WorldWideScience

Sample records for ice age fluids

  1. Fluid dynamics of planetary ices

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The role of water ice in the solar system is reviewed from a fluid-dynamical point of view. On Earth and Mars, water ice forms ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers at the surface, which show glacial flow under their own weight. By contrast, water ice is a major constituent of the bulk volume of the icy satellites in the outer solar system, and ice flow can occur as thermal convection. The rheology of polycrystalline aggregates of ordinary, hexagonal ice Ih is described by a power law, different forms of which are discussed. The temperature dependence of the ice viscosity follows an Arrhenius law. Therefore, the flow of ice in a planetary environment constitutes a thermo-mechanically coupled problem; its model equations are obtained by inserting the flow law and the thermodynamic material equations in the balance laws of mass, momentum and energy. As an example of gravity-driven flow, the polar caps of Mars are discussed. For the north-polar cap, large-scale flow velocities of the order of 0.1...1 mm/a are likely...

  2. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  3. EASE-Grid Sea Ice Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides weekly estimates of sea ice age for the Arctic Ocean from remotely sensed sea ice motion and sea ice extent. The ice age data are derived from...

  4. Defining the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Paasche

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The "Little Ice Age" (LIA is possibly the best-documented climatic anomaly of the past. A wide range of datasets portrays a harsh climate that worsened living conditions, primarily in terms of cooler temperatures, for people across Europe sometime during the last millennium. Regardless of the vast amount of data covering the LIA, there is presently no consensus concerning its spatial manifestation (was it regional or global?, its temporal constraints (when did it start and end?, or the broad-scale dynamics associated with it (what mechanisms did it involve?, although there is no shortage of suggestions. Based on a new compilation of data reflecting atmospheric circulation at both high and low latitudes, we show that the LIA lasted for roughly 400 years (∼1400–1800 AD. During this period at least four major atmospheric circulation systems on Earth co-varied on decadal to centennial timescales: Northern Annular Mode (NAM, Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO and West African Monsoon (WAM. This pattern of convergence suggests that a strong coupling between these circulation systems was an important pre-condition for the realisation of the LIA.

  5. Aerodynamic Effects Of Deicing And Anti-Icing Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents results of wind-tunnel tests of aerodynamic effects of deicing and anti-icing fluids on airplane wings. Tests conducted on three-dimensional half-model airplane and two-dimensional airfoil model at temperatures ranging from -29 to +10 degrees C. Fluids used included three commercial fluids available for use during 1987-1988 winter season, one discontinued commercial fluid, and eight newer fluids experimental at time of test.

  6. Ice Detector and Deicing Fluid Effectiveness Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ice detector and deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring system for an aircraft is disclosed. The ice detection portion is particularly suited for use in flight to notify the flight crew of an accumulation of ice on an aircraft lifting and control surfaces, or helicopter rotors, whereas the deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring portion is particularly suited for use on the ground to notify the flight crew of the possible loss of the effectiveness of the deicing fluid. The ice detection portion comprises a temperature sensor and a parallel arrangement of electrodes whose coefficient of coupling is indicative of the formation of the ice, as well as the thickness of the formed ice. The fluid effectiveness monitoring portion comprises a temperature sensor and an ionic-conduction cell array that measures the conductivity of the deicing fluid which is indicative of its concentration and, thus, its freezing point. By measuring the temperature and having knowledge of the freezing point of the deicing fluid, the fluid effectiveness monitoring portion predicts when the deicing fluid may lose its effectiveness because its freezing point may correspond to the temperature of the ambient.

  7. Using Sea Ice Age as a Proxy for Sea Ice Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Tschudi, M. A.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the beginning of the modern satellite record starting in October 1978, the Arctic sea ice cover has been shrinking, with the largest changes observed at the end of the melt season in September. Through 2013, the September ice extent has declined at a rate of -14.0% dec-1, or -895,300 km2 dec-1. The seven lowest September extents in the satellite record have all occurred in the past seven years. This reduction in ice extent is accompanied by large reductions in winter ice thicknesses that are primarily explained by changes in the ocean's coverage of multiyear ice (MYI). Using the University of Colorado ice age product developed by J. Maslanik and C. Fowler, and currently produced by M. Tschudi we present recent changes in the distribution of ice age from the mid 1980s to present. The CU ice age product is based on (1) the use of ice motion to track areas of sea ice and thus estimate how long the ice survives within the Arctic, and (2) satellite imagery of sea ice concentration to determine when the ice disappears. Age is assigned on a yearly basis, with the age incremented by one year if the ice survives summer melt and stays within the Arctic domain. Age is counted from 1 to 10 years, with all ice older than 10 years assigned to the "10+" age category. The position of the ice is calculated on weekly time steps on NSIDC's 12.5-km EASE-grid. In the mid-1980s, MYI accounted for 70% of total winter ice extent, whereas by the end of 2012 it had dropped to less than 20%. This reflects not only a change in ice type, but also a general thinning of the ice pack, as older ice tends to be thicker ice. Thus, with older ice being replaced by thinner first-year ice, the ice pack is more susceptible to melting out than it was in 1980's. It has been suggested that ice age may be a useful proxy for long-term changes in ice thickness. To assess the relationship between ice age and thickness, and how this may be changing over time, we compare the ice age fields to several

  8. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  9. Improved method for sea ice age computation based on combination of sea ice drift and concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosov, Anton; Rampal, Pierre; Lavergne, Thomas; Aaboe, Signe

    2017-04-01

    Sea Ice Age is one of the components of the Sea Ice ECV as defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) [WMO, 2015]. It is an important climate indicator describing the sea ice state in addition to sea ice concentration (SIC) and thickness (SIT). The amount of old/thick ice in the Arctic Ocean has been decreasing dramatically [Perovich et al. 2015]. Kwok et al. [2009] reported significant decline in the MYI share and consequent loss of thickness and therefore volume. Today, there is only one acknowledged sea ice age climate data record [Tschudi, et al. 2015], based on Maslanik et al. [2011] provided by National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) [http://nsidc.org/data/docs/daac/nsidc0611-sea-ice-age/]. The sea ice age algorithm [Fowler et al., 2004] is using satellite-derived ice drift for Lagrangian tracking of individual ice parcels (12-km grid cells) defined by areas of sea ice concentration > 15% [Maslanik et al., 2011], i.e. sea ice extent, according to the NASA Team algorithm [Cavalieri et al., 1984]. This approach has several drawbacks. (1) Using sea ice extent instead of sea ice concentration leads to overestimation of the amount of older ice. (2) The individual ice parcels are not advected uniformly over (long) time. This leads to undersampling in areas of consistent ice divergence. (3) The end product grid cells are assigned the age of the oldest ice parcel within that cell, and the frequency distribution of the ice age is not taken into account. In addition, the base sea ice drift product (https://nsidc.org/data/docs/daac/nsidc0116_icemotion.gd.html) is known to exhibit greatly reduced accuracy during the summer season [Sumata et al 2014, Szanyi, 2016] as it only relies on a combination of sea ice drifter trajectories and wind-driven "free-drift" motion during summer. This results in a significant overestimate of old-ice content, incorrect shape of the old-ice pack, and lack of information about the ice age distribution within the grid cells. We

  10. Why could ice ages be unpredictable?

    CERN Document Server

    Crucifix, Michel

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the variations of Earth's orbit and obliquity control the timing of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. Evidence comes from power spectrum analysis of palaeoclimate records and from inspection of the timing of glacial and deglacial transitions. However, we do not know how tight this control is. Is it, for example, conceivable that random climatic fluctuations could cause a delay in deglaciation, bad enough to skip a full precession or obliquity cycle and subsequently modify the sequence of ice ages? To address this question, seven previously published conceptual models of ice ages are analysed by reference to the notion of generalised synchronisation. Insight is being gained by comparing the effects of the astronomical forcing with idealised forcings composed of only one or two periodic components. In general, the richness of the astronomical forcing allows for synchronisation over a wider range of parameters, compared to periodic forcing. Hence, glacial cycles may conceivabl...

  11. Why could ice ages be unpredictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crucifix

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that the variations of Earth's orbit and obliquity control the timing of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. Evidence comes from power spectrum analysis of palaeoclimate records and from inspection of the timing of glacial and deglacial transitions. However, we do not know how tight this control is. Is it, for example, conceivable that random climatic fluctuations could cause a delay in deglaciation, bad enough to skip a full precession or obliquity cycle and subsequently modify the sequence of ice ages?

    To address this question, seven previously published conceptual models of ice ages are analysed by reference to the notion of generalised synchronisation. Insight is being gained by comparing the effects of the astronomical forcing with idealised forcings composed of only one or two periodic components. In general, the richness of the astronomical forcing allows for synchronisation over a wider range of parameters, compared to periodic forcing. Hence, glacial cycles may conceivably have remained paced by the astronomical forcing throughout the Pleistocene.

    However, all the models examined here also show a range of parameters for which the structural stability of the ice age dynamics is weak. This means that small variations in parameters or random fluctuations may cause significant shifts in the succession of ice ages if the system were effectively in that parameter range. Whether or not the system has strong structural stability depends on the amplitude of the effects associated with the astronomical forcing, which significantly differ across the different models studied here. The possibility of synchronisation on eccentricity is also discussed and it is shown that a high Rayleigh number on eccentricity, as recently found in observations, is no guarantee of reliable synchronisation.

  12. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  13. Why could ice ages be unpredictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crucifix

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that the variations of Earth's orbit and obliquity control the timing of Pleistocene glacial–interglacial cycles. Evidence comes from power spectrum analysis of palaeoclimate records and from inspection of the timing of glacial and deglacial transitions. However, we do not know how tight this control is. Is it, for example, conceivable that random climatic fluctuations could cause a delay in deglaciation, bad enough to skip a full precession or obliquity cycle and subsequently modify the sequence of ice ages? To address this question, seven previously published conceptual models of ice ages are analysed by reference to the notion of generalised synchronisation. Insight is being gained by comparing the effects of the astronomical forcing with idealised forcings composed of only one or two periodic components. In general, the richness of the astronomical forcing allows for synchronisation over a wider range of parameters, compared to periodic forcing. Hence, glacial cycles may conceivably have remained paced by the astronomical forcing throughout the Pleistocene. However, all the models examined here show regimes of strong structural dependence on parameters. This means that small variations in parameters or random fluctuations may cause significant shifts in the succession of ice ages. Whether the actual system actually resides in such a regime depends on the amplitude of the effects associated with the astronomical forcing, which significantly differ across the different models studied here. The possibility of synchronisation on eccentricity is also discussed and it is shown that a high Rayleigh number on eccentricity, as recently found in observations, is no guarantee of reliable synchronisation.

