 98 constant a approximation of the aerosol burdens of the different compartments was calculated up to 4 years of exposure and compared to the results from Snipes et al. for the "Phoenix" and "Philadelphia" aerosol. References: footnotesize{ Bundke, U. et al.,it{Aerosol Optical Properties during the Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (LACE 98)} ,10.1029/2000JD000188, JGR, 2002 ICRP,it{Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection, Bd. ICRP Publication 66}, Annals of the ICRP, 24,1-3, Elsevier Science, Ocford, 1994 Snipes et al. ,it{The 1994 ICRP66 Human Respiratory Tract Model as a Tool for predicting Lung Burdens from Exposure to Environmental Aerosols}, Appl. Occup. Environ. Hyg., 12, 547-553,1997}

  5. ICRP proposal on radiation protection of non-human species - with TAEA perspective-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okyar, H. B.

    2006-01-01

    Interest in the protection of the environment has greatly increased in recent years, in relation to all aspects of human activities. Such interest has been accompanied by the development and application of various means of assessing and managing the many forms of human impact upon it. Up to now, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has not published any recommendations on how to assess or manage radiation effects in non-human species. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) which is the regulatory body of Turkey in radiation protection also recognises that there is a current lack of consistency at international level with respect to addressing such issues in relation to radioactivity, and therefore believes that a more proactive approach is now necessary. The Commission has decided to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species in order to fill a conceptual gap in radiation protection. The proposed system does not intend to set regulatory standards, but rather to provide guidance and help regulators and operators demonstrate compliance with existing legislation. ICRP developed a small set of reference animals and plants, plus their relevant data bases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. This concept is similar to that of the reference individual (reference man) used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decisions. The Commission has now established a system to continue the work with defining effects end-points of interest, the types of reference organisms to be used by ICRP, and defining a set of reference dose models for assessing and managing radiation exposure in non-human species. This talk will provide a review of ICRP proposed framework for radiation protection of the environment with TAEA comments

  6. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Helena Antoniassi da Silva; Fernando Rosado Spilki; Adriana Gut Lopes Riccetto; Emilio Elias Baracat; Clarice Weis Arns

    2009-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and the human metapneumovírus (hMPV) are main etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARI). The ARI is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide.  hRSV and hMPV are members of the Paramyxoviridae. They are enveloped, non-segmented viruses, with negative-sense single stranded genomes. Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the best characterized agent viral of this group, associated with respiratory diseases in...

  7. Foetal dosimetry--is the ICRP dosimetric system for humans now complete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Steve [Westlakes Research Institute, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-01

    . Nonetheless, calculation of foetal doses as part of a radiological assessment would have been seen as something quite exceptional and not attempted by the average radiation protection practitioner. The recent release of ICRP Publication 88, concisely summarised in this issue by John Stather et al, will change this situation. The new data permit the publication of doses to the embryo and foetus for intakes of radionuclides by the mother both during pregnancy and prior to conception. Selected radioisotopes of 31 elements are covered. A number of intake scenarios are covered including acute intakes at a number of times prior to conception and during pregnancy, constant chronic intakes for one and five years prior to conception, and constant chronic intakes during pregnancy. This report represents the culmination of a major scientific effort by the individuals and institutions involved in Committee 2's Task Group on Internal Dosimetry, on which those involved should be congratulated. In order to calculate dose coefficients for the foetus, the Task Group has needed to establish models for the transfer of radionuclides from maternal circulation to the developing foetus and for the distribution of radionuclides between its tissues and organs; also, a time-dependent model of foetal geometry to permit the calculation of specific effective energies for the necessary source target combinations. As it stands, the report provides a comprehensive basis from which practitioners can calculate foetal doses as part of any radiological assessment, in both occupational and environmental radiation protection settings. A CD-ROM, expected to be available later this year, will make the data more accessible and permit greater flexibility in the calculations. ICRP-88 certainly fills the remaining major gap in the pre-existing system and, to that extent, coverage for humans is now essentially complete. However, many questions remain about the way in which the results of calculations using the new

  8. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Helena Antoniassi da Silva

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV and the human metapneumovírus (hMPV are main etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARI. The ARI is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide.  hRSV and hMPV are members of the Paramyxoviridae. They are enveloped, non-segmented viruses, with negative-sense single stranded genomes. Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV is the best characterized agent viral of this group, associated with respiratory diseases in lower respiratory tract. Recently, a new human pathogen belonging to the subfamily Pneumovirinae was identified, the human metapneumovirus (hMPV, which is structurally similar to the hRSV, in genomic organization, viral structure, antigenicity and clinical symptoms.  The subfamily Pneumovirinae contains two genera: genus Pneumovirus contains hRSV, the bovine (bRSV, as well as the ovine and caprine respiratory syncytial virus and pneumonia virus of mice, the second genus Metapneumovirus, consists of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV. In this work, we present a brief narrative review of the literature on important aspects of the biology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of infections by two respiratory viruses.

  9. A framework for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on non-human species ICRP Publication 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2003-01-01

    In its 1990 Recommendations, the ICRP indicated that it believed that the standards of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable would ensure that other species are not put at risk. The ICRP considers that its system of radiological protection has provided a fairly good indirect protection of the human habitat. However, no internationally agreed criteria or policies explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation, and it is difficult to determine or demonstrate whether or not the environment is adequately protected from potential impacts of radiation under different circumstances. The present report suggests a framework, based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles, by which a policy for the protection of non-human species could be achieved. The primary purpose of developing such a framework is to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection; it does not reflect any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. The proposed framework is designed to harmonise with the ICRP's approach to the protection of human beings, but does not intend to set regulatory standards. Instead, the proposed framework is intended to be a practical tool to provide high-level advice and guidance for regulators and operators. An agreed set of quantities and units, a set of reference dose models, reference dose-per-unit-intake (or unit exposure), and reference fauna and flora are required to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose and between dose and certain categories of effect, for a few, clearly defined types of animals and plants. As a first step, a small set of reference fauna and flora with supporting databases will be developed by the ICRP. Others can then develop more area- and situation-specific approaches to assess and manage risks to non-human species

  10. Biokinetic of plutonium in human beings. Analysis and modification of ICRP 67 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, A.; Castellani, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary research of the available data and empirical functions for the plutonium excretion after injection was carried out. The ICRP model presented in the Publication no. 67 was then analyzed comparing its predictions for the activity in urine and, at a lesser extent, in feces and blood, with the collected data and empirical curves. The model was modified and an optimized age-related compartmental model was developed. A new skeletal model recently developed was also introduced and age depending bone remodelling rates were assumed on the basis of the ICRP Publication 70. This model provides a better agreement with measured urinary excretion data than the current ICRP 67 model, avoiding unphysiological assumptions such as the transfer of activity from soft tissue to urinary bladder, that were part of the ICRP model. The new optimized model predictions of the activity in faeces and in blood after an injection are also closer to the available data than the ICRP 67 estimations. A good agreement with the partitioning factor of plutonium between skeleton and liver obtained from different autopsy studies was also observed [it

  11. Biokinetic of plutonium in human beings. Analysis and modification of ICRP 67 model; Biocinetica del plutonio nell'organismo umano. Analisi e modifica del modello ICRP 67

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, A.; Castellani, C.M. [ENEA, Divisione Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    A preliminary research of the available data and empirical functions for the plutonium excretion after injection was carried out. The ICRP model presented in the Publication no. 67 was then analyzed comparing its predictions for the activity in urine and, at a lesser extent, in feces and blood, with the collected data and empirical curves. The model was modified and an optimized age-related compartmental model was developed. A new skeletal model recently developed was also introduced and age depending bone remodelling rates were assumed on the basis of the ICRP Publication 70. This model provides a better agreement with measured urinary excretion data than the current ICRP 67 model, avoiding unphysiological assumptions such as the transfer of activity from soft tissue to urinary bladder, that were part of the ICRP model. The new optimized model predictions of the activity in faeces and in blood after an injection are also closer to the available data than the ICRP 67 estimations. A good agreement with the partitioning factor of plutonium between skeleton and liver obtained from different autopsy studies was also observed. [Italian] E' stata effettuata preliminarmente una ricerca bibliografica dei dati e delle funzioni di escrezione del plutonio attualmente disponibili in letteratura. Sulla base dei risultati di tale ricerca e' stato verificato il modello proposto dall'ICRP nella Pubblicazione n. 67. Tale modello e' stato quindi modificato al fine non solo di avere una piu' realistica descrizione dei valori predetti per l'escrezione urinaria, ma anche di modellare la cinetica del plutonio evitando quelle assunzioni introdotte appositamente nel modello dell'ICRP per correggere le previsini del modello ma che mancano di una chiara spiegazione di carattere fisiologico. Esso fornisce valutazioni piu' realistiche anche per l'attivita' nelle feci e nel sangue. Il modello sviluppato comprende un modello scheletrico

  12. The postnatal growth of ICRP target organs in reference humans: Spleen and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Attempts to improve radiation dose estimates to infants and children are hampered because of the lack of mathematical models that describe the age variation in anatomical and physiological parameters. Specifically, for one anatomical parameter, organ size, there are no growth models available to the health physics community. In this paper, an empirical mathematical model is introduced for estimating age-specific masses of two ICRP target organs: the spleen and liver. That model, the Power Logistic Additive (PLA) growth model, is fitted to ICRP 23 organ growth data to determine five growth parameters. This model assumes that organs grow under the influence of two main processes: a primary (power function) and a sexual maturation (logistic function) process, which are additive from birth to adulthood. The results show that the model describes the ICRP growth data quite well. Growth parameters and tables listing the predicted masses and mass velocities as a function of age for each organ are provided for application in the ICRP modeling system

  13. Revised dose limits and new respiratory tract model and their implications for annual limits of intake of radioactive materials - A review of recent ICRP publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation may cause immediate and/or delayed biological damages to the body of the exposed person and/or his/her progeny. The exposure may be caused by an external source or may arise due to internal contamination by a radioactive material. In order to prevent such exposure, or to reduce the probability that it will occur, national authorities and international organizations that are engaged in radiation safety and protection have set limits for the exposure to ionizing radiation from either source. The sensitivity of the body to ionizing radiation usually decreases with age. For this reason and due to the limited possibilities to control the exposure of the general public, different limits have been set for for occupational exposure and for the exposure of members of the public of different age groups. The general principles of these limits and guidelines for their calculations are set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and published in the Annals of the ICRP. The basic philosophy of the Commission, which includes the principles of justification, optimization and dose limits, the basic radiobiological models, and the distinction between stochastic and non-stochastic effects has been presented in its publication no. 26 . Based on this philosophy, the Commission issued between 1979 and 1988 a series of publications followed by annexes and addenda known as publication no. 30 . This series presented models describing the metabolism of radioactive materials which enter the body by inhalation and ingestion, the transfer of such materials from the respiratory tract and the gastrointestinal tract to the blood, and from there to the body organs and the excretion of the material from the body. This series presented also values for biokinetic parameters of these systems and transfer paths, and methods for calculating limits on intake which ensure that the exposure from internal contamination will not exceed the dose limits set by the

  14. Revised dose limits and new respiratory tract model and their implications for annual limits of intake of radioactive materials - A review of recent ICRP publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, T; Silverman, I; Shapira, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1996-12-01

    Ionizing radiation may cause immediate and/or delayed biological damages to the body of the exposed person and/or his/her progeny. The exposure may be caused by an external source or may arise due to internal contamination by a radioactive material. To prevent such exposure, or to reduce the probability that it will occur, national authorities and international organizations engaged in radiation safety and protection have set limits for the exposure to ionizing radiation from either source. The sensitivity of the body to ionizing radiation usually decreases with age. For this reason and due to the limited possibilities to control the exposure of the general public, different limits have been set for for occupational exposure and for the exposure of members of the public of different age groups. The general principles of these limits and guidelines for their calculations are set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and published in the Annals of the ICRP. The basic philosophy of the Commission, which includes the principles of justification, optimization and dose limits, the basic radiobiological models, and the distinction between stochastic and non-stochastic effects has been presented in its publication no. 26. Based on this philosophy, the Commission issued between 1979 and 1988 a series of publications followed by annexes and addenda known as publication no. 30. This series presented models describing the metabolism of radioactive materials which enter the body by inhalation and ingestion, the transfer of such materials from the respiratory tract and the gastrointestinal tract to the blood, and from there to the body organs and the excretion of the material from the body. This series presented also values for biokinetic parameters of these systems and transfer paths, and methods for calculating limits on intake which ensure that the exposure from internal contamination will not exceed the dose limits set.

  15. Application of morphological and physiological parameters representative of a sample Brazilian population in the human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.A.; Cardoso, J.C.S.; Lourenco, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) proposed in ICRP Publication 66 account for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. These changing characteristics can influence the rates and the sites of deposition. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The HRTM model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. lt is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined in ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The respiratory values at different levels of activity for ages varying from

  16. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y"−"1 for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. - Highlights: • Consumer products considered that NORM would be included should be regulated. • 44 products were collected and its gamma activities were measured with HPGe detector. • Through Monte Carlo simulation, organ equivalent doses and effective doses on human phantom were calculated. • All annual effective doses for the products were evaluated as lower than dose limit for the public.

  17. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: IV. Basis of the human alimentary tract model and uncertainties in model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.; Harrison, J.; Phipps, A.

    2007-01-01

    The biokinetic and dosimetric model of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract applied in current documents of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was developed in the mid-1960's. The model was based on features of a reference adult male and was first used by the ICRP in Publication 30, Limits for Intakes of Radionuclides by Workers (Part 1, 1979). In the late 1990's an ICRP task group was appointed to develop a biokinetic and dosimetric model of the alimentary tract that reflects updated information and addresses current needs in radiation protection. The new age-specific and gender-specific model, called the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), has been completed and will replace the GI model of Publication 30 in upcoming ICRP documents. This paper discusses the basis for the structure and parameter values of the HATM, summarises the uncertainties associated with selected features and types of predictions of the HATM and examines the sensitivity of dose estimates to these uncertainties for selected radionuclides. Emphasis is on generic biokinetic features of the HATM, particularly transit times through the lumen of the alimentary tract, but key dosimetric features of the model are outlined, and the sensitivity of tissue dose estimates to uncertainties in dosimetric as well as biokinetic features of the HATM are examined for selected radionuclides. (authors)

  18. Intercomparison between ICRP60 and ICRP103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, M. T. A.

    2014-04-01

    In this project inter-comparison between the recommendations from ICRP publication 60, 1900 and the recommendations from ICRP publication 103, 2007 is made. The present 2007 recommendations is an update based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure .This comparison covers the Exposure situations, Tissue Weighting Factors wT, Radiation Weighting Factors wR, and the three Fundamental Principles of Radiological Protection and the protection of the environment. ICRP has retained its fundamental hypothesis for the induction of stochastic effects of linearity of dose and effect without threshold and a dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of 2 to derive nominal risk coefficients for low doses and low dose rates. While the overall detriment from low radiation doses has remained unchanged, ICRP has made adjustments to the values of the radiation and tissue weighting factors. In particular, the tissue weighting factor for breast has increased while that for gonads has decreased. There are some presentational changes to the system of protection. While ICRP has maintained the three fundamental principles-justification, optimization of protection, and dose limitation-it has attempted to develop a more holistic approach to radiological protection covering all exposure situations-planned, existing and emergency and all radiation sources, whether of natural or artificial origin. Dose constraints and reference levels are categorized into three bands which should assist in rationalizing the many values of dose restrictions given in earlier ICRP publications. (au)

  19. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a disposal vault in deep plutonic rock: reassessment using ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuschke, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on the safe disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The program has focussed on the concept of disposal in durable containers in an engineered facility or 'vault' located 500 to 1000 m deep in plutonic rock on the Canadian Shield. As part of this task, a methodology was developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent intrusion scenarios, and applied to a reference conceptual design of a facility for disposal of used fuel. The AECB has specified that 'the predicted radiological risk to individuals from a waste disposal facility shall not exceed 10 -6 fatal cancers and serious genetic effects in a year.' Risk is defined as the sum, of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant radiation dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. The AECB also specifies that 'calculations of individual risk should be made by using the risk conversion factor of 2 x 10 -2 per sievert.' Our earlier assessment of four human intrusion scenarios showed that the estimated risk using the risk conversion factor recommended by the AECB was at least 3 orders of magnitude below the AECB risk criterion, at all times up to 10 000 a, for each of the four scenarios analysed. The AECB risk criterion and risk conversion factor are based on the recommendations of the Intemafional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication ICRP 26. More recently, in its Publication ICRP 60, the ICRP has recommended dose factors for fatal cancers that are larger than those in ICRP 26 and an increase in the risk factor for serious hereditary effects in all future generations. Another ICRP Publication, ICRP 64, states that 'For potential exposure situations, the consideration of the basic dose response used for stochastic effects must be extended into the range of high doses where deterministic effects also occur.' For the new assessments of risk we use the estimated doses and probabilities of

  20. Dosimetric applications of the new ICRP lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has adopted a new dosimetric model of the human respiratory tract, to be issued as ICRP Publication 66. This chapter presents a summary of the main measures of the new model. The model is a general update of that in Publication 30, but is significantly broader in scope. It applies explicitly to workers and all members of the public: for inhalation of particles, gases and vapors; evaluation of dose per unit intake or exposure; and interpretation of bioassay data. The approach is fundamentally different from the Publication 30 model which calculates only the average dose to the lungs. The new model takes account of differences in radiosensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they may receive, and calculates specific tissue doses. The model readily incorporates specific information related to the subject (age, physical activity, smoking or health status) or the exposure (aerosol size and chemical form). The application of the new model to calculate equivalent lung dose and effective dose per unit intake is illustrated for several α- and ∂-emitting radionuclides, and the new values obtained are compared with those given by the ICRP Publication 30 lung model

  1. Solution of human respiratory tract model for chronic inhalation intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadar, Minal Y.; Singh, I.S.; Rao, D.D.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    For the radiation workers of fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication plants, inhalation is one of the major routes of intake of internal contamination. In case of routine monitoring which would result in lung activity above detection limit, it is assumed that intake has occurred at the midpoint of monitoring interval so that underestimation introduced by the unknown time of intake is less than a factor of three. In the plants, chronic intakes of 239 Pu are possible if low levels of 239 Pu activities remain undetected. In ICRP-78, the retention values are given as a function of time for continuous chronic inhalation of 239 Pu at 1.71 Bq/day that would result in Committed Effective Dose (CED) of 20 mSv. Retention values (R) are not given for inhalation intake at any other rate. Therefore, Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) is solved for continuous chronic inhalation at 1 Bq/day rate for type M compounds of 239 Pu to estimate R as a function of time. These values will be useful in estimating intake from lung activity measurements in case of chronic intakes

  2. Exposure implications for uranium aerosols formed at a new laser enrichment facility: application of the ICRP Respiratory Tract and Systemic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansorbolo, E.; Hodgson, A.; Stradling, G.N.; Hodgson, S.; Metivier, H.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Jarvis, N.S.; Birchall, A

    1998-07-01

    A pilot enrichment facility developed in France employs laser technology. The development of this process has resulted in three different types of aerosols identified as variable mixtures of U{sub metal}+ UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. A procedure is described for assessing intakes and doses after inhalation of these dusts using site and material specific data in conjunction with the most recent ICRP biokinetic models. It is concluded that exposure control could be based on either radiotoxicity or chemical toxicity and that chest monitoring and urine assay could be useful, provided that measurements are made soon after a known acute intake. (author)

  3. Application of the physiological and morphological parameters of the brazilian population sample to the mathematical model of the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Arlene Alves dos

    2005-01-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined by the ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. (author)

  4. Safety philosophy of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuaki

    1995-01-01

    Measures are important as the means to realize philosophy. Accordingly, it is meaningful to take measures as the object when the philosophy of ICRP is considered. As to controllable risk factors, restraint shall be done so as to make the risk being brought about as small as possible. When it is not necessary to limit restraining means, risk-free is ideal. Ionizing radiation is one of risk factors. The risk that ICRP speaks is the loss of the probability of maintaining life. The object of radiation protection is limited to the exposure to controllable radiation, and the aim of protection is to minimize risk under the condition of as low as reasonably achievable. The philosophy of ICRP and the problems in the measures are discussed. ICRP and ICRU must reconfirm the allotment of roles. Radiation protection system is composed of system of radiation dosimetry and system of dose limitation. The mission of ICRP is to recommend political decision, and it may make the political declaration 'The radiation below a certain amount may be regarded as safe'. It is better only to recommend the conversion relation of radiation dose and risk. The desire and demand to ICRP are mentioned. (K.I.)

  5. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1mSv y(-1) for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 1990 recommendations of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Main Commission of ICRP finalised its new recommendations during its November 1990 meeting. The recommendations will appear in the Annals of the ICRP in 1991 as Publication 60. This paper represents a personal summary of these recommendations. It covers the basic biological risk estimates and the conceptual framework of the system of radiological protection, the definition of radiation detriment and its use both in the definition of radiation quantities and in the establishment of the dose limits adopted by the Main Commissions. (author)

  7. Review of ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Events in both the scientific world and in the public domain have added pressure to review the recommendations of the ICRP on which radiation protection legislation in most countries is founded. A brief editorial pleads for clarity in ICRP recommendations, suggests the use solely of cumulative with age individual occupational dose limits, suggests that collective doses including both occupational and to the public should be kept as low as reasonably achievable, judged on quantitative economic grounds, and suggests the setting of a probability for serious accidents which may be disregarded in planning. (UK)

  8. ICRP - history and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    A brief history is presented of the evolution of radiation protection concepts, largely through the activities of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and their adoption in Australia by the National Health and Medical Research Council. Changes which have taken place since the preparation of the Code of Practice for Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1980) are described, and likely future directions in radiation protection are suggested. A list of the ICRP publications since ICRP-26 is provided. 4 refs

  9. Current Activities and Plans of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is established to advance for the public benefit the science of (ionising) radiation protection by providing recommendations and guidance, aiming at an appropriate standard of protection without unduly limiting beneficial practices. The Main Commission of ICRP recently launched a Task Group on new, consolidated Recommendations, based on world-wide consultations through IRPA on concepts proposed by the ICRP Chairman. It has also established a Task Group on protection of the environment, to review the Commission's policy that if humans are protected to the degree thought necessary, then other species are adequately protected. Task Groups of Committee 1 (Radiation effects) are planning reports on cancer risks at low doses; radiation effects on the embryo/fetus; and radiation quality effects. Committee 2 (Doses from radiation exposures) has Task Groups on internal dosimetry and on dose calculations, currently drafting reports on embryo/fetus dose coefficients; application of the ICRP lung model, and radionuclide transfer to breast milk. Task Groups on the human alimentary tract and on reference man are also preparing reports. Committee 3 (Protection in medicine) has initiated a series of practical reports on pregnancy and medical radiation; interventional radiology; accident prevention in radiotherapy; computed tomography; and release of patients after therapy with unsealed sources; as well as its series on new radiopharmaceuticals. Committee 4 (Application of ICRP recommendations) is providing input to the Main Commission Task Groups and is proposing a Task Group on radiation in space flight. Information about ICRP activities is available at www.icrp.org. (author)

  10. Impact of ICRP publication 68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.; Woods, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    ICRP Publication 61 was a temporary replacement for ICRP Publication 30. It gave ALIs but not the underlying dose conversion factors. ICRP Publication 68 has now been issued to replace Publication 61; it contains the dose conversion factors but not the ALIs, so comparison is impossible without carrying out calculations. This paper presents comparisons between the two publications and calculates the ICRP Publication 68 ALIs for some of the more common radionuclides. (author)

  11. The work of Committee 2 of ICRP on internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Following publication of new recommendations by ICRP, a series of publications on Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) will give both dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides and data for the interpretation of bioassay information. Account will be taken of revised tissue weighting factors given in the new recommendations and a number of additional developments. These include new human phantoms based upon medical imaging data for calculating doses to body tissues and the new Human Alimentary Tract Model. In addition, parameter values for the Human Respiratory Tract Model are being reviewed, radionuclide decay data are being updated and systemic models for a number of elements revised to take account of more recent data and to provide models that are appropriate for both dosimetry and for bioassay interpretation. The OIR series of publications will be accompanied by a supporting Guidance Document that will give advice on the interpretation of bioassay data. (author)

  12. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on the transportation regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.; Eckerman, K.F.; Wangler, M.E.; Punch, F.; Carriker, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has been providing recommendations for limitations on radiation exposure for decades. The ICRP recommendations address ionizing radiation and are concerned with protecting humans from its effects. These recommendations assist regulatory and advisory agencies in establishing and promulgating national regulations and practices in radiation Protection. Most countries have incorporated at least some aspect of the recommendations in their regulations since about 1956 when the first basic prowdon standard was Published in ICRP 2. Since that time ICRP has issued two major revisions to the recommendations. ICRP 26 was published in 1977 and ICRP 60 was published in 1991. These last two publications have companion works, ICRP 30 atid ICRP 61, that contain Annual Limits of Intake (ALI) for radiation workers. This report discusses the impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transport regulations

  13. The ICRP 2007 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2007-01-01

    The last comprehensive International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations have been published in 1991(1). Since that time new data in physics and biology that are relevant for radiological protection have appeared in the scientific literature. Also, the general thinking about safety standards at the workplace as well as for the protection of the public has developed. Thus, a review of the recommendations is needed. However, as the present standards have worked well, these new recommendations should build on the present ones. Only a process of further development should take place allowing for the following key points: - new biological and physical information and trends in the setting of safety standards; - improvement in the presentation of the recommendations; as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information and environmental aspects will be included. The fundamental principles of radiological protection will remain the same as they have been described in ICRP publication 60(1): Justification: Actions involving new exposures or changes in exposures of individuals have to be justified in advance. A positive net benefit must result. Optimisation: Exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable and should be optimised in relation to with dose constraints. Dose limits: The values will not to be changed from Publication 60. Dose constraints: Development of the concept proposed in Publication 60 will be explained. The ICRP Committees have prepared foundation documents in the fields for which they are responsible and their members have the corresponding expertise. These foundation documents will support the decisions and explain the various statements of the Main Commission in a broader sense. Some of them will be published as Annexes to the recommendations (Annex A: Biological and Epidemiological Information on Health Risks Attributable to Ionising Radiation; Annex B: Quantities used in Radiological

  14. The ICRP 2007 recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Chairman of ICRP Committee 2, Institute of Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The last comprehensive International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations have been published in 1991(1). Since that time new data in physics and biology that are relevant for radiological protection have appeared in the scientific literature. Also, the general thinking about safety standards at the workplace as well as for the protection of the public has developed. Thus, a review of the recommendations is needed. However, as the present standards have worked well, these new recommendations should build on the present ones. Only a process of further development should take place allowing for the following key points: - new biological and physical information and trends in the setting of safety standards; - improvement in the presentation of the recommendations; as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information and environmental aspects will be included. The fundamental principles of radiological protection will remain the same as they have been described in ICRP publication 60(1): Justification: Actions involving new exposures or changes in exposures of individuals have to be justified in advance. A positive net benefit must result. Optimisation: Exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable and should be optimised in relation to with dose constraints. Dose limits: The values will not to be changed from Publication 60. Dose constraints: Development of the concept proposed in Publication 60 will be explained. The ICRP Committees have prepared foundation documents in the fields for which they are responsible and their members have the corresponding expertise. These foundation documents will support the decisions and explain the various statements of the Main Commission in a broader sense. Some of them will be published as Annexes to the recommendations (Annex A: Biological and Epidemiological Information on Health Risks Attributable to Ionising Radiation; Annex B: Quantities used in Radiological

  15. A Review on Human Respiratory Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafarian, Pardis; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Input impedance of the respiratory system is measured by forced oscillation technique (FOT). Multiple prior studies have attempted to match the electromechanical models of the respiratory system to impedance data. Since the mechanical behavior of airways and the respiratory system as a whole are similar to an electrical circuit in a combination of series and parallel formats some theories were introduced according to this issue. It should be noted that, the number of elements used in these models might be less than those required due to the complexity of the pulmonary-chest wall anatomy. Various respiratory models have been proposed based on this idea in order to demonstrate and assess the different parts of respiratory system related to children and adults data. With regard to our knowledge, some of famous respiratory models in related to obstructive, restrictive diseases and also Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are reviewed in this article.

  16. The ICRP working party on bioassay interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, F.A.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Birchall, A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there have been many developments in modelling the behaviour of radionuclides in the human body. The current generation of models are designed to be more 'realistic' than the previous generation of simple compartment models. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) uses these models to produce dose coefficients and recognises that there is a need to give more guidance on how these models can be used to interpret bioassay data. A working party has been set up to address the issue. This paper describes some of the problems, some approaches to solving the problems and the progress of the ICRP working party. (author)

  17. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  18. Application of the physiological and morphological parameters of the brazilian population sample to the mathematical model of the human respiratory tract; Aplicacao dos parametros fisiologicos e morfologicos de uma amostra da populacao brasileira no modelo matematico do trato respiratorio humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Arlene Alves dos

    2005-07-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined by the ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. (author)

  19. HUMTRN: documentation and verification for an ICRP-based age- and sex-specific human simulation model for radionuclide dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1984-06-01

    The dynamic human simulation model HUMTRN is designed specifically as a major module of BIOTRAN to integrate climatic, hydrologic, atmospheric, food crop, and herbivore simulation with human dietary and physiological characteristics, and metabolism and radionuclides to predict radiation doses to selected organs of both sexes in different age groups. The model is based on age- and weight-specific equations developed for predicting human radionuclide transport from metabolic and physical characteristics. These characteristics are modeled from studies documented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 23). HUMTRN allows cumulative doses from uranium or plutonium radionuclides to be predicted by modeling age-specific anatomical, physiological, and metabolic properties of individuals between 1 and 70 years of age and can track radiation exposure and radionuclide metabolism for any age group for specified daily or yearly time periods. The simulated daily dose integration of eight or more simultaneous air, water, and food intakes gives a new, comprehensive, dynamic picture of radionuclide intake, uptake, and hazard analysis for complex scenarios. A detailed example using site-specific data based on the Pantex studies is included for verification. 14 references, 24 figures, 10 tables

  20. The new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.

    1977-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations are based on the concept of risk. The doses received by workers have to be justified and kept as low as practically achievable. The acceptable annual occupational risk is of the order of 10 -4 . This corresponds to an average annual dose equivalent of about 5 mSv(0.5 Rem). The annual dose equivalent limit for whole body irradiation will remain 50 mSv/year (5 Rem/year) provided that the average is about 1/10th of this value. The concept of the critical organ is abandoned and is replaced by the concept of equidetriment. (author)

  1. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype.

  2. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for

  3. What we expect of ICRP new recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    We believe that it is essential for Japan to continue to maintain and promote nuclear power generation. To promote nuclear power generation, we believe it is important that the effect of low-level radiation on humans and the exposure dose limits have to be widely and properly understood by the general public and radiation workers. From such a point of view, we express our agreement with ICRP latest attempt that is aimed at preparing a simple and easy-to understanding radiological protection system. We would like to express some of our opinions about ICRP new recommendations. - The relation between PAL and the conventional dose limit should be shown clearly. - Optimisation on low-enough level (natural background level) should be omitted. - The process of optimisation must take the state of affairs in each country into consideration. - The dose limits (100 mSv/5 yrs and 50 mSv/yr) for workers should not be changed. (Single-year dose limit of 20 mSv/yr has no flexibility and has serious impact on nuclear power operators.). - Full discussion is necessary to establish the radiological protection criteria for environment. We appreciate ICRP's releases and calls for opinions regarding the new recommendations. We hope ICRP continues to disclose the status of discussion in a timely manner, and invite opinions. (author)

  4. Human respiratory syncytial virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-05-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive, and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (P respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (P < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  6. BIOLOGY OF HUMAN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    membrane of the eyes, mouth, or nose and possibly through the ... transmembrane anchor near the C terminus. It is cleaved into two ... immunity induced by previous strains (Hall, 2001). Fluctuations in the .... isolation, and other serological techniques. Antigen .... Respiratory syncytial virus in B.N. fields, D.M. Knipe and.

  7. Application of physiological parameters of a sample of the Brazilian population in different levels of exercise, on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Arlene A. dos; Cardoso, Joaquim C.S.; Lourenco, Maria C.

    2005-01-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population, in different levels of exercise, on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The deposition model was implemented using software Excel for Windows (version 2000). The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. The variations are not the same for all regions of the respiratory tract and depend on levels of exercise. (author)

  8. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  9. UK experience with ICRP26 and ICRP30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dray, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    ICRP26 was adopted in January 1977 which took into account information emerging since the adoption of ICRP9 in September 1969 and specified the basic criteria for dose limitation which still apply today. ICRP30 defines the limits for intakes for radionuclides for workers, and enables the health physicist and regulatory bodies to make appropriate limits for annual intake, air contamination etc, to comply requirements of dose-equivalent commitment and committed dose equivalent. The publication of ICRP26 is reflected in European Communities directive 80/836/Euratom. Council Directive of 15th July 1980 amending the Directive laying down the basic safety standards for the health protection of general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiations. This document being required the member states to bring the requirements of the directive within their legislation. In the United Kingdom this was accomplished by the publication of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985

  10. The new ICRP general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Lochard, J.; Holm, L.E.; Niwa, O.; Ishigure, N.; Kosako, T.; Kai, M.

    2007-01-01

    The new draft ICRP recommendations was presented by the ICRP chair, Professor Lars-Eric Holm. His presentation was followed by presentations by Japanese members of the various (CRP committees, discussing their views of the draft recommendations based on their own technical experience. After these presentations, questions from the floor raised many of the key issues of the conference: dose constrains, the LNT hypothesis, dose bands, etc. This showed that the conference participants had carefully and completely read the draft, and were very interested in building a final ICRP recommendation that appropriately addresses all their concerns. These issues were also discussed throughout the entire conference. (author)

  11. Review of ICRP Publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinmiller, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP were last formulated in 1977. The ICRP has periodically reviewed the recommendations and issued supplementary reports on specific topics. Over the last several years, enough new information accumulated on health effects from exposure to ionizing radiation to change appreciably the assumed risk estimates from such exposure, and to prompt the ICRP to reassess its recommendations for radiological protection. The resulting recommendations were approved by the ICRP in 1990 November. This report examines the recommendations from three perspectives. The first section of the report presents background information on the development of the recommendations and the risk estimates on which they are based. The main reasons for the increase in current risk estimates from previous estimates are given. The second section of the report outlines the basic ICRP recommendations that are relevant to occupational and public radiological protection, and offers interpretation where needed. The third section of the report examines implications of the recommendations for dosimetry. the ICRP is currently working on improvements to some metabolic and dosimetric models. Because it is difficult, in some instances, to decouple the implications of this modelling work and the implications of the new recommendations, both are examined in this third section. This report documents why radiological protection standards have changed recently, what the current standards are, and how they might affect radiation dosimetry. (4 tabs., 15 refs.)

  12. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  13. Deposition of biomass combustion aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löndahl, Jakob; Pagels, Joakim; Boman, Christoffer; Swietlicki, Erik; Massling, Andreas; Rissler, Jenny; Blomberg, Anders; Bohgard, Mats; Sandström, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Smoke from biomass combustion has been identified as a major environmental risk factor associated with adverse health effects globally. Deposition of the smoke particles in the lungs is a crucial factor for toxicological effects, but has not previously been studied experimentally. We investigated the size-dependent respiratory-tract deposition of aerosol particles from wood combustion in humans. Two combustion conditions were studied in a wood pellet burner: efficient ("complete") combustion and low-temperature (incomplete) combustion simulating "wood smoke." The size-dependent deposition fraction of 15-to 680-nm particles was measured for 10 healthy subjects with a novel setup. Both aerosols were extensively characterized with regard to chemical and physical particle properties. The deposition was additionally estimated with the ICRP model, modified for the determined aerosol properties, in order to validate the experiments and allow a generalization of the results. The measured total deposited fraction of particles from both efficient combustion and low-temperature combustion was 0.21-0.24 by number, surface, and mass. The deposition behavior can be explained by the size distributions of the particles and by their ability to grow by water uptake in the lungs, where the relative humidity is close to saturation. The experiments were in basic agreement with the model calculations. Our findings illustrate: (1) that particles from biomass combustion obtain a size in the respiratory tract at which the deposition probability is close to its minimum, (2) that particle water absorption has substantial impact on deposition, and (3) that deposition is markedly influenced by individual factors.

  14. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  15. Interference Between Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Rhinovirus Infection in Infancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achten, Niek B.; Wu, Pingsheng; Bont, Louis; Blanken, Maarten O; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Chappell, James D; Wang, Li; Yu, Chang; Larkin, Emma K; Carroll, Kecia N; Anderson, Larry J; Moore, Martin L; Sloan, Chantel D; Hartert, Tina V

    2017-01-01

    Background.: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV) are the most common viruses associated with acute respiratory tract infections in infancy. Viral interference is important in understanding respiratory viral circulation and the impact of vaccines. Methods.: To study viral

  16. The pressure gradient in the human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chovancová Michaela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory airways cause resistance to air flow during inhalation and exhalation. The pressure gradient is necessary to transport the air from the mount (or nose to pulmonary alveoli. The knowledge of pressure gradient (i.e. respiratory airways resistance is also needed to solve the question of aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract. The obtained data will be used as boundary conditions for CFD simulations of aerosol transport. Understanding of aerosol transport in the human lungs can help us to determine the health hazard of harmful particles. On the other hand it can be used to set the conditions for transport of medication to the desirable place. This article deals with the description of the mathematical equations defining the pressure gradient and resistance in the bronchial three and describes the geometry used in the calculation.

  17. Global Considerations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Meghji, Jamilah; Miller, Robert F; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory tract infection, particularly tuberculosis, is a major cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a dramatic increase in survival, although coverage of HIV treatment remains low in many parts of the world. There is a concurrent growing burden of chronic noninfectious respiratory disease as a result of increased survival. Many risk factors associated with the development of respiratory disease, such as cigarette smoking and intravenous drug use, are overrepresented among people living with HIV. In addition, there is emerging evidence that HIV infection may directly cause or accelerate the course of chronic lung disease. This review summarizes the clinical spectrum and epidemiology of respiratory tract infections and noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, and factors that explain the global variation in HIV-associated respiratory disease. The potential for enhancing diagnoses of noninfective chronic conditions through the use of clinical algorithms is discussed. We also consider issues in assessment and management of HIV-related respiratory disease in view of the increasing global scale up of ART. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  19. Tetratrichomonads from the oral cavity and respiratory tract of humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutišová, K.; Kulda, J.; Čepička, I.; Flegr, J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Teras, J.; Tachezy, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 1 (2005), s. 1-11 ISSN 0031-1820 Grant - others:Grantová agentura Karlovy univerzity v Praze(CZ) 264/1999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Tetratrichomonas spp. * human respiratory tract * oral cavity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.703, year: 2005

  20. 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  1. Computational 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are developing a comprehensive, morphologically-realistic computational model of the human respiratory system that can be used to study the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of contaminants, while being adaptable for age, race, gender, and health/disease status. The model ...

  2. Characterization of novel human respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Wereldwijd komen vier humane coronavirussen (HCoVs) voor, waaronder NL63 en 229E. NL63 werd in 2004 ontdekt in het AMC en veroorzaakt de kinderziekte pseudokroep; 229E is een verkoudheidsvirus. Waarschijnlijk veroorzaken beide virussen vergelijkbare symptomen bij volwassenen. Er is weinig bekend

  3. ICRP putting wealth before health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reductions in recommended dose limits for radiation workers set by the International Commission for Radiological Protection do not go far enough. The ICRP has put industry profitability before worker safety, and their recommendations should not be the basis for UK or European law. (author)

  4. ICRP 60 - the next step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Thomson, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Following the publication in 1990 of the recommendations proposed by the International Commission on Radiological protection (ICRP 60), this editorial briefly highlights the advice given by the NRPB to UK government departments on how to implement those recommendations regarding occupational, medical and public exposure. (UK)

  5. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  6. Workers and the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    In both the preparation and the application of the recommendations presented by the ICRP one important voice has been absent: that of the workers in the nuclear industry. A large number of specialists are studying their situation from all points of view, in their different capacities as workers, consumers and male or female members of the public, but this extensive study is being done without consulting them, without their opinion even being asked for. The paper discusses such deficiencies, in particular all those aspects which distinguish these recommendations from a legal text. The lack of conciseness in the definition of the limit which the average annual dose to a large group of workers must not exceed (500 mrad) is considered. The possibility of a large number of workers being exposed for a long period is not acceptable if the decision is left to the manager of a nuclear facility alone. Cost-benefit analysis, as it is described in the ICRP text, cannot be considered to provide credible protection from the point of view of workers. Moreover, the various ICRP recommendations fail to mention such important matters as allowance for low-dose effects, disparities in the social security coverage offered to various categories of workers in the event of occupational illness, and the increasing use of migrant workers for difficult decontamination and maitenance tasks. At a time when it is thought that nuclear technology can be standardized, the French Democratic Labour Confederation (CFDT) expresses its fears concerning the practical application of the ICRP recommendations; for example, the text of ICRP Publication 26 has not yet been translated into French, but Euratom has already proposed directives for its application in Member States

  7. Application of morphological and physiological parameters representative of a Brazilian population sample in the respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Reis, A. A.; Cardoso, J. C. S.; Lourenco, M. C.

    2007-01-01

    The human respiratory tract model (HRTM) adopted by ICRP in its Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population wherever such information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence of using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66 model. (authors)

  8. New ICRP recommendations 2005: without full consensus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ionising radiation is viewed as one of the most studied of all known carcinogens. Over the last 50 years Recommendations of International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been changed regularly every 10 years. At the beginning these changes were significant, sometimes even radical, according to quick acquiring of new scientific evidence on physical, biological and health effects of radiation. In order to handle each new situation evolution of the radiation protection system has been extended and new portions have been added (the ubiquitous exposure of public to radon gas and its progeny, and the need to develop an appropriate response to emergency situations, increasing social desire to participate in decision making processes, concern for the protection of non-human species and environment), that resulted in a system that is increasingly complicated. Over the last few years very broad discussions of major radiation protection concepts have been encouraged by the ICRP in order to achieve consensus on a more operational and coherent system of radiation protection elaborated in a transparent fashion, and presented in readily understandable terms. This process for the first time involves a broad spectrum of stake holders in these discussions. It is further assumed that these debates will eventually result in consensus on the basis for the next round of ICRP general recommendations, probably in the 2005. While now it is certain that the consensus is not yet reached within the international community and the discussion of these issues will continue for some time the new recommendations should be seen as a consolidation of recommendations from 1990 to give a single unified set that can be simply and coherently expressed. The paper presents essential issues of the outcome of the Commission discussions and improvement of the current system of radiation protection.(author)

  9. ICRP (1991) and deterministic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A critical review of ICRP Publication 60 (1991) shows that considerable revisions are needed in both language and thinking about deterministic effects (DE). ICRP (1991) makes a welcome and clear distinction between change, caused by irradiation; damage, some degree of deleterious change, for example to cells, but not necessarily deleterious to the exposed individual; harm, clinically observable deleterious effects expressed in individuals or their descendants; and detriment, a complex concept combining the probability, severity and time of expression of harm (para42). (All added emphases come from the author.) Unfortunately these distinctions are not carried through into the discussion of deterministic effects (DE) and two important terms are left undefined. Presumably effect may refer to change, damage, harm or detriment, according to context. Clinically observable is also undefined although its meaning is crucial to any consideration of DE since DE are defined as causing observable harm (para 20). (Author)

  10. Human bocavirus in children with acute respiratory infections in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Nguyen, Tran Quynh Nhu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Human bocavirus (HBoV), a novel virus, is recognized to increasingly associate with previously unknown etiology respiratory infections in young children. In this study, the epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics of HBoV infections were described in hospitalized Vietnamese pediatric patients. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1,082 nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from patients with acute respiratory infections at the Children's Hospital 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Samples were screened for HBoV by PCR and further molecularly characterized by sequencing. HBoV was found in 78 (7.2%) children. Co-infection with other viruses was observed in 66.7% of patients infected with HBoV. Children 12-24 months old were the most affected age group. Infections with HBoV were found year-round, though most cases occurred in the dry season (December-April). HBoV was possible to cause severe diseases as determined by higher rates of hypoxia, pneumonia, and longer hospitalization duration in patients with HBoV infection than in those without (P-value infection with HBoV did not affect the disease severity. The phylogenetic analysis of partial VP1 gene showed minor variations and all HBoV sequences belonged to species 1 (HBoV1). In conclusion, HBoV1 was circulating in Vietnam and detected frequently in young children during dry season. Acute respiratory infections caused by HBoV1 were severe enough for hospitalization, which implied that HBoV1 may have an important role in acute respiratory infections among children. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Human coronavirus and severe acute respiratory infection in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Hygor; Faggion, Heloisa Z; Leotte, Jaqueline; Nogueira, Meri B; Vidal, Luine R R; Raboni, Sonia M

    2016-05-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are an important cause of respiratory tract infection and are responsible for causing the common cold in the general population. Thus, adequate surveillance of HCoV is essential. This study aimed to analyze the impact of HCoV infections and their relation to severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in a hospitalized population in Southern Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital, and assessed inpatients under investigation for SARI by the hospital epidemiology department, and all patients who had nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from January 2012 to December 2013 to detect respiratory viruses (RVs). Viral infection was detected by multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with primers specific to the subtypes HCoV-229E/NL63 and OC43/HKU1. The overall positivity rate was 58.8% (444/755), and HCoVs were detected in 7.6% (n = 34) of positive samples. Children below two years of age were most frequently affected (62%). Comorbidities were more likely to be associated with HCoVs than with other RVs. Immunosuppression was an independent risk factor for HCoV infection (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.6). Dyspnea was less frequently associated with HCoV infection (p infected with HCoV (9%) died from respiratory infection. HCoVs are important respiratory pathogens, especially in hospitalized children under 2 years of age and in immunosuppressed patients. They may account for a small proportion of SARI diagnoses, increased need for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and death.

  12. Respiratory compensation to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mark; Alvarez, Naiara M; Trevino, Michael; Weinstein, Gary L

    2012-11-01

    There is limited and disparate information about the extent of the respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) that occurs in response to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans. Our aim was to examine the influence of the plasma bicarbonate concentration, the plasma base excess, and the arterial pH on the arterial carbon dioxide tension in 52 adult patients with primary metabolic alkalosis, mostly due to diuretic use or vomiting. Linear regression analysis was used to correlate degrees of alkalosis with arterial carbon dioxide tensions. In this alkalotic cohort, whose arterial plasma bicarbonate averaged 31.6 mEq/l, plasma base excess averaged 7.8 mEq/l, and pH averaged 7.48, both plasma bicarbonate and base excess correlated closely with arterial carbon dioxide tensions (r = 0.97 and 0.96, respectively; p respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) to primary metabolic alkalosis than has been reported in prior smaller studies.

