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Sample records for icrf full-wave solutions

  1. ICRF full wave field solution and absorption for D-T and D-3He heating scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.; Sund, R.

    1989-01-01

    We consider a fundamental power conservation relation, full wave solutions for fields and power absorption in moderate and high density tokamaks to third order in the gyroradius expansion. The power absorption, conductivity tensor and kinetic flux associated with the conservation relation as well as the wave differential equation are obtained. Cases examined include D-T and D- 3 He scenarios for TFTR,JET and CIT at the Fundamental and Second harmonic. Optimum single pass absorption cases for D-T operation in JET and CIT are considered as a function of the K ≡ spectrum of the antenna with an without a minority He 3 resonance. It is found that at elevated temperatures >4 keV, minority (10%) fundamental deuterium absorption is very efficient for either fast wave low or high field incidence or high field Bernstein wave incidence. We consider the effects of a 10 keV bulk and 100 keV tail helium distribution on the second harmonic absorption in a deuterium plasma for Jet parameters. In addition, scenarios with ICRF operation without attendant substantial tritium concentrations are found the fundamental (15%) and second harmonic helium (33%) heating in a the deuterium plasma. For High field operation at high density in CIT, we find a higher part of the K parallel spectrum yields good single pass absorption with a 5% minority helium concentration in D-T

  2. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Berry, L.; Bilato, R.; Bonoli, P.; Brambilla, M.; Dumont, R.J.; Fukuyama, A.; Harvey, R.; Jaeger, E.F.; Indireshkumar, K.; Lerche, E.; McCune, D.; Phillips, C.K.; Vdovin, V.; Wright, J.

    2011-01-01

    Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  3. Full-wave modeling of ICRF waves: global and quasi-local descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Waves in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) undergo significant space dispersion as they propagate in magnetic fusion plasmas, making it necessary to incorporate non-local effects in their physical description. Full-wave codes are routinely employed to simulate ICRF heating experiments in tokamaks. The vast majority of these codes rely on a description of the plasma based on a 'quasi-local' derivation of the dielectric tensor, i.e. assuming that the range of space dispersion remains small compared to the system dimensions. However, non-local effects caused by wide particle orbits are expected to play a significant role in current and future experiments featuring wave-driven fast ions, fusion-born alpha particles... Global formalisms have thus been proposed to include these effects in a more comprehensive fashion. Based on a description of the particle dynamics in terms of action-angle variables, a full-wave code, named EVE, is currently under development. Its first version, presented here, incorporates quasi-local expressions valid to second order in Larmor radius, derived from the more general Hamiltonian formalism. The obtained tool has the advantage of being compatible with the current requirements of integrated modeling, and lends itself to direct comparisons with existing codes

  4. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, E. M., E-mail: eedlund@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at n{sub φ} = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of n{sub φ} spanning −50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k{sub ||} spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k{sub ||} phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that

  5. Full-wave and Fokker Planck analysis of ICRF heating experiments in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Golovato, S.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The Alcator C-Mod device is a high field, high density, shaped tokamak with parameters a = 0.22 m, R 0 = 0.67 m, B 0 ≤ 9.0 T, κ ≤ 1.8, δ ≤ 0.8, and 1.0 x 10 20 m -3 n e (0) ≤ 1.0 x 10 21 m -3 . Four megawatt of ICRF power is available at 80 MHz. The wide operating range in magnetic field makes several heating schemes possible: (i) Second harmonic heating of hydrogen (f 0 = 2f CH ) at 2.6 T in (D-H); (ii) Fundamental heating of (H) (f 0 = f CH ) at 5.3T in a D-(H) plasma; and (iii) Fundamental heating of ( 3 He) (f 0 = f C 3 He ) at 7.9 T in a D-( 3 He) plasma. The most successful heating regime to date has been (H)-minority heating at 5.3 T. Pellet enhanced performance (PEP) modes have also been achieved in C-Mod in D-(H) at 5.3 T and in D-( 3 He) at 7.9 T, with a combination of intense ICRF heating and Li-pellet injection. A variety of numerical models are used to analyze these heating schemes. A 1-D full-wave code (FELICE) is used to study open-quotes single passclose quotes damping of the ICRF wavefront and damping of mode-converted ion Bernstein waves. A toroidal full-wave code (FISIC) is used to study interference and focussing effects of the ICRF waves as well as damping of the ICRF power upon multiple passes of the ICRF wavefront. A combined bounce averaged Fokker Planck and toroidal full-wave code (FPPRF) is used to study the ion tail formation, orbit losses, and the power partition of the ICRF tail to the background electrons and ions. Full-wave and Fokker Planck analyses confirm the strong single pass absorption of the ICRF power in D-(H) at 5.3 T. Analysis of PEP-mode plasmas in D-( 3 He) indicates improved wave focussing and 3 He-cyclotron absorption of the ICRF waves relative to L-mode. A dramatic increase in the transfer of 3 He tail power to the background deuterium is also found for PEP-mode plasmas

  6. ICRF Mode Conversion Studies with Phase Contrast Imaging and Comparisons with Full-Wave Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Porkolab, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat toka-mak plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the FW converts to ion cyclotron waves (ICW) and ion Bernstein waves (IBW) around the ion-ion hybrid resonance (mode conversion). The mode converted wave is of interest as an actuator to optimise plasma performance through flow drive and current drive. Numerical simulations are essential to describe these processes accurately, and it is important that these simulation codes be validated. On Alcator C-Mod, direct measurements of the mode converted waves have been performed using Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI), which measures the line-integrated electron density fluctuations. The results were compared to full-wave simulations AORSA and TORIC. AORSA is coupled to a Fokker-Planck code CQL3D for self-consistent simulation of the wave electric field and the minority distribution function. The simulation results are compared to PCI measurements using synthetic diagnostic. The experiments were performed in D-H and D- 3 He plasmas over a wide range of ion species concentrations. The simulations agreed well with the measurements in the strong absorption regime. However, the measured fluctuation intensity was smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitudes in the weakly abosorbing regime, and a realistic description of the plasma edge including dissipation and antenna geometry may be required in these cases.

  7. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    In this report we describe theory and 3D full wave code description for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the operated LHD, constructed W7-X, NCSX and projected CSX3 stellarators, as well for re evaluation of ICRF scenarios in operated tokamaks and in the ITER . The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non-orthogonal flux coordinates ({Psi}, {theta}, {var_phi}), {Psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {var_phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma wave induced currents with account to the finite Larmor radius effects. We expand the solution in Fourier series over the toroidal ({var_phi}) and poloidal ({theta}) angles and solve resulting ordinary differential equations in a radial like {Psi}-coordinate by finite difference method. The constructed discretization scheme is divergent-free one, thus retaining the basic properties of original equations. The Fourier expansion over the angle coordinates has given to us the possibility to correctly construct the ''parallel'' wave number k{sub //}, and thereby to correctly describe the ICRF waves absorption by a hot plasma. The toroidal harmonics are tightly

  8. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in tokamak and mirror magnetic fields: a full-wave calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.; Weitzner, H.; Whealton, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Global solutions for the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) wave fields in a straight tokamak with rotational transform and a poloidally symmetric mirror are calculated in the cold plasma limit. The component of the wave electric field parallel to vector Bis assumed zero. Symmetry in each problem allows Fourier decomposition in one ignorable coordinate, and the remaining set of two coupled, two-dimensional partial differential equations is solved by finite differencing. Energy absorption and antenna impedance are calculated using a simple collisional absorption model. When large gradients in vertical barBvertical bar along vectorB are present in either geometry, ICRF heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance is observed. For the mirror, such gradients are always present. But for the tokamak, the rotational transform must be large enough that vectorB . delB greater than or equal to 0(1). For smaller transforms more typical of real tokamaks, only heating at the two-ion hybird resonance is observed. This suggests that direct resonant absorption at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance may be possible in stellarators where vectorB . delB approx. 0(1) + 11

  9. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in tokamak and mirror magnetic fields: a full-wave calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.; Weitzner, H.; Whealton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Global solutions for the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) wave fields in a straight tokamak with rotational transform and in a poloidally symmetric mirror are calculated in the cold plasma limit. The component of the wave electric field parallel to B vector is assumed zero. Symmetry in each problem allows Fourier decomposition in one ignorable coordinate, and the remaining set of two coupled, two-dimensional partial differential equations is solved by finite differencing. Energy absorption and antenna impedance are calculated using a simple collisional absorption model. When large gradients in absolute value B along B vector are present in either geometry, ICRF heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance is observed. For the mirror, such gradients are always present. But for the tokamak, the rotational transform must be large enough that B vector . delB greater than or equal to 0(1). For smaller transforms more typical of real tokamaks, only heating at the two-ion hybrid resonance is observed. This suggests that direct resonant absorption at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance may be possible in stellarators where B vector . delB approx. 0(1) naturally. 13 refs., 23 figs

  10. Full-wave solution of short impulses in inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencz, Orsolya E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the problem of real impulse propagation in arbitrarily inhomogeneous media will be presented on a fundamentally new, general, theoretical way. The general problem of wave propagation of monochromatic signals in inhomogeneous media was enlightened. The earlier theoretical models for spatial inhomogeneities have some errors regarding the structure of the resultant signal originated from backward and forward propagating parts. The application of the method of inhomogeneous basic modes (MIBM) and the complete full-wave solution of arbitrarily shaped non-monochromatic plane waves in plasmas made it possible to obtain a better description of the problem, on a fully analytical way, directly from Maxwell's equations. The model investigated in this paper is inhomogeneous of arbitrary order (while the wave pattern can exist), anisotropic (magnetized), linear, cold plasma, in which the gradient of the one-dimensional spatial inhomogeneity is parallel to the direction of propagation. (author)

  11. The numerical solution of ICRF fields in axisymmetric mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The numerics of a numerical code called GARFIELD (Grumman Aerospace RF fIELD code) designed to calculate the three-dimensional structure of ICRF fields in axisymmetric mirrors is presented. The code solves the electromagnetic wave equation for the electric field using a cold plasma dispersion relation with a small collision term to simulate absorption. The full wave solution including E.B is computed. The fields are Fourier analyzed in the poloidal direction and solved on a grid in the axial and radial directions. A two-dimensional equilibrium can be used as the source of equilibrium data. This allows us to extend previous studies of ICRF wave propagation and absorption in mirrors to include the effect of axial variation of the magnetic field and density. (orig.)

  12. Electromagnetic waves in irregular multilayered spheroidal structures of finite conductivity: full wave solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, E.

    1976-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves excited by electric dipoles oriented along the axis of multilayered spheroidal structures of finite conductivity is investigated. The electromagnetic parameters and the thickness of the layers of the structure are assumed to be functions of the latitude. In the analysis, electric and magnetic field transforms that constitute a discrete and a continuous spectrum of spherical waves are used to provide a suitable basis for the expansion of the electromagnetic fields at any point in the irregular spheroidal structure. For spheroidal structures with good conducting cores, the terms in the solutions associated with the continuous part of the wave spectrum vanish. In general, however, when the skin depth for the core is large compared to its dimensions or when the sources are located in the core of the structure and propagation in the core is of special interest, the contribution from the continuous part of the wave spectrum cannot be neglected. At each interface between the layers of the irregular spheroidal structure, exact boundary conditions are imposed. Since the terms of the field expansions in the irregular structure do not individually satisfy the boundary conditions, Maxwell's equations are reduced to sets of coupled ordinary first-order differential equations for the wave amplitudes. The solutions are shown to satisfy the reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory. The analysis may be applied to problems of radio wave propagation in a nonuniform model of the earth-ionosphere waveguide, particularly when focusing effects at the antipodes are important

  13. Numerical solutions of ICRF fields in axisymmetric mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a new numerical code called GARFIELD (Grumman Aerospace Rf Field code) that calculates ICRF Fields in axisymmetric mirror geometry (such as the central cell of a tandem mirror or an RF test stand) are presented. The code solves the electromagnetic wave equation using a cold plasma dispersion relation with a small collision frequency to simulate absorption. The purpose of the calculation is to examine how ICRF wave structure and propagation is effected by the axial variation of the magnetic field in a mirror for various antenna designs. In the code the wave equation is solved in flux coordinates using a finite element method. This should allow more complex dielectric tensors to be modeled in the future. The resulting matrix is solved iteratively, to maximize the allowable size of the spatial grid. Results for a typical antenna array in a simple mirror will be shown

  14. Solution of Full Wave Equation for Global Modes in Small Aspect Ratio Tokamaks with Non-Circular Cross-Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burma, C.; Cuperman, S.; Komoshvili, K.

    1998-01-01

    The wave equation for strongly toroidal small aspect ratio (spherical) tokamaks with non-circular cross-section is properly formulated and solved for global waves, in the Alfven frequency range. The current-carrying toroidal plasma is surrounded by a helical sheet-current antenna, which is enclosed within a perfectly conducting wall. The problem is formulated in terms of the vector and scalar potentials (A,Φ), thus avoiding the numerical solution occurring in the case of (E,B) formulation. Adequate boundary conditions are applied at the vacuum - metallic wall interface and the magnetic axis. A recently derived dielectric tensor-operator, able to describe the anisotropic plasma response in spherical tokamaks, is used for this purpose; except for its linear character, no physical or geometrical limitations are imposed on it. The equilibrium profiles (magnetic field, pressure and current) are obtained from a numerical solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation. Specifically, the wave equation is solved by the aid of a numerical code we developed for the present problem, based on the well documented 2(1/2)D finite element solver proposed by E.G. Sewell. With the definitions V i (θ,ρ) = U i (-θ,ρ) (V i U i = A j , Φ; j = ρ,φ,θ), our code solves simultaneously 16 second order partial differential equations (eight equations for each of real and imaginary set of functions V i , U i ). A systematic analysis of the solutions obtained for various values and combinations of wavenumbers and frequencies in the Alfven range is presented

  15. Recent progress with ICRF heating on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinjun; Zhao, Y.P.; Mao, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is one of the primary auxiliary heating techniques for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ICRF system for the EAST has been developed to support long-pulse, high-β, advanced tokamak fusion physics experiments. The ICRF system can deliver 12 MW of RF power to the plasma for 1000 seconds through two antennas located in B- and I-ports. Each ICRF transmitter with high power up to 1.5 MW has been successfully tested on a dummy load. The main technical features of the ICRF system is described. Two simulation codes, TORIC (a full wave solver) and SSFPQL (the quasilinear Fokker-Planck solver), are combined to simulate the ICRF heating in the EAST 2D magnetic configuration. The fast wave propagation and absorption characteristics, power partitions among the plasma species and the RF driven energetic tails have been analyzed. (author)

  16. Model for ICRF fast wave current drive in self-consistent MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Englade, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a model for fast wave current drive in the ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) range was incorporated into the current drive and MHD equilibrium code ACCOME. The ACCOME model combines a free boundary solution of the Grad Shafranov equation with the calculation of driven currents due to neutral beam injection, lower hybrid (LH) waves, bootstrap effects, and ICRF fast waves. The equilibrium and current drive packages iterate between each other to obtain an MHD equilibrium which is consistent with the profiles of driven current density. The ICRF current drive package combines a toroidal full-wave code (FISIC) with a parameterization of the current drive efficiency obtained from an adjoint solution of the Fokker Planck equation. The electron absorption calculation in the full-wave code properly accounts for the combined effects of electron Landau damping (ELD) and transit time magnetic pumping (TTMP), assuming a Maxwellian (or bi-Maxwellian) electron distribution function. Furthermore, the current drive efficiency includes the effects of particle trapping, momentum conserving corrections to the background Fokker Planck collision operator, and toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumbers of the injected ICRF waves. This model has been used to carry out detailed studies of advanced physics scenarios in the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Results are shown, for example, which demonstrate the possibility of achieving stable equilibria at high beta and high bootstrap current fraction in TPX. Model results are also shown for the proposed ITER device

  17. TFTR Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) experimental data analysis collaboration. Annual progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharer, J.E.; Bettenhausen, M.; Lam, N.; Sund, R.

    1994-08-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has concentrated on coupling, heating, and current drive issues for TFTR. The authors have developed a code and submitted for publication a open-quotes 3-Dclose quotes coupling analysis of the TFIR ICRF cavity-backed coil antennas to plasma edge profiles including the Faraday shield blade angle and fast wave coupling for heating and current drive. They have also carried out TFTR ICRF full-wave field solutions and heating analyses for the second harmonic tritium supershot, and the effects of fusion alpha particle and tritium ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. They have also published a paper on the effects of alpha particle absorption on fundamental deuterium ion cyclotron absorption incorporating self-consistent deuterium tails and fusion reactivity. Research progress, publications, and conference presentations are summarized in this report

  18. ICRF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.

    1985-12-01

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs

  19. ICRF edge modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the technical progress for the DOE sponsored grant, ''ICRF Edge Modeling.'' An emphasis is placed on the progress since the Technical Progress Report (January 10, 1990) was submitted to the Department of Energy. The design of ICRF antennas for C-Mod and TFTR was investigated during this period. In addition, quasilinear models for electron heating were refined and applied to the design of ICRF antennas. The relevant professional activities sponsored by this grant are given. 4 refs., 11 figs

  20. Three-dimensional calculation analysis of ICRF heating in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tetsuo; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Mutoh, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is one of the heating methods for the fusion plasma experiments and also effective for the helical plasmas. For the purpose of analysis of the ICRF heating in the helical plasmas, the three-dimensional full-wave code has been developed. The feature of the helical system compared with the tokamak device is the strong coupling of the toroidal harmonic modes. They cannot be treated independently. Dependence of the power absorption on the position of the ion cyclotron resonance layer is calculated including all toroidal modes. Strong power absorption was obtained when the position of the resonance layer is slightly different from the experimental results. Difference of the position of the resonance layer in different toroidal angle is thought to be important to achieve the good heating efficiency in the ICRF heating for the helical plasmas. (author)

  1. Numerical experiment for nonlinear full-wave tomography. 3; Hisenkei full wave tomography no suchi jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Nonlinear full-wave tomography (FWT) is under investigation to improve the estimation accuracy of Vp/Vs distributions. Full-wave tomography is one of the underground structure exploration methods mainly using Tarantola`s nonlinear local optimization method (LOM). Numerical experiment for FWT was carried out assuming relatively weak nonlinear underground structure. In the case of inversion by local optimization method, adequate preconditioning is important. Utilization of geological information is also effective in estimating low-frequency components of a model. As far as data are obtained under proper observation arrangement, even in actual field, precise estimation of Vp/Vs distributions is possible by FWT using explosion in a hole as wave source. In full-wave tomography, selection of observation arrangement is essential for both Vp and Vs. However, the proper arrangement is different between Vp and Vs. Approach to different analyses for Vp and Vs is also necessary by using only proper data for Vp and Vs among obtained data sets. 4 figs.

  2. ICRF enhanced potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-confining potentials in the Phaedrus tandem mirror are shown to be enhanced over Boltzmann-relations predicted values by radio-frequency (rf) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). The ICRF enhanced potential is larger in the end cell with a lower passing density. Peak potential values decrease with increasing ion endloss current (or central cell density) for a constant rf capacitor bank voltage, and increase with increasing rf-capacitor bank voltage, for a constant ion endloss value (or central cell density). In fully axisymmetric operation, a potential peak is produced in an end cell by the central-cell rf, (with-out end-cell rf) and is found only in the end cell nearer the central-cell antenna. ICRF enhanced potentials are explained as an equilibrium between the electron-collisional filling-in rate and the electron pumping out rate provided by axial time-varying electric fields. Thermal barrier-like potential structures were found in the transition regions between the central cell and end cells, in the fully axisymmetric Phaedrus. Central-cell ICRF trapping effects combined with end-cell μΔ B forces create and pump the barrier potential wells

  3. Full-wave Simulations of LH Wave Propagation in Toroidal Plasma with non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.; Brambilla, M.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of energetic tails in the electron distribution function is intrinsic to lower-hybrid (LH) heating and current drive in weakly collisional magnetically confined plasma. The effects of these deformations on the RF deposition profile have previously been examined within the ray approximation. Recently, the calculation of full-wave propagation of LH waves in a thermal plasma has been accomplished using an adaptation of the TORIC code. Here, initial results are presented from TORIC simulations of LH propagation in a toroidal plasma with non-thermal electrons. The required efficient computation of the hot plasma dielectric tensor is accomplished using a technique previously demonstrated in full-wave simulations of ICRF propagation in plasma with non-thermal ions

  4. Full-wave solution of short impulses in inhomogeneous plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... in arbitrarily inhomogeneous media will be presented on a fundamentally new, ... The general problem of wave propagation of monochromatic signals in inhomogeneous media was enlightened in [1]. ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News.

  5. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)xv te , where v te ≡ (2T e /m e ) 1/2 is the electron thermal speed. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off-axis (r/a≥0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established techniques for computing wave propagation and absorption use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions.In typical plasma conditions with electron densities of several 10 19 m -3 and toroidal magnetic fields strengths of 4 Telsa, the perpendicular wavelength is of the order of 1 mm and the parallel wavelength is of the order of 1 cm. Even in a relatively small device such as Alcator C-Mod with a minor radius of 22 cm, the number of wavelengths that must be resolved requires large amounts of computational resources for the full wave treatment. These requirements are met with a massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave code that has been adapted specifically for the simulation of LH waves [J. C. Wright, et al., Commun. Comput. Phys., 4, 545 (2008), J. C. Wright, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 July (2009)]. This model accurately represents the effects of focusing and diffraction that occur in LH propagation. It is also coupled with a Fokker-Planck solver, CQL3D, to provide self-consistent distribution functions for the plasma dielectric as well as a synthetic hard X-ray (HXR) diagnostic for direct comparisons with experimental measurements of LH waves.The wave solutions from the TORIC-LH zero FLR model will be compared to the results from ray tracing from the GENRAY/CQL3D code via the synthetic HXR diagnostic and power deposition.

  6. Source inversion in the full-wave tomography; Full wave tomography ni okeru source inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    In order to consider effects of characteristics of a vibration source in the full-wave tomography (FWT), a study has been performed on a method to invert vibration source parameters together with V(p)/V(s) distribution. The study has expanded an analysis method which uses as the basic the gradient method invented by Tarantola and the partial space method invented by Sambridge, and conducted numerical experiments. The experiment No. 1 has performed inversion of only the vibration source parameters, and the experiment No. 2 has executed simultaneous inversion of the V(p)/V(s) distribution and the vibration source parameters. The result of the discussions revealed that and effective analytical procedure would be as follows: in order to predict maximum stress, the average vibration source parameters and the property parameters are first inverted simultaneously; in order to estimate each vibration source parameter at a high accuracy, the property parameters are fixed, and each vibration source parameter is inverted individually; and the derived vibration source parameters are fixed, and the property parameters are again inverted from the initial values. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D- 3 He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D- 3 He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ∼50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  8. ICRF edge modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrman, I.S. (Grumman Corp. Research Center, Princeton, NJ (USA)); Colestock, P.L. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    Theoretical models have been developed, and are currently being refined, to explain the edge plasma-antenna interaction that occurs during ICRF heating. The periodic structure of a Faraday shielded antenna is found to result in strong ponderomotive force in the vicinity of the antenna. A fluid model, which incorporates the ponderomotive force, shows an increase in transport to the Faraday shield. A kinetic model shows that the strong antenna near fields act to increase the energy of deuterons which strike the shield, thereby increasing the sputtering of shield material. Estimates of edge impurity harmonic heating show no significant heating for either in or out-of-phase antenna operation. Additionally, a particle model for electrons near the shield shows that heating results from the parallel electric field associated with the fast wave. A quasilinear model for edge electron heating is presented and compared to the particle calculations. The models' predictions are shown to be consistent with measurements of enhanced transport. (orig.).

  9. Realistic full wave modeling of focal plane array pixels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Jorgenson, Roy E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electromagnetic Theory Dept.; Davids, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.; Peters, David W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Photonic Microsystems Dept.

    2017-11-01

    Here, we investigate full-wave simulations of realistic implementations of multifunctional nanoantenna enabled detectors (NEDs). We focus on a 2x2 pixelated array structure that supports two wavelengths of operation. We design each resonating structure independently using full-wave simulations with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the whole infinite array. We then construct a supercell made of a 2x2 pixelated array with periodic boundary conditions mimicking the full NED; in this case, however, each pixel comprises 10-20 antennas per side. In this way, the cross-talk between contiguous pixels is accounted for in our simulations. We observe that, even though there are finite extent effects, the pixels work as designed, each responding at the respective wavelength of operation. This allows us to stress that realistic simulations of multifunctional NEDs need to be performed to verify the design functionality by taking into account finite extent and cross-talk effects.

  10. An algorithm for the calculation of three-dimensional ICRF fields in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.; Kammash, T.

    1987-01-01

    A computational scheme is developed which permits tractable calculation of three-dimensional full-wave solutions to the Vlasov-Maxwell equations under typical ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) experimental conditions. The method is unique in that power deposition to the plasma is determined via the anti-Hermitian part of a truncated warm plasma dielectric operator, rather than as the result of an assumed phenomenological collision frequency. The resulting computer code allows arbitrary variation of density, temperature, magnetic field and minority concentration in the poloidal plane by performing a convolution of poloidal modes to produce a coupled system of differential equations in the radial variable. By assuming no inhomogeneity along the toroidal axis, an inverse transform over k parallel is performed, yielding the global three-dimensional fast wave field solutions. The application of the code to TFTR-like plasmas shows a mild resonance structure in antenna loading related to the changing number of wavelengths between the antenna and the resonance layer. (author)

  11. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  12. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  13. A two-phase full-wave superconducting rectifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariga, T.; Ishiyama, A.

    1989-01-01

    A two-phase full-wave superconducting rectifier has been developed as a small cryogenic power supply of superconducting magnets for magnetically levitation trains. Those magnets are operated in the persistent current mode. However, small ohmic loss caused at resistive joints and ac loss induced by the vibration of the train cannot be avoided. Therefore, the low-power cryogenic power supply is required to compensate for the reduction in magnet current. The presented superconducting rectifier consists of two identical full-wave rectifiers connected in series. Main components of each rectifier are a troidal shape superconducting set-up transformer and two thermally controlled switches. The test results using a 47.5 mH load magnet at 0.2 Hz and 0.5 Hz operations are described. To estimate the characteristics of the superconducting rectifier, the authors have developed a simulation code. From the experiments and the simulations, the transfer efficiency is examined. Furthermore, the optimal design of thermally controlled switches based on the finite element analysis is also discussed

  14. Simulation study of energetic ion distribution during combined NBI and ICRF heating in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Kasilov, V.

    2006-01-01

    In the LHD, significant performances of ICRF heating (fundamental, minority heating regime) have been demonstrated and up to 500keV of energetic tail ions have been observed by fast neutral particle analysis (NPA). These measured results indicate a good property of energetic ion confinement in helical systems. From the 9th campaign of LHD experiment (FY2005) a new perpendicular NBI heating system (P<3MW) has been installed and an effective heating of perpendicularly injected beam ions by the higher harmonics ICRF heating is expected. ICRF heating generates highly energetic tail ions, which drift around the torus for a long time (typically on a collisional time scale). Thus, the behavior of these energetic ions is strongly affected by the characteristics of the drift motions, which depend on the magnetic field configuration. In particular, in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic configuration, complicated drift motions of trapped particles would play an important role in the confinement of the energetic ions and the ICRF heating process. Therefore a global simulation of ICRF heating is necessary for the accurate modeling of the plasma heating process in a 3D magnetic configuration. In this paper we study the energetic ion distribution during combined NBI and 2nd harmonics ICRF heating in LHD using two global simulation codes: a full wave field solver TASK/WK and a drift kinetic equation solver GNET. GNET solves a linearized drift kinetic equation for energetic ions including complicated behavior of trapped particles in 5-D phase space. TASK/WM solves Maxwell's equation for RF wave electric field with complex frequency as a boundary value problem in the 3D magnetic configuration. (author)

  15. Plasma edge modelling with ICRF coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The physics of Radio-Frequency (RF wave heating in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF in the core plasmas of fusion devices are relatively well understood while those in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL remain still unresolved. This paper is dedicated to study the ICRF interactions with the plasma edge, mainly from the theoretical and numerical point of view, in particular with the 3D edge plasma fluid and neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE and various wave codes. Here emphasis is given to the improvement of ICRF coupling with local gas puffing and to the ICRF induced density convection in the SOL.

  16. Full-Wave Techniques for the Analysis of Electrodynamics and Coherent Quantum Transport in Graphene Nanodevices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Pierantoni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on full-wave techniques in the frequency (energy-domain and the time-domain, aimed at the investigation of the combined electromagnetic-coherent transport problem in carbon based nanostructured materials and devices viz. graphene nanoribbons. The frequency-domain approach is introduced in order to describe a Poisson-Schrödinger / Dirac system in a quasi static framework. Thetime-domain approach deals with the full-wave solution of the combined Maxwell-Schrödinger / Dirac system of equations. From the above theoretical platforms, home-made solvers are provided, aimed atdealing with challenging problems in realistic devices / systems environments, typical of the area of radio-frequency nanoelectronics.

  17. RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: RENORMALIZED EIGENVECTORS AND FULL WAVE DECOMPOSITION RIEMANN SOLVER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, Luis; MartI, Jose M; Ibanez, Jose M; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar; Miralles, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

  18. High-efficiency passive full wave rectification for electromagnetic harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Tunkar, Bassam A.; Park, Sangtak; Elrayes, Karim; Mahmoud, Mohamed A. E.; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    We compare the performance of four types of full-wave bridge rectifiers designed for electromagnetic energy harvesters based on silicon diodes, Schottky diodes, passive MOSFETs, and active MOSFETs. Simulation and experimental results show that MOSFET-type rectifiers are more efficient than diode-type rectifiers, reaching voltage and power efficiency of 99% for ideal voltage source with input amplitudes larger than 800 mV. Since active MOSFETs require extra components and an external DC power supply, we conclude that passive MOSFETs are superior for micro-power energy harvesting systems. We demonstrate passive MOSFET rectifiers implemented using discrete, off-shelf components and show that they outperform all electromagnetic harvester rectifiers hitherto reported obtaining a power efficiency of 95%. Furthermore, we show that passive MOSFET rectifiers do not affect the center frequency, harvesting bandwidth, or optimal resistance of electromagnetic harvesters. We demonstrate a complete power management module by adding a capacitor to the rectifier output terminal. We found that this configuration changed the optimal resistive load from 40 Ω to 55 Ω and decreased output power efficiency to 86%.

  19. EAST ICRF system for long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y.P.; Zhang, X.J.; Mao, Y.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is one of the primary auxiliary heating techniques for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A 6.0 MW ICRF systems in the range of 25-70 MHz has been put into operation during the EAST 2012 spring campaign. The ICRF systems consist of two port-mounted antennas and each antenna is driven by two independent 1.5 MW RF power source. Another four 1.5 MW ICRF system is under way of construction.The system will deliver more than 10 MW of RF power to the plasma for 1000 sec pulse length. This paper gives brief introduction of the ICRF systems capability on EAST. (author)

  20. Full-wave calculation of fast-wave current drive in tokamaks including kparallel upshifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical calculations of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) efficiency have generally been of two types: ray tracing or global wave calculations. Ray tracing shows that the projection of the wave number (k parallel) along the magnetic field can vary greatly over a ray trajectory, particularly when the launch point is above or below the equatorial plane. As the wave penetrates toward the center of the plasma, k parallel increases, causing a decrease in the parallel phase speed and a corresponding decrease in the current drive efficiency, γ. But the assumptions of geometrical optics, namely short wavelength and strong single-pass absorption, are not greatly applicable in FWCD scenarios. Eigenmode structure, which is ignored in ray tracing, can play an important role in determining electric field strength and Landau damping rates. In such cases, a full-wave or global solution for the wave fields is desirable. In full-wave calculations such as ORION k parallel appear as a differential operator (rvec B·∇) in the argument of the plasma dispersion function. Since this leads to a differential system of infinite order, such codes of necessity assume k parallel ∼ k var-phi = const, where k var-phi is the toroidal wave number. Thus, it is not possible to correctly include effects of the poloidal magnetic field on k parallel. The problem can be alleviated by expressing the electric field as a superposition of poloidal modes, in which case k parallel is purely algebraic. This paper describes a new full-wave calculation, Poloidal Ion Cyclotron Expansion Solution, which uses poloidal and toroidal mode expansions to solve the wave equation in general flux coordinates. The calculation includes a full solution for E parallel and uses a reduced-order form of the plasma conductivity tensor to eliminate numerical problems associated with resolution of the very short wavelength ion Bernstein wave

  1. Current and Voltage Conveyors in Current- and Voltage-Mode Precision Full-Wave Rectifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koton

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper new versatile precision full-wave rectifiers using current and/or voltage conveyors as active elements and two diodes are presented. The performance of these circuit solutions is analysed and compared to the opamp based precision rectifier. To analyze the behavior of the functional blocks, the frequency dependent RMS error and DC transient value are evaluated for different values of input voltage amplitudes. Furthermore, experimental results are given that show the feasibilities of the conveyor based rectifiers superior to the corresponding operational amplifier based topology.

  2. An algorithm for the calculation of 3-D ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] fields in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.; Colestock, P.L.; Kashuba, R.J.; Kammash, T.

    1987-04-01

    A computational scheme is developed which permits tractable calculation of three-dimensional full-wave solutions to the Maxwell-Vlasov equations under typical Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) experimental conditions. The method is unique in that power deposition to the plasma is determined via the anti-Hermitian part of a truncated warm-plasma dielectric operator, rather than as the result of an assumed phenomenological collision frequency. The resulting computer code allows arbitrary variation of density, temperature, magnetic field, and minority concentration in the poloidal plane by performing a convolution of poloidal modes to produce a coupled system of differential equations in the radial variable. By assuming no inhomogeneity along the toroidal axis, an inverse transform over k/sub parallel/ is performed to yield the full three-dimensional field solutions. The application of the code to TFTR-like plasmas shows a mild resonance structure in antenna loading related to the changing number of wavelengths between antenna and the resonance layer. 48 figs

  3. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. ICRF Review: From ERASMUS To ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weynants, R. R.

    2009-11-01

    This is a personal account of how I saw ICRF evolve since 1974, with a presentation that is ordered according to the topics: heating, antenna coupling, impurity generation/mitigation and system technology. The nature of the main issues is each time reviewed, recent findings are incorporated, and it is shown how the ICRF community has been able to react to sometimes rapidly changing demands and is indeed resolutely preparing ITER.

  5. ICRF heating experiments in JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    This is an experimental study of ICRF heating on JFT-2 Tokamak in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this study, we first clarified physical and engineering problems of ICRF heating of tokamak plasma. Next, we optimized the design of the ICRF heating system, and the plasma parameters for the heating. Finally, we could demonstrate a high efficiency of this additional heating method by launching RF power which is two or three times as large as an ohmic input power to a plasma. And we achieved following things. (1) We optimized a design of an antenna, and we improved a durability of the system for high voltage. With the result that we achieved the maximum power density on an antenna. (2) We demonstrated that electron heating regime and ion heating regime can be easily accessed by controlling plasma parameters. Also we found the optimum heating conditions in each heating regime. (3) We experimentally clarified the production mechanism of impurities during ICRF heating. We could reduce the influx of metal impurity ions to a plasma by employing low z materials for limiters and antenna shields. Consequently, we improved a heating efficiency of electrons. Next, we studied a power balance of plasma during ICRF heating, and we could compare heating characteristics of ICRF with other additional heatings on JFT-2. (author)

  6. Combined therapy of the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma with X-rays and ICRF-159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaphaus, A.

    1974-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma of the rat under the influence of the tumour-inhibiting bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-159 was studied in collectives of 11-16 animals with tumours. In the combined radio- and chemotherapy, the animals received a daily i.p. injection of 30 mg/kg K.G. of the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-159 in 1.0 ml NaCl solution containing carboxyl methyl cellulose. The tumour inhibition was determined by multidimensional measurements of the increase in tumour size with the aid of a slide gange. The combined therapy had a better inhibiting effect on tumour growth than radiotherapy alone. (orig./AK) [de

  7. The ICRF antennas for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gardner, W.L.; Hosea, J.C.; Nagy, A.; Stevens, J.; Swain, D.W.; Wilson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two compact loop antennas have been designed to provide ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heating for TFTR. The antennas can convey a total of 10 MW to accomplish core heating in either high-density or high-temperature plasmas. The near-term goal of heating TFTR plasmas and the longer-term goals of ease in handling (for remote maintenance) and high reliability (in an inaccessible tritium tokamak environment) were major considerations in the antenna designs. The compact loop configuration facilitates handling because the antennas fit completely through their ports. Conservative design and extensive testing were used to attain the reliability required for TFTR. This paper summarizes how these antennas will accomplish these goals. 5 figs, 1 tab

  8. FISIC - a full-wave code to model ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-08-01

    We present a user manual for the FISIC code which solves the integrodifferential wave equation in the finite Larmor radius approximation in fully toroidal geometry to simulate ICRF heating experiments. The code models the electromagnetic wave field as well as antenna coupling and power deposition profiles in axisymmetric plasmas. (orig.)

  9. ICRF waveguide coupler research. Progress report, July 1983-July 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    This report highlights results we have obtained on our ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) waveguide launcher research during the past year. We have completed an analysis of waveguide aperture launching of waves into a hot plasma with any prescribed edge density and temperature profile. The model Fourier analyzes the waveguide aperture fields and calculates the incident and reflected fast magnetosonic wave fields in the plasma edge region utilizing a stratified slab model. The requirement that the total wave fields at the waveguide-plasma interface match provides the boundary conditions which allow the solution for the plasma input impedance and reflection coefficient

  10. ICRF/edge physics research on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oost, G. van; Nieuwenhove, R. van; Koch, R.; Messiaen, A.M.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Weynants, R.R.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Lie, Y.T.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Conn, R.W.; Corbett, W.J.; Goebel, D.M.; Moyer, R.A.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1990-01-01

    Extensive investigations of ICRF-induced effects on the edge plasma and on plasma-wall interaction were conducted on TEXTOR under different wall- and limiter as well as plasma- and heating conditions. Several strong effects of ICRF on the edge parameters were observed on TEXTOR, such as density rise, instantaneous electron heating, modification of SOL profiles, influx of ligth and/or heavy impurities, increased heat flux to the limiters, and production of energetic ions in the SOL. The fast response time of some of the changes and the observation of a maximum in the SOL profile of electron temperature, heat flux and metal sputtering clearly demonstrated that RF power is directly absorbed in the SOL. Estimates of this power amount to several percent of the total RF power launched into the plasma. Plasma-wall interaction during ICRF was substantially reduced by an appropriate choice of the wall conditioning procedures (wall carbonization with liner at 400degC or, above all, boronization). As a result record low values of the radiated power fraction were achieved during ICRF and long pulse, high power, low impurity operation was possible. Further improvement was obtained by ICRF antenna phasing. When ICRF power is coupled to the plasma, several effects on the core and edge plasma influence the operation of the toroidal pump limiter ALT-II. Experimental and theoretical studies were performed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the ICRF-induced effects, including the propagation of plasma waves in the edge plasma and nonlinear phenomena such as parametric decay, important changes in the DC current between the antenna structure and the liner due to the sheath effect at the antennas, and the generation of waves at harmonics of the RF generator frequency. Radial profiles of the DC radial and poloidal electric fields as well as a localized RF electric field structure were measured in the SOL using a fast scanning probe. (orig.)

  11. ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] heating and antenna coupling in a high beta tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elet, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Maxwell's Equations are solved in two-dimensions for the electromagnetic fields in a toroidal cavity using the cold plasma fluid dielectric tensor in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). The Vector Wave Equation is transformed to a set of two, coupled second-order partial differential equations with inhomogeneous forcing functions which model a wave launcher. The resulting equations are finite differenced and solved numerically with a complex banded matrix algorithm on a Cray-2 computer using a code described in this report. This code is used to study power coupling characteristics of a wave launcher for low and high beta tokamaks. The low and high beta equilibrium tokamak magnetic fields applied in this model are determined from analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation. The code shows good correspondence with the results of low field side ICRF heating experiments performed on the Tokamak of Fontenay-Aux-Roses (TFR). Low field side and high field side antenna coupling properties for ICRF heating in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT) experiment are calculated with this code. Variations of antenna position in the tokamak, ionic concentration and plasma density, and volume-averaged beta have been analyzed for HBT. It is found that the location of the antenna with respect to the plasma has the dominant role in the design of an ICRF heating experiment in HBT. 10 refs., 52 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Upgrade of ICRF heating system on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gen; Zhao Yanpin; Mao Yuzhou

    2013-01-01

    ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency) heating is an essential heating and current drive tool on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). The high-power steady-state transmitters were designed as a part of research and development of ICRF heating system which aimed at output power of 1.5 MW for 1000 s in a frequency range of 25 to 70 MHz. There are 3 stage power amplifiers for each transmitter. Tube TH525A and TH535 were chosen for drive power amplifier (DPA) and final power amplifier (FPA), respectively. The power supply system of DPA and FPA were upgraded by using reliable PSM high voltage sources, whose response time is less than 5 μs. The ICRF system, which consists of 8 transmitters, will give out more than 10 MW total output power in the future. Four of them have been already fabricated, and another four are under construction. Three liquid stub tuners are used for impedance matching between antennas and transmitters, which can be only tuned shot to shot. There are two fast wave heating antennas which are assembled at I port and B port on EAST. Several projects are in progress including fast response impedance matching, distributed data acquisition and control system and so on for EAST ICRF heating system. (author)

  13. ICRF stabilization of sawteeth on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Hammett, G.W.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Jassby, D.; McCune, D.; McGuire, K.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Stratton, B.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Towner, H.; White, R.; Zweben, S.; Phillips, M.W.; Hughes, M.; Bush, C.; Goldfinger, R.; Hoffman, D.; Houlberg, W.; Nagayama, Y.; Smithe, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from experiments utilizing high power ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) heating to stabilize sawtooth oscillations on TFTR are reviewed. The key observations include existence of a minimum ICRF power required to achieve stabilization, a dependence of the stabilization threshold on the relative size of the ICRF power deposition profile to the q=1 volume, and a peaking of the equilibrium pressure and current profiles during sawtooth-free phases of the discharges. In addition, preliminary measurements of the poloidal magnetic field profile indicate that q on axis decreases to a value of 0.55±0.15 after a sawtooth-stabilized period of ∼0.5 sec has transpired. The results are discussed in the context of theory, which suggests that the fast ions produced by the ICRF heating suppress sawteeth by stabilizing the m=1 MHD instabilities believed to be the trigger for the sawtooth oscillations. Though qualitative agreement is found between the observations and the theory, further refinement of the theory coupled with more accurate measurements of experimental profiles will be required in order to complete quantitative comparisons

  14. The essential theory of fast wave current drive with full wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Gong Xueyu; Yang Lei; Yin Chenyan; Yin Lan

    2007-01-01

    The full wave numerical method is developed for analyzing fast wave current drive in the range of ion cyclotron waves in tokamak plasmas, taking into account finite larmor radius effects and parallel dispersion. the physical model, the dispersion relation on the assumption of Finite Larmor Radius (FLR) effects and the form of full wave be used for computer simulation are developed. All of the work will contribute to further study of fast wave current drive. (authors)

  15. RF current distribution and topology of RF sheath potentials in front of ICRF antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Bremond, S.; Bosia, G.

    2005-01-01

    The 2D (radial/poloidal) spatial topology of RF-induced convective cells developing radially in front of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is investigated, in relation to the spatial distribution of RF currents over the metallic structure of the antenna. This is done via a Green's function, determined from the ICRF wave coupling equations, and well-suited to open field lines extending toroidally far away on both sides of the antenna. Using such formalism, combined with a full-wave calculation using the 3D antenna code ICANT (Pecoul S. et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. 146 166-87), two classes of convective cells are analysed. The first one appears in front of phased arrays of straps, and depending on the strap phasing, its topology is interpreted using the poloidal profiles of either the RF current or the RF voltage of the strip line theory. The other class of convective cells is specific to antenna box corners and is evidenced for the first time. Based on such analysis, general design rules are worked out in order to reduce the RF-sheath potentials, which generalize those proposed in the earlier literature, and concrete antenna design options are tested numerically. The merits of aligning all strap centres on the same (tilted) flux tube, and of reducing the antenna box toroidal conductivity in its lower and upper parts, are discussed

  16. Recent developments in ICRF antenna modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamalle, P.U.; Messiaen, A.M.; Dumortier, P.; Louche, F.

    2005-01-01

    The antennas presently developed for ICRF heating of the ITER plasma consist of a tightly packed array of a large number of radiating straps, in order to deliver a high power density without exceeding radio-frequency voltage standoffs. Recently developed commercial software has enabled important progress in the coupling analysis and optimisation of such demanding systems. Approximations allowing to convincingly include a realistic plasma description in these codes are discussed. Application of the resulting numerical tools is illustrated by simulation of the existing JET A2 ICRF array, with the goal to validate simulations for future antennas. Advances in the design of realistic test bed conditions, using salted water as a means of creating plasma-relevant antenna loading, and the appropriate scaling of a mockup are also presented. (author)

  17. ICRF heating experiments on JIPP T-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, M.; Fujita, J.; Hirokura, S.