  14. Arctic sea ice thickness changes in terms of sea ice age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Haibo; FU Min; SUN Ke; LIU Yilin; XU Xiuli; HUANG Haijun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, changes in Arctic sea ice thickness for each ice age category were examined based on satellite observations and modelled results. Interannual changes obtained from Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat)-based results show a thickness reduction over perennial sea ice (ice that survives at least one melt season with an age of no less than 2 year) up to approximately 0.5–1.0 m and 0.6–0.8 m (depending on ice age) during the investigated winter and autumn ICESat periods, respectively. Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS)-based results provide a view of a continued thickness reduction over the past four decades. Compared to 1980s, there is a clear thickness drop of roughly 0.50 m in 2010s for perennial ice. This overall decrease in sea ice thickness can be in part attributed to the amplified warming climate in north latitudes. Besides, we figure out that strongly anomalous southerly summer surface winds may play an important role in prompting the thickness decline in perennial ice zone through transporting heat deposited in open water (primarily via albedo feedback) in Eurasian sector deep into a broader sea ice regime in central Arctic Ocean. This heat source is responsible for enhanced ice bottom melting, leading to further reduction in ice thickness.

  15. Explosive ice age diversification of kiwi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T; Haddrath, Oliver; Robertson, Hugh A; Colbourne, Rogan M; Baker, Allan J

    2016-09-20

    Molecular dating largely overturned the paradigm that global cooling during recent Pleistocene glacial cycles resulted in a burst of species diversification although some evidence exists that speciation was commonly promoted in habitats near the expanding and retracting ice sheets. Here, we used a genome-wide dataset of more than half a million base pairs of DNA to test for a glacially induced burst of diversification in kiwi, an avian family distributed within several hundred kilometers of the expanding and retracting glaciers of the Southern Alps of New Zealand. By sampling across the geographic range of the five kiwi species, we discovered many cryptic lineages, bringing the total number of kiwi taxa that currently exist to 11 and the number that existed just before human arrival to 16 or 17. We found that 80% of kiwi diversification events date to the major glacial advances of the Middle and Late Pleistocene. During this period, New Zealand was repeatedly fragmented by glaciers into a series of refugia, with the tiny geographic ranges of many kiwi lineages currently distributed in areas adjacent to these refugia. Estimates of effective population size through time show a dramatic bottleneck during the last glacial cycle in all but one kiwi lineage, as expected if kiwi were isolated in glacially induced refugia. Our results support a fivefold increase in diversification rates during key glacial periods, comparable with levels observed in classic adaptive radiations, and confirm that at least some lineages distributed near glaciated regions underwent rapid ice age diversification.

  16. On the origin of the ice ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ice sheet dynamics provide a possible explanation for the 100 kyr power in climatic records. Some numerical experiments presented here show that even the transition from an essentially ice-free earth to a glacial can be produced by a northern hemisphere ice-sheet model, provided that a slow general

  17. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Petr, Martin; Mallick, Swapan; Fernandes, Daniel; Furtwängler, Anja; Haak, Wolfgang; Meyer, Matthias; Mittnik, Alissa; Nickel, Birgit; Peltzer, Alexander; Rohland, Nadin; Slon, Viviane; Talamo, Sahra; Lazaridis, Iosif; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Schiffels, Stephan; Skoglund, Pontus; Derevianko, Anatoly P.; Drozdov, Nikolai; Slavinsky, Vyacheslav; Tsybankov, Alexander; Cremonesi, Renata Grifoni; Mallegni, Francesco; Gély, Bernard; Vacca, Eligio; González Morales, Manuel R.; Straus, Lawrence G.; Neugebauer-Maresch, Christine; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Constantin, Silviu; Moldovan, Oana Teodora; Benazzi, Stefano; Peresani, Marco; Coppola, Donato; Lari, Martina; Ricci, Stefano; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Valentin, Frédérique; Thevenet, Corinne; Wehrberger, Kurt; Grigorescu, Dan; Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Flas, Damien; Semal, Patrick; Mannino, Marcello A.; Cupillard, Christophe; Bocherens, Hervé; Conard, Nicholas J.; Harvati, Katerina; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Drucker, Dorothée G.; Svoboda, Jiří; Richards, Michael P.; Caramelli, David; Pinhasi, Ron; Kelso, Janet; Patterson, Nick; Krause, Johannes; Pääbo, Svante; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. We analyze genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000-7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3–6% to around 2%, consistent with natural selection against Neanderthal variants in modern humans. Whereas the earliest modern humans in Europe did not contribute substantially to present-day Europeans, all individuals between ~37,000 and ~14,000 years ago descended from a single founder population which forms part of the ancestry of present-day Europeans. A ~35,000 year old individual from northwest Europe represents an early branch of this founder population which was then displaced across a broad region, before reappearing in southwest Europe during the Ice Age ~19,000 years ago. During the major warming period after ~14,000 years ago, a new genetic component related to present-day Near Easterners appears in Europe. These results document how population turnover and migration have been recurring themes of European pre-history. PMID:27135931

  18. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  19. Case Study of an Ice Sensor using Computational Fluid Dynamics, Measurements and Pictures - Boundary displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Sørensen, Henrik; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    This paper presents an icing model developed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). One key part part of the model development is the surface boundary displacement due to the accumulated mass of ice. The paper presents the development of a boundary layer displacement method to be included...... in the CFD icing model using ANSYS-FLUENT....

  20. RECOVERY FROM THE LITTLE ICE AGE: GEOTHERMAL EVIDENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gornostayeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied geothermal method for paleoclimatic reconstruction of the ground surface temperature history during the Little Ice Age and contemporary warming. We analyzed 83 borehole temperature profiles and estimated warming amplitudes and warming start dates after the Little Ice Age. The studied boreholes are situated in the Urals and Eastern Europe (Finland, Ukraine, and Belarus. Our investigation shows high degree of spatial variability of climatic changes in 18–19 centuries. Spatial distribution of amplitudes of paleoclimatic changes and warming start date testifies that warming following after the Little Ice Age was in progress in several steps and for different regions it started at different times.

  1. Palaeoclimate simulation of Little Ice Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian; CHEN Xing; WANG Sumin; ZHENG Yiqun

    2004-01-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA) is a typical cold climate period in global scope with a profound impact upon human society. In this study, a coupled global atmospheric circulation model including the land processes (AGCM + SSiB) is used to perform the simulation of LIA climate. Under the control of solar radiation reduction mechanism, the decrease of temperature is more obvious in summer than in winter; meanwhile, there is regional difference in the change of winter temperature. But the temperature decrease is the main characteristic of the annual mean temperature. Volcanic dust has an evident effect on the winter temperature decrease, but to a less extent than the solar radiation. The synchronous function caused by the reduction of solar radiation and the increase of optic depth of volcanic dust has a superposed strengthening effect on the temperature decrease in large regions. Promotion of the vegetation cover rate profits the increase of temperature, and vise versa. Certain decrease of solar radiation will favor the increase of summer monsoon precipitation in East Asia. The increase of optic depth of volcanic dust does not have a significant effect on the annual precipitation in most parts of Eurasian continent. The composite effect of the decrease of solar radiation and the increase of volcanic dust makes the summer monsoon precipitation in East China increase, and that in South Asia decrease. Together with vegetation change, the result shows that precipitation increases with the increase of vegetation coverage (e.g. East Asia), and when the vegetation coverage reduces (e.g. North Africa) the precipitation will decrease, too.

  2. Amplification of European Little Ice Age by sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Flavio; Born, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~950-1250 AD) to the Little Ice Age (~1400-1700 AD) is believed to have been driven by an interplay of external forcing and climate system-internal variability. While the hemispheric signal seems to have been dominated by solar irradiance and volcanic eruptions, the understanding of mechanisms shaping the climate on continental scale is less robust. Examining an ensemble of transient model simulations as well as a new type of sensitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth, we identify a sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism that amplifies the Little Ice Age cooling in the North Atlantic-European region and produces the temperature pattern expected from reconstructions. Initiated by increasing negative forcing, the Arctic sea ice substantially expands at the beginning of the Little Ice Age. The excess of sea ice is exported to the subpolar North Atlantic, where it melts, thereby weakening convection of the ocean. As a consequence, northward ocean heat transport is reduced, reinforcing the expansion of the sea ice and the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. In the Nordic Seas, sea surface height anomalies cause the oceanic recirculation to strengthen at the expense of the warm Barents Sea inflow, thereby further reinforcing sea ice growth in the Barents Sea. The absent ocean-atmosphere heat flux in the Barents Sea results in an amplified cooling over Northern Europe. The positive nature of this feedback mechanism enables sea ice to remain in an expanded state for decades to centuries and explain sustained cold periods over Europe such as the Little Ice Age. Support for the feedback mechanism comes from recent proxy reconstructions around the Nordic Seas.

  3. Siple Dome ice reveals two modes of millennial CO2 change during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jinho; Brook, Edward J

    2014-04-29

    Reconstruction of atmospheric CO2 during times of past abrupt climate change may help us better understand climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. Previous ice core studies reveal simultaneous increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature during times when Greenland and the northern hemisphere experienced very long, cold stadial conditions during the last ice age. Whether this relationship extends to all of the numerous stadial events in the Greenland ice core record has not been clear. Here we present a high-resolution record of atmospheric CO2 from the Siple Dome ice core, Antarctica for part of the last ice age. We find that CO2 does not significantly change during the short Greenlandic stadial events, implying that the climate system perturbation that produced the short stadials was not strong enough to substantially alter the carbon cycle.

  4. 500,000-year temperature record challenges ice age theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, K. Mitchell

    1994-01-01

    Just outside the searing heat of Death Valley lies Devils Hole (fig. 1), a fault-created cave that harbors two remnants of the Earth's great ice ages. The endangered desert pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) has long made its home in the cave. A 500,000-year record of the planet's climate that challenges a widely accepted theory explaining the ice ages also has been preserved in Devils Hole.

  5. Self-consistent ice-sheet properties: ice dynamics, temperature, accumulation, delta-age and chronologies for ice cores and radar isochrones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, J.; Waddington, E. D.; Conway, H.