  13. Ozone exposure increases respiratory epithelial permeability in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehrl, H.R.; Vincent, L.M.; Kowalsky, R.J.; Horstman, D.H.; O'Neil, J.J.; McCartney, W.H.; Bromberg, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone is a respiratory irritant that has been shown to cause an increase in the permeability of the respiratory epithelium in animals. We used inhaled aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-labeled diethylene triamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) to investigate whether human respiratory epithelial permeability is similarly affected by exposure to ozone. In a randomized, crossover double-blinded study, 8 healthy, nonsmoking young men were exposed for 2 h to purified air and 0.4 ppm ozone while performing intermittent high intensity treadmill exercise (minute ventilation = 66.8 L/min). SRaw and FVC were measured before and at the end of exposures. Seventy-five minutes after the exposures, the pulmonary clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was measured by sequential posterior lung imaging with a computer-assisted gamma camera. Ozone exposure caused respiratory symptoms in all 8 subjects and was associated with a 14 +/- 2.8% (mean +/- SEM) decrement in FVC (p less than 0.001) and a 71 +/- 22% increase in SRaw (p = 0.04). Compared with the air exposure day, 7 of the 8 subjects showed increased /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance after the ozone exposure, with the mean value increasing from 0.59 +/- 0.08 to 1.75 +/- 0.43%/min (p = 0.03). These data show that ozone exposure sufficient to produce decrements in the pulmonary function of human subjects also causes an increase in /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae enhances human respiratory syncytial virus infection in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.T. Nguyen (Tien); R.P.L. Louwen (Rogier); Elberse, K. (Karin); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. Yüksel (Selma); A. Luijendijk (Ad); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); W.P. Duprex (William Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHuman respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants

  15. Intercomparison of concepts in ICRP 60 and ICRP 103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssif, B. E.

    2013-04-01

    The ICRP has produced recommendation three times in the last 30 years, In 2007, the ICRP approved new recommendations, These revised Recommendations for a System of Radiological Protection formally replace the Commission’s previous, 1990, Recommendations; and updated, consolidated, and developed the additional guidance on the control of exposure from radiation sources issued since 1990. The purpose of this study is to highlight and review some of major changes that have taken place. To compare between the 1990 recommendations (ICRP 60) and the 2007 recommendations (ICRP 103) according to radiological studies updated. The 2007 Recommendations update the radiation and tissue weighting factors in the quantities equivalent and effective dose .The major differences for tissue weighting factors increased by about a factor of two for breast and remainder tissues. Whilst the gonads are decreased by about a factor of two. The major change of WR for protons is a reduction from five to two reflecting a better understanding of the dosimetry of proton. For neutrons there is a reduction of WR of about a factor of two for thermal neutrons. An update on the radiation detriment has been made; based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure. The detrimental nominal risk coefficient in 2007 Recommendations is lower by about 25% compared to 1990 Recommendations. Publication 103 maintains the Commission’s three fundamental principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and the application of dose limits, clarifying how they apply to radiation sources delivering exposure and to individuals receiving exposure. The 2007 Recommendations evolve from the previous process-based protection approach using practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the exposure situation. The recommendations recognise planned, emergency, and existing exposure situations, and apply the fundamental principles

  16. Dosimetric methodology of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1994-01-01

    Establishment of guidance for the protection of workers and members of the public from radiation exposures necessitates estimation of the radiation dose to tissues of the body at risk. The dosimetric methodology formulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to be responsive to this need. While developed for radiation protection, elements of the methodology are often applied in addressing other radiation issues; e.g., risk assessment. This chapter provides an overview of the methodology, discusses its recent extension to age-dependent considerations, and illustrates specific aspects of the methodology through a number of numerical examples

  17. Biology of human respiratory syncytial virus: a review | Aliyu | Bayero ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in young children worldwide. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the single most important viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection during infancy and early childhood worldwide. Respiratory syncytial virus belongs to the ...

  18. ICRP: Engaging with the RP profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Just as the ICRP system of radiological protection must adapt to changes in scientific understanding, social and ethical values, and practical experience, ICRP itself continues to adapt as an organisation. One aspect of the continual modernisation of ICRP is a greater emphasis on engaging with the radiological protection profession.Ten years ago, on August 8, 2004, ICRP formally began open consultation on what was then referred to as the draft “2005 Recommendations of ICRP”. As most readers will know, this was published in due course as ICRP Publication 103, “The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection” (ICRP, 2007).Being managed through the ICRP website, it opened up the possibility for anyone, anywhere, with an internet connection and an interest in radiological protection, to review the draft document and submit comments directly to ICRP.Open consultation on draft publications is but one aspect of ICRP’s efforts to become a more open and transparent organisation, and to increase engagement with the radiological protection profession. A modern arrangement for formal relations with other international organisations was established in 2012 with the objective of being more inclusive, effective, and efficient. In addition, there are efforts underway to seek the support needed to enable ICRP to broaden awareness of our recommendations, particularly in the medical field, and to increase engagement through social media and at relevant conferences, symposia, meetings, etc

  19. Implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is about to publish new recommendations on radiation protection. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is also under process in revising its International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) to take into account of the changes of the ICRP recommendations. As soon as the revision of the BSS is completed, Korean government is considering to implement those changes in the BSS and the ICRP recommendations into its national radiation protection laws and regulations. This paper introduces the current activities and future prospects in this matter. In the 2007 ICRP recommendations, there are some new concepts, principles and quantities such as the changes in the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, new definitions on the tissue weighting factors and radiation weighting factors for neutron and proton, extended application of the dose constraints in all exposure situations in source-related radiation protection, and the introduction of new system of protection for non-human species. Based on the study carried out by KINS so far, the following points are identified as major areas that need for further in-depth review and consideration for the implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations into Korean radiation protection laws and regulations; changes in the radiation risk factors, radiation weighting factors and tissue weighting factors, maintenance of the ICRP 60 dose limits, practical application of the dose constraints and determination of the reference levels in many source to individual exposure relationships, change from process-based system to exposure situation-based system, strengthening of the principle of optimization in all exposure situations, system of radiation protection for the environment, practical application of the exclusion and exemption principles, active participation of the stake holders, changes in glossary etc. The study for the implementation of the ICRP

  20. A Novel Parametric Model For The Human Respiratory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Mihaela IONESCU

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to present some recent results in an ongoing research project between Ghent University and Chess Medical Technology Company Belgium. The overall aim of the project is to provide a fast method for identification of the human respiratory system in order to allow for an instantaneously diagnosis of the patient by the medical staff. A novel parametric model of the human respiratory system as well as the obtained experimental results is presented in this paper. A prototype apparatus developed by the company, based on the forced oscillation technique is used to record experimental data from 4 patients in this paper. Signal processing is based on spectral analysis and is followed by the parametric identification of a non-linear mechanistic model. The parametric model is equivalent to the structure of a simple electrical RLC-circuit, containing a non-linear capacitor. These parameters have a useful and easy-to-interpret physical meaning for the medical staff members.

  1. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcner, J.; Jedelsky, J.; Lizal, F.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  2. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  3. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (original ICRP reference phantoms, it is believed that the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms properly developed will not only provide the same or similar dose values (say, difference <5 or 10%) for highly penetrating radiations, but also provide correct dose values for the weakly penetrating

  4. The new ICRP general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Ch.; Kosako, T.; Kuniyoshi, H.; Kiryu, Y.; Choi, H.S.; Burns, P.A.; Pan, Z.Q.; Xia, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory views from Japan, South Korea, Australia, China and Indonesia were explained based on their regional context. Some issues, for example 'optimisation', 'dose constrains', 'natural radioactivity', were addressed from the viewpoint of how each country's current regulation system would adopt these new recommendations. It was noted that there would be a need for some flexibility in applying these new recommendations since different countries have different regulatory criteria and benchmarks as well different decision-making processes. It was also noted that definitions and terminologies should be given serious consideration with regard to non-English speaking countries to assure that the new ICRP recommendations are clearly understood, not misinterpreted, easily translated and finally applied in the field of radiation protection. In addition, some recent radiation protection activities, as well as views on utilisation of nuclear power in several countries were presented. (authors)

  5. Possible implications of draft ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has, since its inception, worked to develop and improve international norms in the area of radiological protection of the public, workers and the environment. International radiological protection norms continue to evolve, with significant new steps having been taken by the International Radiological Protection Commission (ICRP). Since the issuance of its 1990 recommendations, which form the basis of the international system of radiological protection, the ICRP has continued to add to them. The sum of these recommendations has become overly complicated and at times incoherent. In 1999 the ICRP therefore began to re-evaluate its recommendations with the aim of consolidation, simplification and clarification. New ICRP recommendations are due to be published in 2005. The CRPPH is contributing to the development of these new recommendations by providing the views of regulators and practitioners from its member countries. This report summarises the views of the CRPPH regarding the conceptual framework that the ICRP has recently proposed as the basis for its forthcoming detailed recommendations. The CRPPH highly appreciates the open stakeholder process that the ICRP has initiated to gather input for the development of new recommendations. This document, which is supported by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and by the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee, provides detailed suggestions with regard to the proposed ICRP framework. The stakeholder views expressed in this report have been presented to the ICRP at the second NEA/ICRP Forum in April 2003, and have persuaded the ICRP to reintroduce several key concepts into its proposed new system. (author)

  6. ICRP guidance on radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued recommendations for a system of radiological protection in 1991 as the 1990 Recommendations. Guidance on the application of these recommendations in the general area of waste disposal was issued in 1997 as Publication 77 and guidance specific to disposal of solid long-lived radioactive waste was issued as Publication 81. This paper summarises ICRP guidance in radiological protection requirements for waste disposal concentrating on the ones of relevance to the geological disposal of solid radioactive waste. Suggestions are made for areas where further work is required to apply the ICRP guidance. (author)

  7. Interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with human respiratory mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A M; Chadwick, M V; Nicholson, A G; Dewar, A; Groger, R K; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L; Wilson, R

    2002-01-01

    Endobronchial infection is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in the majority of cases. We have investigated the adherence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to the human respiratory mucosa. Organ cultures constructed with human tissue were infected with M. tuberculosis in the presence or absence of mycobacterial fibronectin attachment cell surface proteins and examined by scanning electron microscopy. M. tuberculosis adhered mainly to extracellular matrix (ECM) in areas of mucosal damage, but not to ciliated mucosa, intact extruded cells, basement membrane or collagen fibres. Bacteria also adhered to fibrous but not globular mucus and occasionally to healthy unciliated mucosa, open tight junctions and to extruded cells that had degenerated, exposing their contents. There was a significant reduction (pprotein (FAP) and M. bovis antigen 85B protein, in a concentration dependent manner. The combined effect of FAP and antigen 85B protein was significantly greater than either protein alone. Bacterial adherence to fibrous mucus was not influenced by fibronectin. We conclude that M. tuberculosis adheres to ECM in areas of mucosal damage at least in part via FAP and antigen 85B protein.

  8. Minocycline affects human neutrophil respiratory burst and transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Astrid; Indorato, Boris; Paccosi, Sara

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activity of minocycline and doxycycline on human polymorphonuclear (h-PMN) cell function. h-PMNs were isolated from whole venous blood of healthy subjects; PMN oxidative burst was measured by monitoring ROS-induced oxidation of luminol and transendothelial migration was studied by measuring PMN migration through a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Differences between multiple groups were determined by ANOVA followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test; Student's t test for unpaired data for two groups. Minocycline (1-300 µM) concentration dependently and significantly inhibited oxidative burst of h-PMNs stimulated with 100 nM fMLP. Ten micromolar concentrations, which are superimposable to C max following a standard oral dose of minocycline, promoted a 29.8 ± 4 % inhibition of respiratory burst (P minocycline impaired PMN transendothelial migration, with maximal effect at 100 µM (42.5 ± 7 %, inhibition, n = 5, P minocycline exerted on innate immune h-PMN cell function.

  9. Dosimetry of the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.

    1996-01-01

    A new dosimetric model of the human respiratory tract has been recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, in ICRP Publication 66. This model was intended to update the previous lung model of the Task Group on Lung Dynamics that was adopted by ICRP in Publication 30. With this aim, extensive reviews of the available knowledge were made for anatomy and physiology of the respiratory tract and for deposition, clearance and biological effects of inhaled radionuclides. Finally, expanded dosimetry requirements resulted in a widely different approach from the former model. The main features of the new model are the followings: instead of calculating the average dose to the total mass of blood filled lung, the model takes account of differences in radiosensitivity of the venous respiratory tract tissues. It applies not only to adult workers but also to all members of the population, and provides reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years, and adults. Deposition modelling of airborne gases and aerosols associates age dependent breathing rates, airway dimensions and physical activity, to particle size, density and chemical form of inhaled material. Clearance results of competition between mechanical transport clearance and absorption to blood. At each step of the calculation, adjustment guidance is provided to account for use of exact values of particle sizes and specific dissolution rates of inhaled material in order to calculate their own parameter of retention in the airways, and to assess accurately doses to the respiratory tract. Possible influence of smoking, of respiratory tract diseases and of eventual exposure to airborne toxicants is also addressed. (author)

  10. ICRP Publication 116—the first ICRP/ICRU application of the male and female adult reference computational phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Eckerman, Keith F; Endo, Akira; Hertel, Nolan; Hunt, John; Menzel, Hans G; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Schlattl, Helmut; Zankl, Maria

    2014-01-01

    ICRP Publication 116 on `Conversion coefficients for radiological protection quantities for external radiation exposures', provides fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for organ-absorbed doses and effective dose for various types of external exposures (ICRP 2010 ICRP Publication 116). The publication supersedes the ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74, ICRU 1998 ICRU Report 57), including new particle types and expanding the energy ranges considered. The coefficients were calculated using the ICRP/ICRU computational phantoms (ICRP 2009 ICRP Publication 110) representing the reference adult male and reference adult female (ICRP 2002 ICRP Publication 89), together with a variety of Monte Carlo codes simulating the radiation transport in the body. Idealized whole-body irradiation from unidirectional and rotational parallel beams as well as isotropic irradiation was considered for a large variety of incident radiations and energy ranges. Comparison of the effective doses with operational quantit...

  11. ICRP-26 and skin contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnigan, T.; Huda, W.; Newbery, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The experience of dealing with skin contamination incidents at The Radiochemical Centre over a 3-year period is presented. Data are given for the primary isotopes involved, the duration of skin contamination, and the skin doses that arise from these incidents. The methods employed in performing dosimetry for skin contamination are discussed and examples involving the isotopes carbon-14 and indium-111 are described. For skin contamination incidents, the mode of penetration of the activity into skin is normally not known and this can be of major significance for the final skin dose estimate. The operational health physics difficulties encountered in complying with both ICRP-26 and UK legislation for skin contamination are considered. In the event of multiple exposure (i.e. skin doses calculated from whole body film badges, extremity TLD dose meters and skin contamination) there is ambiguity in the precise meaning of the skin dose. The usefulness of Derived Working Levels is also discussed. Experience at The Radiochemical Centre has shown that good plant design, proper training and prompt action in dealing with contamination incidents ensures that overexposures to skin from accidental contamination are rare occurrences. (author)

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency is positively correlated with human sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Provenzano, Sara Pinto; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    To correlate sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency with variations in sperm motility and with sperm morphologic anomalies. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically-treated sperm cells. A possible relationship among sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, sperm motility, and morphologic anomalies was investigated. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was positively correlated with sperm motility and negatively correlated with the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. Moreover, midpiece defects impaired mitochondrial functionality. Our data indicate that an increase in sperm motility requires a parallel increase in mitochondrial respiratory capacity, thereby supporting the fundamental role played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in sperm motility of normozoospermic subjects. These results are of physiopathological relevance because they suggest that disturbances of sperm mitochondrial function and of energy production could be responsible for asthenozoospermia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of human respiratory syncytial virus in summer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobugawa, Y; Takeuchi, T; Hibino, A; Hassan, M R; Yagami, R; Kondo, H; Odagiri, T; Saito, R

    2017-01-01

    In temperate zones, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) outbreaks typically occur in cold weather, i.e. in late autumn and winter. However, recent outbreaks in Japan have tended to start during summer and autumn. This study examined associations of meteorological conditions with the numbers of HRSV cases reported in summer in Japan. Using data from the HRSV national surveillance system and national meteorological data for summer during the period 2007-2014, we utilized negative binomial logistic regression analysis to identify associations between meteorological conditions and reported cases of HRSV. HRSV cases increased when summer temperatures rose and when relative humidity increased. Consideration of the interaction term temperature × relative humidity enabled us to show synergistic effects of high temperature with HRSV occurrence. In particular, HRSV cases synergistically increased when relative humidity increased while the temperature was ⩾28·2 °C. Seasonal-trend decomposition analysis using the HRSV national surveillance data divided by 11 climate divisions showed that summer HRSV cases occurred in South Japan (Okinawa Island), Kyushu, and Nankai climate divisions, which are located in southwest Japan. Higher temperature and higher relative humidity were necessary conditions for HRSV occurrence in summer in Japan. Paediatricians in temperate zones should be mindful of possible HRSV cases in summer, when suitable conditions are present.

  14. Recommendations of ICRP for radiation protection in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L. E.

    2004-01-01

    The present recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were published in 1991, and since then, the ICRP has provided additional recommendations. The system of protection has become increasingly co plex with time, and the Commission has decided to adopt a new set of recommendations in 2005- These should be seen as a consolidation of earlier recommendations. The new recommendations will recognize where the responsibility for justifying the introduction of a new practice lies, maintain the existing dose limits for individuals, develop the concept of dose constraints, require optimisation of protection from any source to ensure that exposures are as law as reasonably achievable, include of a policy for protection of non-human species, and clarify the dramatics quantities. The Commission intends to adopt the new recommendations in 2005, and this will be 15 years after the current recommendations were adopted. (Author) 13 refs

  15. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Debby; den Bakker, Michael A; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Munster, Vincent J; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by virus histochemistry of three human and three avian influenza viruses in human nasal septum, conchae, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and larynx. We found that the human influenza viruses-two seasonal influenza viruses and pandemic H1N1 virus-attached abundantly to ciliated epithelial cells and goblet cells throughout the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, the avian influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, attached only rarely to epithelial cells or goblet cells. Both human and avian viruses attached occasionally to cells of the submucosal glands. The pattern of virus attachment was similar among the different sites of the human upper respiratory tract for each virus tested. We conclude that influenza viruses that are transmitted efficiently among humans attach abundantly to human upper respiratory tract, whereas inefficiently transmitted influenza viruses attach rarely. These results suggest that the ability of an influenza virus to attach to human upper respiratory tract is a critical factor for efficient transmission in the human population.

  16. ICRP risk estimates - an alternative view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1987-01-01

    This criticism of the worth of the ICRP Main Commission spans 60 years, reviewed by a member of the Commission. Beginning in 1960 two serious radiation exposure problems (occupational exposure in uranium mines and population exposure from testing of nuclear weapons) came to their attention. One might have expected ICRP to be the first to try to reduce these exposures but it was conspicuous by its silence. In 1958 ICRP set limits of exposure for radiation workers and member of the public. Nineteen years later (1977) when it was realized that the risk of radiation induced cancer was ten to thirty times what it was perceived to be in 1958, ICRP might have been expected to recommend a major reduction in permissible exposure levels, but to the dismay of some it increased them. It was also a great disappointment when in 1977, levels of MPC of radionuclides in air, water and food were increased for a large fraction of the more dangerous radionuclides. The reactor accident at Chernobyl calls for a number of new ICRP recommendations. When can we expect them? (author)

  17. Respectful doubts on the new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1992-01-01

    The admiration and deference an International Organization, as ICRP, deserves not only by its altruistic mission but also by the eminent and distinguished scientists who work for it, in some way 'dazzles' to simple students of its theories and, in some way 'force' us to accept, sometimes without any critical, serious and previous meditation, its recommendations. But it is not the bad thing this kind of 'blindness' we have before the almighty ...ICRP dixit..., the worst thing is that non-specialist and non-specialized persons believe as 'dogmas' and 'axioms' the ICRP recommednations and make of them legal dispositions through standards and regulations. Standards an regulations which can frustate an industrial or any other type of peaceful nuclear activity due to the economic or the social reasons derived from ICRP recommendations. The inflexibility (weakened in the arguments but strengthened in the recommendations) of this influent Organism on the 'linearity without threshold' in the dose-effect relationship and the compromises of the International Labor Organization (ILO) with respect ICRP recommedations provole irrational, ilogical and non desirable answers. (author)

  18. Transmission of human respiratory syncytial virus in the immunocompromised ferret model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, L. (Leon); S.L. Smits (Saskia); E.J.B. Veldhuis Kroeze (Edwin); G. van Amerongen (Geert); Pohl, M.O. (Marie O.); Osterhaus, A.D.M.E. (Albert D. M. E.); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractHuman respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) causes substantial morbidity and mortality in vulnerable patients, such as the very young, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals of any age. Nosocomial transmission of HRSV remains a serious challenge in hospital settings, with

  19. Mobilisation of toxic elements in the human respiratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Alves, L.C.; Palhano, M.J.; Bugalho de Almeida, A.

    2001-01-01

    The fate of respired particles in the respiratory system is inferred through the chemical characterisation of individual particles at the tracheal and bronchial mucosas, and the accumulation of toxic elements in lung alveoli and lymph nodes. The particles and tissue elemental distributions were identified and characterised using micro-PIXE elemental mapping of thin frozen sections using the ITN Nuclear Microprobe facility. Significant particle deposits are found at the distal respiratory tract. Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn are elements detected at these accumulation areas. The elemental distributions in the different cellular environments of lymph nodes vary. The major compartments for Al, Si, Ti, Fe and Cr are the phagocytic cells and capsule of lymph nodes, while V and Ni are in the cortex and paracortex medullar areas which retain more than 70% of these two elements, suggesting high solubility of the latter in the cellular milieu. The elemental mobilisation from particles or deposits to surrounding tissues at the respiratory ducts evidences patterns of diffusion and removal that are different than those for elements in the respiratory tract. Mobilisation of elements such as V, Cr and Ni is more relevant at alveoli areas where gaseous exchange takes place. The apparent high solubility of V and Ni in the respiratory tract tissue points towards a deviation of the lymphatic system filtering efficiency for these elements when compared to others

  20. A perspective on the ICRP approach to Radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRP, in response to concerns by the environmental community, has begun the process of addressing radiation protection of non-human species. Concerns have been raised that the current framework for radiation protection fails to adequately protect the environment. Although most everyone agrees that some change to the ICRP radiation protection framework is called for, the extent of the revision is debatable. In May 2000, the ICRP set up a Task Group to provide advice on the development of a policy for the protection of the environment and to suggest a framework for environmental protection based on scientific, ethical, and philosophical principles. Based on Task Group input, ICRP intends to develop a framework for protection of the environment that can be integrated into an overall system of protection. This paper explores four major issues that serve to identify questions that ICRP should consider in its 2005 recommendations regarding radiation protection of the environment: (1) the role of ICRP, (2) defining the environment and criteria for protection, (3) the framework for environmental protection, and (4) risk management. (author)

  1. Environmental radiation protection. The new ICRP concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaps, C.; Lorenz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the environment regarding radiation protection was so far reduced to the concept: if man is protected the environment is protected well enough. This was derived from the radiosensitivity curve, according to which highly developed organisms are more sensible to radiation than less highly developed. ICRP publication 103 put this simple concept in question. Even before, ICRP set up a committee to discuss this theme. End of 2012 ICRP released a new concept of environmental protection regarding different exposure situations and brought it up for discussion in the internet. This concept is based on Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) and analogous to the concept of the protection for man. The exposure for representative organisms regarding ionizing radiation shall be estimated and compared with Derived Consideration Reference Levels (DCRLs). If the DCRLs are reached or exceeded there is a need to react. This concept raises several questions. (orig.)

  2. Nation-wide surveillance of human acute respiratory virus infections between 2013 and 2015 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Anna; Lee, Nam-Joo; Chu, Hyuk; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Jang-Hoon

    2018-07-01

    The prevalence of eight respiratory viruses detected in patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Korea was investigated through analysis of data recorded by the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Viruses Surveillance System (KINRESS) from 2013 to 2015. Nasal aspirate and throat swabs specimens were collected from 36 915 patients with ARIs, and viral nucleic acids were detected by real-time (reverse-transcription) polymerase chain reaction for eight respiratory viruses, including human respiratory syncytial viruses (HRSVs), influenza viruses (IFVs), human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs), human coronaviruses (HCoVs), human rhinovirus (HRV), human adenovirus (HAdV), human bocavirus (HBoV), and human metapneumovirus (HMPV). The overall positive rate of patient specimens was 49.4% (18 236/36 915), 5% of which carried two or more viruses simultaneously. HRV (15.6%) was the most predominantly detected virus, followed by IFVs (14.6%), HAdV (7.5%), HPIVs (5.8%), HCoVs (4.2%), HRSVs (3.6%), HBoV (1.9%), and HMPV (1.6%). Most of the ARIs were significantly correlated with clinical symptoms of fever, cough, and runny nose. Although HRV and HAdV were frequently detected throughout the year in patients, other respiratory viruses showed apparent seasonality. HRSVs and IFVs were the major causative agents of acute respiratory diseases in infants and young children. Overall, this study demonstrates a meaningful relationship between viral infection and typical manifestations of known clinical features as well as seasonality, age distribution, and co-infection among respiratory viruses. Therefore, these data could provide useful information for public health management and to enhance patient care for primary clinicians. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Correspondence of the ICRP database of dose coefficients (1996) to 2007 recommendations of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadatskaya, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The new IAEA international safety standards, issued in 2011, recommend in practical implementation of the 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP continue to use dosimetric database developed in 1996. This article presents method and results of the calculation of committed effective dose of internal exposure in accordance with the new definition of this quantity given in 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP. It is shown that in the control of internal doses in accordance with the 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP it is allowed to use dose factors which were released in 1996. (authors)

  4. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); M.A. den Bakker (Michael); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Chutinimitkul (Salin); V.J. Munster (Vincent); E. de Wit (Emmie); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by

  5. Comparison of Radiation Dose Rates with the Flux to Dose Conversion Factors Recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kil, A Reum; Lee, Jo Eun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation shielding has been performed for the design and maintenance of various facilities using radioactive sources such as nuclear fuel, accelerator, and radionuclide. The conversion of flux to dose mainly used in nuclear and radiation fields has been generally made with the dose coefficients presented in ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP- 74), which are produced based on ICRP Publication 60. On the other hand, ICRP Publication 116 (ICRP-116), which adopts the protection system of ICRP Publication 103, has recently been published and provides the dose conversion coefficients calculated with a variety of Monte Carlo codes. The coefficients have more than an update of those in ICRP-74, including new particle types and a greatly expanded energy range. In this study, a shielding evaluation of a specific container for neutron and gamma sources was performed with the MCNP6 code. The dose rates from neutron and gamma-ray sources were calculated using the MCNP6 codes, and these results were based on the flux to dose conversion factors recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116. As a result, the dose rates evaluated with ICRP-74 were generally shown higher than those with ICRP-116. For neutrons, the difference is mainly occurred by the decrease of radiation weighting factors in a part of energy ranges in the ICRP-116 recommendations. For gamma-rays, the ICRP-74 recommendation applied with the kerma approximation leads to overestimated results than the other assessment

  6. Pregnancy and medical irradiation. ICRP-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    A translation to Spanish of the ICRP document number 84. The exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant patients and radiation workers is a relevant subject in radiation protection, concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. Great anxiety and unnecessary termination of pregnancies may be the consequences of the lack of correlation between the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals and their real magnitude. The International Commission on Radiation Protection has edited in 2000 the document ICRP 84 'Pregnancy and Medical Irradiation', addressed to medical and sanitary personnel. This document has been written as a practical guide which describes the effects of prenatal exposure to ionising radiation , the dose-thresholds and their relationship with the gestational age. It includes occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. With the aim of facilitating the diffusion of this document in the Ibero-American community , the Argentine Society of Radiation Protection (SAR) and the Spanish Society of Radiation Protection (SEPR) have worked together to producing a spanish version of ICRP84 , that is now presented in this publication, authorized by the ICRP

  7. Radiation protection. Basic concepts of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained. Main international organizations for radiation protection are United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The UNSCEAR objectively summarizes and publishes scientific findings; ICRP, an NGO, takes part in recommending the radiological protection from the expertized aspect; and IAEA, a UN autonomy, aims at peaceful usage of atomic power. These organizations support the legal regulation and standard of nations. The purpose of the ICRP recommendation (Pub. 103, 2007) is to contribute to the appropriate protection of radiation hazardous effects, which are assumed to be linearly proportional (the model of linear no-threshold, LNT) that radiation risk exists even at the lowest dose. When a change in the single cell results in hazardous alteration, the causative effects are called stochastic effects, which include the mutation leading to cancer formation and genetic effect in offspring (not observed in man). ICRP says the validity of LNT for the stochastic effects essentially from the protective aspect, although epidemiological data support it at >100 mSv exposure. The deterministic effects are caused by loss of cell itself or of its function, where the threshold is defined to be the dose causing >1% of disorder or death. Radiation protective system against exposure is on the situation (programmed, emergent and natural), category (occupational, public and medical) and 3 principles of justification, optimization and application of dose limit. (T.T.)

  8. The effects of carbon monoxide on respiratory chemoreflexes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, A.E.; Somogyi, R.B.; Sasano, Hiroshi; Sasano, Nobuko; Fisher, J.A.; Duffin, James

    2004-01-01

    As protection against low-oxygen and high-carbon-dioxide environments, the respiratory chemoreceptors reflexly increase breathing. Since CO is also frequently present in such environments, it is important to know whether CO affects the respiratory chemoreflexes responsiveness. Although the peripheral chemoreceptors fail to detect hypoxia produced by CO poisoning, whether CO affects the respiratory chemoreflex responsiveness to carbon dioxide is unknown. The responsiveness of 10 healthy male volunteers were assessed before and after inhalation of ∼1200 ppm CO in air using two iso-oxic rebreathing tests; hypoxic, to emphasize the peripheral chemoreflex, and hyperoxic, to emphasize the central chemoreflex. Although mean (SEM) COHb values of 10.2 (0.2)% were achieved, no statistically significant effects of CO were observed. The average differences between pre- and post-CO values for ventilation response threshold and sensitivity were -0.5 (0.9) mmHg and 0.8 (0.3) L/min/mmHg, respectively, for hyperoxia, and 0.7 (1.1) mmHg and 1.2 (0.8) L/min/mmHg, respectively, for hypoxia. The 95% confidence intervals for the effect of CO were small. We conclude that environments with low levels of CO do not have a clinically significant effect acutely on either the central or the peripheral chemoreflex responsiveness to carbon dioxide

  9. Remarks of the SFRP working group about ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.

    2005-01-01

    Remarks of the SFRP working group about ICRP recommendations. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has proposed last summer on its Web site the draft text of the 2005 ICRP recommendations for consultation. As it was done for the previous drafts, the French Society for Radiation Protection, has sent his comments to the ICRP, through a specific working group. The text sent to the ICRP is presented here to the readers of the SFRP's Journal. (author)

  10. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  11. Effect of human milk prostaglandins and lactoferrin on respiratory syncytial virus and rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, M; Giouzeppos, O; Schnagl, R D; May, J T

    1997-03-01

    The effect of lactoferrin and prostaglandins E and F2 alpha on the growth of rotavirus and respiratory syncytial virus in cell culture was investigated. Lactoferrin inhibited the growth of respiratory syncytial virus at a concentration tenfold lower than that normally present in human milk. The prostaglandins had no effect on either virus growth, even at a concentration of 100-fold more than that found in human milk. Lactoferrin may have some antiviral properties in human milk in addition to its known antibacterial functions.

  12. Respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  13. SRS-A leukotrienes decrease the activity of human respiratory cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, M

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) constituents leukotrienes (LT) C4 and D4 on the ciliary activity of human respiratory cells. The ciliary beat frequency on human nasal cells harvested by cell scraping from the inferior turbinate was measured...

  14. Hyperthermic-induced hyperventilation and associated respiratory alkalosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiss, Chris R; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if increased environmental heat leads to hyperthermic-induced hypocapnia and associated alkalosis during prolonged self-paced cycling. Nine male cyclists completed three 100 km stochastic time trials in hot (34 degrees C), neutral (22 degrees C) and cold (10 degrees C) environments. Intermittent measurements of rectal and skin temperature, expired gases, blood pH, PaCO(2), PaO(2), and bicarbonate were made throughout. Rectal temperature increased significantly throughout all trials (P respiratory alkalosis.

  15. ICRP Publication 84 of the ICRP. Pregnancy and medical irradiation; ICRP publication 84 de la CIPR. Grossesse et irradiation medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In this volume, the ICRP answers questions relative to medical irradiation of pregnant women, that without responses could lead to unappropriated behaviours. It gives the circumstances for a women to be irradiated, the radiation doses delivered by the radiological procedures for a diagnosis and for a therapy. The risks for the fetus and the woman are tackled, their part in the general risks of the pregnancy and the information to give to the future mother. (N.C.)

  16. The work of committee 2 of ICRP on internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Over the last few years the Task Group of Committee 2 of ICRP on Internal Dosimetry (INDOS), in conjunction with the Task Group on Dose Calculations (DOCAL), has prepared a series of publications that have given dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by infants, children and adults. The most recent publications have been Publication 88 that gives doses to the embryo, fetus and newborn child from intakes of radionuclides by the mother and Publication 94 that will give doses to the newborn child from intakes of radionuclides in mothers' milk. These documents have completed the programme of work of Committee 2 on dose coefficients for members of the public. The emphasis of work on internal dosimetry by Committee 2 is now concerned with occupational exposure. This is will take into account recent advice from ICRP, including the new 2005 Recommendations of ICRP which are expected to provide revised tissue weighting factors for the calculation of effective dose. In addition ICRP has issued Publication 89 on Basic Anatomical and Physiological Data for use in Radiological Protection and in addition will have published a new Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM). It will have implemented a human phantom for dose calculations based upon medical imaging data and updated radionuclide decay data; superseding Publication 38. In addition, the systemic models for a number of elements are being revised to take account of more recent data, and the lung clearance characteristics of a wide range of compounds relevant to occupational exposure are being reviewed. It is intended to replace Publications 30 and 68 that give biokinetic data and dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides and Publications 54 and 78 that give information for bioassay interpretation, with a single series of publications. This series will cover both dosimetry and data for bioassay interpretation. The first report will cover radionuclides of the 31 elements covered in the series of

  17. Human and avian influenza viruses target different cells in the lower respiratory tract of humans and other mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); V.J. Munster (Vincent); E. de Wit (Emmie); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractViral attachment to the host cell is critical for tissue and species specificity of virus infections. Recently, pattern of viral attachment (PVA) in human respiratory tract was determined for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of subtype H5N1. However, PVA of human influenza viruses

  18. Intermittent hypoxia, respiratory plasticity and sleep apnea in humans: present knowledge and future investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, Jason H; Syed, Ziauddin

    2013-09-15

    This review examines the role that respiratory plasticity has in the maintenance of breathing stability during sleep in individuals with sleep apnea. The initial portion of the review considers the manner in which repetitive breathing events may be initiated in individuals with sleep apnea. Thereafter, the role that two forms of respiratory plasticity, progressive augmentation of the hypoxic ventilatory response and long-term facilitation of upper airway and respiratory muscle activity, might have in modifying breathing events in humans is examined. In this context, present knowledge regarding the initiation of respiratory plasticity in humans during wakefulness and sleep is addressed. Also, published findings which reveal that exposure to intermittent hypoxia promotes breathing instability, at least in part, because of progressive augmentation of the hypoxic ventilatory response and the absence of long-term facilitation, are considered. Next, future directions are presented and are focused on the manner in which forms of plasticity that stabilize breathing might be promoted while diminishing destabilizing forms, concurrently. These future directions will consider the potential role of circadian rhythms in the promotion of respiratory plasticity and the role of respiratory plasticity in enhancing established treatments for sleep apnea. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Intermittent hypoxia, respiratory plasticity and sleep apnea in humans; present knowledge and future investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, Jason H.; Syed, Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the role that respiratory plasticity has in the maintenance of breathing stability during sleep in individuals with sleep apnea. The initial portion of the review considers the manner in which repetitive breathing events may be initiated in individuals with sleep apnea. Thereafter, the role that two forms of respiratory plasticity, progressive augmentation of the hypoxic ventilatory response and long-term facilitation of upper airway and respiratory muscle activity, might have in modifying breathing events in humans is examined. In this context, present knowledge regarding the initiation of respiratory plasticity in humans during wakefulness and sleep is addressed. Also, published findings which reveal that exposure to intermittent hypoxia promotes breathing instability, at least in part, because of progressive augmentation of the hypoxic ventilatory response and the absence of long-term facilitation, are considered. Next, future directions are presented and are focused on the manner in which forms of plasticity that stabilize breathing might be promoted while diminishing destabilizing forms, concurrently. These future directions will consider the potential role of circadian rhythms in the promotion of respiratory plasticity and the role of respiratory plasticity in enhancing established treatments for sleep apnea. PMID:23587570

  20. Equation Discovery for Model Identification in Respiratory Mechanics of the Mechanically Ventilated Human Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzert, Steven; Guttmann, Josef; Steinmann, Daniel; Kramer, Stefan

    Lung protective ventilation strategies reduce the risk of ventilator associated lung injury. To develop such strategies, knowledge about mechanical properties of the mechanically ventilated human lung is essential. This study was designed to develop an equation discovery system to identify mathematical models of the respiratory system in time-series data obtained from mechanically ventilated patients. Two techniques were combined: (i) the usage of declarative bias to reduce search space complexity and inherently providing the processing of background knowledge. (ii) A newly developed heuristic for traversing the hypothesis space with a greedy, randomized strategy analogical to the GSAT algorithm. In 96.8% of all runs the applied equation discovery system was capable to detect the well-established equation of motion model of the respiratory system in the provided data. We see the potential of this semi-automatic approach to detect more complex mathematical descriptions of the respiratory system from respiratory data.

  1. The evolution of thoughts from ICRP 46 concept of potential exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since issuing its latest basic recommendations in 1991 as ICRP Publication 60, the Commission has reviewed these recommendations regularly and, from time to time, has issued supplementary reports in the Annals of the ICRP. The extent of these supplementary reports has indicated a need for consolidation and rationalization. New scientific data have also been published since Publication 60, and while the biological and physical assumptions and concepts remain robust, some updating is required. In addition, there have been societal developments in that more emphasis is now given on the protection of individuals and stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological risk. Finally, it has also become apparent that the radiological protection of non-human species should receive more emphasis than in the past. It is against this background that the Commission has now decided to adopt a revised set of Recommendations while at the same time maintaining stability with the previous recommendations. Following several years of an open and worldwide discussion process, mainly through web consultation, ICRP intends to publish its new recommendations in 2007. In the context of AEN/NEA seminar on safety case for the deep disposal of radioactive waste, it appeared necessary first of all to examine the above mentioned evolution of ICRP system, as well as to recall the main ICRP publications on potential exposure and waste disposal and finally to focus on the main recommendations on solid waste disposal which are still valid. (author)

  2. Comments on ICRP-60 rationale for dose limits for the pregnant worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1992-06-01

    ICRP Publication 60 has recently recommended new dose limits for the radiation exposure of pregnant workers. These new dose limits for pregnant workers are more restrictive than the current limits in force in Canada. Recent presentations by Dr. R.H. Mole have faulted the arguments provided by ICRP as justification for reducing the previously recommended limits for pregnant radiation workers. The present paper provides a brief review of the development of the human conceptus, of the biological effects of low doses of radiation on the foetus, and discusses R.H. Mole's comments on ICRP-60. On the critical issues concerning the presence or absence of threshold doses for induction of specific biological endpoints, Dr. Mole and ICRP-60 appear to be in agreement. The basic disagreement between Dr. Mole and ICRP-60 seems to revolve around the philosophical question of whether dose limits should be based on quantitative risks to the foetus or whether dose limits to the pregnant worker should provide a standard of protection to the foetus which is broadly comparable with that provided for members of the general public. Further research is recommended on one of the topics raised by Dr. Mole, namely, foetal doses from radionuclides inhaled or ingested by the mother

  3. Mathematical modelling of a human external respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A closed system of algebraic and common differential equations solved by computer is investigated. It includes equations which describe the activity pattern of the respiratory center, the phrenic nerve, the thrust produced by the diaphragm as a function of the lung volume and discharge frequency of the phrenic nerve, as well as certain relations of the lung stretch receptors and chemoreceptors on various lung and blood characteristics, equations for lung biomechanics, pulmonary blood flow, alveolar gas exchange and capillary blood composition equations to determine various air and blood flow and gas exchange parameters, and various gas mixing and arterial and venous blood composition equations, to determine other blood, air and gas mixing characteristics. Data are presented by means of graphs and tables, and some advantages of this model over others are demonstrated by test results.

  4. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  5. ICRP-Radiation protection principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the history of ICRP, its basic standards and recommendations and their rationale, from its foundation in 1928 to the latest major review of its recommendation in 1977. In this time the basic radiation standard for whole body irradiation of a radiation worker has dropped from the equivalent of 50 r per year (in 1934) through 15 rem per year (1954) to 5 rem per year in 1958. ICRP recommendations include maximum permissible doses for particular organs and a comprehensive list of derived limits governing the intake of radionuclides into the body, and dose limits for members of the public. Emphasis in current radiation protection practice is on avoiding all unnecessary exposures and keeping doses as far below dose limits as is reasonably achievable. The use of cost-benefit analysis to optimize protection and some of its inherent difficulties, is discussed

  6. ICRP new recommendations. Committee 2's efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) may release new primary radiation protection recommendation in 2007. Committee 2 has underway reviews of the dosimetric and biokinetic models and associated data used in calculating dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides and exposures to external radiation fields. This paper outlines the work plans of Committee 2 during the current term, 2005-2009, in anticipation of the new primary recommendations. The two task groups of Committee 2 responsible for the computations of dose coefficients, INDOS and DOCAL, are reviewing the models and data used in the computations. INDOS is reviewing the lung model and the biokinetic models that describe the behavior of the radionuclides in the body. DOCAL is reviewing its computational formulations with the objective of harmonizing the formulation with those of nuclear medicine, and developing new computational phantoms representing the adult male and female reference individuals of ICRP Publication 89. In addition, DOCAL will issue a publication on nuclear decay data to replace ICRP Publication 38. While the current efforts are focused on updating the dose coefficients for occupational intakes of radionuclides plans are being formulated to address dose coefficients for external radiation fields which include consideration of high energy fields associated with accelerators and space travel and the updating of dose coefficients for members of the public. (author)

  7. Respiratory health in Latin America: number of specialists and human resources training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-García, Juan-Carlos; Salas-Hernández, Jorge; Pérez Padilla, Rogelio; Montes de Oca, María

    2014-01-01

    Latin America is made up of a number of developing countries. Demographic changes are occurring in the close to 600 million inhabitants, in whom a significant growth in population is combined with the progressive ageing of the population. This part of the world poses great challenges for general and respiratory health. Most of the countries have significant, or even greater, rates of chronic respiratory diseases or exposure to risk. Human resources in healthcare are not readily available, particularly in the area of respiratory disease specialists. Academic training centers are few and even non-existent in the majority of the countries. The detailed analysis of these conditions provides a basis for reflection on the main challenges and proposals for the management and training of better human resources in this specialist area. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. ICRP recommendations in the present and in the short term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The recommendations of ICRP are either re-stated or revised at intervals of about 15 years, most recently in 1990. The protection philosophy in Publication 60 comprises justification of the practice or intervention considered; optimisation of protection; dose and risk limits and constraints to restrict the options in optimisation. For medical exposures, dose and risk limits and formal constraints are irrelevant, but Diagnostic Reference Levels serve a similar purpose. Building on this foundation, ICRP plans to issue its next recommendations around 2005. The 2005 Recommendations are likely to emphasise protection of the individual more than protection of society; to aim at protection of non-human species as well as man; to summarise and simplify advice given in various reports after Publication 60, and to be formatted as concise recommendations underpinned by separate publications with more detail. The draft will be circulated and comments will be discussed in 2004 with a view approval of the recommendations in 2005 and publication in 2005 or 2006. Thus, integration into legislation may be possible sometime between 2006 and 2010. (author)

  9. ICRP and impairment of mental function following prenatal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A brief account is given of mental retardation and intelligence testing in unirradiated human populations, without which it is not possible to judge the 1991 ICRP Recommendations relating to mental impairment. The dose-response used by ICRP (1991) for the reduction of IQ by irradiation in utero has no radiobiological basis because IQ values are derived from intelligence test scores by transforming the scale of measurement. It is also defective because it assumed that IQ is distributed normally whereas this is so only in normal school children, not in a population in general including retarded persons. There seems good evidence for a substantial threshold of dose for both reduction in IQ and increase in severe mental retardation (SMR). The four prenatally irradiated bomb survivors with SMR and intrauterine dose in the dose range 1-49 cGy were not intelligence tested, so the relation between SMR and IQ in that practically important dose range cannot be examined directly, SMR is a deterministic phenomenon, so is not expected to occur unless dose exceeds a threshold. The threshold doses for SMR based on linear dose-responses using ungrouped doses were 46 and 55 cGy DS86 intrauterine dose (Otake et al 1987). The threshold 50 cGy derived here for reduction in IQ is closely similar. Mild mental retardation has not been reported as a diagnosis in bombs survivors exposed in utero. (Author)

  10. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  11. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  12. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS. Zhe Zhang*, Huawei Shi, Clement Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910; Chong S. Kim, National Health and En...

  13. New ICRP recommendations on occupational limits for radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1981-01-01

    The ICRP has recommended in 1959 for the first time a maximum permissible concentration (MPC) for the occupational exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters. Since this time more realistic dosimetric models for radon daughters have been developed. Taking into account epidemiological and new dosimetric findings the ICRP has adopted in March this year new recommendations on occupational limits for inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their short-lived daughters. This report will be published this year as ICRP Publication 32 (ICRP 1981). The recommended limits for radon daughters were derived from the basic dose and risk limits as they were proposed by ICRP in its new basic recommendations (ICRP Publ. 26, 1977). In the following this basic system of dose limitation is shortly outlined before the special recommendations for radon daughters are described

  14. Human airway epithelial cell cultures for modeling respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Raymond J

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human respiratory pathogen with narrow species tropism. Limited availability of human pathologic specimens during early RSV-induced lung disease and ethical restrictions for RSV challenge studies in the lower airways of human volunteers has slowed our understanding of how RSV causes airway disease and greatly limited the development of therapeutic strategies for reducing RSV disease burden. Our current knowledge of RSV infection and pathology is largely based on in vitro studies using nonpolarized epithelial cell-lines grown on plastic or in vivo studies using animal models semipermissive for RSV infection. Although these models have revealed important aspects of RSV infection, replication, and associated inflammatory responses, these models do not broadly recapitulate the early interactions and potential consequences of RSV infection of the human columnar airway epithelium in vivo. In this chapter, the pro et contra of in vitro models of human columnar airway epithelium and their usefulness in respiratory virus pathogenesis and vaccine development studies will be discussed. The use of such culture models to predict characteristics of RSV infection and the correlation of these findings to the human in vivo situation will likely accelerate our understanding of RSV pathogenesis potentially identifying novel strategies for limiting the severity of RSV-associated airway disease.

  15. Human bocavirus isolated from children with acute respiratory tract infections in Korea, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong Gyun; Choi, Seong Yeol; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) was first recognized in respiratory samples in 2005. The clinical importance of HBoV infection remains unclear. This report describes the clinical features and molecular phylogeny of HBoV isolates in children with acute respiratory infections. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 1,528 children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011. Respiratory samples were screened for HBoV by multiplex PCR. A phylogenetic analysis of the HBoV VP1/VP2 gene was also undertaken. HBoV was detected in 187 (12.2%) of the 1,528 patients with a peak incidence of infection observed in patients aged 12-24 months. Coinfection with other respiratory viruses was observed in 107 (57.2%) of the HBoV-positive children. The peak of HBoV activity occurred during the month of June in both 2010 and 2011. A higher previous history of wheezing (P = 0.016), a higher frequency of chest retraction (P respiratory symptom score (P = 0.002), and a longer duration of hospital stay (P = 0.021) were observed in HBoV-positive children compared with the HBoV-negative group. Phylogenetic analysis showed all 187 HBoV-positive isolates were identified as HBoV 1, indicating minimal sequence variations among the isolates. A single lineage of HBoV 1 was found to have circulated in children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011 and was associated with several clinical characteristics including age, seasonality, and clinical severity with retraction, wheezing, and longer hospitalization. The clinical relevance of the minimal sequence variations of HBoV remains to be determined. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Excretion patterns of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus among young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Koch, A

    2006-01-01

    of the infected children showed to have an upper respiratory tract infection when following up. CONCLUSION: Viral RNA was present in nasal secretions, saliva, sweat, and faeces, but whether or not the virions were infectious and constitute a potential mode of transmission remains to be shown in future studies.......BACKGROUND: As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) cause serious respiratory tract infections, the routes of transmission of these viruses are important to elucidate. We examined the modes of virus shedding and shedding duration of RSV and hMPV in young children....... METHODS: From each child in a group of 44 children (37 RSV-positive, 6 hMPV-positive, and 1 co-infected child), aged between 0.5-38 months, hospitalised at Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, one nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), saliva, urine, and faeces sample were collected at inclusion and weekly...