    1983-10-01

    Data of JIPP T-II ICRF heating experiments are presented. The experiment covers three typical cases: the low concentration hydrogen minority case, the high concentration hydrogen minority case, and the 3 He minority case. The best heating efficiency is obtained for the 3 Heminority case. It is shown through power balance analysis that the two H-minority cases are different in the wave energy deposition profile. The difference is explained by the presence of local cavity mode for the high concentration minority case. The ion temperature stops rising at the power density level of 0.65 W/cm 3 . An analytic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is derived to interpret the deterioration of heating efficiency. (author)

  18. Current Mode Full-Wave Rectifier Based on a Single MZC-CDTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a current mode full-wave rectifier based on single modified Z copy current difference transconductance amplifier (MZC-CDTA and two switches. The circuit is simple and is suitable for IC implementation. The functionality of the circuit is verified with SPICE simulation using 0.35 μm TSMC CMOS technology parameters.

  19. Full wave dc-to-dc converter using energy storage transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, E. T.; Wilson, T. G.

    1969-01-01

    Full wave dc-to-dc converter, for an ion thrustor, uses energy storage transformers to provide a method of dc-to-dc conversion and regulation. The converter has a high degree of physical simplicity, is lightweight and has high efficiency.

  20. 2D full wave simulation on electromagnetic wave propagation in toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Uruta, Go; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mase, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    Global full-wave simulation on electromagnetic wave propagation in toroidal plasma with an external magnetic field imaging a tokamak configuration is performed in two dimensions. The temporal behavior of an electromagnetic wave launched into plasma from a wave-guiding region is obtained. (author)

  1. A Novel Current-Mode Full-Wave Rectifier Based on One CDTA and Two Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khateb

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Precision rectifiers are important building blocks for analog signal processing. The traditional approach based on diodes and operational amplifiers (OpAmps exhibits undesirable effects caused by limited OpAmp slew rate and diode commutations. In the paper, a full-wave rectifier based on one CDTA and two Schottky diodes is presented. The PSpice simulation results are included.

  2. Design of optimized impedance transformer for ICRF antenna in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K., E-mail: saito@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kumazawa, R.; Nomura, G.; Shimpo, F.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We developed optimization method of impedance transformer for ICRF antenna. ► Power loss will be one-third with the optimized impedance transformer. ► Possibility of damage on the transmission line will be drastically reduced. ► High performance will be kept in the wide antenna impedance region. -- Abstract: A pair of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas in the large helical device (LHD), HAS antennas showed high efficiency in minority ion heating. However the low loading resistance must be increased to prevent breakdown in transmission line. Moreover, the voltage and the current around the feed-through must be reduced to protect it. For these purpose, we developed a design procedure of the impedance transformer for HAS antennas. To optimize the transformer, the inner conductors were divided into several segments and the radii of them were given discretely and independently. The maximum effective loading resistance was obtained by using all combinations of radii within the limitations of the voltage and current at the feed-through and the electric field on the transformer. To get a precise solution, this procedure was repeated several times by narrowing the range of radii of inner conductors. Then the optimized impedance transformer was designed by smoothing the radii of inner conductors. For the typical discharge, the voltage and current at the feed-through were reduced to the half of the original values with the same power. The effective loading resistance was increased to more than four times. High performance is expected in wide impedance region.

  3. Uses of the ICRF and implications for future VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chopo

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception on 1 Jan 1998, the fundamental ICRF has been set by the VLBI positions of 212 "defining" extragalactic radio sources. In all there are approx.3000 sources with usefully accurate (< few mas) positions consistent with the ICRF. The uses of the ICRF include fundamental astrometry, monitoring of Earth orientation, and spacecraft navigation. For fundamental astrometry, stability and accuracy are most important, and realizations at different frequencies must be in proper registration. However, there is no preferred frequency, and the GAIA mission has the potential for an optical ICRF with 500,000 objects at the 50 microarcsec level some time after the planned 2011 launch. The radio ICRF should be properly prepared for a transition to assure long term stability and consistency. Earth orientation monitoring requires objects attached to the solid Earth, and VLBI will continue to be the fundamental technique. For this purpose it is essential that the new VLBI stations contemplated in the VLBI20l0 report be capable of observing a sufficiently large and well-distributed set of stable sources, and identifying these sources is an on-going effort. Spacecraft navigation by differential VLBI is planned using the Ka-band telemetry signal, and work has begun towards an ICRF realization suitable for this purpose. The balancing of different needs related to the VLBI ICRF will be discussed.

  4. Possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single benzene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2018-02-01

    This work focused on possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single and two benzene rings, respectively. The benzene rings were threaded by a magnetic flux that changes over time. The quantum interference effect was considered as the basic idea in the rectification action, the para and meta configurations were investigated. All the calculations are performed by using steady-state theoretical model, which is based on the time-dependent Hamiltonian model. The electrical conductance and the electric current are considered as DC output signals of half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers. The finding in this work opens up the exciting potential to use these molecular rectifiers in molecular electronics.

  5. Quasi-Resonant Full-Wave Zero-Current Switching Buck Converter Design, Simulation and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Yanik, G.; Isen, E.

    2015-01-01

    —This paper presents a full wave quasi-resonant zerocurrent switching buck converter design, simulation and application. The converter control uses with zero-current switching (ZCS) technique to decrease the switching losses. Comparing to conventional buck converter, resonant buck converter includes a resonant tank equipped with resonant inductor and capacitor. The converter is analyzed in mathematical for each subintervals. Depending on the desired input and output electrical quantities, con...

  6. ICRF-induced fusion product loss in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Chang, C.S.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    When ICRF power is applied to plasmas in which there is no externally-supplied minority species, an enhanced loss of DD fusion products results. The characteristics of the loss are consistent with particles at or near the birth energy having their perpendicular velocity increased by the ICRF such that those near the passing/trapped boundary are carried into the first orbit loss cone. A rudimentary model of this process predicts losses of a magnitude similar to those seen. Predictions based upon this data for hypothetical ICRF ash removal from reactor plasmas suggest that the technique will not be energy efficient

  7. A new radiation stripline ICRF antenna design for EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; Zhang, X. J.; Yang, Q. X.; Yuan, S.; Braun, F.; Notedame, J.-M.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-01-01

    A new type of toroidal long Radiation Stripline Antenna (RSA) is presented, which can effectively improve antenna radiation, leading in reduction of max voltage on transmission line and decrease of the sensitivity to ELM's of the ICRF system at some frequencies. Based on the new concept, a 4-straps RSA is proposed for EAST device. Using 3-D computing simulator code (HFSS), RF current distribution, S-parameters and electromagnetic field distribution on and near the RSA ICRF antenna are analyzed and compared with present ICRF antenna on EAST

  8. ICRF-induced DD fusion product losses in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Budny, R.V.

    1994-10-01

    When ICRF power is applied to TFTR plasmas in which there is no externally-supplied minority species, an enhanced loss of DD fusion products results. The characteristics of the loss are consistent with particles at or near the birth energy having their perpendicular velocity increased by the ICRF such that those near the passing/trapped boundary are carried into the first orbit loss cone. A rudimentary model of this process predicts losses of a magnitude similar to those seen. Extrapolations based upon this data for hypothetical ICRF ash removal from reactor plasmas suggest that the technique will not be energy efficient

  9. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the elastic wave-equation; Dansei hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, S [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, T; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Algorithm is constructed and a program developed for a full-wave inversion (FWI) method utilizing the elastic wave equation in seismic exploration. The FWI method is a method for obtaining a physical property distribution using the whole observed waveforms as the data. It is capable of high resolution which is several times smaller than the wavelength since it can handle such phenomena as wave reflection and dispersion. The method for determining the P-wave velocity structure by use of the acoustic wave equation does not provide information about the S-wave velocity since it does not consider S-waves or converted waves. In an analysis using the elastic wave equation, on the other hand, not only P-wave data but also S-wave data can be utilized. In this report, under such circumstances, an inverse analysis algorithm is constructed on the basis of the elastic wave equation, and a basic program is developed. On the basis of the methods of Mora and of Luo and Schuster, the correction factors for P-wave and S-wave velocities are formulated directly from the elastic wave equation. Computations are performed and the effects of the hypocenter frequency and vibration transmission direction are examined. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L. Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, D.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Poor definition of the heating profiles that occur during normal operation of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas has complicated the mechanical design of ICRF system components. This paper reports that at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Faraday shield analysis is being used in defining rf heating profiles. In recent numerical analyses of proposed hardware for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) and DIII-D, rf magnetic fields at Faraday shield surfaces were calculated, providing realistic predictions of the induced skin currents flowing on the shield elements and the resulting dissipated power profile. Detailed measurements on mock-ups of the Faraday shields for DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirmed the predicted magnetic field distributions. A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the DIII-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed

  11. ICRF heating on the burning plasma experiment (BPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Ryan, P.M.; Swain, D.W.; Tolliver, J.S.; Yugo, J.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaye, S.M.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Mau, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    RF power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) has been chosen as the primary heating technique for BPX. This decision is based on the wide success of ICRF heating in existing experiments (JET, TFTR, JT-60), the capability of ion cyclotron waves to penetrate the high-density plasmas of BPX, the ability to concentrate ICRF power deposition near the plasma center, and the ready availability of high-power sources at the appropriate frequency. The primary task of the ICRF system is to heat the plasma to ignition. However, other important roles are envisaged; these include the stabilization of sawteeth, preheating of the plasma during current ramp-up, and possible control of the plasma current profile by means of fast-wave current drive. We give a brief overview of the RF system, describe the operating scenarios planned for BPX, and discuss some of the antenna design issues for BPX. 4 refs., 3 figs

  12. ICRF sawtooth stabilization: Application on TFTR and CIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Boivin, R.; Cavallo, A.; Colestock, P.; Fredrickson, E.; Hammett, G.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.; Jobes, F.; McGuire, K.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, K.; Park, H.; Schmidt, G.; Stratton, B.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Zweben, S.

    1991-03-01

    The use of ICRF heating to stabilize the core plasma sawtooth relaxations has been extended to TFTR where such stabilization has been produced at relatively low power in the L Mode regime at moderate density (P RF = 4 MW, 2.6 MW in helium and deuterium discharges, respectively, for the minority hydrogen ICRF heating regime with bar n e ∼2.5 x 10 13 cm -3 ). These results, as in the case of those obtained on JET, are qualitatively consistent with energetic ion stabilization of the m = 1, n = 1 ideal/resistive kink mode. The relevance of sawtooth stabilization to the primary regimes of interest on TFTR -- the high-Q supershot regime and the high density pellet injection regimes -- and on CIT -- the high density ICRF heated regime -- is considered in the context of the present theory and the projected ICRF power deposition characteristics. 35 refs., 11 figs

  13. Mechanical design of the second ICRF antenna for EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.Q., E-mail: yangqx@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Y.T.; Wu, S.T.; Zhao, Y.P.; Zhang, J.X.; Wang, Z.W. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second ICRF antenna of EAST is capable of coupling higher power than the former ICRF antenna due to it has been designed with four current straps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many cooling channels have been designed for the key components of faraday shied, current strap, baffles and transmission lines, which can remove the dissipated RF loss power and incoming heat loads on them and make ICRF antenna being capable of coupling higher power in constant wave operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra structure via cantilever support beam has been designed to support the forepart of the ICRF antenna. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis by applying the thermo-mechanical coupling method have been applied to analyze for the key components of ICRF antenna. - Abstract: In order to satisfy the requirements of heating plasma on EAST project, 3 MW ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating system will be available at the second stage. Based on this requirement, the second ICRF antenna, has been designed for EAST. The antenna which is planned to operate with a frequency ranging from 30 MHz to 110 MHz, comprises four poloidal current straps. The antenna has many cooling channels inside the current straps, faraday shield and baffle to remove the dissipated RF loss power and incoming plasma heat loads. The antenna is supported via a cantilever support box to the external support structure. Its assembly is plugged in the port and fixed on the support box. External slideway and bellows allow the antenna to be able to move in the radial direction. The key components of the second ICRF antenna has been designed together with structural and thermal analysis presented.

  14. Orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Dillner, Oe.; Lisak, M.

    1992-01-01

    An approximate analytical investigation is made to assess the importance of orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated minority ions. Explicit expressions for the fraction of lost minority ions are derived and shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulation results. The results indicate that present day ICRF heating power density levels cannot be raised significantly without causing important particle and energy losses due to unconfined particle orbits. 6 refs., 5 figs

  15. Efficient full wave code for the coupling of large multirow multijunction LH grills.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Hillairet, J.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 116060. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : lower hybrid waves * coupling * large multirow multijunction grills * tokamak * full-wave Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa7f4f/meta

  16. Universal Voltage Conveyor and Current Conveyor in Fast Full-Wave Rectifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Burian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals about the design of a fast voltage-mode full-wave rectifier, where universal voltage conveyor and second-generation current conveyor are used as active elements. Thanks to the active elements, the input and output impedance of the non-linear circuit is infinitely high respectively zero in theory. For the rectification only two diodes and three resistors are required as passive elements. The performance of the circuit is shown on experimental measurement results showing the dynamic range, time response, frequency dependent DC transient value and RMS error for different values of input voltage amplitudes.

  17. ICRF heating in T.F.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambier, D.J.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments on plasma heating by RF in the ion cyclotron range of frequency have been performed on T.F.R. in various regimes, such as the mode conversion regime and the minority regime. The latest theoretical developments of ICRF modeling are presented and the experimental data obtained in a deuterium plasma containing 20% or 5% of hydrogen are reviewed. With 20% of hydrogen a large increase of both ion and electron temperature is observed while the level of metallic impurity radiation has been considerably reduced using a carbon limiter. With 5% of hydrogen the location of the antenna system in the minor cross section produces no dramatic differences with respect to ion heating. Finally the metallic impurity production is examined and thus allows one to eliminate the Faraday shield of the antenna as the main source of pollution by heavy ions of the plasma

  18. ICRF heating analysis on ASDEX plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Kimitaka; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Morishita, Takayuki; Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    1988-01-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) waves heating in an ASDEX tokamak are analyzed. The excitation, propagation and absorption are studied by using a global wave code. This analysis is combined with a Fokker-Planck code. The waveform in the plasma, the loading resistance and the reactance of the antenna are calculated for both the minority ion heating and the second harmonic resonance heating. Attention is given to the change of the antenna loading associated with the L/H transition. Optimum conditions for the loading are discussed. In the minority heating case, the tail generation and thermalization are analyzed. Spatial profiles of the tail-ion temperature and the power transferred to the bulk electrons and ions are obtained. Central as well as off-central heating cases are investigated. The effect of the reactive electric field is discussed in connection with rf losses and impurity production. (author)

  19. Advanced fusion in ICRF injected plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpignano, F.; Coppi, B.; Detragiache, P.; Migliuolo, S.; Nassi, M.; Rogers, B.

    1994-01-01

    Fusion burning of a D- 3 He mixture in a high density, high magnetic field, compact toroidal experiment (Ignitor) with a high injected power density at the ion cyclotron frequency (ICRF) is investigated. A superthermal tail (with energies exceeding 1 MeV in the central part of the plasma column) is induced in the distribution of the minority 3 He population ( 0 20 m -3 ). This stems from the high value of the peak RF power density absorbed by the minority species (ρ RF ∼ 60 MW/m 3 ) that should be obtained in Ignitor when the total injected power is about 18 MW. This experiment is suitable to begin the study of advanced fusion burning, because of the high plasma currents (I p 3 He fusion powers of the order of 1 MW should be attained. (author) 8 refs., 3 figs

  20. Present and future JET ICRF antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, A.; Brown, T.; Bhatnagar, V.; Crawley, P.; Jacquinot, J.; Lobel, R.; Plancoulaine, J.; Rebut, P.H.; Wade, T.; Walker, C.

    1994-01-01

    Since the initial operation of the JET ICRF system in 1985, up to 22 MW has been coupled to the plasma, many heating scenarios have been demonstrated and the main technological problem of RF-specific impurity production overcome. Many developments of the antennae have taken place over this period, notably the replacement of the water-cooled nickel screens with indirectly cooled beryllium screens, and the forthcoming installation of eight new A2 antennae for operation during the pumped divertor phase of JET. The A2 antennae include enhanced provision for fast wave current drive experiments on JET. This paper describes the beryllium screens, the technological results from operation and subsequent inspection of these screens, the design of the A2 antennae and the results from high power RF testing of a model of the A2 antenna. (orig.)

  1. Toroidal mode-conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, A.; Hellsten, T.; Chiu, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Mode-conversion is studied in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighborhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave which deposits the wave energy through resonant interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted and could in experiments be driven to large amplitudes so as to interact efficiently with fast particles. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 48 refs

  2. Two frequency ICRF operation on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Majeski, R.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.; Phillips, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Modifications have been made recently to allow two of the ICRF antennas (bays L and M) on TFTR to operate at either of two frequencies, 43 MHz or 64 MHz. This was accomplished by lengthening the resonant loops (2Λ at 43 MHz, 3Λ at 64 MHz) and replacing the conventional quarter wave impedance transformers with a tapered impedance design. The other two antennas (bays K and N) will operate at a fixed frequency, 43 MHz. The two frequency operation will allow a combination of 3 He-minority and H-minority heating at near full field on TFTR. The higher frequency, 64 MHz, may also be useful in direct electron heating and current drive experiments at lower toroidal fields. Models of the antenna, resonant loops and impedance matching system are presented

  3. Synthetic Diagnostic for Doppler Backscattering (DBS) Turbulence Measurements based on Full Wave Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Kubota, S.; Crocker, N.

    2017-10-01

    Plasma full-wave simulations of the DIII-D DBS system including its lenses and mirrors are developed using the GPU-based FDTD2D code, verified against the GENRAY ray-tracing code and TORBEAM paraxial beam code. Our semi-analytic description of the effective spot size for a synthetic diagnostic reveals new focusing and defocusing effects arising from the combined effects of the curvature of the reflecting surface and that of the Gaussian beam wavefront. We compute the DBS transfer function from full-wave simulations to verify these effects. Using the synthetic diagnostic, nonlinear GYRO simulations closely match DBS fluctuation spectra with and without strong electron heating, without adjustment or change in normalization, while both GYRO and GENE also match fluxes in all transport channels. Density gradient driven TEMs that are observed by the DBS diagnostic on DIII-D are reproduced by simulations as a band of discrete toroidal mode numbers which intensify during strong electron heating. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-08ER54984.

  4. Two-dimensional full-wave code for reflectometry simulations in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, E.; Heuraux, S.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Cupido, L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional full-wave code in the extraordinary mode has been developed to simulate reflectometry in TJ-II. The code allows us to study the measurement capabilities of the future correlation reflectometer that is being installed in TJ-II. The code uses the finite-difference-time-domain technique to solve Maxwell's equations in the presence of density fluctuations. Boundary conditions are implemented by a perfectly matched layer to simulate free propagation. To assure the stability of the code, the current equations are solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Density fluctuation parameters such as fluctuation level, wave numbers, and correlation lengths are extrapolated from those measured at the plasma edge using Langmuir probes. In addition, realistic plasma shape, density profile, magnetic configuration, and experimental setup of TJ-II are included to determine the plasma regimes in which accurate information may be obtained

  5. Full-wave modeling of the O-X mode conversion in the Pegasus toroidal experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehn, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 (Germany); Jacquot, J. [IRFM, CEA, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bongard, M. W.; Hinson, E. T.; Volpe, F. A. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Gallian, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The ordinary-extraordinary (O-X) mode conversion is modeled with the aid of a 2D full-wave code in the Pegasus toroidal experiment as a function of the launch angles. It is shown how the shape of the plasma density profile in front of the antenna can significantly influence the mode conversion efficiency and, thus, the generation of electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). It is therefore desirable to control the density profile in front of the antenna for successful operation of an EBW heating and current drive system. On the other hand, the conversion efficiency is shown to be resilient to vertical displacements of the plasma as large as {+-}10 cm.

  6. A Full-Wave Seismic Tomography for the Crustal Structure in the Metropolitan Beijing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A.; Zhao, L.; Chen, Q.

    2008-12-01

    The greater Beijing metropolitan region is located in an old cratonic block in northeast China with complex geology and several large historic earthquakes, such as the Sanhe-Pinggu earthquake (~M8.0) in 1679, the Xingtai earthquake (M7.2) in 1966, and the Tangshan earthquake (M7.8) in 1976. To enhance our understanding of the crustal structure and the seismotectonics under this region, we conduct a full-wave three-dimensional (3D) tomographic study of this region using the waveforms recorded by the newly established Beijing metropolitan digital seismic network. Since the Beijing network was put into operation in October 2001, there have been 89 local earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 and above. From these, we selected 23 events of magnitude 3.2 and above and obtained their waveform records at 50 stations within our area of interest. The types of instruments at these stations include broadband, short-period and very broadband. First-motion focal mechanisms were determined for these events. We used a regional 3D model obtained by seismic reflection surveys as the reference model and calculated the synthetic seismograms by the finite-difference method. In this first attempt at finite- frequency tomography for the Beijing region, we focus on the variation of the P-wave speed using the first- arriving P waves. We measure the frequency-dependent traveltime anomalies of the P waves by the cross- correlation between observed and synthetic P waveforms within several discrete frequency bands between 20-sec and 5-sec periods. The sensitivity or Frechet kernels of these measurements for the perturbations in P-wave speed were computed by the same finite-difference method. We will present the preliminary result in our full-wave seismic tomography for the Beijing region.

  7. Development and test of decoupler for ICRF antenna in EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gen, E-mail: chengen@ipp.ac.cn; Mao, Yuzhou; Zhao, Yanping; Yuan, Shuai; Zhang, Xinjun; Qing, Chengming

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The mechanism of decoupler for ICRF antenna is proposed. • Three candidate assembly positions for the decouper can be used. • The performance relies on the ohmic dissipation and the assembly position of decoupler. - Abstract: Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating has been adopted in EAST tokamak as one of main auxiliary heating methods. The ICRF antenna usually consists of multiple launching elements because of limited port and space of tokamak device. Mutual coupling between straps has been observed in previous EAST ICRF current drive experiments. Due to adverse effects of such mutual coupling, many issues induced by cross power cannot be ignored, such as power imbalance in feed lines, high voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR), and etc. To restrain such mutual coupling, A device named decoupler was developed and tested in EAST ICRF system. According to the admittance matrix of load, three assembly positions (oscillation position, optimum position, and smooth position) along transmission line for the decoupler were taken into account and tested. The test results showed that ohmic dissipation in decoupler could not be neglected, which partly influenced the decoupling performance. The oscillation position and optimum position could restrain such adverse effects of ohmic dissipation and showed good decoupling performance. However, they cannot ensure the steady operation during H-mod due to the load variation. Finally, the smooth position has been adopted for EAST I port antenna because of steady decoupling performance comprised with engineering error and load resilience, which sincerely enhance the capability of system operation.

  8. The ICRF-3: Status, Plans, and Multi-wavelength Progress on the next generation Celestial Reference Frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    ICRF-3 seeks to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverage relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames that are ready for comparison with the Gaia optical frame.Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration to improve at S/X-band precision of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey's ~2200 sources, which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2, is bearing fruit and is projected to yield a factor of 3 improvement in precision. S/X-band southern hemisphere precision improvements are underway with observations using southern antennas such as the AuScope, Warkworth, and HartRAO, South Africa.We also seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka-band and K-band work. An X/Ka frame of 660 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which is strengthening the southern hemisphere in general. The X/Ka-band frame's precision is now comparable to the ICRF-2 for the 530 sources in common. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. By the time of this meeting, we expect K-band to complete full sky coverage with south polar cap observations and to improve spatial density north of -30 deg declination with VLBA observations.On the analysis front, special attention is being given to combination techniques both of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frames and of multiple data types. Consistency of the Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) with the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and Earth Oreintation Parameters (EOP) is another area of concern. Comparison of celestial frame solutions from various groups is underway in order to identify and correct systematic errors. We will discuss evidence emerging for 100 µas zonal errors in the ICRF2 in the declination range from 0 to -30 deg.Finally, work is underway to identify and

  9. High-power ICRF and ICRF plus neutral-beam heating on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.

    1983-01-01

    PLT ICRF experiments with RF powers up to approx.=3 MW have demonstrated efficient plasma heating in both the minority fundamental and the second harmonic ion-cyclotron regimes. In the minority 3 He regime, ion temperatures of approx.=3 keV have been produced along with approx.=1 kW of D- 3 He fusion power and substantial electron heating. In the second harmonic H regime, an equivalent averaged ion energy of approx.=4 keV has been achieved. Combined ICRF plus neutral-beam heating experiments with auxiliary powers totalling up to 4.5 MW have provided insight into auxiliary heating performance at stored plasma energy levels up to approx.=100 kJ. Values of #betta#sub(phi) in the range of 1.5-2% have been attained for Bsub(phi) approx.=17 kG. Energetic discharges with n-barsub(e) up to approx.6x10 13 cm - 3 at Bsub(phi) approx.=28 kG have also been investigated. Preliminary confinement studies suggest that energetic ion losses may contribute to a direct loss of the input RF power in the H minority heating regime but are insignificant in the 3 He minority case. The energy confinement time for the H minority regime is reduced somewhat from the Ohmic value. (author)

  10. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (orig.)

  11. ICRF induced edge plasma convection in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching/Greifswald (Germany); University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Feng, Yuehe; Lunt, Tilmann; Jacquot, Jonathan; Coster, David; Bilato, Roberto; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Ochoukov, Roman [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching/Greifswald (Germany); Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching/Greifswald (Germany); University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Colas, Laurent [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating is one of the main auxiliary plasma heating methods in tokamaks. It relies on the fast wave to heat the plasma. However the slow wave can also be generated parasitically. The parallel electric field of the slow wave can induce large biased plasma potential through sheath rectification. The rapid variation of this rectified potential across the magnetic field can cause significant E x B convection in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL). The ICRF induced convection can affect the SOL density, influence the ICRF power coupling and enhance the strength of plasma-wall interactions. To explore these physics, we not only show the experimental evidences in ASDEX Upgrade, but also present the associated simulation results with the 3D edge plasma fluid code EMC3-Eirene. Further simulations via combination of EMC3-Eirene and a sheath code SSWICH in an iterative and quasi self-consistent way can give good predictions for future experiments.

  12. DT simulation of ICRF heated supershots in TFTR using TRANSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, R.C.; Batchelor, D.B.; Phillips, C.K.; Budny, R.; Hammett, G.W.; Hosea, J.C.; McCune, D.M.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The principal goal of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is to enhance plasma performance during the deuterium-tritium (DT) physics phase of operations. Strongly centralized ICRF heating may play a critical role in obtaining high Q DT and high β α operation in TFTR, as well as in future fusion reactors. ICRF heating of a dilute minority species leads to the formation of an energetic ion population that, in turn, provides strong central electron heating. The corresponding rise in the central electron temperature translates into an increase in the slowing-down time of either neutral beam or alpha particles in the discharge. Preliminary DT simulations of the experimental results in deuterium-deuterium (DD) plasmas performed with the TRANSP code are presented in this paper

  13. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system (ρ,ξ) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number α as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions

  15. A PIC-MCC code RFdinity1d for simulation of discharge initiation by ICRF antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripský, M.; Wauters, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Bobkov, V.; Schneider, P. A.; Stepanov, I.; Douai, D.; Van Eester, D.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Van Schoor, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-12-01

    Discharges produced and sustained by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves in absence of plasma current will be used on ITER for (ion cyclotron-) wall conditioning (ICWC, Te = 3{-}5 eV, ne 18 m-3 ). In this paper, we present the 1D particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) RFdinity1d for the study the breakdown phase of ICRF discharges, and its dependency on the RF discharge parameters (i) antenna input power P i , (ii) RF frequency f, (iii) shape of the electric field and (iv) the neutral gas pressure pH_2 . The code traces the motion of both electrons and ions in a narrow bundle of magnetic field lines close to the antenna straps. The charged particles are accelerated in the parallel direction with respect to the magnetic field B T by two electric fields: (i) the vacuum RF field of the ICRF antenna E_z^RF and (ii) the electrostatic field E_zP determined by the solution of Poisson’s equation. The electron density evolution in simulations follows exponential increase, {\\dot{n_e} ∼ ν_ion t } . The ionization rate varies with increasing electron density as different mechanisms become important. The charged particles are affected solely by the antenna RF field E_z^RF at low electron density ({ne < 1011} m-3 , {≤ft \\vert E_z^RF \\right \\vert \\gg ≤ft \\vert E_zP \\right \\vert } ). At higher densities, when the electrostatic field E_zP is comparable to the antenna RF field E_z^RF , the ionization frequency reaches the maximum. Plasma oscillations propagating toroidally away from the antenna are observed. The simulated energy distributions of ions and electrons at {ne ∼ 1015} m-3 correspond a power-law Kappa energy distribution. This energy distribution was also observed in NPA measurements at ASDEX Upgrade in ICWC experiments.

  16. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I (Italy); Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Di Donato, L. [Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Isernia, T. [Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  17. Ion cyclotron emission calculations using a 2D full wave numerical code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Colestock, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of radiation in the HF band due to cyclotron emission by energetic ions produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic on large devices which are entering the reactor regime of operation. A number of complications make the modelling and interpretation of such measurements difficult using conventional geometrical optics methods. In particular the long wavelength and lack of high directivity of antennas in this frequency regime make observation of a single path across the plasma into a viewing dump impractical. Pickup antennas effectively see the whole plasma and wall reflection effects are important. We have modified our 2D full wave ICRH code 2 to calculate wave fields due to a distribution of energetic ions in tokamak geometry. The radiation is modeled as due to an ensemble of localized source currents distributed in space. The spatial structure of the coherent wave field is then calculated including cyclotron harmonic damping as compared to the usual procedure of incoherently summing powers of individual radiators. This method has the advantage that phase information from localized radiating currents is globally retained so the directivity of the pickup antennas is correctly represented. Also standing waves and wall reflections are automatically included

  18. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Eun-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF waves in the scape-off layer (SOL of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  19. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Bertelli, Nicola; Johnson, Jay; Valeo, Ernest; Hosea, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D) for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry) and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF) waves in the scape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  20. Full-wave simulations of current profiles for fast magnetosonic wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrieva, M.V.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Gambier, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    Numerical simulations of current drive in tokamaks by fast waves (FWCD) have been performed in the range of the ion cyclotron and at lower frequencies via 3-Dimensional numerical code ICTOR. Trapped particles effects were taken into account in the calculation of the fast wave current drive efficiency and the bootstrap current generation. The global efficiency of FWCD if found to be γ∼ 0.1 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for the Joint European Torus tokamak (JET) parameters at a central electron temperature of ∼ 10 kev. The efficiency of FWCD for reactor-like plasmas is found to be γ∼0.3 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for ∼ 100% of FWCD and γ∼ 1 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 for FWCD and ∼ 65% of bootstrap in a total current of ∼ 25MA at a 25kev central temperature with a density of ∼10 20 m -3 and major radius R ∼ 8m. Non-inductive current density profiles are studied. Broad FWCD current profiles are obtained for flat reactor temperature and density profiles with bootstrap current concentrated at the plasma edge. The possibility of a steady-state reactor on full wave (FW) with a large fraction of bootstrap current is discussed. It appears to be impractical to rely on such an external current driven (CD) scheme for a reactor as long a γ is less than 2 x 10 20 AW -1 m -2 . (Author)

  1. AORSA full wave calculations of helicon waves in DIII-D and ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C.; Jaeger, E. F.; Bertelli, N.; Berry, L. A.; Green, D. L.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.

    2018-06-01

    Helicon waves have been recently proposed as an off-axis current drive actuator for DIII-D, FNSF, and DEMO tokamaks. Previous ray tracing modeling using GENRAY predicts strong single pass absorption and current drive in the mid-radius region on DIII-D in high beta tokamak discharges. The full wave code AORSA, which is valid to all order of Larmor radius and can resolve arbitrary ion cyclotron harmonics, has been used to validate the ray tracing technique. If the scrape-off-layer (SOL) is ignored in the modeling, AORSA agrees with GENRAY in both the amplitude and location of driven current for DIII-D and ITER cases. These models also show that helicon current drive can possibly be an efficient current drive actuator for ITER. Previous GENRAY analysis did not include the SOL. AORSA has also been used to extend the simulations to include the SOL and to estimate possible power losses of helicon waves in the SOL. AORSA calculations show that another mode can propagate in the SOL and lead to significant (~10%–20%) SOL losses at high SOL densities. Optimizing the SOL density profile can reduce these SOL losses to a few percent.

  2. Characterization of an SRF gun: a 3D full wave simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized a BNL 1.3GHz half-cell SRF gun is tested for GaAs photocathode. The gun already was simulated several years ago via two-dimensional (2D) numerical codes (i.e., Superfish and Parmela) with and without the beam. In this paper, we discuss our investigation of its characteristics using a three dimensional (3D) full-wave code (CST STUDIO SUITE(trademark)).The input/pickup couplers are sited symmetrically on the same side of the gun at an angle of 180 o . In particular, the inner conductor of the pickup coupler is considerably shorter than that of the input coupler. We evaluated the cross-talk between the beam (trajectory) and the signal on the input coupler compared our findings with published results based on analytical models. The CST STUDIO SUITE(trademark) also was used to predict the field within the cavity; particularly, a combination of transient/eigenmode solvers was employed to accurately construct the RF field for the particles, which also includes the effects of the couplers. Finally, we explored the beam's dynamics with a particle in cell (PIC) simulation, validated the results and compare them with 2D code result.

  3. Local full-wave energy and quasilinear analysis in nonuniform plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    The subject of local wave energy in plasmas is treated via quasilinear theory from the dual perspectives of the action-angle formalism and gyrokinetic analysis. An extension is presented to all orders in the gyroradius of the self-consistent wave-propagation/quasilinear-absorption problem using gyrokinetics. Questions of when and under what conditions local energy should be of definite sign are answered using the action-angle formalism. An important result is that the ''dielectric operators'' of the linearized wave equation and of the local energy are not the same, a fact which is obscured when the eikonal or WKB assumption is invoked. Even though the two dielectrics are very different in character, it is demonstrated that they are nevertheless related by a simple mathematical statement. This study was originally motivated by concern over the question of local energy for r.f.-heating of plasmas, where in certain instances, full-wave effects such as refraction, strong absorption, and mode conversion are of primary importance. Fundamentally, the r.f.-absorption must equate with the energy moment of the quasilinear term to achieve a correct energy balance. This fact governs the derivation (as opposed to postulation) of the local absorption. The troublesome ''kinetic flux'' may then be chosen (it is not unique) to satisfy a wave-energy balance relation with the Poynting flux and local absorption. It is shown that at least one such choice reduces asymptotically to the Stix form away from nonuniformities. (author)

  4. Heat Loads On Tore Supra ICRF Launchers Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Chantant, M.; Beaumont, B.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Moreau, P.; Mitteau, R.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the heat loads on Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency launchers plasma facing components is a crucial task both for operating present tokamaks and for designing ITER ICRF launchers as these loads may limit the RF power coupling capability. Tore Supra facility is particularly well suited to take this issue. Parametric studies have been performed which enables to get an overall detailed picture of the different heat loads on several areas, pointing to different mechanisms at the origin of the heat power fluxes. Lessons are drawned both with regards to Tore Supra possible operational limits and to ITER ICRF launcher design

  5. ICRF heating of passing ions in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Dimonte, G.; Barter, J.; Campbell, R.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Ferguson, S.W.; Poulsen, P.

    1986-04-01

    By placing ion-cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas on both sides of a midplane gas-feed system in the central cell of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), our results have improved in the following areas: (a) The end losses out both ends show a factor of 3 to 4 increase in passing-ion temperatures and a factor of 2 to 3 decrease in passing-ion densities. (b) The passing-ion heating is consistent with Monte Carlo predictions. (c) The plasma density can be sustained by ICRF plus gas fueling as observed on other experiments

  6. Ripple losses during ICRF heating in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bergeaud, V.; Chantant, M.; Martin, G.; Nguyen, F.; Reichle, R.; Vallet, J.C.; Delpeche, L.; Surle, F.

    2004-01-01

    The toroidal field coils in Tore Supra are supra-conducting, and their number is restricted to 18. As a result, the ripple is fairly large, about 7% at the plasma boundary. Tore Supra has consequently been equipped with dedicated ripple loss diagnostics, which has allowed ripple loss studies. This paper reports on the measurements made with these diagnostics and provides an analysis of the experimental results, comparing them with theoretical expectations whenever possible. Furthermore, the main heating source accelerating ions in Tore Supra is ion cyclotron resonance range of frequency (ICRF) heating, and the paper provides new information on the ripple losses of ICRF accelerated ions. (author)

  7. SOL RF physics modelling in Europe, in support of ICRF experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A European project was undertaken to improve the available SOL ICRF physics simulation tools and confront them with measurements. This paper first reviews code upgrades within the project. Using the multi-physics finite element solver COMSOL, the SSWICH code couples RF full-wave propagation with DC plasma biasing over “antenna-scale” 2D (toroidal/radial domains, via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs applied at shaped plasma-facing boundaries. For the different modules and associated SBCs, more elaborate basic research in RF-sheath physics, SOL turbulent transport and applied mathematics, generally over smaller spatial scales, guides code improvement. The available simulation tools were applied to interpret experimental observations on various tokamaks. We focus on robust qualitative results common to several devices: the spatial distribution of RF-induced DC bias; left-right asymmetries over strap power unbalance; parametric dependence and antenna electrical tuning; DC SOL biasing far from the antennas, and RF-induced density modifications. From these results we try to identify the relevant physical ingredients necessary to reproduce the measurements, e.g. accurate radiated field maps from 3D antenna codes, spatial proximity effects from wave evanescence in the near RF field, or DC current transport. Pending issues towards quantitative predictions are also outlined.

  8. ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequencies] coupling on DIII-D and the implications on ICRF technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Swain, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Low-power coupling tests have been carried out with a prototype ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) compact loop antenna on the DIII-D tokamak. Plasma load resistance values higher than originally calculated are measured in ohmic and L-mode, beam-heated plasmas. Load resistance decreases by a factor of ∼2 in H-mode operation. When edge localized modes (ELMs) occur, the antenna loading increases transiently to several ohms. Results indicate that fast-wave ICRF antenna coupling characteristics are highly sensitive to changes in the edge plasma profiles associated with the H-mode regime

  9. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Murakami, M.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P rf ∼ 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments

  10. Advanced ponderomotive description of electron acceleration in ICRF discharge initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wauters Tom

    2017-01-01

    An example for plasma production by the TOMAS ICRF system is given. Following the described conditions it can be derived that plasma production is (i most efficient close to the antenna straps (few cm's where the field gradient and amplitude are large, and (ii that the lower frequency field accelerates electrons more easily for a given antenna voltage.

  11. 2-D mapping of ICRF-induced SOL perturbations in

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Colas, L.; Gunn, J. P.; Nanobashvili, I.; Petržílka, Václav; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Heuraux, S.; Joffrin, E.; Saint Laurent, F.; Balorin, C.; Lowry, C.; Basiuk, V.

    363-365, č. 4 (2007), s. 555-559 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : ICRF antenna * plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2007

  12. Particle Scattering in the Resonance Regime: Full-Wave Solution for Axisymmetric Particles with Large Aspect Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Crisp, David

    1997-01-01

    Reliable descriptions of the optical properties of clouds and aerosols are essential for studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres. The scattering algorithms provide accurate estimates of these properties for spherical particles with a wide range of sizes and refractive indices, but these methods are not valid for non-spherical particles (e.g., ice crystals, mineral dust, and smoke). Even though a host of methods exist for deriving the optical properties of nonspherical particles that are very small or very large compared with the wavelength, only a few methods are valid in the resonance regime, where the particle dimensions are comparable with the wavelength. Most such methods are not ideal for particles with sharp edges or large axial ratios. We explore the utility of an integral equation approach for deriving the single-scattering optical properties of axisymmetric particles with large axial ratios. The accuracy of this technique is shown for spheres of increasing size parameters and an ensemble of randomly oriented prolate spheroids of size parameter equal to 10.079368. In this last case our results are compared with published results obtained with the T-matrix approach. Next we derive cross sections, single-scattering albedos, and phase functions for cylinders, disks, and spheroids of ice with dimensions extending from the Rayleigh to the geometric optics regime. Compared with those for a standard surface integral equation method, the storage requirement and the computer time needed by this method are reduced, thus making it attractive for generating databases to be used in multiple-scattering calculations. Our results show that water ice disks and cylinders are more strongly absorbing than equivalent volume spheres at most infrared wavelengths. The geometry of these particles also affects the angular dependence of the scattering. Disks and columns with maximum linear dimensions larger than the wavelength scatter much more radiation in the forward and backward directions and much less radiation at intermediate phase angles than equivalent volume spheres.

  13. Efficient Full-Wave Analysis of Waveguide Arrays on Cylindrical Surfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Guglielmi, M.; Rozzi, T.; Zappelli, L.

    1999-01-01

    Conformal open-ended waveguide arrays received great attention in the early seventies. Recently, dielectric loaded waveguide radiators have been again proposed to achieve high dety microwave packaging [1], [2]. The efficient design of highly integrated array solutions, however, require fast and

  14. Tokamak wave coupling and heating in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, H.; Scharer, J.; Sund, R.

    1983-01-01

    The authors consider wave propagation in the vicinity of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) in general tokamak geometries. The problem of wave coupling by means of waveguides is addressed. In particular, the reflection coefficient for a simple TE 10 waveguide is obtained by taking into account both the z and y spectrum of the launcher. In order to take into account spatial gradients in the plasma medium, they use a one-dimensional slab model of the plasma. Good coupling and heating results are obtained for the first few harmonics for sufficiently weak edge density gradient and > about 1 keV core temperatures. To analyze the heating of the plasma interior in the presence of ICRF, a 2-D differential equation is being developed which takes into account spatial gradients and mode coupling

  15. Alpha-particle simulation using NBI beam and ICRF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hamada, Y.

    1984-07-01

    A new idea to produce the distribution function similar to that of alpha-particles in an ignited plasma has been proposed. This concept is attributed to the acceleration of the injected beam up to about 1 MeV/nucleon by the ICRF wave with cyclotron higher harmonics. This new method makes it possible to perform the simulation experiments for alpha-particles under the condition of moderate plasma parameters (e.g., Tsub(e) = 4 keV, nsub(e) = 3.5x10 19 m -3 and B sub(T) = 3 T). And it is found that 3ωsub(ci) ICRF wave is preferable compared with other cyclotron harmonics, from the viewpoints of the effective tail formation with smaller bulk ion heating and lower amplitude of the applied electric field. The formula for the maximum energy of the extended beam is also derived. (author)

  16. RF field measurements in the vicinity of an ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Intrator, T.; Roberts, D.; Hershkowitz, N.; Tataronis, J.; Grossmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the rf fields near an ICRF antenna installed in the central cell of the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror have been made, both in vacuum and in the presence of plasma. The antenna is a Faraday shielded partial turn loop. The front surface of the Faraday shield is composed of cylindrical elements in an arrangement similar to the Faraday shield design employed on TFTR. The antenna is run at relatively low power levels, in the 3.5-10 MHz frequency range. Two other ICRF systems in the phaedrus-B central cell sustain and heat the plasma at the 400 KW level. The vacuum field measurements are compared with the predictions of the ARGUS code, which models details of the Faraday shield structure. Fields in the plasma are modelled by the ANTENA code. Particle currents collected by the Faraday shield during plasma operation are also observed

  17. Bulk Ion Heating with ICRF Waves in Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER...... when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central 3He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the Ti profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LTi of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG...

  18. Simulations of ICRF-fast wave current drive on DIIID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Self-consistent calculations of MHD equilibria, generated by fast wave current drive and including the bootstrap effect, were done to guide and anticipate the results of upcoming experiments on the DIIID tokamak. The simulations predict that 2 MW of ICRF power is more than adequate to create several hundred kiloamperes in steady state; the total current increases with the temperature and density of the target plasma. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  19. Assessment of ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, G.; Wukitch, S.J.; Lin, Y.; Basse, N.; Bonoli, P.T.; Edlund, E.; Lin, L.; Parisot, A.; Porkolab, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Alcator C-Mod has presented a challenge to install high-power ICRF antennas in a tight space. Modifications have been made to the antenna plasma-facing surfaces and the internal current-carrying structure in order to overcome performance limitations. At the present time, the antennas have exceeded 5 MW into plasma with heating phasing, up to 2.7 MW with current-drive phasing, with good efficiency and no deleterious effects

  20. Recent results of JT-60U ICRF antenna operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, T.; Saigusa, M.; Kimura, H.

    1994-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is one of attractive plasma heating methods for reactor grade tokamaks, because it is quite effective in the wide ranges of plasma density and temperature. An antenna which should inject high power into plasma has been developed intensively because the heating efficiency and the coupling properties depend on its design. The antenna was operated at a small antenna-plasma gap in the JT-60 in out of phase mode, which showed the high heating efficiency to obtain high loading resistance, and similarly to other tokamaks. However, in order to reduce heat load to the antenna from plasma, a wide gap is required in reactor grade tokamaks such as ITER, in which the gap is designed to be 0.15 m in CDA. Two new antennas were fabricated for the JT-60U, which were designed to obtain high loading resistance at a wide gap for (π,0) phasing. The JT-60U ICRF heating system is explained. Also the JT-60U antenna is described. Antenna conditioning has been conducted well in the initial operation period. The phasing mode was set at (π,0) phasing, in which high heating efficiency is expected. The procedure is explained. The coupling and radiation loss properties during ICRF heating are reported. The JT-60U ICRF antennas were conditioned quickly with about 70 shots. The maximum coupled power was 6.4 MW for (π,0) phasing, and the power density was 6.1 MW/m 2 . (K.I.)