    2011-12-01

    Ice sheet behavior has not previously been modeled to force self-consistency, to determine histories of accumulation, temperature, and ice dynamics that incorporate the ice-age/gas-age offset (delta-age) and sparse depth-age measurements from ice cores. An iterative scheme is used to combine several modular components into one self-consistent model. The goal is to determine a suite of histories constrained by the depth-age data from ice cores and ice radar that are part of a physically self-consistent ice sheet. The model is tested using a synthetic data set resembling WAIS divide. Using synthetic data provides proof of concept that histories of accumulation, temperature and ice dynamics can be recovered by the self-consistent model, and that the depth-age from ice cores and ice radar can be matched. Results from synthetic data show we can recover the ice-sheet properties used to generate the data and we can improve the depth-age chronologies by interpolating with an ice-flow model where data are sparse. When this self-consistent model can be applied to field data, results will (1) improve chronologies for ice cores and radar layers, (2) determine histories of accumulation for GCM modelling, and (3) improve estimates of past ice sheet configurations, incorporating data from ice cores and ice radar.

  6. Ice age plant refugia in East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby

    1979-01-01

    evidence it is inferred that the flora in the refugia comprised mainly species which today occur over a wide geographical and ecological range. The "odd" occurrences that initiated the discussion may represent random.seed dispersal accumulated in the ice-free areas through long periods of time...

  7. Did glacially induced TPW end the ice age? A reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ngai-Ham; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Daradich, Amy

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of Earth rotation perturbations due to ice-age loading have predicted a slow secular drift of the rotation axis relative to the surface geography (i.e. true polar wander, TPW) of order of several degrees over the Plio-Pleistocene. It has been argued that this drift and the change in the geographic distribution of solar insolation that it implies may have been responsible for important transitions in ice-age climate, including the termination of ice-age cycles.We use a revised rotational stability theory that incorporates a more accurate treatment of the Earth's background ellipticity to reconsider this issue, and demonstrate that the net displacement of the pole predicted in earlier studies disappears. This more muted polar motion is due to two factors: first, the revised theory no longer predicts the permanent shift in the rotation axis, or the so-called `unidirectional TPW', that appears in the traditional stability theory; and, second, the increased background ellipticity incorporated in the revised predictions acts to reduce the normal mode amplitudes governing the motion of the pole. We conclude that ice-age-induced TPW was not responsible for the termination of the ice age. This does not preclude the possibility that TPW induced by mantle convective flow may have played a role in major Plio-Pleistocene climate transitions, including the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  8. An ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Isaac B; Putzig, Nathaniel E; Holt, John W; Phillips, Roger J

    2016-05-27

    Layered ice deposits at the poles of Mars record a detailed history of accumulation and erosion related to climate processes. Radar investigations measure these layers and provide evidence for climate changes such as ice advance and retreat. We present a detailed analysis of observational data showing that ~87,000 cubic kilometers of ice have accumulated at the poles since the end of the last ice age ~370,000 years ago; this volume is equivalent to a global layer of ~60 centimeters. The majority of the material accumulated at the north pole. These results provide both a means to understand the accumulation history of the polar deposits as related to orbital Milankovitch cycles and constraints for better determination of Mars' past and future climates.

  9. An ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Isaac B.; Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Holt, John W.; Phillips, Roger J.

    2016-05-01

    Layered ice deposits at the poles of Mars record a detailed history of accumulation and erosion related to climate processes. Radar investigations measure these layers and provide evidence for climate changes such as ice advance and retreat. We present a detailed analysis of observational data showing that ~87,000 cubic kilometers of ice have accumulated at the poles since the end of the last ice age ~370,000 years ago; this volume is equivalent to a global layer of ~60 centimeters. The majority of the material accumulated at the north pole. These results provide both a means to understand the accumulation history of the polar deposits as related to orbital Milankovitch cycles and constraints for better determination of Mars’ past and future climates.

  10. 40 CFR 405.70 - Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. 405.70 Section 405.70 Protection of... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Fluid Mix for Ice Cream and Other Frozen Desserts Subcategory § 405.70 Applicability; description of the fluid mix for ice cream and other frozen desserts subcategory. The...

  11. New constraints on the gas age-ice age difference along the EPICA ice cores, 0–50 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chappellaz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas is trapped in polar ice sheets at ~50–120 m below the surface and is therefore younger than the surrounding ice. Firn densification models are used to evaluate this ice age-gas age difference (Δage in the past. However, such models need to be validated by data, in particular for periods colder than present day on the East Antarctic plateau. Here we bring new constraints to test a firn densification model applied to the EPICA Dome C (EDC site for the last 50 kyr, by linking the EDC ice core to the EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML ice core, both in the ice phase (using volcanic horizons and in the gas phase (using rapid methane variations. We also use the structured 10Be peak, occurring 41 kyr before present (BP and due to the low geomagnetic field associated with the Laschamp event, to experimentally estimate the Δage during this event. Our results seem to reveal an overestimate of the Δage by the firn densification model during the last glacial period at EDC. Tests with different accumulation rates and temperature scenarios do not entirely resolve this discrepancy. Although the exact reasons for the Δage overestimate at the two EPICA sites remain unknown at this stage, we conclude that current densification model simulations have deficits under glacial climatic conditions. Whatever the cause of the Δage overestimate, our finding suggests that the phase relationship between CO2 and EDC temperature previously inferred for the start of the last deglaciation (lag of CO2 by 800±600 yr seems to be overestimated.

  12. Mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age, implications on sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Kjaer, K.; Bjork, A. A.; Khan, S. A.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Larsen, N. K.; Long, A. J.; Woodroffe, S.; Milne, G. A.; Wahr, J. M.; Geruo, A.; Bamber, J. L.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) on 20th Century sea level rise (SLR) has long been subject to intense discussions. While globally distributed tide gauges suggest a global mean SLR of 15-20 cm, quantifying the separate components is of great concern - in particular for modeling sea level projections into the 21st Century. Estimates of the past GrIS contribution to SLR have been derived using a number of different approaches, e.g. surface mass balance (SMB) calculations combined with estimates of ice discharge found by in correlating SMB anomalies and calving rates. Here, we adopt a novel geometric approach to determine the post-Little Ice Age (LIA) mass loss of the GrIS. We use high quality aerial stereo photogrammetric imagery recorded between 1978 and 1987 to map morphological features such as trim lines (boundary between freshly eroded and non-eroded bedrock) and end moraines marking the ice extent of the LIA, which thereby enables us to obtain vertical point-based differences associated with changes in ice extent. These point measurements are combined with contemporary ice surface differences derived using NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) from 2002-2010, NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from 2003-2009, and NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. We present mass balance estimates of the GrIS since retreat commence from the maximum extent of the LIA to 2010 derived for three intervals, LIAmax (1900) - 1978/87, 1978/87 - 2002, and 2002 - 2010. Results suggest that despite highly spatially- and temporally variable post-LIA mass loss, the total mass loss and thus the contribution from the GrIS to global SLR has accelerated significantly during the 20th Century.

  13. New constraints on the gas age-ice age difference along the EPICA ice cores, 0–50 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chappellaz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas is trapped in polar ice sheets at ~50–120 m below the surface and is therefore younger than the surrounding ice. Firn densification models are used to evaluate this ice age-gas age difference (Δage in the past. However, such models are not well tested on low accumulation and cold sites of the East Antarctic plateau, especially for periods with different climatic conditions. Here we bring new constraints to test a firn densification model applied to the EPICA Dome C (EDC site for the last 50 kyr, by linking the EDC ice core to the EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML ice core, both in the ice phase (using volcanic horizons and in the gas phase (using rapid methane variations. We use the structured 10Be peak, occurring 41 kyr before present (BP and due to the low geomagnetic field associated with the Laschamp event, to experimentally estimate the Δage and Δdepth during this event. It allows us to evaluate the model and to link together climatic archives from EDC and EDML to NorthGRIP (Greenland. Our results reveal an overestimate of the Δage by the firn densification model during the last glacial period at EDC. Tests with different accumulation rates and temperature scenarios do not entirely resolve this discrepancy. Our finding suggests that the phase relationship between CO2 and EDC temperature inferred at the start of the last deglaciation (lag of CO2 by 800±600 yr is overestimated and that the CO2 increase could well have been in phase or slightly leading the temperature increase at EDC.

  14. Pacific winds preventing ice sheet buildup over Siberia during the Ice Age climax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Bakker, Pepijn; Prange, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    At the culmination of the last Ice Age ( 21,000 years ago), vast portions of the Northern Hemisphere land areas were buried under several-kilometer-thick ice sheets. Surprisingly, one of the coldest regions in the modern world, Northern Siberia, escaped this fate and remained largely ice free. To date, two potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon: A regional precipitation deficit that would not allow for a sufficient snow accumulation and an increased dust deposition that would enhance snow melt during the summer ablation period. Here we use high-resolution climate and ice sheet simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum, land proxy data and paleoglacial reconstructions to link the absence of extensive glaciations to changes in the large-scale atmospheric circulation. Our analysis suggests that a reorganization of major stationary pressure systems resulted in strong seasonal winds from the Pacific Ocean that maintained warm spring and summer conditions over the Siberian coasts during the coldest stage of the last glacial period. Both our simulations and proxy data indicate snow-free summers over much of Northern Siberia, in particular due to a pronounced warming of the Arctic shelf placed above the sea level during the Last Glacial Maximum. Although of a regional nature, our finding presents a challenge to the polar amplification theory that cannot reconcile modern-like or even warmer Arctic summers during the Ice Age climax.

  15. Paleoclimates of Amazonia: An ice-age view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M.B.; De Oliveira, P.E.; Raczka, M.F.; Gosling, W.D.; Mayle, F.E.; McMichael, C.H.; Urrego, D.H.; de Souza Carvalho, I.; Garcia, M.J.; Cunha Lana, C.; Strohschoen Jr., O.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence points to climatic complexity during the Ice-Ages. Amazonia does not respond uniformly to modern climatic forcing, and the same was true of the past. Although some climatic forcings were probably expressed everywhere, they were manifested differently. Consequently, climate

  16. Challenges for ice age dynamics: a dynamical systems perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Crucifix, Michel; Mitsui, Takahito

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to the slow dynamics of the climate system, at time scales of one~thousand to one million years. We focus specifically on the phenomenon of ice ages that has characterised the slow evolution of climate over the Quaternary. Ice ages are a form of variability featuring interactions between different large-scale components and processes in the climate system, including ice sheet, deep-ocean and carbon cycle dynamics. This variability is also at least partly controlled by changes in the seasonal and latitudinal incoming solar radiation associated with the combined effects of changes in Earth's orbit shape, precession of equinoxes, and changes in obliquity. A number of possible mechanisms are reviewed in this chapter. We stress that the nature of the interactions between these slow dynamics and faster modes of variability, such as millennium and centennial modes of variability, are still poorly understood. For example, whether the time sequence of ice ages is robustly determined or not by...