  17. ICRP-26, the recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the last ICRP recommendations on radiological protection was pubished in 1966 as it's publication 9, the revised edition of the recommendations had first been published in 1977, accommodating up-to-date knowledge of radiobiology and operational experiences of radiation protection built up for over a decade. In this article, the new version of the recommendations is reviewed in comparison with those of the publication 9, while the corrections and modifications made afterward are introduced together with the recent trends and responses of the experts in various countries for the pracical adoption or legislation of the recommendations. (Author)

  18. The direction of ICRP - new recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    ICRP has been stimulating discussion, during the past three years, on the best way of expressing protection philosophy for the next publication of its Recommendations, which it hopes will be by 2005. The present recommendations were initiated by Publication 60 in 1990 and have subsequently been complemented by additional publications over the last twelve years. In this paper the totality of those recommendations is summarised and used to indicate a way forward to produce a simplified and more coherent statement of protection philosophy for the start of the 21. century. (author)

  19. Pregnancy and medical irradiation. ICRP-84; Embarazo e irradiacion medica. ICRP-84

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A translation to Spanish of the ICRP document number 84. The exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant patients and radiation workers is a relevant subject in radiation protection, concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. Great anxiety and unnecessary termination of pregnancies may be the consequences of the lack of correlation between the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals and their real magnitude. The International Commission on Radiation Protection has edited in 2000 the document ICRP 84 'Pregnancy and Medical Irradiation', addressed to medical and sanitary personnel. This document has been written as a practical guide which describes the effects of prenatal exposure to ionising radiation , the dose-thresholds and their relationship with the gestational age. It includes occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. With the aim of facilitating the diffusion of this document in the Ibero-American community , the Argentine Society of Radiation Protection (SAR) and the Spanish Society of Radiation Protection (SEPR) have worked together to producing a spanish version of ICRP84 , that is now presented in this publication, authorized by the ICRP.

  20. The recommendations of ICRP Publication 111 in the light of the ICRP dialogue initiative in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochard, J

    2016-12-01

    Publication 111, published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 2009, provided the first recommendations for dealing with the long-term recovery phase after a nuclear accident. Its focus is on the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident, drawing on the experience of the Belarus population, Cumbrian sheep farmers in the UK, and Sami reindeer herders in Norway affected by the fallout from Chernobyl. The ICRP dialogue initiative in Fukushima confirmed what had been identified after Chernobyl, namely the very strong concern for health, particularly that of children, loss of control over everyday life, apprehension about the future, disintegration of family life and of the social and economic fabric, and the threat to the autonomy and dignity of affected people. Through their testimonies and reflections, the participants of the 12 dialogue meetings shed light on this complex situation. The ICRP dialogue initiative also confirmed that the wellbeing of the affected people is at stake, and radiological protection must focus on rehabilitation of their living conditions. The challenge is to incorporate the important clarifications resulting from the ICRP dialogue initiative into the updated version of Publication 111 that is currently in development. This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  1. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  2. Human milk reduces outpatient upper respiratory symptoms in premature infants during their first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaymore Bier, Jo-Ann; Oliver, Tanya; Ferguson, Anne; Vohr, Betty R

    2002-01-01

    To determine if ingestion of human milk after discharge reduces symptoms of infections in premature infants. Follow-up of 39 infants with birth weights milk and 15 of whom received only formula after discharge, was carried out. Mothers were given a calendar on which they recorded any signs of infections and feeding and day-care information. Data were collected at 1 month after discharge and at 3, 7, and 12 months corrected age. Results show no differences between groups in birth weight, gestation, gender, maternal age, parental tobacco use, number of siblings, and day-care attendance. Socioeconomic status score was higher in the human milk group. Infants who received human milk had fewer days of upper respiratory symptoms at 1 month after discharge (pmilk post discharge is associated with a reduction of upper respiratory symptoms in premature infants during their first year of life.

  3. The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: our evolving understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Kathryn M; Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2017-04-01

    Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human respiratory tract. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Water extract of Pueraria lobata Ohwi has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng-Jih Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV infects all age groups and causes bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome with a significant mortality rate. To date, only ribavirin has been used to manage HRSV infection. However, ribavirin is expensive with an only modest effect. Furthermore, ribavirin has several side effects, which means it has limited clinical benefit. Pueraria lobata Ohwi (P. lobata is a common ingredient of Ge-Gen-Tang (Kakkon-to and Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (Shoma-kakkon-to, which are prescriptions of Chinese traditional medicine proven to have antiviral activity against HRSV. Therefore, it was hypothesized that P. lobata might be effective against HRSV. To find a cost-effective therapeutic modality, both human upper (HEp-2 and lower (A549 respiratory tract cell lines were used to test the hypothesis that P. lobata could inhibit HRSV-induced plaque formation. Results showed that the water extract of P. lobata was effective (p < 0.0001 against HRSV-induced plaque formation. P. lobata was more effective when given prior to viral inoculation (p < 0.0001 by inhibiting viral attachment (p < 0.0001 and penetration (p < 0.0001. However, supplementation with P. lobata could not stimulate interferon secretion after HRSV infection. In conclusion, P. lobata has antiviral activity against HRSV-induced plaque formation in airway mucosa mainly by inhibiting viral attachment and internalization. Further identification of effective constituents could contribute to the prevention of HRSV infection.

  5. Codetection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Habituated Wild Western Lowland Gorillas and Humans During a Respiratory Disease Outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grützmacher, K. S.; Köndgen, S.; Keil, V.; Todd, A.; Feistner, A.; Herbinger, I.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Fuh, T.; Leendertz, S. A.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.; Leendertz, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 499-510 ISSN 1612-9202 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : respiratory disease * respiratory syncytial virus * enterovirus * western lowland gorillas * great apes * noninvasive detection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2016

  6. Codetection of respiratory syncytial virus in habituated wild western lowland gorillas and humans during a respiratory disease outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grützmacher, K. S.; Köndgen, S.; Keil, V.; Todd, A.; Feistner, A.; Herbinger, I.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Fuh, T.; Leendertz, S. A.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.; Leendertz, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 499-510 ISSN 1612-9202 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : respiratory disease * respiratory syncytial virus * enterovirus * western lowland gorillas * great apes * noninvasive detection Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2016

  7. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  8. Where do we stand with ICRP60?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Thomson, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the implications of ICRP60 for nuclear medicine. Radiation doses to staff are currently low and reduction of the dose limits will have little impact. However, the proposed figures for the foetus may have implications for pregnant women where the workloads are high. With nursing staff on the ward, laboratory staff or indeed departmental porters there seems little problem. Radiation dose to the fingers is, however, a key factor, and ensuring that nor further restrictions are placed on the proposed dose limits is important. The concept of constraints is becoming clearer but will need further thought, particularly with regard to exposure of the general public. The previous basis for declaring controlled and supervised areas has been abandoned, and the situation is now less clear. A most important area of debate will be the patient who is a controlled area, and great care will have to be taken to ensure that the number of patients in this category is not increased so that many more patients need to be kept in hospital. Exposure of the general public is also an issue and expanding the concept of medical exposure to include carers is an important development. This should prevent a number of unnecessary restrictions and adds weight to the point that two waiting rooms are not justified in nuclear medicine departments. ICRP recommendations will soon be incorporated into the legislation of member states and it is important for everyone to ensure that drafts are read carefully and that national proposals are not too restrictive. (orig.)

  9. The work of ICRP Committee 1 on radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rëhm, W.

    2018-01-01

    Among the four ICRP Committees, Committee 1 deals with the effects of ionizing radiation. For example, this committee considers the risks and mechanisms of induction of cancer and heritable disease; discusses the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects; and reviews effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota on a population level. The present paper gives an overview on the recent activities of the committee including the last meetings in Chennai, India, in 2016, and in Paris, France, in 2017. The paper also discusses briefly the focus of the currently active C1 Task Groups on alpha emitters, low-dose and low-dose-rate effects, and detriment calculation methodology

  10. Propagation of respiratory viruses in human airway epithelia reveals persistent virus-specific signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi-Laziosi, Manel; Brito, Francisco; Benaoudia, Sacha; Royston, Léna; Cagno, Valeria; Fernandes-Rocha, Mélanie; Piuz, Isabelle; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Huang, Song; Constant, Samuel; Boldi, Marc-Olivier; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2018-06-01

    The leading cause of acute illnesses, respiratory viruses, typically cause self-limited diseases, although severe complications can occur in fragile patients. Rhinoviruses (RVs), respiratory enteroviruses (EVs), influenza virus, respiratory syncytial viruses (RSVs), and coronaviruses are highly prevalent respiratory pathogens, but because of the lack of reliable animal models, their differential pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. We sought to compare infections by respiratory viruses isolated from clinical specimens using reconstituted human airway epithelia. Tissues were infected with RV-A55, RV-A49, RV-B48, RV-C8, and RV-C15; respiratory EV-D68; influenza virus H3N2; RSV-B; and human coronavirus (HCoV)-OC43. Replication kinetics, cell tropism, effect on tissue integrity, and cytokine secretion were compared. Viral adaptation and tissue response were assessed through RNA sequencing. RVs, RSV-B, and HCoV-OC43 infected ciliated cells and caused no major cell death, whereas H3N2 and EV-D68 induced ciliated cell loss and tissue integrity disruption. H3N2 was also detected in rare goblet and basal cells. All viruses, except RV-B48 and HCoV-OC43, altered cilia beating and mucociliary clearance. H3N2 was the strongest cytokine inducer, and HCoV-OC43 was the weakest. Persistent infection was observed in all cases. RNA sequencing highlighted perturbation of tissue metabolism and induction of a transient but important immune response at 4 days after infection. No majority mutations emerged in the viral population. Our results highlight the differential in vitro pathogenesis of respiratory viruses during the acute infection phase and their ability to persist under immune tolerance. These data help to appreciate the range of disease severity observed in vivo and the occurrence of chronic respiratory tract infections in immunocompromised hosts. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational Breakthrough of Natural Lead Hits from the Genus of Arisaema against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kamal; Lal, Uma Ranjan; Ghosh, Manik

    2018-01-01

    To date, efforts for the prevention and treatment of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been still vain, and there is no safe and effective clinical accepted vaccine. Arisaema genus has claimed for various traditional bioactivities, but scientific assessments are quite limited. This encouraged us to carry out our present study on around 60 phytoconstituents of different Arisaema species as a natural inhibitor against the human RSV. Selected 60 phytochemical entities were evaluated on the docking behavior of human RSV receptor (PDB: 4UCC) using Maestro 9.3 (Schrödinger, LLC, Cambridge, USA). Furthermore, kinetic properties and toxicity nature of top graded ligands were analyzed through QikProp and ProTox tools. Notably, rutin (glide score: -8.49), schaftoside (glide score: -8.18) and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside (glide score - 7.29) have resulted in hopeful natural lead hits with an ideal range of kinetic descriptors values. ProTox tool (oral rodent toxicity) has resulted in likely toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Finally, the whole efforts can be explored further as a model to confirm its anti-human RSV potential with wet laboratory experiments. Rutin, schaftoside, and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside showed promising top hits docking profile against human respiratory syncytial virusMoreover, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion properties (QikProp) of top hits resulted within an ideal range of kinetic descriptorsProTox tool highlighted toxicity class ranges, LD 50 values, and possible toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Abbreviations used: RSV: Respiratory syncytial virus, PRRSV: Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, ADME-T: Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity.

  12. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia stabilizes mean arterial blood pressure at high-frequency interval in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, Maja; Walløe, Lars; Holme, Nathalie L A; Maes, Elke; Thoresen, Marianne

    2015-03-01

    Arterial blood pressure variations are an independent risk factor for end organ failure. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is a sign of a healthy cardiovascular system. However, whether RSA counteracts arterial blood pressure variations during the respiratory cycle remains controversial. We restricted normal RSA with non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) to test the hypothesis that RSA normally functions to stabilize mean arterial blood pressure. Ten young volunteers were investigated during metronome-paced breathing and IPPV. Heart rate (ECG), mean arterial blood pressure and left stroke volume (finger arterial pressure curve) and right stroke volume (pulsed ultrasound Doppler) were recorded, while systemic and pulmonary blood flow were calculated beat-by-beat. Respiratory variations (high-frequency power, 0.15-0.40 Hz) in cardiovascular variables were estimated by spectral analysis. Phase angles and correlation were calculated by cross-spectral analysis. The magnitude of RSA was reduced from 4.9 bpm(2) (95% CI 3.0, 6.2) during metronome breathing to 2.8 bpm(2) (95% CI 1.1, 5.0) during IPPV (p = 0.03). Variations in mean arterial blood pressure were greater (2.3 mmHg(2) (95% CI 1.4, 3.9) during IPPV than during metronome breathing (1.0 mmHg(2) [95% CI 0.7, 1.3]) (p = 0.014). Respiratory variations in right and left stroke volumes were inversely related in the respiratory cycle during both metronome breathing and IPPV. RSA magnitude is lower and mean arterial blood pressure variability is greater during IPPV than during metronome breathing. We conclude that in healthy humans, RSA stabilizes mean arterial blood pressure at respiratory frequency.

  13. Human bocavirus infection as a cause of severe acute respiratory tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, F M; van Kampen, J J A; van der Eijk, A A; van Rossum, A M C; de Hoog, M; Schutten, M; Smits, S L; Bodewes, R; Osterhaus, A D M E; Fraaij, P L A

    2015-10-01

    In 2005 human bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in respiratory tract samples of children. The role of HBoV as the single causative agent for respiratory tract infections remains unclear. Detection of HBoV in children with respiratory disease is frequently in combination with other viruses or bacteria. We set up an algorithm to study whether HBoV alone can cause severe acute respiratory tract infection (SARI) in children. The algorithm was developed to exclude cases with no other likely cause than HBoV for the need for admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI. We searched for other viruses by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in these cases and studied their HBoV viral loads. To benchmark our algorithm, the same was applied to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-positive patients. From our total group of 990 patients who tested positive for a respiratory virus by means of RT-PCR, HBoV and RSV were detected in 178 and 366 children admitted to our hospital. Forty-nine HBoV-positive patients and 72 RSV-positive patients were admitted to the PICU. We found seven single HBoV-infected cases with SARI admitted to PICU (7/49, 14%). They had no other detectable virus by NGS. They had much higher HBoV loads than other patients positive for HBoV. We identified 14 RSV-infected SARI patients with a single RSV infection (14/72, 19%). We conclude that our study provides strong support that HBoV can cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a bolus injection system for regional deposition studies of nanoparticles in the human respiratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koujalagi, V; Semple, S; Ayres, J G; Ramesh, S L; Gunarathne, G P P

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the work carried out in developing a precision bolus injection system in order to understand the regional deposition of nanoparticles (NP) in human lung. A real-time control system has been developed that is capable of storing graphite NP, assessing human breathing pattern and delivering a bolus of the stored NP at a pre-determined instance of the inhalation phase of breathing. This will form the basis for further development of a system to deliver radioactive nanoparticles to enable 3-dimensional lung imaging using techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). The system may then be used to better understand the actual regional deposition in human lung, which could validate or challenge the current computational lung models such as that published by the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP-1994). A dose related response to inhaled PM can possibly be shown, which can be used to review the current workplace exposure limits (WELs).

  15. Development of a bolus injection system for regional deposition studies of nanoparticles in the human respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koujalagi, V.; Ramesh, S. L.; Gunarathne, G. P. P.; Semple, S.; Ayres, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    This study presents the work carried out in developing a precision bolus injection system in order to understand the regional deposition of nanoparticles (NP) in human lung. A real-time control system has been developed that is capable of storing graphite NP, assessing human breathing pattern and delivering a bolus of the stored NP at a pre-determined instance of the inhalation phase of breathing. This will form the basis for further development of a system to deliver radioactive nanoparticles to enable 3-dimensional lung imaging using techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). The system may then be used to better understand the actual regional deposition in human lung, which could validate or challenge the current computational lung models such as that published by the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP-1994). A dose related response to inhaled PM can possibly be shown, which can be used to review the current workplace exposure limits (WELs).

  16. A Two-Dimensional Human Minilung System (Model for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Magro-Lopez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of serious pediatric respiratory diseases that lacks effective vaccine or specific therapeutics. Although our understanding about HRSV biology has dramatically increased during the last decades, the need for adequate models of HRSV infection is compelling. We have generated a two-dimensional minilung from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. The differentiation protocol yielded at least six types of lung and airway cells, although it is biased toward the generation of distal cells. We show evidence of HRSV replication in lung cells, and the induction of innate and proinflammatory responses, thus supporting its use as a model for the study of HRSV–host interactions.

  17. Differential expression of the MERS-coronavirus receptor in the upper respiratory tract of humans and dromedary camels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widagdo, W; Raj, V Stalin; Schipper, Debby; Kolijn, Kimberley; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Bosch, Berend J; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koopmans, Marion P; van den Brand, Judith M A; Haagmans, Bart L

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor - dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) - is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels but not

  18. Central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity: a rebreathing demonstration illustrating integrative human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Christina M; Skow, Rachel J; Tymko, Michael M; Boulet, Lindsey M; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D; Ainslie, Philip N; Lemieux, Chantelle C M; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations have the added benefit of being able to show multiple organ system integration. Many research techniques can also serve as effective demonstrations of integrative human physiology. The "Duffin" hyperoxic rebreathing test is often used in research settings as a test of central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of the hyperoxic rebreathing test for both respiratory and cerebrovascular responses to increases in CO2 and illustrate the integration of the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems. In the present article, methods such as spirometry, respiratory gas analysis, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound are described, and raw data traces can be adopted for discussion in a tutorial setting. If educators have these instruments available, instructions on how to carry out the test are provided so students can collect their own data. In either case, data analysis and quantification are discussed, including principles of linear regression, calculation of slope, the coefficient of determination (R(2)), and differences between plotting absolute versus normalized data. Using the hyperoxic rebreathing test as a demonstration of the complex interaction and integration between the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems provides senior undergraduate, graduate, and medical students with an advanced understanding of the integrative nature of human physiology. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  19. Management of radon: a review of ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaillant, Ludovic; Bataille, Céline

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a review of past and current ICRP publications dealing with the management of radon exposures. Its main objective is to identify and discuss the driving factors that have been used by the Commission during the last 50 years so as to better appreciate current issues regarding radon exposure management. The analysis shows that major evolutions took place in very recent years. As far as the management of radon exposures is concerned, ICRP recommended, until ICRP Publication 103 (ICRP 2007 ICRP Publication 103; Ann. ICRP 37), to use action levels and to consider only exposures above these levels. The Commission has reviewed its approach and now proposes to manage any radon exposure through the application of the optimisation principle and associated reference levels. As far as the assessment of the radon risk is concerned, it appears that the successive changes made by ICRP did not have a strong impact on the values of radon gas concentration recommended as action levels either in dwellings or in workplaces. The major change occurred in late 2009 with the publication of the ICRP Statement on Radon, which acknowledged that the radon risk has been underestimated by a factor of 2, thus inducing a major revision of radon reference levels. (review)

  20. Numerical Simulation of Hemodynamic and Physiological Responses of Human Cardiovascular and Respiratory System under Drugs Administration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2004), s. 295-304 ISSN 1567-8822 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/1073; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : human cardiovascular and respiratory system * baroreflex and chemoreflex control * physiologically based pharmacokinetic model Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  1. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population

  2. Human Metapneumovirus Infection is Associated with Severe Respiratory Disease in Preschool Children with History of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancham, Krishna; Sami, Iman; Perez, Geovanny F; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Kurdi, Bassem; Rose, Mary C; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-02-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered respiratory pathogen of the family Paramyxoviridae, the same family as that of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Premature children are at high risk of severe RSV infections, however, it is unclear whether HMPV infection is more severe in hospitalized children with a history of severe prematurity. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical respiratory presentation of all polymerase chain reaction-confirmed HMPV infections in preschool-age children (≤5 years) with and without history of severe prematurity (prematurity. Preschool children with a history of prematurity had more severe HMPV disease as illustrated by longer hospitalizations, new or increased need for supplemental O2, and higher severity scores independently of age, ethnicity, and history of asthma. Our study suggests that HMPV infection causes significant disease burden among preschool children with a history of prematurity leading to severe respiratory infections and increasing health care resource utilization due to prolonged hospitalizations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Import of ICRP 60 for general mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the ubiquity of natural, the International Commission on Radiological Protection limits the definition of occupational exposure to circumstances that can reasonably be regarded as the responsibility of management. Radon in workplaces in given as the prime example in ICRP Publication 60, the new recommendations of the Commission. But not all workplaces are to be included, and the Commission advises that agencies should identify the particular circumstances in which protection is required. It offers some guidance: spas, uranium mines, other underground mines and caves are mentioned. Few would dispute the suggestion that underground exposure to radon in general non-uranium mining may be appreciable and that the system of protection needs to be applied in the industry. Conditions in underground mining are examined in this paper. (author)

  4. ICRP policy for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    Jean-Claude Nenot (IPSN, France) gave an overview of recommendations from ICRP during the past 25 years that are relevant to the safety of waste disposal. These recommendations were primarily concerned with public exposure, and suggested that the necessary system of protection should be controlled through the principles of constrained optimisation and prescriptive limits. The principles of justification, optimisation and dose and risk limitation were applicable to waste management. Justification should however be applied to the practice resulting in the generation of waste rather than to waste management per se. As regards optimisation, this should be interpreted in a subtler manner than the simple application of cost-benefit analysis, as an aggregation of very small doses over future world populations would be essentially meaningless. The primary criterion should therefore be the dose to an individual from a relevant critical group, and optimisation should also take account of social and economic factors. The application of dose limits had intrinsic difficulties because of multiple sources, through restrictions determined as a result of monitoring could be envisaged. The approach to dealing with potential future intrusion presented a particular difficulty (as compared to natural processes) because the probability of occurrence could not realistically be determined and therefore a risk-based approach was not recommended. Instead, prospective doses should be assessed against criteria for intervention situations, as proposed in ICRP 82, i.e. action (in terms of a preventative design change, for example) was unlikely to be justifiable at hypothetical and uncertain future dose levels below about 10 mSv/year

  5. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  6. The viral transcription group determines the HLA class I cellular immune response against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolina; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Infantes, Susana; Lemonnier, François A; David, Chella S; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this study, naturally processed viral human leukocyte antigen class I ligands were identified with mass spectrometry analysis of complex human leukocyte antigen-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of human respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. Acute antiviral T-cell response characterization showed that viral transcription determines both the immunoprevalence and immunodominance of the human leukocyte antigen class I response to human respiratory syncytial virus. These findings have clear implications for antiviral vaccine design. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Viral Transcription Group Determines the HLA Class I Cellular Immune Response Against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolina; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Infantes, Susana; Lemonnier, François A.; David, Chella S.; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this study, naturally processed viral human leukocyte antigen class I ligands were identified with mass spectrometry analysis of complex human leukocyte antigen-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of human respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. Acute antiviral T-cell response characterization showed that viral transcription determines both the immunoprevalence and immunodominance of the human leukocyte antigen class I response to human respiratory syncytial virus. These findings have clear implications for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:25635267

  8. Progress in lung modelling by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Birchall, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Task Group has reviewed the data on: (a) morphology and physiology of the human respiratory tract; (b) inspirability of aerosols and their deposition in anatomical regions as functions of respiratory parameters; (c) clearance of particles within and from the respiratory tract; (d) absorption of different materials into the blood in humans and in animals. The Task Group proposes a new model which predicts the deposition, retention and systemic uptake of materials, enabling doses absorbed by different respiratory tissues and other body organs to be evaluated. In the proposed model, clearance is described in terms of competition between the processes moving particles to the oropharynx or to lymph nodes and that of absorption into the blood. From studies with human subjects, characteristic rates and pathways are defined to represent mechanical clearance of particles from each region, which do not depend on the material. Conversely, the absorption rate is determined solely by the material: it is assumed to be the same in all parts of the respiratory tract and in other animal species. For several of the radiologically important forms of actinides, absorption rates can be derived from animal experiments, or, in some cases, directly from human data. Otherwise, default values are used, based on the current D, W and Y classification system. (author)

  9. The human cathelicidin LL-37 has antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke M Currie

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness among infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Currently, there is no effective vaccine or disease modifying treatment available and novel interventions are urgently required. Cathelicidins are cationic host defence peptides expressed in the inflamed lung, with key roles in innate host defence against infection. We demonstrate that the human cathelicidin LL-37 has effective antiviral activity against RSV in vitro, retained by a truncated central peptide fragment. LL-37 prevented virus-induced cell death in epithelial cultures, significantly inhibited the production of new infectious particles and diminished the spread of infection, with antiviral effects directed both against the viral particles and the epithelial cells. LL-37 may represent an important targetable component of innate host defence against RSV infection. Prophylactic modulation of LL-37 expression and/or use of synthetic analogues post-infection may represent future novel strategies against RSV infection.

  10. Human milk 90K (Mac-2 BP): possible protective effects against acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornarini, B; Iacobelli, S; Tinari, N; Natoli, C; De Martino, M; Sabatino, G

    1999-01-01

    Eighty-six children fed human milk were followed prospectively from birth to 12 months of age to assess the effect of milk 90K, a secreted glycoprotein with immune-stimulatory properties, on development of acute respiratory infections (ARI). The level of human milk 90K was inversely related to episodes of ARI (r = - 0.34; P = 0.001). The average 90K level in human milk fed to children who did not develop ARI was significantly higher than in milk fed to children in whom infection occurred on multiple occasions (156.6 +/- 144.8 microg/ml versus 70.9 +/- 92.3 microg/ml; P = 0.001). These data suggest that the protective effects of human milk against ARI may be due in part to immune maturation effects by secreted 90K.

  11. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J; Tyler, Scott R; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J; Kelly, Sara M; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the 'gold standard' for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotated 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterized the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time-course data and showed distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis disease progression, we showed that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with cystic fibrosis disease.

  12. Glycomic analysis of human respiratory tract tissues and correlation with influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevenan Walther

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in influenza infection of the human respiratory tract is binding of the virus to sialic (Sia acid terminated receptors. The binding of different strains of virus for the receptor is determined by the α linkage of the sialic acid to galactose and the adjacent glycan structure. In this study the N- and O-glycan composition of the human lung, bronchus and nasopharynx was characterized by mass spectrometry. Analysis showed that there was a wide spectrum of both Sia α2-3 and α2-6 glycans in the lung and bronchus. This glycan structural data was then utilized in combination with binding data from 4 of the published glycan arrays to assess whether these current glycan arrays were able to predict replication of human, avian and swine viruses in human ex vivo respiratory tract tissues. The most comprehensive array from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics contained the greatest diversity of sialylated glycans, but was not predictive of productive replication in the bronchus and lung. Our findings indicate that more comprehensive but focused arrays need to be developed to investigate influenza virus binding in an assessment of newly emerging influenza viruses.

  13. Effects of Long-Term Dust Exposure on Human Respiratory System Health in Minqin County, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shigong; Shang, Kezheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of long-term sand dust exposure on human respiratory health. Dust events break out frequently in Minqin County, northwest China, whereas Pingliang City, northwest China, is rarely influenced by dust events. Therefore, Minqin and Pingliang were selected as sand dust exposure region and control area, respectively. The incidence of respiratory system diseases and symptoms was determined through a structured respiratory health questionnaire (ATS-DLD-78-A) and personal interviews. The subjects comprised 728 farmers (Minqin, 424; Pingliang, 304) aged 40 years or older, who had nondocumented occupational history to industrial dust exposure. Prevalences (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI]) of chronic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, and chronic cough increased 9.6% (3.141, 1.776-5.555), 7.5% (2.468, 1.421-4.286), and 10.2% (1.787, 1.246-2.563) in Minqin comparison with Pingliang, respectively, and the differences were significant (p <.01).

  14. Genetic diversity of human metapneumovirus in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagušić, Maja; Slović, Anamarija; Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Mlinarić-Galinović, Gordana; Forčić, Dubravko

    2017-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is recognized as a global and frequent cause of acute respiratory tract infections among people of all ages. The objectives of this study were molecular epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of HMPV strains which produced moderate and severe acute respiratory tract infections in children in Croatia during four consecutive seasons (2011-2014). A total of 117 HMPV-positive samples collected from hospitalized pediatric patients presenting with acute respiratory tract infections and tested by direct immunofluorescence assay were first analyzed by amplifying a part of the F gene. Sixteen samples were further analyzed based on complete F, G, and SH gene sequences. HMPV genome was identified in 92 of 117 samples (78%) and the circulation of multiple lineages of HMPV was confirmed. In 2011, 2012, and 2014, subgroups A2 and B2 co-circulated, while B1 gained prevalence in 2013 and 2014. The study established the presence of a novel subcluster A2c in Croatia. This subcluster has only recently been detected in East and Southeast Asia. This study provides new insights into epidemiology and genetic diversity of HMPV in this part of Europe. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Phylogenic analysis of human bocavirus detected in children with acute respiratory infection in Yaounde, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, Sebastien; Vernet, Marie-Astrid; Njankouo-Ripa, Mohamadou; Penlap, Véronique Beng; Vabret, Astrid; Njouom, Richard

    2017-07-17

    Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was first identified in 2005 and has been shown to be a common cause of respiratory infections and gastroenteritis in children. In a recent study, we found that 10.7% of children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) were infected by HBoV. Genetic characterization of this virus remains unknown in Central Africa, particularly in Cameroon Leeding us to evaluate the molecular characteristics of HBoV strains in Cameroonian children with ARI. Phylogenetic analysis of partial HBoV VP1/2 sequences showed a low level of nucleotide variation and the circulation of HBoV genotype 1 (HBoV-1) only. Three clades were obtained, two clustering with each of the reference strains ST1 and ST2, and a third group consisting of only Cameroon strains. By comparing with the Swedish reference sequences, ST1 and ST2, Cameroon sequences showed nucleotide and amino acid similarities of respectively 97.36-100% and 98.35-100%. These results could help improve strategies for monitoring and control of respiratory infections in Cameroon.

  16. A diverse group of previously unrecognized human rhinoviruses are common causes of respiratory illnesses in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Ming Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRVs are the most prevalent human pathogens, and consist of 101 serotypes that are classified into groups A and B according to sequence variations. HRV infections cause a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe lower respiratory symptoms. Defining the role of specific strains in various HRV illnesses has been difficult because traditional serology, which requires viral culture and neutralization tests using 101 serotype-specific antisera, is insensitive and laborious.To directly type HRVs in nasal secretions of infants with frequent respiratory illnesses, we developed a sensitive molecular typing assay based on phylogenetic comparisons of a 260-bp variable sequence in the 5' noncoding region with homologous sequences of the 101 known serotypes. Nasal samples from 26 infants were first tested with a multiplex PCR assay for respiratory viruses, and HRV was the most common virus found (108 of 181 samples. Typing was completed for 101 samples and 103 HRVs were identified. Surprisingly, 54 (52.4% HRVs did not match any of the known serotypes and had 12-35% nucleotide divergence from the nearest reference HRVs. Of these novel viruses, 9 strains (17 HRVs segregated from HRVA, HRVB and human enterovirus into a distinct genetic group ("C". None of these new strains could be cultured in traditional cell lines.By molecular analysis, over 50% of HRV detected in sick infants were previously unrecognized strains, including 9 strains that may represent a new HRV group. These findings indicate that the number of HRV strains is considerably larger than the 101 serotypes identified with traditional diagnostic techniques, and provide evidence of a new HRV group.

  17. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  18. Publication of ICRP 60 and 61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfinch, E P

    1990-01-01

    After considerable deliberation and consultation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published its 1990 recommendations and resultant annual limits on intakes for workers. The effects of these new recommendations will be considered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in relation to its transport regulations and supporting documents during the current revision process. This revision process should lead to the publication of revised regulations in 1996. Initially, the immediate reaction in some areas is that the revised dose limits and annual limits should automatically result in straightforward reductions in the A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} values in the regulations, and in reduction in the permitted radiation levels on and around packages, conveyances etc. However, this reaction is questioned for the reason that it is necessary to separately examine the radiological consequences in routine transport and in accidents (''normal conditions of transport'' and ''accident conditions'' in the terminology of the regulations). Because accidents to radioactive material packaging are rare, the potential harm to individuals is not likely to be repeated. Thus a lowering of the dose limit may not be necessary. (author).

  19. Effect of compounds with antibacterial activities in human milk on respiratory syncytial virus and cytomegalovirus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, J; Gordon, A; May, J T

    1998-11-01

    The effect of some antibacterial compounds present in human milk were tested for antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus, Semliki Forest virus and cytomegalovirus. These included the gangliosides GM1, GM2 and GM3, sialyl-lactose, lactoferrin and chondroitin sulphate A, B and C, which were all tested for their ability to inhibit the viruses in cell culture. Of the compounds tested, only the ganglioside GM2, chondroitin sulphate B and lactoferrin inhibited the absorption and growth of respiratory syncytial virus in cell culture, and none inhibited the growth of Semliki Forest virus, indicating that lipid antiviral activity was not associated with any of the gangliosides. While the concentrations of these two compounds required to inhibit respiratory syncytial virus were in excess of those present in human milk, sialyl-lactose concentrations similar to those present in human milk increased the growth of cytomegalovirus. Lactoferrin was confirmed as inhibiting both respiratory syncytial virus and cytomegalovirus growth in culture even when used at lower concentrations than those present in human milk. The antiviral activities of GM2, chondroitin sulphate B and lactoferrin were tested when added to an infant formula. Lactoferrin continued to have antiviral activity against cytomegalovirus, but a lower activity against respiratory syncytial virus; ganglioside GM2 and chondroitin sulphate B still maintained antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus.

  20. ICRP risk assessment-another view (24 november 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning in 1960 two serious radiation exposure problems (occupational exposure in uranium mines and population exposure from testing of nuclear weapons) came to the attention. One might have expected ICRP to be the first to try to reduce these exposures but it was conspicuous by its silence. In 1958 ICRP set limits of exposure for radiation workers and members of the public. Nineteen years later (1977) when it was realized that the risk of radiation induced cancer was ten to thirty times what it was estimated to be in 1958, ICRP might have been expected to recommend a significant reduction in permissible exposure levels, but to the dismay of some it increased them. It was also a great disappointment when in 1977, levels of maximum permissible concentration of radionuclides in air, water and food were increased for a large fraction of the more dangerous radionuclides. The reactor accident at Chernobyl calls for a number of new ICRP recommendations [fr

  1. Basic concepts and assumptions behind the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1981-03-01

    The paper gives a review of the current radiation protection recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It discusses concepts like stochastic effects, radiation detriments, collective dose, dose equivalent and dose limits. (G.B.)

  2. A constructive critique to the ICRP's system and counter proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, K.

    1998-01-01

    In the author's opinion, there is a need for continuous efforts in revising the systems of radiation protection designed and operated according to ICRP recommendations. The fundamentals of the ICRP system of radiation protection are analyzed and classified into scientific and political or strategic features. Several proposals for changes are presented, concerning the restoration of the causality relation for radiation protection, the criteria for safety controlling, and the methodology of exposure control. (A.K.)

  3. Radiological protection: a summary handbook of ICRP publications and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaratnam, A.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation and potential risks therefrom far exceeds the knowledge of any other hazardous agent, whether in the industrial field, or in the general environment affecting members of the public. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been playing a pioneering role for decades in this direction. The extensive database that has been established over the decades by the ICRP, the methodologies, techniques and the organizational structures that have been developed to control radiation hazards, and, above all, the philosophy of risk evaluation and management that has been evolved by ICRP, would serve as valuable guides not only to those concerned with radiological protection but to scientist, technologist and administrators involved in all facets of occupational and industrial safety, as well as those concerned with environmental protection. From 1959 to the end of 1993 ICRP has brought out 64 publications running to around 9000 pages. It is important that everyone connected with the uses of ionizing radiations should be familiar with at least the basic features of the thinking of ICRP as embodied in these publications. The present handbook attempts to give in a concise, consolidated and codified form the salient features of all the relevant information contained in the voluminous ICRP publications. The material has been presented in 7 parts, each dealing with one major aspect of the recommendations, and summarizing the various publications connected with it. A separate note following the preface gives a brief summary of the way the contents of the handbook have been arranged. refs., tabs., figs

  4. Functional Impairment of Mononuclear Phagocyte System by the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bohmwald

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS comprises of monocytes, macrophages (MΦ, and dendritic cells (DCs. MPS is part of the first line of immune defense against a wide range of pathogens, including viruses, such as the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV. The hRSV is an enveloped virus that belongs to the Pneumoviridae family, Orthopneumovirus genus. This virus is the main etiological agent causing severe acute lower respiratory tract infection, especially in infants, children and the elderly. Human RSV can cause bronchiolitis and pneumonia and it has also been implicated in the development of recurrent wheezing and asthma. Monocytes, MΦ, and DCs significantly contribute to acute inflammation during hRSV-induced bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbation. Furthermore, these cells seem to be an important component for the association between hRSV and reactive airway disease. After hRSV infection, the first cells encountered by the virus are respiratory epithelial cells, alveolar macrophages (AMs, DCs, and monocytes in the airways. Because AMs constitute the predominant cell population at the alveolar space in healthy subjects, these cells work as major innate sentinels for the recognition of pathogens. Although adaptive immunity is crucial for viral clearance, AMs are required for the early immune response against hRSV, promoting viral clearance and controlling immunopathology. Furthermore, exposure to hRSV may affect the phagocytic and microbicidal capacity of monocytes and MΦs against other infectious agents. Finally, different studies have addressed the roles of different DC subsets during infection by hRSV. In this review article, we discuss the role of the lung MPS during hRSV infection and their involvement in the development of bronchiolitis.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  7. Patterns of Human Respiratory Viruses and Lack of MERS-Coronavirus in Patients with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Southwestern Province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abdulhaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We undertook enhanced surveillance of those presenting with respiratory symptoms at five healthcare centers by testing all symptomatic outpatients between November 2013 and January 2014 (winter time. Nasal swabs were collected from 182 patients and screened for MERS-CoV as well as other respiratory viruses using RT-PCR and multiplex microarray. A total of 75 (41.2% of these patients had positive viral infection. MERS-CoV was not detected in any of the samples. Human rhinovirus (hRV was the most detected pathogen (40.9% followed by non-MERS-CoV human coronaviruses (19.3%, influenza (Flu viruses (15.9%, and human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV (13.6%. Viruses differed markedly depending on age in which hRV, Flu A, and hCoV-OC43 were more prevalent in adults and RSV, hCoV-HKU1, and hCoV-NL63 were mostly restricted to children under the age of 15. Moreover, coinfection was not uncommon in this study, in which 17.3% of the infected patients had dual infections due to several combinations of viruses. Dual infections decreased with age and completely disappeared in people older than 45 years. Our study confirms that MERS-CoV is not common in the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia and shows high diversity and prevalence of other common respiratory viruses. This study also highlights the importance and contribution of enhanced surveillance systems for better infection control.

  8. Basis for the ICRP's age-specific biokinetic model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is developing age-specific biokinetic models and dose coefficients for environmentally important radionuclides. This paper describes the ICRP's age-specific biokinetic model for uranium. The model is constructed within a physiologically based framework originally developed for application to the alkaline earth elements but sufficiently general to apply to the larger class of bone-volume-seeking elements. Transfer rates for a reference adult are based mainly on: (1) measurements of uranium in blood and excreta of several human subjects who were intravenously injected with uranium; (2) postmortem measurements of uranium in tissues of some of those subjects; (3) postmortem measurements of uranium in tissues of occupationally and non-occupationally exposed subjects; (4) data on baboons, dogs, and smaller laboratory animals exposed to uranium for experimental purposes; and (5) consideration of the physiological processes thought to control retention and translocation of uranium in the body. Transfer rates for the adult are extended to children by application of a set of generic assumptions applied by the ICRP to calcium-like elements. These assumptions were derived mainly from observations of the age-specific biokinetics of the alkaline earth elements and lead in humans and laboratory animals but are consistent with available age-specific biokinetic data on uranium. 82 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Fundamental ICRP recommendations at the start of the 21st century: status of the revision of ICRP publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2002-01-01

    The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, are either re-stated or revised at intervals of about 15 years, most recently in ICRP Publication 60, adopted in 1990. ICRP plan to issue its next recommendations around 2005. Through extensive consultation, the active participation of the radiological protection community was recruited already at the conceptual stage. Based on the vast input received, ICRP is currently preparing draft recommendations. These are likely to emphasise egalitarian values more than utilitarian ones, to be holistic rather than anthropocentric, and to be formatted as a relatively concise set of actual recommendations underpinned by separate publications with more detail. The draft will again be circulated worldwide and comments will be discussed in 2004 with a view to approval of the recommendations in 2005 and publication in 2005 or 2006. Thus, integration into legislation would be possible sometime between 2006 and 2010, say. (orig.) [de

  10. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanohorns in different human cells of the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Franziska; Lange, Martina; Hoppmann, Pia; Heutelbeck, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    One of the new synthetic carbon-based nanomaterials is carbon nanohorns (CNH). A potential risk for employees of production processes is an unintentional intake of these nanomaterials via inhalation. Once taken up, nanoparticles might interact with cells of different tissues as well as with intercellular substances. These interactions may have far-reaching consequences for human health. Currently, many gaps in available information on the CNH toxicological profile remain. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxicity of CNH particles on human epithelial cells of the respiratory system with special consideration given to different particle sizes. In all cell lines, cell viability was reduced after 24 h of exposure up to 60% and metabolic activity as evidenced by mitochondrial activity was lowered to 9% at a concentration of 1 g/L. The three respiratory cell lines differed in their sensitivity. The most robust cells were the bronchial epithelial cells. Further, particle size fractions induced different adverse effect strength, whereby no correlation between particle size fraction and toxicity was found. These findings demonstrate the need for further information regarding the behavior and effect strength of nanomaterial. To avoid the production of new harmful materials, a more comprehensive integration of results from toxicity studies in the development processes of engineered nanomaterials is recommended not only from an occupational viewpoint but also from an environmental perspective.

  11. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  12. Data file on retention and excretion of inhaled radionuclides calculated using ICRP dosimetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigure, Nobuhito; Nakano, Takashi; Enomoto, Hiroko; Shimo, Michikuni; Inaba, Jiro

    2000-01-01

    The authors have computed whole-body or a specific organ content and the daily urinary and faecal excretion rate of some selected radionuclides following acute intake by inhalation and ingestion, where the ICRP new respiratory tract model (ICRP Publication 66) and the latest ICRP biokinetic models were applied. The results were compiled in a file of MS Excel. The file was tentatively called MONDAI for reference. MONDAI contains the data for all radionuclides in ICRP Publications 54 and 78 and, in addition, some other radionuclides which are important from the viewpoint of occupational exposure in nuclear industry, research and medicine. They are H-3, P-32, Cr-51, Mn-54, Fe-59, Co-57, Co-58, Co-60, Zn-65, Rb-86, Sr-85, Sr-89, Sr-90, Zr-95, Ru-106, Ag-110m, Sb-124, Sb-125, I-125, I-129, I-131, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ba-140, Ce-141, Ce-144, Hg-203, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, Th-232, U-234, U-235, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Cm-242, Cm-244 and Cf-252. The day-by-day data up to 1000 days and the data at every 10 days up to 10000 days are presented. The following ICRP default values for the physical characteristics of the radioactive aerosols were used: AMAD=5 micron, geometric SD=2.5, particle density = 3 g/cm 3 , particle shape factor = 1.5. The subject exposed to the aerosols is the ICRP reference worker doing light work: light exercise with the ventilation rate of 1.5 m 3 /h for 5.5 h + sitting with the ventilation rate of 0.54 m 3 /h for 2.5 h. MONDAI was originally made by Version 7.0 of MS Excel for Windows 95, but the file was saved in the form of Ver. 4.0 as well as Ver. 7.0. Therefore, if the user has Ver. 4.0 or an upper version, he can open the file and operate it. With the graph-wizard of MS Excel the user can easily make a diagram for the retention or daily excretion of a radionuclide of interest. The dose coefficient (Sv/Bq intake) of each radionuclide for each absorption type given in ICRP Publication 68 was also written in each sheet. Therefore

  13. Waste Management within the Framework of ICRP Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.; Larsson, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    There are good reasons why ICRP should revisit the issue of solid radioactive waste disposal after the new recommendations have been established. One reason is the relation between radiation protection and the concept of sustainable development. Since the post-closure regulations determine the maximum burden for future generations at the disposal site, it is natural to make such a link. If we assume the continuation of the practice of nuclear power production or an alternative production with equivalent risk burdens, it is natural to consider the combined effect of present and future activities, particularly for long-lived radioactive waste. This leads to a suggested margin for dose to the public from a single repository. Another issue is the biosphere assumed in the assessment of exposure from a hypothetical outflow from the repository in the future. The existing regulations require dose or risk to be determined in most national standards. The issue of the future biosphere therefore cannot be avoided. However, if several possible future human activities in alternative biospheres have to be assumed in reviewing if the standard is met, the process can be said to take future generations need into account, also in harmony with the sustainable development. (Author)

  14. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, Stephanie; Paterson, Suzanna; Chiu, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies) that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell generation and

  15. Induction and Subversion of Human Protective Immunity: Contrasting Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ascough

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza are among the most important causes of severe respiratory disease worldwide. Despite the clinical need, barriers to developing reliably effective vaccines against these viruses have remained firmly in place for decades. Overcoming these hurdles requires better understanding of human immunity and the strategies by which these pathogens evade it. Although superficially similar, the virology and host response to RSV and influenza are strikingly distinct. Influenza induces robust strain-specific immunity following natural infection, although protection by current vaccines is short-lived. In contrast, even strain-specific protection is incomplete after RSV and there are currently no licensed RSV vaccines. Although animal models have been critical for developing a fundamental understanding of antiviral immunity, extrapolating to human disease has been problematic. It is only with recent translational advances (such as controlled human infection models and high-dimensional technologies that the mechanisms responsible for differences in protection against RSV compared to influenza have begun to be elucidated in the human context. Influenza infection elicits high-affinity IgA in the respiratory tract and virus-specific IgG, which correlates with protection. Long-lived influenza-specific T cells have also been shown to ameliorate disease. This robust immunity promotes rapid emergence of antigenic variants leading to immune escape. RSV differs markedly, as reinfection with similar strains occurs despite natural infection inducing high levels of antibody against conserved antigens. The immunomodulatory mechanisms of RSV are thus highly effective in inhibiting long-term protection, with disturbance of type I interferon signaling, antigen presentation and chemokine-induced inflammation possibly all contributing. These lead to widespread effects on adaptive immunity with impaired B cell memory and reduced T cell

  16. Molecular Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Philippines, 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungnapa Malasao

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. We performed molecular analysis of HRSV among infants and children with clinical diagnosis of severe pneumonia in four study sites in the Philippines, including Biliran, Leyte, Palawan, and Metro Manila from June 2012 to July 2013. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and screened for HRSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Positive samples were tested by conventional PCR and sequenced for the second hypervariable region (2nd HVR of the G gene. Among a total of 1,505 samples, 423 samples were positive for HRSV (28.1%, of which 305 (72.1% and 118 (27.9% were identified as HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. Two genotypes of HRSV-A, NA1 and ON1, were identified during the study period. The novel ON1 genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in 2nd HVR of the G gene increased rapidly and finally became the predominant genotype in 2013 with an evolutionary rate higher than the NA1 genotype. Moreover, in the ON1 genotype, we found positive selection at amino acid position 274 (p<0.05 and massive O- and N-glycosylation in the 2nd HVR of the G gene. Among HRSV-B, BA9 was the predominant genotype circulating in the Philippines. However, two sporadic cases of GB2 genotype were found, which might share a common ancestor with other Asian strains. These findings suggest that HRSV is an important cause of severe acute respiratory infection among children in the Philippines and revealed the emergence and subsequent predominance of the ON1 genotype and the sporadic detection of the GB2 genotype. Both genotypes were detected for the first time in the Philippines.