  1. Perspectives gained from ICRF physics studies on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Bell, M.; Batha, S.

    1998-01-01

    The physics of ICRF heating and current drive has been studied on TFTR for over a decade. Following the early low power coupling studies, high power experiments resulted in sawtooth stabilization, the first observation of RF-driven excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and the discovery of a mode conversion scenario for localized off-axis electron heating. The program culminated with the first studies of high power ICRF heating and profile control in tritium-rich high performance plasmas. A significant part of the concluding experiments centered on the potential of ICRF to drive sheared flows in order to suppress turbulence in the plasma core. Initial measurements taken with a novel poloidal velocity diagnostic suggest that localized sheared poloidal flows can be driven with ion Bernstein waves excited directly or else via mode conversion from a propagating fast magnetosonic wave. In this paper, recent results from TFTR on wave-based profile control techniques will be summarized along with suggestions for future studies elsewhere

  2. High Power RF Transmitters for ICRF Applications on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yuzhou; Yuan Shuai; Zhao Yanping; Zhang Xinjun; Chen Gen; Cheng Yan; Wang Lei; Ju Songqing; Deng Xu; Qin Chengming; Yang Lei; Kumazawa, R.

    2013-01-01

    An Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) system with a radio frequency (RF) power of 4 × 1.5 MW was developed for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). High RF power transmitters were designed as a part of the research and development (R and D) for an ICRF system with long pulse operation at megawatt levels in a frequency range of 25 MHz to 70 MHz. Studies presented in this paper cover the following parts of the high power transmitter: the three staged high power amplifier, which is composed of a 5 kW wideband solid state amplifier, a 100 kW tetrode drive stage amplifier and a 1.5 MW tetrode final stage amplifier, and the DC high voltage power supply (HVPS). Based on engineering design and static examinations, the RF transmitters were tested using a matched dummy load where an RF output power of 1.5 MW was achieved. The transmitters provide 6 MW RF power in primary phase and will reach a level up to 12 MW after a later upgrade. The transmitters performed successfully in stable operations in EAST and HT-7 devices. Up to 1.8 MW of RF power was injected into plasmas in EAST ICRF heating experiments during the 2010 autumn campaign and plasma performance was greatly improved.

  3. Global analysis of ICRF wave coupling on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Tore Supra tokamak is equipped with a multi-megawatt ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) system for heating and current drive. The coupling of the fast wave to the plasma, characterized by the distributed coupling resistance along the radiating straps, is a crucial issue in order to launch large RF powers. Many factors can have an effect on ICRF wave coupling. Quantitative prediction from theoretical modelling requires the knowledge of the local inhomogeneous plasma density profile in front of the antenna for running sophisticated antenna codes. In this work, we have rather followed a 'global' approach, based on Tore Supra experimental results, for the parametric study of the coupling resistance. From a large data base covering seven experimental campaigns (∼2250 shots), a scaling law of the coupling resistance including the main parameters of the plasma and of the antenna configuration is established. This approach is found to be reliable for the analysis of coupling in the different scenarios: He/D 2 gas filling, gas/pellets for plasma fuelling, plasma leaning on inner wall/low field side limiter, limiter/ergodic divertor configuration, minority heating/direct electron heating. From one scenario to another, a significant variation of the coefficients of the scaling law is found. The study of these variations allows to get some insight on the main physical mechanisms which influence the ICRF wave coupling in a tokamak operation, such as the wall conditioning and recycling conditions, RF sheaths or frequency. (author)

  4. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  5. Sequential modelling of ICRF wave near RF fields and asymptotic RF sheaths description for AUG ICRF antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquot Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of simulations is performed with RAPLICASOL and SSWICH to compare two AUG ICRF antennas. RAPLICASOL outputs have been used as input to SSWICH-SW for the AUG ICRF antennas. Using parallel electric field maps and the scattering matrix produced by RAPLICASOL, SSWICH-SW, reduced to its asymptotic part, is able to produce a 2D radial/poloidal map of the DC plasma potential accounting for the antenna input settings (total power, power balance, phasing. Two models of antennas are compared: 2-strap antenna vs 3-strap antenna. The 2D DC potential structures are correlated to structures of the parallel electric field map for different phasing and power balance. The overall DC plasma potential on the 3-strap antenna is lower due to better global RF currents compensation. Spatial proximity between regions of high RF electric field and regions where high DC plasma potentials are observed is an important factor for sheath rectification.

  6. A four-diode full-wave ionic current rectifier based on bipolar membranes: overcoming the limit of electrode capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Janson, Per; Tybrandt, Klas; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-08-13

    Full-wave rectification of ionic currents is obtained by constructing the typical four-diode bridge out of ion conducting bipolar membranes. Together with conjugated polymer electrodes addressed with alternating current, the bridge allows for generation of a controlled ionic direct current for extended periods of time without the production of toxic species or gas typically arising from electrode side-reactions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of La3+-Doped TiO2 Nanotubes with Full Wave-Band Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minghao; Huang, Lingling; Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Yongqian

    2018-06-01

    TiO2 nanotubes doped with La3+ were synthesized by anodic oxidation method and the photocatalytic activity was detected by photodegrading methylene blue. As-prepared samples improved the absorption of both ultraviolet light and visible light and have a great enhancement on the photocatalytic activity while contrasting with the pristine TiO2 nanotubes. A tentative mechanism for the enhancement of photocatalytic activity with full wave-band absorption is proposed.

  8. A full wave code for ion cyclotron waves in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1996-02-01

    The code TORIC solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ion cyclotron frequency range in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The model used describes the compressional and torsional Alfven waves (or, depending on the parallel phase velocity, the kinetic counterpart of the latter), and ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion near the first ion cyclotron harmonic. In the ion response the broadening of the absorption regions due to the finite width of the cyclotron resonance of individual ions in toroidal geometry is taken into account. The parallel component of the wave electric field is evaluated on the same footing as the transverse ones; the response of the electrons includes Landau damping, Transit Time damping and the mixed term. The numerical approach uses a spectral representation of the solution in the poloidal angle θ, and cubic finite elements in the radial variable ψ. Great flexibility is provided in the way ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion are damped when their wavelength becomes comparable with the ion Larmor radius, in the regularization of Alfven resonances, and in the treatment of the outer plasma layers. As an option, we have also implemented the Order Reduction Algorithm, which provides a particularly fast, yet accurate evaluation of the power deposition profiles in toroidal geometry. Thee present report describes the model and its numerical implementation, and provides the information needed to use the code. A few examples illustrating applications of TORIC are also included. (orig.)

  9. The International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the Relationship Between Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chopo

    2000-01-01

    The International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), a catalog of VLBI source positions, is now the basis for astrometry and geodesy. Its construction and extension/maintenance will be discussed as well as the relationship of the ICRF, ITRF, and EOP/nutation.

  10. Full-Wave Ambient Noise Tomography of the Long Valley Volcanic Region (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, A. F.; Shelly, D. R.; Dawson, P. B.; Hill, D. P.; Shen, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In the late 1970s, and throughout the 1990s, Long Valley Caldera (California) experienced intense periods of unrest characterized by uplift of the resurgent dome, earthquake swarms, and CO2 emissions around Mammoth Mountain. While modeling of the uplift and gravity changes support the possibility of new magmatic intrusions beneath the caldera, geologic interpretations conclude that the magmatic system underlying the caldera is moribund. Geophysical studies yield diverse versions of a sizable but poorly resolved low-velocity zone at depth (> 6km), yet whether this zone is indicative of a significant volume of crystal mush, smaller isolated pockets of partial melt, or magmatic fluids, is inconclusive. The nature of this low-velocity zone, and the state of volcano's magmatic system, carry important implications for the significance of resurgent-dome inflation and the nature of associated hazards. To better characterize this low-velocity zone we present preliminary results from a 3D full-waveform ambient-noise seismic tomography model derived from the past 25 years of vertical component broadband and short-period seismic data. This new study uses fully numerical solutions of the wave equation to account for the complex wave propagation in a heterogeneous, 3D earth model, including wave interaction with topography. The method ensures that wave propagation is modeled accurately in 3D, enabling the full use of seismic records. By using empirical Green's functions, derived from ambient noise and modeled as Rayleigh surface waves, we are able to extend model resolution to depths beyond the limits of previous local earthquake studies. The model encompasses not only the Long Valley Caldera, but the entire Long Valley Volcanic Region, including Mammoth Mountain and the Mono Crater/Inyo Domes volcanic chain.

  11. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-06-01

    ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using the results based on Monte Carlo simulations. The global energy confinement time including energetic ion effect can be expressed in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density, and magnetic field strength in heliotrons. Our results in the CHS plasma show the systematic decrement of the global energy confinement time due to the energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Also we apply our model to the ICRF minority heating in the LHD plasma in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. The clear increment of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while the decrement is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  12. Measurement of Dielectric Properties at 75 - 325 GHz using a Vector Network Analyzer and Full Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Khanal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fast and easy to use method to determine permittivity and loss tangent in the frequency range of 75 to 325 GHz. To obtain the permittivity and the loss tangent of the test material, the reflection and transmission S-parameters of a waveguide section filled with the test material are measured using a vector network analyzer and then compared with the simulated plots from a full wave simulator (HFSS, or alternatively the measurement results are used in mathematical formulas. The results are coherent over multiple waveguide bands.

  13. The ASDEX Upgrade ICRF system: Operational experience and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faugel, H.; Angene, P.; Becker, W.; Braun, F.; Bobkov, Vl.V.; Eckert, B.; Fischer, F.; Hartmann, D.A.; Heilmaier, G.; Kneidl, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Siegl, G.; Wuersching, E.

    2005-01-01

    The ICRF system at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is in operation since May 1992. Following some modifications of which the major one was the installation of 3 dB couplers it has become a reliable additional heating system. The maximum power coupled into the plasma has been raised up to 7.2 MW (90% of the installed RF power) for short pulses and up to 6.2 MW for pulses several second long with energy of up to 29 MJ. A power of 5 MW is delivered on a regular basis to replace two NBI sources

  14. ICRF array module development and optimization for high power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.M.; Swain, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the analysis and optimization of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Antenna Array for the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). The objectives of this effort were to: (1) minimize the applied radiofrequency rf voltages occurring in vacuum by proper layout and shape of components, limit the component's surface/volumes where the rf voltage is high; (2) study the effects of magnetic insulation, as applied to the current design; (3) provide electrical characteristics of the antenna for the development and analysis of tuning, arc detection/suppression, and systems for discriminating between arcs and edge-localized modes (ELMs); (4) maintain close interface with mechanical design

  15. Improved confinement during ICRF heating on JFT-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Toshihide; Tamai, Hiroshi

    1986-10-01

    Significant improvement of energy confinement was observed on JFT-2M during ICRF heating. This improvement is associated with the sudden depression of H α /D α emission and the following increase of plasma stored energy, electron density and the radiation loss. This should be the same phenomena as H-mode transitions observed in ASDEX, PDX, and D-III divertor experiments with neutral beam injection heating. However, this transition is also observed in limiter discharges as well as in open divertor configurations on JFT-2M. (author)

  16. ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Monakhov, I.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Drewelow, P.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Campergue, A-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Czarnecka, A. [Association Euratom-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Klepper, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, ERM-KMS, Brussels (Belgium); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Mlynar, J. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall material on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation was assessed and also the properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF were studied. No substantial change of the antenna coupling resistance was observed with the ILW as compared with the carbon wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing) are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can well reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. Some experimental facts indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions; the W content is also increased in ICRF-heated limiter plasmas; and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong and long lasting reduction of the impurity level. The ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 20%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating efficiency; The ICRF power can be deposited at plasma centre and the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core could be observed.

  17. International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF): mantenimiento y extensión

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.; Arias, E. F.; Eubanks, T.; Fey, A. L.; Gontier, A.-M.; Jacobs, C. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Archinal, B. A.; Charlot, P.

    A partir de enero de 1998 el sistema de referencia celeste convencional está representado por el International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) y materializado a través de las coordenadas VLBI del conjunto de radiofuentes extragalácticas que conforman el International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). La primera realización del ICRF, fue elaborada en 1995 por un grupo de expertos designado por la IAU, la que encomendó al International Earth Rotation Service el mantenimiento del ICRS, del ICRF y del vínculo con marcos de referencia en otras frecuencias. Una primera extensión del ICRF se realizó entre abril y junio de 1999, con el objetivo primario de proveer posiciones de radiofuentes extragalácticas observadas a partir de julio de 1995 y de mejorar las posiciones de las fuentes ``candidatas" con la inclusión de observaciones adicionales. Objetivos secundarios fueron monitorear a las radiofuentes para verificar que siguen siendo adecuadas para realizar al ICRF y mejorar las técnicas de análisis de datos. Como resultado del nuevo análisis se obtuvo una solución a partir de la cual se construyó la primera extensión del ICRF, denominada ICRF - Ext.1. Ella representa al ICRS, sus fuentes de definición se mantienen con las mismas posiciones y errores que en la primera realización del ICRF; las demás radiofuentes tienen coordenadas mejor determinadas que en ICRF; el marco de referencia se densificó con el agregado de 59 nuevas radiofuentes.

  18. The effect of ICRF antenna phasing on metal impurities in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.E.; Bush, C.; Colestock, P.L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov

    1989-07-01

    ICRF power levels of up to 2.8 MW were achieved during the 1988 experimental run on TFTR. Metal impurity concentrations (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni) and Z eff were monitored during ICRF heating by x-ray pulse height analysis and uv spectroscopy. Antenna phasing was the key variable affecting ICRF performance. No increase in metallic impurities was observed for P rf approx lt 2.8 MW with the antenna straps 0-Π, while a measurable increase in titanium (Faraday screen material) was observed for P rf approx gt 1.0 MW with 0-0 phasing. 18 refs., 8 figs

  19. Expanding the operating space of ICRF on JET with a view to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamalle, P.U.; Bonheure, G.; Durodie, F.; Lerche, E.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Eester, D.; Weyssow, B.; Mantsinen, M.J.; Heikkinen, J.; Salmi, A.; Santala, M.I.K.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Bovkov, V.V.; Alper, B.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Vries, P. de; Gowers, C.; Felton, R.; Kiptily, V.; Lawson, K.; Lomas, P.; Mayoral, M.L.; Monakhov, I.; Popovichev, S.; Sharapov, S.; Bertalot, L.; Castaldo, C.; Tardocchi, M.; La Luna, E. de; Eriksson, L.G.; Baar, M. de; Meo, F.; Mironov, M.; Nunes, I.; Piazza, G.; Noterdaeme, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper reports on ITER-relevant ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) physics investigated on JET in 2003 and early 2004: minority heating of He 3 and D in H plasmas, minority heating of tritium in D, investigations of finite Larmor radius effects on the RF-induced high-energy tails, fast wave heating and current drive, and new results on the heating efficiency of ICRF antennas. ELM (edge localized mode) studies using fast RF measurements, experimental demonstration of a new ELM-tolerant antenna matching scheme, and technical enhancements planned on the JET ICRF system for 2005, themselves likewise strongly driven by the preparation for ITER, are also summarized. (authors)

  20. Heat loads on Tore Supra ICRF Launchers Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Mitteau, R.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the heat loads on Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) launchers plasma-facing components is a crucial task both for operating present tokamaks and for designing ITER ICRF launchers as these loads may limit the RF power coupling capability. Tore Supra facility is particularly well suited to take this issue. Parametric studies have been performed which enables to get an overall detailed picture of the different heat loads on several areas, pointing to different mechanisms at the origin of the heat power fluxes. It is found that the most critical items for Tore-Supra operation are localized heat loads on the Faraday screen top left corner and vertical edges. Warming up close to maximum temperature limit originally set for protection of the plasma-facing components is found of high power pulses, but no erosion was observed after detailed inspection of the launcher in Tore-Supra vessel. Yet, the associated heat loads could be limiting for Tore-Supra operation in the future, and some dedicated work is under progress to improve the understanding of these power fluxes, pointing out the importance of getting a better knowledge of particle flows in the scrape of layer

  1. ICRF heating and current drive experiments on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at TFTR have focused on the RF physics relevant to advanced tokamak D-T reactors. Experiments performed either tested confinement in reactor relevant plasmas or tested specific ICRF heating scenarios under consideration for reactors. H-minority heating was used to supply identical heating sources for matched D-T and D only L-mode plasmas to determine the species scaling for energy confinement. Second harmonic tritium heating was performed with only thermal tritium ions in an L-mode target plasma, verifying a possible start-up scenario for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Direct electron heating in Enhanced Reverse Shear (ERS) plasmas has been found to delay the back transition out of the ERS state. D-T mode conversion of the fast magnetosonic wave to an Ion Berstein Wave (IBW) for off-axis heating and current drive has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Parasitic Li 7 cyclotron damping limited the fraction of the power going to the electrons to less than 30%. Similar parasitic damping by Be 9 could be problematic in ITER. Doppler shifted fundamental resonance heating of beam ions and alpha particles has also been observed

  2. ICRF current drive by using antenna phase control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Itoh, K.

    1987-01-01

    A global analysis of current drive in tokamaks by using waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), considering the entire antenna-plasma system, is presented. A phase shifted antenna array is used to inject toroidal momentum into the electrons. Within the context of quasi-linear theory, a Fokker-Planck calculation is combined with an ICRF wave propagation-absorption analysis which includes kinetic effects and realistic boundary conditions. The radial profile of the current induced by the mode converted ion Bernstein wave and by the magnetosonic fast wave is obtained, together with the global current drive efficiency (total induced current/total emitted power from the antennas) in the high density and temperature plasma regime. The phase dependence of the global efficiency is investigated by changing the launching conditions such as the total antenna number and the antenna spacing. In medium size tokamaks, the electron power absorption and the associated driven current are found to be affected considerably by the plasma cavity resonance. It is also found that the global efficiency is sensitive to the antenna spacing. When the antenna spacing is increased, the global efficiency is reduced by counter current generation. (author)

  3. Foundations of ICRF heating--A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Tom Stix has made many major contributions to the development of understanding of a wide array of rf heating and diagnostics methods, in experiment and theory. In recognition of his profound influence on ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating research, this paper is focused on two major building blocks contributed by him which served to help guide and quantify the research toward establishing ICRF heating as a viable technique for the reactor regime: (1) the formalism for quantitative evaluation of antenna loading contained in his 1962 text book and (2) his Fokker-Planck analysis for heating of ions and especially minority species ions in his 1975 Nuclear Fusion paper. Importantly, his work from the mid 1950s to the mid 1970s from which these two building blocks derive, provided a solid basis for the rapid developing ion cyclotron heating research in the 1970s and helped to guide that research to definitive demonstration of the viability of the minority ion heating regime as a reactor heating method by the end of the decade

  4. Arc detection for the ICRF system on ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Inca, R.

    2011-12-01

    The ICRF system for ITER is designed to respect the high voltage breakdown limits. However arcs can still statistically happen and must be quickly detected and suppressed by shutting the RF power down. For the conception of a reliable and efficient detector, the analysis of the mechanism of arcs is necessary to find their unique signature. Numerous systems have been conceived to address the issues of arc detection. VSWR-based detectors, RF noise detectors, sound detectors, optical detectors, S-matrix based detectors. Until now, none of them has succeeded in demonstrating the fulfillment of all requirements and the studies for ITER now follow three directions: improvement of the existing concepts to fix their flaws, development of new theoretically fully compliant detectors (like the GUIDAR) and combination of several detectors to benefit from the advantages of each of them. Together with the physical and engineering challenges, the development of an arc detection system for ITER raises methodological concerns to extrapolate the results from basic experiments and present machines to the ITER scale ICRF system and to conduct a relevant risk analysis.

  5. Electromagnetic simulations of the ASDEX Upgrade ICRF Antenna with the TOPICA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivska, A.; Milanesio, D.; Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate and efficient simulation tools are necessary to optimize the ICRF antenna design for a set of operational conditions. The TOPICA code was developed for performance prediction and for the analysis of ICRF antenna systems in the presence of plasma, given realistic antenna geometries. Fully 3D antenna geometries can be adopted in TOPICA, just as in available commercial codes. But while those commercial codes cannot operate with a plasma loading, the TOPICA code correctly accounts for realistic plasma loading conditions, by means of the coupling with 1D FELICE code. This paper presents the evaluation of the electric current distribution on the structure, of the parallel electric field in the region between the straps and the plasma and the computation of sheaths driving RF potentials. Results of TOPICA simulations will help to optimize and re-design the ICRF ASDEX Upgrade antenna in order to reduce tungsten (W) sputtering attributed to the rectified sheath effect during ICRF operation.

  6. Removal of particles by ICRF cleaning in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiansheng; Li Jiangang; Zhang Shouyin; Gu Xuemao; Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Yanping; Gong Xianzu; Kuang Guangli; Li Chengfu; Luo Jiarong; Wang Xiaoming; Gao Xiang; Wan Baonian; Xie Jikang; Wan Yuanxi

    2001-01-01

    The ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range Frequency) cleaning technique has been used as a routine wall cleaning method in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. In a wide range of toroidal field, the removal rate of residual gas by ICRF cleaning was about twenty times higher than that of glow discharge cleaning (GDC). At different gas pressure and RF power levels, the ICRF cleaning is studied carefully. A good impurity cleaning effect and a very high hydrogen removal rate were obtained. The removal rate of hydrogen by 5 kW ICRF cleaning achieved was 1.6 x 10 -5 Torr.l/s. And the relationships among pressure P, outgassing rate Q, atomic layers L absorbed on surface and the cleaning mode were discussed briefly

  7. Localized bulk electron heating with ICRF mode conversion in the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Eester, D. Van

    2004-01-01

    of the He-3 ion cyclotron resonance layer in D and He-4 plasmas and subsequently damped on the bulk electrons. The resulting electron power deposition, measured using ICRF power modulation, is narrow with a typical full-width at half-maximum of approximate to30 cm (i.e. about 30% of the minor radius......) and the total deposited power to electrons comprises at least up to 80% of the applied ICRF power. The ICRF mode conversion power deposition has been kept constant using He-3 bleed throughout the ICRF phase with a typical duration of 4-6 s, i.e. 15-40 energy confinement times. Using waves propagating...

  8. Slow wave antenna coupling to ion Bernstein waves for plasma heating in ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, W.N-C.; Amano, T.; Ando, R.; Fukuyama, A.; Watari, T.

    1984-10-01

    The coupling of ICRF power from a slow wave antenna to a plasma with finite temperature is examined theoretically and compared to an independent computer calculation. It is shown that such antennas can be highly efficient in trasferring most of the antenna power directly to ion Bernstein waves, with only a very small fraction going into fast waves. The potentiality of this coupling scheme for plasma heating in ICRF is briefly discussed. (author)

  9. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); D' Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

    2014-02-12

    We performed an extensive survey of the plasma potential in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Ion Cyclotron Range-of Frequencies (ICRF)-heated discharges on Alcator C-Mod. Our results show that plasma potentials are enhanced in the presence of ICRF power and plasma potential values of >100 V are often observed. Such potentials are high enough to induce sputtering of high-Z molybdenum (Mo) plasma facing components by deuterium ions on C-Mod. For comparison, the plasma potential in Ohmic discharges is typically less than 10 V, well below the threshold needed to induce Mo sputtering by deuterium ions. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials are observed in the SOL regions that both magnetically map and do not map to active ICRF antennas. Regions that magnetically map to active ICRF antennas are accessible to slow waves directly launched by the antennas and these regions experience plasma potential enhancement that is partially consistent with the slow wave rectification mechanism. One of the most defining features of the slow wave rectification is a threshold appearance of significant plasma potentials (>100 V) when the dimensionless rectification parameter Λ{sub −o} is above unity and this trend is observed experimentally. We also observe ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials >100 V in regions that do not magnetically map to the active antennas and, hence, are not accessible for slow waves launched directly by the active antennas. However, unabsorbed fast waves can reach these regions. The general trend that we observe in these 'un-mapped' regions is that the plasma potential scales with the strength of the local RF wave fields with the fast wave polarization and the highest plasma potentials are observed in discharges with the highest levels of unabsorbed ICRF power. Similarly, we find that core Mo levels scale with the level of unabsorbed ICRF power suggesting a link between plasma potentials in the SOL and the strength of the impurity source.

  10. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, N., E-mail: nbertell@pppl.gov; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Qin, C. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  11. Review of ICRF antenna development and heating experiments up to advanced experiment I, 1989 on the JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1992-03-01

    Two main subjects of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating on JT-60 are described in this paper from development phase of the JT-60 ICRF heating system up to advanced experiment I, 1989. One is antenna design and development for the high power JT-60 ICRF heating system (6 MW for 10 s at a frequency range of 108 - 132 MHz). The other is the experimental investigation of characteristics of second harmonic ICRF heating in a large tokamak. (J.P.N.)

  12. High coupling performance of JT-60U ICRF antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, M.; Moriyama, S.; Fujii, T.; Kimura, H.; Sato, M.; Hosogane, N.; Nemoto, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Sufficient coupling of an ICRF antenna for high power experiments was obtained even for a wide gap between the separatrix and the antenna in JT-60U. The loading resistances for an out-of-phase mode are over 4 Ω for a gap of 13 cm between the separatrix and the Faraday shield over the wide range of electron density from 1 x 10 19 to 5.5 x 10 19 m -3 . In particular, the loading resistances for an in-phase mode are about 5 Ω for a gap of 33 cm between the separatrix and the Faraday shield for the same plasma parameters. However, the heating response for the out-of phase mode is much stronger than that for the in-phase mode. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 11 refs, 6 figs

  13. A predictive transport modeling code for ICRF-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Hwang, D.Q.

    1992-02-01

    In this report, a detailed description of the physic included in the WHIST/RAZE package as well as a few illustrative examples of the capabilities of the package will be presented. An in depth analysis of ICRF heating experiments using WHIST/RAZE will be discussed in a forthcoming report. A general overview of philosophy behind the structure of the WHIST/RAZE package, a summary of the features of the WHIST code, and a description of the interface to the RAZE subroutines are presented in section 2 of this report. Details of the physics contained in the RAZE code are examined in section 3. Sample results from the package follow in section 4, with concluding remarks and a discussion of possible improvements to the package discussed in section 5

  14. DIII-D ICRF high voltage power supply regulator upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, W.P.; Burley, B.L.; Grosnickle, W.H.

    1997-11-01

    For reliable operation and component protection, of the 2 MW 30--120 MHz ICRF Amplifier System on DIII-D, it is desirable for the amplifier to respond to high VSWR conditions as rapidly as possible. This requires a rapid change in power which also means a rapid change in the high voltage power supply current demands. An analysis of the power supply's regulator dynamics was needed to verify its expected operation during such conditions. Based on this information it was found that a new regulator with a larger dynamic range and some anticipation capability would be required. This paper will discuss the system requirements, the as-delivered regulator performance, and the improved performance after installation of the new regulator system. It will also be shown how this improvement has made the amplifier perform at higher power levels more reliably

  15. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  16. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement

  17. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, Ernest; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Eun-Hwa; Phillips, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  18. Analysis of an inverter-supplied multi-winding transformer with a full-wave rectifier at the output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopcic, Beno; Dolinar, Drago; Stumberger, Gorazd

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the magnetic analysis of an inverter-supplied multi-winding transformer frequently used in resistance spot welding applications. The basic structure of the analyzed system consists of an inverter, a single-phase transformer with two secondary windings and a full-wave rectifier mounted at the output of the transformer, which assure a very short rise time of the welding current. The disturbing current spikes often appear in the transformer's primary in the steady-state operation, which can activate the over-current protection switch-off of the system. The results of numerical analysis performed on the nonlinear model of the discussed system have shown that very strong magnetic saturation of the transformer's iron core, caused by the interaction among the different ohmic resistances of secondary windings and different characteristics of the output rectifier diodes, provokes unwanted current spikes. Magnetic saturation could be efficiently eliminated using very simple passive method proposed in this paper. All findings are confirmed by systematic analysis numerically and experimentally

  19. Information content in frequency-dependent, multi-offset GPR data for layered media reconstruction using full-wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Albéric; Phuong Tran, Anh; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Water lost through leaks can represent high percentages of the total production in water supply systems and constitutes an important issue. Leak detection can be tackled with various techniques such as the ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Based on this technology, various procedures have been elaborated to characterize a leak and its evolution. In this study, we focus on a new full-wave radar modelling approach for near-field conditions, which takes into account the antenna effects as well as the interactions between the antenna(s) and the medium through frequency-dependent global transmission and reflection coefficients. This approach is applied to layered media for which 3-D Green's functions can be calculated. The model allows for a quantitative estimation of the properties of multilayered media by using full-wave inversion. This method, however, proves to be limited to provide users with an on-demand assessment as it is generally computationally demanding and time consuming, depending on the medium configuration as well as the number of unknown parameters to retrieve. In that respect, we propose two leads in order to enhance the parameter retrieval step. The first one consists in analyzing the impact of the reduction of the number of frequencies on the information content. For both numerical and laboratory experiments, this operation has been achieved by investigating the response surface topography of objective functions arising from the comparison between measured and modelled data. The second one involves the numerical implementation of multistatic antenna configurations with constant and variable offsets in the model. These two kinds of analyses are then combined in numerical experiments to observe the conjugated effect of the number of frequencies and the offset configuration. To perform the numerical analyses, synthetic Green's functions were simulated for different multilayered medium configurations. The results show that an antenna offset increase leads

  20. Modelling of combined ICRF and NBI heating in JET hybrid plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallart Dani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2015-2016 JET campaigns many efforts have been devoted to the exploration of high performance plasma scenarios envisaged for ITER operation. In this paper we model the combined ICRF+NBI heating in selected key hybrid discharges using PION. The antenna frequency was tuned to match the cyclotron frequency of minority hydrogen (H at the center of the tokamak coinciding with the second harmonic cyclotron resonance of deuterium. The modelling takes into account the synergy between ICRF and NBI heating through the second harmonic cyclotron resonance of deuterium beam ions which allows us to assess its impact on the neutron rate RNT. We evaluate the influence of H concentration which was varied in different discharges in order to test their role in the heating performance. According to our modelling, the ICRF enhancement of RNT increases by decreasing the H concentration which increases the ICRF power absorbed by deuterons. We find that in the recent hybrid discharges this ICRF enhancement was in the range of 10-25%. Finally, we extrapolate the results to D-T and find that the best performing hybrid discharges correspond to an equivalent fusion power of ∼7.0 MW in D-T.

  1. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k / spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  2. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated, including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using results based on Monte Carlo simulations (Murakami, S., et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 26 (1995) 209). The global energy confinement time including the energetic ion effect can be expressed in heliotrons in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density and magnetic field strength. Results in plasmas at CHS show a systematic decrease of the global energy confinement time due to energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The model is also applied to ICRF minority heating in LHD plasmas in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. A clear increase of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while a decrease is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  3. Density Convection near Radiating ICRF Antennas and its Effect on the Coupling of Lower Hybrid Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mailloux, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore Supra and JET tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in JET indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k//-spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum

  4. Heat deposition on the first wall due to ICRF-induced loss of fast ions in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Y.; Tobita, K.; Kimura, H.; Hamamatsu, K.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, M.; Saigusa, M.; Moriyama, S.; Tani, K.; Koide, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Nishitani, T.; Ushigusa, K.

    1995-01-01

    In JT-60U, the heat deposition on the first wall due to the ICRF-induced loss of fast ions was investigated by changing the position of the resonance layer in the ripple-trapping region. A heat spot appears on the first wall of the same major radius as the resonance layer of the ICRF waves. The broadening of the heat spot in the major radius direction is consistent with that of the resonance layer due to the Doppler broadening. The heat spot is considered to be formed by the ICRF-induced ripple-trapped loss of fast ions. Although the total ICRF-induced loss power to the heat spot is as low as 2% of the total ICRF power, the additional heat flux will become a new issue because of the localized heat deposition on the first wall. ((orig.))

  5. Lead elimination by ICRF 158 in rats after chronic lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witting, U; Hultsch, E

    1981-02-01

    Lead elimination by ICRF 158, a lipophilic derivative of ethylene-diaminetetra-acetate (EDTA), was investigated in rats after chronic lead exposure. The animals had received a lead concentration of 550 ppm in their drinking water for 140 days. Subsequent treatment with ICRF 158 for 30 days led to increased mobilization and elimination of incorporated lead, and the lead-induced inhibition of hemosynthesis was removed. ICR 158 produced no renal damage in excess to lead-induced tubular nephrosis. Separate toxicity tests in mice demonstrated that is less toxic than CaNa/sub 2/EDTA. ICRF 158 does not form stable complexes with lead ions in vitro. The mechanism of action of this lipophilic EDTA derivative is compared to that of its hydrophilic correspondent, the chelating agent CaNa/sub 2/EDTA.

  6. Rf sheaths and impurity generation by ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequencies] antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1988-11-01

    In general, Faraday screen elements in an ICRF antenna are not aligned precisely along the combined toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. When plasma of density n > 2ε 0 V/eg 2 /approximately/ 10 9 cm -3 is present in the gap between elements, electron response to the parallel electric field shorts out the electric field over most of the gap, leaving a narrow sheath of positive space charge and intense electric field. Here V denotes the voltage across the gap and g the gap spacing. This intense electric field accelerates ions up to an appreciable fraction of the gap voltage (/approximately/ 1 kV), sufficient to cause physical sputtering of the screen material. Impurities so generated constitute the principal limitation on power density (kW/cm 2 ) for ICRF antennas. ICRF antenna and Faraday screen design principles which minimize sputtering are discussed. 24 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. Advanced impedance matching system for ICRF heating using innovative twin stub tuner and frequency variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Kato, A.; Okada, H.; Zhao, Y.; Kwak, J.G.; Yoon, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating has been a reliable tool for steady-state plasma heating with high RF power of several tens of megawatts. However, a sudden increase in the reflected RF power during ICRF heating experiments with ELMy H-mode plasmas is an issue which must be solved for future fusion experimental devices or fusion reactors. This paper describes an innovative ICRF heating system using a frequency feedback control to reduce the reflected power in response to the rapid change in the plasma impedance in the ELMy H-mode plasma. A twin stub tuner has been newly invented for this purpose. The feasibility of keeping the reflected RF power fraction at a low level, e.g. 1%, is demonstrated even with a large change in plasma resistance, e.g. 2 ∼ 8Ω. Calculated and experimental results are presented for the conventional double stub tuner impedance matching system equipped with the twin stub tuner.

  8. ICRF heating of passing ions in a thermal barrier tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Dimonte, G.; Campbell, R.; Barter, J.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Poulsen, P.

    1985-05-01

    Ion heating is used in the central cells of tandem mirrors to reduce the collisional trapping of passing ions in the end cell thermal barriers. In this paper, we reevaluate ICRF heating of the TMX-U central cell in two limits. The first we term isotropic, because we impose the condition that ions heated in the perpendicular direction be confined for at least one 90 0 scattering time, thereby heating the passing ions. The second we call anisotropic heating. It uses higher ICRF power to mirror trap a majority of the ions near the midplane, thereby reducing the density and collisionality of passing ions. Anisotropic heating has the advantage of increasing with ICRF power, whereas isotropic heating is limited by ion collisionality. Both techniques require gas fueling near the central cell midplane, with an ion cyclotron resonance toward each end cell to heat the cold ions

  9. Current phase control test based on real-time measurement of impedance matrix of ICRF antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K., E-mail: saito@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Yokota, M.; Nomura, G.; Shimpo, F.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    New ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas have just been installed in the large helical device (LHD). These side-by-side ICRF antennas are symmetrical and designed to launch fast waves with various wave numbers parallel to the magnetic field line. The wave number can be controlled by changing the current phase on the straps; however, the mutual coupling between antennas changes antenna impedances, even if the plasma parameters are constant, leading to an increase in the reflected power. In addition to the current phase control, impedance matching devices must be tuned for the protection of tetrode tubes and efficient power injection. For this purpose, the impedance matrix of ICRF antennas must be determined, and it can be deduced from the forward and reflected waves at the outlet of the power amplifier by assuming geometric symmetry and reciprocity of the antennas. Using half-scale antennas, we successfully demonstrated simultaneous impedance matching and current phase control.

  10. ORNL diagnostic and modeling development for LAPD ICRF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, R. C.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Lau, C.; Martin, E. H.; Perkins, R. J.; Compernolle, B. Van; Vincena, S.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.

    2017-10-01

    PPPL, UCLA, and ORNL scientists have recently collaborated on a three week ICRF campaign at the upgraded LAPD device to study near field-plasma interactions associated with a single strap antenna driven at 2.38 MHz with 100 kW of RF power. This poster highlights ORNL involvement through implementation of the following diagnostics: an optical emission probe to measure neutral density, a retarding field energy analyzer to measure fast ions, phase locked imaging to measure line integrated RF-driven optical emission fluctuations, and an RF compensated triple Langmuir probe to measure density and temperature. To interpret the results of the experimental campaign a 3D cold plasma finite element model with realistic antenna and vacuum vessel geometry was developed in COMSOL. A summary of these results will be discussed. Highlights include a proof of principle localized and spatially resolved measurement of the neutral density, a strong increase in RF-driven optical emission fluctuations directly in front of the RF antenna strap, a shift in fast ion energies near the plasma edge, and qualitative agreement between the COMSOL cold plasma model with the various diagnostics. Funded by the DOE OFES (DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and DE-FC02-07ER54918) and the Univ. of California (12-LR-237124).

  11. Ion and electron heating in ICRF heating experiments on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating conducted in 1999 in the 3rd experimental campaign on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with an emphasis on the optimization of the heating regime. Specifically, an exhaustive study of seven different heating regimes was carried out by changing the RF frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity, and the dependence of the heating efficiency on H-minority concentration was investigated. It was found in the experiment that both ion and electron heating are attainable with the same experimental setup by properly choosing the frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity. In the cases of both electron heating and ion heating, the power absorption efficiency depends on the minority ion concentration. An optimum minority concentration exists in the ion heating case while, in the electron heating case, the efficiency increases with concentration monotonically. A simple model calculation is introduced to provide a heuristic understanding of these experimental results. Among the heating regimes examined in this experiment, one of the ion heating regimes was finally chosen as the optimized heating regime and various high performance discharges were realized with it. (author)

  12. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1998-01-01

    All high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time dependent on timescales as rapid as 10 -1 s, while the radio frequency (RF) generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array's input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the RF source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In 'lossy passive schemes', reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array. (author)

  13. Design and control of phased ICRF antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Phased antenna arrays operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are used to produce highly directional wave spectra, primarily for use in current drive experiments. RF current drive using phased antennas has been demonstrated in both the JET and DIII-D tokamaks, and both devices are planning to operate new four-element arrays beginning early next year. Features of antenna design that are relevant to phased operation and production of directional spectra are reviewed. Recent advances in the design of the feed circuits and the related control systems for these arrays should substantially improve their performance, by reducing the coupling seen by the matching networks and rf power supplies caused by the mutual impedance of the array elements. The feed circuit designs for the DIII-D and JET phased antenna arrays are compared. The two configurations differ significantly due to the fact that one power amplifier is used for the entire array in the former case, and one per element in the latter. The JET system uses automatic feedback control of matching, phase and amplitude of antenna currents, and the transmitter power balance. The design of this system is discussed, and a time dependent model used to predict its behavior is described

  14. Resonance absorption of ICRF wave in edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Ryo; Yamanaka, Kaoru.

    1987-07-01

    An edge plasma is shown to significantly absorb ICRF wave when a resonant triplet, a cutoff-resonance-cutoff triplet, is constructed in the evanescent region. Two-ion-component plasmas in a torus are considered though the plasmas are modeled by a slab in which the density changes linearly along the x-axis. The resonance is a perpendicular-ion-cyclotron resonance, i.e., an Alfven resonance, and is formed when the applied frequency ω is smaller than the local cyclotron frequency, at the edge of the antenna side, of the lighter species of ions. Roughly the absorption rate A b is given by M 2 for M 2 >> S 2 and S 4 for S 2 >> M 2 where M = k y l and S ≅ k z l and l is a scale length of the order of the plasma minor radius and k y and k z are the perpendicular and the parallel components of the wave vector. It is noted that the both quantities, M and S, readily become of the order of unity. Since A b is not very sensitive to the density ratio of the two ion species, a few percent of impurities may cause a significant absorption. As the mass ratio of the two ion species comes close to unity the triplet forms readily. Therefore a D-T plasma seems to suffer more easily this kind of resonance absorption than a D-H plasma. (author)

  15. ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] edge modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Colestock, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models have been developed, and are currently being refined, to explain the edge plasma-antenna interaction that occurs during ICRF heating. The periodic structure of a Faraday shielded antenna is found to result in strong ponderomotive force in the vicinity of the antenna. A fluid model, which incorporates the ponderomotive force, shows an increase in transport to the Faraday shield. A kinetic model shows that the strong antenna near fields act to increase the energy of deuterons which strike the shield, thereby increasing the sputtering of shield material. Estimates of edge impurity harmonic heating no significant heating for either in or out-of-phase antenna operation. Additionally, a particle model for electrons near the shield shows that heating results from the parallel electric field associated with the fast wave. A quasilinear model for edge electron heating is presented and compared to the particle calculations. The models' predictions are shown to be consistent with measurements of enhanced transport. 19 refs., 9 figs

  16. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1998-03-01

    All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array's input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array

  17. Design and RF Test of Broadband Coaxial Hybrid Splitter for ITER ICRF System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Wang, S. J.; Park, B. H.; Yang, H. L.; Kwak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, J. J. [Kwangwoon Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The ICRF system of the ITER is required to couple 20 MW to the plasma in the 40∼55 MHz frequency band for RF heating and current drive operation. The corresponding matching system of ICRF antenna must be load-resilient for a wide range of antenna load variations due to mode transitions or edge localized modes. Indeed the use of hybrid splitters ensures that no reflections occur at the generator when the reflections on the adjacent lines are equal both in magnitude and in phase, in which case all reflected power will not be seen by the generators and will be returned to the dummy loads. Most 3 dB coaxial hybrid circuits installed and implemented on the ICRF system is single section coupler providing best performance at the design frequency with narrow bandwidth. The bandwidth of such a single-section 3 dB hybrid coupler is limited to less than 20% due to the quarter wavelength transmission line requirement. The amplitude balance becomes rapidly degraded away from the center frequency. We designed, fabricated and tested a high power, ultra-wideband two-section 3 dB coaxial hybrid coupler over all frequencies from 40 MHz to 55 MHz for ITER ICRF system by configuring asymmetric impedance matching. We have designed, fabricated, and tested a 3-dB wideband hybrid coupler for stable and load resilient operation of the ITER ICRF system. The wideband two section 3-dB coaxial hybrid coupler was well designed by configuring asymmetric impedance matching using HFSS. In the rf measurements, we found that wideband hybrid splitter has an amplitude imbalance of 0.1 dB over all frequencies from 40 MHz to 55 MHz. We expect that wideband hybrid splitter will be applicable to ITER ICRF matching system for load resilient operation at fusion plasmas.

  18. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Zenere, Katrina A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ∼160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  19. Preparing ITER ICRF: development and analysis of the load resilient matching systems based on antenna mock-up measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Dumortier, P.; Grine, D.; Lamalle, P.U.; Durodie, F.; Koch, R.; Louche, F.; Weynants, R.

    2009-01-01

    The reference design for the ICRF antenna of ITER is constituted by a tight array of 24 straps grouped in eight triplets. The matching network must be load resilient for operation in ELMy discharges and must have antenna spectrum control for heating or current drive operation. The load resilience is based on the use of either hybrid couplers or conjugate-T circuits. However, the mutual coupling between the triplets at the low expected loading strongly counteracts the load resilience and the spectrum control. Using a mock-up of the ITER antenna array with adjustable water load matching solutions are designed. These solutions are derived from transmission line modelling based on the measured scattering matrix and are finally tested. We show that the array current spectrum can be controlled by the anti-node voltage distribution and that suitable decoupler circuits can not only neutralize the adverse mutual coupling effects but also monitor this anti-node voltage distribution. A matching solution using four 3 dB hybrids and the antenna current spectrum feedback control by the decouplers provides outstanding performance if each pair of poloidal triplets undergoes a same load variation. Finally, it is verified by modelling that this matching scenario has the same antenna spectrum and load resilience performances as the antenna array loaded by plasma as described by the TOPICA simulation. This is true for any phasing and frequency in the ITER frequency band. The conjugate-T solution is presently considered as a back-up option.