  17. Climatic variations since the Little Ice Age recorded in the Guliya Ice Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚檀栋; 焦克勤; 田立德; 杨志红; 施维林; Lonnie G. Thompson

    1996-01-01

    The climatic variations since the Little Ice Age recorded in the Guliya Ice Core are discussed based on glacial δ18O and accumulation records in the Guliya Ice Core. Several obvious climate fluctuation events since 1570 can be observed according to the records. In the past 400 years, the 17th and 19th centuries are relatively cool periods with less precipitation, and the 18th and 20th centuries are relatively warm periods with high precipitation. The study has also revealed the close relationship between temperature and precipitation on the plateau. Warming corresponds to high precipitation and cooling corresponds to less precipitation, which is related with the influence of monsoon on this region.

  18. Mass loss from the southern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders Anker

    Northern hemisphere temperatures reached their Holocene minimum and most glaciers reached their maximum during The Little Ice Age (LIA), but the timing of specific cold intervals is site-specific. In southern Greenland, we have compiled data from organic matter incorporated in LIA sediments, used...... as a signal for ice-free terrain being overridden by LIA glacier advances, and data from threshold lakes showing the onset of glacier-fed lakes, thus revealing the advance-maximum phase initiating the LIA. Finally, we have compiled lichenometry results indicating the onset of bedrock vegetation succeeding ice...... the Arctic. Furthermore, the glacier response seems to be mirrored by a oceanic cooling between 500-1000 AD, followed by onset of the LIA at 1150-1250 AD as seen in the relative strength of warm subsurface water and the influence of the East Greenland Current....

  19. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, S; Adami, N; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4 °C for which the water density is maximum. The 4 °C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  20. Mass loss from the southern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Vinther, Bo; Andresen, Camilla S.; Long, Antony J.; Woodroffe, Sarah A.; Steen Hansen, Eric; Olsen, Jesper

    2013-04-01

    The impact of mass loss from the Greenland Ice sheet (GrIS) on the 20th Century sea level rise (SLR) has long been subject to immense discussions. While globally distributed tide gauges suggest SLR of 15-20 cm computing the input constituents is of great concern - in particular for modeling sea level projections into the 21st Century. Estimates of the GrIS contribution to SLR have been derived using a number of different approaches, e.g. surface mass balance (SMB) calculations combined with estimates of ice discharge founded in correlating SMB anomalies and calving rates. Here, we show a novel geometric approach to determine the post-Little Ice Age (LIA) mass loss of the southern GrIS. We present mass balance estimates of the GrIS south of 71N since retreat commence from the maximum extent of the LIA to 2010. The mass loss estimates are derived for three intervals, LIAmax (1900) - 1981/85 (1), 1981/85 - 2002 (2), and 2002 - 2010 (3). We use high quality aerial stereo photogrammetric imagery recorded in 1981 and 1985 to map morphological features such as trim lines (boundary between freshly eroded and non-eroded bedrock) and end moraines marking the ice extent of the LIA, which thereby enables us to obtain vertical difference associated with former ice extent. We combine these with contemporary ice surface differences derived using NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) from 2002-2010, NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from 2003-2009, and NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. Using our novel approach we find mass loss rates for the above periods (1) to (3) of 53 Gt/yr, 46 Gt/yr, and 109 Gt/yr, respectively. In southeast GrIS we find substantial and extensive mass loss reaching the ice divide while in southwestern GrIS mass loss is less and mainly associated with marine outlet glaciers. Furthermore, post-LIA mass loss is found to be highly variable, even

  1. Ice-age megafauna in Arctic Alaska: extinction, invasion, survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Daniel H.; Groves, Pamela; Kunz, Michael L.; Reanier, Richard E.; Gaglioti, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Radical restructuring of the terrestrial, large mammal fauna living in arctic Alaska occurred between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age. Steppe bison, horse, and woolly mammoth became extinct, moose and humans invaded, while muskox and caribou persisted. The ice age megafauna was more diverse in species and possibly contained 6× more individual animals than live in the region today. Megafaunal biomass during the last ice age may have been 30× greater than present. Horse was the dominant species in terms of number of individuals. Lions, short-faced bears, wolves, and possibly grizzly bears comprised the predator/scavenger guild. The youngest mammoth so far discovered lived ca 13,800 years ago, while horses and bison persisted on the North Slope until at least 12,500 years ago during the Younger Dryas cold interval. The first people arrived on the North Slope ca 13,500 years ago. Bone-isotope measurements and foot-loading characteristics suggest megafaunal niches were segregated along a moisture gradient, with the surviving species (muskox and caribou) utilizing the warmer and moister portions of the vegetation mosaic. As the ice age ended, the moisture gradient shifted and eliminated habitats utilized by the dryland, grazing species (bison, horse, mammoth). The proximate cause for this change was regional paludification, the spread of organic soil horizons and peat. End-Pleistocene extinctions in arctic Alaska represent local, not global extinctions since the megafaunal species lost there persisted to later times elsewhere. Hunting seems unlikely as the cause of these extinctions, but it cannot be ruled out as the final blow to megafaunal populations that were already functionally extinct by the time humans arrived in the region.

  2. On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Matthew S; Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) to drink during practices decreased fluid intake or affected other hydration and (or) sweat measures. All testing was conducted on elite players of an Ontario Hockey League team (+/-SE; mean age, 17.6 +/- 0.3 years; mean height, 182.9 +/- 1.4 cm; mean body mass, 83.0 +/- 1.7 kg). Players were studied 3 times over the course of 6 weekly on-ice practices (+/-SE; mean playing time, 1.58 +/- 0.07 h; mean temperature, 11.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C; mean relative humidity, 52% +/- 3%). There was strong repeatability of the measured hydration and sweat parameters between 2 similar on-ice practices when players drank only water. Limiting the players to drinking only a CES (as opposed to water) did not decrease fluid intake during practice (+/-SE; mean CES intake, 0.72 +/- 0.07 L.h-1 vs. mean water intake, 0.82 +/- 0.08 L.h-1) or affect sweat rate (1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1), sweat sodium concentration (72.4 +/- 5.6 mmol.L-1 vs. 73.0 +/- 4.4 mmol.L-1), or percent body mass loss (1.1% +/- 0.2% vs. 0.9% +/- 0.2%). Drinking a CES also improved sodium balance (-2.1 +/- 0.2 g.h-1 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 g.h-1) and provided the players with a significant carbohydrate (43 +/- 4 g.h-1 vs. 0 +/- 0 g.h-1) during practice. In summary, a single field sweat test during similar on-ice hockey practices in male junior hockey players is sufficient to evaluate fluid and electrolyte balance. Also, a CES does not affect voluntary fluid intake during practice, compared with water, in these players. The CES provided some salt to offset the salt lost in sweat, and carbohydrate, which may help maintain physical and mental performance in the later stages of practice.

  3. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Riley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24 percent on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3 percent on the PIWT model at 8 angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2 percent. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3 to 9.2 percent, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  4. Timing of the Little Ice Age in southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Kurt H.; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Vinther, Bo; Andresen, Camilla S.; Long, Antony J.; Woodroffe, Sarah A.; Steen Hansen, Eric; Olsen, Jesper

    2013-04-01

    Northern hemisphere temperatures reached their Holocene minimum and most glaciers reached their maximum during The Little Ice Age (LIA), but the timing of specific cold intervals is site-specific. In southern Greenland, we have compiled data from organic matter incorporated in LIA sediments, used as a signal for ice-free terrain being overridden by LIA glacier advances, and data from threshold lakes showing the onset of glacier-fed lakes, thus revealing the advance-maximum phase initiating the LIA. Finally, we have compiled lichenometry results indicating the onset of bedrock vegetation succeeding ice retreat. Our results show that the advance of glaciers during the LIA occurs early after the Medieval Warm Period terminating soon after 1200 AD and culminates c. 1500-1600 AD. Historical maps also show that many glaciers on the western coast occupy a still-stand near the LIA maximum until 1900 AD before retreat commence. Thus in southern Greenland, we define LIA as the period between the first signs of Late Holocene glacier readvance and the latest onset of retreat - i.e. from ca. 1200 to c. 1900. During this period northern hemisphere annual mean temperatures, although fluctuating, were generally below the 1961-1990 average, with the coldest interval between c. 1600 and 1800. Even though winter temperatures may have dominated the cooling, also the summer temperatures which are most closely correlated with glacier mass balances, dropped, to c. 0.6° below the average in the northern hemisphere including the Arctic. Furthermore, the glacier response seems to be mirrored by a oceanic cooling between 500-1000 AD, followed by onset of the LIA at 1150-1250 AD as seen in the relative strength of warm subsurface water and the influence of the East Greenland Current.

  5. Evaluating sun-climate relationships since the Little Ice Age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lean, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States). E.O. Hulburt Center for Space Research; Rind, D. [Columbia University, GISS, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    From the coldest period of the Little Ice Age to the present time, the surface temperature of the Earth increased by perhaps 0.8{sup o}C. Solar variability may account for part of this warming which, during the past 350 years, generally tracks fluctuating solar activity levels. While increases in greenhouse gas concentrations are widely assumed to be the primary cause of recent climate change, surface temperatures nevertheless varied significantly during pre-industrial periods, under minimal levels of greenhouse gas variations. A climate forcing of 0.3 W m{sup -2} arising from a speculated 0.13% solar irradiance increase can account for the 0.3{sup o}C surface warming evident in the paleoclimate record from 1650 to 1790, assuming that climate sensitivity is 1{sup o}C W{sup -1} m{sup -2} (which is within the IPCC range). The empirical Sun-climate relationship defined by these pre-industrial data suggests that solar variability may have contributed 0.25{sup o}C of the 0.6{sup o}C subsequent warming from 1900 to 1990, a scenario which time dependent GCM simulations replicate when forced with reconstructed solar irradiance. Thus, while solar variability likely played a dominant role in modulating climate during the Little Ice Age prior to 1850, its influence since 1900 has become an increasingly less significant component of climate change in the industrial epoch. It is unlikely that Sun-climate relationships can account for much of the warming since 1970, notwithstanding recent attempts to deduce long term solar irradiance fluctuations from the observational data base, which has notable occurrences of instrumental drifts. Empirical evidence suggests that Sun-climate relationships exist on decadal as well as centennial time scales, but present sensitivities of the climate system are insufficient to explain these short-term relationships. Still to be simulated over the time scale of the Little Ice Age to the present is the combined effect of direct radiative forcing

  6. The Little Ice Age in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomelli, V.; Cooley, D.; Naveau, P.; Rabatel, A.