  17. Respiratory tract dose calculation considering physiological parameters from samples of Brazilian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.; Lopes, R.; Lourenco, M.; Cardoso, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The ICRP 66 presents deposition fraction in the respiratory tract regions considering reference values from Caucasian man. However, in order to obtain a more accurate assessment of intake and dose the ICRP recommends the use of specific information when they are available. The application of parameters from Brazilian population in the deposition and in the clearance model shows significant variations in the deposition fractions and in the fraction of inhaled activity transferred to blood. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the influence in dose calculation to each region of the respiratory tract when physiological parameters from Brazilian population are applied in the model. The purpose of the dosimetric model is to evaluate dose to each tissues of respiratory tract that are potentially risk from inhaled radioactive materials. The committed equivalent dose, H.T., is calculated by the product of the total number of transformations of the radionuclide in tissue source S over a period of fifty years after incorporation and of the energy absorbed per unit mass in the target tissue T, for each radiation emitted per transformation in tissue source S. The dosimetric model of Human Respirator y Tract was implemented in the software Excel for Windows (version 2000) and H.T. was determined in two stages. First it was calculated the number of total transformations, US, considering the fractional deposition of activity in each source tissue and then it was calculated the total energy absorbed per unit mass S.E.E., in the target tissue. It was assumed that the radionuclide emits an alpha particle with average energy of 5.15 MeV. The variation in the fractional deposition in the compartments of the respiratory tract in changing the physiological parameters from Caucasian to Brazilian adult man causes variation in the number of

  18. Protection of the Environment: Current ICRP Work and EC-Funded Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.M.; Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The requirement for assessments of the environmental effects of radiation, i.e. effects on non-human biota, is increasing due to growing public concern for environmental protection issues and integration of environmental impact assessments into the regulatory process. Thus, there is a strong need to establish a framework for the assessment of environmental impact of ionising radiation, as well as a system for protection of the environment from ionising radiation. These ambitions are reflected in a number of international efforts and various 'systems' have been proposed or are under development. This paper considers the current discussions on environmental protection within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), as part of the Commission's ongoing revision of its recommendations as laid out in Publication 60. Furthermore, the paper reviews work within the EC-funded FASSET (Framework for ASSessment of Environmental impacT) project. The concepts developed both by ICRP and FASSET are similar, and the FASSET approach and results may illustrate how forthcoming ICRP recommendations could be turned into practical application. (orig.)

  19. The role of Mycobacterium avium complex fibronectin attachment protein in adherence to the human respiratory mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A M; Chadwick, M V; Nicholson, A G; Dewar, A; Groger, R K; Brown, E J; Wilson, R

    2000-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic respiratory pathogens that infect non-immunocompromised patients with established lung disease, although they can also cause primary infections. The ability to bind fibronectin is conserved among many mycobacterial species. We have investigated the adherence of a sputum isolate of MAC to the mucosa of organ cultures constructed with human tissue and the contribution of M. avium fibronectin attachment protein (FAP) to the process. MAC adhered to fibrous, but not globular mucus, and to extracellular matrix (ECM) in areas of epithelial damage, but not to intact extruded cells and collagen fibres. Bacteria occasionally adhered to healthy unciliated epithelium and to cells that had degenerated exposing their contents, but never to ciliated cells. The results obtained with different respiratory tissues were similar. Two ATCC strains of MAC gave similar results. There was a significant reduction (P fibrous mucus was unchanged. Immunogold labelling demonstrated fibronectin in ECM as well as in other areas of epithelial damage, but only ECM bound FAP. A Mycobacterium smegmatis strain had the same pattern of adherence to the mucosa as MAC. When the FAP gene was deleted, the strain demonstrated reduced adherence to ECM, and adherence was restored when the strain was transfected with an M. avium FAP expression construct. We conclude that MAC adheres to ECM in areas of epithelial damage via FAP and to mucus with a fibrous appearance via another adhesin. Epithelial damage exposing ECM and poor mucus clearance will predispose to MAC airway infection.

  20. Testing Human Skin and Respiratory Sensitizers—What Is Good Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anki Malmborg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative methods for accurate in vitro assessment of skin and respiratory sensitizers are urgently needed. Sensitization is a complex biological process that cannot be evaluated accurately using single events or biomarkers, since the information content is too restricted in these measurements. On the contrary, if the tremendous information content harbored in DNA/mRNA could be mined, most complex biological processes could be elucidated. Genomic technologies available today, including transcriptional profiling and next generation sequencing, have the power to decipher sensitization, when used in the right context. Thus, a genomic test platform has been developed, denoted the Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD assay. Due to the high informational content of the GARD test, accurate predictions of both the skin and respiratory sensitizing capacity of chemicals, have been demonstrated. Based on a matured dendritic cell line, acting as a human-like reporter system, information about potency has also been acquired. Consequently, multiparametric diagnostic technologies are disruptive test principles that can change the way in which the next generation of alternative methods are designed.

  1. Comparative epidemiology of human metapneumovirus- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospitalizations in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, John P; Arvelo, Wences; Ortíz, José; Reyes, Lissette; Gray, Jennifer; Estevez, Alejandra; Castañeda, Oscar; Langley, Gayle; Lindblade, Kim A

    2014-01-01

    Background Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important cause of acute respiratory infections (ARI), but little is known about how it compares with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in Central America. Objectives In this study, we describe hospitalized cases of HMPV- and RSV-ARI in Guatemala. Methods We conducted surveillance at three hospitals (November 2007–December 2012) and tested nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swab specimens for HMPV and RSV using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We calculated incidence rates, and compared the epidemiology and outcomes of HMPV-positive versus RSV-positive and RSV-HMPV-negative cases. Results We enrolled and tested specimens from 6288 ARI cases; 596 (9%) were HMPV-positive and 1485 (24%) were RSV-positive. We observed a seasonal pattern of RSV but not HMPV. The proportion HMPV-positive was low (3%) and RSV-positive high (41%) for age Guatemala, but HMPV hospitalizations are less frequent than RSV and, in young children, less severe than other etiologies. Preventive interventions should take into account the wide variation in incidence by age and unpredictable timing of incidence peaks. PMID:24761765

  2. Effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at the onset of submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, P J; Parolin, M L; Jones, N L; Heigenhauser, G J F

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at rest and during submaximal exercise. Subjects exercised on two occasions for 15 min at 55 % of their maximal oxygen uptake while either hyperventilating (R-Alk) or breathing normally (Con). Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 1 and 15 min of exercise. At rest, no effects on muscle metabolism were observed in response to R-Alk. In the first minute of exercise, there was a delayed activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in R-Alk compared with Con, resulting in a reduced rate of pyruvate oxidation. Also, glycogenolysis was higher in R-Alk compared with Con, which was attributed to a higher availability of the monoprotonated form of inorganic phosphate (P(i)), resulting in an elevated rate of pyruvate production. The mismatch between pyruvate production and its oxidation resulted in net lactate accumulation. These effects were not seen after 15 min of exercise, with no further differences in muscle metabolism between conditions. The results from the present study suggest that respiratory alkalosis may play an important role in lactate accumulation during the transition from rest to exercise in acute hypoxic conditions, but that other factors mediate lactate accumulation during steady-state exercise.

  3. Purification and characterization of factors produced by Aspergillus fumigatus which affect human ciliated respiratory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitani, R; Taylor, G; Elezis, E N; Llewellyn-Jones, C; Mitchell, J; Kuze, F; Cole, P J; Wilson, R

    1995-09-01

    The mechanisms by which Aspergillus fumigatus colonizes the respiratory mucosa are unknown. Culture filtrates of eight of nine clinical isolates of A. fumigatus slowed ciliary beat frequency and damaged human respiratory epithelium in vitro. These changes appeared to occur concurrently. Culture filtrates of two clinical isolates of Candida albicans had no effect on ciliated epithelium. We have purified and characterized cilioinhibitory factors of a clinical isolate of A. fumigatus. The cilioinhibitory activity was heat labile, reduced by dialysis, and partially extractable into chloroform. The activity was associated with both high- and low-molecular-weight factors, as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50. A low-molecular-weight cilioinhibitory factor was further purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and shown by mass spectrometry to be gliotoxin, a known metabolite of A. fumigatus. Gliotoxin significantly slowed ciliary beat frequency in association with epithelial damage at concentrations above 0.2 microgram/ml; other Aspergillus toxins, i.e., fumagillin and helvolic acid, were also cilioinhibitory but at much higher concentrations. High-molecular-weight (> or = 35,000 and 25,000) cilioinhibitory materials had neither elastolytic nor proteolytic activity and remain to be identified. Thus, A. fumigatus produces a number of biologically active substances which slow ciliary beating and damage epithelium and which may influence colonization of the airways.

  4. [Different species of human rhinovirus infection in children with acute respiratory tract infections in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-hui; Zhao, Lin-qing; Qian, Yuan; Zhu, Ru-nan; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Tian, Run

    2013-12-01

    To understand the clinical characteristics of different groups human rhinovirus (HRV)-A, B and C infection in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) in Beijing. Respiratory tract specimens (n = 1412) collected from children with ARI during Jan. 2011 to Dec. 2012 were tested for HRV by using semi-nested PCR. Gene fragments of VP4/VP2 capsid protein amplified from HRV positive specimens were sequenced for HRV genotype confirmation. Then epidemiological characteristics of these HRV-positive cases were analyzed. Among these 1412 specimens tested, 103 (7.3%) were HRV positive, including 54 (52.4%) positive for HRV-A, 14 (13.6%) for HRV-B, 35 (34.0%) for HRV-C determined by sequence analysis. The positive rates of HRV-A, B and C (2.5%, 16/638; 0.3%, 2/638 and 1.3%, 8/638) in children with acute upper respiratory tract infections (URI) were lower than those (5.8%, 36/623; 1.8%, 11/623 and 3.9%, 24/623) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRI) (P = 0.003, 0.011, 0.003). In children with LRI, the positive rates of HRV-A, C were similar to each other (P = 0.112), and both were higher than that of HRV-B (P = 0.000, P = 0.026). The severity of ARI among children positive for different groups HRV showed no significant difference evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis H test (Hc = 0.044, P > 0.05), as well as that between children co-infected with HRV and other viruses and those infected with HRV only evaluated by Wilcoxon rank sum test (Zc = 0.872, P > 0.05). HRV is one of important pathogens for children with ARI, especially LRI in Beijing. The positive rates of HRV-A and HRV-C are similar to each other, and both are higher than that of HRV-B. No significant difference was shown among children with different HRV genotypes by evaluation of the severity of ARI, and co-infections of HRV with other viruses do not significantly increase the severity of ARI.

  5. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued its ''1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection'' that provide guidance on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation (1). The ICRP recommendations and their incorporation into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ''Basic Safety Standards,'' Safety Series No. 9, provide the basis on which the IAEA ''Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials,'' Safety Series No. 6, are built. The transportation regulations are developed to ensure safety during the movement of radioactive materials and to provide reasonable assurance the transportation activities comply with the basic radiation protection principles of Safety Series No. 9. During the 1985 revision of the IAEA transport regulations, a comprehensive model was developed to derive Type A (non-accident resistant) package contents limits that were consistent with Safety Series No.9 and, consequently, the earlier ICRP recommendations (2). Now that ICRP 60 has been published, the IAEA and Member States are faced with the task of evaluating how the transport regulations need to be revised to conform with the new recommendations. Several potentially significant issues need to be addressed to determine whether the old linkages between the recommendations and the transport regulations require modification. This paper addresses the issues that arise from the revisions to the ICRP recommendations and how the transportation regulations may be affected

  6. Glycolipid-Dependent, Protease Sensitive Internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Into Cultured Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Aufaugh; Carter, William G; Lingwood, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Internalization of PAK strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human respiratory epithelial cell lines and HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro was readily demonstrable via a gentamycin protection assay. Depletion of target cell glycosphingolipids (GSLs) using a glucosyl ceramide synthase inhibitor, P4, completely prevented P. aeruginosa internalization. In contrast, P4 treatment had no effect on the internalization of Salmonella typhimurium into HeLa cells. Internalized P. aeruginosa were within membrane vacuoles, often containing microvesicles, between the bacterium and the limiting membrane. P. aeruginosa internalization was markedly enhanced by target cell pretreatment with the exogenous GSL, deacetyl gangliotetraosyl ceramide (Gg4). Gg4 binds the lipid raft marker, GM1 ganglioside. Target cell pretreatment with TLCK, but not other (serine) protease inhibitors, prevented both P. aeruginosa host cell binding and internalization. NFkB inhibition also prevented internalization. A GSL-containing lipid-raft model of P. aeruginosa host cell binding/internalization is proposed PMID:21270937

  7. The potential health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis through quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Forhan, Sara E; Gottlieb, Sami L; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2008-08-18

    We estimated the health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) through quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We applied a simple mathematical model to estimate the averted costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) saved by preventing RRP in children whose mothers had been vaccinated at age 12 years. Under base case assumptions, the prevention of RRP would avert an estimated USD 31 (range: USD 2-178) in medical costs (2006 US dollars) and save 0.00016 QALYs (range: 0.00001-0.00152) per 12-year-old girl vaccinated. Including the benefits of RRP reduced the estimated cost per QALY gained by HPV vaccination by roughly 14-21% in the base case and by 100% in the sensitivity analyses. More precise estimates of the incidence of RRP are needed, however, to quantify this impact more reliably.

  8. Stake holders' views on the implications of the new ICRP recommendations: an environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of the new ICRP Recommendations are of significant interest to environmental organisations. There are several issues of particular interest: 1. whether the 'approach and the numbers are right'? in the general recommendations; 2. to what extent the understandings being developed for both human and non-human species will effectively address concerns regarding protecting the health of people and the environment; and 3. to what extent these new recommendations will inform the broader regulatory and policy debates, in particular those concerning the uses of nuclear power, fuel cycle developments and radioactive waste management practices. This presentation will explore various aspects of these issues from the perspectives of environmental organisations. (author)

  9. Board advice following publication of the 1990 Recommendations of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published new Recommendations and the Board has a statutory duty to advise Government and those with responsibilities for radiation protection on the acceptability to and the applicability in the UK of those Recommendations. The Board wishes to consult widely before finalising the advice which is proposed in this document. In general, the Board endorses the conceptual framework for radiological protection recommended by ICRP. In particular, the distinction between practices and intervention is useful and is consistent with the way in which the Board has presented its recent advice. A major new concept is that of a constraint. The Board believes that the introduction of constraints provides a powerful method for improving protection against ionising radiation. The advice in this consultative document is for maximum generic values of dose constraints for both workers and the public. Finally the Board proposes to endorse the use of the radiological quantities recommended by ICRP. (author)

  10. Internal dosimetry data and methods of ICRP. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.R.; Bernard, S.R.; Dillman, L.T.; Watson, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology being used to update the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report of Committee 2, ICRP Publication 2 on Permissible Dose for Internal Radiation, is described. The system of differential equations, which is used to calculate the cumulated activity in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, other body organs, and the transfer compartment of reference man, is presented. These equations describe the physical decay and metabolism of a radionuclide as governed by the lung and gastrointestinal tract models adopted by Committee 2 from models developed for the ICRP. The equations also take into account organ uptake and retention following intake into blood and the contribution of activity from radioactive daughter nuclides. Additionally, the scheme for estimating the dose from immersion in a radioactive cloud and the scheme for computing the nuclear decay data needed for all of the dose computations are presented. In computing the immersion dose, estimates for both the infinite and the finite cloud are considered

  11. Development of derived limits for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Lee, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Derived limits such as the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), Derived Air Concentration (DAC) and Effluent Concentration Limit (ECL) for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations were calculated using dose limits and committed effective dose coefficients of the basic Safety Standards of IAEA (i.e. safety series 115; BSS-96). Derived limits regarding occupational exposure were derived using methodologies of ICRP-61 and dose limit stated in ICRP -60. ECL in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment were derived using methodologies of 10 CFR part 20 and dose limit stated in ICRP-60. In order to analyze the impact of implementing derived limits on nuclear facilities, the derived values in this study were compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) of Notice No. 98-12 of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). According to the comparison results, ECLs in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment in this study are shown to have lower values (i.e. more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12. These differences are due to the reduction of dose limit, adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, and application of new respiratory tract model and bio-kinetics model. Especially, for uranium elements (i.e., 235 U, 238 U, etc.), which are governing ones in the nuclear fuel industries, ECLs in water are approximately a magnitude in the order of two lower than those in Notice No. 98-12. These are attributable to the adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, newly recommended dose coefficients for ingestion pathway, and reduction of dose limit. It was found out that the differences in ECLs in water for uranium elements originated mostly from ingestion dose coefficients recommended by BSS-96. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  12. Human metapnuemovirus infections in hospitalized children and comparison with other respiratory viruses. 2005-2014 prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz García-García

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV has an important etiological role in acute lower respiratory infections in children under five years. Our objectives were to estimate the relative contribution of HMPV to hospitalization in children with acute respiratory infection, to define the clinical and epidemiological features of HMPV single and multiple infections, and to compare HMPV infections with respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, rhinovirus (HRV, adenovirus and human bocavirus infections in the same population.A prospective study performed on all children less than 14 years of age with a respiratory tract disease admitted to a secondary hospital between September 2005- June 2014. Clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed. Nasopharyngeal aspirate was taken at admission for viral study with polymerase chain reaction for 16 respiratory viruses. A total of 3,906 children were included. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 75.2% of them. The most common identified virus was HRSV, followed by HRV. HMPV was detected in 214 cases (5.5%; 133 (62% were single infections and the remaining were detected in coinfection with other viruses. 90.7% cases were detected between February and May. Children's mean age was 13.83 ± 18 months. Fever was frequent (69%, and bronchiolitis (27%, and recurrent wheezing (63% were the main clinical diagnosis. Hypoxia was present in 65% of the patients and 47% of them had an infiltrate in X-ray. Only 6 (2.8% children were admitted to the intensive care unit. Only the duration of the hospitalization was different, being longer in the coinfections group (p <0.05. There were many differences in seasonality and clinical characteristics between HMPV and other respiratory viruses being more similar to HRSV.HMPV infections accounted for 5.5% of total viral infections in hospitalized children. The clinical characteristics were similar to HRSV infections, but seasonality and clinical data were different from other viral

  13. The recommendations of the ICRP: the reasons for a change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Nenot, J.C.; Lecomte, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has regularly produced recommendations on the protection against ionising radiation; these recommendations are currently taken up by international organisations and by states. Since 1990, date of issue of the most recent recommendations (Publication 60), advances in scientific knowledge, technical developments, feedback and desire to meet modern societal developments, have incited the ICRP to modify its system of protection. The latest draft, which was recently presented openly for consultation and proposals, is described and discussed. (author)

  14. Osmolality and respiratory regulation in humans: respiratory compensation for hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is absent after infusion of hypertonic saline in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Vibeke; Brudin, Lars; Rundgren, Mats; Irestedt, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Several animal studies show that changes in plasma osmolality may influence ventilation. Respiratory depression caused by increased plasma osmolality is interpreted as inhibition of water-dependent thermoregulation because conservation of body fluid predominates at the cost of increased core temperature. Respiratory alkalosis, on the other hand, is associated with a decrease in plasma osmolality and strong ion difference (SID) during human pregnancy. We investigated the hypothesis that osmolality would influence ventilation, so that increased osmolality will decrease ventilation and decreased osmolality will stimulate ventilation in both men and women. Our study participants were healthy volunteers of both sexes (ASA physical status I). Ten men (mean 28 years; range 20-40) and 9 women (mean 33 years; range 22-43) were included. All women participated in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Hyperosmolality was induced by IV infusion of hypertonic saline 3%, and hypoosmolality by drinking tap water. Arterial blood samples were collected for analysis of electrolytes, osmolality, and blood gases. Sensitivity to CO2 was determined by rebreathing tests performed before and after the fluid-loading procedures. Infusion of hypertonic saline caused hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with decreased SID in all subjects. Analysis of pooled data showed absence of respiratory compensation. Baseline arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) mean (SD) 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg remained unaltered, with lowest PaCO2 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg after 100 minutes, P = 0.70, causing a decrease in pH from mean (SD) 7.42 (0.02) to 7.38 (0.02), P acidosis was also observed during water loading. Pooled results show that PaCO2 decreased from 38.2 (3.3) mm Hg at baseline to 35.7 (2.8) mm Hg after 80 minutes of drinking water, P = 0.002, and pH remained unaltered: pH 7.43 (0.02) at baseline to pH 7.42 (0.02), P = 0.14, mean difference (confidence interval) = pH -0.007 (-0.017 to 0.003). Our results indicate

  15. An image-based skeletal tissue model for the ICRP reference newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Watchman, Christopher; Bourke, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Aris, John [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shagina, Natalia [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Harrison, John; Fell, Tim [Radiation Protection Division, Health Protection Agency, Chilton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2009-07-21

    Hybrid phantoms represent a third generation of computational models of human anatomy needed for dose assessment in both external and internal radiation exposures. Recently, we presented the first whole-body hybrid phantom of the ICRP reference newborn with a skeleton constructed from both non-uniform rational B-spline and polygon-mesh surfaces (Lee et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33). The skeleton in that model included regions of cartilage and fibrous connective tissue, with the remainder given as a homogenous mixture of cortical and trabecular bone, active marrow and miscellaneous skeletal tissues. In the present study, we present a comprehensive skeletal tissue model of the ICRP reference newborn to permit a heterogeneous representation of the skeleton in that hybrid phantom set-both male and female-that explicitly includes a delineation of cortical bone so that marrow shielding effects are correctly modeled for low-energy photons incident upon the newborn skeleton. Data sources for the tissue model were threefold. First, skeletal site-dependent volumes of homogeneous bone were obtained from whole-cadaver CT image analyses. Second, selected newborn bone specimens were acquired at autopsy and subjected to micro-CT image analysis to derive model parameters of the marrow cavity and bone trabecular 3D microarchitecture. Third, data given in ICRP Publications 70 and 89 were selected to match reference values on total skeletal tissue mass. Active marrow distributions were found to be in reasonable agreement with those given previously by the ICRP. However, significant differences were seen in total skeletal and site-specific masses of trabecular and cortical bone between the current and ICRP newborn skeletal tissue models. The latter utilizes an age-independent ratio of 80%/20% cortical and trabecular bone for the reference newborn. In the current study, a ratio closer to 40%/60% is used based upon newborn CT and micro-CT skeletal image analyses. These changes in

  16. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  17. Application in the Nordic countries of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The radiation protection institutes of the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, published in 1976 a joint report on the applicability of international radiation protection recommendations in the Nordic countries. The report was mainly based on the set of recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In the report it was stated that 'if the basic recommendations of ICRP are subsequently revised, it is the intention of the radiation protection institutes to consider equivalent changes in the recommended basis for regulatory texts and, if there is full agreement, jointly to announce changes which may be made in respect to the principles which have been recommended here'. In 1977 ICRP published its revised basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) which resulted from the examination of new information during the last decade and since the Commission's previous basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 9 adopted in 1965. In 1978 the representatives of the radiation protection institutes of the Nordic countries agreed at their meeting in Helsinki to prepare a joint policy document on the application of the revised ICRP recommendations in the Nordic countries. In common with the previous joint report of the Nordic radiation protection institutes of 1976 the present recommendations deal only with ionizing radiation. In the new recommendations ICRP has more clearly than in the previous recommendations systematized the basic principles in radiation protection by crystallizing its system of dose limitation in three main points: a) no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit; b) all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; and C) the dose equivalent to individuals shall not exceed the limits recommended for the appropriate circumstances by the Commission. The levels for basic dose

  18. Morphological changes of carotid bodies in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a morphometric study in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinhaes E.N.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid bodies are chemoreceptors sensitive to a fall of partial oxygen pressure in blood (hypoxia. The morphological alterations of these organs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and in people living at high altitude are well known. However, it is not known whether the histological profile of human carotid bodies is changed in acute clinical conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The objective of the present study was to perform a quantitative analysis of the histology of carotid bodies collected from patients who died of ARDS. A morphometric study of carotid bodies collected during routine autopsies was carried out on three groups: patients that died of non-respiratory diseases (controls, N = 8, patients that presented COPD and died of its complications or associated diseases (N = 7, and patients that died of ARDS (N = 7. Morphometric measurements of the volume fraction of clusters of chief cells were performed in five fields on each slide at 40X magnification. The numerical proportion of the four main histological cell types (light, dark, progenitor and sustentacular cells was determined analyzing 10 fields on each slide at 400X magnification. The proportion of dark cells was 0.22 in ARDS patients, 0.12 in controls (P<0.001, and 0.08 in the COPD group. The proportion of light cells was 0.33 (ARDS, 0.44 (controls (P<0.001, and 0.36 (COPD. These findings suggest that chronic and acute hypoxia have different effects on the histology of glomic tissue.

  19. Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov., a slowly growing mycobacterium isolated from human respiratory samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Marola, Jamie L; Buss, Sarah; Jones, Victoria; McNeil, Michael R; Freifeld, Alison G; Elaine Epperson, L; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Jackson, Mary; Iwen, Peter C; Salfinger, Max; Strong, Michael

    2017-08-01

    A novel slowly growing, non-chromogenic species of the class Actinobacteria was isolated from a human respiratory sample in Nebraska, USA, in 2012. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence supported placement into the genus Mycobacterium with high sequence similarity to a previously undescribed strain isolated from a patient respiratory sample from Oregon, USA, held in a collection in Colorado, USA, in 2000. The two isolates were subjected to phenotypic testing and whole genome sequencing and found to be indistinguishable. The bacteria were acid-fast stain-positive, rod-shaped and exhibited growth after 7-10 days on solid media at temperatures ranging from 25 to 42°C. Colonies were non-pigmented, rough and slightly raised. Analyses of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight profiles showed no matches against a reference library of 130 mycobacterial species. Full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical for the two isolates, the average nucleotide identity (ANI) between their genomes was 99.7 % and phylogenetic comparisons classified the novel mycobacteria as the basal most species in the slowly growing Mycobacterium clade. Mycobacterium avium is the most closely related species based on rpoB gene sequence similarity (92 %), but the ANI between the genomes was 81.5 %, below the suggested cut-off for differentiating two species (95 %). Mycolic acid profiles were more similar to M. avium than to Mycobacterium simiae or Mycobacterium abscessus. The phenotypic and genomic data support the conclusion that the two related isolates represent a novel Mycobacterium species for which the name Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE-TNMC-100812T (=ATCC BAA-2683T=DSM 46873T).

  20. ICRP Recommendations to the Protection of People Living in Long-Term Contaminated Areas ICRP publication 111 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Rashad, S.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to through some lights on ICRP free release publication at 4 April 2011-Internationally Known as ICRP publication 111. The title of the publication is (application of the commission's recommendations to the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency). Nuclear accidents or a radiation emergency may cause contamination. The contamination may be spread on a large area. There are people living in these areas. For many factors the people refuse to leave their homes. They want to stay along their life as in the case of the normal conditions. So, it is important to facilitate their stay and make it safe. This is not easy. But it is possible without neglect the radiation hazard. The radiation hazard is effective on the life fields. It is harmful in plants, animals, foods, water, milk and the buildings it self. With considering the radiological protection principles the living of the people for a long time could be a fact of the life and will be more easy and safe. Optimization principle has priority to apply. This publication achieves these purposes.The ICRP-111 is translated into Arabic at August 2012. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the ICRP radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translations include, ICRP-105 (radiation protection in medicine) and ICRP -113 (education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures).

  1. El Bocavirus humano: un nuevo virus respiratorio Human bocavirus: a new respiratory virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aguirre Muñoz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones respiratorias agudas son una causa muy importante de morbilidad y mortalidad, especialmente en los niños y en los países en desarrollo. Con los métodos de laboratorio actuales, aproximadamente una tercera parte de estas infecciones se queda sin diagnóstico etiológico. Se acepta que los virus juegan un papel cardinal y que más de 200 virus, pertenecientes a seis familias virales están implicados en la génesis de este problema. La familia Parvoviridae se conoce desde mediados del siglo XX. El Parvovirus humano B19, identificado en 1980 y causante de enfermedades febriles y exantemáticas, fue considerado por muchos años como el único miembro de esta familia capaz de afectar a la especie humana. Sin embargo, un grupo de investigadores suecos comandado por Tobías Allander informó en agosto de 2005 el hallazgo de un nuevo Parvovirus, denominado provisionalmente Bocavirus humano, relacionado con infección respiratoria aguda en niños. En este artículo se resumen las características de este nuevo agente, se resalta la importancia de su hallazgo y de la técnica de investigación empleada. Respiratory tract infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, mainly in children and also in developing countries. The aethiology of approximately 30% of these infections remains obscure, using current laboratory methods. It has been accepted that viruses play an important role and more than 200 viruses, belonging to 6 viral families are implied in the pathogenesis of this problem. Parvoviridae family has been known since the middle of the XX century. Human Parvovirus B19 was identified in 1980; it causes rashes and febrile diseases and it was considered for many years as the only member of this family able to affect humans. However, Dr. Tobias Allander and colleagues, at Karolinska Institut, have discovered a previously unknown parvovirus, called Human Bocavirus, that has been found to affect children, causing lower

  2. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan Robert J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649 that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells and A549 (type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE. Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures. A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705. The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to

  3. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) β and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects

  4. Transmission of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Immunocompromised Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Leon; Smits, Saskia L.; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J. B.; van Amerongen, Geert; Pohl, Marie O.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Stittelaar, Koert J.

    2018-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) causes substantial morbidity and mortality in vulnerable patients, such as the very young, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals of any age. Nosocomial transmission of HRSV remains a serious challenge in hospital settings, with intervention strategies largely limited to infection control measures, including isolation of cases, high standards of hand hygiene, cohort nursing, and use of personal protective equipment. No vaccines against HRSV are currently available, and treatment options are largely supportive care and expensive monoclonal antibody or antiviral therapy. The limitations of current animal models for HRSV infection impede the development of new preventive and therapeutic agents, and the assessment of their potential for limiting HRSV transmission, in particular in nosocomial settings. Here, we demonstrate the efficient transmission of HRSV from immunocompromised ferrets to both immunocompromised and immunocompetent contact ferrets, with pathological findings reproducing HRSV pathology in humans. The immunocompromised ferret-HRSV model represents a novel tool for the evaluation of intervention strategies against nosocomial transmission of HRSV. PMID:29301313

  5. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target

  6. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  7. Influence of a Gas Exchange Correction Procedure on Resting Metabolic Rate and Respiratory Quotient in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Jose E; Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of a gas exchange correction protocol on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ), assessed by a Vmax Encore 29n metabolic cart (SensorMedics Co., Yorba Linda, California) in overnight fasted and fed humans, and to assess the predictive power of body size for corrected and uncorrected RMR. Healthy participants (23 M/29 F; 34 ± 9 years old; 26.3 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) ingested two 3-hour-apart glucose loads (75 g). Indirect calorimetry was conducted before and hourly over a 6-hour period. Immediately after indirect calorimetry assessment, gas exchange was simulated through high-precision mass-flow regulators, which permitted the correction of RMR and RQ values. Uncorrected and corrected RMR and RQ were directly related at each time over the 6-hour period. However, uncorrected versus corrected RMR was 6.9% ± 0.5% higher (128 ± 7 kcal/d; P exchange in humans over a 6-hour period is feasible and provides information of improved accuracy. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  9. Dose concepts and the achievability of protection for the disposal of long-lived solid waste according to ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Schneider, Th.

    2010-01-01

    excess of risk resulting from the exposure of the involved population. In this perspective, ICRP has considered it was neither its responsibility nor a wise position to establish evolutionary scenarios for the health of future generations, which would be among the requirements for converting this general appreciation into an actual prediction of health effects. For long-term situations the relevant concept is potential exposure although the situation is planned. According to ICRP 103, long lived waste disposal should be dealt with as a planned exposure situation, and the resulting exposures in the long term should be considered as potential exposures. This leads to the use of a risk constraint in implementing the optimisation principle, which implies the consideration of the dose and the associated probability of occurrence for each process or event corresponding to the scenario of exposure. The same level of protection should be achieved for future generations as for present generations. The position of the ICRP on the interpretation of the quote by ICRP 81 that 'individuals and populations in the future should be afforded at least at the same level of protection from actions taken today as is the current generation' is that the risk resulting from the evolution of the disposal system should be as low as reasonably achievable below a selected risk constraint. In the demonstration of compliance (performance assessment), which may differ when dealing with natural processes vs. human intrusion, the objective is not to attempt to estimate a radiation detriment for future individuals but rather to test the weaknesses and the robustness of the disposal system. The goal is to compare disposal options. Calculated doses to future individuals should be regarded as indicators of safety. In ICRP 103 it is stated that 'in the decision-making process, owing to the increasing uncertainties, giving less weight to very low doses and to doses received in the distant future could be

  10. The ratio of ICRP103 to ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT: Monte Carlo calculations with the ADELAIDE voxel paediatric model and comparisons with published values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ADELAIDE voxel model of paediatric anatomy was used with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to compare effective dose from computed tomography (CT) calculated with both the ICRP103 and ICRP60 definitions which are different in their tissue weighting factors and in the included tissues. The new tissue weighting factors resulted in a lower effective dose for pelvis CT (than if calculated using ICRP60 tissue weighting factors), by 6.5 % but higher effective doses for all other examinations. ICRP103 calculated effective dose for CT abdomen + pelvis was higher by 4.6 %, for CT abdomen (by 9.5 %), for CT chest + abdomen + pelvis (by 6 %), for CT chest + abdomen (by 9.6 %), for CT chest (by 10.1 %) and for cardiac CT (by 11.5 %). These values, along with published values of effective dose from CT that were calculated for both sets of tissue weighting factors were used to determine single values for the ratio ICRP103:ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT, for seven CT examinations. The following values for ICRP103:ICRP60 are suggested for use to convert ICRP60 calculated effective dose to ICRP103 calculated effective dose for the following CT examinations: Pelvis CT, 0.75; for abdomen CT, abdomen + pelvis CT, chest + abdomen + pelvis CT, 1.00; for chest + abdomen CT, and for chest CT. 1.15; for cardiac CT 1.25.

  11. Clinical characteristics and viral load of respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in children hospitaled for acute lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Li; Li, Yu-Ning; Tang, Yi-Jie; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Han-Chun; Yang, Xue-Mei; Li, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Jun; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are two common viral pathogens in acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI). However, the association of viral load with clinical characteristics is not well-defined in ALRTI. To explore the correlation between viral load and clinical characteristics of RSV and HMPV in children hospitalized for ALRTI in Lanzhou, China. Three hundred and eighty-seven children hospitalized for ALRTI were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were sampled from each children. Real-time PCR was used to screen RSV, HMPV, and twelve additional respiratory viruses. Bronchiolitis was the leading diagnoses both in RSV and HMPV positive patients. A significantly greater frequency of wheezing (52% vs. 33.52%, P = 0.000) was noted in RSV positive and negative patients. The RSV viral load was significant higher in children aged infections (P = 0.000). No difference was found in the clinical features of HMPV positive and negative patients. The HMPV viral load had no correlation with any clinical characteristics. The incidences of severe disease were similar between single infection and coinfection for the two viruses (RSV, P = 0.221; HMPV, P = 0.764) and there has no statistical significance between severity and viral load (P = 0.166 and P = 0.721). Bronchiolitis is the most common disease caused by RSV and HMPV. High viral load or co-infection may be associated with some symptoms but neither has a significant impact on disease severity for the two viruses. J. Med. Virol. 89:589-597, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A component of the Indian Climate Research Programme (ICRP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Indian Climate Research Programme (ICRP) focuses on the study of climate variability and its impact on agriculture. To address the role of the Bay of Bengal in monsoon variability, a process study was organised during July-August 1999, deploying research ships, buoys, INSAT, coastal radar and conventional ...

  13. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (IGRP) has issued its '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection' that provide guidance on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation. The ICRP recommendations and their incorporation into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) 'Basic Safety Standards', Safety Series No. 9, provide the basis on which the IAEA 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials', Safety Series No. 6, are built. The transportation regulations are developed to ensure safety during the movement of radioactive materials and to provide reasonable assurance the transportation activities comply with the basic radiation protection principles of Safety Series No. 9. During the 1985 revision of the IAEA transport regulations, a comprehensive model was developed to derive Type A (non-accident resistant) package contents limits that were consistent with Safety Series No. 9 and, consequently, the earlier ICRP recommendations. Now that ICRP 60 has been published, the IAEA and Member States are faced with the task of evaluating how the transport regulations need to be revised to conform with the new recommendations. Several potentially significant issues need to be addressed to determine whether the old linkages between the recommendations and the transport regulations require modification. This paper addresses the issues that arise from the revisions to the ICRP recommendations and how the transportation regulations may be affected. (author)

  14. Non-stochastic effects: compatibility with present ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.B.; Upton, A.C.; New York Univ., NY

    1985-01-01

    The present recommendations of the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) are almost entirely based on 'stochastic effects' of ionizing radiation, i.e. cancer induction and heritable effects. In a recent report the compatibility of present recommendations with non-stochastic effects has been considered. The present paper is a summary of these findings. (author)

  15. Status of ICRP recommendations at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Masahito

    1996-01-01

    Results of actual radiation exposure in nuclear power plants and related matters were presented for discussion of the principle of radiation protection involved in ICRP recommendations, which is prerequisite for safe operation of the plants and for treatment of radioactive waste. There were no personnel with actual exposure dose exceeding 50 mSv/y in 1995. Total exposure dose was 66.32 psn.Sv. and mean dose equivalent/personnel, 1.0 mSv. The amount of radioactive gasses and liquids released in the environment was far lower (<1/7,000) than that for the exposure index of 50 microSv/y in the public around the plant. The marked decrease in the amount of radioactive solid waste was noted in the plants. The laws and ICRP recommendations have been the basis for agreement between labor and management in the plant: e.g., the proposed voluntary dose was 30 mSv/y. This was also true for the recommendations in 1990. Finally, followings were proposed to ICRP: re-examination of linear theory without threshold, consideration for the balance between the radiation and other kind of hazardous materials and factors, carefulness in changing the recommendation concept, and exclusion of more severe limitations than those included in ICRP recommendations. (K.H.)

  16. Basic concepts and assumptions behind the new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of some of the basic concepts and assumptions behind the current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in ICRP Publications 26 and 28, which form the basis for the revision of the Basic Safety Standards jointly undertaken by IAEA, ILO, NEA and WHO. Special attention is given to the assumption of a linear, non-threshold dose-response relationship for stochastic radiation effects such as cancer and hereditary harm. The three basic principles of protection are discussed: justification of practice, optimization of protection and individual risk limitation. In the new ICRP recommendations particular emphasis is given to the principle of keeping all radiation doses as low as is reasonably achievable. A consequence of this is that the ICRP dose limits are now given as boundary conditions for the justification and optimization procedures rather than as values that should be used for purposes of planning and design. The fractional increase in total risk at various ages after continuous exposure near the dose limits is given as an illustration. The need for taking other sources, present and future, into account when applying the dose limits leads to the use of the commitment concept. This is briefly discussed as well as the new quantity, the effective dose equivalent, introduced by ICRP. (author)

  17. Improvement of skeleton conversion in ICRP reference phantom conversion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhao Jun; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Thang, Nguyen Tat; Kim, Han Sung; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    In the previous skeleton conversion, most bones were directly converted from the ICRP voxel phantoms by using the 3D rendering method whereas several complex-shape bones (cranium, ribs, spines, feet, and hands) were not able to be directly converted. We alternatively employed the corresponding well-defined polygonal models and attempted to adjust them to match the voxel models. However, this approach was unsatisfactory. The shapes of the alternative models were significantly different from those of the voxel models, making it virtually impossible to exactly match the voxel models as shown in Fig. 3 (left). In order to overcome the difficulty in the complex bone conversion, the present study developed a new conversion method and converted these complex bones voxel models of the ICRP male phantom to polygonal models. The present study developed the new conversion method and successfully improved polygonal models for cranium, ribs, and spines for the ICRP male phantom. The new conversion method will be also applied to the complex bone conversion for the ICRP female phantom as well as other complex organ conversion in the future.

  18. Improvement of skeleton conversion in ICRP reference phantom conversion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhao Jun; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Thang, Nguyen Tat; Kim, Han Sung; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    In the previous skeleton conversion, most bones were directly converted from the ICRP voxel phantoms by using the 3D rendering method whereas several complex-shape bones (cranium, ribs, spines, feet, and hands) were not able to be directly converted. We alternatively employed the corresponding well-defined polygonal models and attempted to adjust them to match the voxel models. However, this approach was unsatisfactory. The shapes of the alternative models were significantly different from those of the voxel models, making it virtually impossible to exactly match the voxel models as shown in Fig. 3 (left). In order to overcome the difficulty in the complex bone conversion, the present study developed a new conversion method and converted these complex bones voxel models of the ICRP male phantom to polygonal models. The present study developed the new conversion method and successfully improved polygonal models for cranium, ribs, and spines for the ICRP male phantom. The new conversion method will be also applied to the complex bone conversion for the ICRP female phantom as well as other complex organ conversion in the future

  19. Radon dosimetry for workers: ICRP's approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, James W.; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently published two reports on radon exposure; Publication 115 on lung cancer risks from radon and radon progeny and Publication 126 on radiological protection against radon exposure. A specific graded approach for the control of radon in workplaces is recommended where a dose assessment is required in certain situations. In its forthcoming publication on Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) document, Part 3, effective dose coefficients for radon and thoron will be provided. These will be calculated using ICRP reference biokinetic and dosimetric models. Sufficient information and dosimetric data will be given so that site-specific dose coefficients can be calculated based on measured aerosol parameter values. However, ICRP will recommend a single dose coefficient of 12 mSv per working level month (WLM) for inhaled radon progeny to be used in most circumstances. This chosen reference value was based on both dosimetry and epidemiological data. In this paper, the application and use of dose coefficients for workplaces are discussed including the reasons for the choice of the reference value. Preliminary results of dose calculations for indoor workplaces and mines are presented. The paper also briefly describes the general approach for the management of radon exposure in workplaces based both on ICRP recommendations and the European directive (2013/59/EURATOM). (authors)

  20. Overview of ICRP Committee 4: application of the Commission's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, D A

    2016-06-01

    Committee 4 develops principles and recommendations on radiological protection of people in all exposure situations. The committee meeting in 2014 was hosted by GE Healthcare in Arlington Heights, IL, USA on 27 July-1 August 2014. The programme of work of Committee 4 encompasses several broad areas, including a series of reports covering various aspects of existing exposure situations, leading the efforts of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to update and elaborate recommendations in light of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant for emergencies and living in contaminated areas, elaborating the underpinnings of the system of radiological protection, and developing focussed reports on specific topic areas in consultation with ICRP's special liaison organisations. Committee 4 has six active Task Groups working on naturally occurring radioactive material; cosmic radiation in aviation; updates of ICRP Publications 109 and 111; ethics of radiological protection; surface and near-surface disposal of solid radioactive waste; and exposures resulting from contaminated sites from past industrial, military, and nuclear activities. In addition, there is a Working Party on tolerability of risk, and ongoing work with the various special liaison organisations of ICRP. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  1. Radiobiological basis of radiation protection and ICRP 2007 general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The ICRP 2007 General Recommendations are based on the detailed review of the new information on the biological effects and risk evaluation done during the last decade. Most of this information reinforces the validity of earlier findings. Since the publication of ICRP 60 general recommendations in 1991(ICRP 1991b), sufficient new information on the health effects of ionizing radiations has accrued based on radiobiological and epidemiological studies (UNSCEAR 2000, ICRP Publication 99). There is an improvement in understanding the mechanistic aspects of the induction of radiation damage at cellular level. Biophysical studies based on Monte Carlo track structure codes have provided information on the nature of critical damage to DNA leading to the radiation effects at cellular level. Experimental work with model animal systems has provided information on the role of post irradiation repair processes and the genes influencing the process of radiation carcinogenesis. Longer follow up of A-Bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provides a more reliable risk estimate based on the cancer incidence data and also a better model for the transfer of risk among different populations with varying frequency of background incidence. At present it is clear that the breast cancer contributes substantially to the radiation risk and provides quantitative risk estimates for brain and salivary glands. In the light of the new information, Tissue Weighting factors (WT) have been revised

  2. ICRP and UNSCEAR: Their roles in defining the most important biomedical effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.

    The history of ICRP from its origin in the British X-ray and Radiation Protection Committee (1921) to the present is described. Particular attention is directed to the evolution of occupational dose limits, which show a gradual decline, and to the perceptions of the most important effects on human beings. Recent developments in derived (or secondary) dose limits are also described. Basic to the dose limits are the risk estimates. UNSCEAR, since its establishment in 1955, has provided leadership in estimating numerically the risks of genetic defects and malignancy from exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of providing risk estimates for public education has severe limitations. (author)

  3. Distance to human populations influences epidemiology of respiratory disease in desert tortoises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kristin H.; Ashley A. Coble (formerly Emerson), no longer USGS; Yee, Julie L.; Mack, Jeremy S.; Perry, William M.; Anderson, Kemp M.; Brown, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    We explored variables likely to affect health of Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) in a 1,183-km2 study area in the central Mojave Desert of California between 2005 and 2008. We evaluated 1,004 tortoises for prevalence and spatial distribution of 2 pathogens, Mycoplasma agassizii and M. testudineum, that cause upper respiratory tract disease. We defined tortoises as test-positive if they were positive by culture and/or DNA identification or positive or suspect for specific antibody for either of the two pathogens. We used covariates of habitat (vegetation, elevation, slope, and aspect), tortoise size and sex, distance from another test-positive tortoise, and anthropogenic variables (distances to roads, agricultural areas, playas, urban areas, and centroids of human-populated census blocks). We used both logistic regression models and regression trees to evaluate the 2 species of Mycoplasma separately. The prevalence of test-positive tortoises was low: 1.49% (15/1,004) for M. agassizii and 2.89% (29/1,004) for M. testudineum. The spatial distributions of test-positive tortoises for the 2 Mycoplasma species showed little overlap; only 2 tortoises were test-positive for both diseases. However, the spatial distributions did not differ statistically between the 2 species. We consistently found higher prevalence of test-positive tortoises with shorter distances to centroids of human-populated census blocks. The relationship between distance to human-populated census blocks and tortoises that are test-positive for M. agassizii and potentially M. testudineum may be related to release or escape of captive tortoises because the prevalence of M. agassizii in captive tortoises is high. Our findings have application to other species of chelonians where both domestic captive and wild populations exist. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Differences in viral load among human respiratory syncytial virus genotypes in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infections in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadji, Francois Marie Ngako; Okamoto, Michiko; Furuse, Yuki; Tamaki, Raita; Suzuki, Akira; Lirio, Irene; Dapat, Clyde; Malasao, Rungnapa; Saito, Mariko; Pedrera-Rico, Gay Anne Granada; Tallo, Veronica; Lupisan, Socorro; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-27

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading viral etiologic agent of pediatric lower respiratory infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Two antigenic subgroups, HRSV-A and B, each contain several genotypes. While viral load may vary among HRSV genotypes and affect the clinical course of disease, data are scarce regarding the actual differences among genotypes. Therefore, this study estimated and compared viral load among NA1 and ON1 genotypes of HRSV-A and BA9 of HRSV-B. ON1 is a newly emerged genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in the G gene as observed previously with BA genotypes in HRSV-B. Children <5 years of age with an initial diagnosis of severe or very severe pneumonia at a hospital in the Philippines from September 2012 to December 2013 were enrolled. HRSV genotypes were determined and the viral load measured from nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS). The viral load of HRSV genotype NA1 were significantly higher than those of ON1 and BA9. Regression analysis showed that both genotype NA1 and younger age were significantly associated with high HRSV viral load. The viral load of NA1 was higher than that of ON1 and BA9 in NPS samples. HRSV genotypes may be associated with HRSV viral load. The reasons and clinical impacts of these differences in viral load among HRSV genotypes require further evaluation.

  5. Blood flow index using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green as a minimally invasive tool to assess respiratory muscle blood flow in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenette, Jordan A; Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Paolo B

    2011-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with indocyanine green (ICG) dye has recently been used to measure respiratory muscle blood flow (RMBF) in humans. This method is based on the Fick principle and is determined by measuring ICG in the respiratory muscles using transcutaneous NIRS...... relationships with the work of breathing and EMG for both respiratory muscles. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) comparing BFI vs. the work of breathing for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.887 (P

  6. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stittelaar, Koert J.; de Waal, Leon; van Amerongen, Geert; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J.B.; Fraaij, Pieter L.A.; van Baalen, Carel A.; van Kampen, Jeroen J.A.; van der Vries, Erhard; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (105 TCID50) administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI). Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies. PMID:27314379

  7. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert J. Stittelaar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo. Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (105 TCID50 administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI. Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies.