  20. Single-Phase Full-Wave Rectifier as an Effective Example to Teach Normalization, Conduction Modes, and Circuit Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Pejovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of a single phase rectifier as an example in teaching circuit modeling, normalization, operating modes of nonlinear circuits, and circuit analysis methods is proposed.The rectifier supplied from a voltage source by an inductive impedance is analyzed in the discontinuous as well as in the continuous conduction mode. Completely analytical solution for the continuous conduction mode is derived. Appropriate numerical methods are proposed to obtain the circuit waveforms in both of the operating modes, and to compute the performance parameters. Source code of the program that performs such computation is provided.

  1. Confinement characteristics of high-energy ions produced by ICRF heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, R; Saito, K; Torii, Y; Mutoh, T; Seki, T; Watari, T; Osakabe, M; Murakami, S; Sasao, M; Watanabe, T; Yamamoto, T; Notake, T; Takeuchi, N; Saida, T; Shimpo, F; Nomura, G; Yokota, M; Kato, A; Zao, Y; Okada, H; Isobe, M; Ozaki, T; Narihara, K; Nagayama, Y; Inagaki, S; Morita, S; Krasilnikov, A V; Idei, H; Kubo, S; Ohkubo, K; Sato, M; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Ikeda, K; Nagaoka, K; Oka, Y; Takeiri, Y; Tsumori, K; Ashikawa, N; Emoto, M; Funaba, H; Goto, M; Ida, K; Kobuchi, T; Liang, Y; Masuzaki, S; Minami, T; Miyazawa, J; Morisaki, T; Muto, S; Nakamura, Y; Nakanishi, H; Nishimura, K; Noda, N; Ohdachi, S; Peterson, B J; Sagara, A; Sakakibara, S; Sakamoto, R; Sato, K; Shoji, M; Suzuki, H; Tanaka, K; Toi, K; Tokuzawa, T; Watanabe, K Y; Yamada, I; Yamamoto, S; Yoshinuma, M; Yokoyama, M; Watanabe, K-Y; Kaneko, O; Kawahata, K; Komori, A; Ohyabu, N; Yamada, H; Yamazaki, K; Sudo, S; Matsuoka, K; Hamada, Y; Motojima, O; Fujiwara, M

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of high-energy ions accelerated by an ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) electric field in the large helical device (LHD) is discussed. A better confinement performance of high-energy ions in the inward-shifted magnetic axis configuration was experimentally verified by measuring their energy spectrum and comparing it with the effective temperature determined by an electron slowing down process. In the standard magnetic axis configuration a saturation of the measured tail temperature was observed as the effective temperature was increased. The ratio between these two quantities is a measure of the quality of transfer efficiency from high-energy ions to a bulk plasma; when this efficiency was compared with Monte Carlo simulations the results agreed fairly well. The ratio of the stored energy of the high-energy ions to that of the bulk plasma was measured using an ICRF heating power modulation method; it was deduced from phase differences between total and bulk plasma stored energies and the modulated ICRF heating power. The measured high energy fraction agreed with that calculated using the injected ICRF heating power, the transfer efficiency determined in the experiment and the confinement scaling of the LHD plasma

  2. Effects of ICRF-187 and L-Carnitine on bleomycin-induced lung toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shouman, Samia A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.A.; Hassan, Zeinab A.; Mansour, Heba H.

    2002-01-01

    The possible modulatory effects of ICRF-187 and L-carnitine against bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity in male rats were investigated. Repeated administration of bleomycin (10 mg/kg, twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks) produced significant lung toxicity. The toxicity was manifested by significant increase in normal contents of lipid peroxide (LPO, 91.7%) reduced glutathione (GSH, 73.2%) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG, 135.4%) as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, 222.7%). Thirty minutes prior to bleomycin treatment, other groups of rats received either ICRF-187 (95 mg/kg) or L-carnitine (500 mg/kg) adopting the same schedule of treatment as in bleomycin-treated group. L-carnitine decreased bleomycin-induced elevations in SOD activity, GSH and GSSG contents, however, it failed to suppress the increase in LPO level. On the other hand, treatment with ICRF-187 returned back all the elevated biochemical parameters induced by bleomycin to nearly normal levels. In conclusion, the results of this study showed a potential capability of ICRF-187 to mitigate the bleomycin-induced lung injury. Moreover, despite the inability of L-carnitine to change the elevated LPO content, it was able however, to decrease the elevated endogenous antioxidant parameters. (author)

  3. Interaction of ICRF power and edge plasma in Tore Supra ergodic divertor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, F.; Grosman, A.; Basiuk, V.; Fraboulet, D.; Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ladurelle, L.; Meslin, B.

    2000-01-01

    The coupling of ICRF power to plasma is a crucial problem in Tore Supra for high power and long pulse operations and depends greatly on the edge parameters, in particular on the edge density. Conversely, the behaviour of the bulk plasma is related to the edge conditions and the injection of RF power also induces major modifications on the edge plasma. Moreover, the Ergodic Divertor (ED) of Tore Supra imposes a complex configuration at the edge due to the presence of the magnetic perturbation. Several diagnostics are available to study the interaction of ICRF power with the edge plasma: Langmuir probes on the ED modules, infra red (IR) cameras, charge exchange neutral analysers. In minority heating scheme, the edge density is very sensitive to any perturbation in the high recycling regime which is always found in the ED configuration for relevant plasma parameters. Partially detached regimes, with or without inhomogeneities of density and temperature induced by the flux tubes of the laminar layer, are obtained for high resistance coupling values. The coupling is then not very robust and feedback control or antenna automatic matching techniques are developed. In fast wave electron heating scheme with ED, various fast wave absorption mechanisms (minority heating, Mode Conversion, Alfven resonance) are present at the plasma edge due to the large size of the plasma. The ICRF coupling is difficult due to the low fast wave direct electron damping, even with high hydrogen minority scheme. An increase of the injected ICRF power could improve this situation

  4. Hybrid code simulation on mode conversion in the second harmonic ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Matsumoto, M.; Sugihara, R.

    1985-01-01

    ICRF second harmonic heating of a single-species plasma is studied by using a 1-1/2 dimensional quasi-neutral hybrid code. Mode conversion, transmission and reflection of the magnetosonic waves are confirmed, both for the high- and low-field-side excitations. The ion heating by waves propagating perpendicularly to the static magnetic field is also observed

  5. A thermal transport coefficient for ohmic and ICRF plasmas in alcator C-mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughton, W.; Coppi, B.; Greenwald, M.

    1996-01-01

    The energy confinement in plasmas produced by Alcator C-Mod machine is markedly different from that observed by previous high field compact machines such as Alcator A and C, FT, and more recently FTU. For ohmic plasmas at low and moderate densities, the confinement times routinely exceed those expected from the so-called open-quotes neo-Alcatorclose quotes scaling by a factor as high as three. For both ohmic and ICRF heated plasmas, the energy confinement time increases with the current and is approximately independent of the density. The similarity in the confinement between the ohmic and ICRF regimes opens the possibility that the thermal transport in Alcator C-Mod may be described by one transport coefficient for both regimes. We introduce a modified form of a transport coefficient previously used to describe ohmic plasmas in Alcator C-Mod. The coefficient is inspired by the properties of the so-called open-quotes ubiquitousclose quotes mode that can be excited in the presence of a significant fraction of trapped electrons and also includes the constraint of profile consistency. A detailed series of transport simulations are used to show that the proposed coefficient can reproduce the observed temperature profiles, loop voltage and energy confinement time for both ohmic and ICRF discharges. A total of nearly two dozen ohmic and ICRF Alcator C-Mod discharges have been fit over the range of parameter space available using this transport coefficient

  6. Electromagnetic simulations of JET ICRF ITER-like antenna with TOPICA and SSWICH asymptotic codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Křivská Alena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF heating is routinely used in the JET tokamak. To increase the ICRF heating power available from the A2 antennas, the ICRF ITER-Like Antenna (ILA was reinstalled for the 2015 JET ITER-like wall experimental campaign. The application of high levels of ICRF power typically results in increased plasma wall interaction which leads to the observation of enhanced influx of metallic impurities in the plasma edge. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by the parallel component of the Radio-Frequency (RF antenna electric near-field, E// (parallel to the confinement magnetic field of the tokamak, that is rectified in a thin boundary layer (RF sheath. Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA code was used to compute E// field maps in front of the ILA and between its poloidal limiters in the presence of plasma using measured density profiles and various antenna feedings. E// field maps calculated between the poloidal limiters were used to estimate the poloidal distribution of RF-sheath Direct Current (DC potential in this private region of the ILA and make relative comparison of various antenna electrical settings. For this purpose we used the asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating Slow-Wave (SSWICH-SW code. These estimations can help to study the formation of RF sheaths around the antenna and even at distant locations (∼3m away.

  7. Efficiencies of the ICRF minority heating in the CHS and LHD plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Mutoh, T.

    1994-01-01

    ICRF minority heatings are investigated in the plasmas of the Compact Helical System (CHS) and the Large Helical Device (LHD) by means of the orbit following Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the heating efficiency decreases with increase of the absorption power by minority ions and depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the field configuration. (author)

  8. Expanding the operating space of ICRF on JET with a view to ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamalle, P.U.; Mantsinen, M.J.; Noterdaeme, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    when the 3 He concentration increased above similar to 2%. In the latter regime the best heating performance (a maximum electron temperature of 8 keV with 5 MW of ICRF power) was achieved with dipole array phasing, i.e. a symmetric antenna power spectrum. Minority heating of deuterium in hydrogen...

  9. Plasma-surface interactions with ICRF antennas and lower hybrid grills in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.H.; Hutter, T.; Hogan, J.T.; Basiuk, V.; Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Bremond, S.; Carter, M.D.; Goniche, M.; Goulding, R.H.; Guilhem, D.; Haste, G.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Litaudon, X.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The edge plasma interactions of the actively cooled radio-frequency heating launchers in Tore Supra ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas and lower-hybrid (LH) grills are studied using infrared video imaging. On the two-strap ICRF antennas, operated in fast-wave electron heating or current drive mode, hot spots with temperatures of 500-900 C are observed by the end of 2 s power pulses of 2 MW per antenna. The steady-state temperature distribution is determined principally by the relative phase of the two antenna straps: dipole (heating) phasing results in significantly less antenna heating than does 90 (current drive) phasing. Transient heat fluxes of 1-20 MW/m 2 are measured on the lateral protection bumpers at ICRF turn-on; these fluxes are primarily a function of plasma and radio frequency (rf) control. The remarkable feature of the lower hybrid edge interaction is the production of beams of heat flux in front of the grills; these beams propagate along the helical magnetic field lines and can deliver fluxes of 5-10 MW/m 2 over areas of several cm 2 to plasma-facing components. Both the ICRF and LH phenomena appear to result from the acceleration of particles by the near fields of the launchers. Modeling of the heat flux deposition on components and its relation to sputtering processes is presented. (orig.)

  10. Analytical models for predicting the ion velocity distributions in JET in the presence of ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Lisak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work performed within the contract JT4/9008, the aim of which is to derive analytical models for ion velocity distributions resulting from ICRF heating on JET. The work has been performed over a two-year-period ending in August 1986 and has involved a total effort of 2.4 man years. (author)

  11. Numerical modelling of ICRF physics experiments in the Alcator C-mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Boivin, R.L.; Brambilla, M.

    2001-01-01

    A full-wave spectral code (TORIC) has been used to simulate mode converted ion Bernstein wave (IBW) propagation and absorption for the first time at high poloidal mode number (-80< m<+80). Converged wave solutions for the mode converted wave are obtained in this limit and the predicted electron damping of the IBW is found to be consistent with experimental measurements from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The TORIC code has also been coupled to a bounce-averaged Fokker Planck module FPPRF and the combined codes are now run within the transport analysis tool TRANSP. This model was used to analyze off-axis hydrogen minority heating experiments in C-Mod where an internal transport barrier was obtained. (author)

  12. ICRF antenna modeling and simulation. Final report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-30

    SAIC has undergone a three year research and development program in support of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy`s (OFE) program in Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating of present, next generation, and future plasma fusion devices. The effort entailed advancing theoretical models and numerical simulation technology of ICRF physics and engineering issues associated predominately with, but not limited to, tokamak Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and fast wave current drive (FWCD). Ion cyclotron heating and current drive is a central element in all current and planned large fusion experiments. In recent years, the variety of uses for ICRF systems has expanded, and includes the following: (1) Heating sufficient to drive plasma to ignition. (a) Second-harmonic T heating. (b) He{sup 3} minority heating. (2) Second-harmonic He{sup 4} heating in H plasma (for non-activated phase). (3) Detailed equilibrium profile control minority heating. (a) Ion minority (He{sup 3}) CD (for profile control on inside of plasma). (b) Ion minority (He{sup 3}) CD (for profile control on outside of plasma). (4) Ion-ion hybrid regime majority ion heating. (5) Electron current drive. (6) Mode conversion to drive current. (7) Deuterium minority heating. (8) Sawtooth instability stabilization. (9) Alpha particle parameter enhancement. (10) The generation of minority tails by ICRF to simulate D-T plasma particle physics in a deuterium plasma. Optimization of ICRF antenna performance for either heating or current drive depends critically on the complex balance and interplay between the plasma physics and the electromechanical system requirements. For example, ITER IC rf designs call for an IC. system frequency range from 20 MHz to 100 MHz. Additionally, antenna designs and operational modes that minimize impurity production and induced sheath formation may degrade current drive efficiency. Such effects have been observed in experiments involving it versus zero antenna phasing.

  13. ICRF antenna modeling and simulation. Final report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    SAIC has undergone a three year research and development program in support of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy's (OFE) program in Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating of present, next generation, and future plasma fusion devices. The effort entailed advancing theoretical models and numerical simulation technology of ICRF physics and engineering issues associated predominately with, but not limited to, tokamak Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and fast wave current drive (FWCD). Ion cyclotron heating and current drive is a central element in all current and planned large fusion experiments. In recent years, the variety of uses for ICRF systems has expanded, and includes the following: (1) Heating sufficient to drive plasma to ignition. (a) Second-harmonic T heating. (b) He 3 minority heating. (2) Second-harmonic He 4 heating in H plasma (for non-activated phase). (3) Detailed equilibrium profile control minority heating. (a) Ion minority (He 3 ) CD (for profile control on inside of plasma). (b) Ion minority (He 3 ) CD (for profile control on outside of plasma). (4) Ion-ion hybrid regime majority ion heating. (5) Electron current drive. (6) Mode conversion to drive current. (7) Deuterium minority heating. (8) Sawtooth instability stabilization. (9) Alpha particle parameter enhancement. (10) The generation of minority tails by ICRF to simulate D-T plasma particle physics in a deuterium plasma. Optimization of ICRF antenna performance for either heating or current drive depends critically on the complex balance and interplay between the plasma physics and the electromechanical system requirements. For example, ITER IC rf designs call for an IC. system frequency range from 20 MHz to 100 MHz. Additionally, antenna designs and operational modes that minimize impurity production and induced sheath formation may degrade current drive efficiency. Such effects have been observed in experiments involving it versus zero antenna phasing

  14. A Single MO-CFTA Based Electronically/Temperature Insensitive Current-mode Half-wave and Full-wave Rectifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Weerapon Kongnun; Phamorn Silapan

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a current-mode full-wave rectifier employing multiple output current follower transconductance amplifier (MO-CFTA). The both circuits description is very simple, it merely comprises only single MO-CFTA, without external passive element. In addition, the magnitude and direction of output currents can be controlled via electronically method. Furthermore, the outputs are independent of the thermal voltage (VT). The performances of the proposed circuits are investigated thro...

  15. Effects of half-wave and full-wave power source on the anodic oxidation process on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximei; Zhu, Liqun; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong; Li, Yihong

    2009-03-01

    Anodic films have been prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloys in 1 mol/L Na 2SiO 3 with 10 vol.% silica sol addition under the constant voltage of 60 V at room temperature by half-wave and full-wave power sources. The weight of the anodic films has been scaled by analytical balance, and the thickness has been measured by eddy current instrument. The surface morphologies, chemical composition and structure of the anodic films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the thickness and weight of the anodic films formed by the two power sources both increase with the anodizing time, and the films anodized by full-wave power source grow faster than that by half-wave one. Furthermore, we have fitted polynomial to the scattered data of the weight and thickness in a least-squares sense with MATLAB, which could express the growth process of the anodic films sufficiently. The full-wave power source is inclined to accelerate the growth of the anodic films, and the half-wave one is mainly contributed to the uniformity and fineness of the films. The anodic film consists of crystalline Mg 2SiO 4 and amorphous SiO 2.

  16. Effects of half-wave and full-wave power source on the anodic oxidation process on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ximei [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)], E-mail: wangximei126@126.com; Zhu Liqun; Li Weiping; Liu Huicong; Li Yihong [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Anodic films have been prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloys in 1 mol/L Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} with 10 vol.% silica sol addition under the constant voltage of 60 V at room temperature by half-wave and full-wave power sources. The weight of the anodic films has been scaled by analytical balance, and the thickness has been measured by eddy current instrument. The surface morphologies, chemical composition and structure of the anodic films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the thickness and weight of the anodic films formed by the two power sources both increase with the anodizing time, and the films anodized by full-wave power source grow faster than that by half-wave one. Furthermore, we have fitted polynomial to the scattered data of the weight and thickness in a least-squares sense with MATLAB, which could express the growth process of the anodic films sufficiently. The full-wave power source is inclined to accelerate the growth of the anodic films, and the half-wave one is mainly contributed to the uniformity and fineness of the films. The anodic film consists of crystalline Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and amorphous SiO{sub 2}.

  17. Possible effects of RF field near ICRF antenna on density control during long pulse discharge in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Noda, N.; Watanabe, T.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Torii, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the large helical device (LHD), the plasma duration time was extended up to 150 s by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating. Time-integrated total input power reached 71 MJ. However, this discharge terminated due to radiation collapse accompanied by an increase of electron density. The temperature of the divertor plates and the intensity of H α were locally increased in the same toroidal section, near the ICRF antenna. One of the possible causes of the increase of radiation power is an outgassing from the divertor plates that were heated by particles accelerated in the cyclotron resonance layer near the antenna. Another possible cause is the outgassing from the ICRF antenna itself due to a temperature increase of the ICRF antenna owing to high-energy particles, or the formation of an RF (radio frequency) sheath

  18. Zeff measurements and low-Z impurity transport for NBI and ICRF heated plasma in JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Amano, T.; Kawahata, K.; Kaneko, O.

    1988-12-01

    A visible bremsstrahlung detector array system for Z eff measurements and a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system for fully ionized impurity profile measurements were installed on JIPP TII-U to study impurity transport for NBI and ICRF heated plasma. More impurities are sputtered by ICRF heating than by NBI and/or ohmic heatings. The carbon contribution to Z eff is 80-90 % for NBI heated plasmas, and 60 % for NBI + ICRF heated plasmas. With a carbon coating of vacuum vessel, the Z eff value decreases 2.4 to 1.7 and the carbon contribution to Z eff increases up to 80-90 %. We obtain the diffusion coefficient D a = 1.0 m 2 /s and the convective velocity V a (a) = 13 m/s at the plasma edge for carbon impurity from the radial profile and time evolution of fully ionized carbon after the ICRF pulse is turned on. (author)

  19. ICRF experiments and potential formation on the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, M.; Cho, T.; Higaki, H.

    2005-01-01

    Target plasmas, on which the formation of the electrostatic potentials and the improvement of the confinement are studied, are produced with ICRF in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The ion temperature of more than 10 keV has been achieved in relatively low density plasmas. When the strong ICRF heating is applied, it is observed that the high frequency and the low frequency fluctuations are excited and suppress the increase in the plasma parameters. Recently, a new high power gyrotron system has been constructed and the plug ECRH power extends up to 370 kW. The improvement of the confinement due to the formation of the potential in the axial direction and the strong radial electric field shear has been observed. (author)

  20. 3D electromagnetic theory of ICRF multi PORT multi loop antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, V.L.; Kamenskij, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    In this report the theory of three dimensional antenna in Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) is developed for a plasma with circular magnetic surfaces. The multi loop antenna is located in ITER several ports. Circular plasma and antenna geometry provides new important tools to account for: 1) right loading antenna impedance matrix calculation urgently needed for a matching of RF generator with an antenna; 2) right calculation of an antenna toroidal and poloidal excited spectra because the DIFFRACTION, refraction and REFLECTION effects for the Fast Waves (FW) are in FIRST time are included self consistently in 3D ICRF antenna - plasma treatment; 3) right calculation of RF power deposition profiles because self consistently found 3D antenna - plasma FW excited spectra in non slab plasma model are important ones in a weakly dissipated plasma for Fast Waves (even for ITER parameters). (J.P.N.)

  1. Coupling of an ICRF compact loop antenna to H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayberry, M.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Luxon, J.L.; Owens, T.L.; Prater, R.

    1987-01-01

    Low power coupling tests have been carried out with a prototype ICRF compact loop antenna on the DIII-D tokamak. During neutral-beam-heated L-mode discharges the antenna loading is typically R≅1-2Ω for an rf frequency of 32 MHz (B/sub T/ = 21 kG, ω = 2Ω/sub D/(0)). When a transition into the H-mode regime of improved confinement occurs, the loading drops to R≅0.5-1.0Ω. During ELMs, transient increases in loading up to several Ohms are observed. The apparent sensitivity of ICRF antenna coupling to changes in the edge plasma profiles associated with the H-mode regime could have important implications for the design of future high power systems

  2. The healthiness of JT-60 ICRF antenna and development of its temperature measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranai, Shinichi; Yokokura, Kenji; Moriyama, Shinichi; Sato, Tomio; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1998-03-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating system in JT-60 employs two antennas to couple RF power in the range of 100 MHz to the plasma. The antennas are installed in the vacuum vessel of JT-60, facing to the high temperature plasma. Due to the severe heat load from the plasma, parts of the antenna surface are suffering from melt. It is important to investigate the mechanism of the heat load and the melting. 'Temperature measurement for ICRF antenna surface' employing an infrared thermographic camera has been developed, in order to investigate the heat load to the antenna and to maintain the antenna available. We have succeeded in minimizing the melting damage of the antenna surface using the temperature measurement device. (author)

  3. 3-D analysis on arbitrarily-shaped ICRF antennas and Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.L.; Whealton, J.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Owens, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Cavity antennas with Faraday shields are proposed to couple ion cyclotron radio frequency power for heating fusion plasmas. This application requires small, high-power, low-frequency antennas. The results are presented of a theoretical study of the ICRF antennas being developed for this purpose at the Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF). The objectives of this work are to optimize experimental designs and to confirm test results

  4. ICRF specific plasma wall interactions in JET with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobkov, Vl., E-mail: bobkov@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Arnoux, G. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Clever, M. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Czarnecka, A. [Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Braun, F.; Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Huber, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Jacquet, P. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Klepper, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-Belgian State, TEC Partners, Brussels (Belgium); Maggi, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Marcotte, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.L. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); McCormick, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Meigs, A. [Culham Science Centre, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-07-15

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q{sub 95}-scans, and intensification of those for the −90° phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  5. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R.I.; Pitts, R.A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G.R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petržílka, Václav; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A.C.C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2016), s. 046001 ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ICRF power * antenna loading * gas injection * SOL density Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/4/046001

  6. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutoh, T., E-mail: mutoh@nifs.ac.jp; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ii, T.; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Shinya, T. [The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 2777-8561 (Japan)

    2015-12-10

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}.

  7. Reversed magnetic shear operation with ICRF minority heating on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Antar, G.; Aniel, T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports a scenario recently investigated in Tore Supra for high density and high plasma current (Ip) operation, which allows to use the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) minority heating only for the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation. The main aim is to perform a hollow current density profile by minimizing the edge resistive skin depth during the rapid Ip ramp-up, i-e efficient freezing of the resistive current diffusion

  8. ICRF power deposition profile and determination of the electron thermal diffusivity by modulation experiments in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambier, D.J.; Evrard, M.P.; Adam, J.

    1990-01-01

    The power deposition profile in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) has been investigated experimentally in JET by means of a square wave modulated RF perturbation. The study has been conducted in D(H) and D( 3 He) plasmas for two heating scenarios. In D( 3 He) plasmas and for central heating in a scenario where mode conversion to Bernstein waves is accessible, the direct power deposition profile on electrons has been derived. It accounts for 15% of the total coupled power and extends over 25% of the minor radius. Outside the RF power deposition zone, the electron thermal diffusivity χ e inside the inversion radius surface (r i ) can be estimated through observation of the diffusive electronic transport. In discharges without monster sawteeth and for a low central temperature gradient (∇T e (r ≤ r i ) ≤ ∇T e (r ≥ r i ) approx. = 5 keV·m -1 ) the value obtained is small (approx. =0.24 +- 0.05 m 2 · s -1 ), typically ten times lower than χ e values deduced from heat pulse propagation in similar discharges at radii larger than the inversion radius. For the D(H) minority heating scheme, a large fraction of the ICRF modulated power is absorbed by minority ions, and the minority tail is modulated with a characteristic ion-electron (i-e) slowing-down time. In this scheme, electron heating occurs only through collisions with the minority ion tail and no modulation of the electron temperature is observed in sawtoothing discharges. This is interpreted as a consequence of the long i-e equipartition time, acting as an integrator for the modulated ICRF signal. Finally, a correlation between the time of the sawtooth crash and the periodic turn-off of the ICRF power is found and its consequence for modulation experiments is reviewed. (author). 22 refs, 16 figs

  9. On the role of ion heating in ICRF-heated discharges in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.; Hoang, G.; Bergeaud, V.

    2000-09-01

    The effect of bulk ion heating in Tore Supra has been investigated by studying discharges with varying concentrations of minority ions during ICRF hydrogen minority heating in Deuterium/ 4 He plasmas. As expected, the level of bulk ion heating is found to increase with the minority concentration. Higher levels of ion heating are shown to be accompanied by two significant effects: an improved energy confinement and a strong influence on the plasma rotation. (author)

  10. Plasma-surface interactions with ICRF antennas and lower hybrid grills in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutter, T. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The edge plasma interactions of the actively cooled radio-frequency heating launchers in Tore Supra- ion-cyclotron range-of-frequencies (ICRF) antennas and lower-hybrid (LH) grills-are studied using infrared video imaging. On the two-strap ICRF antennas, operated in fast-wave electron heating or current drive mode, hot spots with temperatures of 500-900{degrees} C are observed by the end of 2-s power pulses of 2 MW per antenna. The distribution and maximum values of temperature are determined principally by the relative phase of the two antenna straps: dipole (heating) phasing results in significantly less antenna heating than does 90` (current drive) phasing. Transient heat fluxes of 1-20 MW/m{sup 2} are measured on the lateral protection bumpers at ICRF turn-on; these fluxes are primarily a function of plasma and radio frequency (rf) control, and are not simply correlated with the strap phasing or the final surface temperature distributions. The remarkable feature of the lower hybrid edge interaction is the production of beams of heat flux in front of the grills; these beams propagate along the helical magnetic field lines and can deliver fluxes of 5-10 MW/m{sup 2} over areas of several cm{sup 2} to plasma-facing components such as the grill or antenna lateral bumpers. Both the ICRF and LH phenomena appear to result from the acceleration of particles by the near fields of the launchers. Modeling of the heat flux deposition on components and its relation to sputtering processes is presented, and possibilities for controlling these interactions are discussed.

  11. Power absorption and confinement studies of ICRF-heated plasma in JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Toi, K.

    1988-08-01

    The energy confinement characteristics of ICRF-heated tokamak plasmas are studied at high input power density ∼ 2 MWm -3 volume averaged, on the JIPP T-IIU device(R = 0.91 m/a = 0.23 m). High electron and ion temperatures (T e ∼ 2.5 keV, T i ∼ 2.0 keV, at each maximum) have been achieved by the operation at a plasma current I P of 280 kA, plasma line-averaged electron density n-bar e of 7 x 10 13 cm -3 and input power of 2 MW, with a suppression of total radiation loss (30 to 40 % of the total input power) by a carbon coating on the vacuum vessel. The fraction of ICRF power absorbed by the plasma, α, is determined experimentally from the decay of the stored plasma energy just after the ICRF pulse is terminated. The value of α increases slightly with increasing electron density and decreases from 90 to 70 % as the ICRF power is increased from 1 MWm -3 to 2 MWm -3 volume averaged. The global energy confinement time τ E , defined by W P /(P OH + αP rf ), decreases by a factor of 2 ∼ 3 from that in ohmic plasmas as the heating power increases up to 2 MW. It is found that the energy confinement time has a strong line-averaged electron density dependence as τ E ∝n-bar e 0.6 , which is obtained by the use of the measured absorbed power, while the Kaye-Goldston scaling predicts τ E ∝n-bar e 0.26 . (author)

  12. One-D full-wave description of plasma emission and absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraboulet, D.; Becoulet, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1998-11-01

    To maintain the ignition state in a tokamak fusion reactor, a control must be performed on the population of alpha-products, and this implies the ability to diagnose those α-particles. It is studied here whether the detection of emission radiated in the ion cyclotron range of frequency be a reactor plasma can provide useful information concerning fusion products, especially concerning their density profile. It is shown that the detection of the radiation emitted by the fast alpha particles along their cyclotron motion can give access to moments of their distribution function. This requires to compute the phase of the emitted field, using a full-wave approach. Such a technique allows to set in a convenient way the inverse problem of the determination of the emitting α-particles distribution through the radiation detection. A brief analysis of the expected situation in a reactor-relevant plasma is given. In parallel, the 1-D full-wave code developed in this frame is also useful for studying the physics of Fast Wave plasma heating. It enables to take into account the mode conversion of the Fast Wave into the Ion Bernstein Wave that appears near each ion cyclotron resonance. Results show that higher order terms may significantly alter the energy partitioning, in hot plasma cases involving mode conversion heating and/or ion cyclotron high harmonics heating. (author)

  13. Study of probing beam enlargement due to forward-scattering under low wavenumber turbulence using a FDTD full-wave code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, F. da [Associao EURATOM/IST, IPFN-LA, Instituto Superor Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Heuraux, S. [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Nancy-Universite, BP70239, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gusakov, E.; Popov, A. [Ioffe Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Forward-scattering under high level of turbulence or long propagation paths can induce significant effects, as predicted by theory, and impose a signature on the Doppler reflectometry response. Simulations using a FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) full-wave code have confirmed the main dependencies and general behavior described by theory but display a returned RMS power, at moderate amplitudes, half of the one predicted by theory due to the impossibility to reach the numerical requirements needed to describe the small wavenumber spectrum with the wanted accuracy.One justifying factor may be due to the splitting and enlargement of the probing beam. At high turbulence levels, the scattered power returning to the antenna is higher than the predicted by the theory probably due to the scattered zone being closer than the oblique cutoff. This loss of coherence of the wavefront induces a beam spreading, which is also responsible for a diminution of the wavenumber resolution. With a FDTD full-wave code we study the behavior of the probing beam under several amplitude levels of low wavenumber plasma turbulence, using long temporal simulations series to ensure statistical accuracy. (authors)

  14. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in axisymmetric mirrors. Annual report, July 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Phillips, M.W.

    1986-04-01

    A numerical code called GARFIELD has been developed to calculate the structure of ICRF electric fields in axisymmetric mirrors. It is being used to investigate ICRF wave structure of central cells of tandem mirror experiments. Fields are solved on a 2-D grid in the axial and radial directions. This permits us to study the effect that axial as well as radial variations of the magnetic field and density have on ICRF wave propagation and absorption. Much of this time frame was spent writing the code and refining the numerics. Initial calculations have been completed for the Phaedrus tandem mirror. These show that there is an evanescent fast wave structure in the radial direction, a standing wave formation in the axial direction, and a small amount of propagating ion cyclotron wave towards a shallow magnetic beach in the center of the mirror. In general, the fields peak on the outside which would show that the resulting pondermotive force would tend to stabilize the plasma

  15. Operation of ICRF antennas in a full tungsten environment in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, Vl.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Giannone, L.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Müller, H. W.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pütterich, Th.; Rohde, V.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-06-01

    In the 2007 and early part of 2008 experimental campaigns, ASDEX Upgrade operated with full tungsten (W) wall without boronization. Use of ICRF power results in a significant increase of W source. Low temperature conditions at the plasma facing components, achieved by a large clearance between the separatrix and the antenna (>6 cm) and by elevated gas puff rates (>5×1021 s) help to lower W sputtering yield during ICRF. Operation of neighboring ICRF antennas at the phase difference close to -90° can lead to a reduction in the W source. However, a reduction of parallel near-fields by antenna design is needed to further minimize the W source. A relation has been established between the HFSS code calculations predicting a dominant role of box currents in the formation of parallel antenna near-fields and the experiment. The shapes of the measured vertical profile of effective sputtering yields and the calculated sheath driving voltages show a qualitative agreement. This confirms that the existing tools are a good basis to design an improved antenna.

  16. Operation of ICRF antennas in a full tungsten environment in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobkov, Vl.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Giannone, L.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Mueller, H.W.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Puetterich, Th.; Rohde, V.

    2009-01-01

    In the 2007 and early part of 2008 experimental campaigns, ASDEX Upgrade operated with full tungsten (W) wall without boronization. Use of ICRF power results in a significant increase of W source. Low temperature conditions at the plasma facing components, achieved by a large clearance between the separatrix and the antenna (>6 cm) and by elevated gas puff rates (>5x10 21 s -1 ) help to lower W sputtering yield during ICRF. Operation of neighboring ICRF antennas at the phase difference close to -90 deg. can lead to a reduction in the W source. However, a reduction of parallel near-fields by antenna design is needed to further minimize the W source. A relation has been established between the HFSS code calculations predicting a dominant role of box currents in the formation of parallel antenna near-fields and the experiment. The shapes of the measured vertical profile of effective sputtering yields and the calculated sheath driving voltages show a qualitative agreement. This confirms that the existing tools are a good basis to design an improved antenna.

  17. TRANSP modeling of minority ion sawtooth mixing in ICRF + NBI heated discharges in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, R.C.; Batchelor, D.B.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Budny, R.; Hammett, G.W.; McCune, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Time independent code analysis indicates that the sawtooth relaxation phenomenon affects RF power deposition profiles through the mixing of fast ions. Predicted central electron heating rates are substantially above experimental values unless sawtooth relaxation is included. The PPPL time dependent transport analysis code, TRANSP, currently has a model to redistribute thermal electron and ion species, energy densities, plasma current density, and fast ions from neutral beam injection at each sawtooth event using the Kadomtsev (3) prescription. Results are presented here in which the set of models is extended to include sawtooth mixing effects on the hot ion population generated from ICRF heating. The ICRF generated hot ion distribution function, line-integral(ν parallel , ν perpendicular ), which is strongly peaked at the center before each sawtooth, is replaced throughout the sawtooth mixing volume by its volume averaged value at each sawtooth. The modified line-integral(ν parallel ,ν perpendicular ) is then used to recalculate the collisional transfer of power from the minority species to the background species. Results demonstrate that neglect of sawtooth mixing of ICRF-induced fast ions leads to prediction of faster central electron reheat rates than are measured experimentally

  18. Monte Carlo simulation study of the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1993-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for the ICRF heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions, and interactions between the particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device. The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the Large Helical Device. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, the higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to the finite beta effects is found at the high ICRF wave power region. However the radial profile of the transferred power to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes by the deformation of the trapped particle orbits due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author)

  19. Modeling and simulation support for ICRF heating of fusion plasmas. Annual report, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-03-15

    Recent experimental, theoretical and computational results have shown the need and usefulness of a combined approach to the design, analysis and evaluation of ICH antenna configurations. The work at the University of Wisconsin (UW) in particular has shown that much needed information on the vacuum operation of ICH antennas can be obtained by a modest experimental and computational effort. These model experiments at UW and SAIC simulations have shown dramatically the potential for positive impact upon the ICRF program. Results of the UW-SAIC joint ICRF antenna analysis effort have been presented at several international meetings and numerous meetings in the United States. The PPPL bay M antenna has been modeled using the ARGUS code. The results of this effort are shown in Appendix C. SAIC has recently begun a collaboration with the ICRF antenna design and analysis group at ORNL. At present there are two separate projects underway. The first is associated with the simulation of and determination of the effect of adding slots in the antenna septum and side walls. The second project concerns the modeling and simulation of the ORNL folded waveguide (FWG) concept.

  20. Long-Pulse Operation and High-Energy Particle Confinement Study in ICRF Heating of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutoh, Takashi; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Seki, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    Long-pulse operation and high-energy particle confinement properties were studied using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating for the Large Helical Device. For the minority-ion mode, ions with energies up to 500 keV were observed by concentrating the ICRF heating power near the plasma axis. The confinement of high-energy particles was studied using the power-modulation technique. This confirmed that the confinement of high-energy particles was better with the inward-shifted configuration than with the normal configuration. This behavior was the same for bulk plasma confinement. Long-pulse operation for more than 2 min was achieved during the experimental program in 2002. This was mainly due to better confinement of the helically trapped particles and accumulation of fewer impurities in the region of the plasma core, in conjunction with substantial hardware improvements. Currently, the plasma operation time is limited by an unexpected density rise due to outgassing from the chamber materials. The temperature of the local carbon plates of the divertor exceeded 400 deg, C, and a charge-coupled device camera observed the hot spots. The hot spot pattern was well explained by a calculation of the accelerated-particle orbits, and those accelerated particles came from outside the plasma near the ICRF antenna

  1. Monte Carlo simulation study of ICRF minority heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions and interactions between particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the LHD. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, a higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to finite beta effects is found in the high ICRF wave power region. However, the radial profile of the power transferred to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes because of the deformation of the trapped particle due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author). 26 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Tunable biasing magnetic field design of ferrite tuner for ICRF heating system in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manman, XU; Yuntao, SONG; Gen, CHEN; Yanping, ZHAO; Yuzhou, MAO; Guang, LIU; Zhen, PENG

    2017-11-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating has been used in tokamaks as one of the most successful auxiliary heating tools and has been adopted in the EAST. However, the antenna load will fluctuate with the change of plasma parameters in the ICRF heating process. To ensure the steady operation of the ICRF heating system in the EAST, fast ferrite tuner (FFT) has been carried out to achieve real-time impedance matching. For the requirements of the FFT impedance matching system, the magnet system of the ferrite tuner (FT) was designed by numerical simulations and experimental analysis, where the biasing magnetic circuit and alternating magnetic circuit were the key researched parts of the ferrite magnet. The integral design goal of the FT magnetic circuit is that DC bias magnetic field is 2000 Gs and alternating magnetic field is ±400 Gs. In the FTT, E-type magnetic circuit was adopted. Ferrite material is NdFeB with a thickness of 30 mm by setting the working point of NdFeB, and the ampere turn of excitation coil is 25 through the theoretical calculation and simulation analysis. The coil inductance to generate alternating magnetic field is about 7 mH. Eddy-current effect has been analyzed, while the magnetic field distribution has been measured by a Hall probe in the medium plane of the biasing magnet. Finally, the test results show the good performance of the biasing magnet satisfying the design and operating requirements of the FFT.

  3. Monte-Carlo study of ICRF-sustained mode operation in tandem mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1984-09-01

    A study, using a Monte-Carlo simulation code, of ICRF-sustained mode operation in tandem mirrors by way of ICRF end-cell fuelling and heating is described. Although the basic parameter space considered corresponds to the Phaedrus experiment, the central-cell density and temperatures are extended towards the reactor regime. It is found that significant end cell ion potential barriers can be generated with ICRF, but that, owing to choking of the central-cell ion source stream by the plugging potential, saturation occurs and power requirements rapidly increase, so that the potential rise is limited to about twice the central-cell ion temperature. Although performance is improved as the ion cyclotron resonance approaches the end-cell mid-plane, no significant difference is found between inboard, outboard or double resonance location. As the central-cell density and temperatures are increased, the RF power requirement is found to increase dramatically. Optimum performance for end cell fuelling results when the central-cell electron temperature is higher than the ion temperature, but the magnitude of this ratio is limited by an increase in threshold power level with electron temperature.

  4. ICRF power-deposition profiles and heating in monster sawtooth and peaked-density profile discharges in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Taroni, A.; Ellis, J.J.; Jacquinot, J.; Stuart, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we compare experimental results of electron and ion-heating in discharges that feature monster sawtooth with those in pellet-produced peaked-density profile discharges which were heated with ICRF. Also we carry out a comprehensive analysis of ICRF-heated peaked-density profile discharges by a transport code to simulate the evolution of JET discharges and to provide an insight into the improved heating and confinement found in these discharges. In this analysis, the ICRF power-deposition profile in the minority-heating scenario is computed by the ray-tracing code BRAYCO that self-consistently takes the finite antenna geometry, its radiation spectrum and the hot-plasma damping into account. The power delivered to ions and electrons is calculated based on Stix model. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs

  5. The influence of ICRF-159 and levamisole on the incidence of metastases following local irradiation of a solid tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.; Constable, W.; Elkon, D.; Rinehart, L.

    1981-11-15

    Courses of irradiation consisting of 6000 rad in ten equal fractions over 12 days delivered to KHT sarcomas in mice controlled 55% of the local tumors but 83% of the mice died from metastases. Three strategies to reduce the risk of metastatic spread were tested. The fractionation scheme was changed to deliver the same total dose using a large initial fraction followed by seven equal portions with the same overall time. ICRF-159 was used with the intention of partially synchronizing the tumor growth fraction in a radiosensitive state of the growth cycle and of promoting normalization of the tumor vasculature. Levamisole was used to stimulate the immune system. The combination of ICRF-159 with the eight-fraction radiation course proved to be effective for both increasing local control and decreasing the incidence of metastases. The addition of levamisole did not improve the results obtained with a combination of ICRF-159 and irradiation.

  6. Influence of ICRF-159 and levamisole on the incidence of metastases following local irradiation of a solid tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.; Constable, W.; Elkon, D.; Rinehart, L.

    1981-11-15

    Courses of irradiation consisting of 6000 rad in ten equal fractions over 12 days delivered to KHT sarcomas in mice controlled 55% of the local tumors but 83% of the mice died from metastases. Three strategies to reduce the risk of metastatic spread were tested. The fractionation scheme was changed to deliver the same total dose using a large initial fraction followed by seven equal portions with the same overall time. ICRF-159 was used with the intention of partially synchronizing the tumor growth fraction in a radiosensitive state of the growth cycle and of promoting normalization of the tumor vasculature. Levamisole was used to stimulate the immune system. The combination of ICRF-159 with the eight-fraction radiation course proved to be effective for both increasing local control and decreasing the incidence of metastases. The addition of levamisole did not improve the results obtained with a combination of ICRF-159 and irradiation.

  7. 15-MeV proton emission from ICRF-heated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O N; Conroy, S W; Hone, M; Sadler, G J; Van Belle, P [Commission of the European Communities, Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    1994-07-01

    {sup 3} He-d fusion reaction protons emitted from ICRF-heated discharges were recorded with a silicon diode detector installed in the JET tokamak. The detection rates demonstrated that sawtooth crashes eject fast particles from the inner region of the plasma. The energy spectra of the fusion product protons using H minority provided evidence for the second harmonic acceleration of deuterons at sub-MW levels of RF power and those with {sup 3} He minority did not possess the expected twin-lobed shape predicted by kinematics calculations. (authors). 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Observations of neutral beam and ICRF tail ion losses due to Alfven modes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Chang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Fast ion losses resulting from MHD modes at the Alfven frequency, such as the TAE, have been observed in TFTR. The modes have been driven both by neutral beam ions, at low B T , and by H-minority ICRF tail ions at higher B T . The measurements indicate that the loss rate varies linearly with the mode amplitude, and that the fast ion losses during the mode activity can be significant, e.g. up to 10% of the input power is lost in the worst case

  9. Electromagnetic analysis of the Faraday shield of the EAST ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qingxi; Song Yuntao; Wu Songtao; Zhao Yanping

    2011-01-01

    Faraday shield is one of the important components of ICRF antenna for EAST. In view of the structural safety of the Faraday shield, the electromagnetic and structural analyses for the Faraday shield have been carried out by applying the finite element method and the formulas under the cases of plasma disruption and vertical displacement event (VDE). Results of the electromagnetic forces, the stresses distribution as well as the deformation in the Faraday shield have been obtained under the two cases. They meet the design requirements and provide the theoretical basis for the structural safety evaluation of the Faraday shield. (authors)

  10. Progress in ICRF heating technology and designs for future large tokamak heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.; Swain, D.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Bryan, W.E.; Mayberry, M.J.; Owens, T.L.; Yugo, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of advancing the technology of heating with the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) for successful application to ignited plasmas is being addressed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the collaboration of several laboratories in the United States and Europe. The needs of experiments such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) have been evaluated and conceptual approaches identified. These concepts and their components are examined in the laboratory and applied to present-day machines. The status of this program is presented

  11. ICRF Mode Conversion Current Drive for Plasma Stability Control in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grekov, D.; Kock, R.; Lyssoivan, A.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Ongena, J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a substantial incentive for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) to operate at the highest attainable beta (plasma pressure normalized to magnetic pressure), a point emphasized by requirements of attractive economics in a reactor. Recent experiments aiming at stationary high beta discharges in tokamak plasmas have shown that maximum achievable beta value is often limited by the onset of instabilities at rational magnetic surfaces (neoclassical tearing modes). So, methods of effective control of these instabilities have to be developed. One possible way for neoclassical tearing modes control is an external current drive in the island to locally replace the missing bootstrap current and thus to suppress the instability. Also, a significant control of the sawtooth behaviour was demonstrated when the magnetic shear was modified by driven current at the magnetic surface where safety factor equals to 1. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), the mode conversion regime can be used to drive the local external current near the position of the fast-to-slow wave conversion layer, thus providing an efficient means of plasma stability control. The slow wave energy is effectively absorbed in the vicinity of mode conversion layer by electrons with such parallel to confining magnetic field velocities that the Landau resonance condition is satisfied. For parameters of present day tokamaks and for ITER parameters the slow wave phase velocity is rather low, so the large ratio of momentum to energy content would yield high current drive efficiency. In order to achieve noticeable current drive effect, it is necessary to create asymmetry in the ICRF power absorption between top and bottom parts of the plasma minor cross-section. Such asymmetric electron heating may be realized using: - shifted from the torus midplane ICRF antenna in TEXTOR tokamak; - plasma displacement in vertical direction that is feasible in ASDEX-Upgrade; - the

  12. 15-MeV proton emission from ICRF-heated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Conroy, S.W.; Hone, M.; Sadler, G.J.; Belle, P. van [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-12-31

    {sup 3}He-d fusion reaction protons emitted from ICRF-heated discharges were recorded with a silicon diode detector installed in the Joint European Torus (JET). The detection rates demonstrated that sawtooth crashes eject fast particles from the inner region of the plasma. The energy spectra of the fusion product protons using H minority provided evidence for the second harmonic acceleration of deuterons at sub-MW levels of RF power and those with {sup 3}He minority did not possess the expected twin-lobed shape predicted by kinematics calculations. (author) 5 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfvén Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfvén wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  14. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghini, Orso [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Volpe, Francesco A., E-mail: fvolpe@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  15. One-dimensional full wave treatment of mode conversion process at the ion-ion hybrid resonance in a bounded tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, I.; Becoulet, A.; Fraboulet, D.; NGuyen, F.