    2003-12-01

    The period known as the Little Ice Age, from the 17th to the 19th century, brought a cooling of around 0.5 degrees Celsius as well as varyingly humid episodes Eurasia and North America. Because of a lack of long paleoclimatic time series in the tropical Andes, it is still unclear if similar cooling occurred over these tropical and Southern Hemisphere regions. Furthermore, if changes did take place, it is currently not well established if they were temporally synchronous or shifted with respect of the variations in the Northern Hemisphere or the globe. To look into this important climatic question and for advancing our understanding of the past climate links between the tropics and higher latitudes, 25 glaciers located in Bolivia and in Peru were carefully selected. Glacial activity and environmental changes were analyzed using lichenometry. Largest lichen diameters were measured in the different glacial basins. To better analyze these maximum diameters and to more appropriately represent uncertainty and the character of this collected data, age estimates of the different moraine systems were derived using extreme value theory rather than the traditional averaging. The results reveal two particular phases of glacier growth, 1550-1600 and 1800-1850. These two phases have also been identified in other proxy records, such as ice-cores and documentary data (particularly from church chronicles). In order to understand the climatic changes that could have contributed to the glacial variations, a simple model based on both precipitations and temperatures is applied to estimate mass balance questions in the basins. A cooling of the order of 0.5 C seems to be the most consistent with the data. Finally, these findings are compared with the better-known histories of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude glaciers.

  7. Comparative evaluation of the indigenous microbial diversity vs. drilling fluid contaminants in the NEEM Greenland ice core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Vanya; Burlingame, Caroline; Sowers, Todd; Brenchley, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Demonstrating that the detected microbial diversity in nonaseptically drilled deep ice cores is truly indigenous is challenging because of potential contamination with exogenous microbial cells. The NEEM Greenland ice core project provided a first-time opportunity to determine the origin and extent of contamination throughout drilling. We performed multiple parallel cultivation and culture-independent analyses of five decontaminated ice core samples from different depths (100-2051 m), the drilling fluid and its components Estisol and Coasol, and the drilling chips collected during drilling. We created a collection of diverse bacterial and fungal isolates (84 from the drilling fluid and its components, 45 from decontaminated ice, and 66 from drilling chips). Their categorization as contaminants or intrinsic glacial ice microorganisms was based on several criteria, including phylogenetic analyses, genomic fingerprinting, phenotypic characteristics, and presence in drilling fluid, chips, and/or ice. Firmicutes and fungi comprised the dominant group of contaminants among isolates and cloned rRNA genes. Conversely, most Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria originating from the ice were identified as intrinsic. This study provides a database of potential contaminants useful for future studies of NEEM cores and can contribute toward developing standardized protocols for contamination detection and ensuring the authenticity of the microbial diversity in deep glacial ice.

  8. Ice Shelves as Floating Channel Flows of Viscous Power-Law Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2013-01-01

    We attempt to better understand the flow of marine ice sheets. Treating ice as a viscous shear-thinning power law fluid, we develop an asymptotic (late-time) theory in two cases - the presence or absence of contact with sidewalls. Most real-world situations fall somewhere between the two extreme cases considered. When sidewalls are absent, we obtain the equilibrium grounding line thickness using a simple computer model and have an analytic approximation. For shelves in contact with sidewalls, we obtain an asymptotic theory, valid for long shelves. Our theory is based on the velocity profile across the channel being a generalised version of Poiseuille flow, which works when lateral shear dominates the force balance. We determine when this is. We conducted experiments using a laboratory model for ice. This was a suspension of xanthan in water, at a concentration of 0.5% by mass. The lab model has $n \\approx 3.8$ (similar to that of ice). The experiments agreed extremely well with our theories for all relevant p...

  9. Interface Configuration Experiments (ICE) Explore the Effects of Microgravity on Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) is actually a series of experiments that explore the striking behavior of liquid-vapor interfaces (i.e., fluid surfaces) in a low gravity environment under which major shifts in liquid position can arise from small changes in container shape or contact angle. Although these experiments are designed to test current mathematical theory, there are numerous practical applications that could result from these studies. When designing fluid management systems for space-based operations, it is important to be able to predict the locations and configurations that fluids will assume in containers under low-gravity conditions. The increased ability to predict, and hence control, fluid interfaces is vital to systems and/or processes where capillary forces play a significant role both in space and on the Earth. Some of these applications are in general coating processes (paints, pesticides, printing, etc.), fluid transport in porous media (ground water flows, oil recovery, etc.), liquid propellant systems in space (liquid fuel and oxygen), capillary-pumped loops and heat pipes, and space-based life-support systems. In space, almost every fluid system is affected, if not dominated, by capillarity. Knowledge of the liquid-vapor interface behavior, and in particular the interface shape from which any analysis must begin, is required as a foundation to predict how these fluids will react in microgravity and on Earth. With such knowledge, system designs can be optimized, thereby decreasing costs and complexity, while increasing performance and reliability. ICE has increased, and will continue to increase this knowledge, as it probes the specific peculiarities of current theory upon which our current understanding of these effects is based. Several versions of ICE were conducted in NASA Lewis Research Center's drop towers and on the space shuttle during the first and second United States Microgravity Laboratory missions (USML-1 and USML-2

  10. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Kanji, Z. A.; Stetzer, O.; Tritscher, T.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE) conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC) at three nominal temperatures, -30 °C, -35 °C and -40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at -40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw), and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at -35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN) at -40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at -35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at -30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below -40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  11. Effect of photochemical aging on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Stetzer, O.; Tritscher, T.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Kanji, Z. A.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Lohmann, U.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE) was conducted in 2009 and aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro with no emission after-treatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC) at three nominal temperatures, -30 °C, -35 °C and -40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at -40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw), and photochemical aging did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behavior. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added, showed an ice nucleation enhancement after the aging at -35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN) at -40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical aging did also not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at -35 °C with no ice nucleation observed at -30 °C for wood burning particles. Photochemical aging did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below -30 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical aging on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  12. Influence of anisotropy on velocity and age distribution at Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zwinger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use a full-Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled ice-flow model to study the dynamics of the glacier inside Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The domain encompasses a high accumulation rate region and, downstream a sublimation-dominated bare ice ablation area. The ablation ice area is notable for having old ice at its surface since the vertical velocity is upwards, and horizontal velocities are almost stagnant there. We compare the model simulation with field observations of velocities and the age distribution of the surface ice. A satisfactory match with simulations using an isotropic flow law was not found because of too high horizontal velocities and too slow vertical ones. However, the existence of a pronounced ice fabric may explain the present day surface velocity distribution in the inner Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area. Near absence of data on the temporal evolution of Scharffenbergbotnen since the Late Glacial Maximum necessitates exploration of the impact of anisotropy using prescribed ice fabrics: isotropic, single maximum, and linear variation with depth, in both two-dimensional and three dimensional flow models. The realistic velocity field simulated with a non-collinear orthotropic flow law, however produced surface ages in significant disagreement with the few reliable age measurements and suggests that the age field is not in a steady state and that the present distribution is a result of a flow reorganization at about 15 000 yr BP. In order to fully understand the surface age distribution a transient simulation starting from the Late Glacial Maximum including the correct initial conditions for geometry, age, fabric and temperature distribution would be needed. It is the first time that the importance of anisotropy has been demonstrated in the ice dynamics of a blue ice area. This is useful to understand ice flow in order to better interpret archives of ancient ice for paleoclimate research.

  13. Effect of photochemical aging on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE was conducted in 2009 and aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro with no emission after-treatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical aging did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behavior. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added, showed an ice nucleation enhancement after the aging at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical aging did also not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C with no ice nucleation observed at −30 °C for wood burning particles. Photochemical aging did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −30 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical aging on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  14. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  15. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulphate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. Additionally, these are also the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low exposure Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka whereas high exposure ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, where as high exposure ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. Based on our results, we present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can represent ice nucleation of atmospherically aged and non-aged particles for both immersion and deposition mode. We find excellent agreement (to within less than a factor of 2 with field measurements when parameterizations derived from our results are used to

  16. Global deep-sea extinctions during the Pleistocene ice ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Bruce W.

    2001-07-01

    The dark, near-freezing environment of the deep oceans is regarded as one of the most stable habitats on Earth, and this stability is generally reflected in the slow turnover rates (extinctions and appearances) of the organisms that live there. By far the best fossil record of deep-sea organisms is provided by the shells of benthic foraminifera (Protista). A little-known global extinction of deep-sea benthic foraminifera occurred during the Pleistocene ice ages. In the southwest Pacific, it caused the disappearance of at least two families, 15 genera, and 48 species (˜15% 25% of the fauna) of dominantly uniserial, elongate foraminifera with distinctive apertural modifications. These forms progressively died back and became extinct during glacial periods in the late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene (ca. 2.5 0.6 Ma); most extinctions occurred between 1.0 and 0.6 Ma, at the time of the middle Pleistocene climatic revolution. This first high-resolution study of this extinction event indicates that it was far more significant for deep-sea diversity loss than previously reported (10 species). The middle Pleistocene extinction was the most dramatic last phase of a worldwide decline in the abundance of these elongate forms, a phase that began during cooling near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and continued during the middle Miocene. Clearly these taxa declined when the world cooled, but the reason is yet to be resolved.

  17. Radiocarbon in tropical tree rings during the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Q.; Barbetti, M.; Zoppi, U.; Fink, D.; Watanasak, M.; Jacobsen, G. E.

    2004-08-01

    Cross-dated tree-ring cores (Pinus merkusii) from north-central Thailand, spanning AD 1620-1780, were used to investigate atmospheric 14C for the tropics during the latter part of the Little Ice Age. In addition, a cross-dated section of Huon pine from western Tasmania, covering the same period of time, was investigated. A total of 16 pairs of decadal samples were extracted to alpha-cellulose for AMS 14C analysis using the ANTARES facility at ANSTO. The 14C results from Thailand follow the trend of the southern hemisphere, rather than that of the northern hemisphere. This is a surprising result, and we infer that atmospheric 14C for north-central Thailand, at 17° N, was strongly influenced by the entrainment of southern hemisphere air parcels during the southwest Asian monsoon, when the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone moves to the north of our sampling site. Such atmospheric transport and mixing are therefore considered to be one of the principal mechanisms for regional 14C offsets.