  8. A mathematical model of transport and regional uptake of radioactive gases in the human respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Inseok

    The purpose of this research is to describe the development of a mathematical model of diffusion, convection, and lateral transport into the airway wall and alveolar absorption for inhaled radioactive gases in the human conductive and respiratory airways based on a Single Path Trumpet-bell model (SPM). Mathematical simulation models have been used successfully to study transport, absorption into the blood through alveoli, and lung tissue uptake of soluble and nonreactive radioactive gases. Results from such simulations also show clearly that inhaled radioactive gases are absorbed into the lung tissues as well as into the blood through the alveoli. In contrast to previous reports in the literature, the present study found that blood uptake through alveoli is much greater than that calculated previously. Regional depositions in the lung from inhaled radioactive gases are presented as the result of this simulation. The committed effective dose to lung tissue due to submersion in radioactive clouds has been newly defined using the results of this simulation.

  9. [Detection and Analysis of Human Parainfluenza Virus Infection in Hospitalized Adults with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Qiao; Liu, Xue-Wei; Zhou, Tao; Pei, Xiao-Fang

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence and gene characteristics of different groups of human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) infection in hospitalized adults with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI). RT-PCR was used to detect HPIV hemagglutinin (HA) DNA,which was extracted from sputum samples of 1 039 adult patients with ARI from March,2014 to June,2016. The HA gene amplified from randomly selected positive samples were sequenced to analyze the homology and variation. 10.6% (110/1 039) of these samples were positive for HPIV,including 8 cases of HPIV-1,22 cases of HPIV-2,46 cases of HPIV-3 and 34 cases of HPIV-4. Detectable rate varied among different groups of HPIV according to seasons of the year and ages of patients. No significant differences were found between the positive samples and the reference sequences. Compared with different reference strains of different regions,the genetic distance of nucleotide is the smallest between the strains tested in this study and the reference strains of other provinces and cities in China. In Chengdu region,HPIV virus is highly detected in ARI,all subtypes were detected with HPIV-3 being the main subtype.

  10. Ameliorating Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei Ling; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. The lack of proper prophylactics and therapeutics for controlling hRSV infection has been of great concern worldwide. Xylitol is a well-known sugar substitute and its effect against bacteria in the oral cavity is well known. However, little is known of its effect on viral infections. In this study, the effect of dietary xylitol on hRSV infection was investigated in a mouse model for the first time. Mice received xylitol for 14 d prior to virus challenge and for a further 3 d post challenge. Significantly larger reductions in lung virus titers were observed in the mice receiving xylitol than in the controls receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In addition, fewer CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes, whose numbers reflect inflammatory status, were recruited in the mice receiving xylitol. These results indicate that dietary xylitol can ameliorate hRSV infections and reduce inflammation-associated immune responses to hRSV infection.

  11. Human nasal turbinates as a viable source of respiratory epithelial cells using co-culture system versus dispase-dissociation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noruddin, Nur Adelina Ahmad; Saim, Aminuddin B; Chua, Kien Hui; Idrus, Ruszymah

    2007-12-01

    To compare a co-culture system with a conventional dispase-dissociation method for obtaining functional human respiratory epithelial cells from the nasal turbinates for tissue engineering application. Human respiratory epithelial cells were serially passaged using a co-culture system and a conventional dispase-dissociation technique. The growth kinetics and gene expression levels of the cultured respiratory epithelial cells were compared. Four genes were investigated, namely cytokeratin-18, a marker for ciliated and secretory epithelial cells; cytokeratin-14, a marker for basal epithelial cells; MKI67, a proliferation marker; and MUC5B, a marker for mucin secretion. Immunocytochemical analysis was performed using monoclonal antibodies against the high molecular-weight cytokeratin 34 beta E12, cytokeratin 18, and MUC5A to investigate the protein expression from cultured respiratory epithelial cells. Respiratory epithelial cells cultured using both methods maintained polygonal morphology throughout the passages. At passage 1, co-cultured respiratory epithelial showed a 2.6-times higher growth rate compared to conventional dispase dissociation technique, and 7.8 times higher at passage 2. Better basal gene expression was observed by co-cultured respiratory epithelial cells compared to dispase dissociated cells. Immunocytochemical analyses were positive for the respiratory epithelial cells cultured using both techniques. Co-culture system produced superior quality of cultured human respiratory epithelial cells from the nasal turbinates as compared to dispase dissociation technique.

  12. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T.; Salzwedel, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of

  13. Prevalence of human rhinovirus in children admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infections in Changsha, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sai-Zhen; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Xie, Guang-Cheng; Zhong, Li-Li; Wang, Juan; Huang, Han; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections. This study analyzed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of three HRV groups (HRV-A, -B, and -C) among 1,165 children aged 14 years or younger who were hospitalized with acute lower respiratory tract infection in China. PCR or reverse transcription-PCR was performed to detect 14 respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from September 2007 to August 2008 in Changsha, China. HRV was detected in 202 (17.3%) of the 1,165 children; 25.3% of the HRV-positive children were 13-36 months of age (χ(2)  = 22.803, P = 0.000). HRV was detected year round and peaked between September and December. Fifty-three percent of the HRV-positive samples were also positive for other respiratory viruses; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was the most common secondary virus. Phylogenetic analysis using the VP4/VP2 region grouped the HRV-positive strains as follows: 101 HRV-A (50.0%), 21 HRV-B (10.4%), and 80 HRV-C (39.6%). HRV-A infections occurred predominantly in spring and autumn, and the peak prevalence of HRV-C was in early winter and late autumn. HRV-B infections were less common in spring (χ(2)  = 31.914, P = 0.000). No significant difference in clinical severity or presentation was found between patients with HRV single infection and HRV co-detections. Furthermore, the clinical characterizations did not differ among the three HRV species. These results suggest that HRV-C is an important viral agent along with HRV-A and HRV-B and that among hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in China, the three HRV genotypes have similar clinical characteristics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Optimisation of Protection as applicable to geological disposal: the ICRP view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.

    2010-01-01

    , there still is an obligation to show that protection is optimised. He stated further that the ICRP recommends applying BATNEEC (best available technology not entailing excessive cost) concept rather than BAT. The principles of optimisation and BATNEEC complement each other. Namely, the control of residual doses (human health) is driven by optimisation, whilst BATNEEC is applied as a means to control effluents in cases where humans are not directly affected. In the optimisation process responsibilities are shared among stakeholders. The requirement of the optimisation of protection is the responsibility of the operating management, subject to the requirements of the competent national authorities. Operating management, propose and implement optimisation, and then use experience to further improve it. Appropriate competent authorities require and promote optimisation and may verify that it has been effectively implemented. Regulatory requirements should include the need for an active safety culture in both the authority itself and all regulated operating management. Finally, regarding responsibilities to future generations, Wolfgang Weiss pointed out the position stated in ICRP-101, which shows that at this stage a variety of approaches could be taken as long as they are properly justified by the regulator

  15. How to understand the radiation effects of small dose - some critical comments on ICRP recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, T. [Radiation Education Forum, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The widespread feeling of `radiophobia` by the general public has its basis on the ICRP`s `linear no-threshold` hypothesis in dose-response relationship for low dose radiation from the standpoint of radiation protection. Although this common feeling served as a merit for constructing the `safety culture` of society, it has now become a large obstacle for the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology as a demerit. Recently many data have been accumulated for the radiation effects of low dose, both epidemiologically and experimentally. Although in general it is very difficult to obtain clear evidence of presence or absence of threshold, it seems to be true that the risk by radiation exposure at low level (the definition of which is below 0.2 Gy) is not so large as that of extrapolation from the high or medium dose range. In fact, many data suggest that some quite different mechanisms are working in low dose from high dose, such as `adaptive response`, and a new concept, `radiation hormesis`, has emerged, that the low level radiation is not only quite harmless but is rather necessary for living cells or beneficial for human health. In this paper, some critical comments on ICRP recommendations are given as a personal view by the author. These include: (1) a question of exact assessment of exposed dose by A-bomb survivors used for the epidemiological data, which are regarded to be the most authentic and important; (2) a brief summary of effects at the natural radiation level, including the high background area data; (3) the importance of dose rate effect, which reflects the living matter`s repairability from radiation injury, and (4) the proposal of new paradigm by adopting the reasonable `de minimis` level (below which there is no harm) both for low dose and at low dose rate. A simple mathematical analysis for representative data of dose rate effect was shown as an appendix 50 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP in children is connected with HPV infection transmitted vertically from mother to child during the passage of the foetus through an infected birth canal. [b]objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to establish the level of Human Papillomaviruses carrier state in upper respiratory tract mucosa in healthy pre-school children, and to identify potential risk factors for HPV infection. [b]materials and method[/b]. After obtaining consent from their parents, 97 pre-school children were examined – 51 girls and 46 boys between the ages of 3 – 5 years; average age – 4 years and 5 months. 68 children were urban dwellers and 29 came from a rural environment. A questionnaire with detailed history was taken including parents’ and child`s personal data, as well as perinatal risk factors in pregnancy. Socio-demographic information was also obtained, including the standard of living, and chosen environmental factors. Routine ENT examination was performed. Exfoliated oral squamous cells were collected from swabs and analysed for the presence of DNA papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction. [b]results.[/b] The presence of HPV in the respiratory tract in children was detected in 19.6% cases. ‘High oncogenic potential’ HPVs, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, were not observed in squamous cell mucosa of the respiratory tract in the children. No significant differences were observed between the HPV carrier state in urban and rural inhabitants.

  17. Early consumption of human milk oligosaccharides is inversely related to subsequent risk of respiratory and enteric disease in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepans, Mary Beth Flanders; Wilhelm, Susan L; Hertzog, Melody; Rodehorst, T Kim Callahan; Blaney, Susan; Clemens, Beth; Polak, Josef J; Newburg, David S

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study tested the relationship between human milk oligosaccharide consumption, oligosaccharide content of feces, and subsequent disease in breastfed infants. Forty-nine (49) mother-infant pairs provided milk and fecal samples 2 weeks postpartum; infant health was assessed through 2, 6, 12, and 24 weeks. LNF-II (lacto-N-fucopentaose II), a major human milk oligosaccharide, was measured to represent levels of total oligosaccharides consumed in milk and remaining in feces. LNF-II levels in milk at 2 weeks postpartum were associated with fewer infant respiratory problems by 6 weeks (p = 0.010), as were LNF-II levels in infant feces (p = 0.003). LNF-II levels in milk at 2 weeks were also associated with fewer respiratory problems by 12 weeks (p = 0.038), and fewer enteric problems by 6 weeks (p = 0.004) and 12 weeks (p = 0.045). Thus, consumption of human milk oligosaccharides through breastfeeding, represented by LNF-II, was associated with less reported respiratory and gastrointestinal illness in infants.

  18. ICRP-recommendations on dose limits for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Dose limits proposed by the ICRP have been incorporated in most national and international standards and their respect has caused a distribution of doses with a average not exceeding 1/10 of the maximum permissible dose. This distribution corresponds to a risk which is well within the risks in 'safe industries'. There are at present some inconsistancies in the current system of recommended limits, for example having the same limit of 5 rem for the whole-body and also for some organs. Hopefully, this incosistancy will be removed in the next recommendation of the ICRP. But the whole-body limit of 5 rem in a year has been safe and there is little ground to reduce this limit on the basis of comparisons with 'safe industries'. (orig./HP) [de

  19. ICRP recommendations and the safe disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; Barraclough, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    There are some special difficulties in setting up and applying radiological protection principle to the disposal of solid radioactive wastes. These were recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). One difficulty is the uncertain or probabilistic nature of some of the events or processes that could occur and affect the integrity of a waste repository. The other feature of solid waste disposal that causes difficulty is the length of time period of concern. The practical problem is the difficulties in predicting future conditions and in making the useful estimate of long term radiation impact with sufficient confidence. In this paper, the proposals made by the ICRP to deal with the above difficulties are briefly reviewed. Some suggestions are made as to how the criteria might be clarified, and the necessary calculation made to match the criteria. The reappraisal of the criteria for assessing the radiological safety of waste repositories is needed. (K.I.)

  20. Implementation of the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, R.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed investigations have been made of the consequences of ICRP Publication 60 for nuclear power plants. A methodology has not yet been defined for handling the aspect of design against accidents within the framework of ICRP 60. Other new requirements, i.e. new individual limits and the application of higher risk factors, may pose minor problems for plants of older design. In plants of recent collective doses for plant personnel and for the public are already so low that the increase in risk factors will not require additional protection measures. The new limit for the individual dose accumulated during five calendar years may require additional surveillance of a few persons in plants of older design. Intakes of radionuclides are a minor contributor to dose, even at these low levels of exposure. Uncertainties in the determination of a committed dose rather than the actual dose can therefore be tolerated. (Author)

  1. Board advice following publication of the 1990 Recommendations of ICRP

    CERN Document Server

    United Kingdom. At. Energy Res. Establ. Nat. Radiolog. Protect. Board. Harwell

    1991-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published new Recommendations and the board has a statutory duty to advise Government and those with responsibilities for radiation protection on the acceptability to and the applicability in the UK of those Recommendations. The Board wishes to consult widely before finalising the advice which is proposed in this document. In general, the Board endorses the conceptual framework for radiological protection recommended by ICRP. In particular, the distinction between practices and intervention is useful and is consistent with the way in which the Board has presented its recent advice. A major new concept is that of a constraint. The Board believes that the introduction of constraints provides a powerful method for improving protection against ionising radiation. The advice in this consultative document is for maximum generic values of dose constraints for both workers and the public. Finally the Board proposes to endorse the use of the radiologic...

  2. Uses and limitations of dosimetric data in ICRP 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations of Publications 26 and 30 provide a well founded, logical approach to radiation protection. These recommendations lend themselves to scientific scrutiny and evaluation much more than the earlier recommendations. While there are many issues which national authorities may find necessary to address as they develop their national radiation protection guidance, the long awaited revision of the ICRP recommendations provides the technical bases upon which such guidance can be developed. The acceptance of the new recommendations by national authorities and the radiation protection community appears to be related to the lack of substantial departure in the numerical value of the secondry limits from the previous limits. This reflects an apparent concensus that the earlier recommendations provided an adequate level of protection. It thus appears reasonable to suggest that a similar level of protection is offered by the new recommendations. 24 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  3. MTO1 mutations are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis and cause respiratory chain deficiency in humans and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruffini, Enrico; Dallabona, Cristina; Invernizzi, Federica; Yarham, John W; Melchionda, Laura; Blakely, Emma L; Lamantea, Eleonora; Donnini, Claudia; Santra, Saikat; Vijayaraghavan, Suresh; Roper, Helen P; Burlina, Alberto; Kopajtich, Robert; Walther, Anett; Strom, Tim M; Haack, Tobias B; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W; Ferrero, Ileana; Zeviani, Massimo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We report three families presenting with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and multiple defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activities. By direct sequencing of the candidate gene MTO1, encoding the mitochondrial-tRNA modifier 1, or whole exome sequencing analysis, we identified novel missense mutations. All MTO1 mutations were predicted to be deleterious on MTO1 function. Their pathogenic role was experimentally validated in a recombinant yeast model, by assessing oxidative growth, respiratory activity, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and complex IV activity. In one case, we also demonstrated that expression of wt MTO1 could rescue the respiratory defect in mutant fibroblasts. The severity of the yeast respiratory phenotypes partly correlated with the different clinical presentations observed in MTO1 mutant patients, although the clinical outcome was highly variable in patients with the same mutation and seemed also to depend on timely start of pharmacological treatment, centered on the control of lactic acidosis by dichloroacetate. Our results indicate that MTO1 mutations are commonly associated with a presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and MRC deficiency, and that ad hoc recombinant yeast models represent a useful system to test the pathogenic potential of uncommon variants, and provide insight into their effects on the expression of a biochemical phenotype. © 2013 The Authors. *Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  5. Rethinking basic concepts in ICRP's system of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.; Mossman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The present criterion for radiation protection appears to be exposure reduction rather than adequate protection of health. The 1990 ICRP draft recommendations for a system of dose limitation would further implement this more restrictive criterion by implementing certain academic concepts and assumptions. These concepts and assumptions are discussed and the suggestion is made that the radiation protection community needs to carefully examine the need for the complex system proposed

  6. The instrumentation calibration reduction program (ICRP) at Northeast Utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, R.; Blanch, P.

    1987-01-01

    Northeast Utilities (NU) funded a project to study the feasibility of determining the state of core exit thermocouple (CET) calibration without having to have direct access to the CETs. Although the CETs were the prime focus, other safety related sensors were investigated. This paper describes presumptions and methods employed in the first phase, the feasibility study. Additionally, it describes the cost/benefit analysis which can be used by any utility to determine ICRP payback

  7. Work of ICRP Committee 4 on the implementation of the new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    2010-01-01

    ICRP Mission was founded in 1928 by the international Society of Radiology to advance for the public benefit the science of radiological protection, in particular by providing recommendations and guidance on all aspects of protection against ionizing radiation. The commission has five committees, plus a scientific secretariat. It has task groups and working parties which are established either by the main commission or by the committees. It consists of 82 members from 24 countries and six continents. It has 7 approximately 100 external experts participating in task groups. It also has an international community of experts in radiological protection. Committee 4 is concerned with providing advice on the application of the recommended system of protection in all its facets for occupational and public exposure. It also acts as the major point of contact with other international organizations and professional societies concerned with protection against ionizing radiation. The priorities of Committee 4 (2009 -2013) are to: . Develop advice on the implementation of the new recommendations and contribute to their dissemination . Review the ethics and values (precautionary principles, tolerability of risk, equity, sustainable development¡¦) underlying the principles and concepts of the radiation protection system . Enhance the dialogue and cooperation with international organizations and professionals The programme of work for Committee 4 was outlined: a) Task Group N¡Æ 76 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to NORM b) Task Group N¡Æ 80 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations as applied to the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste c) Task Group N¡Æ 81 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to radon exposure d) Committee 4 programme of work (4): Task Group (to be established): Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to the protection of aircraft crew to cosmic rays e) Committee 4 programme of work (5

  8. The models of internal dose calculation in ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    There are a lot discussions about internal dose calculation in ICRP. Many efforts are devoted to improvement in models and parameters. In this report, we discuss what kind of models and parameters are used in ICRP. Models are divided into two parts, the dosimetric model and biokinetic model. The former is a mathematical phantom model, and it is mainly developed in ORNL. The results are used in many researchers. The latter is a compartment model and it has a difficulty to decide the parameter values. They are not easy to estimate because of their age dependency. ICRP officially sets values at ages of 3 month, 1 year, 5 year, 10 year, 15 year and adult, and recommends to get values among ages by linear age interpolate. But it is very difficult to solve the basic equation with these values, so we calculate by use of computers. However, it has complex shame and needs long CPU time. We should make approximated equations. The parameter values include much uncertainty because of less experimental data, especially for a child. And these models and parameter values are for Caucasian. We should inquire whether they could correctly describe other than Caucasian. The body size affects the values of calculated SAF, and the differences of metabolism change the biokinetic pattern. (author)

  9. Implications of the 1990 ICRP recommendations for the mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Significant radiological protection problems arise in the mining and processing of uranium and thorium bearing ores, beach sands and other materials that have enhanced levels of uranium (e.g. phosphate). They are at their most extreme in the underground mining of uranium. Under the new ICRP 60 occupational dose limits it may be necessary to subject virtually all mining operations to some degree of radiological surveillance. There are three principal modes of radiation exposure in uranium mining operations: gamma rays, an external whole body radiation hazard; the inhalation of radon daughter products; and the inhalation of ore dust containing the long-lived alpha emitting daughter products of uranium, principally 230Th and 226Ra. A number of the new recommendations in ICRP60 considered to have significant implications for the mining industry in general and the above mentioned issues in particular are discussed. These include the definition of occupational exposure occupational dose limit, the review of the radon dose limits, the system of radiological protection. The major conclusions and recommendation of the IAEA Technical Committee to Explore the Impact of the new ICRP Occupational Dose Limits in the operation of underground mines are also summarized. 18 refs., 1 tab

  10. Problems of using ICRP models for the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.; Roedler, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    ICRP Publication 30 refers to occupationally exposed adult persons. ICRP does not recommend the use of these data and models for calculating the committed dose equivalent for members of the public from the intake of radionuclides in the environment, with corrections only in respect to organ masses or intake. In its statement from the 1983 meeting in Washington, USA, the ICRP quantitatively assessed those factors which, from the viewpoint of age dependence, influence the limits on intake for the public and the organ dose factors from which these limits are derived. The present paper summarizes the results from these considerations. Additionally, the influence of age dependent weighting factors on the annual limits on intake is examined for selected radionuclides. Modifying factors are derived for body mass, retention, fractional distribution, absorption and age-dependent w T . A procedure is proposed to classify radionuclides and their compounds into individual classes characterized by different modifying factors, in order to apply the dose factors, as calculated for occupational exposure, also to members of the public. The future realization of this type of procedure remains to be further investigated. 24 refs.; 2 tabs

  11. ICRP publication 26. Its applicability in a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.; Donnelly, K.

    1980-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is a major Canadian provincial utility with more than 5 GW(e) installed nuclear electricity generating capacity and with a planned commitment to an additional 8.5 GW(e), all units being of the CANDU pressurized heavy-water type. The radiation protection programme, in addition to complying with Canadian Federal regulations, has been consistent with the philosophy and intent of ICRP recommendations and is frequently reviewed to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the most recent of which is ICRP-26. The application of the ALARA principle in this power reactor programme is described. A set of general guidelines has been established, the main features of which are: (a) achieving a dose consumption per unit of electricity generated which is low compared with reactors of a similar type; (b) ensuring that stations are operable with the dose equivalent of their labour-dictated manpower; (c) ensuring that the risk to atomic radiation workers is compatible with a corporate fatality rate standard of 8 man-hours worked. Achievement of these guidelines has necessitated implementing a continued dose-management programme. This programme is described generally. The cost applied to justify a dose reduction of 1 man.Sv is given, and a comparison is made with the equivalent life costs this implies and the costs used by safety agencies for other risk-reduction activities. Finally, some practical problems associated with some of the recommendations of ICRP-26 are discussed. (author)

  12. [Relationship between viral load of human bocavirus and clinical characteristics in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Bing; Zhong, Li-Li; Xie, Le-Yun; Xiao, Ni-Guang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection and to explore the relationship between the viral load of HBoV and the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. A total of 1 554 nasopharyngeal aspirates from children who were hospitalized due to acute lower respiratory tract infection between March 2011 and March 2014 were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect 12 RNA and 2 DNA viruses, adenovirus (ADV) and HBoV, and to measure the viral load of HBoV in HBoV-positive children. A comprehensive analysis was performed with reference to clinical symptoms and indicators. In the 1 554 specimens, 1 212 (77.99%) were positive for viruses, and 275 (17.70%) were HBoV-positive. In HBoV-positive cases, 94.9% were aged infection, and 230 (83.64%) had mixed infection. There was no significant difference in viral load between children with single infection and mixed infection (P>0.05). The patients with fever had a significantly higher viral load than those without fever (Pacute lower respiratory tract infection (P>0.05). HBoV is one of the important pathogens of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. Children with a higher viral load of HBoV are more likely to experience symptoms such as fever and wheezing. However, the severity of disease and mixed infection are not significantly related to viral load.

  13. Maturation Modulates Pharyngeal-Stimulus Provoked Pharyngeal and Respiratory Rhythms in Human Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstab, Kathryn A; Sitaram, Swetha; Lang, Ivan M; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2018-02-01

    Pharyngeal-provocation induced aerodigestive symptoms in infants remain an enigma. Sources of pharyngeal provocation can be anterograde as with feeding, and retrograde as in gastroesophageal reflux. We determined maturational and dose-response effects of targeted pharyngeal-stimulus on frequency, stability, and magnitude of pharyngeal and respiratory waveforms during multiple pharyngeal swallowing responses in preterm-born infants when they were of full-term postmenstrual age (PMA). Eighteen infants (11 male) were studied longitudinally at 39.8 ± 4.8 weeks PMA (time-1) and 44.1 ± 5.8 weeks PMA (time-2). Infants underwent concurrent pharyngo-esophageal manometry, respiratory inductance plethysmography, and nasal airflow thermistor methods to test sensory-motor interactions between the pharynx, esophagus, and airway. Linear mixed models were used and data presented as mean ± SEM or %. Overall, responses to 250 stimuli were analyzed. Of the multiple pharyngeal swallowing responses (n = 160), with maturation (a) deglutition apnea duration decreases (p  0.05), and (c) respiratory changes were unaffected (p > 0.05). Initial and subsequent pharyngeal responses and respiratory rhythm interactions become more distinct with maturation. Interval oromotor experiences and volume-dependent increase in adaptive responses may be contributory. These mechanisms may be important in modulating and restoring respiratory rhythm normalcy.

  14. Frequency of human bocavirus (HBoV) infection among children with febrile respiratory symptoms in Argentina, Nicaragua and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmón‐Mulanovich, Gabriela; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, V. Alberto; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Lescano, Andres G.; Chauca, Gloria; Sanchez, J. Felix; Rodriguez, Francisco; Parrales, Eduardo; Ocaña, Victor; Barrantes, Melvin; Blazes, David L.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Salmón‐Mulanovich et al. (2010) Frequency of human bocavirus (HBoV) infection among children with febrile respiratory symptoms in Argentina, Nicaragua and Peru. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 1–5. Background  Globally, respiratory infections are the primary cause of illness in developing countries, specifically among children; however, an etiological agent for many of these illnesses is rarely identified. Objectives  Our study aimed to estimate the frequency of human bocavirus (HBoV) infection among pediatric populations in Argentina, Nicaragua and Peru. Methods  We conducted a cross‐sectional study using stored samples of an influenza‐like illness surveillance program. Irrespective of previous diagnosis, nasopharyngeal or nasal swab specimens were randomly selected and tested using real‐time PCR from three sites during 2007 from patients younger than 6 years old. Results  A total of 568 specimens from Argentina (185), Nicaragua (192) and Peru (191) were tested. The prevalence of HBoV was 10·8% (95% CI: 6·3; 15·3) in Argentina, 33·3% in Nicaragua (95% CI: 26·6; 40·1) and 25·1% in Peru (95% CI: 18·9; 31·3). Conclusions  These findings demonstrate circulation of HBoV in Argentina, Nicaragua and Peru among children with influenza‐like symptoms enrolled in a sentinel surveillance program. PMID:21138534

  15. Epidemic 2014 enterovirus D68 cross-reacts with human rhinovirus on a respiratory molecular diagnostic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Shane C; Schleiss, Mark R; Arbefeville, Sophie; Steiner, Marie E; Hanson, Ryan S; Pollock, Catherine; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging virus known to cause sporadic disease and occasional epidemics of severe lower respiratory tract infection. However, the true prevalence of infection with EV-D68 is unknown, due in part to the lack of a rapid and specific nucleic acid amplification test as well as the infrequency with which respiratory samples are analyzed by enterovirus surveillance programs. During the 2014 EV-D68 epidemic in the United States, we noted an increased frequency of "low-positive" results for human rhinovirus (HRV) detected in respiratory tract samples using the GenMark Diagnostics eSensor respiratory viral panel, a multiplex PCR assay able to detect 14 known respiratory viruses but not enteroviruses. We simultaneously noted markedly increased admissions to our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for severe lower respiratory tract infections in patients both with and without a history of reactive airway disease. Accordingly, we hypothesized that these "low-positive" RVP results were due to EV-D68 rather than rhinovirus infection. Sequencing of the picornavirus 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of 49 samples positive for HRV by the GenMark RVP revealed that 33 (67.3%) were in fact EV-D68. Notably, the mean intensity of the HRV RVP result was significantly lower in the sequence-identified EV-D68 samples (20.3 nA) compared to HRV (129.7 nA). Using a cut-off of 40 nA for the differentiation of EV-D68 from HRV resulted in 94% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The robust diagnostic characteristics of our data suggest that the cross-reactivity of EV-D68 and HRV on the GenMark Diagnostics eSensor RVP platform may be an important factor to consider in making accurate molecular diagnosis of EV-D68 at institutions utilizing this system or other molecular respiratory platforms that may also cross-react.

  16. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könik, Arda; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Pretorius, P H; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A; Connolly, Caitlin M; Segars, Paul W; Lindsay, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  17. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W.; Pretorius, P. H.; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  18. Acute encephalopathy with concurrent respiratory and metabolic disturbances in first known parenteral human administration of flunixin meglumine and acepromazine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Michael F; Wilson, Anwar C; Acquisto, Nicole M; Spillane, Linda; Schneider, Sandra M

    2013-08-01

    Flunexin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved for veterinary use in horses and cattle. Acepromazine is a phenothiazine derivative used in horses, dogs, and cats. Human exposure to these substances is rare. We report a case of a human injection of two equine medications, flunixin and acepromazine, which resulted in altered mental status, respiratory alkalosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and elevation of liver transaminases in a 43-year-old woman who worked as a horse trainer. The patient intentionally self-injected these medications and subsequently presented to the Emergency Department with altered mental status and lethargy. The patient required hospitalization for metabolic abnormalities, including respiratory alkalosis, and suffered a gastrointestinal bleed requiring blood transfusion. The patient ultimately recovered with supportive measures. We believe this to be the first case of concomitant injection of flunixin and acepromazine in a human. This report explains a case of parenteral administration of two equine medications and the subsequent complications in a patient that presented to the Emergency Department. Human exposure to veterinary medications cannot be predicted by their effect in animals due to variations in absorption, distribution, and metabolism. Physicians should be aware that individuals who work with animals may have access to large quantities of veterinary medicine. This case also exemplifies the challenges that Emergency Physicians face on a daily basis, and generates additional consideration for overdoses and intoxications from medications that are not considered commonplace in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of urease by Haemophilus influenzae during human respiratory tract infection and role in survival in an acid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prior studies have shown that H. influenzae expresses abundant urease during growth in the middle ear of the chinchilla and in pooled human sputum, suggesting that expression of urease is important for colonization and infection in the hostile environments of the middle ear and in the airways in adults. Virtually nothing else is known about the urease of H. influenzae, which was characterized in the present study. Results Analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the ure gene cluster is expressed as a single transcript. Knockout mutants of a urease structural gene (ureC) and of the entire ure operon demonstrated no detectable urease activity indicating that this operon is the only one encoding an active urease. The ure operon is present in all strains tested, including clinical isolates from otitis media and COPD. Urease activity decreased as nitrogen availability increased. To test the hypothesis that urease is expressed during human infection, purified recombinant urease C was used in ELISA with pre acquisition and post infection serum from adults with COPD who experienced infections caused by H. influenzae. A total of 28% of patients developed new antibodies following infection indicating that H. influenzae expresses urease during airway infection. Bacterial viability assays performed at varying pH indicate that urease mediates survival of H. influenzae in an acid environment. Conclusions The H. influenzae genome contains a single urease operon that mediates urease expression and that is present in all clinical isolates tested. Nitrogen availability is a determinant of urease expression. H. influenzae expresses urease during human respiratory tract infection and urease is a target of the human antibody response. Expression of urease enhances viability in an acid

  20. A safe and efficient BCG vectored vaccine to prevent the disease caused by the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Soto, Jorge; Gálvez, Nicolás; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-09-02

    The human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) causes lower respiratory tract infections including pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Such infections also cause a large number of hospitalizations and affects mainly newborns, young children and the elderly worldwide. Symptoms associated with hRSV infection are due to an exacerbated immune response characterized by low levels of IFN-γ, recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils to the site of infection and lung damage. Although hRSV is a major health problem, no vaccines are currently available. Different immunization approaches have been developed to achieve a vaccine that activates the immune system, without triggering an unbalanced inflammation. These approaches include live attenuated vaccine, DNA or proteins technologies, and the use of vectors to express proteins of the virus. In this review, we discuss the host immune response to hRSV and the immunological mechanisms underlying an effective and safe BCG vectored vaccine against hRSV.

  1. Clinical features of human metapneumovirus genotypes in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sai-Zhen; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Zhong, Li-Li; Yu, Tian; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    To explore the epidemiological and clinical features of different human metapneumovirus (hMPV) genotypes in hospitalized children. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR was employed to screen for both hMPV and other common respiratory viruses in 2613 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens collected from children with lower respiratory tract infections from September 2007 to February 2011 (a period of 3.5 years). The demographics and clinical presentations of patients infected with different genotypes of hMPV were compared. A total of 135 samples were positive for hMPV (positive detection rate: 5.2%). Co-infection with other viruses was observed in 45.9% (62/135) of cases, and human bocavirus was the most common additional respiratory virus. The most common symptoms included cough, fever, and wheezing. The M gene was sequenced for 135 isolates; of these, genotype A was identified in 72.6% (98/135) of patients, and genotype B was identified in 27.4% (37/135) of patients. The predominant genotype of hMPV changed over the 3.5-year study period from genotype A2b to A2b or B1 and then to predominantly B1. Most of clinical features were similar between patients infected with different hMPV genotypes. These results suggested that hMPV is an important viral pathogen in pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha. The hMPV subtypes A2b and B1 were found to co-circulate. The different hMPV genotypes exhibit similar clinical characteristics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Co-circulation of genetically distinct human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus strains in young children with respiratory tract infections in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Alessandra; Canuti, Marta; Frati, Elena; Pariani, Elena; Perin, Silvana; Ruzza, Maria Lorena; Farina, Claudio; Podestà, Alberto; Zanetti, Alessandro; Amendola, Antonella; Tanzi, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) and human Bocavirus (hBoV) identified the etiological causes of several cases of acute respiratory tract infections in children. This report describes the molecular epidemiology of hMPV and hBoV infections observed following viral surveillance of children hospitalized for acute respiratory tract infections in Milan, Italy. Pharyngeal swabs were collected from 240 children ≤3 years of age (130 males, 110 females; median age, 5.0 months; IQR, 2.0-12.5 months) and tested for respiratory viruses, including hMPV and hBoV, by molecular methods. hMPV-RNA and hBoV-DNA positive samples were characterized molecularly and a phylogenetical analysis was performed. PCR analysis identified 131/240 (54.6%) samples positive for at least one virus. The frequency of hMPV and hBoV infections was similar (8.3% and 12.1%, respectively). Both infections were associated with lower respiratory tract infections: hMPV was present as a single infectious agent in 7.2% of children with bronchiolitis, hBoV was associated with 18.5% of pediatric pneumonias and identified frequently as a single etiological agent. Genetically distinct hMPV and hBoV strains were identified in children examined with respiratory tract infections. Phylogenetic analysis showed an increased prevalence of hMPV genotype A (A2b sublineage) compared to genotype B (80% vs. 20%, respectively) and of the hBoV genotype St2 compared to genotype St1 (71.4% vs. 28.6%, respectively). Interestingly, a shift in hMPV infections resulting from A2 strains has been observed in recent years. In addition, the occurrence of recombination events between two hBoV strains with a breakpoint located in the VP1/VP2 region was identified. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The effects of human serum to the morphology, proliferation and gene expression level of the respiratory epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Mohd Heikal Mohd; Siang, Kan Chan; Hashim, Nurul Izzati; Zhi, Ng Pei; Zamani, Nur Fathurah; Sabri, Primuharsa Putra; Busra, Mohd Fauzi; Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; Idrus, Ruszymah Binti Haji

    2014-08-01

    The culture of human airway epithelial cells has played an important role in advancing our understanding of the metabolic and molecular mechanisms underlying normal function and disease pathology of airway epithelial cells. The present study focused on investigating the effects of human serum (HS) on the qualitative and quantitative properties of the human respiratory epithelium compared to the fetal bovine serum (FBS), as a supplement in culture. Respiratory epithelial (RE) cells derived from human nasal turbinate were co-cultured with fibroblasts, subsequently separated at 80-90% confluency by differential trypsinization. RE cells were then sub-cultured into 2 different plates containing 5% allogenic HS and FBS supplemented media respectively up to passage 1 (P1). Cell morphology, growth rate, cell viability and population doubling time were assessed under light microscope, and levels of gene expression were measured via real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). RE cells appeared as polygonal shape and expanded when cultured in HS whereas RE cells in FBS were observed to be easily matured thus limit the RE cells expansion. Proliferation rate of RE cells in HS supplemented media (7673.18 ± 1207.15) was 3 times higher compared to RE in FBS supplemented media (2357.68 ± 186.85). Furthermore, RE cells cultured in HS-supplemented media required fewer days (9.15 ± 1.10) to double in numbers compared to cells cultured in FBS-supplemented media (13.66 ± 0.81). Both the differences were significant (p0.05). In conclusion, HS is a comparatively better choice of media supplement in accelerating growth kinetics of RE cells in vitro thus producing a better quality of respiratory epithelium for future tracheal reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria in respiratory epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus and functional implications for virus and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise the mitochondrial proteome of airway epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), a major cause of paediatric illness. Quantitative proteomics, underpinned by stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture, coupled to LC-MS/MS, was applied to mitochondrial fractions prepared from HRSV-infected and mock-infected cells 12 and 24 h post-infection. Datasets were analysed using ingenuity pathway analysis, and the results were validated and characterised using bioimaging, targeted inhibition and gene depletion. The data quantitatively indicated that antiviral signalling proteins converged on mitochondria during HRSV infection. The mitochondrial receptor protein Tom70 was found to act in an antiviral manner, while its chaperone, Hsp90, was confirmed to be a positive viral factor. Proteins associated with different organelles were also co-enriched in the mitochondrial fractions from HRSV-infected cells, suggesting that alterations in organelle dynamics and membrane associations occur during virus infection. Protein and pathway-specific alterations occur to the mitochondrial proteome in a spatial and temporal manner during HRSV infection, suggesting that this organelle may have altered functions. These could be targeted as part of potential therapeutic strategies to disrupt virus biology. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Biomechanical investigation of different surgical strategies for the treatment of rib fractures using a three-dimensional human respiratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Truong, Thanh An; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2017-11-02

    Rib fracture is a common injury and can result in pain during respiration. Conservative treatment of rib fracture is applied via mechanical ventilation. However, ventilator-associated complications frequently occur. Surgical fixation is another approach to treat rib fractures. Unfortunately, this surgical treatment is still not completely defined. Past studies have evaluated the biomechanics of the rib cage during respiration using a finite element method, but only intact conditions were modelled. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic numerical model of the human rib cage and to analyse the biomechanical performance of intact, injured and treated rib cages. Three-dimensional finite element models of the human rib cage were developed. Respiratory movement of the human rib cage was simulated to evaluate the strengths and limitations of different scenarios. The results show that a realistic human respiratory movement can be simulated and the predicted results were closely related to previous study (correlation coefficient>0.92). Fixation of two fractured ribs significantly decreased the fixation index (191%) compared to the injured model. This fixation may provide adequate fixation stability as well as reveal lower bone stress and implant stress compared with the fixation of three or more fractured ribs.

  6. Decision-making about chronic radiation exposure to the public. New recommendations from the ICRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.J. [Division of Radiation and Waste Safety, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-05-01

    The paper discusses decision-making in situations of chronic exposure within the framework of a forthcoming related ICRP report on the subject which has been produced by an ICRP Task Group chaired by the author. This ICRP report will provide guidance on the application of the ICRP System of Radiological Protection to prolonged exposure situations afflicting members of the public. It will address the general application of the System to the control of prolonged exposures resulting from practices and to the undertaking of interventions in prolonged exposure situations, and will provide recommendations on generic reference levels for such interventions. It will also consider some specific situations and will discuss a number of issues that have been of concern, namely: natural radiation sources that may give rise to high doses; the restoration and rehabilitation of sites where human activities involving radioactive substances have been carried out; the return to 'normality' following an accident that has released radioactive substances to the environment; and the global marketing of commodities for public consumption that contain relatively high levels of radioactive substances. Annexes will provide some examples of prolonged exposure situations and will discuss the radiological protection quantities, radiation-induced health effects and aspects of the System of Radiological Protection relevant to prolonged exposure. The quantitative recommendations for prolonged exposures provided in the report will be as follows: generic reference levels for intervention, in terms of existing annual doses, of < or approx. 100 mSv, above which intervention is almost always justifiable (situations for which the annual dose threshold for deterministic effects in relevant organs is exceeded will almost always require intervention), and of < or approx.10 mSv, below which intervention is not likely to be justifiable (and above which it may be necessary); intervention exemption

  7. An ultrastructural study of the interaction of human eosinophils with respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; Garofalo, R; Welliver, RC; Fujihara, K; Ogra, PL

    It was shown previously that eosinophils are activated in vivo and in vitro by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (Garofalo et al., J Pediatr 1992: 120: 28-32; Kimpen et al., Pediatr Res 1992: 32: 160-4). For study of the interaction of eosinophils and RSV on the ultrastructural level, normodense

  8. Comparison of predicted with observed biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, A.; Shutt, A.L.; Etherington, G.; Hodgson, S.A.; Rance, E.; Stradling, G.N.; Youngman, M.J.; Ziesenis, A.; Kreyling, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption kinetics to blood of plutonium and gadolinium after inhalation as nitrate and oxide in humans and animals has been studied. For each material, values describing the time dependence of absorption were derived from the studies in animals and used with the ICRP human respiratory tract model to predict lung retention and cumulative amounts to blood for the volunteers inhaling the same materials. Comparison with the observed behaviour in the volunteers suggests that absorption of plutonium and gadolinium is reasonably species independent, and that data obtained from animal studies can be used to assess their biokinetic behaviour in humans. (author)

  9. Comparison of effective doses using tissue-weighting factors in the 1977, 1990, and 2007 recommendations of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Ai; Suzuki, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established recommended tissue-weighting factors. Although there have been international reports on effective doses using the factors listed in the 1977, 1990, and 2007 recommendations of the ICRP, there have been no papers in Japan. The aim of this study was to evaluate effective doses using the tissue-weighting factors listed in each recommendation of the ICRP under 2011 exposure conditions in Japan. We used a human body phantom to estimate patient exposure doses during chest, abdomen, lumbar spine (anteroposterior and lateral), and head radiographs. With thermoluminescence dosimeters placed at various positions on and in the phantom, radiation doses were determined. There was little change in the effective doses to the chest and head from each recommendation. However, the effective doses recommended in 1977 were 0.2 mSv to the abdomen, 0.1 mSv to the lumbar spine anteroposteriorally, and 0.1 mSv to the lumbar spine laterally; these values are lower than those recommended in 1990 and 2007, which were 0.5 mSv to the abdomen, 0.4 mSv to the lumbar spine anteroposteriorally, and 0.6 mSv to the lumbar spine laterally. We could evaluate the effective doses using each recommendation and 2011 exposure conditions in Japan. (author)

  10. A Rare Case of Human Coronavirus 229E Associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Healthy Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foula Vassilara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E is one of the first coronavirus strains being described. It is linked to common cold symptoms in healthy adults. Younger children and the elderly are considered vulnerable to developing lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. In particular, immunocompromised patients have been reported with severe and life-threatening LRTIs attributed to HCoV-229E. We report for the first time a case of LRTI and acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in a healthy adult with no comorbidities and HCoV-229E strain identified as the only causative agent. A 45-year-old female with a clear medical history presented with fever, cough, and headache. Respiratory tract infection was diagnosed, and empirical antibiotics were started. Within two days, she developed bilateral pleural effusions, diffuse consolidations, and ground glass opacities involving all lung fields. She needed immediate oxygen supply, while ABGs deteriorated and chest imaging and PaO2/FiO2 indicated ARDS. Early administration of systemic corticosteroids led to gradual clinical improvement. Multiplex PCR from nasal secretions was positive only for HCoV-229E and negative for multiple other pathogens. It remains to be elucidated how an immunocompetent adult developed a life-threatening LRTI caused by a “benign considered” coronavirus strain, the HCoV-229E.

  11. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  12. Molecular typing and epidemiology profiles of human adenovirus infection among paediatric patients with severe acute respiratory infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yamin; Zhou, Weimin; Zhao, Yanjie; Wang, Yanqun; Xie, Zhengde; Lou, Yongliang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been recognised as pathogens that cause a broad spectrum of diseases. The studies on HAdV infection among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) are limited. To investigate the prevalence, epidemiology, and genotype of HAdV among children with SARI in China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) or induced sputum (IS) was collected from hospitalised children with SARIs in Beijing (representing Northern China; n = 259) and Zhejiang Province (representing Eastern China; n = 293) from 2007 to 2010. The prevalence of HAdV was screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by sequence typing of PCR fragments that targeted the second half of the hexon gene. In addition, co-infection with other human respiratory viruses, related epidemiological profiles and clinical presentations were investigated. In total, 76 (13.8%) of 552 SARI patients were positive for HAdV, and the infection rates of HAdV in Northern and Eastern China were 20.1% (n = 52) and 8.2% (n = 24), respectively. HAdV co-infection with other respiratory viruses was frequent (infection rates: Northern China, 90.4%; Eastern China, 70.8%). The peak seasons for HAdV-B infection was winter and spring. Additionally, members of multiple species (Human mastadenovirus B, C, D and E) were circulating among paediatric patients with SARI, of which HAdV-B (34/52; 65.4%) and HAdV-C (20/24, 83.3%) were the most predominant in Northern and Eastern China, respectively. These findings provide a benchmark for future epidemiology and prevention strategies for HAdV.