    1998-09-01

    A consistent picture of the mode conversion (MC) process at the ion-ion hybrid resonance in a bounded plasma of a tokamak is discussed, which clarifies the role of the global fast wave interference and cavity effects in the determination of the MC efficiency. This picture is supported by simulations with one-dimensional full wave kinetic code 'VICE'. The concept of the 'global resonator', formed by the R = n 2 || boundary cutoffs [B. Saoutic et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1647 (1996)], is justified, as well as the importance of a proper tunneling factor choice η cr = 0.22 [A. K. Ram et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1976 (1996)]. The MC scheme behavior appears to be very sensitive to the MC layer position relative to the global wave field pattern, i.e. to the local value of 'poloidal' electric field at the resonance. Optimal MC regimes are found to be attainable without requirement of a particular parallel wavenumber choice. (author)

  16. Finite-element-analysis of fields radiated from ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kaoru; Sugihara, Ryo.

    1984-04-01

    In several simple geometries, electromagnetic fields radiated from a loop antenna, on which a current oscillately flows across the static magnetic field B-vector 0 , are calculated by the finite element method (FEM) as well as by analytic methods in a cross section of a plasma cylinder. A finite wave number along B-vector 0 is assumed. Good agreement between FEM and the analytic solutions is obtained, which indicates the accuracy of FEM solutions. The method is applied to calculations of fields from a half-turn antenna and reasonable results are obtained. It is found that a straightforward application of FEM to problems in an anisotropic medium may bring about erroneous results and that an appropriate coordinate transformation is needed for FEM to become applicable. (author)

  17. Use of the TFTR prototype charge exchange neutral analyzer for fast He3++ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.

    1981-07-01

    The Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer (CENA) for TFTR is designed to measure singly charged ion species of atomic mass A = 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously with up to 75 energy channels per mass and an energy range of 0.5 3 charge exchange neutrals makes the analyzer of particular interest for recently proposed fast He 3 ++ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT

  18. Theoretical study for ICRF sustained LHD type p-11B reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    2003-04-01

    This is a summary of the workshop on 'Theoretical Study for ICRF Sustained LHD Type p- 11 B Reactor' held in National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) on July 25, 2002. In the workshop, study of LHD type D- 3 He reactor is also reported. A review concerning the advanced nuclear fusion fuels is also attached. This review was reported at the workshop of last year. The development of the p- 11 B reactor research which uses the LHD magnetic field configuration has been briefly summarized in section 1. In section 2, an integrated report on advanced nuclear fusion fuels is given. Ignition conditions in a D- 3 He helical reactor are summarized in section 3. 0-dimensional particle and power balance equations are solved numerically assuming the ISS95 confinement law including a confinement factor (γ HH ). It is shown that high average beta plasma confinement, a large confinement factor (γ HH > 3) and the hot ion mode (T i /T e > 1.4) are necessary to achieve the ignition of the D- 3 He helical reactor. Characteristics of ICRF sustained p- 11 B reactor are analyzed in section 4. The nuclear fusion reaction rate is derived assuming a quasilinear plateau distribution function (QPDF) for protons, and an ignition condition of p- 11 B reactor is shown to be possible. The 3 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: 24 and 43 GHz Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Ed B.; Gordon, David; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Ma, Chopo; Naudet, Charles J.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Zhang, Liwei D.; Kq VLBI Survey Collaboration

    2004-06-01

    Celestial reference frames have been constructed at K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz) based on VLBI astrometric survey observations of active galactic nuclei. Five VLBA observing sessions covered the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -44°. K-band's 230 sources have median formal position uncertainties of 150 and 290 μas in α cos δ and δ, respectively; the corresponding uncertainties for 132 Q-band sources are 215 and 360 μas, respectively. K-band weighted RMS (WRMS) residuals were 33 ps and 48 fs/s in delay and rate, respectively. Comparison of the K-band frame to the S/X-band ICRF shows WRMS agreement of 330 and 590 μas in α cos δ and δ, respectively. The motivations for extending the ICRF to higher frequencies are to use more compact sources to construct a more stable frame, to provide phase calibrators, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  20. Modeling ambipolar potential formation due to ICRF heating effects on electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.W.; Callen, J.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1985-08-01

    A mechanism for the potential bump observed near the region of ICRF heating in the endplugs of the Phaedrus tandem mirror experiment is investigated by numerical simulation of electron orbits in a simple mirror geometry. Given initial magnetic and ambipolar potential wells that trap the electrons, the ''near field'' parallel electric field E-tilde/sub z/e/sup -iωt/, which is localized near and due to the ICRF heating, tends to eject electrons from the region where E-tilde/sub z/ is nonzero. This depletion of the local electron population causes a local increase in the ambipolar potential. The rate at which the electrons are ejected, (dn/dt), is calculated from the electron orbit computation for a given potential well depth. The rate at which passing particles ''fill in'' the potential well can also be calculated. An estimate of how large the bump in the ambipolar potential becomes is obtained by finding the well depth at which (dn/dt) approximately equals the ''filling'' rate. For Phaedrus parameters (n 0 approx. = 4.0 x 10 12 cm -3 , T/sub e/ = 20 eV, E-tilde/sub z/ approx. = 1.0 V/cm) the electron pumping rate balances the ''filling'' rate at a potential well depth of approximately 40 V, consistent with experimental results

  1. Status of R&D activity for ITER ICRF power source system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Aparajita; Trivedi, Rajesh; Singh, Raghuraj; Rajnish, Kumar; Machchhar, Harsha; Ajesh, P.; Suthar, Gajendra; Soni, Dipal; Patel, Manoj; Mohan, Kartik; Hari, J.V.S.; Anand, Rohit; Verma, Sriprakash; Agarwal, Rohit; Jha, Akhil; Kazarian, Fabienne; Beaumont, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • R&D program to establish high power RF technology for ITER ICRF source is described. • R&D RF source is being developed using Diacrode & Tetrode technologies. • Test rig (3 MW/3600 s/35–65 MHz) simulating plasma load is developed. - Abstract: India is in-charge for the procurement of ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) sources (1 Prototype + 8 series units) along with auxiliary power supplies and Local Control Unit. As there is no unique amplifier chain able to meet the output power specifications as per ITER requirement (2.5 MW per source at 35–65 MHz/CW/VSWR 2.0), two parallel three-stage amplifier chains along with a combiner circuit on the output side is considered. This kind of RF source will be unique in terms of its stringent specifications and building a first of its kind is always a challenge. An R&D phase has been initiated for establishing the technology considering single amplifier chain experimentation (1.5 MW/35–65 MHz/3600 s/VSWR 2.0) prior to Prototype and series production. This paper presents the status of R&D activity to resolve technological challenges involved and various infrastructures developed at ITER-India lab to support such operation.

  2. 2-D mapping of ICRF-induced SOL perturbations in Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Gunn, J.P.; Nanobashvili, I.; Petrzilka, V.; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Heuraux, S.; Joffrin, E.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Balorin, C.; Lowry, C.; Basiuk, V.

    2007-01-01

    ICRF-induced SOL modifications are mapped for the first time in 2-D around Tore Supra ICRF antennas using reciprocating Langmuir probes. When probe heads are magnetically connected to powered antennas, radical modifications of floating potentials V float , effective temperatures T eff and ion saturation currents are observed. V float perturbations are located radially near antenna limiters, with a typical extension 2 cm. Poloidally they are locally minimal near the equatorial plane, and maximal near antenna box corners. Two possible interpretations for increased T eff are proposed: localised electron heating and RF loop voltage induced along probe circuit. Both interpretations rely on the generation of parallel RF fields by parallel RF currents on the antenna structure. The topology of such currents could explain the 2-D structure of T eff maps. Both interpretations also imply a positive DC biasing of the antenna environment. Differential biasing of nearby flux tubes drives DC E x B 0 convection that could explain 2-D density patterns

  3. Development of Tokamak experiment technology - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hang Young; Lee, Soon Chil; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Jeon, Sang Jin; Heo, Sung Hee; Heo, Eun Gi; Lee, Dae Hang; Lee, Chan Hee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate antenna, measure the property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling. Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. So, the plasma current produced is more than 30 kA and, the loop voltage of the plasma is 2 {approx} 3V. The power of the plasma by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, it is needed RF system with more than 100 kW in 7 {approx} 15 MHz. In the first year a RF amplifier with 1 kW in 300 khz {approx} 35 MHz was bought. The manufacture of ICRF system will start from next years. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. Experimentally, we obtain the results that the signal of piezo element is proportional to the square of electric field. In the next year, we will research the type of antenna subsequently. 28 refs., 3 tabs., 18 figs. (author)

  4. Status of R&D activity for ITER ICRF power source system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Aparajita, E-mail: aparajita.mukherjee@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar–382428 (India); Trivedi, Rajesh; Singh, Raghuraj; Rajnish, Kumar; Machchhar, Harsha; Ajesh, P.; Suthar, Gajendra; Soni, Dipal; Patel, Manoj; Mohan, Kartik; Hari, J.V.S.; Anand, Rohit; Verma, Sriprakash; Agarwal, Rohit; Jha, Akhil [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar–382428 (India); Kazarian, Fabienne; Beaumont, Bertrand [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 Sain-Paul-Les-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D program to establish high power RF technology for ITER ICRF source is described. • R&D RF source is being developed using Diacrode & Tetrode technologies. • Test rig (3 MW/3600 s/35–65 MHz) simulating plasma load is developed. - Abstract: India is in-charge for the procurement of ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) sources (1 Prototype + 8 series units) along with auxiliary power supplies and Local Control Unit. As there is no unique amplifier chain able to meet the output power specifications as per ITER requirement (2.5 MW per source at 35–65 MHz/CW/VSWR 2.0), two parallel three-stage amplifier chains along with a combiner circuit on the output side is considered. This kind of RF source will be unique in terms of its stringent specifications and building a first of its kind is always a challenge. An R&D phase has been initiated for establishing the technology considering single amplifier chain experimentation (1.5 MW/35–65 MHz/3600 s/VSWR 2.0) prior to Prototype and series production. This paper presents the status of R&D activity to resolve technological challenges involved and various infrastructures developed at ITER-India lab to support such operation.

  5. Application of a simplified calculation for full-wave microtremor H/ V spectral ratio based on the diffuse field approximation to identify underground velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Masaki, Kazuaki; Irikura, Kojiro; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco José

    2017-12-01

    Under the diffuse field approximation, the full-wave (FW) microtremor H/ V spectral ratio ( H/ V) is modeled as the square root of the ratio of the sum of imaginary parts of the Green's function of the horizontal components to that of the vertical one. For a given layered medium, the FW H/ V can be well approximated with only surface waves (SW) H/ V of the "cap-layered" medium which consists of the given layered medium and a new larger velocity half-space (cap layer) at large depth. Because the contribution of surface waves can be simply obtained by the residue theorem, the computation of SW H/ V of cap-layered medium is faster than that of FW H/ V evaluated by discrete wavenumber method and contour integration method. The simplified computation of SW H/ V was then applied to identify the underground velocity structures at six KiK-net strong-motion stations. The inverted underground velocity structures were used to evaluate FW H/ Vs which were consistent with the SW H/ Vs of corresponding cap-layered media. The previous study on surface waves H/ Vs proposed with the distributed surface sources assumption and a fixed Rayleigh-to-Love waves amplitude ratio for horizontal motions showed a good agreement with the SW H/ Vs of our study. The consistency between observed and theoretical spectral ratios, such as the earthquake motions of H/ V spectral ratio and spectral ratio of horizontal motions between surface and bottom of borehole, indicated that the underground velocity structures identified from SW H/ V of cap-layered medium were well resolved by the new method.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Generation and sustainment of plasma rotation by ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.; White, R.; Bonoli, P.T.; Chan, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed and evaluated for driving rotation in tokamak plasmas by minority ion-cyclotron heating, even though this process introduces negligible angular momentum. The mechanism has two elements: First, angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a non-slip boundary condition at the separatrix. Second, Monte-Carlo calculations show that energized particles will provide a torque density source which has a zero volume integral but separated positive and negative regions. With such a source, a solution of the diffusion equation predicts the on-axis rotation frequency Ω to be Ω=(4q max WJ*)eBR 3 a 2 n e (2π) 2 ) -1 (τ M /τ E ) where vertical bar J* vertical bar ∼ 5-10 is a non-dimensional rotation frequency calculated by the Monte-Carlo ORBIT code. Overall, agreement with experiment is good, when the resonance is on the low-field-side of the magnetic axis. The rotation becomes more counter-current and reverses sign on the high field side for a no-slip boundary. The velocity shear layer position is controllable and of sufficient magnitude to affect microinstabilities. (author)

  7. ICRF hydrogen minority heating in the boronized ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Braun, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Steuer, K.H.; Wesner, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the divertor of ASDEX has been modified (1986-87) the hydrogen concentration in deuterium plasmas could not be reduced below 10%, although the machine was operated for long periods of time with deuterium injection. This is probably due to desorption in the divertor as indicated by the increasing H-concentration during a deuterium injection pulse. As a consequence for H-minority heating in deuterium, the maximum power into ohmic plasmas without causing a disruption was limited to few hundred kW. A partial solution was ICRH in combination with deuterium injection which allowed us to apply up to 1.5 MW ICRH to the plasma. The beneficial role of the injection is attributed to an improved ICRH absorption and to the higher energy flux and temperature in the divertor. During the last ICRH campaign we operated mainly in helium plasmas for a lower hydrogen concentration and the vessel was boronised. The H-concentration is measured routinely by a mass spectrometer in the divertor chamber. (orig./AH)

  8. Dielectric window development for the ITER ICRF vacuum transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikinheimo, L.; Heikkinen, J.; Hytoenen, Y.

    1998-08-01

    A vacuum window block design is presented for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) ion cyclotron radio frequency heating vacuum transmission line. The vacuum windows in various auxiliaries of the present fusion facilities and in future fusion reactors are essential and most vulnerable components, as they provide ultimate vacuum and tritium containment. Various existing windows, e.g. those at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (IPP, Garching), Tore Supra (CEA, Cadarache), and at JET Tokamak (Euratom, Culham), have provided a starting point for the present work, but the large size, remote handling and cooling requirements, as well as the strong neutron radiation in the fusion reactors have called a new design, where new material combinations for the dielectric and conductor have deemed to be necessary. Conventional and well tested design solutions have been chosen wherever possible. A preprototype construction has been launched to test the design principles, in particular the joining of the ceramics to a titanium conductor by brazing which has not been possible so far in this size and geometry. First results of the preprototype tests are reported here. The present final report is a combination of the results achieved with the support of two different projects; an industrial project funded by EFET and a NET Research and Design project funded by the Euratom/TEKES within the Euratom fusion programme. (orig.)

  9. ICRF hydrogen minority heating in the boronized ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Braun, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Steuer, K.H.; Wesner, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the divertor of ASDEX has been modified (1986-87) the hydrogen concentration in deuterium plasmas could not be reduced below 10%, although the machine was operated for long periods of time with deuterium injection. This is probably due to desorption in the divertor as indicated by the increasing H-concentration during a deuterium injection pulse. As a consequence for H-minority heating in deuterium, the maximum power into ohmic plasmas without causing a disruption was limited to few hundred kW. A partial solution was ICRH in combination with deuterium injection which allowed us to apply up to 1.5 MW ICRH to the plasma. The beneficial role of the injection is attributed to an improved ICRH absorption and to the higher energy flux and temperature in the divertor. During the last ICRH campaign we operated mainly in helium plasmas for a lower hydrogen concentration and the vessel was boronised. The H-concentration is measured routinely by a mass spectrometer in the divertor chamber. This measurement does not give a fast response to eventual changes and also no absolute concentrations in the main plasma, but it gives a reliable estimate of the time evolution during one discharge or from shot to shot. The data from the mass spectrometer were often cross-checked with charge exchange measurements from the main plasma. In helium discharges the hydrogen concentration is around 2% in the ohmic phase but it increases up to 8% as ICRH is applied. Under these conditions the maximum available power (2.7 MW) could be applied to the plasma without causing a disruption. This is partly due to the low H-concentration in helium at the beginning of the ICRH pulse but also to the boronisation, as discussed in a later. (author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Fast-wave ICRF minority-regime heating experiments on the Tore Supra tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarici, G; Beaumont, B; Becoulet, A; Kuus, H; Saoutic, B; Martin, G [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (FR). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Shepard, T D; Haste, G R; Baity, F W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Evans, T E [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (US)

    1992-12-31

    Up to 4 MW of rf power at 57 MHz has been coupled to Ohmic target plasmas during the first ICRF heating experiments on Tore Supra. A total of 12 MW of rf power will ultimately be available from six tetrode amplifiers and will be coupled to the plasmas using three ORNL/CEA-designed resonant double-loop antennas. During these first experiments, two antennas were used, with one or two energized at a time. The antenna loading with plasma was observed to be well over an order of magnitude greater than that without plasma. In addition, one kilo-electron-volt of electron heating, significant minority nonthermal ions, and significant increases in diamagnetic stored energy were observed. A comparison of in-phase and out-of-phase antenna operation showed the same increase in stored energy, less radiated power, and a larger drop in loop voltage for out-of-phase operation. Confinement scaling agrees with the ITER scaling law.

  11. Anti-alias filter in AORSA for modeling ICRF heating of DT plasmas in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, L. A.; Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; RF SciDAC Team

    2011-10-01

    The spectral wave solver AORSA has been used extensively to model full-field, ICRF heating scenarios for DT plasmas in ITER. In these scenarios, the tritium (T) second harmonic cyclotron resonance is positioned near the magnetic axis, where fast magnetosonic waves are efficiently absorbed by tritium ions. In some cases, a fundamental deuterium (D) cyclotron layer can also be located within the plasma, but close to the high field boundary. In this case, the existence of multiple ion cyclotron resonances presents a serious challenge for numerical simulation because short-wavelength, mode-converted waves can be excited close to the plasma edge at the ion-ion hybrid layer. Although the left hand circularly polarized component of the wave field is partially shielded from the fundamental D resonance, some power penetrates, and a small fraction (typically LLC.

  12. Observation of Electron Energy Pinch in HT-7 ICRF Heated Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Siye; Wan Baonian; Ti Ang; Zhang Xinjun; Liu Zixi; Qian Jinping; Zhong Guoqiang; Duan Yanmin; Wang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Inward energy transport (pinch phenomenon) in the electron channel is observed in HT-7 plasmas using off-axis ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating. Experimental results and power balance transport analysis by TRANSP code are presented in this article. With the aids of GLF23 and Chang-Hinton transport models, which predict energy diffusivity in experimental conditions, the estimated electron pinch velocity is obtained by experimental data and is found reasonably comparable to the results in the previous study, such as Song on Tore Supra. Density scanning shows that the energy convective velocity in the electron channel has a close relation to density scale length, which is qualitatively in agreement with Wang's theoretical prediction. The parametric dependence of electron energy convective velocity on plasma current is still ambiguous and is worthy of future research on EAST. (magnetically confined plasma)

  13. Enhanced performance on high current discharges in JET produced by ICRF heating during the current rise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Cotrell, G.; Corti, S.; Christiansen, J.P.; Hellsten, T.; Jacquinot, J.; Lallia, P.; Lomas, P.; O'Rourke, J.; Taroni, A.; Tibone, F.; Start, D.F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of high current discharges can be increased by applying central ICRF heating before or shortly after the onset of sawtooth activity in the plasma current rise phase. Sawtooth-free periods have been obtained resulting in the enhanced discharge performance. High T e (0) 9 - 10.5 keV with peaked profiles T e (0)/ e > = 3 - 4 were obtained giving values of n e (0)T e (0) up to 6x10 20 (keV m -3 ). Improvements in T i (0) and neutron production are observed. A 60 % enhancement in D-D reaction rate from 2nd harmonic deuterium (2ω CD ) heating appears to be present. In all current rise (CR) discharges radiation amounts to 25-50 % of total power. (author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  14. ICRF boronization. A new technique towards high efficiency wall coating for superconducting tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Zhao Yan Ping; Gu Xue Mao

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for wall conditioning that will be especially useful for future larger superconducting tokamaks, such as ITER, has been successfully developed and encouraging results have been obtained. Solid carborane powder, which is non-toxic and non-explosive, was used. Pulsed RF plasma was produced by a non-Faraday shielding RF antenna with RF power of 10 kW. The ion temperature was about 2 keV with a toroidal magnetic field of 1.8 T and a pressure of 3x10 -1 Pa. Energetic ions broke up the carborane molecules, and the resulting boron ions struck and were deposited on the first wall. In comparison with glow discharge cleaning boronization, the B/C coating film shows higher adhesion, more uniformity and longer lifetime during plasma discharges. The plasma performance was improved after ICRF boronization. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. A global simulation of ICRF heating in a 3D magnetic configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Akutsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    A global simulation code for the ICRF heating analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic configuration is developed combining two global simulation codes; a drift kinetic equation solver, GNET, and a wave field solver, TASK/WM. Both codes take into account 3D geometry using the numerically obtained 3D MHD equilibrium. The developed simulation code is applied to the LHD configuration as an example. Characteristics of energetic ion distributions in the phase space are clarified in LHD. The simulation results are also compared with experimental results by evaluating the count number of the neutral particle analyzer using the obtained energetic ion distribution, and a relatively good agreement is obtained. (author)

  16. A portable data acquisition system on J.I.P.P. T-II ICRF experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidekuma, S.

    1982-03-01

    This system has been developed for the data acquisition in the J.I.P.P. T-II ICRF experiment. It is composed of the LSI-11/2(56KB), a dual floppy disk drive, CAMAC modules, a graphic display and an interface module to the HITAC 10-II system. The operating system is RT-11. This system has functions of the data acquisition through A-D converters (max.32ch), the transfer of the data to the HITAC 10-II system and the preservation of them in its floppy disk. Furthermore, a user can easily develop his application programs with this system. The operating procedures of this system are described. (author)

  17. Antenna loading and electron heating experiments of ICRF wave in TNT-A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Naito, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Kenro

    1984-01-01

    Antenna loading resistance and electron heating effects of ICRF wave were investigated in TNT-A tokamak. Lodaing resistance increased with the mean plasma density and decreased with the input power. The effect of the distance between the plasma and antenna surface on loading resistance was studied and had good agreements with the calculated results. The increase in the soft Xray emissivity was larger in the presence of ion-ion hybrid and/or ion cyclotron resonance layer in the plasma than that in the absence of them. With the absorbed power up to two times of the ohmic power, the central electron temperature increased by 20%, the soft Xray emissivity increased by 80% and the mean plasma density decreased by 10%, while the total radiation loss increased slightly (by 15%). (author)

  18. Measurements of the loading impedance and field scaling of a cavity ICRF launcher for Big D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, C.; Ryan, P.M.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, a new ICRF launcher in the form of a resonant coil cavity has been proposed and analyzed using a convenient two-dimensional model and a Poisson-solver computer code. Here, a physical model of the launcher has been fabricated to test the scaling characteristics of the impedance and relative fields as a function of the physical sizing of the structure. Variable parameters include the antenna-to-plasma distance, the cavity back wall-to-plasma distance, and the antenna cross-sectional shape. Each of these parameters is varied in the interest of optimizing the radiated power for given antenna voltage and current limits. Critical design criterial will be determined from the data. The report consists of 21 viewgraphs

  19. Materials tests and analyses of Faraday shield tubes for ICRF [ion cyclotron resonant frequency] antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Walls, J.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas for heating fusion plasmas require careful analysis of the materials selected for the design and the successful fabrication of high integrity braze bonds. Graphite tiles are brazed to Inconel 625 Faraday shield tubes to protect the antenna from the plasma. The bond between the graphite and Inconel tube is difficult to achieve due to the different coefficients of thermal expansion. A 2-D stress analysis showed the graphite could be bonded to Inconel with a Ag-Cu-Ti braze alloy without cracking the graphite. Brazing procedures and nondestructive examination methods have been developed for these joints. This paper presents the results of our joining development and proof testing. 2 refs., 3 figs

  20. Joule loss on a Faraday shield of JT-60 ICRF test antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki; Saigusa, Mikio; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Haruyuki; Hirashima, Teruhisa; Uehara, Munenori.

    1988-01-01

    Joule loss on a Faraday shield of JT-60 ICRF test antenna with a conductive casing is investigated at the frequency range of 120 MHz. The magnetic field radiated from the antenna is measured by three-dimensionally scanning an rf probe both inside and outside the antenna casing. The magnetic field perpendicular to the Faraday shield, B x , is found to be the largest component near the Faraday shield. It consequently gives the major part of the joule loss on the Faraday shield. The temperature distribution of the Faraday shield due to joule loss is measured directly with a thermocamera. It is confirmed that the area of the high temperature rise is consistent with the peak positions of the B x field. Faraday shield resistance which is estimated from power measurements agrees with the theoretical value. (author)

  1. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  2. SIDON: A simulator of radio-frequency networks. Application to WEST ICRF launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Walid; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Colas, Laurent; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Moreau, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SIDON (SImulator of raDiO-frequency Networks) is an in-house developed Radio-Frequency (RF) network solver that has been implemented to cross-validate the design of WEST ICRF launchers and simulate their impedance matching algorithm while considering all mutual couplings and asymmetries. In this paper, the authors illustrate the theory of SIDON as well as results of its calculations. The authors have built time-varying plasma scenarios (a sequence of launchers front-faces L-mode and H-mode Z-matrices), where at each time step (1 millisecond here), SIDON solves the RF network. At the same time, when activated, the impedance matching algorithm controls the matching elements (vacuum capacitors) and thus their corresponding S-matrices. Typically a 1-second pulse requires around 10 seconds of computational time on a desktop computer. These tasks can be hardly handled by commercial RF software. This innovative work allows identifying strategies for the launchers future operation while insuring the limitations on the currents, voltages and electric fields, matching and Load-Resilience, as well as the required straps voltage amplitude/phase balance. In this paper, a particular attention is paid to the simulation of the launchers behavior when arcs appear at several locations of their circuits using SIDON calculator. This latter work shall confirm or identify strategies for the arc detection using various RF electrical signals. One shall note that the use of such solvers in not limited to ICRF launchers simulations but can be employed, in principle, to any linear or linearized RF problem.

  3. Effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio due to a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports results of MCNP-5 calculations, with the nuclear data library FENDL-2.1, to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) due to a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna integrated in the blanket of a DEMO fusion power reactor. A preliminary design of the antenna with a reference configuration of the DEMO reactor was used together with a parametric analysis for different parameters that strongly affect the TBR. These are the type of breeding blanket (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed, Helium Cooled Lithium Lead and Water Cooled Lithium Lead), the covering ratio of the straps of the antenna (the ratio between the surface of all the straps and the projected surface of the antenna slot: 0.49, 0.72 and 0.94), the antenna radial thickness (20 cm and 40 cm), the thickness of the straps (2 cm, 4 cm and a double layer of 0.2 cm plus 2.5 cm with the composition of the First Wall), and finally the poloidal position of the antenna (0°, which is the equatorial port, 40° and 90°, which is the upper port). For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidaly at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m and a total First Wall surface of 67 m"2, the reduction of the TBR is −0.35% for a HCPB blanket concept, −0.53% for a HCLL blanket concept and −0.51% for a WCLL blanket concept. In all cases covered by the parametric analysis, the loss of TBR remains below 0.61%. Such a distributed ICRF antenna has thus only a marginal effect on the TBR for a DEMO reactor.

  4. Theoretical study for ICRF sustained LHD type p-{sup 11}B reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tsuguhiro (ed.)

    2003-04-01

    This is a summary of the workshop on 'Theoretical Study for ICRF Sustained LHD Type p-{sup 11}B Reactor' held in National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) on July 25, 2002. In the workshop, study of LHD type D-{sup 3}He reactor is also reported. A review concerning the advanced nuclear fusion fuels is also attached. This review was reported at the workshop of last year. The development of the p-{sup 11}B reactor research which uses the LHD magnetic field configuration has been briefly summarized in section 1. In section 2, an integrated report on advanced nuclear fusion fuels is given. Ignition conditions in a D-{sup 3}He helical reactor are summarized in section 3. 0-dimensional particle and power balance equations are solved numerically assuming the ISS95 confinement law including a confinement factor ({gamma}{sub HH}). It is shown that high average beta plasma confinement, a large confinement factor ({gamma}{sub HH} > 3) and the hot ion mode (T{sub i}/T{sub e} > 1.4) are necessary to achieve the ignition of the D-{sup 3}He helical reactor. Characteristics of ICRF sustained p-{sup 11}B reactor are analyzed in section 4. The nuclear fusion reaction rate < {sigma}{upsilon} > is derived assuming a quasilinear plateau distribution function (QPDF) for protons, and an ignition condition of p-{sup 11}B reactor is shown to be possible. The 3 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio due to a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A., E-mail: albert.garcia.hp@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Dies, J. [Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    This thesis reports results of MCNP-5 calculations, with the nuclear data library FENDL-2.1, to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) due to a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna integrated in the blanket of a DEMO fusion power reactor. A preliminary design of the antenna with a reference configuration of the DEMO reactor was used together with a parametric analysis for different parameters that strongly affect the TBR. These are the type of breeding blanket (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed, Helium Cooled Lithium Lead and Water Cooled Lithium Lead), the covering ratio of the straps of the antenna (the ratio between the surface of all the straps and the projected surface of the antenna slot: 0.49, 0.72 and 0.94), the antenna radial thickness (20 cm and 40 cm), the thickness of the straps (2 cm, 4 cm and a double layer of 0.2 cm plus 2.5 cm with the composition of the First Wall), and finally the poloidal position of the antenna (0°, which is the equatorial port, 40° and 90°, which is the upper port). For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidaly at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m and a total First Wall surface of 67 m{sup 2}, the reduction of the TBR is −0.35% for a HCPB blanket concept, −0.53% for a HCLL blanket concept and −0.51% for a WCLL blanket concept. In all cases covered by the parametric analysis, the loss of TBR remains below 0.61%. Such a distributed ICRF antenna has thus only a marginal effect on the TBR for a DEMO reactor.

  6. Study and optimization of magnetized ICRF discharges for tokamak wall conditioning and assessment of the applicability to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauters, T.

    2011-11-01

    This work is devoted to the study and optimization of the Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) technique. ICWC, operated in presence of the toroidal magnetic field, makes use of four main tokamak systems: the ICRF antennas to initiate and sustain the conditioning discharge, the gas injection valves to provide the discharge gas, the machine pumps to remove the wall desorbed particles, and the poloidal magnetic field system to optimize the discharge homogeneity. Additionally neutral gas and plasma diagnostics are required to monitor the discharge and the conditioning efficiency. In chapter 2 a general overview on ICWC is given. Chapter 3 treats the ICRF discharge homogeneity and the confinement properties of the employed magnetic field. In the first part we will discuss experimental facts on plasma homogeneity, and how experimental optimization led to its improvement. In the second part of the chapter the confinement properties of a partially ionized plasma in a toroidal magnetic field configuration with additional small vertical component are discussed. Chapter 4 gives an overview of experimental results on the efficiency of ICWC, obtained on TORE SUPRA, TEXTOR, JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In chapter 5 a 0D kinetic description of hydrogen-helium RF plasmas is outlined. The model, describing the evolution of ICRF plasmas from discharge initiation to the (quasi) steady state plasma stage, is developed to obtain insight on ICRF plasma parameters, particle fluxes to the walls and the main collisional processes. Chapter 6 presents a minimum structure for a 0D reservoir model of the wall to investigate in deeper detail the ICWC plasma wall interaction during isotopic exchange experiments. The hypothesis used to build up the wall model is that the same model structure should be able to describe the wall behavior during normal plasmas and conditioning procedures. Chapter 7 extrapolates the results to the envisaged application of ICWC on ITER

  7. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II...... chelation alone does not appear to be sufficient for protection against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/8...

  8. Ion heating up to 1 MeV range with higher harmonic ICRF wave on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, M.; Kusama, Y.; Hamamatsu, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujii, T.; Moriyama, S.; Saigusa, M.; Afanassiev, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of protons under accleration by an ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves with the second to fourth hydrogen harmonics have been investigated in the JT-60U tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Protons have been accelerated up to 1 MeV in the presence of an ICRF wave of fixed frequency, neutral beams (NB), and a fixed toroidal magnetic field which is scanned through several plasma discharges. The tail temperature of the protons, which is evaluated in the range 0.32-0.86 MeV, has been observed to increase in the second to third harmonics, however increase of the tail temperature in the third to fourth harmonics has not been observed clearly. Furthermore, the dependence of tail temperature on the harmonic number has been found to be in qualitative agreement with results from a simulation code analysis based upon the one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation coupled with the kinetic wave equation. Experimental values for the stored energy of the accelerated ions have shown, however, that the response of stored energy to changes in absorbed ICRF power is much stronger than the response to changes in harmonic number. Also, the incremental energy confinement times for heating discharges matching the third and fourth harmonics (3 ω CH) and 4 ω CH) of hydrogen have been observed to be less than half that for those matching the second harmonic. It has been found that suppression of the absorbed ICRF power accompanied with the occurence of cavity resonance in the 3ω CH and 4ω CH heating discharges reduces the stored energy of the accelerated ions and the incremental energy confinement time. (Author)

  9. Measurements of plasma termination in ICRF heated long pulse discharges with fast framing cameras in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mamoru; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    The termination process of long pulse plasma discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD) have been observed with fast framing cameras, which shows that the reason for the termination of the discharged has been changed with increased plasma heating power, improvements of plasma heating systems and change of the divertor configuration, etc. For long pulse discharges in FYs2010-2012, the main reason triggering the plasma termination was reduction of ICRF heating power with rise of iron ion emission due to electric breakdown in an ICRF antenna. In the experimental campaign in FY2013, the duration time of ICRF heated long pulse plasma discharges has been extended to about 48 minutes with a plasma heating power of ∼1.2 MW and a line-averaged electron density of ∼1.2 × 10"1"9 m"-"3. The termination of the discharges was triggered by release of large amounts of carbon dusts from closed divertor regions, indicating that the control of dust formation in the divertor regions is indispensable for extending the duration time of long pulse discharges. (author)

  10. EMC3-Eirene simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Coster, David; Lunt, Tilmann; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Feng, Yuehe [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade team

    2015-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating relies on the Fast Wave (FW) to transport the power from the edge (the antenna) to the plasma center. Since the FW is evanescent below a critical density (typically in the 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} range), the wave does not propagate in the region where the density is below this value in the very edge of the plasma. The coupling depends strongly on the width of this region. The distance between the ICRF antenna and the FW cut-off layer can be made smaller by increasing the edge density in front of the ICRF antenna. Previous experiments in many tokamaks and preliminary simulation results for AUG and JET with EDGE2D-EIRENE show that the edge density could indeed be increased with gas puffing at the top of the vessel or in the midplane. But the 2D code cannot quantitatively reproduce the experimental results, mainly due to the assumptions of toroidal axisymmetry. EMC3-EIRENE is a 3D Edge Monte Carlo plasma fluid transport code. By including the toroidal nonaxisymmetric plasma facing components and 3D positions of gas valves in the code, the simulations can be made more realistic. We will show first simulation results of the code and a comparison to experiments.

  11. Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks, Task 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1991-07-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past three years has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling and heating issues: efficient coupling during the L- to H-mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas edge plasma profiles; analysis of both dielectric-filled waveguide and coil ICRF antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results; ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation and heating analyses; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report. 15 refs

  12. Sub-basalt Imaging of Hydrocarbon-Bearing Mesozoic Sediments Using Ray-Trace Inversion of First-Arrival Seismic Data and Elastic Finite-Difference Full-Wave Modeling Along Sinor-Valod Profile of Deccan Syneclise, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Karabi; Behera, Laxmidhar

    2018-03-01

    Imaging below the basalt for hydrocarbon exploration is a global problem because of poor penetration and significant loss of seismic energy due to scattering, attenuation, absorption and mode-conversion when the seismic waves encounter a highly heterogeneous and rugose basalt layer. The conventional (short offset) seismic data acquisition, processing and modeling techniques adopted by the oil industry generally fails to image hydrocarbon-bearing sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments hidden below the basalt and is considered as a serious problem for hydrocarbon exploration in the world. To overcome this difficulty of sub-basalt imaging, we have generated dense synthetic seismic data with the help of elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling using staggered-grid scheme for the model derived from ray-trace inversion using sparse wide-angle seismic data acquired along Sinor-Valod profile in the Deccan Volcanic Province of India. The full-wave synthetic seismic data generated have been processed and imaged using conventional seismic data processing technique with Kirchhoff pre-stack time and depth migrations. The seismic image obtained correlates with all the structural features of the model obtained through ray-trace inversion of wide-angle seismic data, validating the effectiveness of robust elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling approach for imaging below thick basalts. Using the full-wave modeling also allows us to decipher small-scale heterogeneities imposed in the model as a measure of the rugose basalt interfaces, which could not be dealt with ray-trace inversion. Furthermore, we were able to accurately image thin low-velocity hydrocarbon-bearing Mesozoic sediments sandwiched between and hidden below two thick sequences of high-velocity basalt layers lying above the basement.

  13. 3D-full wave and kinetics numerical modelling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources plasma: steps towards self-consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Torrisi, G.; Sorbello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion Sources are the most performing machines for the production of intense beams of multi-charged ions in fundamental science, applied physics and industry. Investigation of plasma dynamics in ECRIS still remains a challenge. A better comprehension of electron heating, ionization and diffusion processes, ion confinement and ion beam formation is mandatory in order to increase ECRIS performances both in terms of output beams currents, charge states, beam quality (emittance minimization, beam halos suppression, etc.). Numerical solution of Vlasov equation via kinetic codes coupled to FEM solvers is ongoing at INFN-LNS, based on a PIC strategy. Preliminary results of the modeling will be shown about wave-plasma interaction and electron-ion confinement: the obtained results are very helpful to better understand the influence of the different parameters (especially RF frequency and power) on the ion beam formation mechanism. The most important clues coming out from the simulations are that although vacuum field RF field distribution (that is a cavity, modal field distribution) is perturbed by the plasma medium, the non-uniformity in the electric field amplitude still persists in the plasma filled cavity. This non-uniformity can be correlated with non-uniform plasma distribution, explaining a number of experimental observations

  14. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF Antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; W. Beck; R.L. Boivin; P.T. Bonoli; D. Gwinn; W.D. Lee; E. Nelson-Melby; M. Porkolab; R. Vieira; S.J. Wukitch; J.A. Goetz

    2001-01-01

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in February 2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low-heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in July 2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radio- frequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in February 2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented

  15. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF antenna geometry for long pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring powered ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas in magnetic fusion devices has revealed localized modifications of the plasma edge in the antenna shadow, most of them probably related to an enhanced polarization of the scrape-off layer (SOL) through radio-frequency (RF) sheath rectification. Although tolerable on present short RF pulses, sheaths should be minimized, as they may hinder proper operation of steady-state antennas and other subsystems connected magnetically to them, such as lower hybrid grills. As a first step towards mitigating RF sheaths in the design of future antennas, the present paper analyses the spatial structure of sheath potential maps in their vicinity, in relation with the 3D topology of RF near fields and the geometry of antenna front faces. Various combinations of poloidal radiating straps are first considered, and results are confronted to those inferred from transmission line theory. The dependence of sheath potentials on RF voltages or RF currents is studied. The role of RF near-field symmetries along tilted field lines is stressed to interpret such effects as that of strap phasing. A generalization of the 'dipole effect' is proposed. With similar arguments, the behavior of Faraday screen corners, where hot spots concentrate on Tore-Supra (TS), is then studied. The merits of aligning the antenna structure with the tilted magnetic field are thus discussed. The effect of switching from TS (high RF voltage near corners) to ITER-like electrical configurations of the straps (high voltage near equatorial plane) is also analyzed. (authors)

  16. Enhanced performance of high current discharges in JET produced by ICRF heating during the current rise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Christiansen, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of high current discharges can be improved by applying central ICRF heating before or shortly after the onset of sawtooth activity in the plasma current rise phase. Long sawtooth-free periods have been obtained which result in a transiently-enhanced discharge performance. High T c (0) = 9-10.5 keV with peaked profile T e (0)/ e > = 3-4 were obtained giving values of N e (0)T e (0) up to 6 x 10 20 (keV m -3 ). Improvements in T i (0) and neutron production are observed. A best value of n Dd (0)T i (0)τ E = 1.65 x 10 20 (m -3 keV s) was achieved. Local transport simulation shows that the electron and ion thermal diffusivities do not differ substantially in the two cases of current-rise (CR) and flat-top (FT) heating, the performance of the central plasma region being enhanced, in the case of current-rise, entirely by the elimination of the sawtooth instability. The maximum D-D reaction rate is enhanced by a factor of 2 compared to the flat-top value. An appreciable part of the reaction rate is attributed to 2nd harmonic deuterium (2ω CD ) heating. In all current-rise discharges radiation amounts to 25-50% of total power and Ζ eff remains roughly constant. (author)

  17. Experimental investigation of ICRF effects: Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1988-October 15, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Phaedrus Program now consists of two major devices, the Phaedrus-B Tandem mirror and the Phaedrus-T tokamak. Phaedrus-B has been modified to operate as an axisymmetric tandem mirror with no quadrupole end cell fields and only circular baffles. Phaedrus-T is now under construction. The Phaedrus-T vacuum chamber is nearing completion and new toroidal field coils have been ordered (with completion expected in early 1989). As originally proposed, when Phaedrus-T is operational, our initial plan is to continue operating both devices (on alternating schedules). We will utilize the same control room, power supplies, and staff for both devices, and graduate students will have thesis project physics issues that can be studied on both devices. Investigations are currently and, will continue to be, centered around five physics areas. All involve ICRF. These are: edge physics; ponderomotive effects; mode conversion; mode control; and tandem mirror specific. The first four will ultimately involve activities on both Phaedrus-T and Phaedrus-B. The fifth includes work that is specifically related to tandem mirror issues. 4 figs

  18. Analysis of 4-strap ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, G.; Wukitch, S.J.; Boivin, R.L.; Goetz, J.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Irby, J.H.; Lin, Y.; Parisot, A.; Porkolab, M.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna was designed and fabricated for plasma heating and current drive in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial upgrades were carried out in 2000 and 2001, which eliminated surface arcing between the metallic protection tiles and reduced plasma-wall interactions at the antenna front surface. A boron nitride septum was added at the antenna midplane to intersect electric fields resulting from radio-frequency sheath rectification, which eliminated antenna corner heating at high power levels. The current feeds to the radiating straps were reoriented from an E||B to E parallel B geometry, avoiding the empirically observed ∼15 kV/cm field limit and raising antenna voltage holding capability. Further modifications were carried out in 2002 and 2003. These included changes to the antenna current strap, the boron nitride tile mounting geometry, and shielding the BN-metal interface from the plasma. The antenna heating efficiency, power, and voltage characteristics under these various configurations will be presented

  19. Loading, absorption, and Fokker-Planck calculations for upcoming ICRF experiments on ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, T.D.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Kwon, M.