  18. The WAIS-Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology – Part 2: Methane synchronization (68–31 ka BP and the gas age-ice age difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Buizert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS-Divide ice core (WAIS-D is a newly drilled, high-accumulation deep ice core that provides Antarctic climate records of the past ∼68 ka at unprecedented temporal resolution. The upper 2850 m (back to 31.2 ka BP have been dated using annual-layer counting. Here we present a chronology for the deep part of the core (67.8–31.2 ka BP, which is based on stratigraphic matching to annual-layer-counted Greenland ice cores using globally well-mixed atmospheric methane. We calculate the WAIS-D gas age-ice age difference (Δage using a combination of firn densification modeling, ice flow modeling, and a dataset of δ15N-N2, a proxy for past firn column thickness. The largest Δage at WAIS-D occurs during the last glacial maximum, and is 525 ± 100 years. Internally consistent solutions can only be found when assuming little-to-no influence of impurity content on densification rates, contrary to a recently proposed hypothesis. We synchronize the WAIS-D chronology to a linearly scaled version of the layer-counted Greenland Ice Core Chronology (GICC05, which brings the age of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO events into agreement with the U/Th absolutely dated Hulu speleothem record. The small Δage at WAIS-D provides valuable opportunities to investigate the timing of atmospheric greenhouse gas variations relative to Antarctic climate, as well as the interhemispheric phasing of the bipolar "seesaw".

  19. Numerical Modeling of the Last Glacial Maximum Yellowstone Ice Cap Captures Asymmetry in Moraine Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. S.; Wickert, A. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Yellowstone Ice Cap was the largest continuous ice body in the US Rocky Mountains. Terminal moraine ages derived from cosmogenic radionuclide dating (e.g., Licciardi and Pierce, 2008) constrain the timing of maximum Ice Cap extent. Importantly, the moraine ages vary by several thousand years around the Ice Cap; ages on the eastern outlet glaciers are significantly younger than their western counterparts. In order to interpret these observations within the context of LGM climate in North America, we perform two numerical glacier modeling experiments: 1) We model the initiation and growth of the Ice Cap to steady state; and 2) We estimate the range of LGM climate states which led to the formation of the Ice Cap. We use an efficient semi-implicit 2-D glacier model coupled to a fully implicit solution for flexural isostasy, allowing for transient links between climatic forcing, ice thickness, and earth surface deflection. Independent of parameter selection, the Ice Cap initiates in the Absaroka and Beartooth mountains and then advances across the Yellowstone plateau to the west. The Ice Cap advances to its maximum extent first to the older eastern moraines and last to the younger western and northwestern moraines. This suggests that the moraine ages may reflect the timescale required for the Ice Cap to advance across the high elevation Yellowstone plateau rather than the timing of local LGM climate. With no change in annual precipitation from the present, a mean summer temperature drop of 8-9° C is required to form the Ice Cap. Further parameter searches provide the full range of LGM paleoclimate states that led to the Yellowstone Ice Cap. Using our preferred parameter set, we find that the timescale for the growth of the complete Ice Cap is roughly 10,000 years. Isostatic subsidence helps explain the long timescale of Ice Cap growth. The Yellowstone Ice Cap caused a maximum surface deflection of 300 m (using a constant effective elastic

  20. Mammoth interatrial septal aneurysm in the ICE age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timperley John

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE is a useful imaging modality that is now being used more widely to assist in the percutaneous closure of atrial septal defects (ASD and patent foramen ovales (PFO. Case presentation A 42 year old lady with a history of transient ischaemic attacks and migraine underwent percutaneous closure of an ASD. Intraprocedural ICE demonstrated a mammoth billowing multiperforated interatrial septal aneurysm in association with a secondum ASD. Conclusion ICE provides excellent adjuvant imaging during percutaneous closure of intracardiac shunts, in this case demonstrating a 'mammoth' interatrial septal aneurysm.

  1. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Welti, A.; Chou, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-09-01

    Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 < T < 263 K. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of untreated kaolinite (Ka) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles is compared to corresponding aged particles that are subjected to ozone concentrations of 0.4-4.3 ppmv in a stainless steel aerosol tank. The portable ice nucleation counter (PINC) and immersion chamber combined with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber (IMCA-ZINC) are used to conduct deposition and immersion mode measurements, respectively. Ice active fractions as well as ice active surface site densities (ns) are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (in)organic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low

  2. Mass loss from the southern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age Maximum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders Anker

    Northern hemisphere temperatures reached their Holocene minimum and most glaciers reached their maximum during The Little Ice Age (LIA), but the timing of specific cold intervals is site-specific. In southern Greenland, we have compiled data from organic matter incorporated in LIA sediments, used...... as a signal for ice-free terrain being overridden by LIA glacier advances, and data from threshold lakes showing the onset of glacier-fed lakes, thus revealing the advance-maximum phase initiating the LIA. Finally, we have compiled lichenometry results indicating the onset of bedrock vegetation succeeding ice...... the Arctic. Furthermore, the glacier response seems to be mirrored by a oceanic cooling between 500-1000 AD, followed by onset of the LIA at 1150-1250 AD as seen in the relative strength of warm subsurface water and the influence of the East Greenland Current....

  3. The last forests in Greenland, and the age of the ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Schmidt, Astrid M. Z.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-05-01

    Recently ancient DNA (aDNA) studies of the basal ice in the Camp Century ice core, northern Greenland, have shown that mixed coniferous-deciduous forest grew here before the area was invaded and permanently covered by the ice sheet. The coring site is situated only 100 km from the present ice margin and more than 500 km from the ice divide, indicating that since this last inception the northern part of the ice sheet never receded more than 100 km from its present margin. Dating of the basal ice and obtaining an age for the forest and for the beginning of the ice sheet's permanency has been attempted by analyzing for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), meteoric 10Be/36Cl cosmogenic nuclides, 234U/238U recoil. These methods all provide only minimum ages and show that the forest at Cap Century is older than 500 ka. Comparison with other Pleistocene "forest sites" in Greenland - the Kap København Formation in northernmost Greenland, the DYE-3 ice core in the south, the ODP boring 646 south of Greenland, as well as results from basal ice in the GRIP ice core - extends the minimum age to c. 1 ma. The maximum age is provided by the Kap København Formation, which must be older - or contemporaneous. The formation has recently been confirmed to date within the interval 2-2.5 ma, with a preferred age of 2.3-2.4 ma. Surprisingly, application of the molecular clock of insect COI sequences on the Camp Century aDNA now seem to push the minimum age just as far back - to 2.4 ma, suggesting that the timberline boreal forest at Kap København is contemporaneous with the mixed forest at Camp Century, 600 km to the south. From this we conclude that the northern ice sheet dome, which today contains 85% of the total ice sheet volume, has remained within 100 km of its present margin for at least 1 ma, and possibly may go back as far as 2.4 ma. The ice sheet has therefore survived both interglacials and "super interglacials" that were both warmer and longer than the present. This

  4. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. From our results, we derive and present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can be used in models to predict ice nuclei concentrations based on available aerosol surface area.

  5. Little Ice Age Maximum Glacier Extent, Exit and Paradise Glaciers, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a single polyline file that depicts the boundary of the Little Ice Age maximum advance of the terminus of Exit and Paradise Glaciers. The data were...

  6. Mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age, implications on sea level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Bjork, A. A.; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas

    The impact of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) on 20th Century sea level rise (SLR) has long been subject to intense discussions. While globally distributed tide gauges suggest a global mean SLR of 15-20 cm, quantifying the separate components is of great concern - in particular...... for modeling sea level projections into the 21st Century. Estimates of the past GrIS contribution to SLR have been derived using a number of different approaches, e.g. surface mass balance (SMB) calculations combined with estimates of ice discharge found by in correlating SMB anomalies and calving rates. Here...

  7. Estimating the extent of Antarctic summer sea ice during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinburgh, Tom; Day, Jonathan J.

    2016-11-01

    In stark contrast to the sharp decline in Arctic sea ice, there has been a steady increase in ice extent around Antarctica during the last three decades, especially in the Weddell and Ross seas. In general, climate models do not to capture this trend and a lack of information about sea ice coverage in the pre-satellite period limits our ability to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to climate change and robustly validate climate models. However, evidence of the presence and nature of sea ice was often recorded during early Antarctic exploration, though these sources have not previously been explored or exploited until now. We have analysed observations of the summer sea ice edge from the ship logbooks of explorers such as Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton and their contemporaries during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (1897-1917), and in this study we compare these to satellite observations from the period 1989-2014, offering insight into the ice conditions of this period, from direct observations, for the first time. This comparison shows that the summer sea ice edge was between 1.0 and 1.7° further north in the Weddell Sea during this period but that ice conditions were surprisingly comparable to the present day in other sectors.

  8. Weak chemical weathering during the Little Ice Age recorded by lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Low magnetic susceptibility, low Sr content and hence high Rb/Sr ratio in the lake sediment sequence indicate a weak chemical weathering process under arid and cold climate of the Little Ice Age in a single closed lake watershed. According to different geochemical behavior between rubidium and strontium in earth surface processes, variation of Rb/Sr ratios in the lake sediment sequence can be used as an effective geochemical proxy with definite climatic significance of chemical weathering in watershed. Unlike chemical weathering process in tropic zone and modern temperate-humid climate, concordant changes in both Sr content and magnetic susceptibility with d18O values of Dunde ice core suggest that the weak chemical weathering was controlled by air temperature during the Little Ice Age maximum. After the Little Ice Age, chemical weathering intensity was controlled also gradually by precipitation with increasing in temperature.

  9. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allisse Maxime

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p < 0.05. However, maximal aerobic power improved only during the off-season. All skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally <20% of the explained variance between physiological variables measured off-ice and on-ice skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued.

  10. Modelling the behavior of the Jakobshavn glacier since the end of the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muresan, Ioana Stefania; Khroulev, Constantine; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas;

    2014-01-01

    Current model estimates of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) are almost entirely based on coarse grids (>10km) and constrained by climate models that span from 60s to present. To improve the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond decadal...... timescale is required. Here, we use a continuous 171 year reconstruction (since the end of the Little Ice Age) by J.E. Box of the Greenland Ice Sheet climatic surface mass balance and its sub-components to study the interaction between climate and the cryosphere originating in changes in the surface mass...... balance and dynamics of the GrIS over the last 171 years. Throughout our study, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) capabilities. The initialization of the ice sheet is performed on a 5 km grid using paleo climatic forcing (-125 ka to present) based on a positive degree day (PDD) model...