  13. Implications of the ICRP draft recommendations for ALIs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Phipps, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of the calculations summarised here suggest that under the new scheme for calculating annual limits on intake proposed by ICRP there may still be a need for an organ dose limit. This would lose one of the main advantages of the new scheme, namely that ALIs could be strictly additive. Adjusting the weighting factors and allocating the 'remainder' to possibly two tissues with the highest doses would result in effectances from different radionuclides which were not strictly additive. If, however, for practical purposes effectance could be taken to be additive, then the resulting ALIs could be apportioned between different radionuclides as desired. (author)

  14. Effect of new ICRP guidelines on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new limits proposed by ICRP and under consideration (at the time of writing) by AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada) reduce the maximum exposure of atomic radiation workers from 50 to 20 mSv per year, and that of the general public from 5 to 1 mSv. The new guidelines will have three main effects: first, some licensees may have difficulty in complying; secondly, many workers may have to be reclassified as atomic radiation workers; thirdly, extensive retraining will be needed. Activities affected include reactor retubing and underground uranium mining

  15. Acute ingestion dosimetry using the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the gastrointestinal (GI) tract model used for dosimetry as outlined in ICRP30, to allow quick calculations of effective dose equivalents for acute radionuclide ingestion. A computer program has been developed to emulate the GI tract model. The program and associated data files are structured so that the GI tract model parameters can be varied, while the file structure and algorithm for the GI tract model should require minimal modification to allow the same theories that apply in this model to be used for other dosimetric models

  16. Thought about ICRP TG84 report. What beyond it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2013-01-01

    Explained was the ICRP TG84 Report (Report of ICRP Task Group 84 on Initial Lessons Learned from the Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Japan vis-a-vis the ICRP System of Radiological Protection: Issues Identified from the NPP Accident in Japan and Recommendations to Improve the System of Radiation Protection; presented in October, 2012), together with author's thought about it. The Report contained 18 items and their related proposals: Inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients), Attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures, Quantifying radiation exposure, Assessing the importance of internal exposures, Managing emergency crisis, Protecting rescuers and volunteers, Responding with medical aid, Justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions, Transiting from an emergency to an existing situation, Rehabilitating evacuated areas, Categorizing public exposures due to an accident, Restricting individual doses of members of the public, Caring for infants and children, Considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos, Monitoring public protection, Dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues, and consumer products, Recognizing the importance of psychological consequences, and Fostering the sharing of information. The Report also contained 11 Recommendations of actions for the Commission to take. The author had been installed as the Chair of Radiation Council in February, 2011, just before the Accident in March, and had had to concern the definition of various post-Accident dose limits in Japan, having had often faced the inefficiency of measures. He thought the ICRP protecting system was difficult to understand due to 2 reasons: one was that the system had been written aiming at experts of radiological protection and the other, that the system had been composed not only from science but also from an incorporated standard of social values, which resulted in inconsiderateness to the general

  17. Accumulation of plutonium in mammalian wildlife tissues: comparison of recent data with the ICRP distribution models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, M.; Child, D.; Davis, E.; Hotchkis, M.; Payne, T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Org. (Australia); Ikeda-Ohno, A. [University of New South Wales (Australia); Twining, J. [Austral Radioecology (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    We examined the distribution of plutonium (Pu) in the tissues of mammalian wildlife to address the paucity of such data under environmental exposure conditions. Pu activity concentrations were measured in Macropus rufus (red kangaroo), Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit), and Pseudomys hermannsburgensis (sandy inland mouse)inhabiting the relatively undisturbed, semi-arid conditions at the former Taranaki weapons test site at Maralinga, Australia. Of the absorbed Pu (distributed via circulatory and lymph systems) accumulation was foremost in bone (83% ±10% SD), followed by muscle (9% ±10%), liver (7% ±7%), kidneys (0.5% ±0.3%), and heart (0.4% ±0.4%). The bone values are higher than those reported in ICRP 19 and 48 (45-50% bone), while the liver values are lower than ICRP values (30-45% liver). The ICRP values were based on data dominated by relatively soluble forms of Pu, including prepared solutions and single-atom ions produced by decay following the volatilisation of uranium during nuclear detonation (fallout Pu, ICRP 1986). In contrast, the Maralinga data relates to low-soluble forms of Pu used in tests designed to simulate accidental release and dispersal. We measured Pu in lung, GI-tract and the skin and fur as distinct from the absorbed Pu in bone, liver, muscle, and kidneys. Compared with the mean absorbed activity concentrations, the results for lung tissues were higher by up to one order of magnitude, and those in the GI tract contents and the washed skin/fur were higher by more than two orders of magnitude. These elevated levels are consistent with the presence of low-soluble Pu, including particulate forms, which pass through, or adhere upon, certain organs, but are not readily absorbed into the bloodstream. This more transitory Pu can provide dose to the lung and GI tract organs, as well as provide potential transfer of contamination when consumed in predator-prey food chains, or during human foodstuff consumption. For example, activity

  18. Novel avian-origin human influenza A(H7N9) can be transmitted between ferrets via respiratory droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Deng, Wei; Dong, Libo; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Ting; Lv, Qi; Li, Fengdi; Yuan, Jing; Xiang, Zhiguang; Gao, Kai; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Jiangning; Yao, Yanfeng; Yu, Pin; Li, Xiyan; Huang, Weijuan; Zhao, Xiang; Lan, Yu; Guo, Junfeng; Yong, Weidong; Wei, Qiang; Chen, Honglin; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2014-02-15

    The outbreak of human infections caused by novel avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) in China since March 2013 underscores the need to better understand the pathogenicity and transmissibility of these viruses in mammals. In a ferret model, the pathogenicity of influenza A(H7N9) was found to be less than that of an influenza A(H5N1) strain but comparable to that of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1), based on the clinical signs, mortality, virus dissemination, and results of histopathologic analyses. Influenza A(H7N9) could replicate in the upper and lower respiratory tract, the heart, the liver, and the olfactory bulb. It is worth noting that influenza A(H7N9) exhibited a low level of transmission between ferrets via respiratory droplets. There were 4 mutations in the virus isolated from the contact ferret: D678Y in the gene encoding PB2, R157K in the gene encoding hemagglutinin (H3 numbering), I109T in the gene encoding nucleoprotein, and T10I in the gene encoding neuraminidase. These data emphasized that avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) can be transmitted between mammals, highlighting its potential for human-to-human transmissibility.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of the SH (small hydrophobic) gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), over 2 consecutive years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Hildenêr Nogueira; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal; Campos, Angélica Cristine de Almeida; Leal, Andrea Lima; Silva, Tereza Souza; Bosso, Patrícia Alves Ramos; Moraes, Claudia Trigo Pedroso; Filho, Claudionor Gomes da Silva; Vieira, Sandra Elisabete; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Stewien, Klaus Eberhard; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were isolated from nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from 965 children between 2004 and 2005, yielding 424 positive samples. We sequenced the small hydrophobic protein (SH) gene of 117 strains and compared them with other viruses identified worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis showed a low genetic variability among the isolates but allowed us to classify the viruses into different genotypes for both groups, HRSVA and HRSVB. It is also shown that the novel BA-like genotype was well segregated from the others, indicating that the mutations are not limited to the G gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A stake holder dialogue on the implications of the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since its inception the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has been involved in the assessment and implementation of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The development of new general ICRP recommendations, to replace those of the 1990 ICRP Publication 60, was thus of great interest to the NEA and its member countries. As a result, the NEA initiated a process of interaction and dialogue with the ICRP to ensure that the views and concerns of NEA member countries could be voiced and appropriately addressed in the new ICRP recommendations. The new ICRP recommendations were approved by the ICRP Main Commission in March 2007, by which point the NEA had sponsored 7 international conferences and produced 13 publications on the subject. This report is the summary of the three international dialogue conferences (held in Tokyo, 5-6 July 2006, Washington, DC, 28-29 August 2006, and Prague, 24-25 October 2006) that were organised to provide the ICRP with feedback regarding the June 2006 draft of its new recommendations. It includes a presentation of the key points of the draft recommendations, a summary of the suggestions made during the three conferences, and an assessment of the significant evolution that has been seen in the ICRP presentation of its draft recommendations over the course of the conference series. (authors)

  1. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  2. Respiratory acidosis prolongs, while alkalosis shortens, the duration and recovery time of vecuronium in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiromi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2002-03-01

    To determine the effects of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis by mechanical ventilation on the onset, duration, and recovery times of vecuronium. Randomized, prospective study. Operating rooms in the Sapporo Medical University Hospital and Kitami Red Cross Hospital. 90 ASA physical status I and II patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups by arterial carbon dioxide tension level (PaCO2; mmHg) after induction: hyperventilation group (PaCO2 = 25-35), normoventilation group (PaCO2 = 35-45), and hypoventilation group (PaCO2 = 45-55). Anesthesia was maintained by spinal block with inhalation of 50% to 66% nitrous oxide in oxygen and intermittent intravenous administration of fentanyl and midazolam with tracheal intubation. After vecuronium 0.08 mg/kg was given, onset, duration, and recovery time were measured by mechanomyography (Biometer Myograph 2,000, Odense, Denmark). There were significant differences in the duration and recovery time of vecuronium among the normoventilation group (12.7 +/- 3.3 min and 11.8 +/- 2.8 min, respectively), the hyperventilation group (10.6 +/- 3.5 min and 9.2 +/- 2.7 min, respectively; p respiratory acidosis and shortened in respiratory alkalosis.

  3. Radiological protection in medicine: work of ICRP Committee 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vañó, E.; Cosset, J.M.; Rehani, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with protection in medicine, and develops recommendations and guidance on the protection of patients, staff, and the public against radiation exposure in medicine. This paper presents an overview of the work of Committee 3 over recent years, and the work in progress agreed at the last annual meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 2011. The reports published by ICRP dealing with radiological protection in medicine in the last 10 years cover topics on: education and training in radiological protection; preventing accidental exposures in radiation therapy; dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals; radiation safety aspects of brachytherapy; release of patients after therapy with unsealed radionuclides; managing patient dose in digital radiology and computed tomography; avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures; pregnancy and medical radiation; and diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging. Three new reports will be published in the coming months dealing with aspects of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures outside imaging departments; cardiology; and paediatric radiology. The work in progress agreed by Committee 3 is also described.

  4. New radiobiological findings bearing on the 1977 ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Recent experiments on low-level irradiation during development raise questions relevant to ICRP Publication 26. Mice and monkeys were studied; the measured endpoint was the radiation-induced loss of female germ cells. Three issues are examined. The first is the numerical value of Q (quality factor) appropriate for low-energy beta rays. Comparisons of tritium with gamma radiation were made under conditions of chronic, low-level exposure, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was found to approach 3. Its bearing on ICRP's recommendations concerning Q applicable to tritium is discussed. Second, female germ cells in squirrel monkeys before birth were discovered to be extraordinarily radiosensitive, more easily destroyed than those of mice. If this holds for other primates too, it has radiation-protection implications hitherto overlooked. Third, the contrast between massive germ-cell loss from chronic exposure in prenatal squirrel monkeys and reported radioresistance of oocytes to acute exposure in rhesus monkeys, unless due to species difference, suggests that during development protracted irradiation may be especially injurious. This also could have important radiation-protection implications and is under investigation

  5. ICRP recommendations on 'managing patient dose in digital radiology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) approved the publication of a document on 'Managing patient dose in digital radiology' in 2003. The paper describes the content of the report and some of its key points, together with the formal recommendations of the Commission on this topic. With digital techniques exists not only the potential to improve the practice of radiology but also the risk to overuse radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging: wide dynamic range, post-processing, multiple viewing options, electronic transfer and archiving possibilities are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. It is expected that the ICRP report helps to profit from the benefits of this important technological advance in medical imaging with the best management of radiation doses to the patients. It is also expected to promote training actions before the digital techniques are introduced in the radiology departments and to foster the industry to offer enough technical and dosimetric information to radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists to help in the optimisation of the imaging. (authors)

  6. New ICRP recommendations and radiation safety of an NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2007-01-01

    In March 2007 the fundamental radiation protection recommendations used world-widely in nuclear facilities were approved by the ICRP. Implementation of radiation safety standards in an NPP is a challenging issue related to all NPP phases from planning a site and its design to its decommissioning also because if neglected it could be very difficult if not impossible to implement improvement of radiation safety later during operation or decommissioning without a substantial cost. The standards are changing with a period of 15 years which is small regarding a prolonged lifetime of many NPPs and also foreseen lifetime of new NPPs, i.e. 60 years. The new recommendations are actually an upgrading of the ICRP 60. Among other changes new sets of wR and wT are given, as well as an update of around 50 different values related to doses. Two new concepts are also tackled i.e. terrorist attacks and protection of the environment. The influence of the new recommendations on the radiation safety of NPPs can be analysed by a selection of four renewed or new concepts: types of exposure situation, dose constraints, source-related approach and safety and security. Their implementation could lead to upgrading the radiation safety of future or existing NPPs as well as of decommissioning processes. Some of the concepts were already extensively and successfully used by designers of modifications or of new NPPs, as well as by operators. (author)

  7. Is the ICRP-26 weighting factor for gonadal dose appropriate for new federal regulations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drum, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1977 the ICRP recommended that computation of the occupational whole body effective dose equivalent include individual organ dose weighting factors derived from risk coefficients for stochastic effects. The-preeminent weighting factor of 0.25 was assigned to irradiation of the gonads in order to account for heritable genetic effects manifest in later generations. As of 1990, there exists no positive significant evidence for the occurrence of transmitted genetic effects in humans after radiation of any form, dose, or dose rate. To assign to gonads 25% of the health detriment from radiation has no basis in medical experience. It establishes a policy that may underestimate the proportion of real mortality from other more radiosensitive organs, and the policy could compromise unreasonably the occupational stability of workers whose activities may involve gonadal irradiation

  8. An approach to the new ICRP recommendations on protection of the environment for the control of radioactive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telleria, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full text: For many years it has been agreed at the international level that the regulations for the control of discharges during normal operation from nuclear installation shall be based in the principles of individual dose limitation and optimization of the radiation protection focused on man. These regulations using a process of constrained optimization of protection, when properly applied to limit the discharges of radionuclides, were assumed to protect also other species than man and, within the available level of scientific knowledge, this assumption is still likely to be certain. After the International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Stockholm, 2003, many national, international, regional and non-governmental organizations have been working to develop a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to exposures to ionizing radiation. One of the key issues to solve is how to include in the analysis and judgment process explicitly non-human species. Most of the organizations, particularly at the international level, have expressed their expectative in connection with the results of the work of the ICRP. In December 2007 the ICRP published its new recommendations and during 2008 key documents for the international community like the UNSCEAR document on effects of radiation on non-human biota and the ICRP publication on the approach to a framework for non-human protection using the concept of reference plants and animals could close, at least, the first chapter in this complex evolutionary process in the field of radiation protection. While some of the relevant topics for the protection of the environment from all the pollutants, like the global distribution patterns, the long term bioaccumulation effects, the relation of the individual effects regarding the communities and populations, Etc are still not fully discerned and noting that ICRP in its

  9. The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 3 on radiological protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D L; Martin, C J; Rehani, M M

    2018-01-01

    The mandate of Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionising radiation is used in medical diagnosis, therapy, and biomedical research. Protection in veterinary medicine has been newly added to the mandate. Committee 3 develops recommendations and guidance in these areas. The most recent documents published by ICRP that relate to radiological protection in medicine are 'Radiological protection in cone beam computed tomography' (ICRP Publication 129) and 'Radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy' (ICRP Publication 127). A report in cooperation with ICRP Committee 2 entitled 'Radiation dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals: a compendium of current information related to frequently used substances' (ICRP Publication 128) has also been published. 'Diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging' (ICRP Publication 135), published in 2017, provides specific advice on the setting and use of diagnostic reference levels for diagnostic and interventional radiology, digital imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, paediatrics, and multi-modality procedures. 'Occupational radiological protection in interventional procedures' was published in March 2018 as ICRP Publication 139. A document on radiological protection in therapy with radiopharmaceuticals is likely to be published in 2018. Work is in progress on several other topics, including appropriate use of effective dose in collaboration with the other ICRP committees, guidance for occupational radiological protection in brachytherapy, justification in medical imaging, and radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals (an update to ICRP Publication 128). Committee 3 is also considering the development of guidance on radiological protection in medicine related to individual radiosusceptibility, in collaboration with ICRP Committee 1.

  10. Development of polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Preliminary study for posture change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tat Thang; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2013-01-01

    Even though International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) officially adopted a set of adult male and female voxel phantoms as the ICRP reference phantoms, there are several critical limitations due to the nature of voxel geometry and their low voxel resolutions. In order to overcome these limitations of the ICRP phantoms, we are currently developing polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP voxel phantoms to polygonal surface geometries. Among the many advantages of the ICRP polygonal surface phantom, especially, it is flexible and deformable. In principle, it is, therefore, possible to make the posture-changed ICRP phantoms which can provide more accurate dose values for exposure situations strongly relevant to worker's postures. As a preliminary study for developing the posture-changed ICRP phantoms, in this work we changed the posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom constructed in the previous study. Organ doses were then compared between original and posture-changed phantoms. In the present study, we successfully changed a posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom to the walking posture. From this results, it was explicitly shown that the polygon-surface version of the ICRP phantoms can be sufficiently modified to be various postures with the posture-changing method used in this study. In addition, it was demonstrated that phantom's posture must be considered in certain exposure situations, which can differ dose values from the conventional standing-posture phantom

  11. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botosso, Viviane F; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Ueda, Mirthes; Arruda, Eurico; Gilio, Alfredo E; Vieira, Sandra E; Stewien, Klaus E; Peret, Teresa C T; Jamal, Leda F; Pardini, Maria I de M C; Pinho, João R R; Massad, Eduardo; Sant'anna, Osvaldo A; Holmes, Eddie C; Durigon, Edison L

    2009-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  12. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  13. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  14. Intranasal Administration of Maleic Anhydride-Modified Human Serum Albumin for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwu Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of pediatric viral respiratory tract infections. Neither vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy is available to prevent and treat RSV infection. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, is the only product approved to prevent serious RSV infection, but its high cost is prohibitive in low-income countries. Here, we aimed to identify an effective, safe, and affordable antiviral agent for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP of RSV infection in children at high risk. We found that maleic anhydride (ML-modified human serum albumin (HSA, designated ML-HSA, exhibited potent antiviral activity against RSV and that the percentages of the modified lysines and arginies in ML- are correlated with such anti-RSV activity. ML-HSA inhibited RSV entry and replication by interacting with viral G protein and blocking RSV attachment to the target cells, while ML-HAS neither bound to F protein, nor inhibited F protein-mediated membrane fusion. Intranasal administration of ML-HSA before RSV infection resulted in significant decrease of the viral titers in the lungs of mice. ML-HSA shows promise for further development into an effective, safe, affordable, and easy-to-use intranasal regimen for pre-exposure prophylaxis of RSV infection in children at high risk in both low- and high-income countries.

  15. Culturing of respiratory viruses in well-differentiated pseudostratified human airway epithelium as a tool to detect unknown viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Deijs, Martin; Dijkman, Ronald; Molenkamp, Richard; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, virus discovery is mainly based on molecular techniques. Here, we propose a method that relies on virus culturing combined with state-of-the-art sequencing techniques. The most natural ex vivo culture system was used to enable replication of respiratory viruses. Method Three respiratory clinical samples were tested on well-differentiated pseudostratified tracheobronchial human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures grown at an air–liquid interface, which resemble the airway epithelium. Cells were stained with convalescent serum of the patients to identify infected cells and apical washes were analyzed by VIDISCA-454, a next-generation sequencing virus discovery technique. Results Infected cells were observed for all three samples. Sequencing subsequently indicated that the cells were infected by either human coronavirus OC43, influenzavirus B, or influenzavirus A. The sequence reads covered a large part of the genome (52%, 82%, and 57%, respectively). Conclusion We present here a new method for virus discovery that requires a virus culture on primary cells and an antibody detection. The virus in the harvest can be used to characterize the viral genome sequence and cell tropism, but also provides progeny virus to initiate experiments to fulfill the Koch's postulates. PMID:25482367

  16. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  17. Avian influenza A virus (H7N7) associated with human conjunctivitis and a fatal case of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouchier, R.A.M.; Schneeberger, P.M.; Rozendaal, F.W.; Broekman, J.M.; Kemink, S.A.G.; Munnster, V.; Kuiken, T.; Rimmelzwaan, G.F.; Schutten, M.; Doornum, van G.J.J.; Koch, G.; Bosman, A.; Koopmans, M.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 are the causative agents of fowl plague in poultry. Influenza A viruses of subtype H5N1 also caused severe respiratory disease in humans in Hong Kong in 1997 and 2003, including at least seven fatal cases, posing a serious human

  18. Comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the ICRP 30 and ICRP 60 models for a repeated incorporation by inhalation of I-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreno P, A.L.; Cortes C, A.; Alonso V, G.; Serrano P, F.

    2005-01-01

    Presently work, a comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the models of the ICRP 30 and those of the ICRP 60 for the analysis of internal dose due to repeated incorporation of I-125 is shown. The estimations of incorporated activity are obtained starting from the proportionate data for an exercise of inter comparison, with which it should be determined the internal dose later on. For to estimate the initial activity incorporated by repeated dose was assumed that this it was given through of multiple individual incorporations which happened in the middle points of the monitoring periods. The results using the models of the ICRP 30 and of the ICRP 60 are compared and the causes of the differences are analyzed. (Author)

  19. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Human Respiratory Epithelium Affected by Invasive Candida Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Aun Muhammad

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis is potentially life-threatening systemic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans. Candida enters the blood stream and disseminate throughout the body and it is often observed in hospitalized patients, immunocompromised individuals or those with chronic diseases. This infection is opportunistic and risk starts with the colonization of C. albicans on mucocutaneous surfaces and respiratory epithelium. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs which are involved in the regulation of virtually every cellular process. They regulate and control the levels of mRNA stability and post-transcriptional gene expression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been associated in many disease states, and miRNA-based therapies are in progress. In this study, we investigated possible variations of miRNA expression profiles of respiratory epithelial cells infected by invasive Candida species. For this purpose, respiratory epithelial tissues of infected individuals from hospital laboratory were accessed before their treatment. Invasive Candida infection was confirmed by isolation of Candia albicans from the blood cultures of the same infected individuals. The purity of epithelial tissues was assessed by flow cytometry (FACSCalibur cytometer; BD Biosciences, Heidelberg, Germany using statin antibody (S-44. TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR (in a TaqMan Low Density Array format was used for miRNA expression profiling. MiRNAs investigated, the levels of expression of 55 miRNA were significantly altered in infected tissues. Some miRNAs showed dramatic increase (miR-16-1 or decrease of expression (miR-17-3p as compared to control. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these miRNA-targeted genes suggests that Candidal infection affect many important biological pathways. In summary, disturbance in miRNA expression levels indicated the change in cascade of pathological processes and the regulation of respiratory epithelial functions

  20. Respiratory trace deposition models. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.C.

    1980-03-01

    Respiratory tract characteristics of four mammalian species (human, dog, rat and Syrian hamster) were studied, using replica lung casts. An in situ casting techniques was developed for making the casts. Based on an idealized branch model, over 38,000 records of airway segment diameters, lengths, branching angles and gravity angles were obtained from measurements of two humans, two Beagle dogs, two rats and one Syrian hamster. From examination of the trimmed casts and morphometric data, it appeared that the structure of the human airway is closer to a dichotomous structure, whereas for dog, rat and hamster, it is monopodial. Flow velocity in the trachea and major bronchi in living Beagle dogs was measured using an implanted, subminiaturized, heated film anemometer. A physical model was developed to simulate the regional deposition characteristics proposed by the Task Group on Lung Dynamics of the ICRP. Various simulation modules for the nasopharyngeal (NP), tracheobronchial (TB) and pulmonary (P) compartments were designed and tested. Three types of monodisperse aerosols were developed for animal inhalation studies. Fifty Syrian hamsters and 50 rats were exposed to five different sizes of monodisperse fused aluminosilicate particles labeled with 169 Yb. Anatomical lung models were developed for four species (human, Beagle dog, rat and Syrian hamster) that were based on detailed morphometric measurements of replica lung casts. Emphasis was placed on developing a lobar typical-path lung model and on developing a modeling technique which could be applied to various mammalian species. A set of particle deposition equations for deposition caused by inertial impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion were developed. Theoretical models of particle deposition were developed based on these equations and on the anatomical lung models

  1. Structural Analysis of Major Species Barriers between Humans and Palm Civets for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang (UMM)

    2008-09-23

    It is believed that a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was passed from palm civets to humans and caused the epidemic of SARS in 2002 to 2003. The major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections are the specific interactions between a defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) on a viral spike protein and its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study a chimeric ACE2 bearing the critical N-terminal helix from civet and the remaining peptidase domain from human was constructed, and it was shown that this construct has the same receptor activity as civet ACE2. In addition, crystal structures of the chimeric ACE2 complexed with RBDs from various human and civet SARS-CoV strains were determined. These structures, combined with a previously determined structure of human ACE2 complexed with the RBD from a human SARS-CoV strain, have revealed a structural basis for understanding the major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections. They show that the major species barriers are determined by interactions between four ACE2 residues (residues 31, 35, 38, and 353) and two RBD residues (residues 479 and 487), that early civet SARS-CoV isolates were prevented from infecting human cells due to imbalanced salt bridges at the hydrophobic virus/receptor interface, and that SARS-CoV has evolved to gain sustained infectivity for human cells by eliminating unfavorable free charges at the interface through stepwise mutations at positions 479 and 487. These results enhance our understanding of host adaptations and cross-species infections of SARS-CoV and other emerging animal viruses.

  2. International radiation protection recommendations. Five years experience of ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Beninson, D.; Sowby, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has issued radiation protection recommendations since 1928. The latest set of basic recommendations was adopted by the Commission on 17 January 1977, and subsequently published as ICRP Publication 26. This document has met with a wider interest than any of the previous ICRP recommendations. It has been considered to mark a radical change in the protection policy advocated by ICRP. It is not often appreciated that recommendations which are believed to be 'new' in ICRP Publication 26 had already been made in ICRP Publication 9 more than ten years earlier. In any event, ICRP Publication 26 has had a substantial impact on regulatory work in countries all over the world. It forms the basis for the Basic Safety Standards of the international organizations IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and WHO. The paper refers to the experience gained in using the new ICRP recommendations over the five years that have passed since ICRP Publication 26 was adopted and discusses some of the problems that have arisen in the practical application of the new recommendations in various countries. (author)

  3. Radiation Protection for Radon in Dwellings - Consequences of the ICRP Publication 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, Jai T.; Breckow, J.; Grimm, V.; Grund, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several epidemiological studies on risk estimations due to exposure to radon in dwellings revealed higher risks to radon exposure than estimated previously. Thus, in ICRP Publication 115 (ICRP, 2011) a revised nominal probability coefficient for radon and its progeny-induced lung cancer was propounded. Based on the results of the exposure from residential studies and underground miners, the risk of lung cancer was estimated as 5x10 -4 per WLM (lifetime excess absolute risk, LEAR) and 8x10 -1 0 per Bqxh/m 3 , respectively. In the former Publication 65 (ICRP, 1993), the coefficient has been 2.83x10 -4 per WLM and 4x10 -1 0 per Bqxh/m 3 , respectively. Typical radon activity concentration in dwellings is about 60 Bq/m? in many parts of Europe. According to the ICRP Publication 65-dose coefficients, this concentration leads to a mean annual effective dose of 1.2 mSv. If the new nominal risk coefficient from ICRP Publication 115 is applied, the effective dose due to radon in dwellings increases to approximately 2.3 mSv per year. Referring the reference level of 10 mSv/a for radon exposure in dwellings in ICRP Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) and based on the new recommendations in ICRP Publication 115, actions have to be taken to reduce the upper reference level for radon gas in dwellings from 600 Bq/m 3 to 300 Bq/m 3 .(author)

  4. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Han Sung; Wang, Zhao Jun; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Beom Sun

    2015-11-21

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens.

  5. Deposition and retention models for internal dosimetry of the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-01-01

    A general overview of particulate deposition and clearance, particularly as related to radionuclides, but generally applicable is described. The respiratory system is divided into naso-pharynx (N-P) and tracheobronchial (T-B) (together constituting anatomical dead space and ciliated, mucus-covered portion) and pulmonary (caudally from respiratory bronchioles). N-P deposition (N) is expressed by: N = 0.62 + 0.475log(aerodynamic diameter)/sup 2/(inhalation, liters/min). T-B deposition calculated from anatomical and physical data (affected by hygroscopicity, especially for low-MW and low-density particles). Clearance mechanisms include: (1) a very rapid phase (minutes) for particles deposited on ciliated epithelium; (2) a rapid phase consisting of the slower elements of ciliary clearance and the rapidly recruitable phagocytes (transitional character of this phase makes it difficult to estimate half-time, 24 hr); (3) a slower alveolar phase dependent on properties of dust; (4) elimination via lymph. (3) and (4) have similar kinetics, but (3) is via T-B and GI.

  6. Potential risks to human respiratory health from "acid fog": evidence from experimental studies of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, J D; Linn, W S; Avol, E L

    1985-11-01

    Observations of high acidity (pH as low as 1.7) in fogwater collected in polluted areas have provoked concern for public health. Effects of exposure to acidic pollutants have not been studied under foggy conditions; thus there is no directly relevant information from which to estimate the health risk. Indirectly relevant information is available from numerous studies of volunteers exposed to "acid fog precursors" under controlled conditions at less than 100% relative humidity. The effect of fog in modifying responses to inhaled acidic pollutants is difficult to predict: depending on circumstances, fog droplets might either increase or decrease the effective dose of pollutants to the lower respiratory tract. Fog inhalation per se may have unfavorable effects in some individuals. Sulfur dioxide is known to exacerbate airway constriction in exercising asthmatics, at exposure concentrations attainable in ambient air. Nitrogen dioxide has shown little untoward respiratory effect at ambient concentrations in most studies, although it has been suggested to increase bronchial reactivity. Sulfuric acid aerosol has shown no clear effects at concentrations within the ambient range. At somewhat higher levels, increased bronchial reactivity and change in mucociliary clearance have been suggested. Almost no information is available concerning nitric acid.

  7. Impact of ICRP-60 on the operation of underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Hussein, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of occupational exposure from: 50 mSv to 20 mSv per annum for uranium miners faces difficulties. For miners this affects the gamma radiation dose and ALI's except radon gas and its short lived daughters of Uranium and Thorium whereas the ICRP planned to review radon daughters exposure limits. New dose limits introduce other mines, e.g. phosphate mines, to be considered as occupational areas. Reclassification of radiation workers has to be done; control, licensing, cost, Gamma dose rate is influenced by the grade and type of ore body and the mining method. The primary mode of radionuclide intake in the mine environment is inhalation, however, ventilation is the principal control of airborne dust. The current average radon daughters dose rate in several underground mines among those are phosphate mines in Egypt is well above 20 mSv/a. Recorded values of Egyptian phosphate mines are more than 1 WL of radon daughters (1WL = 62 uSv/h) considering 2000 h/y, therefore, the annual dose = 124 mSv/a. Mining method dictated by location, size and shape of ore body, hydrology. Priority is given for conventional safety of work place, e.g. rock collapse as well as care of economics of the process and mine development. It is well defined that the control of gamma radiation dose is very much dependent upon the geometry of ore body. Shielding of ore trucks could not be justified (fuel consumption and its pollution). Bulk ore handling method may reduce gamma doses but it generates dust which may increase inhalation doses of long lived alpha emitters. Ventilation is the principal method to control inhalation hazards of dust and radon daughters, but high rates of ventilation has reverse effects of generating more dust and drying wet surfaces of ores. Accordingly, reduction in radon daughters exposure will result in high cost of production. In Egypt radon and thoron (risk/problems) are previously monitored in phosphate mines (upper Egypt). Values greater than 1 WL were

  8. Effects of wood smoke particles from wood-burning stoves on the respiratory health of atopic humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddervold Ingunn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing evidence that particulate air pollution derived from wood stoves causes acute inflammation in the respiratory system, increases the incidence of asthma and other allergic diseases, and increases respiratory morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate acute respiratory effects from short-term wood smoke exposure in humans. Twenty non-smoking atopic volunteers with normal lung function and without bronchial responsiveness were monitored during three different experimental exposure sessions, aiming at particle concentrations of about 200 μg/m3, 400 μg/m3, and clean air as control exposure. A balanced cross-over design was used and participants were randomly allocated to exposure orders. Particles were generated in a wood-burning facility and added to a full-scale climate chamber where the participants were exposed for 3 hours under controlled environmental conditions. Health effects were evaluated in relation to: peak expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1, and forced vital capacity (FVC. Furthermore, the effects were assessed in relation to changes in nasal patency and from markers of airway inflammation: fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC and nasal lavage (NAL samples were collected before, and at various intervals after exposure. Results No statistically significant effect of wood smoke exposure was found for lung function, for FENO, for NAL or for the nasal patency. Limited signs of airway inflammation were found in EBC. Conclusion In conclusion, short term exposure with wood smoke at a concentration normally found in a residential area with a high density of burning wood stoves causes only mild inflammatory response.

  9. How to understand the radiation effects of small dose - some critical comments on ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.

    1997-01-01

    The widespread feeling of 'radiophobia' by the general public has its basis on the ICRP's 'linear no-threshold' hypothesis in dose-response relationship for low dose radiation from the standpoint of radiation protection. Although this common feeling served as a merit for constructing the 'safety culture' of society, it has now become a large obstacle for the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology as a demerit. Recently many data have been accumulated for the radiation effects of low dose, both epidemiologically and experimentally. Although in general it is very difficult to obtain clear evidence of presence or absence of threshold, it seems to be true that the risk by radiation exposure at low level (the definition of which is below 0.2 Gy) is not so large as that of extrapolation from the high or medium dose range. In fact, many data suggest that some quite different mechanisms are working in low dose from high dose, such as 'adaptive response', and a new concept, 'radiation hormesis', has emerged, that the low level radiation is not only quite harmless but is rather necessary for living cells or beneficial for human health. In this paper, some critical comments on ICRP recommendations are given as a personal view by the author. These include: (1) a question of exact assessment of exposed dose by A-bomb survivors used for the epidemiological data, which are regarded to be the most authentic and important; (2) a brief summary of effects at the natural radiation level, including the high background area data; (3) the importance of dose rate effect, which reflects the living matter's repairability from radiation injury, and (4) the proposal of new paradigm by adopting the reasonable 'de minimis' level (below which there is no harm) both for low dose and at low dose rate. A simple mathematical analysis for representative data of dose rate effect was shown as an appendix

  10. Explanation of ICRP publication 81 in consideration of geologic disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection which has published various recommendations on the radiation protection describes the system of radiation protection on the disposal of radioactive waste in Publication 46, 77 and 81. Especially, Publication 81, Radiation Protection Recommendations as Applied to the Disposal of Long-lived Solid Radioactive Waste, was published in order to supplement, update and clarify the material in Publication 46 published in 1985 in consideration of the recent international progress in the disposal of radioactive waste. At present, the study is in progress to materialize the concept and the safety regulation of geologic disposal in Japan, and it is important to reflect appropriately these international publications. This paper explains each paragraph in Publication 81 in order to understand the system of radiation protection on the geologic disposal fully and concretely, paying attention to the mutual relationship among each paragraph, the development of ICRP recommendations and the relationship to other publications. (author)

  11. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowser, K.E.; Snyder, W.S.; Struxness, E.G.

    1969-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  12. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowser, K E; Snyder, W S; Struxness, E G [Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  13. Practical applications of the new ICRP recommendation to external dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1992-01-01

    Focussing on external dosimetry for occupational exposure the consequences of the new quantities equivalent dose (radiation weighting factor), effective dose (tissue weighting factor) and the ICRU operational quantities for individual and area dosimetry are discussed. Despite some arguments against the new quantities they should be introduced as rapidly as possible to keep international uniformity in radiation protection monitoring. It is shown that they provide a conservative estimate of the effective dose for photons and neutrons. In photon dosimetry only minor changes of the conversion factors relating operational quantities to effective dose is observed. In neutron dosimetry the conversion factors change by a factor of up to 2. It is pointed out that there is a urgent need to calculate standardized conversion factors for field quantities -operational quantities- organ and effective dose in a joint effort of ICRP and ICRU. This includes standardization of calibration methods for individual dosimetry using suitable phantoms instead of the sphere. (author)

  14. Transposition of ICRP-60 recommendations into French uranium mining regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.

    2001-01-01

    Directive 96/29/Euratom, drawn up from recommendations of the ICRP 60, must be transposed into French legislation before 13 May 2000. For the French uranium mining sector, two ministerial decrees, one for workers, the other for the environment, must be modified to take account of the new European rules. These modifications entail new statutory limits either for the workers, or to characterise the radiological impact on the environment. For the workers, the implementation since 1980 of a policy of optimising radiation protection in French mines enables us to envisage that these limits will be respected. For the environment, the application of new limits involves a new approach for the assessment of public doses, with the precise definition of critical groups and their realistic exposure scenario. (author)

  15. Potential impact of ICRP-30 on the calculated risk from waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the large body of information that has been gathered since ICRP-2 was published (1959), the ICRP has undertaken the task of updating its radiation protection guidance. This update involves revision of the primary radiation guidance as well as the recalculation of intake limits (ICRP-30) based on update biological models, updated nuclide decay schemes, and a new method accounting for simultaneous dose to more than one organ. A detailed analysis of the impacts of ICRP-30 on waste repository safety and risk analyses would require an extensive and detailed study that has not yet been undertaken. Nevertheless, it is possible to identify, in an approximate manner, the impact of using ICRP-30 instead of 10 CFR 20/ICRP-2 in calculating the risk from radioactive repositories. Toward this end, the numerical guidance of ICRP-30 has been obtained and converted into RCG values for the general public using the same methods that were employed in deriving 10 CFR 20. The conversion was cross-checked by comparing 10 CFR 20 and ICRP-30-based values that were known to have remained the same. The most restrictive ICRP-30 RCGs were incorporated into the ORIGEN2 computer code, which was then used to calculate the toxicity of some radioactive materials of interest in waste repository considerations. As a basis for discussion, the toxicities of the spent fuel from a PWR and of the uranium ore required to make the fuel are given for both the 10 CFR 20 and ICRP-30-based RCGs. As is evident, the use of the revised RCGs reduces the toxicity of the spent fuel at times less than 100 years and increases the toxicity at times thereafter

  16. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  17. Multi-Organ Damage in Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Transgenic Mice Infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Zhao

    Full Text Available The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV causes severe acute respiratory failure and considerable extrapumonary organ dysfuction with substantial high mortality. For the limited number of autopsy reports, small animal models are urgently needed to study the mechanisms of MERS-CoV infection and pathogenesis of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model globally expressing codon-optimized human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4, the receptor for MERS-CoV. After intranasal inoculation with MERS-CoV, the mice rapidly developed severe pneumonia and multi-organ damage, with viral replication being detected in the lungs on day 5 and in the lungs, kidneys and brains on day 9 post-infection. In addition, the mice exhibited systemic inflammation with mild to severe pneumonia accompanied by the injury of liver, kidney and spleen with neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Importantly, the mice exhibited symptoms of paralysis with high viral burden and viral positive neurons on day 9. Taken together, this study characterizes the tropism of MERS-CoV upon infection. Importantly, this hDPP4-expressing transgenic mouse model will be applicable for studying the pathogenesis of MERS-CoV infection and investigating the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral agents designed to combat MERS-CoV infection.

  18. Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Bianca, V.; Grzeskowiak, M.; Lissandrini, D.; Rossi, F.

    1991-01-01

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that in human neutrophils phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles is associated with activation of phospholipase D and that this reaction is the main source of diglycerides. The demonstration is based upon the following findings: (1) the challenge of neutrophils with these opsonized particles was followed by a rapid formation of [3H]alkyl-phosphatidic acid [( 3H]alkyl-PA) and [3H]alkyl-diglyceride [( 3H]alkyl-DG) in cells labeled with [3H]alkyl-lyso-phosphatidylcholine; (2) in the presence of ethanol [3H]alkyl-phosphatidylethanol was formed, and accumulation of [3H]alkyl-PA and [3H]alkyl-DG was depressed; (3) propranolol, by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of [3H]alkyl-PA, completely inhibited the accumulation of [3H]alkyl-DG and depressed by about 75% the formation of diglyceride mass. Evidence is also presented that phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst can take place independently of diglyceride formation and of the activity of this second messenger on protein kinase C. In fact: (a) propranolol while completely inhibited the formation of diglyceride mass did not modify either the phagocytosis or respiratory burst; (b) these two processes were insensitive to staurosporine

  19. Analysis of Cigarette Smoke Deposition Within an In Vitro Exposure System for Simulating Exposure in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Shinkichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the risk assessment of airborne chemicals, a variety of in vitro direct exposure systems have been developed to replicate airborne chemical exposure in vivo. Since cells at the air-liquid interface are exposed to cigarette smoke as an aerosol in direct exposure systems, it is possible to reproduce the situation of cigarette smoke exposure in the human respiratory system using this device. However it is difficult to know whether the exposed cigarette smoke in this system is consistent with the smoke retained in the human respiratory tract. The purpose of this study is to clarify this point using the CULTEX® RFS module which is a recently developed direct exposure system. For this purpose, solanesol and acetaldehyde were respectively chosen as the particulate and gas/vapor phase representatives of smoke constituents, and their deposition and balance per unit area of cell culture surface of the RFS module were measured (dosimetry. We also conducted human retention studies to compare with the dosimetry data. By comparing inhaled smoke and exhaled smoke under three inhalation conditions, we estimated the regional retention and balance of each representative per unit surface area of the respiratory tract (mouth, bronchi, and alveoli separately. The deposition of solanesol and acetaldehyde per unit area of cell culture surface in the RFS module decreased dependent on the dilution flow rate and ranged from 0.26-0.0076%/cm2 in our experimental conditions. The ratio of deposited acetaldehyde to deposited solanesol ranged from 0.96-1.96 in the RFS module. The retention of solanesol and acetaldehyde per unit surface area in the mouth and the bronchi ranged from 0.095-0.0083%/cm2 in this study. The retention per unit surface area of alveoli was far lower than in the other two regions (0.0000063%/cm2. The ratio of retained acetaldehyde to retained solanesol ranged from 0.54-1.97. From these results, we concluded that the CULTEX® RFS module can simulate

  20. A brief introduction of ICRP Publication 49: Developmental effects of irradiation on the brain of the embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1988-01-01

    ICRP established a task group within its Committee 1 to carry out studies on the effects of irradiation on the central nerve system of embryos and fetuses. The present article summarizes the study results presented in the report, named ICRP Publication 49, published by the task group. Publication 49 consists of seven chapters dealing with the introduction, development of brain and auxiliary organs of embryo primates, retarded development of central nerve system, ionizing radiation as factor in teratogenesis of central nerve system, maximum susceptibility period, risk estimation for human being, and necessity of research. Radiation may cause either organogenetic or histological disturbances depending on the developmental stage of the brain. Results of animal tests can be applied to studies on the morphogenetic disturbances in human beings. Data on embryos and fetuses that received radiation in Hiroshima or Nagasaki are currently used for the estimation of the risk of disturbance in the brain of human embryos and fetuses. Risk estimation for the brain of human embryo exposed to radiation is discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  2. Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values ICRP Publication 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents detailed information on age- and gender-related differences in the anatomical and physiological characteristics of reference individuals. These reference values provide needed input to prospective dosimetry calculations for radiation protection purposes for both workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and unify in one publication, important new information on reference anatomical and physiological values that has become available since Publication 23 was published by the ICRP in 1975. There are two aspects of this work. The first is to revise and extend the information in Publication 23 as appropriate. The second is to provide additional information on individual variation among grossly normal individuals resulting from differences in age, gender, race, or other factors. This publication collects, unifies, and expands the updated ICRP reference values for the purpose of providing a comprehensive and consistent set of age- and gender-specific reference values for anatomical and physiological features of the human body pertinent to radiation dosimetry. The reference values given in this report are based on: (a) anatomical and physiological information not published before by the ICRP; (b) recent ICRP publications containing reference value information; and (c) information in Publication 23 that is still considered valid and appropriate for radiation protection purposes. Moving from the past emphasis on 'Reference Man', the new report presents a series of reference values for both male and female subjects of six different ages: newborn, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years, and adult. In selecting reference values, the Commission has used data on Western Europeans and North Americans because these populations have been well studied with respect to anatomy, body composition, and physiology. When appropriate, comparisons are made between the chosen reference values and data from several Asian

  3. Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values ICRP Publication 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, J

    2002-12-01

    This report presents detailed information on age- and gender-related differences in the anatomical and physiological characteristics of reference individuals. These reference values provide needed input to prospective dosimetry calculations for radiation protection purposes for both workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and unify in one publication, important new information on reference anatomical and physiological values that has become available since Publication 23 was published by the ICRP in 1975. There are two aspects of this work. The first is to revise and extend the information in Publication 23 as appropriate. The second is to provide additional information on individual variation among grossly normal individuals resulting from differences in age, gender, race, or other factors. This publication collects, unifies, and expands the updated ICRP reference values for the purpose of providing a comprehensive and consistent set of age- and gender-specific reference values for anatomical and physiological features of the human body pertinent to radiation dosimetry. The reference values given in this report are based on: (a) anatomical and physiological information not published before by the ICRP; (b) recent ICRP publications containing reference value information; and (c) information in Publication 23 that is still considered valid and appropriate for radiation protection purposes. Moving from the past emphasis on 'Reference Man', the new report presents a series of reference values for both male and female subjects of six different ages: newborn, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years, and adult. In selecting reference values, the Commission has used data on Western Europeans and North Americans because these populations have been well studied with respect to anatomy, body composition, and physiology. When appropriate, comparisons are made between the chosen reference values and data from several Asian

  4. Changes in relative fit of human heat stress indices to cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal hospitalizations across five Australian urban populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, James; Alexander, Lisa; Lewis, Sophie C.; Sherwood, Steven C.; Bambrick, Hilary

    2018-03-01

    Various human heat stress indices have been developed to relate atmospheric measures of extreme heat to human health impacts, but the usefulness of different indices across various health impacts and in different populations is poorly understood. This paper determines which heat stress indices best fit hospital admissions for sets of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal diseases across five Australian cities. We hypothesized that the best indices would be largely dependent on location. We fit parent models to these counts in the summers (November-March) between 2001 and 2013 using negative binomial regression. We then added 15 heat stress indices to these models, ranking their goodness of fit using the Akaike information criterion. Admissions for each health outcome were nearly always higher in hot or humid conditions. Contrary to our hypothesis that location would determine the best-fitting heat stress index, we found that the best indices were related largely by health outcome of interest, rather than location as hypothesized. In particular, heatwave and temperature indices had the best fit to cardiovascular admissions, humidity indices had the best fit to respiratory admissions, and combined heat-humidity indices had the best fit to renal admissions. With a few exceptions, the results were similar across all five cities. The best-fitting heat stress indices appear to be useful across several Australian cities with differing climates, but they may have varying usefulness depending on the outcome of interest. These findings suggest that future research on heat and health impacts, and in particular hospital demand modeling, could better reflect reality if it avoided "all-cause" health outcomes and used heat stress indices appropriate to specific diseases and disease groups.

  5. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  6. Changes in relative fit of human heat stress indices to cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal hospitalizations across five Australian urban populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, James; Alexander, Lisa; Lewis, Sophie C; Sherwood, Steven C; Bambrick, Hilary

    2018-03-01

    Various human heat stress indices have been developed to relate atmospheric measures of extreme heat to human health impacts, but the usefulness of different indices across various health impacts and in different populations is poorly understood. This paper determines which heat stress indices best fit hospital admissions for sets of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal diseases across five Australian cities. We hypothesized that the best indices would be largely dependent on location. We fit parent models to these counts in the summers (November-March) between 2001 and 2013 using negative binomial regression. We then added 15 heat stress indices to these models, ranking their goodness of fit using the Akaike information criterion. Admissions for each health outcome were nearly always higher in hot or humid conditions. Contrary to our hypothesis that location would determine the best-fitting heat stress index, we found that the best indices were related largely by health outcome of interest, rather than location as hypothesized. In particular, heatwave and temperature indices had the best fit to cardiovascular admissions, humidity indices had the best fit to respiratory admissions, and combined heat-humidity indices had the best fit to renal admissions. With a few exceptions, the results were similar across all five cities. The best-fitting heat stress indices appear to be useful across several Australian cities with differing climates, but they may have varying usefulness depending on the outcome of interest. These findings suggest that future research on heat and health impacts, and in particular hospital demand modeling, could better reflect reality if it avoided "all-cause" health outcomes and used heat stress indices appropriate to specific diseases and disease groups.