    1989-01-01

    ICRF experiments on ATF at the 100-kW level are planned for the current 1989 operating period. These plans include the 2ω/sub cH/ regime at f/sub RF/ = 28.88 MHz, D(H) at 14.44 MHz, and 4 He( 3 He) and D( 3 He) at 9.63 MHz. ECH target plasmas have n/sub eO/ /approxreverse arrowlt/ 0.15 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ and B = 0.95 T. The density and temperature profiles obtained are broader than those from 1988, owing to recent field error corrections. The values used for target-plasma parameters in the calculations were taken from initial 1989 ATF data. Loading and absorption calculations have been performed using the 3D RF heating code ORION with a helically symmetric equilibrium, and Fokker-Planck calculations were performed using the steady-state code RFTRANS with two velocity dimensions and one spatial dimension. 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. A study on the fusion reactor - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hong Young; Lee, Sun Chil; Jun, Sang Jin; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Heo, Sung Hoi; You, Kwang Il; Song, Soo Bin; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Chan Hui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate the antenna, measure t property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling, Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. The power of the plasma produced by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, the RF system`s output power is about 10 kW and frequency range is 7 {approx} 30 MHz. In the first year, a 1 kW RF preamplifier was bought. In this year, a CW 2 kW RF main amp. and RF power monitoring system was bought. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. The matching network composed of two VVC (35 kV), 100 {approx} 1000 pF match firmly up to 50 kW power. We studied the measurement method of antenna impedance theoretically, and measured power efficiency and antenna impedance in the helicon plasma. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  1. Measurement of fast minority /sub 3/He/sup + +/ energy distribution during ICRF heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Grisham, L.R.; Medley, S.S.

    A method and means for measuring the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ distribution during /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating is disclosed. The present invention involves the use of 10 to 100 keV beams of neutral helium atoms to neutralize the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ ions in a heated plasma by double charge exchange (/sub 3/He/sup + +/ + /sub 4/He/sup 0/ ..-->.. /sub 3/He/sup 0/ + /sub 4/He/sup + +/). The neutralized fast /sub 3/He/sup 0/ atoms then escape from the hot plasma confined by a magnetic field and are detected by conventional neutral particle analyzing means. This technique permits the effectiveness of the coupling of the ion cyclotron waves to the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority ions to be accurately measured. The present invention is particularly adapted for use in evaluating the effectiveness of the intermediate coupling between the RF heating and the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ in an energetic toroidal plasma.

  2. Construction of a resonant loop with the ICRF antenna for KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Young Dug; Jeong, Sung Un; Yoon, Jae Sung; Hong, Bong Geon

    2003-01-01

    The antenna of the KSTAR ICRF heating system consists of four current straps, each of which is grounded at the center, and has two coaxial ports, one at each end. The top and bottom ports of each strap are fed by one transmitter. The two ports are connected at tee connector to form a resonant loop, and the coaxial feed line from the transmitter is connected to the tee. One resonant loop with the proto-type antenna is built at the RF test stand in KAERI. It is composed with one current strap, one tee connector and two arms connecting them. Each arm consists of a 6-inch vacuum transmission line, a vacuum feed through, a part of pressurized 9-inch coaxial line, and an adjustable phase shifter to cover wide frequency range of 25-60 MHz. Total electrical length is changeable from 45 to 51 m. Many voltage probes and directional couplers are installed to measure RF voltage of the standing wave, power flow and phase difference. Resonant and matching conditions are investigated for various frequencies

  3. Recycling behaviour during long pulse discharges after ICRF boronization in the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.; Wan, B.N.; Li, J.G.; Gong, X.Z.; Zhang, X.D.; Wu, Z.W.; Zhou, Q.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of recycling behaviour has been investigated during long pulse discharges in the HT-7 tokamak after ICRF boronization (C 2 B 10 H 12 ) using the H/(H+D) ratio and the edge recycling coefficient R. After boronization, impurity reduction is observed, attributed to the fresh boron film, but the recycling coefficient can exceed unity due to a large amount of hydrogen absorbed in the film, leading to an uncontrollable density rise and discharge termination. When the H/(H+D) ratio was reduced to less than 25%, the electron density was easily controlled. The longest discharge, up to 240 s with central electron temperature T e (0) of about 1.0 keV and central electron density n e (0) of 0.8 x 10 19 m -3 , was achieved following boronization. After many discharges the effectiveness of boron film was weakened, and the density rise was correlated with an increase in both carbon and oxygen radiation which limited the duration of long pulse discharges

  4. Modelling of DC electric fields induced by RF sheath in front of ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing the ICRF (ion cyclotron range frequency) antenna-plasma interaction is one of the key points for reaching very long tokamak discharges. One problem which limits such discharges, is the appearance of hot spots on the surface of the antenna: Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths modify the properties of the edge plasma by rectifying the RF potential along open magnetic field lines and can induce hot spots. This paper investigates the corrections to sheath potentials introduced by the interactions between adjacent flux tubes. Our theoretical study started from an oscillating double Langmuir probe model, in which a transverse influx of current was included. This model was confronted with 1D PIC simulations along a magnetic field line, and demonstrated that current exchanges can decrease mean potentials. A 2D electrostatic fluid code was then developed, which couples adjacent flux tubes in a poloidal cross section with collisional conductivity or polarization currents. It showed that transverse currents are able to smooth structures smaller than a characteristic size in the sheath potential maps (results for Tore Supra). These computed rectified potentials can be used to obtain the DC electric fields in front of the antenna. And then, it gives an estimate of the particle drift and the energy flux on the antenna structure, which can explain hot spots. (author)

  5. VUV study of impurity generation during ICRF heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, H.L.

    1986-06-01

    A 2.2 meter grazing incidence VUV monochromator has been converted into a time-resolving spectrograph by the addition of a new detector system, based on a microchannel plate image intensifier linked to a 1024-element linear photodiode array. The system covers the wavelength range 15 to 1200 A (typically 40 A at a time) with resolution of up to .3 A FWHM. Time resolution is selectable down to 0.5 msec. The system sensitivity was absolutely calibrated below 150 A by a soft x-ray calibration facility. The spectrograph was installed on the Alcator C tokamak at MIT to monitor plasma impurity emission. There, cross-calibration with a calibrated EUV monochromator was performed above 400 A. Calibration results, system performance characteristics, and data from Alcator C are presented. Observations of impurity behavior are presented from a series of ICRF heating experiments (180 MHz, 50 to 400 kW) performed on the Alcator C tokamak, using graphite limiters and stainless steel antenna Faraday shields

  6. Performance of the JT-60 ICRF antenna with an open type Faraday shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, T.; Saigusa, M.; Kimura, H.; Moriyama, S.; Annoh, K.; Kawano, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Shinozaki, S.; Terakado, M.

    1992-01-01

    Performance of the JT-60 ICRF antenna in second and third harmonic heating schemes (f=120, 131 MHz) over past four years of operation is presented. The antenna is mainly composed of phased 2x2 loops, an open type Faraday shield and a metallic casing, forming a plug-in type. The antenna is operated for wide plasma parameters: anti n e =1-7x10 19 m -3 , I P =1-2.8 MA and B T =2.2-4.8 T. The open type Faraday shield shows no deterioration for impurity production and heating efficiency up to the maximum injected power of 3.1 MW (the power density of 16 MW/m 2 ) except the following particular condition. Only for (0, 0) phasing and less than 30 mm of the distance between the outermost magnetic surface and the antenna guard limiter, the radiation loss increases abruptly from ΔP rad /P IC ∝0.3 to ΔP rad /P IC ∝4 in carbon limiter discharges when the injected power exceeds a threshold value of ∝0.5 MW. Strong titanium impurity release from the Faraday shield is observed in coincidence with the increase in the radiation loss. This suggests that strong ion sputtering is induced on the Faraday shield by RF sheaths. (orig.)

  7. ICRF Wave Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2002-01-01

    Some results obtained with the one dimensional, all orders, full wave code METS, which has been successfully employed in the past to describe a number of experiments, are reported. By using massively parallel computers, this code has been extended to handle non-thermal populations. Various physical situations, in which non-Maxwellian species are expected to be encountered, are studied, such as simultaneous neutral beam injection and high harmonic fast wave electron heating or ion cyclotron resonance heating in the presence of fusion products

  8. Comparative study of fundamental and second-harmonic ICRF wave propagation and damping at high density in the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.

    1981-09-01

    Due to the versatility of the high power apparatus, the fast magnetosonic branch is used with ω 0 = 1,2,3,4 ω/sub ci/, unlike most other ICRF experiments. Unusually high magnetic field (B 0 = 40 to 80 kG), plasma density (n/sub e/ = 10 13 - 5 x 10 14 /cm 3 ), generator frequency (f 0 = 90 to 200 MHz) and transmitter power, with shielded and unshielded antennas, are the key parameters of the experiment. This wide parameter range allows a direct comparison between fundamental and second harmonic regimes, and shielded and unshielded antennas, our prime goals. The real and imaginary parts of the parallel and perpendicular wave numbers are measured with extensive magnetic probe diagnostics for a spectrum of plasma parameters and compared with theory. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the wave structure and scaling laws are derived analytically in simple geometries and computed numerically for realistic plasma parameters and profiles. General figures of merit, such as radiation resistance and quality factor, are also derived and compared with the experiment. Secondary effects of the high power wave launching, such as changes in plasma current, density, Z/sub eff/, energetic neutral flux, soft x-rays, neutron flux, and impurities are also discussed. Most important, a general synthesis of the many engineering, physics, and experimental problems and conclusions of the Alcator A ICRF program are inspected in detail. Finally, the derived and experimentally determined scaling laws and engineering constraints are used to estimate the ICRF requrements, advantages, and potential pitfalls of the next generations of experiments on the Alcator tokamaks

  9. Spatial distribution of {gamma} emissivity and fast ions during ({sup 3}He)D ICRF heating experiments on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Righi, E [Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (United Kingdom); Warrick, C [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented that can simulate the {gamma} emissivity in the poloidal cross-section during ({sup 3}He)D ICRF heated discharges in JET plasmas, by merging information obtained from the fast ion distribution and from nuclear reactions producing the observed {gamma} emissivity (production of {gamma} photons during {sup 3}He-{sup 9}Be reactions). This technique can play an important role in the identification of plasma instabilities that affect the redistribution of the fast ions in the plasma, like the TAE modes and the ripple in the tokamak magnetic field. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Development of supersonic plasma flows by use of a magnetic nozzle and an ICRF heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inutake, M.; Ando, A.; Hattori, K.; Tobari, H.; Hosokawa, Y.; Sato, R.; Hatanaka, M.; Harata, K. [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Sendai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    A high-beta, supersonic plasma flow plays a crucial role in MHD phenomena in space and fusion plasmas. There are a few experimental researches on production and control of a fast flowing plasma in spite of a growing significance in the magnetized-plasma flow dynamics. A magneto-plasma-dynamic arc-jet (MPDA) is one of promising devices to produce a supersonic plasma flow and has been utilized as an electric propulsion device with a higher specific impulse and a relatively larger thrust. We have improved the performance of an MPDA to produce a quasi-steady plasma flow with a transonic and supersonic Mach number in a highly-ionized state. There are two methods in order to control an ion-acoustic Mach number of the plasma flow exhausted from an MPDA: one is to use a magnetic Laval nozzle to convert a thermal energy to a flow energy and the other is a combined system of an ion heating and a divergent magnetic nozzle. The former is an analogous method to a compressible air flow and the latter is the method proposed in an advanced thruster for a manned interplanetary space mission. We have clarified the plasma flow characteristics in various shapes of a magnetic field configuration. It was demonstrated that the Mach number of the plasma flow could increase up to almost 3 in a divergent magnetic nozzle field. This paper reports recent results on the flow field improvements: one is on a magnetic-Laval-nozzle effects observed at the muzzle region of the MPDA, and the other is on ICRF (ion-cyclotron-range of frequency) heating of a supersonic plasma by use of a helical antenna. (authors)

  11. Plasma enhanced RF power deposition on ICRF antennas in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R.H.; Harris, J.H.; Carter, M.D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Ryan, P.M.; Beaumont, B.; Bremond, S.; Hutter, T.

    1997-01-01

    The dual-strap Tore Supra ICRF antennas have been very successful in coupling high power fluxes > 16 MW/m2 to the plasma. In many cases it has been found that the power is limited not by the voltages and currents that can be sustained on antenna components, but rather by localized increases in antenna surface temperatures which are correlated with increased impurity levels. Hot spots have been observed using an IR imaging system with peak temperatures as high as 1,100 C after 2 s, and as little as 1.5 MW power coupled from a single launcher. The maximum temperature observed is highly dependent on antenna phasing, and is lowest with dipole (π) phasing of the relative antenna currents. Both toroidal and poloidal asymmetries in hot spot distribution have been observed, and interestingly, the toroidal asymmetry has been found to vary when the phase is changed from +π/2 to -π/2. Significant differences in the temperature profiles have been seen on the two types of Faraday shield in use, which appears to be related to the fact that one type has a recessed center septum between straps while the other does not. In some cases, the peak temperature has been observed to increase as the antenna/plasma gap is increased, while the peak remains in the same location. This behavior suggests that voltages generated by currents flowing in the Faraday shield structure itself may play a role in generating potentials responsible for the hot spots, in addition to rf fields in the plasma. In this paper data on antenna surface heating and loading data as a function of plasma density, antenna/plasma gap, and phasing will be presented. Calculations from the RANT3D electromagnetic code together with bench measurements of electric fields near the antenna surface will also be shown

  12. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3He /n e = 15% - 30%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR

  13. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3 He /n e > 10%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR

  14. Full-wave current conveyor precision rectifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodan R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A circuit that provides precision rectification of small signal with low temperature sensitivity for frequencies up to 100 kHz without waveform distortion is presented. It utilizes an improved second type current conveyor based on current-steering output stage and biased silicon diodes. The use of a DC current source to bias the rectifying diodes provides higher temperature stability and lower DC offset level at the output. Proposed design of the precision rectifier ensures good current transfer linearity in the range that satisfy class A of the amplifier and good voltage transfer characteristic for low level signals. Distortion during the zero crossing of the input signal is practically eliminated. Design of the proposed rectifier is realized with standard components.

  15. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjögreen, Björn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Petersson, N. Anders [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  16. Three phase full wave dc motor decoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A three phase decoder for dc motors is disclosed which employs an extremely simple six transistor circuit to derive six properly phased output signals for fullwave operation of dc motors. Six decoding transistors are coupled at their base-emitter junctions across a resistor network arranged in a delta configuration. Each point of the delta configuration is coupled to one of three position sensors which sense the rotational position of the motor. A second embodiment of the invention is disclosed in which photo-optical isolators are used in place of the decoding transistors.

  17. Analysis of resonant fast ion distributions during combined ICRF and NBI heating with transients using neutron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Mantsinen, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Kiptily, V. G.; Nabais, F.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    ICRF heating at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of a hydrogen minority ion species also gives rise to a partial power absorption by deuterium ions at their second harmonic resonance. This paper studies the deuterium distributions resulting from such 2nd harmonic heating at JET using neutron emission spectroscopy data from the time of flight spectrometer TOFOR. The fast deuterium distributions are obtained over the energy range 100 keV to 2 MeV. Specifically, we study how the fast deuterium distributions vary as ICRF heating is used alone as well as in combination with NBI heating. When comparing the different heating scenarios, we observed both a difference in the shapes of the distributions as well as in their absolute level. The differences are most pronounced below 0.5 MeV. Comparisons are made with corresponding distributions calculated with the code PION. We find a good agreement between the measured distributions and those calculated with PION, both in terms of their shapes as well as their amplitudes. However, we also identified a period with signs of an inverted fast ion distribution, which showed large disagreements between the modeled and measured results. Resonant interactions with tornado modes, i.e. core localized toroidal alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), are put forward as a possible explanation for the inverted distribution.

  18. Reduction in 14 MeV neutron generation rate by ICRF injection in D-3He burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    The triton distribution function during ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves injection in D- 3 He plasmas is examined by solving the 2-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. Triton distribution function originally has a non-Maxwellian (tail) component around 1.01 MeV birth energy range due to D(d,p)T fusion reaction. Owing to the extension of the original tail by ICRF injection, the high-energy resonance tritons further increase, and the velocity-averaged T(d,n) 4 He fusion reaction rate coefficient, i.e. 14 MeV neutron generation rate, decreases from the values when triton is assumed to be Maxwellian. It is shown that when tritons absorb ∼1/200 of the fusion power from the waves in typical D- 3 He plasma, i.e. T=80 keV, n D =2x10 20 m -3 , τ E0 =3 sec and B=6T, the 14 MeV neutron generation rate is reduced by about ∼20% from the values for Maxwellian plasmas. (author)

  19. Validation of a 3D/1D Simulation Tool for ICRF Antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiora, R.; Lancellotti, V.; Milanesio, D.; Vecchi, G.; Kyrytsya, V.; Parisot, A.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    TOPICA is an innovative tool for the simulation of the Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) antenna systems that incorporates commercial-grade graphic interfaces into a fully 3D self-consistent description of the antenna geometry and an accurate description of the plasma; it can be considered as a 'Virtual Prototyping Laboratory' to assist the detailed design phase of the antenna system. Recent theoretical and computational advances of the TOPICA code has allowed to incorporate a CAD drawing capability of the antenna geometry, with fully 3D geometrical modeling, and to combine it with a 1D accurate plasma description that takes into account density and temperature profiles, and FLR effects; the profiles are inserted directly from measured data (when available), or specified analytically by the user. The coaxial feeding line is modeled as such; computation and visualization of relevant parameters (input scattering parameters, current and field distributions, etc.) complete the suite. The approach to the problem is based on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. The environment has been subdivided in two coupled region: the plasma region and the vacuum region. The two problems are linked self-consistently by representing the field continuity in terms of equivalent (unknown) sources. In the vacuum region all the calculations are executed in the spatial (configuration) domain, and this allows triangular-facet description of the arbitrarily shaped conductors and associated currents; in the plasma region a spectral representation of the fields is used, which allows to enter the plasma effect via a surface impedance matrix; for this reason any plasma model can be used, and at present the FELICE code has been adopted; special techniques have been adopted to increase the numerical efficiency. The TOPICA suite has been previously tested against assessed codes and against measurements of mock-ups and

  20. ICRF power-deposition profiles, heating and confinement of monster sawtooth and peaked-density profile discharges in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Taroni, A.; Ellis, J.J.; Jacquinot, J.; Start, D.F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonance heating of monster sawtooth (period greater than the energy confinement time) and pellet-fueled peaked-density profiles in limiter discharges of JET Tokamak are studied. The monster sawtooth is a characteristic JET regime which is related to fast ions generated during the minority ion heating. In the ICRF heating of peaked-density profile discharges, we find typically the T i0 is higher roughly by a factor of 2 and T e0 roughly by 35% at a fixed P TOT /n e0 when compared to non-peaked profile cases. Here, T e0 and T i0 are central electron and ion temperatures, respectively, n e0 is the central electron density and P TOT is the total input power. The ion heating is improved in the pellet case, in part, due to a higher collisionality between the background ions and the energetic minority, but more significantly by a reduction of local ion energy transport in the central region. The transport-code simulation of these discharges reveals that there is a reduction of both χ e and χ i in the central region of the plasma in the ICRF heated peaked-profile discharges where χ e and χ i are the electron and ion heat conductivities, respectively. The improvement of confinement is not explained quantitatively by any of the existing η i -driven turbulence theories as the n i parameter (η i = d ln T i /d ln n i where T i is the ion temperature and n i is the ion density), instead of dropping below the critical value, remains above it for most of the duration of the improved confinement phase. The physical mechanism(s) that plays a role in this improvement is not yet clear. (author)

  1. The Role of Combined ICRF and NBI Heating in JET Hybrid Plasmas in Quest for High D-T Fusion Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantsinen Mervi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined ICRF and NBI heating played a key role in achieving the world-record fusion yield in the first deuterium-tritium campaign at the JET tokamak in 1997. The current plans for JET include new experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T plasmas with more ITER-like conditions given the recently installed ITER-like wall (ILW. In the 2015-2016 campaigns, significant efforts have been devoted to the development of high-performance plasma scenarios compatible with ILW in preparation of the forthcoming D-T campaign. Good progress was made in both the inductive (baseline and the hybrid scenario: a new record JET ILW fusion yield with a significantly extended duration of the high-performance phase was achieved. This paper reports on the progress with the hybrid scenario which is a candidate for ITER longpulse operation (∼1000 s thanks to its improved normalized confinement, reduced plasma current and higher plasma beta with respect to the ITER reference baseline scenario. The combined NBI+ICRF power in the hybrid scenario was increased to 33 MW and the record fusion yield, averaged over 100 ms, to 2.9x1016 neutrons/s from the 2014 ILW fusion record of 2.3x1016 neutrons/s. Impurity control with ICRF waves was one of the key means for extending the duration of the high-performance phase. The main results are reviewed covering both key core and edge plasma issues.

  2. Fusion plasma theory: Task 3, Auxiliary heating in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    The research that we have accomplished during the past year (1988--1989) includes the topics of ICRF fast wave waveguide coupling to H-mode profiles simulating CIT and full wave ICRF field solutions and a power conservation relation based on fundamental principles with JET and CIT heating applications. We have also published work on Fokker-Planck simulations of minority ion ICRF strong core electron sawteeth processes in JET, a publication on the effect of plasma edge density fluctuation and ponderomotive force effects on the coupling of ion Bernstein waves and a publication on the coupling of dielectric filled waveguides to plasmas in the ICRF. The analysis of ICRF H-mode coupling is crucial to the economic success of proposed ignition devices such as CIT and ITER. We have analyzed the coupling of ICRF waveguide launchers to H-mode density profiles modelled by a pedestal width and Gaussian edge variations with gradients comparable to current machines. We find that the launcher aperture spectrum, density gradients and width of the pedestal are important parameters in determining the coupling efficiency. The launcher-plasma admittance spectrum in k y -k z space is utilized to show that the H-mode launcher reflections increase when compared to the L-mode profile, but that they can be handled by launcher matching circuits and modest modifications of the H-mode profile. We plan to analyze the recent successful JET ICRF H-mode operation utilizing our formalism. We have also carried out a full wave ICRF field solution and the associated power conservation relation with expressions evaluated up to the third harmonic. We have implemented this in a computer code which utilizes invariant imbedding to solve the system of equations. 7 refs., 1 tab

  3. Edge measurements during ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequency] heating on the PLT [Princeton Large Torus] tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Colestock, P.L.; McNeill, D.H.; Greene, G.J.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.C.; Ono, M.; Shohet, J.L.; Wilson, J.R.

    1989-04-01

    Edge measurements have been conducted on the PLT tokamak under a variety of operating conditions in order to ascertain the relevant processes at work in coupling rf power to plasmas. The edge density is found to increase significantly with the application of ICRF, and electron heating occurs in the vicinity of the Faraday shield surrounding the antenna. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that the energized antenna is a significant particle source. The relative increase of metallic impurities was found to be /approximately/2.7 times larger than the corresponding increase in deuterium. In addition, the relative increase of deuterium and impurities was /approximately/3--4 times greater at the energized antenna than at other locations around the torus. Model calculations show that for deuterium released from the Faraday shield, the D/sub α/ emission is localized radially to a region within 4 cm of the antenna. A correlation was found between the edge density and the D/sub α/ intensity that justifies its use as a measure of the particle source rate. 26 refs., 14 figs

  4. Integral equation solution for truncated slab structures by using a fringe current formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Toccafondi, A.; Maci, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full-wave solutions of truncated dielectric slab problems are interesting for a variety of engineering applications, in particular patch antennas on finite ground planes. For this application a canonical reference solution is that of a semi-infinite slab illuminated by a line source. Standard int...

  5. Progress towards RF heated steady-state plasma operations on LHD by employing ICRF heating methods and improved divertor plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.

    2008-10-01

    A long pulse plasma discharge experiment was carried out using RF heating power in the Large Helical Device (LHD), a currentless magnetic confining system. Progress in long pulse operation is summarized since the 10th experimental campaign (2006). A scaling relation of the plasma duration time to the applied RF power has been derived from the experimental data so far collected. It indicates that there exists a critical divertor temperature and consequently a critical RF heating power P RFcrit =0.65 MW. The area on the graph of the duration time versus the RF heating power was extended over the scaling relation by replacing divertor plates with new ones with better heat conductivity. The cause of the plasma collapse at the end of the long pulse operation was found to be the penetration of metal impurities. Many thin flakes consisting of heavy metals and graphite in stratified layers were found on the divertor plates and it was thought that they were the cause of impurity metals penetrating into the plasma. In a simulation involving injecting a graphite-coated Fe pellet to the plasma it was found that 230 Eμm in the diameter of the Fe pellet sphere was the critical size which led the plasma to collapse. A mode-conversion heating method was examined in place of the minority ICRF heating which has been employed in almost all the long-pulse plasma discharges. It was found that this method was much better from the viewpoint of achieving uniformity of the plasma heat load to the divertors. It is expected that P RFcrit will be increased by using the mode-conversion heating method. (author)

  6. Edge localized modes and edge pedestal in NBI and ICRF heated H, D and T-plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.; Lingertat, J.; Barnsley, R.

    1998-12-01

    Based on experiments carried out in JET in D:T mixtures varying from 100:0 to 5:95 and those carried out in hydrogen plasmas, the isotopic mass dependence of ELM parameters and the edge pedestal pressure in neutral beam (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICRF) heated H-mode plasmas is presented. The ELM frequency is found to decrease with the atomic mass number both in ICRH and NBI discharges. However, the frequency in the case of ICRH is about 8 - 10 times higher than in the NBI case. Assuming that ELMs occur at a critical edge pressure gradient, limited by the ballooning instability, the scaling of the maximum edge pressure is most consistent with the assumption that the width of the transport barrier scales as the ion poloidal Larmor radius governed by the average energy of fast ions at the edge. The critical edge pressure in NBI heated discharges increases with the isotopic mass which. is consistent with the higher deduced width of the edge transport, barrier in tritium than in deuterium and hydrogen. The critical edge pressure in ICRH discharges is smaller, presumably, due to the smaller fast-ion contribution to the edge region. As a consequence of the edge pressure scaling with isotopic mass, the edge operational space in the n e - T e diagram increases with operation in tritium. If the evidence that the edge pedestal width is governed by the average energy of fast ions in the edge prevails, the pedestal in ITER would be controlled by the slowing down energy spectrum of α-particles in the edge. (author)

  7. Numerical investigation of ICRF antenna designs and heating schemes for Alcator C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackfield, D.T.; Blackwell, B.D.

    1983-02-01

    Initially, approximately 500 kW of rf power will be launched through one port of Alcator C at a frequency of 180 to 220 MHz. We use a hot-plasma slab model to examine antenna coupling and power deposition for second harmonic (H, B 0 = 6.7 T) heating regime. The plasma medium is assumed uniform in y and z and is stratified in x. Three-dimensional, four-mode field solutions are obtained by solution of the boundary condition equations in the x direction, and by Fourier transform methods in y and z. We study the dependence of radiation resistance upon coupling parameters such as antenna width and radial position. This is interpreted in terms of the spectral (k/sub y/, k/sub z/) distribution of power, the effect of the evanescent region at the edge, and the attenuation length of the waves

  8. Kinetic theory and simulation of multi-species plasmas in tokamaks excited with ICRF microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear model for the kinetic description of tokamak plasmas. The non-linear collision and quasilinear resonant diffusion operators are represented in a form conducive to numerical solution with specific attention to the treatment of the boundary layer separating trapped and passing orbit regions of velocity space. The numerical techniques employed are detailed in so far as they constitute significant departure from those used in the conventional uniform magnetic field case. Examples are given to illustrate the combined effects of collisional and resonant diffusion

  9. Determination of ICRF antenna fields in the vicinity of a 3-D Faraday shield structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P M; Rothe, K E; Whealton, J H; Shepard, T D [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1990-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) magnetostatic analysis developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been used to calculate the electromagnetic transmission properties of representative Faraday shield designs. The analysis uses the long-wavelength approximation to obtain a 3-D Laplace solution for the magnetic scalar potential over one poloidal period of the Faraday shield, from which the complete magnetic field distribution may be obtained. Once the magnetic field distributions in the presence and absence of a Faraday shield are known, the flux transmission coefficient can be found, as well as any change in the distributed inductance of the current strap. The distrbuted capacitance of the strap can be found from an analogous 3-D electrostatic calculation, enabling the phase velocity of the slow-wave structure to be determined. Power dissipation in the shield may be estimated by equating the surface current on a perfect conductor with the surface magnetic field and using this surface current in conjunction with the finite conductivities of the shield materials to obtain the power distribution due to eddy current heating. (orig.).

  10. Field and ray analyses of antenna excitations in ICRF heating of large Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.; Lister, G.; Jacquinot, J.

    1980-09-01

    We present analytical and computational techniques for determining the electromagnetic fields and associated power flow excited by antenna systems external to large Tokamak plasmas. The finite poloidal and toroidal extension of the poloidal antenna current is modeled by a superposition of current sheets placed at a fixed radius outside the plasma. Antennae both with and without a screen between the current sheet and the plasma are considered. The plama is modeled by its cold dielectric tensor and inhomogeneous density and applied magnetic field. For large Tokamak plasmas in which the plasma dimensions are large compared to the antenna, the field excitation problem can be considered approximately in slab geometry. The field solution of this problem which we present, gives the electromagnetic fields excited in the edge plasma by the antennae and includes the effect of the cutoffs which may exist in this region. To proceed further into the plasma we consider a ray tracing analysis. Starting from an equiphase surface of the excited fields in the edge plasma, the group velocity rays can be followed in full toroidal geometry up to the cyclotron singular resonance region where the power is deposited in the particles. Both the amplitude and phase of the fields can be established in the vicinity of the angular surface so that the power deposition profile can be eventually calculated

  11. RF design and tests on a broadband, high-power coaxial quadrature hybrid applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line system for load-resilient operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Jin; Wang, Son Jong; Park, Byoung Ho; Kwak, Jong-Gu; Hillairet, Julien; Choi, Jin Joo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Amplitude balanced 3 dB coaxial hybrid splitter has been designed and rf tested. • The proposed hybrid is applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line for load resilience. • Two-section, broadband coaxial hybrid can be tunable by changing dielectric insulator. - Abstract: RF design and network analyzer tests of broadband, amplitude-balanced coaxial hybrid junctions are presented. We have designed two 3 dB hybrid splitters with 9 and 12 in. coaxial transmission lines applicable to ITER ICRF for load-resilient operations using ANSYS HFSS. Amplitude-balanced broadband responses were obtained with the combination of impedance reductions of longitudinal and transverse branches in unequal proportion, length change of 50 Ω lines and diameter change of high impedance lines connected transversely to the T-section of the hybrid splitter, respectively. We have fabricated and RF tested the 9 in. coaxial hybrid coupler. We obtained an excellent coupling flatness of −3.2 ± 0.2 dB, phase difference of 4 degrees and return loss of 16 dB in 40–55 MHz. The measured data of 9 in. hybrid splitter is highly consistent with HFSS simulations. We found that the proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be tunable with amplitude-balanced, broadband response by changing dielectric insulators to keep the inner and outer conductors of coaxial line apart. The proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be utilized for load-resilient operations in a wide range of antenna load variations due to mode transitions or edge localized modes (ELMs) in fusion plasmas.

  12. RF design and tests on a broadband, high-power coaxial quadrature hybrid applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line system for load-resilient operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Jin, E-mail: haejin@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Son Jong; Park, Byoung Ho; Kwak, Jong-Gu [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hillairet, Julien [CEA/IRFM, Saint-lez-Durance (France); Choi, Jin Joo [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Amplitude balanced 3 dB coaxial hybrid splitter has been designed and rf tested. • The proposed hybrid is applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line for load resilience. • Two-section, broadband coaxial hybrid can be tunable by changing dielectric insulator. - Abstract: RF design and network analyzer tests of broadband, amplitude-balanced coaxial hybrid junctions are presented. We have designed two 3 dB hybrid splitters with 9 and 12 in. coaxial transmission lines applicable to ITER ICRF for load-resilient operations using ANSYS HFSS. Amplitude-balanced broadband responses were obtained with the combination of impedance reductions of longitudinal and transverse branches in unequal proportion, length change of 50 Ω lines and diameter change of high impedance lines connected transversely to the T-section of the hybrid splitter, respectively. We have fabricated and RF tested the 9 in. coaxial hybrid coupler. We obtained an excellent coupling flatness of −3.2 ± 0.2 dB, phase difference of 4 degrees and return loss of 16 dB in 40–55 MHz. The measured data of 9 in. hybrid splitter is highly consistent with HFSS simulations. We found that the proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be tunable with amplitude-balanced, broadband response by changing dielectric insulators to keep the inner and outer conductors of coaxial line apart. The proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be utilized for load-resilient operations in a wide range of antenna load variations due to mode transitions or edge localized modes (ELMs) in fusion plasmas.

  13. Effects of Non-Maxwellian Plasma Species on ICRF Propagation and Absorption in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Auxiliary heating supplied by externally launched electromagnetic waves is commonly used in toroidal magnetically confined fusion experiments for profile control via localized heating, current drive and perhaps flow shear. In these experiments, the confined plasma is often characterized by the presence of a significant population of non-thermal species arising from neutral beam injection, from acceleration of the particles by the applied waves, or from copious fusion reactions in future devices. Such non-thermal species may alter the wave propagation as well as the wave absorption dynamics in the plasma. Previous studies have treated the corresponding velocity distributions as either equivalent Maxwellians, or else have included realistic distributions only in the finite Larmor radius limit. In this work, the hot plasma dielectric response of the plasma has been generalized to treat arbitrary distribution functions in the non-relativistic limit. The generalized dielectric tensor has been incorporated into a one-dimensional full wave all-orders kinetic field code. Initial comparative studies of ion cyclotron range of frequency wave propagation and heating in plasmas with nonthermal species, represented by realistic distribution functions or by appropriately defined equivalent Maxwellians, have been completed for some specific experiments and are presented

  14. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Peter C; Dallum, Gregory E; Welsh, Patrick A; Romero, Carlos E

    2013-11-19

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  15. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Peter C.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Welsh, Patrick A.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2015-09-29

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  16. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A U; Yangirov, I Z

    1982-01-01

    A clay-powder, cement, and water-base plugging solution is proposed having reduced solution viscosity characteristics while maintaining tensile strength in cement stone. This solution utilizes silver graphite and its ingredients, by mass weight, are as follows: cement 51.2-54.3%; claypowder 6.06-9.1%; silver graphite 0.24-0.33%; with water making up the remainder.

  17. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    in expression of the beta isoform. Sequencing of the entire topoisomerase IIalpha cDNA from NYH/187 cells demonstrated a homozygous G-->A point mutation at nucleotide 485, leading to a R162Q conversion in the Walker A consensus ATP binding site (residues 161-165 in the alpha isoform), this being the first drug......-selected mutation described at this site. Western blotting after incubation with ICRF-187 showed no depletion of the alpha isoform in NYH/187 cells in contrast to wild-type (wt) cells, whereas equal depletion of the beta isoform was observed in the two sublines. Alkaline elution assay demonstrated a lack...... of inhibition of etoposide-induced DNA single-stranded breaks in NYH/187 cells, whereas this inhibition was readily apparent in NYH cells. Site-directed mutagenesis in human topoisomerase IIalpha introduced into a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with a temperature-conditional yeast TOP2 mutant...

  18. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  19. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  20. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  1. Circular Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Haas, de W.; Kuikman, P.J.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Sikirica, N.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth part of this report on Circular Solutions is about the circular principle From Waste to Resource. The purpose of this study is to select promising options for the implementation of this circular principle and to elaborate these options further.

  2. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  3. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines an artifact building and evaluation proposal. Design Science Research (DSR) studies usually consider encapsulated artifact that have relationships with other artifacts. The solution prototype as a composed artifact demands for a more comprehensive consideration in its systematic...... environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven......’s research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex...

  4. Influence of the plasma profile and the antenna geometry on the matching and current distribution control of the ITER ICRF antenna array. Optimization of the decoupling-matching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A., E-mail: a.messiaen@fz-juelich.de [LPP-ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Belgian State Association, TEC Partner, CYCLE, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Swain, D. [US ITER Team, ORNL (United States); Vervier, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Grine, D. [LPP-ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Belgian State Association, TEC Partner, CYCLE, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Analysis of the matching-decoupling system of the ICRF antenna array of ITER. ► Control of the array phasing by the decouplers for the same power of power sources. ► Computation for the 2012 design status of the antenna plug. ► 7 decouplers needed but 10 can be used to decrease the ratings of components. ► Effects of plasma profile and antenna geometry. -- Abstract: The eight triplets of straps of the ITER ICRF antenna array are fed through 8 matching circuits and 4 hybrids to ensure load resilience. Decouplers are used to mitigate the effects of triplet mutual coupling. They also control the array phasing. The electrical constraints on the decouplers for different layouts with heating (H) or current drive (CD) phasing are compared starting from the TOPICA matrix computed for the last antenna plug design and the reference (most pessimistic) plasma profile “2010low” provided by IO. It is shown that this last profile provides a significant decrease of plasma coupling and increase of mutual coupling with respect to the previous reference profile “Sc2short17”. This results in a larger range of decoupler reactance X{sub dec} and voltage V{sub Xdec} needed. This range can be reduced when using 10 decouplers instead of the 7 needed for the same forward power P{sub Gk+} of the 4 power sources. For H phasing only 4 decouplers could be used but with different P{sub Gk+} (P{sub Gk+} ratio up to 1.5–2.5). For CD phasing and same plasma profile the power capability P{sub tot} is increased by 25% with a decoupler layout allowing much smaller poloidal phasing than the 90° provided by the hybrids. A decrease of the distance antenna-plasma profile reduces the normalized decoupler voltage V{sub Xdec}/√P{sub tot} with no significant change of the X{sub dec} range. The recess of the vertical septa between the strap boxes increases the plasma coupling but has the drawback of also increasing the mutual coupling between triplets: the needed range of X

  5. Nouvelles méthodes d'identification des fractures par diagraphie acoustique en full wave form New Methods of Identifying Fractures by Full Wave Form Acoustic Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les outils acoustiques de dernière génération permettent maintenant d'enregistrer l'ensemble des ondes générées par une source acoustique à l'intérieur d'une géométrie cylindrique telle qu'un puits de sondage. Le train d'onde qu'il est alors possible d'analyser se compose successivement de trois composantes majeures (l'onde de compression, de cisaillement et de Stoneley dont nous avons une représentation pour chaque position de la sonde à l'intérieur du puits. Nous présentons, dans ce texte, trois méthodes originales et rapides (calculs possibles sur le site même pour identifier, à partir du traitement de l'onde de Stoneley, les fractures ouvertes recoupées par un forage. Nous donnons, dans un premier temps, nos motivations pour le choix unique du traitement de l'onde de Stoneley pour, dans un deuxième temps, exposer les trois méthodes développées et montrer pour chacune d'entre elles une application pratique. Interest in recognizing and identifying fractures in a coherent formation for the petroleum, geothermal and storage (oil and gas, wastes sectors has led to the development of indirect prospection methods inside boreholes such as acoustic logging. The latest acoustic tools are capable of recording all waves generated by an acoustic logging tool inside a cyclindrical geometry such as a borehole. The wavetrain that can then be analyzed is successively made up of three major components (the P compression wave, the S shear wave and the Stoneley wave for which we have a representation for each position of the logging tool in the borehole. An example of a recording is shown in Fig. 1. Because of its specific features (high amplitudes, low frequency, high signal-to-noise ratio, the Stoneley wave is recognized to be a good indicator of open fractures. Therefore, we use simple digital processing to quantify the influence of fracturing on the propagation of the Stoneley wave. Three methods stemming from the digital processing of the Stoneley wave are proposed. For each of them, an application to data obtained from deep drilling illustrates their potential for use. The first method consists in quantifying, in the frequency domain, the frequency modifications of the Stoneley wave as it passes a fracture. For this we have adapted the coherency function (Fig. 2. The second method is based on an examination of the deformation of the shape of the Stoneley wave in the vicinity of or opposite fractured levels (Fig. 3. The third and last method adapts geometric inversion techniques to acoustic logging. This enables us to use the energy of the Stoneley wave (Fig. 4 to obtain attenuation logs with a maximum vertical resolution (Fig. 5. For all these methods, the vertical resolution obtained is equivalent to the displacement interval of the logging tool inside the borehole. A quick inventory of the methods normally used for detecting fractured zones has been made. The impossibility of such methods to position and assess the importance of each fracture making up a fractured zone, particularly because of low vertical resolution, shows the great contribution of the methods proposed for better identifying fractures.

  6. A Dual Egalitarian Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.; Tijs, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this note we introduce an egalitarian solution, called the dual egalitarian solution, that is the natural counterpart of the egalitarian solution of Dutta and Ray (1989).We prove, among others, that for a convex game the egalitarian solution coincides with the dual egalitarian solution for its

  7. Compressive sensing of full wave field data for structural health monitoring applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    ; however, the acquisition process is generally time-consuming, posing a limit in the applicability of such approaches. To reduce the acquisition time, we use a random sampling scheme based on compressive sensing (CS) to minimize the number of points at which the field is measured. The CS reconstruction...

  8. Full wave field recording of the vertical strain at SAFOD from local, regional and teleseismic earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Karrenbach, M. H.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The main borehole at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) contains optical fibers cemented in place in between casing strings from the surface to just below the top of the basement. The fibers are under tension of approximately 1 N and are housed in a 0.9 mm diameter stainless steel tube. Earth strain is transmitted to the fiber by frictional contact with the tube wall. One fiber has been in use as a vertical strainmeter since 2005, measuring the total strain between 9 and 740 m by laser interferometry. In June 2017 we attached an OptaSense Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) system, model ODH3.1, to a second fiber that terminates at 864 m depth. The DAS laser interrogator measures the strain over a gauge length with a set spacing between gauge intervals. For this experiment we set the gauge length to 10 m with 1 m spacing between gauges. Including the surface run of the fiber, this gives us 936 channels measuring the vertical strain at a sample interval of 0.4 msec (2500 samples/s). Continuous recording of the string produces approximately 1 TB/day. During one month of data collection, we recorded local, regional and teleseismic earthquakes. With this recording geometry, the DAS system captures the full vertical wavefield between the basement interface and free surface, revealing direct, converted and refracted waves. Both P- and S- strain waves are clearly visible in the data, even for 10 km deep earthquakes located almost directly below the well (see figure). The incident and surface reflected wavefields can be separated by frequency-wavenumber filtering due to the large-aperture and fine spatial and temporal sampling. Up- and downgoing strain waves illuminate the subsurface within the sensor array's depth range. Accurate arrival time determinations of the initial arrival phase are possible due to consistent wave forms recorded at 1 m spatial intervals that can be used for fine-scale shallow velocity model estimation.

  9. Full-Wave Analysis of Microstrip Antennas in Three-Layered Spherical Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of three-layered spherical microstrip antenna has been analyzed based on Rao-Wilton-Glisson (RWG triangular basis functions using mixed potential integral equation (MPIE. Firstly, the model of antenna and the dyadic Green’s function in spherical microstrip antennas are given at the beginning of this paper. Then, due to the infinite series convergence problem, asymptotic extraction approach is presented to accelerate the Green’s functions convergence speed when source and field points are located in the same layer and different layers. The convergence speed can be accelerated observably by using this method. Finally, in order to simplify impedance matrix elements calculation at the junction of the probe and patch, a novel division fashion of pair of triangles is adopted in this paper. The input impedance result obtained shows the validity and effectiveness of the analysis method comparing with published data.

  10. Full-wave Simulation of Doppler Reflectometry in the Presence of Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechte, C. [Institut fur Plasmaforschung, Universitat Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Doppler reflectometry is a microwave plasma diagnostic well suited for density fluctuation measurement. A meaningful interpretation of Doppler reflectometry measurements necessitates the analysis of the wave propagation in the plasma using simulations methods. While the beam path can usually be reconstructed with beam tracing methods, the modeling of the scattering process demands the use of wave simulation codes. Furthermore, in the presence of strong density fluctuations, the response from the plasma is dominated by dispersion and multiple scattering, and hence becomes non-linear. IPF-FD3D is the finite difference time domain code used to investigate the dependence of the scattering efficiency on the various plasma conditions. It uses the full set of Maxwell equations and the electron equation of motion in a cold plasma. First results in slab geometry indicate a strong dependence of the scattering efficiency on the density gradient, the incident angle, and the wave polarisation. Further complications arise with the introduction of broadband turbulent fluctuations, where additional knowledge of the radial spectrum is necessary to reconstruct the full fluctuation spectrum from Doppler reflectometry measurements. This paper presents the reconstruction of the turbulent fluctuation spectrum from simulated Doppler reflectometry measurements in slab geometry. Two cases of analytical turbulence in slab geometry are presented where the fluctuation wavenumber spectrum was recovered. It is planned to extend these investigations to X mode polarization and to supplement actual fusion experiments

  11. Full-wave Ambient Noise Tomography of Mt Rainier volcano, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Ashton; Shen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mount Rainier towers over the landscape of western Washington (USA), ranking with Fuji-yama in Japan, Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Mt Vesuvius in Italy, as one of the great stratovolcanoes of the world. Notwithstanding its picturesque stature, Mt Rainier is potentially the most devastating stratovolcano in North America, with more than 3.5 million people living beneath is shadow in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The primary hazard posed by the volcano is in the form of highly destructive debris flows (lahars). These lahars form when water and/or melted ice erode away and entrain preexisting volcanic sediment. At Mt Rainier these flows are often initiated by sector collapse of the volcano's hydrothermally rotten flanks and compounded by Mt Rainier's extensive snow and glacial ice coverage. It is therefore imperative to ascertain the extent of the volcano's summit hydrothermal alteration, and determine areas prone to collapse. Despite being one of the sixteen volcanoes globally designated by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior as warranting detailed and focused study, Mt Rainier remains enigmatic both in terms of the shallow internal structure and the degree of summit hydrothermal alteration. We image this shallow internal structure and areas of possible summit alteration using ambient noise tomography. Our full waveform forward modeling includes high-resolution topography allowing us to accuratly account for the effects of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves. Empirical Green's functions were extracted from 80 stations within 200 km of Mt Rainier, and compared with synthetic greens functions over multiple frequency bands from 2-28 seconds.