  11. Cosmogenic 10Be Age Constraints on the Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Wohlfarth, B.; Lunkka, J.

    2011-12-01

    An important question in climate science is how ice sheets will respond to a climate warmer than present. Because our understanding of how these changes will occur remains limited, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a climate warmer than present along with understanding their contribution to sea-level rise. We will present new cosmogenic 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. By constraining the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, we will establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, improving our understanding of ice-sheet response to warming climates.

  12. Ice sheet load cycling and fluid underpressures in the Eastern Michigan Basin, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, Christopher E.; Provost, Alden M.

    2014-01-01

    Strong fluid underpressures have been detected in Paleozoic strata in the eastern Michigan Basin, with hydraulic heads reaching ~400 m below land surface (~4 MPa underpressure) and ~200 m below sea level in strata where unusually low permeabilities (~10−20–10−23 m2) were measured in situ. Multiple glaciations, including three with as much as 3 km of ice cover at the site in the last 120 ka, suggest a causal link with the underpressures. We examined this possibility using a one-dimensional groundwater flow model incorporating mechanical loading from both ice weight and lithospheric flexure. Because hydrologic and mechanical changes during glaciation are not well characterized and subsurface properties are imperfectly known, the model was used inversely to estimate flexural loads and loosely constrained permeabilities by matching observed pressures. Acceptable matches were obtained for a surprisingly wide range of scenarios with permeabilities close to measured values and plausible flexural loads. Matches were not obtained when too many parameters were preselected, or when permeabilities were constrained to be significantly larger than measured values. In successful model runs groundwater expulsion under glacial-mechanical loads caused the underpressuring, and flexural loads were important if aquifer and sub-glacial pressures were significantly elevated during glaciation. Simulated fluid pressures in the low-permeability strata fluctuated by 30–40 MPa during glacial cycles but resulted in advective transport of only tens of meters or less. Although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out, we conclude that glacial-mechanical forcing of a water-saturated system can explain the observed underpressures.

  13. Uranium isotopes and dissolved organic carbon in loess permafrost: Modeling the age of ancient ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Stephanie A.; Paces, James B.; O'Donnell, J.A.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kanevskiy, M.Z.; Aiken, George R.; Shur, Y.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The residence time of ice in permafrost is an indicator of past climate history, and of the resilience and vulnerability of high-latitude ecosystems to global change. Development of geochemical indicators of ground-ice residence times in permafrost will advance understanding of the circumstances and evidence of permafrost formation, preservation, and thaw in response to climate warming and other disturbance. We used uranium isotopes to evaluate the residence time of segregated ground ice from ice-rich loess permafrost cores in central Alaska. Activity ratios of 234U vs. 238U (234U/238U) in water from thawed core sections ranged between 1.163 and 1.904 due to contact of ice and associated liquid water with mineral surfaces over time. Measured (234U/238U) values in ground ice showed an overall increase with depth in a series of five neighboring cores up to 21 m deep. This is consistent with increasing residence time of ice with depth as a result of accumulation of loess over time, as well as characteristic ice morphologies, high segregated ice content, and wedge ice, all of which support an interpretation of syngenetic permafrost formation associated with loess deposition. At the same time, stratigraphic evidence indicates some past sediment redistribution and possibly shallow thaw among cores, with local mixing of aged thaw waters. Using measures of surface area and a leaching experiment to determine U distribution, a geometric model of (234U/238U) evolution suggests mean ages of up to ∼200 ky BP in the deepest core, with estimated uncertainties of up to an order of magnitude. Evidence of secondary coatings on loess grains with elevated (234U/238U) values and U concentrations suggests that refinement of the geometric model to account for weathering processes is needed to reduce uncertainty. We suggest that in this area of deep ice-rich loess permafrost, ice bodies have been preserved from the last glacial period (10–100 ky BP), despite subsequent

  14. Experimental study of fluid deicing system in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the icing of horizontal control surfaces at the VFW in 1970 led them to select the NASA Icing Research Tunnel at LRC for their tests. Tests were performed for the VFW 614 aircraft. The TKS ice warning system, the Rosemont ice warning system and the liquid water content indicator were investigated and found to be appropriate for the aircraft.

  15. Little Ice Age Glaciation in Alaska: A record of recent global climatic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkin, P.E.; Wiles, G.C.

    1992-03-01

    General global cooling and temperature fluctuation accompanied by expansion of mountain glaciers characterized the Little Ice Age of about A.D. 1200 through A.D. 1900. The effects of such temperature changes appear first and are strongest at high latitudes. Therefore the Little Ice Age record of glacial fluctuation in Alaska may provide a good proxy for these events and a test for models of future climatic change. Holocene expansions began here as early as 7000 B.P. and locally show a periodicity of 350 years after about 4500 years B.P. The Little Ice Age followed a late Holocene interval of minor ice advance and a subsequent period of ice margin recession lasting one to seven centuries. The timing of expansions since about A.D. 1200 have often varied between glaciers, but these are the most pervasive glacial events of the Holocene in Alaska and frequently represent ice marginal maxima for this interval. At least two major expansions are, apparent in forefields of both land-terminating and fjord-calving glaciers, but the former display the most reliable and detailed climatic record. Major maxima occurred by the 16th century and into the mid-18th century. Culmination of advances occurred throughout Alaska during the 19th century followed within a few decades by general glacial retreat. Concurrently, equilibrium line altitudes have been raised 100-400 m, representing a rise of 2-3 deg C in mean summer temperature.

  16. Interparticle Capillary Forces at a Fluid-Fluid Interface with Strong Polymer-Induced Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Stefano; de Jong, Arthur M; Baudry, Jean; Prins, Menno W J

    2017-01-24

    We report on a measurement of forces between particles adsorbed at a water-oil interface in the presence of an oil-soluble polymer. The cationic polymer interacts electrostatically with the negatively charged particles, thereby modulating the particle contact angle and the magnitude of capillary attraction between the particles. However, polymer adsorption to the interface also generates an increase in the apparent interfacial viscosity over several orders of magnitude in a time span of a few hours. We have designed an experiment in which repeated motion trajectories are measured on pairs of particles. The experiment gives an independent quantification of the interfacial drag coefficient (10(-7)-10(-4) Ns/m) and of the interparticle capillary forces (0.1-10 pN). We observed that the attractive capillary force depends on the amount of polymer in the oil phase and on the particle pair. However, the attraction appears to be independent of the surface rheology, with changes over a wide range of apparent viscosity values due to aging. Given the direction (attraction), the range (∼μm), and the distance dependence (∼1/S(5)) of the observed interparticle force, we interpret the force as being caused by quadrupolar deformations of the fluid-fluid interface induced by particle surface roughness. The results suggest that capillary forces are equilibrated in the early stages of interface aging and thereafter do not change anymore, even though strong changes in surface rheology still occur. The described experimental approach is powerful for studying dissipative as well as conservative forces of micro- and nanoparticles at fluid-fluid interfaces for systems out of equilibrium.

  17. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 25 Appendix X - Forecast Sea Ice Age.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lowry, Thomas Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Shannon M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  18. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 24 Appendix W - Historical Sea Ice Age.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lowry, Thomas Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Shannon M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  19. Holocene glacial history of the west Greenland Ice Sheet inferred from cosmogenic exposure ages and threshold lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, K. H.; Colding, Sune Oluf

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use a combination of 10Be exposure ages and threshold lakes to constrain the ice sheet history in Godthåbs- and Buksefjorden, west Greenland (63-64°N) during the Holocene. The 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages have been used to quantify both the ice retreat and thinning of the west...... Greenland Ice Sheet in 3 transects from the coast to the present ice margin. Preliminary results (n=47) indicate initial deglaciation of coastal areas around 11 ka in concert with existing radiocarbon chronology, followed by a rapid retreat from the outer coast to the present ice margin around 10 ka....... Boulder samples from the highest peaks demonstrate that the ice was warm-based whereas bedrock samples often contain an inherited signal. These results may have implications for other studies in Greenland, which have inferred thin LGM ice based on 10Be ages of bedrock samples. The threshold lakes are used...

  20. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.;

    2014-01-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve...... to the end of the Little Ice Age (prior to 1930) shows no thinning of Helheim Glacier from its maximum extent during the Little Ice Age to 1981, while Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier underwent substantial thinning of 230 to 265 m. Comparison of sub-surface water temperature anomalies and variations in air...... the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond such episodic events is required. Here, we extend the observational record of marginal thinning of Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers from 10 to more than 80 years. We show that, although the frontal portion...

  1. Challenging ICES age estimation protocols: lessons learned from the eastern Baltic cod stock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Radtke, Krzysztof; Plikshs, Maris;

    2016-01-01

    and within readers. Additionally, a wide range of alternative methods for deriving the age information necessary for stock assessment and for validation of the true age have been tested. However, these methods did not produce unbiased age estimates over the entire size and age range of the EBC stock. An age......Over the recent decades, the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has set guidelines for best practise quality control of age estimation procedures. The applicability of these guidelines is assessed by reviewing the ageing issues of eastern Baltic cod (EBC) as a case study....... Since the implementation of an age-based assessment of EBC in the beginning of the 1970s, the assessment has been hampered by the quality of the age composition data, in recent years to a degree that age-based assessment is no longer used. The reason for the age reading problems is the low visual...

  2. A New Ice Age? None Soon, Snow 2 Miles Deep Implies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew C.Revkin; 李杨

    2004-01-01

    @@ Despite the recent trend toward global warming, scientists have long wondered whether the earth is nearing another ice age, an end to the 12,000-year temperate① spell② in which modern civilizations arose. Some have said such a transition is overdue③, given that each of the three temperate intervals that immediately preceded the current one lasted only about 10 ,000 years.