  7. Absence of detectable influenza RNA transmitted via aerosol during various human respiratory activities--experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian W Tang

    Full Text Available Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin's mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. No influenza RNA was detected from any of the PTFE filters or air samples. For the Singapore experiments, 6 influenza-infected volunteers were asked to breathe (nasal/mouth breathing, talk (counting in English/second language, cough (from 1 m/0.1 m away and laugh, onto a thermal, breathing manikin. The manikin's face was swabbed at specific points (around both eyes, the nostrils and the mouth before and after exposure to each of these respiratory activities, and was cleaned between each activity with medical grade alcohol swabs. Shadowgraph imaging was used to record the generation of these respiratory aerosols from the infected volunteers and their impact onto the target manikin. No influenza RNA was detected from any of these swabs with either team's in-house diagnostic influenza assays. All the influenza-infected volunteers had diagnostic swabs taken at recruitment that confirmed influenza (A/H1, A/H3 or B infection with high viral loads, ranging from 10(5-10(8 copies/mL (Hong Kong volunteers/assay and 10(4-10(7 copies/mL influenza viral RNA (Singapore volunteers/assay. These findings suggest that influenza RNA may not be readily transmitted from naturally-infected human source to susceptible recipients via these natural respiratory activities, within

  8. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  9. Human Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viral Pathogens in Border Areas of Western Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ans Timmermans

    Full Text Available Little is known about circulation of influenza and other respiratory viruses in remote populations along the Thai-Cambodia border in western Cambodia. We screened 586 outpatients (median age 5, range 1-77 presenting with influenza-like-illness (ILI at 4 sentinel sites in western Cambodia between May 2010 and December 2012. Real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT PCR for influenza was performed on combined nasal and throat specimens followed by viral culture, antigenic analysis, antiviral susceptibility testing and full genome sequencing for phylogenetic analysis. ILI-specimens negative for influenza were cultured, followed by rRT-PCR for enterovirus and rhinovirus (EV/RV and EV71. Influenza was found in 168 cases (29% and occurred almost exclusively in the rainy season from June to November. Isolated influenza strains had close antigenic and phylogenetic relationships, matching vaccine and circulating strains found elsewhere in Cambodia. Influenza vaccination coverage was low (<20%. Western Cambodian H1N1(2009 isolate genomes were more closely related to 10 earlier Cambodia isolates (94.4% genome conservation than to 13 Thai isolates (75.9% genome conservation, despite sharing the majority of the amino acid changes with the Thai references. Most genes showed signatures of purifying selection. Viral culture detected only adenovirus (5.7% and parainfluenza virus (3.8%, while non-polio enteroviruses (10.3% were detected among 164 culture-negative samples including coxsackievirus A4, A6, A8, A9, A12, B3, B4 and echovirus E6 and E9 using nested RT-PCR methods. A single specimen of EV71 was found. Despite proximity to Thailand, influenza epidemiology of these western Cambodian isolates followed patterns observed elsewhere in Cambodia, continuing to support current vaccine and treatment recommendations from the Cambodian National Influenza Center. Amino acid mutations at non-epitope sites, particularly hemagglutinin genes, require further investigation in

  10. Human Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viral Pathogens in Border Areas of Western Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Ans; Melendrez, Melanie C; Se, Youry; Chuang, Ilin; Samon, Nou; Uthaimongkol, Nichapat; Klungthong, Chonticha; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Tyner, Stuart D; Rith, Sareth; Horm, Viseth Srey; Jarman, Richard G; Bethell, Delia; Chanarat, Nitima; Pavlin, Julie; Wongstitwilairoong, Tippa; Saingam, Piyaporn; El, But Sam; Fukuda, Mark M; Touch, Sok; Sovann, Ly; Fernandez, Stefan; Buchy, Philippe; Chanthap, Lon; Saunders, David

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about circulation of influenza and other respiratory viruses in remote populations along the Thai-Cambodia border in western Cambodia. We screened 586 outpatients (median age 5, range 1-77) presenting with influenza-like-illness (ILI) at 4 sentinel sites in western Cambodia between May 2010 and December 2012. Real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT) PCR for influenza was performed on combined nasal and throat specimens followed by viral culture, antigenic analysis, antiviral susceptibility testing and full genome sequencing for phylogenetic analysis. ILI-specimens negative for influenza were cultured, followed by rRT-PCR for enterovirus and rhinovirus (EV/RV) and EV71. Influenza was found in 168 cases (29%) and occurred almost exclusively in the rainy season from June to November. Isolated influenza strains had close antigenic and phylogenetic relationships, matching vaccine and circulating strains found elsewhere in Cambodia. Influenza vaccination coverage was low (Cambodia isolates (94.4% genome conservation) than to 13 Thai isolates (75.9% genome conservation), despite sharing the majority of the amino acid changes with the Thai references. Most genes showed signatures of purifying selection. Viral culture detected only adenovirus (5.7%) and parainfluenza virus (3.8%), while non-polio enteroviruses (10.3%) were detected among 164 culture-negative samples including coxsackievirus A4, A6, A8, A9, A12, B3, B4 and echovirus E6 and E9 using nested RT-PCR methods. A single specimen of EV71 was found. Despite proximity to Thailand, influenza epidemiology of these western Cambodian isolates followed patterns observed elsewhere in Cambodia, continuing to support current vaccine and treatment recommendations from the Cambodian National Influenza Center. Amino acid mutations at non-epitope sites, particularly hemagglutinin genes, require further investigation in light of an increasingly important role of permissive mutations in influenza virus evolution

  11. Antibody-Induced Internalization of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, A; De Schryver, M; Van der Gucht, W; Heykers, A; Pintelon, I; Hotard, A L; Moore, M L; Melero, J A; McLellan, J S; Graham, B S; Broadbent, L; Power, U F; Caljon, G; Cos, P; Maes, L; Delputte, P

    2017-07-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections remain a major cause of respiratory disease and hospitalizations among infants. Infection recurs frequently and establishes a weak and short-lived immunity. To date, RSV immunoprophylaxis and vaccine research is mainly focused on the RSV fusion (F) protein, but a vaccine remains elusive. The RSV F protein is a highly conserved surface glycoprotein and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies induced by natural infection. Here, we analyzed an internalization process of antigen-antibody complexes after binding of RSV-specific antibodies to RSV antigens expressed on the surface of infected cells. The RSV F protein and attachment (G) protein were found to be internalized in both infected and transfected cells after the addition of either RSV-specific polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) or RSV glycoprotein-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining and flow-cytometric analysis. Internalization experiments with different cell lines, well-differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells (WD-PBECs), and RSV isolates suggest that antibody internalization can be considered a general feature of RSV. More specifically for RSV F, the mechanism of internalization was shown to be clathrin dependent. All RSV F-targeted MAbs tested, regardless of their epitopes, induced internalization of RSV F. No differences could be observed between the different MAbs, indicating that RSV F internalization was epitope independent. Since this process can be either antiviral, by affecting virus assembly and production, or beneficial for the virus, by limiting the efficacy of antibodies and effector mechanism, further research is required to determine the extent to which this occurs in vivo and how this might impact RSV replication. IMPORTANCE Current research into the development of new immunoprophylaxis and vaccines is mainly focused on the RSV F protein since, among others, RSV F-specific antibodies are

  12. Key implications of the new ICRP recommendations: contribution of the C.R.P.P.H. expert group on the implications of ICRP recommendations (E.G.I.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) has embarked on a broad programme of consultation in order to collect concepts, ideas and views regarding how radiological protection should be managed at the start of the 21 st century. The results of this consultation will be a new set of comprehensive ICRP recommendations, updating and consolidating ICRP publication 60 and all subsequent ICRP recommendations. It is expected that the new ICRP general recommendations will be published in 2005 with additional more detailed building block recommendations being published in subsequent years. (N.C.)

  13. Model of human recurrent respiratory papilloma on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane for tumor angiogenesis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Kuzminienė, Alina; Palubinskienė, Jolita; Balnytė, Ingrida; Ulozienė, Ingrida; Valančiūtė, Angelija

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to develop a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model of recurrent respiratory papilloma (RPP) and to evaluate its morphological and morphometric characteristics, together with angiogenic features. Fresh RRP tissue samples obtained from 13 patients were implanted in 174 chick embryo CAMs. Morphological, morphometric, and angiogenic changes in the CAM and chorionic epithelium were evaluated up until 7 days after the implantation. Immunohistochemical analysis (34βE12, Ki-67, MMP-9, PCNA, and Sambucus nigra staining) was performed to detect cytokeratins and endothelial cells and to evaluate proliferative capacity of the RRP before and after implantation on the CAM. The implanted RRP tissue samples survived on CAM in 73% of cases while retaining their essential morphologic characteristics and proliferative capacity of the original tumor. Implants induced thickening of both the CAM (241-560%, p=0.001) and the chorionic epithelium (107-151%, p=0.001), while the number of blood vessels (37-85%, p=0.001) in the CAM increased. The results of the present study confirmed that chick embryo CAM is a relevant host for serving as a medium for RRP fresh tissue implantation. The CAM assay demonstrated the specific RRP tumor growth pattern after implantation and provided the first morphological and morphometric characterization of the RRP CAM model that opens new horizons in studying this disease.

  14. Local forearm and whole-body respiratory quotient in humans after an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1993-01-01

    the glucose load and had not returned to baseline level at the end of the experiment. Whole-body respiratory quotient (RQ) was, on average, 0.80 (SD 0.05) in the baseline condition and increased to a maximum of 0.91 (0.03) and then decreased to baseline level at the end of the experiment. The local forearm.......17) to 0.63 (0.17) 30 min after the glucose load (P glucose load RQ increased to a maximum level at 0.95 (0.22) and decreased then gradually to baseline level. The experiments emphasize several methodological problems in the measurement of local forearm RQ. The whole-body RQ......The effects of an oral glucose load of 75 g on the local forearm and whole-body energy thermogenesis were measured in normal subjects during the 4 h after the glucose intake. Simultaneous assessment of substrate metabolism in the forearm was performed. Energy expenditure (EE) increased after...

  15. ZZ NUCDECAY, Nuclear Decay Data for Radiation Dosimetry Calculation for ICRP and MIRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: - ICRP38: Format: Special format. Number of groups: Energies and intensities of radiations emitted; designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Nuclides: 825 + 13 radionuclides. Origin: ENSDF (data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38). - MIRD: Format: Special format. Number of groups: Energies and intensities of radiations emitted; designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Nuclides: 242 radionuclides. Origin: ENSDF (monograph of the MIRD Committee). The unabridged data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38 and a monograph of the MIRD Committee are distributed in electronic form in this package. The data are assembled in two collections. The collection referred to as ICRP38 consists of data on the energies and intensities of radiations emitted by the 825 radionuclides reported, although abridged, in ICRP Publication 38 plus an additional 13 radionuclides evaluated during preparation of a monograph for the MIRD Committee. The second collection, denoted as MIRD, contains data for the 242 radionuclides in the MIRD monograph noted above. Each collection consists of three ASCII files: (1) the index file (ICRP38.IDX or MIRD.IDX) is a sorted list of the radionuclides with pointers into the data files; (2) the radiation file (ICRP38.RAD or MIRD.RAD) contains data on the energies and intensities of the emitted radiations; (3) the beta spectra file (ICRP38.BET or MIRD.BET) contains the spectra for all beta emitters in the collection. 161 radionuclides of the MIRD collection have later ENSDF dates than those in the ICRP38 collection. In most instances, the differences are of no dosimetric significance, but considerable differences may exist for some nuclides. 2 - Method of solution: This data base has been designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Calculations of the spatial

  16. Recombinant human DNase in children with airway malacia and lower respiratory tract infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, R.; Jongste, J.C. de; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.; Hop, W.C.J.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with airway malacia often have protracted courses of airway infections, because dynamic airway collapse during coughing results in impaired mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the mucolytic drug recombinant human deoxyribonuclease

  17. A mitochondrial cytochrome b mutation causing severe respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in humans and yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakely, E.L.; Mitchell, A.L.; Fisher, N.; Meunier, B.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Schaefer, A.M.; Jackson, M.J.; Turnbull, D.M.; Taylor, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the majority of disease-related mitochondrial DNA mutations exhibit significant biochemical and clinical heterogeneity, mutations within the mitochondrially encoded human cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) are almost exclusively associated with isolated complex III deficiency in muscle and a clinical

  18. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  19. The Genotoxicity of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the exponential growth of the nanomaterial industry, risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is an important aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance. However, this...

  20. Efficiency factors for Phoswich based lung monitor using ICRP Voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohari, M.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    The actinide contamination in lungs is measured either using array of HPGe detector or Phoswich based lung monitors. This paper discusses the results obtained during numerical calibration of Phoswich based lung counting system using ICRP VOXEL phantoms. The results are also compared with measured efficiency values obtained using LLNL phantom. The efficiency factors of 241 Am present in the lungs for phoswich detector was simulated using ICRP male voxel phantom and compared with experimentally observed values using LLNL Phantom. The observed deviation is 12%. The efficiency of the same for female subjects was estimated using ICRP female voxel phantom for both supine and posterior geometries

  1. Diagnostic Reference Levels in the 1990 and 1996 Recommendations of the ICRP (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.

    1998-01-01

    A review of and some comments on the paragraphs in the ICRP Publications 60 and 73 are presented, which are relevant to diagnostic reference doses. The content of the statements is traced back by approximately 50 years when ICRP's preoccupation with the future health and well-being of the population is reflected in guidance for characterisation of 'normal operational conditions'. The early ICRP levels of reference doses are compared with the values currently discussed to demonstrate the importance of diagnostic reference doses in the process of optimisation and to show the importance of a continuous review and update of these levels. (author)

  2. Respiratory chain complex I, a main regulatory target of the cAMP/PKA pathway is defective in different human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papa, S.; De Rasmo, D.; Technikova-Dobrova, Z.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has 31 supernumerary subunits in addition to the 14 conserved from prokaryotes to humans. Multiplicity of structural protein components, as well as of biogenesis factors, makes complex I a sensible pace-...

  3. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with...

  4. Nonrandom variability in respiratory cycle parameters of humans during stage 2 sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarreszadeh, M; Bruce, E N; Gothe, B

    1990-08-01

    We analyzed breath-to-breath inspiratory time (TI), expiratory time (TE), inspiratory volume (VI), and minute ventilation (Vm) from 11 normal subjects during stage 2 sleep. The analysis consisted of 1) fitting first- and second-order autoregressive models (AR1 and AR2) and 2) obtaining the power spectra of the data by fast-Fourier transform. For the AR2 model, the only coefficients that were statistically different from zero were the average alpha 1 (a1) for TI, VI, and Vm (a1 = 0.19, 0.29, and 0.15, respectively). However, the power spectra of all parameters often exhibited peaks at low frequency (less than 0.2 cycles/breath) and/or at high frequency (greater than 0.2 cycles/breath), indicative of periodic oscillations. After accounting for the corrupting effects of added oscillations on the a1 estimates, we conclude that 1) breath-to-breath fluctuations of VI, and to a lesser extent TI and Vm, exhibit a first-order autoregressive structure such that fluctuations of each breath are positively correlated with those of immediately preceding breaths and 2) the correlated components of variability in TE are mostly due to discrete high- and/or low-frequency oscillations with no underlying autoregressive structure. We propose that the autoregressive structure of VI, TI, and Vm during spontaneous breathing in stage 2 sleep may reflect either a central neural mechanism or the effects of noise in respiratory chemical feedback loops; the presence of low-frequency oscillations, seen more often in Vm, suggests possible instability in the chemical feedback loops. Mechanisms of high-frequency periodicities, seen more often in TE, are unknown.

  5. Oxidative stress and respiratory symptoms due to human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Kumasi, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Akoto, Osei; Nakayama, Shouta M.M.; Asante, Kwadwo A.; Baidoo, Elvis; Obirikorang, Christian; Saengtienchai, Aksorn; Isoda, Norikazu; Nimako, Collins

    2017-01-01

    Studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and its metabolites in PM10, soils, rat livers and cattle urine in Kumasi, Ghana, revealed high concentrations and cancer potency. In addition, WHO and IARC have reported an increase in cancer incidence and respiratory diseases in Ghana. Human urine were therefore collected from urban and control sites to: assess the health effects associated with PAHs exposure using malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG); identify any association between OH-PAHs, MDA, 8-OHdG with age and sex; and determine the relationship between PAHs exposure and occurrence of respiratory diseases. From the results, urinary concentrations of the sum of OH-PAHs (∑OHPAHs) were significantly higher from urban sites compared to the control site. Geometric mean concentrations adjusted by specific gravity, GM SG , indicated 2-OHNaphthalene (2-OHNap) (6.01 ± 4.21 ng/mL) as the most abundant OH-PAH, and exposure could be through the use of naphthalene-containing-mothballs in drinking water purification, insect repellent, freshener in clothes and/or “treatment of various ailments”. The study revealed that exposure to naphthalene significantly increases the occurrence of persistent cough (OR = 2.68, CI: 1.43–5.05), persistent headache (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.02–3.26), tachycardia (OR = 3.36, CI: 1.39–8.10) and dyspnea (OR = 3.07, CI: 1.27–7.43) in Kumasi residents. Highest level of urinary 2-OHNap (224 ng/mL) was detected in a female, who reported symptoms of persistent cough, headache, tachycardia, nasal congestion and inflammation, all of which are symptoms of naphthalene exposure according to USEPA. The ∑OHPAHs, 2-OHNap, 2-3-OHFluorenes, and -OHPhenanthrenes showed a significantly positive correlation with MDA and 4-OHPhenanthrene with 8-OHdG, indicating possible lipid peroxidation/cell damage or degenerative disease in some participants. MDA and 8-OHdG were highest in age group 21–60. The present study

  6. Evaluation of the effect of change in the radiosensitive tissue weights listed in the ICRP in estimate of effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Lima Filho, Jose M.; Santana, Ivan E.; Andrade, Pedro H.A.; Cabral, Manuela O.M.

    2015-01-01

    For photons and electrons, the effective dose by gender is a weighted sum of the absorbed doses in radiosensitive organs and tissue of the human body. Effective dose is estimated using Exposure Computational Models (ECM) of both genders for the same age group. The FSTA and MSTA ECMs were developed by researchers from DEN/UFPE and consist of voxel phantoms representing adults coupled to EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code, which, in the folder designed for users of EGS, codes were added to simulate some radioactive sources. The reports 60 and 103 of the ICRP provide the factors that weigh the radiosensitivity of organs and tissues (W T ) required to estimate the effective dose. The two lists were placed in the FSTA and MSTA to simulate radiodiagnostic examination in different regions of the body (cranium, abdomen and thorax). The dosimetric data produced allowed an analysis of the effect of the change in the w T from the report 60 to the 103. The highest mean percent relative error, 64.3%, occurred in the results for the cranium due to the increase of the w T for most of the organs and tissues in the head and trunk in the updated list. In this case, it can be concluded that the values of the effective dose with the wT of the ICRP 60 were underestimated. Other types of simulators of radioactive sources can be used in investigating this problem and other variables related to the phantom can be considered for that proposes a W T 's list specific for the Brazilian population or recommend unrestricted use the ICRP data. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the effect of change in the radiosensitive tissue weights listed in the ICRP in estimate of effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Lima Filho, Jose M.; Santana, Ivan E., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Andrade, Pedro H.A.; Cabral, Manuela O.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Vanildo J.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DA/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For photons and electrons, the effective dose by gender is a weighted sum of the absorbed doses in radiosensitive organs and tissue of the human body. Effective dose is estimated using Exposure Computational Models (ECM) of both genders for the same age group. The FSTA and MSTA ECMs were developed by researchers from DEN/UFPE and consist of voxel phantoms representing adults coupled to EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code, which, in the folder designed for users of EGS, codes were added to simulate some radioactive sources. The reports 60 and 103 of the ICRP provide the factors that weigh the radiosensitivity of organs and tissues (W{sub T}) required to estimate the effective dose. The two lists were placed in the FSTA and MSTA to simulate radiodiagnostic examination in different regions of the body (cranium, abdomen and thorax). The dosimetric data produced allowed an analysis of the effect of the change in the w{sub T} from the report 60 to the 103. The highest mean percent relative error, 64.3%, occurred in the results for the cranium due to the increase of the w{sub T} for most of the organs and tissues in the head and trunk in the updated list. In this case, it can be concluded that the values of the effective dose with the wT of the ICRP 60 were underestimated. Other types of simulators of radioactive sources can be used in investigating this problem and other variables related to the phantom can be considered for that proposes a W{sub T}'s list specific for the Brazilian population or recommend unrestricted use the ICRP data. (author)

  8. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  9. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  10. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  11. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  12. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration

  13. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration.

  14. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Mokili

    Full Text Available As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome and 63.1% (L1 sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4 and a non-coding long control region (LCR between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses.

  15. A conception of practical application of the ICRP Publ. 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao

    1999-01-01

    The report of view for practical application of ICRP Publ. 60 in Japanese regulations and its technical guideline proposal were published by the Advisory Committee of radiation protection in June, 1998 and April, 1999, respectively. This paper described the summary of the above reports and essential conception for the actual application. Following items were summarized: the change of technical terms such as the use of ''dose'' in place of dose equivalent, dose limits in occupational exposure (the effective dose limit not to exceed 100 mSv/5 y and 50 mSv/y), dose limits in women's occupational exposure (not to exceed 5 mSv/3 mth), the working area (the controlled area), public dose limits with consideration for medical exposure, exposure by natural sources of radiation, exposure in volunteers and nursing persons, occupational health service for radiation workers, emergency exposure (100 mSv; 300 mSv for lens and 1 Sv for skin), intervention in the public at emergency exposure, document, and the system for radiation control. It was expected for suitable institutions and groups to develop and make the guideline through the examination of the reports. (K.H.)

  16. Survey of the ICRP 103 detriment-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, S.; Buermeyer, J.; Spruck, K.; Breckow, J.

    2016-01-01

    The detriment of ICRP 103 is roughly defined as the product of the (organ specific) risk coefficient and the ''damage'' that may be associated with a (organ specific) cancer or hereditary effect, respectively. This is to indicate a weighted risk according to the radiation sensitivity of the different organs and the severity of damage that may possibly arise. Whereas the risk coefficients refer to radiation exposure parameters, the scale or degree of damage is independent of these parameters. The radiation independent parameters are the lethality, the loss of quality of life and the reduced life expectancy, which are considered as quantities associated with the severity of disease or damage, respectively. These parameters may change gradually, on the one hand possibly due to an increase of cancer becoming a common disease within the population. On the other hand, possibly to a decrease of cancer due to the progress in medical diagnostics and treatments that allow patients to survive or at least maintain a higher life quality standard. The damage and therefore the detriment appears to be mostly affected by the lethality. The lethality is the quotient of mortality to incidence. The investigation of the detriment presented in this paper focuses on the influence of the lethality on the detriment from 1980-2012 in Germany and USA.

  17. A conception of practical application of the ICRP Publ. 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numakunai, Takao [Inst. of Radiation Measurements, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The report of view for practical application of ICRP Publ. 60 in Japanese regulations and its technical guideline proposal were published by the Advisory Committee of radiation protection in June, 1998 and April, 1999, respectively. This paper described the summary of the above reports and essential conception for the actual application. Following items were summarized: the change of technical terms such as the use of ''dose'' in place of dose equivalent, dose limits in occupational exposure (the effective dose limit not to exceed 100 mSv/5 y and 50 mSv/y), dose limits in women's occupational exposure (not to exceed 5 mSv/3 mth), the working area (the controlled area), public dose limits with consideration for medical exposure, exposure by natural sources of radiation, exposure in volunteers and nursing persons, occupational health service for radiation workers, emergency exposure (100 mSv; 300 mSv for lens and 1 Sv for skin), intervention in the public at emergency exposure, document, and the system for radiation control. It was expected for suitable institutions and groups to develop and make the guideline through the examination of the reports. (K.H.)

  18. Application of ICRP recommendations to radioactive waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.; Lindell, B.

    1984-01-01

    Some radioactive waste categories require isolation from the biosphere for extended periods of time. Various mechanisms can be expected in the future leakage of radionuclides; some are the result of 'normal', expected processes, while others would be the result of random disruptive events. In the second case, the exposures can only be evaluated on a probabilistic basis. Nevertheless, the three basic principles for protection usually recommended by ICRP still apply: individual risk limitation, optimization of protection, and justification of practice. In the individual-related assessment, the requirement should be that the overall probability of death from exposure to waste products (considering both the probability of dose and the probability of death, given the dose) should not exceed the probability of death at the dose 'upper bound' that national authorities would designate for the practice. In the source-related assessment for optimization of protection, the detriment should be assessed over relevant time periods and be the basis for marginal cost-benefit analysis of the various potential improvements in the combined isolation provided by the engineering and geological features. (author)

  19. Challenges of ICRP 60 for uranium refining and conversion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takala, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Cameco Corporation operates high-grade uranium mines in northern Saskatchewan and uranium refining and conversion facilities in Ontario. The dose limits for these and all other nuclear facilities in Canada are 50 mSv per year and 4 WLM per year, which are applied separately. However, the upcoming incorporation of the recommendations in ICRP 60 into the Canadian regulations will result in several important changes. In addition to a more restrictive dose limit, the new regulations will require that all radiation exposures be combined into a single index of exposure. Meeting the new lower dose limits of 50 mSv per year and 100 mSv per 5 years will not be a major problem at Cameco facilities. However, the incorporation of long-lived radioactive dust exposures into the dose calculation will be a major challenge. This will cause the most difficulty at the uranium refining and conversion facilities where much of the process involves handling a variety of uranium compounds in the form of a dry powder. At the uranium conversion facilities the control of exposure to airborne uranium is achieved through a combination of lung counting, urinalysis, and fixed area monitors. To progress from a system of exposure control to dose estimation to individual workers will require some major changes. (author)

  20. The work of committee 2 of ICRP on internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last few years Committee 2 of ICRP has been responsible for preparing a series of publications giving dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by members of the public. The last report in this series covers doses to the offspring in mothers' milk and should be issued in 2005. The emphasis of work on internal dosimetry is now concerned with occupational exposure. It is intended to replace Publications 30 and 68 that give biokinetic data and dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides and Publications 54 and 78 that give information for bioassay interpretation, with a single series of publications. The first report of the series is expected to cover radionuclides of the elements addressed in the publications on dose coefficients for members of the public. It will also take into account new recommendations from the Commission. Subsequent publications will cover additional elements. A supporting Guidance Document is also being developed that will give more comprehensive advice on the interpretation of bioassay data. The need for this document was identified following recent interlaboratory comparisons that have shown wide variations in the way monitoring data can be interpreted in different laboratories. (authors)

  1. Implementation of the ICRP-60 Recommendations by Swiss Pharmaceutical Companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, R. P.; Traub, K.; Berlepsch, P.; Reischmann, F. J.; Zoubek, N.

    2004-01-01

    Switzerland was among the first countries that adapted its national law to the recommendations of the ICRP-publication No. 60. Already in 1991, the Federal Parliament enacted a new Radiological Protection Act. In 1994, the Federal Government adopted the new Radiation Protection Ordinance. Federal Ministries followed with technical ordinances and guidelines, e.g., for radioactive waste in 1996, for handling open sources in 1997, for X-rays in 1998 and for the training and dosimetry of radiation workers in 1999. In 1996, the Council of the European Union (Switzerland is not a member of the EU) decreed the Directive for the Protection of the Health of Workers and the General Public against the Dangers Arising from Ionising Radiation. Based on this directive, Germany adopted a new Radiation Protection Ordinance in 2001 and a new X-Ray-Ordinance in 2002. To transform the ordinances into radiation protection in the workplace further technical ordinances and guidelines are under development. Almost ten years ago, users of ionising radiation in Switzerland had to deal with the problems of implementing the new radiation protection legislation into their local rules that Germany and other EU companies are facing now. Therefore it may be interesting and helpful for authorities and companies in the EU to learn from the experience of their Swiss colleagues. (Author) 4 refs

  2. Comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the ICRP 30 and ICRP 60 models for a repeated incorporation by inhalation of I-125; Comparacion en el calculo de la dosis efectiva comprometida usando los modelos del ICRP 30 y del ICRP 60 para una incorporacion repetida por inhalacion de I-125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreno P, A.L.; Cortes C, A. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alonso V, G.; Serrano P, F. [IPN, Edificio de Fisica Avanzada Zacatenco, 07300 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    Presently work, a comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the models of the ICRP 30 and those of the ICRP 60 for the analysis of internal dose due to repeated incorporation of I-125 is shown. The estimations of incorporated activity are obtained starting from the proportionate data for an exercise of inter comparison, with which it should be determined the internal dose later on. For to estimate the initial activity incorporated by repeated dose was assumed that this it was given through of multiple individual incorporations which happened in the middle points of the monitoring periods. The results using the models of the ICRP 30 and of the ICRP 60 are compared and the causes of the differences are analyzed. (Author)

  3. Safety of irradiated patients: a new publication of the ICRP and Dutch practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The ICRP publication 44 and two publications of the Dutch Health Council are mutually compared and confronted with the Dutch practice. Irradiation risks, precision and aspects of organization are considered. (G.J.P.)

  4. The implications of ICRP publication (60) 1990 for public exposure to natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.Mc.

    1992-01-01

    The implications of the new ICRP recommendations on the control of public exposure to natural radiation are described. As ICRP differentiates between Practices and Interventions the application of the basic recommendations in the case of natural radiation exposures will be discussed in this context. Particular emphasis will be placed on public exposure to indoor radon with some discussion on situations in which occupational and public exposure to this source occur together. This major source of public exposure i discussed in relation to both ICRP 60 and ICRP 39. Some of the difficulties that the new recommendations may give rise to in the management of natural radiation exposures are discussed. One of the major changes in the new recommendations concerns the area of risk. This will be briefly discussed as regards the ways in which the risk arising from public exposure to natural radiation may be assessed. (author)

  5. Radiation Safety Analysis In The NFEC For Assessing Possible Implementation Of The ICRP-60 Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yowono, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation safety analysis of the 3 facilities in the nuclear fuel element center (NFEC) for assessing possible implementation of the ICRP-60 standard has been done. The analysis has covered the radiation dose received by workers, dose rate in the working area, surface contamination level, air contamination level and the level of radioactive gas release to the environment. The analysis has been based on BATAN regulation and ICRP-60 standard. The result of the analysis has showed that the highest radiation dose received has been found to be only around 15% of the set value in the ICRP-60 standard and only 6% of the set value in the BATAN regulation. Thus the ICRP-60 as radiation safety standard could be implemented without changing the laboratory design

  6. The recommendations 2007 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Nenot, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), in particular in the situations of emergency exposure, after an accident or to natural radioactivity. (authors)

  7. A novel pancoronavirus RT-PCR assay: frequent detection of human coronavirus NL63 in children hospitalized with respiratory tract infections in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four human coronaviruses are currently known to infect the respiratory tract: human coronaviruses OC43 (HCoV-OC43 and 229E (HCoV-229E, SARS associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV and the recently identified human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63. In this study we explored the incidence of HCoV-NL63 infection in children diagnosed with respiratory tract infections in Belgium. Methods Samples from children hospitalized with respiratory diseases during the winter seasons of 2003 and 2004 were evaluated for the presence of HCoV-NL63 using a optimized pancoronavirus RT-PCR assay. Results Seven HCoV-NL63 positive samples were identified, six were collected during January/February 2003 and one at the end of February 2004. Conclusions Our results support the notation that HCoV-NL63 can cause serious respiratory symptoms in children. Sequence analysis of the S gene showed that our isolates could be classified into two subtypes corresponding to the two prototype HCoV-NL63 sequences isolated in The Netherlands in 1988 and 2003, indicating that these two subtypes may currently be cocirculating.

  8. Identification of Probiotic Strains from Human Milk in Breastfed Infants with Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamtu Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and industrial exploitation of probiotics from human milk is a goal for worldwide milk biotechnology centres because of their modulation effect on the immune system in infants and adults. In the proposed study we have analysed fermentation patterns of Lactobacilli isolated from human milk, the reliability of API 50 CH carbohydrate fermentation system and a possible link between lactose concentrations and fermentation profiles on carbohydrates. We had succesfully identified three species of Lactobacillus (paracasei ssp paracasei, fermentum, acidophilus and one unsatisfactory identification of Lactoccocus lactis ssp lactis. These strains had different carbohydrate fermentation patterns but with common characteristics and showed no statistically significant correlations between their carbohydrate metabolic trends and lactose concentrations in the milk samples.

  9. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment.

  10. Analysis of the new ICRP recommendations from the point of view of environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper analyses the implications of the new ICRP recommendations referring optimization and justification as they apply to the nuclear power industry, in particular referring to its environmental impact. It also discusses the possible effects of applying this requirements on regional nuclear power programmes. The possibility of extrapolating the ICRP recommendations for use as a basis for nuclear safety aspects of nuclear power reactors is also analyzed. (author)

  11. Implications of recent ICRP recommendations for risk assessments for radioactive waste disposal and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted a new set of recommendations in November 1990 which were issued at ICRP Publication No. 60 in March 1991. These recommendations incorporate new radiobiological information and outline a comprehensive system of radiological protection. This paper evaluates the implications of these new recommendations vis a vis risk assessments for radioactive waste disposal and remediation of radioactively contaminated sites

  12. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment

  13. Implications of draft ICRP recommendations: the View of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, S.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has taken an active interest in the work being performed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop a new set of general recommendations. As several key junctures, the Nea, through the lead of its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) has performed in-depth analyses of the possible implications that draft ICRP materials, in order to inform policy makers of the regulatory and application implications that would result should draft ICRP Recommendations for a system of radiological protection be published. Comments from the Nea have constructively contributed to the ICRP development process, and it is hoped that the final ICRP recommendations in this area will be developed to best serve the needs of national and international radiation protection policy makers, regulators and implementers. Having assessed and commented on previous drafts, the C.R.P.P.H. has co-ordinated the views of all the relevant standing technical committees within the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide constructive suggestions as to how the text could be usefully improved. Comments were requested from the Nea committees dealing with radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, nuclear regulatory activities, nuclear development and nuclear science. The present paper summarises the results of the C.R.P.P.H. review process related to the new ICRP recommendations. (author)

  14. [Pulmonary cystic disease may be a rare complication to recurrent respiratory human papilloma virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, Peter Thaysen; Weinreich, Ulla M Øller

    2014-12-08

    A 19-year-old woman with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis (JLP), treated since childhood with multiple resections, was admitted with symptoms of pneumonia. A chest X-ray and CAT-scan revealed multiple lung cysts and a bronchoalveolar lavage detected human papilloma virus 11. The patient responded well to antibiotics. A body plethysmography showed small lung volumes and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, but normal volume diffusion capacity divided by alveolar volume. Pulmonary cystic disease should be considered when patients with JLP have symptoms of pneumonia.

  15. Culturing of respiratory viruses in well-differentiated pseudostratified human airway epithelium as a tool to detect unknown viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farsani, Seyed Mohammad Jazaeri; Deijs, Martin; Dijkman, Ronald; Molenkamp, Richard; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, virus discovery is mainly based on molecular techniques. Here, we propose a method that relies on virus culturing combined with state-of-the-art sequencing techniques. The most natural ex vivo culture system was used to enable replication of respiratory viruses. Three respiratory clinical

  16. Biological effects after prenatal irradiation (embryo and fetus) ICRP Publication 90 Approved by the Commission in October 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, J

    2003-06-01

    In its 1990 recommendations, the ICRP considered the radiation risks after exposure during prenatal development. This report is a critical review of new experimental animal data on biological effects and evaluations of human studies after prenatal radiation published since the 1990 recommendations. Thus, the report discusses the effects after radiation exposure during pre-implantation, organogenesis, and fetogenesis. The aetiology of long-term effects on brain development is discussed, as well as evidence from studies in man on the effects of in-utero radiation exposure on neurological and mental processes. Animal studies of carcinogenic risk from in-utero radiation and the epidemiology of childhood cancer are discussed, and the carcinogenic risk to man from in-utero radiation is assessed. Open questions and needs for future research are elaborated. The report reiterates that the mammalian embryo and fetus are highly radiosensitive. The nature and sensitivity of induced biological effects depend upon dose and developmental stage at irradiation. The various effects, as studied in experimental systems and in man, are discussed in detail. It is concluded that the findings in the report strengthen and supplement the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP.

  17. Modification of male adult simulator posture of ICRP 110 reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeano, Diego C.; Souza, Divanizia N.; Santos, Willian S.; Carvalho Junior, Alberico B.

    2014-01-01

    Voxel simulators are usually constructed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, so the supine position (lying) is the most used. This may result in a overestimated or underestimated the radiation dose, depending on the exposure scenario adopted. Thus, the objective was to change the attitude of the male adult simulator reference ICRP 110, AM (Adult Male), to a sitting posture. For change of posture were possible, it was necessary increasing the number of slices that comprise AM simulator by reducing the height of the voxel of 8.0 mm to 2.0 mm, thus making each voxel approximately cubic. A subroutine was created in Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the simulator and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. The ScionImage software was used to rebuild and soften the contours of the knee and hip of the simulator in a sitting posture, and 3D visualization of the simulator was used VolView software. The AM simulator in the seated position has the same anatomical features of the simulator in the standing posture. Using the MCNPX code [ref] was carried out the conversion coefficients for calculating the AP irradiation geometry (anteroposterior) comparing the AM simulator standing and sitting in order to evaluate the difference scattering and absorption of radiation by the two simulators. The result shows a difference up to 100% in the fluency conversion coefficients in nearby organs located in the pelvic region and in organs with distribution in the whole body (such as skin, muscle, lymph nodes and skeletal)

  18. Creation of a voxel phantom of the ICRP reference crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, E A; Higley, K A

    2013-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has modeled twelve reference animal and plant (RAP) species using simple geometric shapes in Monte-Carlo (MCNP) based simulations. The focus has now shifted to creating voxel phantoms of each RAP in order to estimate doses to biota with a higher degree of confidence. This paper describes the creation of a voxel model of a Dungeness crab from CT images with shell, gills, gonads, hepatopancreas, and heart identified and segmented. Absorbed fractions were tabulated for each organ as a source and target at twelve photon and nine electron energies: 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 MeV for photons and 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 4.0 MeV for electrons. AFs whose error exceeded 5% are marked with an underline in the data tables; AFs whose error was higher than 10% were excluded, and are shown in the tabulated data as a dashed line. A representative sample of the data is shown in Figs. 3-8; the entire data set is available as an electronic appendix. The results are consistent with previous small organism studies (Kinase, 2008; Stabin et al., 2006), and suggest that AF values are highly dependent on source organ location and mass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The ICRP message;Le message de la CIPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Lopez, P. [Groupe de travail de la CIPR sur la prevention des expositions accidentelles liees a l' utilisation des nouvelles technologies de Radiotherapie par Faisceau Externe, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    The ICRP gives its recommendations in the case of use of new technologies in radiotherapy: lessons learned from conventional technologies and also applicable to the new ones. Training, and specialization of the personnel as well as the need in personnel must be evaluated again. Managers of a radiotherapy service should bear in mind that the work environment must focus on concentration and avoid the risk of inattention. Manufacturers, for their part must provide reliable equipment with correct calibration files and documentation. the acquisition and implementation programs must focus not only on devices for treatment but also on treatment planning systems, computer systems and imaging devices used in radiation therapy, software, procedures and whole clinical process. The devices and procedures need to be re-classified after any changes to hardware, including upgrades and updates of software. The dosimetry protocols must be developed specially for the low doses irradiations and non standard irradiations. To increase the dose without increasing a probability of complication in sane tissues it is necessary to use a conformal therapy with a positioning of the patient. Communication is essential, especially concerning the activities of maintenance and repair that must ne notified to the physicists. In the same way, procedures of failures management in the computer systems must be implemented in order to avoid a loss of data susceptible to lead to serious accidental irradiations. The return of experience can be an help and then must be integrated in personnel training that is encouraged to share the experience in matter of incidents by providing information in a data base such the R.O.S.I.S. data base (radiation oncology safety information system). Before introducing new technologies it is recommended to realize probabilistic safety evaluations in order to develop quality assurance programmes integrating risk factors as, by example the analysis of failure modes and

  20. Diesel exhaust particulate extracts inhibit transcription of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and cell viability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Klinge, Carolyn M. [University of Louisville School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we tested the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particulate extracts (DEPEs), prepared from a truck run at different speeds and engine loads, would inhibit genomic estrogen receptor activation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, we examined how DEPEs affect NRF-1-regulated TFAM expression and, in turn, Tfam-regulated mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI, MTCO1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI) expression as well as cell proliferation and viability. We report that 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), and raloxifene increased NRF-1 transcription in HUVECs in an ER-dependent manner. DEPEs inhibited NRF-1 transcription, and this suppression was not ablated by concomitant treatment with E{sub 2}, 4-OHT, or raloxifene, indicating that the effect was not due to inhibition of ER activity. While E{sub 2} increased HUVEC proliferation and viability, DEPEs inhibited viability but not proliferation. Resveratrol increased NRF-1 transcription in an ER-dependent manner in HUVECs, and ablated DEPE inhibition of basal NRF-1 expression. Given that NRF-1 is a key nuclear transcription factor regulating genes involved in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, these data suggest that DEPEs may adversely affect mitochondrial function leading to endothelial dysfunction and resveratrol may block these effects. (orig.)

  1. Incidence and Risk Factors for Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infections among Children in the Remote Highlands of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andrew; Budge, Philip J.; Williams, John; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Johnson, Monika; Zhu, Yuwei; Hartinger, Stella; Verastegui, Hector; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The disease burden and risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (MPV) infections among children living in remote, rural areas remain unclear. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective, household-based cohort study of children aged factors for RSV detection included younger age (RR 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00-1.03), the presence of a smoker in the house (RR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.12-2.38), residing at higher altitudes (RR 1.93, 95% CI: 1.25-3.00 for 2nd compared to 1st quartile residents; RR 1.98, 95% CI: 1.26-3.13 for 3rd compared to 1st quartile residents). Having an unemployed household head was significantly associated with MPV risk (RR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.12-4.01). Conclusion In rural high altitude communities in Peru, childhood ARI due to RSV or MPV were common and associated with higher morbidity than ARI due to other viruses or with no viral detections. The risk factors identified in this study may be considered for interventional studies to control infections by these viruses among young children from developing countries. PMID:26107630

  2. Structural and Nonstructural Viral Proteins Are Targets of T-Helper Immune Response against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Mir, Carmen; Gebe, John A; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Proper antiviral humoral and cellular immune responses require previous recognition of viral antigenic peptides that are bound to HLA class II molecules, which are exposed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. The helper immune response is critical for the control and the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infection, a virus with severe health risk in infected pediatric, immunocompromised, and elderly populations. In this study, using a mass spectrometry analysis of complex HLA class II-bound peptide pools that were isolated from large amounts of HRSV-infected cells, 19 naturally processed HLA-DR ligands, most of them included in a complex nested set of peptides, were identified. Both the immunoprevalence and the immunodominance of the HLA class II response to HRSV were focused on one nonstructural (NS1) and two structural (matrix and mainly fusion) proteins of the infective virus. These findings have clear implications for analysis of the helper immune response as well as for antiviral vaccine design. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. ICRP PUBLICATION 123: Assessment of Radiation Exposure of Astronauts in Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Bartlett, D.T.; Cool, D.A.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Jia, X.; McAulay, I.R.; Pelliccioni, M.; Petrov, V.; Reitz, G.; Sato, T.

    2013-01-01

    -energy radiation fields in space are described. Results of calculations and measurements of radiation fields in spacecraft are given. Some data for shielding possibilities are also presented. Chapter 6 addresses methods of determining mean absorbed doses and dose equivalents in organs and tissues of the human body. Calculated conversion coefficients of fluence to mean absorbed dose in an organ or tissue are given for heavy ions up to Z = 28 for energies from 10 MeV/u to 100 GeV/u. For the same set of ions and ion energies, mean quality factors in organs and tissues are presented using, on the one hand, the Q(L) function defined in Publication 60 (ICRP, 1991), and, on the other hand, a Q function proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Doses in the body obtained by measurements are compared with results from calculations, and biodosimetric measurements for the assessment of mission doses are also presented. In Chapter 7, operational measures are considered for assessment of the exposure of astronauts during space missions. This includes preflight mission design, area and individual monitoring during flights in space, and dose recording. The importance of the magnitude of uncertainties in dose assessment is considered. Annex A shows conversion coefficients and mean quality factors for protons, charged pions, neutrons, alpha particles, and heavy ions(2 < Z ≤ 28), and particle energies up to 100 GeV/u

  4. Elucidative analysis and sequencing of two respiratory health monitoring methods to study the impact of varying atmospheric composition on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Amit; Hothi, Navjot; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Nirankar; Chakraborty, Monojit; Bansal, Sangeeta

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric composition of ambient air consists of different gases in definite proportion that affect the earth's climate and its ecological system. Due to varied anthropogenic reasons, this composition is changed, which ultimately have an impact on the health of living beings. For survival, the human respiratory system is one of the sensitive systems, which is easily and closely affected by the change in atmospheric composition of an external environment. Many studies have been conducted to quantify the effects of atmospheric pollution on human health by using different approaches. This article presents different scenario of studies conducted to evaluate the effects on different human groups. Differences between the studies conducted using spirometry and survey methods are presented in this article to extract a better sequence between these two methodologies. Many studies have been conducted to measure the respiratory status by evaluating the respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions. Limited numbers of studies are found with repeated spirometry on the same subjects for long duration to nullify the error arising due to decrease in efforts by the same subjects during manoeuvre of pulmonary function tests. Present study reveals the importance of methodological sequencing in order to obtain more authentic and reliable results. This study suggests that impacts of deteriorating atmospheric composition on human health can be more significantly studied if spirometry is done after survey analysis. The article also proposes that efficiency and authenticity of surveys involving health impacts will increase, if medical data information of patients is saved in hospitals in a proper format.

  5. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium; ICRP 2015. 3. Internationales Symposium zum System des Strahlenschutzes. Bericht und Reflexion ueber ein bedeutsames Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  6. The new recommendations of ICRP and their possible consequences for operating nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Hesse, Johannes; Schwarz, Wolfgang; Kapteinat, Heinzpeter; Holl, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Full text: After an extensive and very open debate within the Radiation Protection Community the new recommendations of the ICRP on the basic principles of radiation protection have been issued in 2007. The German nuclear industry has watched the process intensively and tried to bring in their large amount of experience from the daily radiation protection practice in numerous nuclear installations. Notably the ICRP seemed to follow some of the comments given by those experienced operators. The ICRP key message 'stability and continuity' is highly welcomed by industry. The dose levels resulting from well managed operations today are far below the dose limits due to a working system of ALARA thinking and doing. The basic principles of radiation protection as pointed out by ICRP decades ago have been proven to be an effective tool and are an essential part of the legal system of most countries with developed nuclear industries. Unfortunately, not all of the comments of the experienced operators have been considered to the desirable extend. A mayor point of criticism is the central role ICRP devoted to the use of dose constraints for any source. Dose constraints do play a role in today's practice of radiation protection but they have been rather supplementary than central in the system. The idea that for all sources, and there might be Hundreds or Thousands sometimes very tiny sources in a practice, a dose constraint shall exist sounds quite inappropriate. Another example which might disturb the great vision of 'stability and continuity' is the change of ICRP into a different view on protection. Instead of processes now situations are in the focus. There are some doubts about the benefits of such a move. People will always ask if there is a change of content when using a different terminology. A lot of fruitless discussions will probably result. Nevertheless, in spite of some criticism the new ICRP will contribute to strengthen the protection regime and industry will

  7. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Jr, J D Boice

    2005-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl x ) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl x occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl x in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information

  8. Proceedings of the 15th nuclear safety research association symposium ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This is the document of the Symposium in the title, held in Tokyo, 2003. The document contains the greeting by chairperson (Toshiso Kosako, International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) member, Tokyo University): lecture 1; for the title subject presented as ''ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on Radiological Protection'' with its slides entitled ''The Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection-The Justification for ICRP's 2005 Recommendations'' by L.-E. Holm (ICRP Vice-Chairman, Swedish Radiation Protection Authority): lecture 2; ''Protection of the Environment: from Ethics to Genetics''' with slides, ''Ionising Radiation and the Environment'', by R. J. Pentreath (ICRP member, The University of Reading, the United Kingdom (UK)): respectively followed by discussion with 3 Japanese panelists for each lecture: and chairperson's summary. The chair's greeting is about the rise of interest in environmental radiation protection, its background, and related trends in The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). L-EH's presentation involves sections of the background of the recommendations and protection of the environment, mentioning some of the proposed changes in the Commission's recommendations for its 2005 Recommendations. RJP's presentation involves sections of a philosophical platform, environmental management, relevance to radiation and its effects, points of reference and discussion where the impact of radionuclides and radiation in environment on various biological systems is mentioned in view for future. (R.T.)

  9. Aspects of ICRP 60 and ICRU 47 relevant to individual monitoring of external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Menzel, H.G.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure limits recommended by the ICRP and used in regulations are expressed in risk related quantities such as effective dose or effective dose equivalent. Operational quantities such as ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent are defined in phantoms and are designed to give reasonable estimates of exposure limiting quantities. The readings of individual dosemeters are calibrated in terms of operational quantities. The international commissions involved in the definition of risk related quantities (ICRP) and operational quantities (ICRU) have introduced various new definitions and modifications to previous quantities used in their respective publications ICRP 60 and ICRU 39, ICRU 47. The consequences of these alterations for the relationships between quantities within the hierarchy have to be examined and the new quantitative relationships (conversion coefficients) between basic physical radiation quantities such as particle fluence or air kerma and the new quantities have to be evaluated. In 1992, the ICRP and ICRU charged a joint task group with addressing these tasks with a view to revising ICRP Publication 51. This paper presents an outline for the subject of the report to be prepared by the task group. An introduction to the new phantom-based quantities is given and conceptional differences between the newly introduced and the previous quantities are discussed. (author)

  10. A theoretical approach to the deposition and clearance of fibers with variable size in the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, Robert; Hofmann, Werner

    2009-01-01

    In the study presented here, a mathematical approach for the deposition and clearance of rigid and chemically stable fibers in the human respiratory tract (HRT) is described in detail. For the simulation of fiber transport and deposition in lung airways an advanced concept of the aerodynamic diameter is applied to a stochastic lung model with individual particle trajectories computed according to a random walk algorithm. Interception of fibrous material at airway bifurcations is considered by implementation of correction factors obtained from previously published numerical approaches to fiber deposition in short bronchial sequences. Fiber clearance is simulated on the basis of a multicompartment model, within which separate clearance scenarios are assumed for the alveolar, bronchiolar, and bronchial lung region and evacuation of fibrous material commonly takes place via the airway and extrathoracic path to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) or via the transepithelial path to the lymph nodes and blood vessels. Deposition of fibrous particles in the HRT is controlled by the fiber aspect ratio β in as much as particles with diameters <0.1 μm deposit less effectively with increasing β, while larger particles exhibit a positive correlation between their deposition efficiencies and β. A change from sitting to light-work breathing conditions causes only insignificant modifications of total fiber deposition in the HRT, whereas alveolar and, above all, tubular deposition of fibrous particles with a diameter ≥0.1 μm are affected remarkably. For these particles enhancement of the inhalative flow rate results in an increase of the extrathoracic and bronchial deposition fractions. Concerning the clearance of fibers from the HRT, 24-h retention is noticeably influenced by β and, not less important, by the preferential deposition sites of the simulated particles. The significance of β with respect to particle size may be regarded as similar to that determined for the

  11. Dynamic innate immune responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Yoshikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human lung epithelial cells are likely among the first targets to encounter invading severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV. Not only can these cells support the growth of SARS-CoV infection, but they are also capable of secreting inflammatory cytokines to initiate and, eventually, aggravate host innate inflammatory responses, causing detrimental immune-mediated pathology within the lungs. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of the complex epithelial signaling to SARS-CoV is crucial for paving the way to better understand SARS pathogenesis. Based on microarray-based functional genomics, we report here the global gene response of 2B4 cells, a cloned bronchial epithelial cell line derived from Calu-3 cells. Specifically, we found a temporal and spatial activation of nuclear factor (NFkappaB, activator protein (AP-1, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3/7 in infected 2B4 cells at 12-, 24-, and 48-hrs post infection (p.i., resulting in the activation of many antiviral genes, including interferon (IFN-beta, -lambdas, inflammatory mediators, and many IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We also showed, for the first time, that IFN-beta and IFN-lambdas were capable of exerting previously unrecognized, non-redundant, and complementary abilities to limit SARS-CoV replication, even though their expression could not be detected in infected 2B4 bronchial epithelial cells until 48 hrs p.i. Collectively, our results highlight the mechanics of the sequential events of antiviral signaling pathway/s triggered by SARS-CoV in bronchial epithelial cells and identify novel cellular targets for future studies, aiming at advancing strategies against SARS.