  12. Full wave simulations of fast wave mode conversion and lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, J.C.; Bonoli, P.T.; Brambilla, M.

    2004-01-01

    Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k...

  13. Kerr generalized solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A Kerr generalized solution for a stationary axially-symmetric gravitational field of rotating self-gravitational objects is given. For solving the problem Einstein equations and their combinations are used. The particular cases: internal and external Schwarzschild solutions are considered. The external solution of the stationary problem is a Kerr solution generalization. 3 refs

  14. Radiochromic liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.; Culp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A radiochromic solution which is sensitive to small dosages of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation is described. It consists of a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent with enough organic acid added to make the solution at least slightly acidic and responds to radiation by permanently changing color. Up to one half of the solution by weight can be replaced by a second solution of an aromatic solvent and an organic fluor. Another modification of the invention is a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent having an aromatic group, an organic fluor, and enough organic acid to make the solution at least slightly acidic. (author)

  15. Liquid scintillation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid scintillation solution described includes a mixture of: a liquid scintillation solvent, a primary scintillation solute, a secondary scintillation solute, a variety of appreciably different surfactants, and a dissolving and transparency agent. The dissolving and transparency agent is tetrahydrofuran, a cyclic ether. The scintillation solvent is toluene. The primary scintillation solute is PPO, and the secondary scintillation solute is dimethyl POPOP. The variety of appreciably different surfactants is composed of isooctylphenol-polyethoxyethanol and sodium dihexyl sulphosuccinate [fr

  16. Colliding black hole solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mainuddin

    2005-01-01

    A new solution of Einstein equation in general relativity is found. This solution solves an outstanding problem of thermodynamics and black hole physics. Also this work appears to conclude the interpretation of NUT spacetime. (author)

  17. PFP solution stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage

  18. Classical solutions in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baaklini, N.S.; Ferrara, S.; Nieuwenhuizen Van, P.

    1977-06-01

    Classical solutions of supergravity are obtained by making finite global supersymmetry rotation on known solutions of the field equations of the bosonic sector. The Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstoem solutions of general relativity are extended to various supergravity systems and the modification to the perihelion precession of planets is discussed

  19. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid scintillation solution is described which includes (1) a scintillation solvent (toluene and xylene), (2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO and Butyl PBD), (3) a secondary scintillation solute (POPOP and Dimethyl POPOP), (4) a plurality of substantially different surfactants and (5) a filter dissolving and/or transparentizing agent. 8 claims

  20. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  1. Proteins in solution: Fractal surfaces in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tscheliessnig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the surface of a protein in solution, as well of the interface between protein and 'bulk solution', is introduced. The experimental technique of small angle X-ray and neutron scattering is introduced and described briefly. Molecular dynamics simulation, as an appropriate computational tool for studying the hydration shell of proteins, is also discussed. The concept of protein surfaces with fractal dimensions is elaborated. We finish by exposing an experimental (using small angle X-ray scattering and a computer simulation case study, which are meant as demonstrations of the possibilities we have at hand for investigating the delicate interfaces that connect (and divide protein molecules and the neighboring electrolyte solution.

  2. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  3. Two-ion ICRF heating in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennfors, E.

    1985-03-01

    The practical consequences for tokamak plasma heating in the ion cyclotron frequency regime of the two-dimensional treatment of the two-ion mode conversion layer are analyzed. The problem of evaluation of the condition for fast wave resonance is analyzed, as well as the limitations imposed by warm plasma effects. Simple ways to find the mode conversion surfaces when they exist are presented. Also for large tokamaks, it is possible to obtain mode conversion conditions for realistic antenna spectra provided species concentration and frequency are chosen such that the surface Epsilon = 0 intersects the plasma midplane just outside of the magnetic axis. (Author)

  4. ICRF antenna and feedthrough development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Hoffman, D.J.; Owens, T.L.; Rettig, C.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The rf technology program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is highlighted. Simply stated, the objective of the program is to develop the technology for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of the fusion machines leading up to a reactor. Results from an investigation of the importance of current strap shaping in compact antenna design are presented. Designs of the Doublet III-D and Advanced Toroidal Facility compact loop launchers are described, as are the vacuum feedthroughs for the West German tokamak TEXTOR and the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U)

  5. ICRF Traveling Wave launcher for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragona, R

    2017-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive is a method that has the ability to heat directly the ions in the Deuterium-Tritrium fuel to the high temperature needed for the fusion reaction to works. The capability of efficiently couple the Radio Frequency power to the plasma plays a big role in the overall performance of a fusion device. A Traveling Wave Antenna in a resonant ring configuration is a good candidate for an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive system. It has the capability to increase the coupled power with respect to present designs and to have a highly selective power spectrum that can be peaked around the maximally absorbed wave. It is also insensitive to the loading variations due to fluctuation of the plasma edge increasing the reliability and the efficiency of the system. It works as a low power density launcher due to the possible large number of current carrying elements. (paper)

  6. ICRF antenna Faraday shield plasma sheath model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonlinear formulation that explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self-consistent manner is used in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Two models are considered that may provide significant insight into the generation of impurities for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas. In one of these models a significant sheath periodically forms next to the Faraday screen, with ion acoustic waves heating the ions in the plasma. (orig.)

  7. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Compernolle, B. van; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved

  9. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a liquid scintillation solution which contains 1) a scintillation solvent (toluol), 2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO), 3) a secondary scintillation solute (dimethyl POPOP), 4) several surfactants (iso-octyl-phenol polyethoxy-ethanol and sodium di-hexyl sulfosuccinate) essentially different from one another and 5) a filter resolution and/or transparent-making agent (cyclic ether, especially tetrahydrofuran). (HP) [de

  10. PERVASIVE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocsana Tonis (Bucea-Manea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The utility of BI solutions is accepted all over the world in the modern organizations. However, the BI solutions do not offer a constant feedback in line with the organizational activities. In this context, there have been developed pervasive BI solutions which are present at different levels of the organization, so that employees can observe only what is most relevant to their day-to-day tasks. They are organized in vertical silos, with clearly identified performance and expectations. The paper emphasizes the role of pervasive BI solutions in reaching the key performance indicators of the modern organizations, more important in the context of crisis.

  11. Solute-solute interactions in intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Debashis; Murray, Ryan; Collins, Gary S., E-mail: collins@wsu.edu [Washington State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Zacate, Matthew O. [Northern Kentucky University, Department of Physics and Geology (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Experiments were carried out on highly ordered GdAl{sub 2} samples containing extremely dilute mole fractions of{sup 111}In/Cd probe-atom solutes (about 10{sup −11}), intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} having mole fractions of order 0-10{sup −2}, and doped with Ag solutes at mole fractions of order 10{sup −2}. Three types of defect interactions were investigated. (1) Quadrupole interactions caused by Ag-solute atoms neighboring{sup 111}In/Cd solute probe atoms were detected using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays (PAC). Three complexes of pairs of In-probes and Ag-solutes occupying neighboring positions on Gd- and Al-sublattices were identified by comparing site fractions in Gd-poor and Gd-rich GdAl{sub 2}(Ag) samples and from the symmetry of the quadrupole interactions. Interaction enthalpies between solute-atom pairs were determined from temperature dependences of observed site fractions. Repulsive interactions were observed for close-neighbor complexes In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Gd} and In{sub Gd}+Ag{sub Al} pairs, whereas a slightly attractive interaction was observed for In{sub Al}+Ag{sub Al}. Interaction enthalpies were all small, in the range ±0.15 eV. (2) Quadrupole interactions caused by intrinsic antisite atoms Al{sub Gd} neighboring In{sub Gd} probes were also detected and site fractions measured as a function of temperature, as in previous work on samples not doped with Ag-solutes [Temperature- and composition-driven changes in site occupation of solutes in Gd{sub 1+3x}Al{sub 2−3x}, Zacate and Collins (Phys. Rev. B69, 174202 (1))]. However, the effective binding enthalpy between In{sub Gd} probe and Al{sub Gd} antisite was found to change sign from -0.12 eV (attractive interaction) in undoped samples to + 0.24 eV (repulsive) in Ag-doped samples. This may be attributed to an attractive interaction between Al{sub Gd} antisite atoms and Ag-dopants that competes with the attractive interaction between In{sub Gd} and Al{sub Gd

  12. Solutions of nuclear pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We give the exact solution of orbit dependent nuclear pairing problem between two nondegenerate energy levels using the Bethe ansatz technique. Our solution reduces to previously solved cases in the appropriate limits including Richardson's treatment of reduced pairing in terms of rational Gaudin algebra operators

  13. On Lovelock vacuum solution

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    We show that the asymptotic large $r$ limit of all Lovelock vacuum and electrovac solutions with $\\Lambda$ is always the Einstein solution in $d \\geq 2n+1$ dimensions. It is completely free of the order $n$ of the Lovelock polynomial indicating universal asymptotic behaviour.

  14. Rational Solutions and Lump Solutions of the Potential YTSF Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Qian; Chen, Ai-Hua

    2017-07-01

    By using of the bilinear form, rational solutions and lump solutions of the potential Yu-Toda-Sasa-Fukuyama (YTSF) equation are derived. Dynamics of the fundamental lump solution, n1-order lump solutions, and N-lump solutions are studied for some special cases. We also find some interaction behaviours of solitary waves and one lump of rational solutions.

  15. Bolting multicenter solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, Iosif [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-01-30

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  16. Thick brane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Minamitsuji, Masato; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review on thick brane solutions and related topics. Such models have attracted much attention from many aspects since the birth of the brane world scenario. In many works, it has been usually assumed that a brane is an infinitely thin object; however, in more general situations, one can no longer assume this. It is also widely considered that more fundamental theories such as string theory would have a minimal length scale. Many multidimensional field theories coupled to gravitation have exact solutions of gravitating topological defects, which can represent our brane world. The inclusion of brane thickness can realize a variety of possible brane world models. Given our understanding, the known solutions can be classified into topologically non-trivial solutions and trivial ones. The former class contains solutions of a single scalar (domain walls), multi-scalar, gauge-Higgs (vortices), Weyl gravity and so on. As an example of the latter class, we consider solutions of two interacting scalar fields. Approaches to obtain cosmological equations in the thick brane world are reviewed. Solutions with spatially extended branes (S-branes) and those with an extra time-like direction are also discussed.

  17. Professional Hadoop solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lublinsky, Boris; Yakubovich, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    The go-to guidebook for deploying Big Data solutions with Hadoop Today's enterprise architects need to understand how the Hadoop frameworks and APIs fit together, and how they can be integrated to deliver real-world solutions. This book is a practical, detailed guide to building and implementing those solutions, with code-level instruction in the popular Wrox tradition. It covers storing data with HDFS and Hbase, processing data with MapReduce, and automating data processing with Oozie. Hadoop security, running Hadoop with Amazon Web Services, best practices, and automating Hadoop processes i

  18. ERP SOLUTIONS FOR SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTUNEA MIHAELA FILOFTEIA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of activities, the business processes as well as their optimization, bring the perspective of profitable growth and create significant and competitive advantages in any company. The adoption of some ERP integrated software solutions, from SMEs’ perspective, must be considered as a very important management decision in medium and long term. ERP solutions, along with the transparent and optimized management of all internal processes, also offer an intra and inter companies collaborative platform, which allows a rapid expansion of activities towards e- business and mobile-business environments. This material introduces ERP solutions for SMEs from commercial offer and open source perspective; the results of comparative analysis of the solutions on the specific market, can be an useful aid to the management of the companies, in making the decision to integrate business processes, using ERP as a support.

  19. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  20. Conductometry of electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Lyubov P.; Kolker, Arkadii M.

    1992-09-01

    A review is given of the theories of the electrical conductance of electrolyte solutions of different ionic strengths and concentrations, and of the models of ion association. An analysis is made of the methods for mathematical processing of experimental conductometric data. An account is provided of various theories describing the dependence of the limiting value of the ionic electrical conductance on the properties of the solute and solvent. The bibliography includes 115 references.

  1. Solutions to horava gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, H; Mei, Jianwei; Pope, C N

    2009-08-28

    Recently Horava proposed a nonrelativistic renormalizable theory of gravitation, which reduces to Einstein's general relativity at large distances, and that may provide a candidate for a UV completion of Einstein's theory. In this Letter, we derive the full set of equations of motion, and then we obtain spherically symmetric solutions and discuss their properties. We also obtain solutions for the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological metric.

  2. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  3. Radiolysis of spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habersbergerova, A.; Janovsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The factors were studied affecting thiosulfate radiolysis in the so-called spray solution for nuclear power plant containments. The reaction mechanism of primary radiolytic reactions leading to thiosulfate decomposition was studied using pulse radiolysis. Also measured was hydrazine loss in the irradiation of the bubbling solution intended for the capture of volatile chemical forms of radioiodine. Pulse radiolysis was used to study the kinetics of hydrazine reaction with elemental iodine. (author)

  4. A boring solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiuk, M I; Iushkova, N E; Kozubovskii, A I

    1979-10-25

    A boring solution is being patented for boring for oil and gas, which can be used in wells, where the temperature of the circulating liquid reaches 100/sup 0/. Polyvinyl acetate emulsion (PVE) is added for the purpose of decreasing viscosity of the solution at a temperature of agression into the boring solution containing clay, water, carboxymethylcellulose (CBC), a chloride from the number of sodium, potassium, or magnesium chlorides. The solution has the following composition in %: clay, 10 to 20; CBC, 1.5 to 2.0; chloride, 5 to 20; PVE, 0.5 to 2; water, up to 100. In accordance to GOST 1000-62 for the accepted PVE, the compound has the following composition, in %: monomer, 0.8; dry residue, greater than or equal to 50; plasticizer (tributyl phthalate), 5 to 15. The boring solution is processed according to the following method. The original solution, containing clay, water, salts, receives 1.5 to 2% CBC and afterwards it is processed with 0.5 to 2% PVE.

  5. Social information solution; Shakai joho solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    An information system for government offices is developed, a system that integrally supports operations inside government offices and the staff service operations by combining Intra Net as the basis of an information system with Internet. The objective of the system is as follows: (1) Information sharing in the place of work and utilization of information resources. (2) Improvement in administrative services and vitalization of an interchange of residents through the preparation of Internet environment. (3) Rationalization of staff operations through groupeware. In addition, by building a network system for the entire region, information communication service is to be provided as a solution between the residents and the administration in the occurrence of a disaster as well as for home care, medical and nursing assistance in the health, medical and welfare fields. (translated by NEDO)

  6. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  7. Siemens IT solutions for power sector. PROFIT solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunter, P.

    2004-01-01

    The cost reduction, flexibility and revenue increase, potential exploitation, productivity increase, and business opportunities exploitation - that is all what can be required in the races for the promonent positioning on the electricity power market. These requirements can be realized by the sophisticated IT solutions hand-tailored to the special requirements of the electric power producers and tradesmen. This approach makes it possible to achieve greater profit. Our solutions 'PROFIT Solutions', that are symbiosis of the most progressive information technologies and the power plant techniques of the company Siemens, satisfy submitted specifications in substantial measure. The system solutions 'PROFIT Solutions' comprise three solution groups: process, operation a business. The solutions of the group 'IT Process Solutions' increase flexibility and manoeuvrability of equipment, improve the efficiency and contribute to more economical operation of the power generation. Solutions 'IT Process Solutions' simplify and shorten the period of power cycles and conduce to higher labour productivity. Solutions group 'IT Process Solutions' approaches equipment to the market - supports the profit strategies, helps quickly and expertly to determine and predict hazards. The extension PROFIT Cockpit means the nuance to the solutions world 'PROFIT Solutions'. The survey about the whole installation is within reach at the simple touch of a button. It is possible to compile the total system part by part from single solutions 'PROFIT Solutions'. As a matter of fact all single parts can be interconnected with already existing solutions. Routines 'PROFIT Solutions' cooperate with all modern control systems. (author)

  8. Solute segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Okamoto, P.R.; Lam, N.Q.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation at elevated temperature induces redistribution of the elements in alloys on a microstructural level. This phenomenon is caused by differences in the coupling of the various alloy constituents to the radiation-induced defect fluxes. A simple model of the segregation process based on coupled reaction-rate and diffusion equations is discussed. The model gives a good description of the experimentally observed consequences of radiation-induced segregation, including enrichment or depletion of solute elements near defect sinks such as surfaces, voids and dislocations; precipitation of second phases in solid solutions; precipitate redistribution in two-phase alloys; and effects of defect-production rates on void-swelling rates in alloys with minor solute additions

  9. Superstrings fermionic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    1990-06-01

    The solutions proposed by the superstring theory are classified and compared. In order to obtain some of the equivalences, the demonstration is based on the coincidence of the excitation spectrum and the quantum numbers from different states. The fermionic representation of the heterotical strings is discussed. The conformal invariance and the supersymmetric results extended to two dimensions are investigated. Concerning the fermionic strings, the formalism and a phenomenological solution involving three families of quarks, chiral leptons and leptons from the E 6 gauge group are presented. The equivalence between real and complex fermions is discussed. The similarity between some of the solutions of the Wess-Zumino-Witten model and the orbifolds is considered. The formal calculation program developed for reproducing the theory's low energy spectra, in the fermionic string formalism is given [fr

  10. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  11. Calculus problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Ideal for self-instruction as well as for classroom use, this text helps students improve their understanding and problem-solving skills in analysis, analytic geometry, and higher algebra. More than 1,200 problems appear in the text, with concise explanations of the basic notions and theorems to be used in their solution. Many are followed by complete answers; solutions for the others appear at the end of the book. Topics include sequences, functions of a single variable, limit of a function, differential calculus for functions of a single variable, fundamental theorems and applications of dif

  12. In Search of Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    when pursuing minor performance improvements in existing technologies. However, reliance on internal knowledge sources carries a risk of organizational inertia related to problem understanding and solution development in the shape of path-dependencies and preferences for exploitation and reapplication...... of existing knowledge. Such inertia may imbue innovation processes related to the development of new technologies with reduced novelty and an inability to recognize alternative and potentially more attractive solutions. As a result, over-reliance on internal knowledge sources is likely to inhibit the ability...

  13. Business Intelligence Integrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristescu Marian Pompiliu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Business Intelligence solution concerns the simple, real-time access to complete information about the business shown in a relevant format of the report, graphic or dashboard type in order help the taking of strategic decisions regarding the direction in which the company goes. Business Intelligence does not produce data, but uses the data produced by the company’s applications. BI solutions extract their data from ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning, CRM (Customer Relationship Management, HCM (Human Capital Management, and Retail, eCommerce or other databases used in the company.

  14. Microsoft big data solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Adam; Welch, John; Clark, Dan; Price, Christopher; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Tap the power of Big Data with Microsoft technologies Big Data is here, and Microsoft's new Big Data platform is a valuable tool to help your company get the very most out of it. This timely book shows you how to use HDInsight along with HortonWorks Data Platform for Windows to store, manage, analyze, and share Big Data throughout the enterprise. Focusing primarily on Microsoft and HortonWorks technologies but also covering open source tools, Microsoft Big Data Solutions explains best practices, covers on-premises and cloud-based solutions, and features valuable case studies. Best of all,

  15. Phenomenology of polymer solution dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillies, George D. J

    2011-01-01

    ... solutions, not dilute solutions or polymer melts. From centrifugation and solvent dynamics to viscosity and diffusion, experimental measurements and their quantitative representations are the core of the discussion...

  16. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  17. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with

  18. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  19. Aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of aspects concerning the reorientation of polymer, water and ion hydration complexes have been studied in aqueous solution of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The polymer dynamics are investigated by 1 H-PEO and 13 C-PEO nuclear relaxation experiments. 162 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  20. Weak solutions of magma equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, E.V.

    1999-01-01

    Periodic solutions in terms of Jacobian cosine elliptic functions have been obtained for a set of values of two physical parameters for the magma equation which do not reduce to solitary-wave solutions. It was also obtained solitary-wave solutions for another set of these parameters as an infinite period limit of periodic solutions in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobian elliptic functions

  1. Earnest Rutherford, the solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you did not make it to the Science & Society talk by John Campbell last week and are still wondering about the spelling of "Earnest", here is the solution: Two months after the birth of his fourth child on 30 August 1871 in Spring Grove, New Zealand, James Rutherford registered his son, who was recorded as "Earnest" in the Birth Register. Presumably the Registrar wrote the name down as it sounded and the father failed to notice the mistake when signing the Register.

  2. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  3. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  4. Solution mining economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The field of application of in-situ solution mining of uranium is described and areas of competition with open pit and underground mining identified. The influence of high interest rates and dollar inflation on present values and rate of return is shown to be minimized by low capitalization and short construction lead times typical of in-situ leaching ventures. A scheme of three major project account divisions is presented and basic parameters necessary for mine planning are listed. 1979 cost ranges and useful methods of estimation of capital and operating costs are given for the in-situ uranium mining method

  5. Total Logistic Plant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Dorcak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Total Logistics Plant Solutions, plant logistics system - TLPS, based on the philosophy of advanced control processes enables complex coordination of business processes and flows and the management and scheduling of production in the appropriate production plans and planning periods. Main attributes of TLPS is to create a comprehensive, multi-level, enterprise logistics information system, with a certain degree of intelligence, which accepts the latest science and research results in the field of production technology and logistics. Logistic model of company understands as a system of mutually transforming flows of materials, energy, information, finance, which is realized by chain activities and operations

  6. From Goods to Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakkol, Mehmet; Johnson, Mark; Raja, Jawwad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to adopt service-dominant logic (SDL) to empirically explore network configurations resulting from the provision of goods, goods and services, and solutions. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses a single, in-depth, exploratory case study in a truck manufacturer......: dyadic, triadic and tetradic. The extent to which different network actors contribute to value co-creation varies across the offerings. Research limitations/implications – This paper is based on a single, in-depth case study developed in one industrial context. Whilst this represents an appropriate...

  7. A plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gen, O P; Azhigaliyev, G K; Dodonova, S Ye; Dyaltlova, N M; Novokhatskaya, I D; Ryabova, L I

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to increase the durability of cement stone at 150 to 200C. The patent covers a plugging solution which consists of Portlandcement, sand and water. It additionally contains metal organic complexes of nitrylotrimethylphosphonic acid and organosiliconates of alkali or alkaline earth metals with the following component relationship in percent by mass: Portland cement, 42 to 43; sand, 27 to 28; metal organic complexes of nitrylotrimethylphosphonic acid, 0.01 to 1.5; organosiliconates of alkaline or alkaline earthmetals, 0.0025 to 0.375 and water, the remainder.

  8. Classical solutions and extended supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.; Fubini, S.; Furlan, G.

    1980-03-01

    The existence and properties of classical solutions for gravity coupled to matter fields have been investigated previously with the limitation to conformally flat solutions. In the search for a guiding criterion to determine the form of the coupling among the fields, one is led to consider supersymmetric theories, and the question arises whether classical solutions persist in these models. It is found that a discrepancy persists between supergravity and standard meron solutions. Owing to the appearance of the scalar field, a new set of meron solutions exists for particular Lagrangian models. In conclusion, the form of solutions in Minkowski space is discussed

  9. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  10. The Paperless Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    REI Systems, Inc. developed a software solution that uses the Internet to eliminate the paperwork typically required to document and manage complex business processes. The data management solution, called Electronic Handbooks (EHBs), is presently used for the entire SBIR program processes at NASA. The EHB-based system is ideal for programs and projects whose users are geographically distributed and are involved in complex management processes and procedures. EHBs provide flexible access control and increased communications while maintaining security for systems of all sizes. Through Internet Protocol- based access, user authentication and user-based access restrictions, role-based access control, and encryption/decryption, EHBs provide the level of security required for confidential data transfer. EHBs contain electronic forms and menus, which can be used in real time to execute the described processes. EHBs use standard word processors that generate ASCII HTML code to set up electronic forms that are viewed within a web browser. EHBs require no end-user software distribution, significantly reducing operating costs. Each interactive handbook simulates a hard-copy version containing chapters with descriptions of participants' roles in the online process.

  11. Full-Wave Analysis of Traveling-Wave Field-Effect Transistors Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Narahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear transmission lines, which define transmission lines periodically loaded with nonlinear devices such as varactors, diodes, and transistors, are modeled in the framework of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. Originally, some root-finding routine is needed to evaluate the contributions of nonlinear device currents appropriately to the temporally advanced electrical fields. Arbitrary nonlinear transmission lines contain large amount of nonlinear devices; therefore, it costs too much time to complete calculations. To reduce the calculation time, we recently developed a simple model of diodes to eliminate root-finding routines in an FDTD solver. Approximating the diode current-voltage relation by a piecewise-linear function, an extended Ampere's law is solved in a closed form for the time-advanced electrical fields. In this paper, we newly develop an FDTD model of field-effect transistors (FETs, together with several numerical examples that demonstrate pulse-shortening phenomena in a traveling-wave FET.

  12. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  13. Time-Domain Full-Wave Modeling of Nonlinear Air Breakdown in High-Power Microwave Devices and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This final report describes the effort to develop a discontinuous Galerkin time ...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1.0 SUMMARY In this report, a discontinuous Galerkin time -domain (DGTD) method is developed...public release; distribution is unlimited. [23] S. Yan, C.-P. Lin, R. R. Arslanbekov, V. I. Kolobov, and J.-M. Jin, “A discontinuous Galerkin time

  14. Full Wave Function Optimization with Quantum Monte Carlo and Its Effect on the Dissociation Energy of FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Mood, Kaveh; Lüchow, Arne

    2017-08-17

    Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations with partial and full optimization of the guide function are carried out for the dissociation of the FeS molecule. For the first time, quantum Monte Carlo orbital optimization for transition metal compounds is performed. It is demonstrated that energy optimization of the orbitals of a complete active space wave function in the presence of a Jastrow correlation function is required to obtain agreement with the experimental dissociation energy. Furthermore, it is shown that orbital optimization leads to a 5 Δ ground state, in agreement with experiments but in disagreement with other high-level ab initio wave function calculations which all predict a 5 Σ + ground state. The role of the Jastrow factor in DMC calculations with pseudopotentials is investigated. The results suggest that a large Jastrow factor may improve the DMC accuracy substantially at small additional cost.

  15. A new version of the full wave ICRH code FISIC for plasmas with non-circular flux surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-12-01

    A user's manual for a new version of the FISIC code which is now applicable to arbitrary (toroidal) geometry is presented. It contains a description of the input parameters and quantities as well of all subroutines and a list of all common blocks. (orig.)

  16. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, κ perpendicular, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the κ perpendicular upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 x 10 19 A m -2 W -1 if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons

  17. Middle Eastern solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, M.

    2001-01-01

    The need to consider the Middle East as a group of distinct countries and not as one single market and to tailor the services offered by companies is stressed. The cultures, political and social conditions, forms of the oil and gas industry in the countries making up the Middle East and their technology requirements are different and vary widely. The approach taken by Shell Global Solutions to these differences is described and illustrated with Shell's experiences in Oman and Saudi Arabia. Shell has found that Omanis are keen to work in their oil and gas industry, and to protect their country's natural environment. Saudi also have intense pride in their oil industry and here Shell supports refinery operators reduce costs while maintaining strict quality control. Shell has been selected to help Saudi Arabia develop its natural gas reserves; as part of the Core Venture 3 project, Shell will build a power desalination plant

  18. Solvent - solute interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  19. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  20. Diffusion of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xiaojing; Huang, Qi; Dharmawardhana, Chamila Chathuranga; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2018-06-01

    The properties of aqueous solutions of ionic, zwitterionic, and polar solutes are of interest to many fields. For instance, one of the many anomalous properties of aqueous solutions is the behavior of water diffusion in different monovalent salt solutions. In addition, solutes can affect the stabilities of macromolecules such as proteins in aqueous solution. Here, the diffusivities of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, tri-methylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and TMAO-urea are examined in molecular dynamics simulations. The decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of simple ions and urea can be described by a simple model in which the water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solutes are considered to diffuse at the same rate as the solutes, while the remainder of the water molecules are considered to be bulk and diffuse at almost the same rate as pure water. On the other hand, the decrease in the diffusivity of water with the concentration of TMAO is apparently affected by a decrease in the diffusion rate of the bulk water molecules in addition to the decrease due to the water molecules hydrogen bonded to TMAO. In other words, TMAO enhances the viscosity of water, while urea barely affects it. Overall, this separation of water molecules into those that are hydrogen bonded to solute and those that are bulk can provide a useful means of understanding the short- and long-range effects of solutes on water.

  1. Natural climate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscom, Bronson W.; Adams, Justin; Ellis, Peter W.; Houghton, Richard A.; Lomax, Guy; Miteva, Daniela A.; Schlesinger, William H.; Shoch, David; Siikamäki, Juha V.; Smith, Pete; Woodbury, Peter; Zganjar, Chris; Blackman, Allen; Campari, João; Conant, Richard T.; Delgado, Christopher; Elias, Patricia; Gopalakrishna, Trisha; Hamsik, Marisa R.; Herrero, Mario; Kiesecker, Joseph; Landis, Emily; Laestadius, Lars; Leavitt, Sara M.; Minnemeyer, Susan; Polasky, Stephen; Potapov, Peter; Putz, Francis E.; Sanderman, Jonathan; Silvius, Marcel; Wollenberg, Eva; Fargione, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    Better stewardship of land is needed to achieve the Paris Climate Agreement goal of holding warming to below 2 °C; however, confusion persists about the specific set of land stewardship options available and their mitigation potential. To address this, we identify and quantify “natural climate solutions” (NCS): 20 conservation, restoration, and improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands. We find that the maximum potential of NCS—when constrained by food security, fiber security, and biodiversity conservation—is 23.8 petagrams of CO2 equivalent (PgCO2e) y‑1 (95% CI 20.3–37.4). This is ≥30% higher than prior estimates, which did not include the full range of options and safeguards considered here. About half of this maximum (11.3 PgCO2e y‑1) represents cost-effective climate mitigation, assuming the social cost of CO2 pollution is ≥100 USD MgCO2e‑1 by 2030. Natural climate solutions can provide 37% of cost-effective CO2 mitigation needed through 2030 for a >66% chance of holding warming to below 2 °C. One-third of this cost-effective NCS mitigation can be delivered at or below 10 USD MgCO2‑1. Most NCS actions—if effectively implemented—also offer water filtration, flood buffering, soil health, biodiversity habitat, and enhanced climate resilience. Work remains to better constrain uncertainty of NCS mitigation estimates. Nevertheless, existing knowledge reported here provides a robust basis for immediate global action to improve ecosystem stewardship as a major solution to climate change.

  2. Location Intelligence Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, D.

    2015-01-01

    Location Intelligence (LI) means using the spatial dimension of information as a key to support business processes. This spatial dimension has to be defined by geographic coordinates. Storing these spatial objects in a database allows for attaching a 'meaning' to them, like 'current position', 'border', 'building' or 'room'. Now the coordinates represent real-world objects, which can be relevant for the measurement, documentation, control or optimization of (parameters of) business processes aiming at different business objectives. But LI can only be applied, if the locations can be determined with an accuracy (in space and time) appropriate for the business process in consideration. Therefore the first step in any development of a LI solution is the analysis of the business process itself regarding its requirements for spatial and time resolution and accuracy. The next step is the detailed analysis of the surrounding conditions of the process: Does the process happen indoor and/or outdoor? Are there moving objects? If yes, how fast are they? How does the relevant environment look like? Is technical infrastructure available? Is the process restricted by regulations? As a result, a proper Location Detection Technology (LDT) has to be chosen in order to get reliable and accurate positions of the relevant objects. At the highly challenging conditions of the business processes IAEA inspectors are working with, the chosen LDTs have to deliver reliable positioning on ''room-level'' accuracy, even if there is no location enabling infrastructure in place, the objects (people) mostly are indoors and have to work under strong regulations. The presentation will give insights into innovative LI solutions based on technologies of different LDT providers. Pros and cons of combinations of different LDT (like multi- GNSS, IMU, camera, and human interaction based positioning) will be discussed from the

  3. Solute diffusivity in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægdsmand, Mette; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Solute diffusivity in soil plays a major role in many important processes with relation to plant growth and environmental issues. Soil solute diffusivity is affected by the volumetric water content as well as the morphological characteristics of water-filled pores. The solute diffusivity in intact...

  4. Future climate. Engineering solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, J.F.; Hagedorn-Rasmussen, P.; Fonnesbech, B.

    2009-09-15

    Future Climate Engineering Solutions - Joint Report is the common output and a documentation of more than 1 year's effort by 13 engineering associations - in 12 countries - to demonstrate how technologies can combat climate change. The report consists of three parts: Summaries of 10 national climate plans and technology prospects, 5 Key Common Findings, and a Climate Call from Engineers to create a new global climate treaty. The basic assumption of the project is recognition that GHG emissions, and their concentration in the atmosphere, must be reduced to a sustainable level. The project definition of a sustainable level is equivalent to the best-case stabilisation scenario which was presented in the 4th Assessment Report (AR4) by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), whereby the global mean temperature is most likely to stabilise at 2.0-2.4 deg. C. The Future Climate website www.futureclimate.info holds more information about the project, including possibility to download project material, including the full national climate plans.

  5. Plutonium solution analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded)

  6. Simple de Sitter solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverstein, Eva

    2008-01-01

    We present a framework for de Sitter model building in type IIA string theory, illustrated with specific examples. We find metastable de Sitter (dS) minima of the potential for moduli obtained from a compactification on a product of two nil three-manifolds (which have negative scalar curvature) combined with orientifolds, branes, fractional Chern-Simons forms, and fluxes. As a discrete quantum number is taken large, the curvature, field strengths, inverse volume, and four-dimensional string coupling become parametrically small, and the de Sitter Hubble scale can be tuned parametrically smaller than the scales of the moduli, Kaluza Klein (KK), and winding mode masses. A subtle point in the construction is that although the curvature remains consistently weak, the circle fibers of the nilmanifolds become very small in this limit (though this is avoided in illustrative solutions at modest values of the parameters). In the simplest version of the construction, the heaviest moduli masses are parametrically of the same order as the lightest KK and winding masses. However, we provide a method for separating these marginally overlapping scales, and more generally the underlying supersymmetry of the model protects against large corrections to the low-energy moduli potential

  7. Plutonium solution analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded).

  8. Insight solutions are correct more often than analytic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Carola; Bricolo, Emanuela; Kounios, John; Bowden, Edward; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    How accurate are insights compared to analytical solutions? In four experiments, we investigated how participants’ solving strategies influenced their solution accuracies across different types of problems, including one that was linguistic, one that was visual and two that were mixed visual-linguistic. In each experiment, participants’ self-judged insight solutions were, on average, more accurate than their analytic ones. We hypothesised that insight solutions have superior accuracy because they emerge into consciousness in an all-or-nothing fashion when the unconscious solving process is complete, whereas analytic solutions can be guesses based on conscious, prematurely terminated, processing. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that participants’ analytic solutions included relatively more incorrect responses (i.e., errors of commission) than timeouts (i.e., errors of omission) compared to their insight responses. PMID:27667960

  9. Properties of scintillator solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, λ avg , at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, λ max , and emission λ avg values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs

  10. CEFR information management system solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Fei; Zhao Jia'ning

    2011-01-01

    Based on finished information resources planning scheme for China sodium cooled experimental fast breeder reactor and the advanced information resources management solution concepts were applied, we got the building solution of CEFR information management systems. At the same time, the technical solutions of systems structures, logic structures, physical structures, development platforms and operation platforms for information resources management system in fast breeder reactors were developed, which provided programmatic introductions for development works in future. (authors)

  11. Indium flotation from hydrometallurgical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviridov, V.V.; Mal'tsev, G.I.; Petryakova, N.K.; Gomzikov, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The principal possibility of flotation of indium small quantities (10 -4 gxion/l) is established from sulphuric-acid solutions of leaching converter dusts of the copper melting production in the form of complex compounds with sodium hexametaphosphate and cation-active nitrogen-containing surfactants. It is shown that the flotation process effectiveness is determined by the molar ratio of hexametaphosphate and collector introduced into the solution, solution oxidity and surfactant nature

  12. HGMF of 10-L solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkin, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    This test plan describes the activities associated with the High Gradient Magnetic Filtration (HGMF) of plutonium-bearing solutions (10-L). The 10-L solutions were received from Argonne National Laboratories in 1972, are highly acidic, and are considered unstable. The purpose of the testing is to show that HGMF is an applicable method of removing plutonium precipitates from solution. The plutonium then can be stored safely in a solid form

  13. Structure and dynamics of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtaki, H

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of structural and dynamic properties of solutions have provided a molecular picture of solute-solvent interactions. Although the study of thermodynamic as well as electronic properties of solutions have played a role in the development of research on the rate and mechanism of chemical reactions, such macroscopic and microscopic properties are insufficient for a deeper understanding of fast chemical and biological reactions. In order to fill the gap between the two extremes, it is necessary to know how molecules are arranged in solution and how they change their pos

  14. Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

    1996-09-01

    Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, σ MB , from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in σ MB will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of σ MB . Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software

  15. A saving solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, N

    1983-10-01

    Dr. Mujibur Rahaman, senior scientist at the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research in Bangladesh, was interviewed recently in regard to oral rehydration therapy (ORT), a simple and inexpensive way of treating the loss of essential fluids and minerals that accompanies diarrhea. According to Rahaman, ORT, developed quite a while ago, is recently gaining more publicity and wider acceptance as a menas of replacing the water and electrolytes lost during acute diarrhea attack. The standard ingredients of the ORT mixture, as it is used in Bangladesh, are 3.5 gm of sodium chloride, or common salt, 2.5 gm sodium bicarbonate, and 1 gm of potassium chloride. To this one should add either 20 gm of glucose or 40 gm of sugar. This mixture should be dissolved in 1 liter of plain drinking water. Plain sugar is good enough. How much is needed depends on the severity and the duration of diarrhea. Calculations have shown that, as a rule of thumb, a child of 10-12 kg may require little more than a liter in about 24 hours. If the child has diarrhea of sufficient severity, it may require more than a liter. If the diarrhea is prolonged, it may require 2 liters. For children who are in danger of dying from dehydration, parents are warned to be watchful because further treatment and follow-up may be required. In Bangladesh a national program is currently providing the ORT in remote rural areas. At present about 1/3 of Bangladesh is covered. The national health service is distributing the solution free of cost in the villages where they have health volunteers. Although ORT is simple to make and simple to administer, one has to exercise some degree of caution with it in order to prevent infants getting dangerous symptoms like hypernatremia. ORT makes it possible for health educators to enter into the family. It is not totally correct to say water is the main problem or causative factor in producing diarrhea. In infantile diarrhea, the cause is most often a virus. Viral

  16. Calibration of 232U solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan Valera, M. P.; Acena Berrenechea, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    A method for as certain the activity by alpha spectroscopy with semiconductor detectors, of a solution of 232U is presented. It consists of the comparison with a 233U solution activity previously measured in a gridded ionization chamber of 2π geometry. The total measurement uncertainty is about + - 0,02. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Calibration of uranium 232 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan, M.P.; Acena, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method for acertainning the activity by alpha spectroscopy with semiconductor detectors, of a solution of Uranium-232 is presented. It consists of the comparison with a Uranium-233 solution activity previously measured in a gridded ionization chamber of 2 π geometry. The total measurement uncertainty is about +- 0,02. (Author)

  18. Requirements Engineering: Solutions and Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebert, C.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Aurum, A.; Wohlin, C.

    2005-01-01

    This last chapter of the book describes solutions and trends in the discipline of RE. Starting from a wrap-up of what was presented throughout this book, it suggests a framework of requirements engineering and indicates what current solutions are available in this framework. Beyond providing a short

  19. A Wronskian of Jost solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corona-Corona, Gulmaro

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard fact that any matrix potential u=u(x) determines a family of Jost solutions whose parameter runs analytically (continuously) on the (closed) half planes, respectively, the zeros of a suitable matrix valued Wronskian of a Jost solution pair are explored

  20. Some exact Bradlow vortex solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University,Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2017-05-08

    We consider the Bradlow equation for vortices which was recently found by Manton and find a two-parameter class of analytic solutions in closed form on nontrivial geometries with non-constant curvature. The general solution to our class of metrics is given by a hypergeometric function and the area of the vortex domain by the Gaussian hypergeometric function.

  1. Exploring manufacturing solutions for SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Blichfeldt, Henrik; Bilberg, Arne

    This exploratory study provides an overview over current state of manufacturing solutions in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in region of Southern Denmark. Building on manufacturing paradigms, this paper reveals relevant aspects for the development and implementation of improving SMEs...... of manufacturing solutions, which are required to increase their competitiveness and assure sustainable growth....

  2. Thermotransport in interstitial solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel'son, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of literature data the problem of thermotransport of impurities (H, N, O, C) in interstitial solid solutions is considered. It is shown that from experimental data on the thermotransport an important parameter of dissolved atoms can be found which characterizes atom state in these solutions-enthalpy of transport

  3. Analytic solutions of hydrodynamics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggeshall, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    Many similarity solutions have been found for the equations of one-dimensional (1-D) hydrodynamics. These special combinations of variables allow the partial differential equations to be reduced to ordinary differential equations, which must then be solved to determine the physical solutions. Usually, these reduced ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. In some cases it is possible to solve these reduced equations analytically to obtain explicit solutions. In this work a collection of analytic solutions of the 1-D hydrodynamics equations is presented. These can be used for a variety of purposes, including (i) numerical benchmark problems, (ii) as a basis for analytic models, and (iii) to provide insight into more complicated solutions

  4. Whole analogy between Daniel Bernoulli solution and direct kinematics solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the relationship between the original Euler-Bernoulli's rod equation and contemporary knowledge is established. The solution which Daniel Bernoulli defined for the simplest conditions is essentially the solution of 'direct kinematics'. For this reason, special attention is devoted to dynamics and kinematics of elastic mechanisms configuration. The Euler-Bernoulli equation and its solution (used in literature for a long time should be expanded according to the requirements of the mechanisms motion complexity. The elastic deformation is a dynamic value that depends on the total mechanism movements dynamics. Mathematical model of the actuators comprises also elasticity forces.

  5. Solutions for the food processing industry; Shokuhin seizogyo solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, T; Iwami, N [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-10

    To improve quality control and maintain stable operation, the food processing industry requires problem solutions in total, including not only processing and operation control divisions but also quality control, design and production technology, and maintenance divisions. This paper describes solutions for HACCP (hazard analysis critical control point) support, quality control, and maintenance, in order to improve the quality level, ensure traceability and realize stable processing operations. (author)

  6. Analysis of the validity of the asymptotic techniques in the lower hybrid wave equation solution for reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, A.; Morini, L.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Zonca, F.

    2007-01-01

    Knowing that the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation in tokamak plasmas can be correctly described with a full wave approach only, based on fully numerical techniques or on semianalytical approaches, in this paper, the LH wave equation is asymptotically solved via the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method for the first two orders of the expansion parameter, obtaining governing equations for the phase at the lowest and for the amplitude at the next order. The nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) for the phase is solved in a pseudotoroidal geometry (circular and concentric magnetic surfaces) by the method of characteristics. The associated system of ordinary differential equations for the position and the wavenumber is obtained and analytically solved by choosing an appropriate expansion parameter. The quasilinear PDE for the WKB amplitude is also solved analytically, allowing us to reconstruct the wave electric field inside the plasma. The solution is also obtained numerically and compared with the analytical solution. A discussion of the validity limits of the WKB method is also given on the basis of the obtained results

  7. Anisotropic solutions by gravitational decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, J.; Casadio, R.; da Rocha, R.; Sotomayor, A.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the extension of isotropic interior solutions for static self-gravitating systems to include the effects of anisotropic spherically symmetric gravitational sources by means of the gravitational decoupling realised via the minimal geometric deformation approach. In particular, the matching conditions at the surface of the star with the outer Schwarzschild space-time are studied in great detail, and we describe how to generate, from a single physically acceptable isotropic solution, new families of anisotropic solutions whose physical acceptability is also inherited from their isotropic parent.