  12. Phylogenetic evidence for intratypic recombinant events in a novel human adenovirus C that causes severe acute respiratory infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqun; Li, Yamin; Lu, Roujian; Zhao, Yanjie; Xie, Zhengde; Shen, Jun; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-03-10

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are prevalent in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Here, we report a unique recombinant HAdV strain (CBJ113) isolated from a HAdV-positive child with SARI. The whole-genome sequence was determined using Sanger sequencing and high-throughput sequencing. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome indicated that the CBJ113 strain shares a common origin with HAdV-C2, HAdV-C6, HAdV-C1, HAdV-C5, and HAdV-C57 and formed a novel subclade on the same branch as other HAdV-C subtypes. BootScan and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses showed that the CBJ113 genome has an intra-subtype recombinant structure and comprises gene regions mainly originating from two circulating viral strains: HAdV-1 and HAdV-2. The parental penton base, pVI, and DBP genes of the recombinant strain clustered with the HAdV-1 prototype strain, and the E1B, hexon, fiber, and 100 K genes of the recombinant clustered within the HAdV-2 subtype, meanwhile the E4orf1 and DNA polymerase genes of the recombinant shared the greatest similarity with those of HAdV-5 and HAdV-6, respectively. All of these findings provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics of the complexity of the HAdV-C epidemic. More extensive studies should address the pathogenicity and clinical characteristics of the novel recombinant.

  13. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  14. Human respiratory syncytial virus: prevalence, viral co-infections and risk factors for lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age at a general hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabego, Landry; Balol'Ebwami, Serge; Kasengi, Joe Bwija; Miyanga, Serge; Bahati, Yvette Lufungulo; Kambale, Richard; de Beer, Corena

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children under the age of 5 years at the Provincial General Hospital of Bukavu (PGHB), and to analyse factors associated with the risk of ARI being diagnosed as lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A total of 146 children under 5 years visiting the PGHB for ARI between August and December 2016 were recruited, and socio-demographic information, clinical data and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected. The samples were analysed by a multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction targeting 15 different viruses. Of 146 samples collected, 84 (57.5 %) displayed a positive result of at least one of the 15 viruses. The overall prevalence of HRSV was 21.2 %. HRSV A (30, 20.5 %) was the virus the most detected, followed by HRV (24, 16.4 %), PIV3 (20, 16.6) and ADV (7, 4.79 %). The other viruses were detected in three or fewer cases. There were only 11 (7.5 %) cases of co-infection. HRSV infection, malnutrition, younger age, rural settings, low income and mother illiteracy were associated with the risk of ARI being diagnosed as LRTI in bivariate analyses but, after adjusting for the confounding factors, only HRSV infection and younger age were independently associated with LRTI. The prevalence of HRSV is high among children visiting the PGHB for ARI. HRSV infection and lower age are independently associated with the risk of ARI being diagnosed as LRTI.

  15. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  16. ALI and DAC for transuranic elements based on the metabolic data presented in ICRP Publication 48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Orihiko; Yamaguchi, Yukichi; Homma, Toshimitsu

    1987-07-01

    The recently published ICRP report, ICRP Publication 48, presents the new metabolic data of some transuranic elements, compared with those employed in the calculation of ALI and DAC in ICRP Publication 30. Values of ALI and DAC for 72 radionuclides were calculated using the metabolic data presented in the Publication 48. The calculation was performed by a computer code system DOSDAC, which can systematically calculate ALI and DAC by the same method as that described in the Publication 30. The calculated values of ALI and DAC were tabulated in the same format as that of the supplements to the Publication 30. For the convenience of using in the dose assessment, also given are values of committed effective dose equivalent per intake of unit activity. It is expected that these values will be applied to the radiation protection purposes. (author)

  17. What do we know? where do we go from here? implications for ICRP developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.

    2002-01-01

    This first Nea forum is ' in collaboration with ICRP' and we wanted views from participants regarding our initiative on radiological protection of the environment. The members of the main Commission of ICRP who have attended this forum have been delighted with the outcome. ICRP has a range of options for its future activity with regard to radiological protection of the environment, starting with withdrawing altogether from the subject, through maintaining our current assertion, to fully developing a new policy. The emerging consensus from this meeting would suggest that the key elements of a system would involve a clear set of objectives and principles, an agreed set of quantities and units, a reference set of dose models for a defined number of reference fauna and flora, basic knowledge of radiation effects, a means of demonstrating compliance, regular views and revisions as new knowledge develops. (N.C.)

  18. On revision of definition of doses for radiation protection in ICRP 1990 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Michio

    1995-01-01

    The recommendation of ICRP is to give the guideline to the organizations and experts concerned to radiation protection including regulatory authorities on the basic rule which becomes the basis of proper radiation protection, and the radiation protection in respective countries has been carried out, respecting this ICRP recommendation. In 1990, ICRP revised this basic recommendation, and published as Publication 60. In this 1990 recommendation, as the matters that give impact to the dose evaluation of external exposure, the introduction of the new concept of dose, namely radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose, the revision of radiation quality factor and so on are enumerated. As to the 1990 recommendation, absorbed dose and organ dose, radiation weighting factor, equivalent dose, effective dose, quality factor-LET relation, the summation with the former quantities and the operational quantity of ICRU are described. The reason why radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose were introduced are discussed, including the inference of the author. (K.I.)

  19. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection norm and ICRP recommendations published in 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Servico de Radioprotecao. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Campus Pocos de Caldas; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (GETA/LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos. Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais; Mortagua, Valter, E-mail: Valter@inb.gov.br [Usina de lnterlagos (USIN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Coordenacao

    2013-07-01

    In the year 2007, ICRP published a set of recommendations (The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 103), which changed some important concepts. This work aims to compare the Brazilian radiation protection basic norm with the new ICRP recommendations, by checking the existing differences. The main difference between ICRP publication 60 and ICRP publication 103 is the changing of the concept of protection based on process, by using the concepts of practice and intervention, to the protection based in the exposition situation, by using the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existing situation. Other important difference lies in the values of the radiation and tissue weighting factors, in the quantities equivalent and effective dose, and updating the radiation detriment based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure. At last, the demonstration of the environment radiation protection must be clear, and this concept is not found in Brazilian nuclear legislation. Also some similarities were found. The fundamental principles of the Brazilian norms are the same as that of ICRP 103, which are the justification principle, the optimization principle and the application of dose limits. The individual effective dose limit of Brazilian norm is the same of the ICRP 103, established as 20 mSv per year. In order to adequate the Brazilian norm it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation and tissue weighting, and updating the radiation detriment, besides making clear the concept of protection of the environment. It is important to notice that although the Brazilian norm is not in complete agreement with all international recommendations, it must be completely followed as the norm which is in use in the country. (author)

  20. Calculation of local skin doses with ICRP adult mesh-type reference computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Haegin; Choi, Chansoo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Lee, Hanjin; Shin, Bangho; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Recently, Task Group 103 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed new mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) for adult males and females in order to address the limitations of the current voxel-type reference phantoms described in ICRP Publication 110 due to their limited voxel resolutions and the nature of the voxel geometry. One of the substantial advantages of the MRCPs over the ICRP-110 reference phantoms is the inclusion of a 50-μm-thick radiosensitive skin basal-cell layer; however, a methodology for calculating the local skin dose (LSD), i.e., the maximum dose to the basal layer averaged over a 1-cm2 area, has yet to be developed. In the present study, a dedicated program for the LSD calculation with the MRCPs was developed based on the mean shift algorithm and the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The developed program was used to calculate local skin dose coefficients (LSDCs) for electrons and alpha particles, which were then compared with the values given in ICRP Publication 116 that were produced with a simple tissue-equivalent cube model. The results of the present study show that the LSDCs of the MRCPs are generally in good agreement with the ICRP-116 values for alpha particles, but for electrons, significant differences are found at energies higher than 0.15 MeV. The LSDCs of the MRCPs are greater than the ICRP-116 values by as much as 2.7 times at 10 MeV, which is due mainly to the different curvature between realistic MRCPs ( i.e., curved) and the simple cube model ( i.e., flat).

  1. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  2. The use of the ICRP principles for controlling risks from potential exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.; Gonzalez, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Heretofore, ICRP recommendations for radiation protection mainly apply to radiation exposures that are expected to occur with near certainty during normal operation of radiation sources. It is anticipated that the new ICRP recommendations will deal more comprehensively with radiation safety by including consideration of exposure which might or might not occur, but for which a probability of occurrence can be assigned (potential exposure). This paper discusses issues and principles for a system of radiation safety which accommodates both radiation protection and nuclear safety standards and covers both normal and potential exposures. The principles are formulated by interpreting and extrapolating the principles of justification, optimization and dose limitation currently employed for normal exposure

  3. A regulatory view on the applicability of the new ICRP recommendations to nuclear safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Gomez, E.; Naegelin, R.; Vuorinen, A.P.U.

    1991-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations will cause several changes in the radiological practice. This paper discusses these changes from the point of regulatory view of nuclear safety. To avoid adverse short-term effects, the new risk estimates should be adopted in radiation protection standards with great care. The ultimate objective of nuclear safety is to protect people environment and property against radiological hazards. Improvements in principles and practices developed by the ICRP are important in reaching the primary goal. A severe nuclear accident must be prevented in advance. Every scientific and technical means have to used; optimization is not the solution of the problem

  4. Role IAEA implementation of ICRP-60 on regulations the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshinawy, R.K.M.; Gomaa, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    In november 1990, the (ICRP) adopted its 1990 recommendations (ICRP-60) ( 1). These recommendations will significantly influence not only IAEA's basic safety standards (safety series 9) ( 2), but also the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material ( 3) and its supporting documents ( 4-6). IAEA experts are currently engaged in the revision of the transport regulations. This revision process led to the publication of the revised transport regulations of 1966. The transport regulations are developed to ensure safety during movement of radioactive materials, and to provide reasonable assurance that the transport activities comply with the basic safety standards for radiation protection

  5. ALI and DAC for transuranic elements based on the metabolic data presented in ICRP publication 48

    OpenAIRE

    外川 織彦; 山口 勇吉; 本間 俊充

    1987-01-01

    最近刊行されたICRPの報告書、ICRP Publication 48にはICRP Publication 30の年摂取限度(ALI)と誘導空気中濃度(DAC)の計算に採用されたデータと比較して、いくつかの超ウラン元素について新しい代謝データが示されている。

  6. Resolutions of ICRP models with BIOKMOD: Application for the bioassays evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, G.

    2005-01-01

    Biokmod is a tool box developed using Mathematic for solving compartmental modes. It gives analytic and numeric solutions. Biokmod solves the current ICRP models including Acute, constant, continuous variable, multi-inputs and random intakes. All parameters (deposition factors, rate transfer coefficients, fractional rate of absorption, etc.) can be modified by users. It can be also applied for evaluating unknown intakes fitting bioassay experimental data and for evacuating uncertainties in the ICRP models. There is a web version (BiokmodWeb) at http://www3.enusa.es//webMathematica/public/biokmode.html. In this article we describe the application of Biokmod for evaluating Bioassays. (Author) 8 refs

  7. The computation of ICRP dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides with PLEIADES: biokinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, T P

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients conveniently divides into two distinct parts--the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper gives a brief summary of the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES.

  8. The computation of ICRP dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides with PLEIADES: biokinetic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients conveniently divides into two distinct parts - the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper gives a brief summary of the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES. (author)

  9. In vivo measurements of relaxation process in the human liver by MRI. The role of respiratory gating/triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1988-01-01

    In vivo estimation of relaxation processes in the liver by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful for characterization of various pathological conditions in the liver. However, such measurements may be significantly hampered by movement of the liver with the respiration. The effect...... of synchronization of data acquisition to the respiratory cycle on measured T1- and T2-relaxation curves was studied in normal subjects, patients with diffuse liver disease, and patients with focal liver pathology. Multi spin echo sequences with five different repetition times were used. The measurements were...... carried out with and without respiratory gating/triggering. In the healthy subjects as well as in the patients with diffuse liver diseases respiratory synchronization did not alter the obtained relaxation curves. However, in the patients with focal pathology the relaxation curves were significantly...

  10. Adaptation of the ICRP models for the Techa River populations to estimate in utero and postnatal haemopoietic tissue doses from ingested strontium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shagina, Natalia; Tolstykh, Evgenia; Degteva, Marina; Fell, Tim; Harrison, John

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Reliable estimation of tissue doses for exposed individuals is very important in epidemiological studies. Long-term cohort studies of the Techa River populations exposed in the early 1950s due to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak plutonium production facility (Southern Urals, Russia) are unique in allowing the quantification of risks from low-level chronic exposure of the general population and providing information on risks for persons exposed in utero. Strontium isotopes were the most important contributors to haemopoietic tissue doses for people living in the riverside settlements. Large-scale monitoring of the exposed population has provided a comprehensive database, including post mortem and in vivo measurements of 90 Sr in bones and whole body, for use in the estimation of doses. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published biokinetic and dosimetric models for the calculation of doses to members of the public, including doses from in utero exposures and from intakes with breast milk. However, the ICRP models as applied to Sr required modification to provide best estimates of doses to Techa River residents. Adaptations were made to the ICRP model for Sr in children and adults to take account of population-specific features relating to bone mineral turnover and to model age and gender differences in strontium retention. Refinements in the ICRP model for Sr uptake and retention in the fetus were made to improve the treatment of discrimination against Sr, relative to Ca, in transfer from maternal to foetal blood and to take account of population-specific data on the calcium content of the maternal and fetal skeleton. Modification of the ICRP model for Sr transfer in breast-milk included adaptations relating to changes in maternal mineral metabolism during lactation and consideration of population-specific features of breast feeding in the rural population. The improved models were successfully

  11. Development of internal dosimetry protocols using the code MCNPx and voxelized phantoms of Reference of ICRP 110; Desenvolvimento de protocolos de dosimetria interna empregando o codigo MCNPx e fantomas voxelizados de referencia da ICRP 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.M.; Fonseca, T.C.F., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br [Centro de esenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Trindade, B.M.; Campos, T.P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this work was to perform internal dosimetry calculations for {sup 18}F-FDG employing the MCNPx code and ICRP 110 voxelized reference phantoms (RCP{sub A}F and RCP{sub A}M). The methodologies developed and validated here represent protocols of internal dosimetry holding a better anthropomorphic and anthropometric representation of the human model in which heterogeneous distributions of the emissions can be adopted, useful in the study of new radiopharmaceuticals and internal contamination cases. The reference phantoms were implemented to run on MCNPx. Biodistribution data of {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical provided in ICRP 128 were used in the simulations. The organs average absorbed doses and the effective doses were calculated for each model. The values obtained were compared with two reference works available in the literature for validation purposes. The means of the difference of our values and Zankl et al., 2012 reference values were -0.3% for RCP{sub A}M and -0.4% for RCP{sub A}F. Considering Hadid et al., 2013 reference values, the means of the deviation were -2.9% and -2.2% for RCP{sub A}M and RCP{sub A}F respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed (p <0.01) between the reference values and the values calculated by the internal dosimetry protocols developed by our group. Considering the {sup 18}F-FDG validation study performed in this work, the internal dosimetry protocols developed by our group have produced suitable dosimetry data. (author)

  12. The Virome and Its Major Component, Anellovirus, a Convoluted System Molding Human Immune Defenses and Possibly Affecting the Development of Asthma and Respiratory Diseases in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome, a thriving and complex microbial community colonizing the human body, has a broad impact on human health. Colonization is a continuous process that starts very early in life and occurs thanks to shrewd strategies microbes have evolved to tackle a convoluted array of anatomical, physiological, and functional barriers of the human body. Cumulative evidence shows that viruses are part of the microbiome. This part, called virome, has a dynamic composition that reflects what we eat, how and where we live, what we do, our genetic background, and other unpredictable variables. Thus, the virome plays a chief role in shaping innate and adaptive host immune defenses. Imbalance of normal microbial flora is thought to trigger or exacerbate many acute and chronic disorders. A compelling example can be found in the respiratory apparatus, where early-life viral infections are major determinants for the development of allergic diseases, like asthma, and other non-transmissible diseases. In this review, we focus on the virome and, particularly, on Anelloviridae, a recently discovered virus family. Anelloviruses are major components of the virome, present in most, if not all, human beings, where they are acquired early in life and replicate persistently without causing apparent disease. We will discuss how modulation of innate and adaptive immune systems by Anelloviruses can influence the development of respiratory diseases in childhood and provide evidence for the use of Anelloviruses as useful and practical molecular markers to monitor inflammatory processes and immune system competence.

  13. Unsaturated long-chain fatty acids induce the respiratory burst of human neutrophils and monocytes in whole blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osthaus Wilhelm A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly recognized that infectious complications in patients treated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN may be caused by altered immune responses. Neutrophils and monocytes are the first line of defence against bacterial and fungal infection through superoxide anion production during the respiratory burst. To characterize the impact of three different types of lipid solutions that are applied as part of TPN formulations, we investigated the unstimulated respiratory burst activation of neutrophils and monocytes in whole blood. Methods Whole blood samples were incubated with LCT (Intralipid®, LCT/MCT (Lipofundin® and LCT-MUFA (ClinOleic® in three concentrations (0.06, 0.3 and 0.6 mg ml-1 for time periods up to one hour. Hydrogen peroxide production during the respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Results LCT and LCT-MUFA induced a hydrogen peroxide production in neutrophils and monocytes without presence of a physiological stimulus in contrast to LCT/MCT. Conclusion We concluded that parenteral nutrition containing unsaturated oleic (C18:1 and linoleic (C18:2 acid can induce respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes, resulting in an elevated risk of tissue damage by the uncontrolled production of reactive oxygen species. Contradictory observations reported in previous studies may in part be the result of different methods used to determine hydrogen peroxide production.

  14. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlicher, L.

    1982-01-01

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125 I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Characterization of human coronavirus etiology in Chinese adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection by real-time RT-PCR assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roujian Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to SARS associated coronaviruses, 4 non-SARS related human coronaviruses (HCoVs are recognized as common respiratory pathogens. The etiology and clinical impact of HCoVs in Chinese adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI needs to be characterized systematically by molecular detection with excellent sensitivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we detected 4 non-SARS related HCoV species by real-time RT-PCR in 981 nasopharyngeal swabs collected from March 2009 to February 2011. All specimens were also tested for the presence of other common respiratory viruses and newly identified viruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV and human bocavirus (HBoV. 157 of the 981 (16.0% nasopharyngeal swabs were positive for HCoVs. The species detected were 229E (96 cases, 9.8%, OC43 (42 cases, 4.3%, HKU1 (16 cases, 1.6% and NL63 (11 cases, 1.1%. HCoV-229E was circulated in 21 of the 24 months of surveillance. The detection rates for both OC43 and NL63 were showed significantly year-to-year variation between 2009/10 and 2010/11, respectively (P<0.001 and P = 0.003, and there was a higher detection frequency of HKU1 in patients aged over 60 years (P = 0.03. 48 of 157(30.57% HCoV positive patients were co-infected. Undifferentiated human rhinoviruses and influenza (Flu A were the most common viruses detected (more than 35% in HCoV co-infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV and HBoV were detected in very low rate (less than 1% among adult patients with URTI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All 4 non-SARS-associated HCoVs were more frequently detected by real-time RT-PCR assay in adults with URTI in Beijing and HCoV-229E led to the most prevalent infection. Our study also suggested that all non-SARS-associated HCoVs contribute significantly to URTI in adult patients in China.

  16. Effects of Household Air Pollution in Malawi and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Status on Respiratory Symptoms and Inflammation, Injury, and Repair Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles; Jary, Hannah; Mortimer, Kevin; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Curran-Everett, Doug; Gordon, Stephen; Petrache, Irina

    2018-04-01

    Household air pollution (HAP) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are associated with increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both HAP and HIV are widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Malawi, where HIV has 10.6% prevalence in patients 15-49 years old. We hypothesized that HIV infection (HIV + ) and habitual exposure to HAP (HAP + ) synergize to cause systemic inflammation and vascular injury, which may herald early onset of chronic respiratory diseases. In this pilot study, 50 subjects from Malawi with known HIV status were administered surveys recording demographics, HAP exposure, and respiratory symptoms/diagnoses. Peripheral blood was collected, and Meso Scale Discovery V-Plex assay was used to measure the levels of 41 serum markers. Almost all subjects (96%) reported HAP + , 30 were HIV + , 20 were HIV - , with a mean age of 22 years in both groups. More females (73%) were HIV + , whereas 65% of those who were HIV - were males. The vast majority were never-smokers (70% of HIV - and 83% of HIV + subjects, respectively). Forty-six percent of all subjects (57% of HIV + HAP + and 33% of HIV - HAP + ) reported respiratory diagnoses and/or respiratory symptoms, with breathlessness and cough being most common. Although HIV + HAP + individuals had a trend to increased proinflammatory cytokines and vascular injury markers, and decreases in proangiogenic factors compared with HIV - HAP + , only the decrease in serum interleukin-16 (by 44%) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). Also, compared with other subjects, serum interleukin-2 levels were significantly decreased (by 31%; P = 0.02) in HIV + subjects with persistent respiratory symptoms. This study suggests a high prevalence of respiratory symptoms in HIV + individuals exposed to HAP. The significant decrease in interleukin-2 and interleukin-16, cytokines associated with HIV clearance, may contribute to viral persistence, and because their low levels were found to correlate with

  17. Optimization of radiological protection and dose constraints in the new draft ICRP Recommendations 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    2007-01-01

    The overall concept of the new ICRP Recommendations 2006 is analyzed, the concept of dose constraints as a basic tool of radiological protection management is described, arguments and criticisms against the current proposal are cited and points of dispute highlighted, and perspectives of the Recommendations are assessed. (author)

  18. Significance of the new ICRP dose limits in the Indian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The ICRP estimates the risk quantities using the primary risk coefficients from the results of Japanese survivor studies (with DDREF of 2) along with the all-causes mortality and survival probabilities of the Swedish population. In the present work, risk quantities have been computed using the ICRP estimates of the attributable conditional cancer death probability rates for different exposure levels along with the survival probabilities of the Indian population from the official Indian life tables. For this purpose the parameters of the latest Indian life tables are extrapolated beyond the highest tabulated age of 70 years by 'logit transformation' using the parameters of the complete Indian life table to age 100 years for the period 1951-60 as standard. The results of the present work show that the Indian and the Swedish-ICRP risk quantity estimates are consistent as a function of the life expectancies of the populations and that the Swedish-ICRP risk quantity estimates contain safety factors of about 2 in the Indian context. (author)

  19. The programme of work on committee 2 of ICRP on internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Committee 2 of ICRP has the responsibility for establishing secondary standards based on the Commission's recommended dose limits. The Committee has an extensive programme of work related to internally incorporated radionuclides which was reviewed at its September, 1997 meeting in Oxford, England. It is summarized below. (author)

  20. Reference methodologies and datasets of ICRP Committee 2 on doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovskyvl, V.; Harrison, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    A quantitative characterisation of exposures is a core element of the ICRP system of protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Such prospective and retrospective characterisations, or 'dose assessments', are required by international and national safety standards for public, occupational and medical exposures that can occur in various exposure situations

  1. The ICRP 60 and the agency's regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggio, A.L.; Novo, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has adopted its new '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection' in November 1990, they were published in 1991 as 'ICRP Publication 60.' Two main scenarios are considered by the new ICRP's recommendations: a) Protection in proposed and continuing practices (further subdivided as protection against actual exposures and protection against potential exposures); and b) Protection by intervention. Although intervention means any activity in order to decrease the overall exposure, removing existing sources, modifying pathways or reducing the number of exposed individuals, in relation to the transport of radioactive materials, protection by intervention is related mainly to emergency planning, while protection against actual and potential exposures can be considered as the subject of most of the requirements of the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material', of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The on-going revision of the IAEA Safety Series No. 9, which is aimed at putting this publication in line with the new ICRP recommendations will, for the first time, provide a convalidated radiological framework for the 1996 revision of the Agency Transport Regulations. However, to adapt to the transport area the radiological principles and criteria will require a significant effort and a carefully evaluation of the overall impact of each change proposed. (J.P.N.)

  2. Committee 2 of the ICRP: overview of the current and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the current and future work of ICRP Committee 2 was briefly discussed, the discussion was limited to internal dosimetry. The main topics were as follows: (1) Internal dose to members of the public; (2) Internal dose to the workers; (3) Internal dose to patients using radiopharmaceuticals

  3. Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in South African Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Pregnant and Postpartum Women: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, Shabir A; Cutland, Clare L; Downs, Sarah; Jones, Stephanie; van Niekerk, Nadia; Simoes, Eric A F; Nunes, Marta C

    2018-05-17

    Limited data exist on the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) illness among pregnant women, to determine their potential benefit from RSV vaccination. We evaluated the incidence of RSV illness from midpregnancy until 24 weeks postpartum in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected and HIV-infected women and their infants. Mother-infant dyads were enrolled in maternal influenza vaccine efficacy trials. These included 1060 and 1056 HIV-uninfected pregnant women in 2011 and 2012, respectively, 194 HIV-infected pregnant women in 2011, and their infants. Upper respiratory tract samples obtained at illness visits were tested for RSV. The incidence (per 1000 person-months) of RSV illness (n = 43 overall) among HIV-uninfected women was lower in 2011 (1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], .6-2.2) than in 2012 (4.0; 95% CI, 2.8-5.6). The incidence of RSV illness (n = 5) in HIV-infected women was 3.4 (95% CI, 1.4-8.1). Maternal RSV infection was associated with respiratory symptoms including cough (72.1%), rhinorrhea (39.5%), sore throat (37.2%), and headache (42%), but fever was absent. RSV infection during pregnancy was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Postpartum, RSV infection in mothers (n = 27) was associated with concurrent infection among 51.9% of their infants and, conversely, 29.8% of mothers investigated within 7 days of their infants having an RSV illness also tested positive for RSV. RSV infection is associated with respiratory illness during pregnancy and postpartum. Vaccination of pregnant women against RSV could benefit the mother, albeit primarily against nonfebrile illness, and her infant. NCT01306669 and NCT01306682.

  4. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C.

    1998-01-01

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2±1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of the criteria used by the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) to justify the setting of numerical reference values. Report No. 277

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.; Lochard, J.; Crouail, P.

    2005-05-01

    Following its Publication 60, ICRP has proposed nine reports specifying quantified values for dose constraints, action levels, etc. Some 25 values have been identified in all these publications. Since a few years, ICRP is preparing new recommendations in order to provide 'a more coherent and comprehensible system'. The objective of ICRP is to propose to select among the existing quantified values, a few values that could encompass all the other ones. These values are not intended to replace the currently recommended values which remain valid. In this perspective, IRSN has asked CEPN to make a review of all the values introduced in the ICRP publications in order to obtain a broad view of the rationalities proposed by ICRP in the determination of these values. The following Publications of ICRP have been reviewed: - ICRP 60 - 1990 - 1990 Recommendations of ICRP, - ICRP 62 - 1992 - Radiological protection in biomedical research, - ICRP 63 - 1992 - Principles for intervention for protection of the public in a radiological emergency, - ICRP 64 - 1993 - Protection from potential exposure: a conceptual framework, - ICRP 65 - 1993 - Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, - ICRP 68 - 1994 - Dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by workers, - ICRP 75 - 1997 - General principles for the radiation protection of workers, - ICRP 77 - 1997 - Radiological protection policy for the disposal of radioactive waste, - ICRP 81 - 2000 - Radiation protection recommendations as applied to the disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste, - ICRP 82 - 2000 - Protection of the public in situations of prolonged radiation exposure. The different quantitative values found in these publications are presented in this report, grouped by type of value: individual dose limits, 'maximum' individual dose, dose constraints, exemption, action and intervention levels. The rationalities proposed by ICRP for setting these values are presented, mainly based on the quotation of ICRP

  6. Bioengineered 2'-fucosyllactose and 3-fucosyllactose inhibit the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enteric pathogens to human intestinal and respiratory cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Stefan; Jennewein, Stefan; Hüfner, Eric; Weiss, Christel; Borkowski, Julia; Putze, Johannes; Schroten, Horst

    2013-10-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides help to prevent infectious diseases in breastfed infants. Larger scale testing, particularly in animal models and human clinical studies, is still limited due to shortened availability of more complex oligosaccharides. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) synthesized by whole-cell biocatalysis for their biological activity in vitro. Therefore, we have tested these oligosaccharides for their inhibitory potential of pathogen adhesion in two different human epithelial cell lines. 2'-FL could inhibit adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar fyris, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the intestinal human cell line Caco-2 (reduction of 26%, 18%, 12%, and 17%, respectively), as could be shown for 3-FL (enteropathogenic E coli 29%, P aeruginosa 26%). Furthermore, adherence of P aeruginosa to the human respiratory epithelial cell line A549 was significantly inhibited by 2'-FL and 3-FL (reduction of 24% and 23%, respectively). These results confirm the biological and functional activity of biotechnologically synthesized human milk oligosaccharides. Mass-tailored human milk oligosaccharides could be used in the future to supplement infant formula ingredients or as preventatives to reduce the impact of infectious diseases. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A human-like H1N2 influenza virus detected during an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in swine in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rejane; Rech, Raquel Rubia; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Mauricio Egídio; da Silva, Marcia Cristina; Silveira, Simone; Zanella, Janice Reis Ciacci

    2015-01-01

    Passive monitoring for detection of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in pigs has been carried out in Brazil since 2009, detecting mostly the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus. Since then, outbreaks of acute respiratory disease suggestive of influenza A virus infection have been observed frequently in Brazilian pig herds. During a 2010-2011 influenza monitoring, a novel H1N2 influenza virus was detected in nursery pigs showing respiratory signs. The pathologic changes were cranioventral acute necrotizing bronchiolitis to subacute proliferative and purulent bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Lung tissue samples were positive for both influenza A virus and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus based on RT-qPCR of the matrix gene. Two IAVs were isolated in SPF chicken eggs. HI analysis of both swine H1N2 influenza viruses showed reactivity to the H1δ cluster. DNA sequencing was performed for all eight viral gene segments of two virus isolates. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the HA and NA genes clustered with influenza viruses of the human lineage (H1-δ cluster, N2), whereas the six internal gene segments clustered with the A(H1N1)pdm09 group. This is the first report of a reassortant human-like H1N2 influenza virus derived from pandemic H1N1 virus causing an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs in Brazil. The emergence of a reassortant IAV demands the close monitoring of pigs through the full-genome sequencing of virus isolates in order to enhance genetic information about IAVs circulating in pigs.

  8. Genetic variability in G2 and F2 region between biological clones of human respiratory syncytial virus with or without host immune selection pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trigo Pedroso Moraes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is an important respiratory pathogens among children between zero-five years old. Host immunity and viral genetic variability are important factors that can make vaccine production difficult. In this work, differences between biological clones of HRSV were detected in clinical samples in the absence and presence of serum collected from children in the convalescent phase of the illness and from their biological mothers. Viral clones were selected by plaque assay in the absence and presence of serum and nucleotide sequences of the G2 and F2 genes of HRSV biological clones were compared. One non-synonymous mutation was found in the F gene (Ile5Asn in one clone of an HRSV-B sample and one non-synonymous mutation was found in the G gene (Ser291Pro in four clones of the same HRSV-B sample. Only one of these clones was obtained after treatment with the child's serum. In addition, some synonymous mutations were determined in two clones of the HRSV-A samples. In conclusion, it is possible that minor sequences could be selected by host antibodies contributing to the HRSV evolutionary process, hampering the development of an effective vaccine, since we verify the same codon alteration in absence and presence of human sera in individual clones of BR-85 sample.

  9. Genetic variability in G2 and F2 region between biological clones of human respiratory syncytial virus with or without host immune selection pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Claudia Trigo Pedroso; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal; Campos, Angelica Cristine Almeida; Bosso, Patricia Alves; Lima, Hildener Nogueira; Stewien, Klaus Eberhard; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Vieira, Sandra Elisabete; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2015-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important respiratory pathogens among children between zero-five years old. Host immunity and viral genetic variability are important factors that can make vaccine production difficult. In this work, differences between biological clones of HRSV were detected in clinical samples in the absence and presence of serum collected from children in the convalescent phase of the illness and from their biological mothers. Viral clones were selected by plaque assay in the absence and presence of serum and nucleotide sequences of the G2 and F2 genes of HRSV biological clones were compared. One non-synonymous mutation was found in the F gene (Ile5Asn) in one clone of an HRSV-B sample and one non-synonymous mutation was found in the G gene (Ser291Pro) in four clones of the same HRSV-B sample. Only one of these clones was obtained after treatment with the child's serum. In addition, some synonymous mutations were determined in two clones of the HRSV-A samples. In conclusion, it is possible that minor sequences could be selected by host antibodies contributing to the HRSV evolutionary process, hampering the development of an effective vaccine, since we verify the same codon alteration in absence and presence of human sera in individual clones of BR-85 sample.

  10. Activity of Ingavirin (6-[2-(1H-Imidazol-4-ylethylamino]-5-oxo-hexanoic Acid Against Human Respiratory Viruses in in Vivo Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg I. Kiselev

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory viral infections constitute the most frequent reason for medical consultations in the World. They can be associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from self-limited upper respiratory tract infections to more devastating conditions such as pneumonia. In particular, in serious cases influenza A leads to pneumonia, which is particularly fatal in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases, obesity, young children and the elderly. In the present study, we show a protective effect of the low-molecular weight compound Ingavirin (6-[2-(1H-imidazol-4-ylethylamino]-5-oxohexanoic acid against influenza A (H1N1 virus, human parainfluenza virus and human adenovirus infections in animals. Mortality, weight loss, infectious titer of the virus in tissues and tissue morphology were monitored in the experimental groups of animals. The protective action of Ingavirin was observed as a reduction of infectious titer of the virus in the lung tissue, prolongation of the life of the infected animals, normalization of weight dynamics throughout the course of the disease, lowering of mortality of treated animals compared to a placebo control and normalization of tissue structure. In case of influenza virus infection, the protective activity of Ingavirin was similar to that of the reference compound Tamiflu. Based on the results obtained, Ingavirin should be considered as an important part of anti-viral prophylaxis and therapy.

  11. ICRP PUBLICATION 122: radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W; Larsson, C-M; McKenney, C; Minon, J-P; Mobbs, S; Schneider, T; Umeki, H; Hilden, W; Pescatore, C; Vesterlind, M

    2013-06-01

    This report updates and consolidates previous recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) related to solid waste disposal (ICRP, 1985, 1997b, 1998). The recommendations given apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the ICRP system of radiological protection described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. Although the report is written as a standalone document, previous ICRP recommendations not dealt with in depth in the report are still valid. The 2007 ICRP system of radiological protection evolves from the previous process-based protection approach relying on the distinction between practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the distinction between three types of exposure situation: planned, emergency and existing. The Recommendations maintains the Commission's three fundamental principles of radiological protection namely: justification, optimisation of protection and the application of dose limits. They also maintain the current individual dose limits for effective dose and equivalent dose from all regulated sources in planned exposure situations. They re-enforce the principle of optimisation of radiological protection, which applies in a similar way to all exposure situations, subject to restrictions on individual doses: constraints for planned exposure situations, and reference levels for emergency and existing exposure situations. The Recommendations also include an approach for developing a framework to demonstrate radiological protection of the environment. This report describes the different stages in the life time of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that

  12. ICRP PUBLICATION 122: Radiological Protection in Geological Disposal of Long-lived Solid Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.; Larsson, C-M.; McKenney, C.; Minon, J-P.; Mobbs, S.; Schneider, T.; Umeki, H.; Hilden, W.; Pescatore, C.; Vesterlind, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report updates and consolidates previous recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) related to solid waste disposal (ICRP, 1985, 1997b, 1998). The recommendations given apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the ICRP system of radiological protection described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. Although the report is written as a standalone document, previous ICRP recommendations not dealt with in depth in the report are still valid. The 2007 ICRP system of radiological protection evolves from the previous process-based protection approach relying on the distinction between practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the distinction between three types of exposure situation: planned, emergency and existing. The Recommendations maintains the Commission’s three fundamental principles of radiological protection namely: justification, optimisation of protection and the application of dose limits. They also maintain the current individual dose limits for effective dose and equivalent dose from all regulated sources in planned exposure situations. They re-enforce the principle of optimisation of radiological protection, which applies in a similar way to all exposure situations, subject to restrictions on individual doses: constraints for planned exposure situations, and reference levels for emergency and existing exposure situations. The Recommendations also include an approach for developing a framework to demonstrate radiological protection of the environment. This report describes the different stages in the life time of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that

  13. Changes in the etiology, incidence and prognosis of acute lower respiratory track infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelló, Rafael; Escoda, Ona; Camón, Silvia; Miró, Òscar; Castañeda, Marta; Moreno, Asunción; Marcos, Maria Ángeles; Perea, Verónica; Alcolea, Natalia; Sánchez, Miquel; Gatell, Josep Maria; Martínez, Esteban

    2015-04-01

    To describe the incidence, the changes in the etiology and the prognosis of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in HIV infected patients, presenting by the first time to the Emergency Department (ED), during years 2000-2010. Prospective collection of data. Data were collected on the first visit of HIV-infected patients at our ED due to a LRTI, (defined according to the criteria of the European Respiratory Society), between 1/1/2000 and 31/12/2010. A series of epidemiological and laboratory variables as well as the need for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). LRTI etiology were also collected. The influence ofthe mentioned variables on 30-day mortality were analyzed. One hundred thirty one patients were included. LRTI represented 27% of visits to the ED by HIV-infected patients. Mean age was 39±9 years. 72% of patients were males. 18% required admission to the ICU. The most frequent LRTI was pneumonia by P. jiroveci in 35 cases, bacterial penumonia in 27 and pulmonary tuberculosis in 20. LRTI incidence gradually reduced significantly over time from 6.13 × 1000 patients/year in year 2000 to 0.23 × 1000 patients/year in 2010 (pde Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity and Adaptation of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotypes Circulating in Two Distinct Communities: Public Hospital and Day Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rocha Garcia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available HRSV is one of the most important pathogens causing acute respiratory tract diseases as bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants. HRSV was isolated from two distinct communities, a public day care center and a public hospital in São José do Rio Preto – SP, Brazil. We obtained partial sequences from G gene that were used on phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis. HRSV accounted for 29% of respiratory infections in hospitalized children and 7.7% in day care center children. On phylogenetic analysis of 60 HRSV strains, 48 (80% clustered within or adjacent to the GA1 genotype; GA5, NA1, NA2, BA-IV and SAB1 were also observed. SJRP GA1 strains presented variations among deduced amino acids composition and lost the potential O-glycosilation site at amino acid position 295, nevertheless this resulted in an insertion of two potential O-glycosilation sites at positions 296 and 297. Furthermore, a potential O-glycosilation site insertion, at position 293, was only observed for hospital strains. Using SLAC and MEME methods, only amino acid 274 was identified to be under positive selection. This is the first report on HRSV circulation and genotypes classification derived from a day care center community in Brazil.

  15. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  16. Application of the Commission’s recommendations: the activities of ICRP Committee 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Committee 4 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is responsible for developing principles, recommendations, and guidance on the protection of man against radiation exposure; and considering their practical application in all exposure situations. The Committee also acts as a major point of contact between ICRP and other international organisations and professional bodies concerned with protection against ionising radiation. The current work of the Committee involves the development of a series of reports on implementation of the 2007 Recommendations, and a reflection on the ethical foundations of the radiological protection system. Following the accident in Fukushima, Committee 4 also initiated an analysis of management of the consequences of the accident, with the objective of revising, if necessary, the Commission’s publications on emergency and post-accident situations.

  17. Population specific absorption studies for some diet incorporated trace elements : comparison with ICRP data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameswaran, M.; Dang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    Daily intake and excretion can provide an important information regarding the absorption through the gastro-intestinal tract (f1 factor) of trace elements incorporated in diet. The absorption may depend upon the kind of diet consumed, the content of the fibre, protein etc and it could be quite different for two populations groups with entirely different food habits. ICRP has provided data on the intake and excretion of 63 trace elements by Caucasian population representing North American and European adults. This paper reports intake and excretion of twelve elements Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Mn, Rb, Fe, Zn, Sr, Li and Cr for an urban adult Indian population group and compares with corresponding data on ICRP reference man. (author)

  18. Views from the japanese nuclear industry and radiation protection professionals on the draft ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Y.; Choi, H.S.; Muto, S.; Oda, K.; Ishiguchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    The views of the Japanese nuclear industry, radiation protection professionals, and medical professionals on the concepts of the draft recommendations were presented. Specific concerns and suggestions were expressed in each of these fields based on practical considerations and experiences in operational radiation protection. It was noted that there is no need to complicate the current system, in particular without effectively expressed and rational reasoning. However, in general, speakers and participants in these discussions showed an understanding of ICRP publications. (authors)

  19. Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protecion (1977) ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: principles of radiation protection (the reports of ICRP; basis for establishing dose limits; types of radiation harm; occupational dose limits; estimates of tissue dose equivalent; uniformity of tissue dose equivalent; systems of dose limitation; protection of members of the public; exposure of the population); radiation protection in practice (protection standards, types of exposure). (U.K.)

  20. Present situation and influence of new ICRP recommendations on radioactive material transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamard, J.; Ringot, C.

    1991-01-01

    The publication of new ICRP recommendations will involve the revision of IAEA standards and consequently the revision of transport regulations for radioactive materials. Transport regulations are briefly reviewed and application for radiation protection of workers and public is examined. Influence of new recommendations on transport regulations and eventual modifications on classification and transport of materials, packaging design and permissible exposure for workers and public in the prospect of regulation revision forecasted for 1995

  1. Alkaline earth metabolism: the ICRP model reformulated as a semi-Markov model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, A.H.; Becker, A.

    1980-01-01

    Compartmental models are reformulated so as to allow power function or mixed exponential-power function residence time distributions in bone compartments. Numerical results reported for retention functions of calcium, strontium, barium and radium are in reasonable agreement with the ICRP models except at shorter time scales. The number of visits to bone is also sensitive to short-term elimination parameters, so that recycling corrections may require much more detailed analyses at both long and short time-scales. (author)

  2. A Triple Co-Culture Model of the Human Respiratory Tract to Study Immune-Modulatory Effects of Liposomes and Virosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A M Blom

    Full Text Available The respiratory tract with its ease of access, vast surface area and dense network of antigen-presenting cells (APCs represents an ideal target for immune-modulation. Bio-mimetic nanocarriers such as virosomes may provide immunomodulatory properties to treat diseases such as allergic asthma. In our study we employed a triple co-culture model of epithelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells to simulate the human airway barrier. The epithelial cell line 16HBE was grown on inserts and supplemented with human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and dendritic cells (MDDCs for exposure to influenza virosomes and liposomes. Additionally, primary human nasal epithelial cells (PHNEC and EpCAM+ epithelial progenitor cell mono-cultures were utilized to simulate epithelium from large and smaller airways, respectively. To assess particle uptake and phenotype change, cell cultures were analyzed by flow cytometry and pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured by ELISA. All cell types internalized virosomes more efficiently than liposomes in both mono- and co-cultures. APCs like MDMs and MDDCs showed the highest uptake capacity. Virosome and liposome treatment caused a moderate degree of activation in MDDCs from mono-cultures and induced an increased cytokine production in co-cultures. In epithelial cells, virosome uptake was increased compared to liposomes in both mono- and co-cultures with EpCAM+ epithelial progenitor cells showing highest uptake capacity. In conclusion, all cell types successfully internalized both nanocarriers with virosomes being taken up by a higher proportion of cells and at a higher rate inducing limited activation of MDDCs. Thus virosomes may represent ideal carrier antigen systems to modulate mucosal immune responses in the respiratory tract without causing excessive inflammatory changes.

  3. Cleavage of a Neuroinvasive Human Respiratory Virus Spike Glycoprotein by Proprotein Convertases Modulates Neurovirulence and Virus Spread within the Central Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Le Coupanec

    Full Text Available Human coronaviruses (HCoV are respiratory pathogens that may be associated with the development of neurological diseases, in view of their neuroinvasive and neurotropic properties. The viral spike (S glycoprotein is a major virulence factor for several coronavirus species, including the OC43 strain of HCoV (HCoV-OC43. In an attempt to study the role of this protein in virus spread within the central nervous system (CNS and neurovirulence, as well as to identify amino acid residues important for such functions, we compared the sequence of the S gene found in the laboratory reference strain HCoV-OC43 ATCC VR-759 to S sequences of viruses detected in clinical isolates from the human respiratory tract. We identified one predominant mutation at amino acid 758 (from RRSR↓ G758 to RRSR↓R758, which introduces a putative furin-like cleavage (↓ site. Using a molecular cDNA infectious clone to generate a corresponding recombinant virus, we show for the first time that such point mutation in the HCoV-OC43 S glycoprotein creates a functional cleavage site between the S1 and S2 portions of the S protein. While the corresponding recombinant virus retained its neuroinvasive properties, this mutation led to decreased neurovirulence while potentially modifying the mode of virus spread, likely leading to a limited dissemination within the CNS. Taken together, these results are consistent with the adaptation of HCoV-OC43 to the CNS environment, resulting from the selection of quasi-species harboring mutations that lead to amino acid changes in viral genes, like the S gene in HCoV-OC43, which may contribute to a more efficient establishment of a less pathogenic but persistent CNS infection. This adaptative mechanism could potentially be associated with human encephalitis or other neurological degenerative pathologies.

  4. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Zankl, M; Bolch, W E; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E; Hunt, J G; Pelliccioni, M; Schlattl, H; Menzel, H-G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors.

  5. Calculation of skin dose due to beta contamination using the new quantity of the ICRP 116: the local skin dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.; Menard, S.; Comte, N.

    2017-01-01

    Values of the new protection quantity Local Skin Dose 'LSD', introduced by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116, were calculated for 134 β - or β + emitting radionuclides, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. Two types of source geometry are considered: a point source and disc-type surface contamination (the source is placed in contact with the skin). This new protection quantity is compared with the operational quantity H2 (0.07, 0 deg.), leading us to conclude that, in accordance with the rules of the ICRP, the operational quantity over-estimates the protection quantity to a reasonable extent, except in very rare cases for very low average beta energies. Thus, with the new skin model described in ICRP 116, there are no longer any major differences between the operational quantities and protection quantities estimated with the skin model described in ICRP 74. (authors)

  6. Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Features of Human Adenoviruses Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections in Hospitalized Children in Southern China, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Fanghua; Wang, Changbing; Zhao, Mingqi; Deng, Li; Zhong, Jiayu; Zha