  8. Solution of the Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janik, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    We present a method of construction of a family of solutions of the Baxter equation arising in the Generalized Leading Logarithmic Approximation (GLLA) of the QCD pomeron. The details are given for the exchange of N = 2 reggeons but everything can be generalized in a straightforward way to arbitrary N. A specific choice of solutions is shown to reproduce the correct energy levels for half integral conformal weights. It is shown that the Baxter's equation must be supplemented by an additional condition on the solution. (author)

  9. Anisotropic solutions by gravitational decoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovalle, J. [Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Opava (Czech Republic); Universidad Simon Bolivar, Departamento de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Casadio, R. [Alma Mater Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Rocha, R. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Centro de Matematica, Computacao e Cognicao, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Sotomayor, A. [Universidad de Antofagasta, Departamento de Matematicas, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2018-02-15

    We investigate the extension of isotropic interior solutions for static self-gravitating systems to include the effects of anisotropic spherically symmetric gravitational sources by means of the gravitational decoupling realised via the minimal geometric deformation approach. In particular, the matching conditions at the surface of the star with the outer Schwarzschild space-time are studied in great detail, and we describe how to generate, from a single physically acceptable isotropic solution, new families of anisotropic solutions whose physical acceptability is also inherited from their isotropic parent. (orig.)

  10. Analytic Solutions and Resonant Solutions of Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmaker, Timothy Roger

    This dissertation contains two main subject areas. The first deals with solutions to the wave equation Du/Dt + a Du/Dx = 0, where D/Dt and D/Dx represent partial derivatives and a(t,x) is real valued. The question I studied, which arises in control theory, is whether solutions which are real analytic with respect to the time variable are dense in the space of all solutions. If a is real analytic in t and x, the Cauchy-Kovalevsky Theorem implies that the solutions real analytic in t and x are dense, since it suffices to approximate the initial data by polynomials. The same positive result is valid when a is continuously differentiable and independent of t. This is proved by regularization in time. The hypothesis that a is independent of t cannot be replaced by the weaker assumption that a is real analytic in t, even when it is infinitely smooth. I construct a(t,x) for which the solutions which are analytic in time are automatically periodic in time. In particular these solutions are not dense in the space of all solutions. The second area concerns the resonant interaction of oscillatory waves propagating in a compressible inviscid fluid. An asymptotic description given by Andrew Majda, Rodolfo Rosales, and Maria Schonbek (MRS) involves the genuinely nonlinear quasilinear hyperbolic system Du/Dt + D(uu/2)/Dt + v = 0, Dv/Dt - D(vv/2)/Dt - u = 0. They performed many numerical simulations which indicated that small amplitude solutions of this system tend to evade shock formation, and conjectured that "smooth initial data with a sufficiently small amplitude never develop shocks throughout a long time interval of integration.". I proved that for smooth periodic U(x), V(x) and initial data u(0,x) = epsilonU(x), v(0,x) = epsilonV(x), the solution is smooth for time at least constant times | ln epsilon| /epsilon. This is longer than the lifetime order 1/ epsilon of the solution to the decoupled Burgers equations. The decoupled equation describes nonresonant interaction of

  11. Simple Solutions for Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Dry Eye The SSF thanks J. Daniel Nelson, MD, Associate Medical Director, Specialty Care HealthPartners Medical Group & Clinics, and Professor of Ophthalmology, University of ...

  12. Soliton solutions for Q3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, James; Nijhoff, Frank; Hietarinta, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    We construct N-soliton solutions to the equation called Q3 in the recent Adler-Bobenko-Suris classification. An essential ingredient in the construction is the relationship of (Q3) δ=0 to the equation proposed by Nijhoff, Quispel and Capel in 1983 (the NQC equation). This latter equation has two extra parameters, and depending on their sign choices we get a 4-to-1 relationship from NQC to (Q3) δ=0 . This leads to a four-term background solution, and then to a 1-soliton solution using a Baecklund transformation. Using the 1SS as a guide allows us to get the N-soliton solution in terms of the τ-function of the Hirota-Miwa equation. (fast track communication)

  13. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  14. Exact cosmological solutions for MOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshan, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    We find some new exact cosmological solutions for the covariant scalar-tensor-vector gravity theory, the so-called modified gravity (MOG). The exact solution of the vacuum field equations has been derived. Also, for non-vacuum cases we have found some exact solutions with the aid of the Noether symmetry approach. More specifically, the symmetry vector and also the Noether conserved quantity associated to the point-like Lagrangian of the theory have been found. Also we find the exact form of the generic vector field potential of this theory by considering the behavior of the relevant point-like Lagrangian under the infinitesimal generator of the Noether symmetry. Finally, we discuss the cosmological implications of the solutions. (orig.)

  15. Solute carrier transporters: Pharmacogenomics research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghogho

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... This paper reviews the solute carrier transporters and highlights the fact that there is much to be learnt from .... transporters, drug targets, effect or proteins and meta- ... basolateral or apical plasma membrane of polarized cells,.

  16. Transnistria: Prospects for a Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urse, Cristian

    2007-01-01

    .... After the conclusion of the agreement that ended the armed conflict, Chisinau and Tiraspol made efforts to find a political solution, under the supervision of a negotiation mechanism that included...

  17. Anthology of dry storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allimann, Nathalie; Otton, Camille [AREVA, Paris (France)

    2012-03-15

    Around 35,000 PWR, BWR or Veer used fuel elements with various enrichment value up to 5%, various cooling time down to 2 years and various burn-ups up to 60,000 Mwd/tU are currently stored in AREVA dry storage solutions. These solutions are delivered in the United States, in Japan and in many European countries like Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Armenia and Germany. With more than 1000 dry storage solutions delivered all over the world AREVA is the leader on this market. Dealing with dry storage is not an easy task. Products have to be flexible, to be adapted to customer needs and to the national regulations which may stipulate very strict tests such as airplane crash or simulation of earthquake. To develop a dry storage solution for a foreign country means to deal with its national competent authorities. All the national competent authorities do not have the same requirements. Storage conditions may also be different.

  18. Anthology of dry storage solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allimann, Nathalie; Otton, Camille

    2012-01-01

    Around 35,000 PWR, BWR or Veer used fuel elements with various enrichment value up to 5%, various cooling time down to 2 years and various burn-ups up to 60,000 Mwd/tU are currently stored in AREVA dry storage solutions. These solutions are delivered in the United States, in Japan and in many European countries like Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Armenia and Germany. With more than 1000 dry storage solutions delivered all over the world AREVA is the leader on this market. Dealing with dry storage is not an easy task. Products have to be flexible, to be adapted to customer needs and to the national regulations which may stipulate very strict tests such as airplane crash or simulation of earthquake. To develop a dry storage solution for a foreign country means to deal with its national competent authorities. All the national competent authorities do not have the same requirements. Storage conditions may also be different

  19. Rapidly Deployable Mobile Security Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Chapter V, but Android provides default onboard encryption and it is an optional feature for removable media. Wipe the device (to scrub its stored...Mobile Data Solution Since Android has removed the ability to control mobile data, and it is unknown if a creative solution to shut this feature...down exists, then some exploration on this topic is warranted. Android removed the access to this feature under the auspices of preventing

  20. Reuse of hydroponic waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramasamy Rajesh; Cho, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Attaining sustainable agriculture is a key goal in many parts of the world. The increased environmental awareness and the ongoing attempts to execute agricultural practices that are economically feasible and environmentally safe promote the use of hydroponic cultivation. Hydroponics is a technology for growing plants in nutrient solutions with or without the use of artificial medium to provide mechanical support. Major problems for hydroponic cultivation are higher operational cost and the causing of pollution due to discharge of waste nutrient solution. The nutrient effluent released into the environment can have negative impacts on the surrounding ecosystems as well as the potential to contaminate the groundwater utilized by humans for drinking purposes. The reuse of non-recycled, nutrient-rich hydroponic waste solution for growing plants in greenhouses is the possible way to control environmental pollution. Many researchers have successfully grown several plant species in hydroponic waste solution with high yield. Hence, this review addresses the problems associated with the release of hydroponic waste solution into the environment and possible reuse of hydroponic waste solution as an alternative resource for agriculture development and to control environmental pollution.

  1. Radiolysis of Aqueous Toluene Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H C; Gustafson, R

    1971-04-15

    Aqueous toluene solutions have been irradiated with Co gamma-rays. In unbuffered solutions the various cresol isomers are formed in a total yield of 0.45, 0.87 and 0.94 molecules/100 eV absorbed energy in argon-, N{sub 2}O- and air - saturated solutions, respectively. The yields are reduced in acid (pH 3) solutions (G = 0.14, 0.14 and 0.52, respectively) but the reduction is compensated by the formation of 1,2-di-phenylethane in yields of 0.49 and 1.60 in argon- and N{sub 2}O-saturated solutions, respectively. Benzyl radicals are formed through an acid catalysed water elimination reaction from the initially formed hydroxymethylcyclohexadienyl radical. Phenyltolylmethanes, dimethylbiphenyls and partly reduced dimers are also formed during the radiolysis. Hydrogen is formed in the same yield as the molecular yield, g(H{sub 2}). Xylene isomers and benzene are formed in trace quantities. The most remarkable effects of the addition of Fe(III) ions to deaerated acid toluene solutions are the formation of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde and an increase in the yield of 1,2-diphenylethane

  2. Radiolysis of Aqueous Toluene Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H.C.; Gustafson, R.

    1971-04-01

    Aqueous toluene solutions have been irradiated with Co γ-rays. In unbuffered solutions the various cresol isomers are formed in a total yield of 0.45, 0.87 and 0.94 molecules/100 eV absorbed energy in argon-, N 2 O- and air - saturated solutions, respectively. The yields are reduced in acid (pH 3) solutions (G 0.14, 0.14 and 0.52, respectively) but the reduction is compensated by the formation of 1,2-di-phenylethane in yields of 0.49 and 1.60 in argon- and N 2 O-saturated solutions, respectively. Benzyl radicals are formed through an acid catalysed water elimination reaction from the initially formed hydroxymethylcyclohexadienyl radical. Phenyltolylmethanes, dimethylbiphenyls and partly reduced dimers are also formed during the radiolysis. Hydrogen is formed in the same yield as the molecular yield, g(H 2 ). Xylene isomers and benzene are formed in trace quantities. The most remarkable effects of the addition of Fe(III) ions to deaerated acid toluene solutions are the formation of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde and an increase in the yield of 1,2-diphenylethane

  3. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  4. Electroerosion of metal in aqueous solution for sample introduction into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, Douglas; Boileau, Michael; Reinfelds, Gundars

    2003-01-01

    When high current (1-10 A cm -2 ) is applied between two conductive samples (metals) in aqueous solution, electroerosion occurs on the surface as a result of electrolysis and possibly collisions of dissolved ions with the metal surface. The power supply for the electroerosion apparatus in this work was a modified spark source unit. Current could be varied in intervals of 2.5, 5 and 10 A in either half-wave (unipolar) or full-wave (bipolar) output. The electroeroded metal forms a colloidal suspension in aqueous solution with particle sizes of the order of 1-10 μm and possibly larger. The suspension is readily dissolved using a small amount (100 μl) of concentrated acid (HCl or HNO 3 ) prior to analysis. Electroerosion of steel and brass in aqueous solution is described both for rapid sample dissolution and as a solid sampling approach for ICP-MS. Some of the electroerosion properties described in this paper include rates of erosion as a function of gap between the conductive samples and solution conductivity. Rates of electroerosion decreased from 120 to 30 μg s -1 as the gap was increased from 2 to 5 mm. Rates of electroerosion also increased significantly from 200 to 1000 μg s -1 as the conductivity of the electroerosion solution increased from 0.01 to 0.05 M NaCl. Interfacing the electroerosion apparatus to an ICP-MS was straight forward, as no special equipment was required. Therefore, the electroerosion apparatus can be used for rapid 'on-line' sample dissolution prior to introduction into an ICP. ICP-MS time profiles of selected metals in stainless steel 308L illustrate the behavior of 52 Cr + , 55 Mn + and 60 Ni + during a typical electroerosion cycle. Aspiration of the colloidal suspension into the ICP did not appear to load the plasma significantly, however, all of the metals produced noisy signals (±10%). A glass concentric nebulizer was used without clogging, so it is likely that the heterogeneous nature of the colloidal suspension caused this effect

  5. Electroerosion of metal in aqueous solution for sample introduction into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Douglas; Boileau, Michael; Reinfelds, Gundars

    2003-07-01

    When high current (1-10 A cm -2) is applied between two conductive samples (metals) in aqueous solution, electroerosion occurs on the surface as a result of electrolysis and possibly collisions of dissolved ions with the metal surface. The power supply for the electroerosion apparatus in this work was a modified spark source unit. Current could be varied in intervals of 2.5, 5 and 10 A in either half-wave (unipolar) or full-wave (bipolar) output. The electroeroded metal forms a colloidal suspension in aqueous solution with particle sizes of the order of 1-10 μm and possibly larger. The suspension is readily dissolved using a small amount (100 μl) of concentrated acid (HCl or HNO 3) prior to analysis. Electroerosion of steel and brass in aqueous solution is described both for rapid sample dissolution and as a solid sampling approach for ICP-MS. Some of the electroerosion properties described in this paper include rates of erosion as a function of gap between the conductive samples and solution conductivity. Rates of electroerosion decreased from 120 to 30 μg s -1 as the gap was increased from 2 to 5 mm. Rates of electroerosion also increased significantly from 200 to 1000 μg s -1 as the conductivity of the electroerosion solution increased from 0.01 to 0.05 M NaCl. Interfacing the electroerosion apparatus to an ICP-MS was straight forward, as no special equipment was required. Therefore, the electroerosion apparatus can be used for rapid 'on-line' sample dissolution prior to introduction into an ICP. ICP-MS time profiles of selected metals in stainless steel 308L illustrate the behavior of 52Cr +, 55Mn + and 60Ni + during a typical electroerosion cycle. Aspiration of the colloidal suspension into the ICP did not appear to load the plasma significantly, however, all of the metals produced noisy signals (±10%). A glass concentric nebulizer was used without clogging, so it is likely that the heterogeneous nature of the colloidal suspension caused this effect.

  6. Electroerosion of metal in aqueous solution for sample introduction into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltz, Douglas E-mail: dgoltz@uwinnipeg.ca; Boileau, Michael; Reinfelds, Gundars

    2003-07-18

    When high current (1-10 A cm{sup -2}) is applied between two conductive samples (metals) in aqueous solution, electroerosion occurs on the surface as a result of electrolysis and possibly collisions of dissolved ions with the metal surface. The power supply for the electroerosion apparatus in this work was a modified spark source unit. Current could be varied in intervals of 2.5, 5 and 10 A in either half-wave (unipolar) or full-wave (bipolar) output. The electroeroded metal forms a colloidal suspension in aqueous solution with particle sizes of the order of 1-10 {mu}m and possibly larger. The suspension is readily dissolved using a small amount (100 {mu}l) of concentrated acid (HCl or HNO{sub 3}) prior to analysis. Electroerosion of steel and brass in aqueous solution is described both for rapid sample dissolution and as a solid sampling approach for ICP-MS. Some of the electroerosion properties described in this paper include rates of erosion as a function of gap between the conductive samples and solution conductivity. Rates of electroerosion decreased from 120 to 30 {mu}g s{sup -1} as the gap was increased from 2 to 5 mm. Rates of electroerosion also increased significantly from 200 to 1000 {mu}g s{sup -1} as the conductivity of the electroerosion solution increased from 0.01 to 0.05 M NaCl. Interfacing the electroerosion apparatus to an ICP-MS was straight forward, as no special equipment was required. Therefore, the electroerosion apparatus can be used for rapid 'on-line' sample dissolution prior to introduction into an ICP. ICP-MS time profiles of selected metals in stainless steel 308L illustrate the behavior of {sup 52}Cr{sup +}, {sup 55}Mn{sup +} and {sup 60}Ni{sup +} during a typical electroerosion cycle. Aspiration of the colloidal suspension into the ICP did not appear to load the plasma significantly, however, all of the metals produced noisy signals ({+-}10%). A glass concentric nebulizer was used without clogging, so it is likely that the

  7. Radiolysis of Aqueous Benzene Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H

    1964-05-15

    Aerated and deaerated aqueous solutions of benzene have been irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. The products of radiolysis in deaerated, unbuffered or acid, solutions were phenol, biphenyl, hydrogen and in acid solutions also hydrogen peroxide with the following yields: G(phenol) = 0. 37 (0. 37), G(biphenyl) = 1.3 (1.7), G(H{sub 2}) = 0.44 (0. 43) and G(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) = 0 (0.60), the figures in brackets giving the results for acid solutions. The results are shown to agree with the conclusion that k(e{sup -}{sub aq} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) >> k(H + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Furthermore, the results indicate that a competition takes place between the reactions: 2 C{sub 6}H{sub 6}OH {center_dot} -> dimer -> biphenyl. C{sub 6}H{sub 7} {center_dot} + C{sub 6}H{sub 6}OH {center_dot} -> dimer -> biphenyl. The yields in aerated, unbuffered or acid, solutions were: G(phenol) = 2.1 (2.3), G(biphenyl) = 0 (0), and G(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) = 2.2 (3.1), the figures in brackets being valid for acid solutions. The ratio k(H + C{sub 6}H{sub 6})/k(H + O{sub 2}) was 1.4x10{sup -2}. The results indicate that peroxides, or more probably hydroperoxides, take part in the reactions. After the addition of Fe{sup 2+} or Fe{sup 3+} to aerated acid solutions G(phenol) was increased to 6.6 and 3.4 respectively. Oxygen was consumed more rapidly in the presence of Fe. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Solute-matrix and Solute-Solute Interactions during Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Sea Buckthorn Leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, SI (2012), s. 1682-1691 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2012 and 15th Conference PRES 2012 /20./. Prague, 25.08.2012-29.08.2012] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * sea buckthom leaves * solute-solute interaction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  9. Solidification of radioactive aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, Hideaki; Kato, Kiyoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1970-09-07

    A process for solidifying a radioactive waste solution is provided, using as a solidifying agent a mixture of calcined gypsum and burnt vermiculite. The quantity ratio of the mixture is preferred to be 1:1 by volume. The quantity of impregnation is 1/2 of the volume of the total quantity of the solidifying agent. In embodiments, 10 liters of plutonium waste solution was mixed with a mixture of 1:1 calcined gypsum and burnt vermiculite contained in a 20-liter cylindrical steel container lined with asphalt. The plutonium waste solution from the laboratory was neutralized with a caustic soda aqueous solution to prevent explosion due to the nitration of organic compounds. The neutralization is not always necessary. A market available dental gypsum was calcined at 400 to 500/sup 0/C and a vermiculite from Illinois was burnt at 1,100/sup 0/C to prepare the agents. The time required for the impregnation with 10 liters of plutonium solution was four minutes. After impregnation, the temperature rose to 40/sup 0/C within 30 minutes to one hour. Next, it was cooled to room temperature by standing for 3-4 hours. Solidification time was about 1 hour. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Insitute had treated and disposed about 1,000 tons of plutonium waste by this process as of August 19, 1970.

  10. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-08-31

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  11. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  12. Plagiarism Detection by Online Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-01-01

    The problem of plagiarism represents one of the burning issues of the modern scientific world. Detection of plagiarism is a problem that the Editorial Board encounters in their daily work. Software solutions represent a good solution for the detection of plagiarism. The problem of plagiarism will become most discussed topic of the modern scientific world, especially due to the development of standard measures, which rank the work of one author. Investment in education, education of young research personnel about the importance of scientific research, with paying particular attention on ethical behavior, becomes an imperative of academic staff. Editors have to invest additional effort in the development of the base of reviewers team as well as in their proper guidance, because after all, despite the software solutions, they are the best weapon to fight plagiarism. Peer review process should be a key of successful operation of each journal.

  13. Device for analyzing a solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, Joseph.

    1978-01-01

    The device enables a solution containing an antigen to be analyzed by the radio-immunology technique without coming up against the problems of antigen-antibody complex and free antigen separation. This device, for analyzing a solution containing a biological compound capable of reacting with an antagonistic compound specific of the biological compound, features a tube closed at its bottom end and a component set and immobilized in the bottom of the tube so as to leave a capacity between the bottom of the tube and its lower end. The component has a large developed surface and is so shaped that it allows the solution to be analyzed to have access to the bottom of the tube; it is made of a material having some elastic deformation and able to take up a given quantity of the biological compound or of the antagonistic compound specific of the biological compound [fr

  14. Analytical Solution of Multicompartment Solute Kinetics for Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Korohoda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide an exact solution for variable-volume multicompartment kinetic models with linear volume change, and to apply this solution to a 4-compartment diffusion-adjusted regional blood flow model for both urea and creatinine kinetics in hemodialysis. Methods. A matrix-based approach applicable to linear models encompassing any number of compartments is presented. The procedure requires the inversion of a square matrix and the computation of its eigenvalues λ, assuming they are all distinct. This novel approach bypasses the evaluation of the definite integral to solve the inhomogeneous ordinary differential equation. Results. For urea two out of four eigenvalues describing the changes of concentrations in time are about 105 times larger than the other eigenvalues indicating that the 4-compartment model essentially reduces to the 2-compartment regional blood flow model. In case of creatinine, however, the distribution of eigenvalues is more balanced (a factor of 102 between the largest and the smallest eigenvalue indicating that all four compartments contribute to creatinine kinetics in hemodialysis. Interpretation. Apart from providing an exact analytic solution for practical applications such as the identification of relevant model and treatment parameters, the matrix-based approach reveals characteristic details on model symmetry and complexity for different solutes.

  15. Solution chemistry and separation of metal ions in leached solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, J.

    1991-01-01

    The method to presume a dissolved state of metal ions in an aqueous solution and the technology to separate and concentrate metal ions in a leached solution are described in this paper. It is very important for the separation of metal ions to know the dissolved state of metal ions. If we know the composition of an aqueous solution and the stability constants of metal-ligand complexes, we can calculate and estimate the concentration of each species in the solution. Then, we can decide the policy to separate and concentrate metal ions. There are several methods for separation and purification; hydroxide precipitation method, sulfide precipitation method, solvent extraction method and ion exchange resin method. Solvent extraction has been used in purification processes of copper refinery, uranium refinery, platinum metal refinery and rare earth metal refinery. Fundamental process of solvent extraction, a kind of commercial extractants, a way of determining a suitable extractant and an equipment are discussed. Finally, it will be emphasized how the separation of rare earths is improved in solvent extraction. (author) 21 figs., 8 tabs., 8 refs

  16. Fundamental solutions of singular SPDEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selesi, Dora

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fundamental solutions of linear SPDEs are constructed. → Wick-convolution product is introduced for the first time. → Fourier transformation maps Wick-convolution into Wick product. → Solutions of linear SPDEs are expressed via Wick-convolution with fundamental solutions. → Stochastic Helmholtz equation is solved. - Abstract: This paper deals with some models of mathematical physics, where random fluctuations are modeled by white noise or other singular Gaussian generalized processes. White noise, as the distributional derivative od Brownian motion, which is the most important case of a Levy process, is defined in the framework of Hida distribution spaces. The Fourier transformation in the framework of singular generalized stochastic processes is introduced and its applications to solving stochastic differential equations involving Wick products and singularities such as the Dirac delta distribution are presented. Explicit solutions are obtained in form of a chaos expansion in the Kondratiev white noise space, while the coefficients of the expansion are tempered distributions. Stochastic differential equations of the form P(ω, D) ◊ u(x, ω) = A(x, ω) are considered, where A is a singular generalized stochastic process and P(ω, D) is a partial differential operator with random coefficients. We introduce the Wick-convolution operator * which enables us to express the solution as u = s*A ◊ I ◊(-1) , where s denotes the fundamental solution and I is the unit random variable. In particular, the stochastic Helmholtz equation is solved, which in physical interpretation describes waves propagating with a random speed from randomly appearing point sources.

  17. Study of liquids and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    A critical review of what has been achieved on the structure of liquids and solutions and the capabilities and developments of neutron scattering in this domain, are presented. A great variety of simple to complex systems has been investigated with the aim of obtaining a full microscopic description of the structure. Selected examples demonstrate the neutron scattering determination of interaction potentials, intermolecular structures and partial structure factors of complex systems. The isotopic substitution method is illustrated by the application to the study of the solvation of ions in aqueous and non aqueous solutions. (author). 9 figs., 32 refs

  18. Schwarzschild Solution: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusiak, Marcia

    2016-03-01

    While eighteenth-century Newtonians had imagined a precursor to the black hole, the modern version has its roots in the first full solution to Einstein's equations of general relativity, derived by the German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild on a World War I battlefront just weeks after Einstein introduced his completed theory in November 1915. This talk will demonstrate how Schwarzschild's solution is linked to the black hole and how it took more than half a century for the physics community to accept that such a bizarre celestial object could exist in the universe.

  19. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryn, John N [Naperville, IL; Daniels, Edward J [Orland Park, IL; Krumdick, Greg K [Crete, IL

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  20. Magnetic Half-Monopole Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Rosy; Lim, Kok-Geng; Koh, Pin-Wai

    2009-01-01

    We present exact SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole solutions of one half topological charge. These non-Abelian solutions possess gauge potentials which are singular along either the positive or the negative z-axis and common magnetic fields that are singular only at the origin where the half-monopole is located. These half-monopoles are actually a half Wu-Yang monopole and they can possess a finite point electric charge and become half-dyons. They do not necessarily satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and they possess infinite energy density at r = 0.

  1. Teaching sustainable solutions in engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stig Irving; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Ejlertsen, Marina

    2015-01-01

    's study lines. The objectives of the course 'Sustainability in engineering solutions', is for the participants to understand the basic concept of sustainability and its three dimensions (people, profit, planet), as well as to analyse problems and synthesise solutions that are sustainable throughout...... their life cycle. The course runs over a full time 3-week period and employs project-based learning with several sub-projects/-problems. This paper takes an in-depth discussion of the considerations concerning how to teach such a complicated subject to students of widely differing backgrounds, and reflects...

  2. Fluid mechanics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Spurk, Joseph H

    1997-01-01

    his collection of over 200 detailed worked exercises adds to and complements the textbook Fluid Mechanics by the same author, and illustrates the teaching material through examples. In the exercises the fundamental concepts of Fluid Mechanics are applied to obtaining the solution of diverse concrete problems, and in doing this the student's skill in the mathematical modeling of practical problems is developed. In addition, 30 challenging questions without detailed solutions have been included, and while lecturers will find these questions suitable for examinations and tests, the student himself can use them to check his understanding of the subject.

  3. Crystal Nucleation of Tolbutamide in Solution: Relationship to Solvent, Solute Conformation, and Solution Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglinski, Jacek; Kuhs, Manuel; Khamar, Dikshitkumar; Hegarty, Avril C; Devi, Renuka K; Rasmuson, Åke C

    2018-04-03

    The influence of the solvent in nucleation of tolbutamide, a medium-sized, flexible and polymorphic organic molecule, has been explored by measuring nucleation induction times, estimating solvent-solute interaction enthalpies using molecular modelling and calorimetric data, probing interactions and clustering with spectroscopy, and modelling solvent-dependence of molecular conformation in solution. The nucleation driving force required to reach the same induction time is strongly solvent-dependent, increasing in the order: acetonitrilenucleation difficulty is a function of the strength of solvent-solute interaction, with emphasis on the interaction with specific H-bonding polar sites of importance in the crystal structure. A clear exception from this rule is the most difficult nucleation in toluene despite the weakest solvent-solute interactions. However molecular dynamics modelling predicts that tolbutamide assumes an intramolecularly H-bonded conformation in toluene, substantially different from and more stable than the conformation in the crystal structure, and thus presenting an additional barrier to nucleation. This explains why nucleation in toluene is the most difficult and why the relatively higher propensity for aggregation of tolbutamide molecules in toluene solution, as observed with FTIR spectroscopy, does not translate into easier nucleation. Thus, our combined experimental and molecular modelling study suggests that the solvent can influence on the nucleation not only via differences in the desolvation but also through the influence on molecular conformation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Numerical Asymptotic Solutions Of Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical algorithms derived and compared with classical analytical methods. In method, expansions replaced with integrals evaluated numerically. Resulting numerical solutions retain linear independence, main advantage of asymptotic solutions.

  5. Siemens IT solutions for power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunter, P.

    2004-01-01

    The cost reduction, flexibility and revenue increase, potential exploitation, productivity increase, and business opportunities exploitation - that is all what can be required in the races for the promonent positioning on the electricity power market. These requirements can be realized by the sophisticated IT solutions hand-tailored to the special requirements of the electric power producers and tradesmen. This approach makes it possible to achieve greater profit. Our solutions 'PROFIT Solutions', that are symbiosis of the most progressive information technologies and the power plant techniques of the company Siemens, satisfy submitted specifications in substantial measure. The system solutions 'PROFIT Solutions' comprise three solution groups: process, operation a business. The solutions of the group 'IT Process Solutions' increase flexibility and manoeuvrability of equipment, improve the efficiency and contribute to more economical operation of the power generation. Solutions 'IT Process Solutions' simplify and shorten the period of power cycles and conduce to higher labour productivity. Solutions group 'IT Process Solutions' approaches equipment to the market - supports the profit strategies, helps quickly and expertly to determine and predict hazards. The extension PROFIT Cockpit means the nuance to the solutions world 'PROFIT Solutions'. The survey about the whole installation is within reach at the simple touch of a button. It is possible to compile the total system part by part from single solutions 'PROFIT Solutions'. As a matter of fact all single parts can be interconnected with already existing solutions. Routines 'PROFIT Solutions' cooperate with all modern control systems. (author)

  6. Some new radiating Kerr-Newman solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, L.K.; Singh, Tajinder; Koppar, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Three exact non-static solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations corresponding to a field of flowing null radiation plus an electromagnetic field are presented. These solutions are non-static generalizations of the well known Kerr-Newman solution. The current vector is null in all the three solutions. These solutions are the electromagnetic generalizations of the three generalized radiating Kerr solutions discussed by Vaidya and Patel. The solutions discussed here describe the exterior gravitational fields of rotating radiating charged bodies. Many known solutions are derived as particular cases. (author). 12 refs

  7. Business value of solution architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, R.; Dedene, G.; Maes, R.; Proper, E.; Harmsen, F.; Dietz, J.L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The theory and especially the practice of IT architecture have been developed quite vigorously the last years. However, hardly any quantitative data about the value of IT architecture is available. This paper presents the results of a study, which measures the value of IT solution architecture for

  8. COMPOSITE SOLUTIONS IN RAILROAD ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilova Marina Ivanovna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Present-day methods of recovery of used wooden railway ties, including burial, chemical neutralization, gasification and subsequent burning, utilization in the capacity of composite materials, are expensive and unsafe for the environment. The authors propose a new method of their utilization. Ash generated in the course of their burning may replace a portion of cement in composite solutions and act as an additive to grouting mortars designated for the filling of the annulus space of manifold tunnels. The chemical composition of the ash was identified by the x-ray method applied to three samples taken during various periods of time from out of a dry-type dust collector. The level of human health/environmental hazard of the ash is based on its chemical composition. Changes in the rheological properties of composite solutions that contained concrete fractions, various ratios of ash, and 5% of liquid glass were studied in the course of the research. The experiments have proven that in the event of replacement of 20% of cement by ash, the strength of the composite solution is approximately the same as the one of the benchmark sample; therefore, this ash content ratio is deemed acceptable. The finding demonstrate that the ash has no toxic effect, and the ecological safety of this solution is thus confirmed. The authors have proven that 20% of cement may be replaced by the ash generated in the course of burning of waste railway ties.

  9. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  10. Negative energy solutions and symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidharth, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the negative energy solutions of the Dirac (and Klein–Gordon) equation, which become relevant at very high energies in the context of the Feshbach–Villars formulation, and study several symmetries which follow therefrom. Significant consequences are briefly examined. (author)

  11. Scorpion toxins prefer salt solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nikouee, A.; Khabiri, Morteza; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 11 (2015), 287/1-287/14 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : ionic solutions * molecular dynamics * nonaqueous media * secondary structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2015

  12. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  13. A pyramid solution at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the Kiev '92 competition to find a solution to the problem of containing the stricken Chernobyl unit 4, the PPROTECTOR proposal, put forward by a British-led international consortium, ranked fifth after the first round of judging. It made extensive use of advanced CAD techniques. (Author)

  14. Solution chemistry of lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ , luminescence intensity measurements, potentiometric titrations, differential absorption spectroscopy, and spectroscopic titrations were all used to study the binding of lanthanide ions by serine and threonine. At low pH (3.0 to 6.0) the complexes are mononuclear and ligand is only weakly bound. In the pH interval of 6.0 to 8.5 stronger interaction takes place between the ligand and the metal (with possible coordination of the undissociated hydroxyl group), and self-association of complexes becomes important. Above pH 8.5, base hydrolysis of the complexes leads to highly associated species in solution and shortly above this pH an insoluble precipitate is formed. It was found that energy could be transferred from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ more efficiently among complexes prepared from racemic ligands than in complexes made from resolved ligand, but this stereoselectivity was only observed at pH values greater than 6.5 and in solutions having a 1:10 ratio of metal-to-ligand. No stereoselectivity was found in solutions having 1:5 ratios, and this observation was explained by the existence of 1:2 metal-ligand complexes existing in solutions having the higher ratio of metal-to-ligand (only 1:1 complexes are then found at lower ratios of metal-to-ligand). (author)

  15. Hospitality lighting solutions communication framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanch, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Hospitality customers are looking for systems that involve more than just turning the light on and off. They want lighting solutions that are energy-efficient, flexible and that will help enhance the guest experience. Based on on-going research about the impact that light can have in different

  16. Looking to nature for solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Will R.

    2018-01-01

    Completely stopping fossil fuel use may not be enough to avoid dangerous climate change. Recent research on the mitigation potential of conservation, restoration, and improved land management demonstrates that natural solutions can reduce emissions and remove atmospheric CO2 while safeguarding food security and biodiversity.

  17. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  18. Statistical mechanics of protein solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically thermodynamic properties of spherical globular proteins in aqueous solution with added monovalent salt. We show how one can determine an effective interaction potential between the proteins from experimental data as a function of salt concentration and we apply this to the

  19. CERN single sign on solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormancey, E

    2008-01-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his Active Directory group membership can be checked before allowing access to a specific web page

  20. Designing Hyper-V solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Grover, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at IT admins, consultants, and architects alike who wish to deploy, manage, and maintain Hyper-V solutions in organizations of various sizes. You are expected to have a working knowledge of managing Windows Server and a fair understanding of networking and storage concepts.

  1. Climate Change. Solutions for Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, T.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Karoly, D.; Lowe, I.; McMichael, T.; Mitchell, C.; Pearman, G.; Scaife, P.; Reynolds, A. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    The Australian Climate Group was convened in late 2003 by WWF Australia and the Insurance Australia Group (IAG) in response to the increasing need for action on climate change in Australia. This group proposes a set of solutions to lower the risk that climate change will reach a dangerous level.

  2. Archival storage solutions for PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunn, Timothy

    1997-05-01

    While they are many, one of the inhibitors to the wide spread diffusion of PACS systems has been robust, cost effective digital archive storage solutions. Moreover, an automated Nearline solution is key to a central, sharable data repository, enabling many applications such as PACS, telemedicine and teleradiology, and information warehousing and data mining for research such as patient outcome analysis. Selecting the right solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, configuration architecture and flexibility, subsystem availability and reliability, security requirements, system cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, strategic fit and more.This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on storage system throughput will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, high cost storage devices to high capacity, low cost storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive. The concept of access density will also be introduced and applied to the selection of the most cost effective archive solution.

  3. Solution properties of hydrophobically modified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested nine hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides with molecular weights situated between 1.58 and 0.89 × 106 g/mol for enhanced oil recovery applications. Their solution properties were investigated in the distilled water, brine solution, formation water and sea water. Their critical association concentrations were determined from the relationship between their concentrations and the corresponding apparent viscosities (ηapp at 30 °C at shear rate 6 s−1. They were between 0.4 and 0.5 g/dl. The brine solutions of 0.5 g/dl of HM-PAMs were investigated at different conditions regarding their apparent viscosities. Such conditions were mono and divalent cations, temperature ranging from 30 to 90 °C, the shear rate ranging from 6 to 30 s−1 and the aging time for 45 days. The surface and interfacial tensions for the HM-PAMs were measured for concentration range from 0.01 to 1 g/dl brine solutions at 30 °C and their emulsification efficiencies were investigated for 7 days. The discrepancy in the properties and efficiencies of the tested copolymers was discussed in the light of their chemical structure.

  4. Solutions of Einstein's field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Y [Utsunomiya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1978-12-01

    In this paper the author investigates the Einstein's field equations of the non-vacuum case and generalizes the solution of Robertson-Walker by the three dimensional Einstein spaces. In Section 2 the author shortly generalizes the dynamic space-time of G. Lemetre and A. Friedmann by a simple transformation.

  5. Fundamental solutions in piezoelectricity. Penny-shaped crack solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyka, Ewa; Rogowski, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    The problem of electroelasticity for piezoelectric materials is considered. For axially symmetric states three potentials are introduced, which determine the displacements, the electric potentials, the stresses, the components of the electric field vector and the electric displacements in a piezoelectric body. These fundamental solutions are utilized to solve the penny-shaped crack problem. Two cases of boundary-value problems are considered, namely the permeable and impermeable crack boundary conditions. Exact solutions are obtained for elastic and electric fields. The main results are the stress intensity factor for singular stress and the electric displacement intensity factor. The numerical results are presented graphically to show the influence of applied mechanical and electrical loading on the analyzed quantities and to clarify the effect of anisotropy of piezoelectric materials. It is show that the influence of anisotropy of the materials on these fields is significant

  6. Compacton solutions and multiple compacton solutions for a continuum Toda lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xinghua; Tian Lixin

    2006-01-01

    Some special solutions of the Toda lattice model with a transversal degree of freedom are obtained. With the aid of Mathematica and Wu elimination method, more explicit solitary wave solutions, including compacton solutions, multiple compacton solutions, peakon solutions, as well as periodic solutions are found in this paper

  7. ICRF Faraday shield plasma sheath physics: The Perkins paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Using a 2-D nonlinear formulation which considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self consistent manner, progress is indicated in the modeling of the ion motion for a Perkins embodiment. Ambiguities in the formulation are also indicated, the resolution of which will provide significant insight into the impurities generation for ICRH antennas. 6 refs., 3 figs

  8. Optimization of the FAST ICRF antenna using TOPICA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorba, M.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating is one of the most important auxiliary heating systems in most plasma confinement experiments. Because of this, the need for very accurate design of ion cyclotron (IC) launchers has dramatically grown in recent years. Furthermore, a reliable simulation tool is a crucial request in the successful design of these antennas, since full testing is impossible outside experiments. One of the most advanced and validated simulation codes is TOPICA, which offers the possibility to handle the geometrical level of detail of a real antenna in front of an accurately described plasma scenario. Adopting this essential tool made possible to reach a refined design of ion cyclotron radio frequency antenna for the FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) experiment . Starting from a streamlined antenna model and then following well-defined refinement procedures, an optimized launcher design in terms of power delivered to plasma has been finally achieved. The computer-assisted geometry refinements allowed an increase in the performances of the antenna and notably in power handling: the extent of the gained improvements were not experienced in the past, essentially due to the absence of predictive tools capable of analyzing the detailed effects of antenna geometry in plasma facing conditions. Thus, with the help of TOPICA code, it has been possible to comply with the FAST experiment requirements in terms of vacuum chamber constraints and power delivered to plasma. Once an antenna geometry was optimized with a reference plasma profile, the analysis of the performances of the launcher has been extended with respect to two plasma scenarios. Exploiting all TOPICA features, it has been possible to predict the behavior of the launcher in real operating conditions, for instance varying the position of the separatrix surface. In order to fulfil the analysis of the FAST IC antenna, the study of the RF potentials, which depend on the parallel electric field computation, has been carried out with an exceptional level of detail. Finally, in order to provide a more general overview of the antenna performances, two IC launchers have been simulated to determine their mutual influence, achieving an optimum degree of knowledge about the relevant features of the ion cyclotron heating system inside the FAST tokamak.

  9. Measurements of low energy neutral hydrogen efflux during ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Ruzic, D.; Voss, D.E.

    1984-09-01

    Using the Low Energy Neutral Atom Spectrometer, measurements were made of the H 0 and D 0 efflux from PLT during ion cyclotron heating experiments. The application of rf power at frequencies appropriate to fundamental and 2nd-harmonic heating results in a rapid, toroidally uniform rise in the charge-exchange efflux at a rate of about 10 15 cm -2 s -1 MW -1 . This flux increase is larger at lower plasma currents. The cause of this flux and its impact on plasma behavior are discussed

  10. Effects of Radial Electric Fields on ICRF Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.C.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Equilibrium considerations infer that large localized radial electric fields are associated with internal transport barrier structures in tokamaks and other toroidal magnetic confinement configurations. In this paper, the effects of an equilibrium electric field on fast magnetosonic wave propagation are considered in the context of a cold plasma model

  11. ICRF waveguide couplers. Progress report, February 1983-Aug 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1983-08-01

    Calculations were made for the reflection coefficient from a dielectric loaded TE 10 waveguide operating at 54.8 MHz to a plasma with a prescribed density profile. Optimum waveguide proportions are determined to minimize reflections and the proper match point for a coaxial feed to match the system is determined. Future plans call for fabrication and field measurements of a prototype design and the design of an all metal launcher

  12. Integrated Predictive Models for ICRF-Edge Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel A. D'Ippolito

    2005-01-01

    The coupling of radiofrequency waves to the edge plasma of a fusion device produces strong nonlinear interactions with the plasma and surrounding material walls which must be controlled in order to protect the antenna and to obtain efficient heating of the core plasma. The goal of the STTR project was to develop the first quantitative numerical simulation of this problem. This report describes the results of the Phase I work by Lodestar and ORNL on this project

  13. Investigation of energy confinement during ICRF heating on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qin, C. M.; Cheng, Y.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yang, H.; Yuan, S.; Wang, L.; Ju, S. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhang, J. H.; Wang, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Qian, J. P.; Zhang, T.; Li, J. G.; Song, Y. T.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R. J.; Wukitch, S.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.

    2017-09-01

    A summary is given on recent experiments in L-mode with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas on EAST. Experiments show a degradation of confinement with increasing power. Furthermore, the energy confinement time increases with plasma current and magnetic field, whereas it is insensitive to line averaged density. Minority heating has been found to be efficient, and parameters were optimized to maximize its efficiency. ICRH in lower hybrid waves heated plasma was also investigated.

  14. Damping mechanisms and heating scenarii in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Lapierre, Y.

    1980-09-01

    A wave damping and heating model is presented. It permits to treat a wide range of plasma parameters and complex ion species composition. Applied to JET parameters, two selected wave scenarii are found to allow a great flexibility, in particular with respect to complex gas composition. A major results is the possibility of single pass absorption

  15. Resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The majority of these calculations neglect the fact that gyrocenters experience the inhomogeneity via their motion parallel to the magnetic field. The non-local effects of rotational transform and toroidicity can play a significant role in both the propagation and the absorption physics. In strongly driven systems, wave damping can distort the particle distribution function supporting the wave and this produces changes in the absorption. The most common approach is to use Maxwellian absorption rates. We have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element; these data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field

  16. Collision broadened resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1985-08-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The authors have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element. These data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. Collisions affect the absorption of rf energy by two quite distinct processes: In addition to the usual relaxation towards the Maxwellian distribution creating velocity gradients which drive quasilinear diffusion, collisions also affect the wave-particle resonance through the mechanism of gyro-phase diffusion. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field

  17. The plasma facing components of the Tore Supra ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, B.; Agarici, G.; Gauthier, E.; Kuus, H.; Schlosser, J.

    1994-01-01

    Two generations of Faraday shields for the Tore Supra ICRH antennas interacting with the edge plasma are presented. The last one, using a film of boron carbide as protective material performs well, proving the relevance of this technique for in vessel equipment submitted to low power fluxes. The different lateral protections used on Tore Supra are submitted to high power fluxes. Finite element calculations allow to assess their performances. One type, using Boron Carbide, can be used to measure the local heat flux. The estimation of this flux confirm the specificity of the edge/RF interaction, which is more than one order of magnitude above the exponential decay observed in ohmic plasmas. (author) 11 refs.; 1 fig

  18. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  19. Automatic validation of numerical solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with ``Automatic Validation of Numerical Solutions''. The basic theory of interval analysis and self-validating methods is introduced. The mean value enclosure is applied to discrete mappings for obtaining narrow enclosures of the iterates when applying these mappings...... differential equations, but in this thesis, we describe how to use the methods for enclosing iterates of discrete mappings, and then later use them for discretizing solutions of ordinary differential equations. The theory of automatic differentiation is introduced, and three methods for obtaining derivatives...... are described: The forward, the backward, and the Taylor expansion methods. The three methods have been implemented in the C++ program packages FADBAD/TADIFF. Some examples showing how to use the three metho ds are presented. A feature of FADBAD/TADIFF not present in other automatic differentiation packages...

  20. Dynamic viscosity of polymer solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterlin, A

    1982-03-01

    The dynamic viscosity investigation of solutions of long chain polymers in very viscous solvents has definitely shown the existence of the low and high frequency plateau with the gradual transition between them. In both extreme cases the extrapolation of the measured Newtonian viscosities of the plateaus to the infinite dilution yields the limiting intrinsic viscosities. Such a behavior is expected from the dynamic intrinsic viscosity of the necklace model of the linear polymer with finite internal viscosity. The plateau at low frequency shows up in any model of polymer solution. This work shows the constant dynamic intrinsic viscosity in both extreme cases is well reproducible by the necklace model with the internal viscosity acting only between the beads on the same link. 20 references.