  3. End of the "Little Ice Age" in the Alps not forced by industrial black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Michael; Osmont, Dimtri; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing aerosols present in the atmosphere and cryosphere play an important role in the climate system. Their presence in ambient air and snow changes radiative properties of these media, thus contributing to increased atmospheric warming and snowmelt. High spatio-temporal variability of aerosol concentrations in these media and a shortage of long-term observations contribute to large uncertainties in properly assigning the climate effects of these aerosols through time. Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow has been suggested as the main driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps (Painter et al. 2012). Basis for this hypothesis were model simulations using ice-core measurements of elemental carbon at low temporal resolution from two ice cores in the Alps. Here we present sub-annually resolved, well replicated ice-core measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC; using a SP2 soot photometer), mineral dust (Fe, Ca), biomass burning (NH4, K) and distinctive industrial pollution tracers (Bi, Pb, SO4) from an ice core in the Alps covering the past 250 years. These reconstructions allow to precisely compare the timing of observed acceleration of glacier melt in the mid-19th century with that of the increase of soot deposition on ice-sheets caused by the industrialization of Western Europe. Our study suggests that at the time when European rBC emission rates started to significantly increase Alpine glaciers have already experienced more than 70% of their total 19th century length reduction. Industrial BC emissions can therefore not been considered as the primary forcing of the rapid deglaciation at the end of the Little Ice Age in the Alps. References: Painter, T. H., M. G. Flanner, G. Kaser, B. Marzeion, R. A. VanCuren, and W. Abdalati (2013), End of the Little Ice

  4. Past and future ice age initiation: the role of an intrinsic deep-ocean millennial oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper offers three interdependent contributions to studies of climate variation: (1) the recognition and analysis of an intrinsic millennial oceanic oscillation that affects both Northern and Southern high latitude climates, (2) The recognition of an oceanographic switch to ice-free seas west of Greenland that explains the initiation of the Last Ice Age, and (3) an analysis of the effect of increasing salinity in the seas east of Greenland that suggests the possibility of the initiation of an ice age threshold climate in the near future. In the first contribution the millennial oscillation in the flow of the North Atlantic Drift reported by Bond et al. (1997) is proposed to be part of a 1500 yr intrinsic deep ocean oscillation. This oscillation involves the exchange of North Atlantic intermediate-level deep water (NADW) formed in the seas east of Greenland with Antarctic Bottom Water formed in a shallow-water zone at the edge of the Antarctic continent. The concept of NADW formation is already well known, with details of the sinking water flowing out of the Greenland Sea observed by Smethie et al. (2000) using chlorofluorocarbon tracers. The concept of Antarctic Bottom Water formation is also already well established. However, its modulation by the changing fraction of NADW in the Southern Ocean, which I infer from the analysis of Weyl (1968), has not been previously discussed. The modulated lower-salinity Antarctic Bottom Water that reaches the northern North Atlantic then provides negative feedback for the cyclic variation of NADW formation as proposed here. This causes the 1500 yr bipolar oscillation. The feedback suggests the possible sinusoidal character of the proposed oscillation model. The model is consistent with the cooling of the Little Ice Age (Lamb, 1972, 1995), and it also correctly predicts NASA's observation of today's record maximum area of winter sea ice on the Southern Ocean and the present observed record low rate of Antarctic Bottom Water

  5. 机场使用除冰液的应急监测%Airport De-icing Fluid Emergency Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡雄星; 韩中豪

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduced the emergency monitoring for airport de-icing fluid contamination in Shanghai, China The study included development of monitoring program, monitoring sites, analysis project, tracking monitoring, data analysis, etc. The results showed that de-icing waste liquid directly discharging into rivers had polluted water environment seriously in the short term, but the water would gradually return to normal over time. The environmental impact assessment of airport de-icing fluid contamination could be conducted by monitoring the chemical oxygen demand for water.%介绍了机场除冰液污染的应急监测,包括监测方案制订、监测点位设置、分析对象确定、跟踪监测、数据分析等.监测结果表明,除冰液废液直排入河道在短期内对水环境造成了严重影响,但随着时间推移水体逐步恢复正常.机场除冰液污染的应急监测可通过监测水体中的化学需氧量进行.

  6. Interaction of water waves with small undulations on a porous bed in a two-layer ice-covered fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Srikumar; Martha, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The scattering problem involving water waves by small undulation on the porous ocean-bed in a two-layer fluid, is investigated within the framework of the two-dimensional linear water wave theory where the upper layer is covered by a thin uniform sheet of ice modeled as a thin elastic plate. In such a two-layer fluid there exist waves with two different modes, one with a lower wave number propagate along the ice-cover whilst those with a higher wave number propagate along the interface. An incident wave of a particular wave number gets reflected and transmitted over the bottom undulation into waves of both modes. Perturbation analysis in conjunction with the Fourier transform technique is used to derive the first-order corrections of reflection and transmission coefficients for both the modes due to incident waves of two different modes. One special type of bottom topography is considered as an example to evaluate the related coefficients in detail. These coefficients are depicted in graphical forms to demonstrate the transformation of wave energy between the two modes and also to illustrate the effects of the ice sheet and the porosity of the undulating bed.

  7. Little Ice Age in Romania in the Vision of a Syrian Traveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoreanu Elena

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Archdeacon Paul of Aleppo of Damascus accompanied the Patriarch Macarios of Antioch, in Moldavia, Wallachia, Dobrogea for nearly seven years (1652-1659, just in time considered one of the coldest during the Little Ice Age, Maunder Minimum namely (1645-1715. His journey is recorded in his travel diary, written in Arabic and translated into Romanian in 1900. Romanian historians were particularly concerned with the information provided by the passenger about the towns, monasteries, and farmhouses, aspects of daily life, customs, habits and Romanian economy countries. But Paul of Aleppo describe and climate issues, particularly cold winters with frost Danube, snowy, storm at sea, rain, floods, etc. It is a very rich source of information in this area, so far little taken into consideration, showing that the Little Ice Age was also evident in Eastern Europe.

  8. An additional planet as a model for the Pleistocene Ice Age

    CERN Document Server

    Wölfli, W; Nufer, R

    2002-01-01

    We propose a model for the Pleistocene Ice Age, assuming the following scenario: Between 3 Myr and 11.5 kyr BP a Mars-sized object existed which moved in a highly eccentric orbit. Originating from this object, gas clouds with a complex dynamics reduced Earth's insolation and caused a drop in the global temperature. In a close encounter, 11.5 kyr ago, tidal forces deformed the Earth. While the shape of the gyroscope Earth relaxed, the North Pole moved geographically from Greenland to its present position. During this close encounter, the object was torn to pieces, each of which subsequently evaporated or plunged into the sun. These events terminated the Ice Age Epoch.

  9. Impact of Ice Ages on the genetic structure of trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascoux, Martin; Palmé, Anna E; Cheddadi, Rachid; Latta, Robert G

    2004-02-29

    Data on the genetic structure of tree and shrub populations on the continental scale have accumulated dramatically over the past decade. However, our ability to make inferences on the impact of the last ice age still depends crucially on the availability of informative palaeoecological data. This is well illustrated by the results from a recent project, during which new pollen fossil maps were established and the variation in chloroplast DNA was studied in 22 European species of trees and shrubs. Species exhibit very different levels of genetic variation between and within populations, and obviously went through very different histories after Ice Ages. However, when palaeoecological data are non-informative, inferences on past history are difficult to draw from entirely genetic data. On the other hand, as illustrated by a study in ponderosa pine, when we can infer the species' history with some certainty, coalescent simulations can be used and new hypotheses can be tested.

  10. The Great Ice Age cycles associated with the variation of the atmospheric heat engine efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤懋苍; 郭维栋

    2000-01-01

    Investigating all the Great Ice Age events throughout the Earth’s history, each was found to follow a strong mountain-making process. Therefore, a hypothesis was put forward with its causality chain as: strong mountain-making process→great disparity in topography on the Earth surface→introducing efficient atmospheric circulation system (plateau monsoon)→increase in global atmospheric heat engine efficiency →generating more atmospheric kinetic energy → enhancing the planetary westerly (under the condition that the huge relief is longitudinal on the whole )→widening the temperature difference between the equator and the polar regions (restrained by the thermal wind law)→sharp cooling in high latitudes and the polars (supposing the solar radiation was approximately constant)→forming a Great Ice Age event.

  11. The Great Ice Age cycles associated with the variation of the atmospheric heat engine efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Investigating all the Great Ice Age events throughout the Earth's history, each was found to follow a strong mountain-making process. Therefore, a hypothesis was put forward with its causality chain as: strong mountain-making process→great disparity in topography on the Earth surface→introducing efficient atmospheric circulation system (plateau monsoon)→increase in global atmospheric heat engine efficiency→generating more atmospheric kinetic energy→enhancing the planetary westerly (under the condition that the huge relief is longitudinal on the whole )→widening the temperature difference between the equator and the polar regions (restrained by the thermal wind law)→sharp cooling in high latitudes and the polars (supposing the solar radiation was approximately constant)→forming a Great Ice Age event.

  12. Rate and style of ice stream retreat constrained by new surface-exposure ages: The Minch, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradwell, Tom; Small, David; Fabel, Derek; Dove, Dayton; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Clark, Chris; Consortium, Britice-Chrono

    2016-04-01

    Chronologically constrained studies of former ice-sheet extents and dynamics are important for understanding past cryospheric responses and modelling future ice-sheet and sea-level change. As part of the BRITICE-CHRONO project, we present new geomorphological and chronological data from a marine-terminating ice stream system in NW Europe that operated during the Late Weichselian Glaciation. A suite of 51 cosmogenic-nuclide exposure ages from ice sheet moraines and glacially transported boulders constrain the maximum extent of the ice sheet on the continental shelf (~28 ka BP) and its subsequent retreat, between ~27 and 16 ka BP, into a large marine embayment (ca. 7000 km2; the Minch, NW Scotland). Recently acquired swath bathymetry and acoustic sub-bottom profiler data reveal several large transverse grounding-zone wedges up to 40 m thick and 5 km wide with diagnostic acoustic-facies architecture. These seabed sediment wedges mark former quasi-stable positions of grounded marine-terminating ice-stream fronts; their size and thickness suggest long-lived stillstands of the order of centuries. Statistically significant clusters of exposure ages from glacial deposits on islands and intervening headlands shed important new light on the age of these marine grounding-zone wedges and, by inference, the rate and timing of Minch palaeo-ice stream retreat. We find strong evidence for episodic ice stream retreat on the continental shelf between ~28-24 ka BP, in the outer Minch between ~24-22 ka BP, and in the central Minch between 22-18.5 ka BP. In contrast, final ice stream deglaciation (probably rapid and uninterrupted - with the ice sheet margin at or close to the present-day coastline in NW Scotland by 16.1 ka BP. It is hoped that these results will form the empirical basis for future ice-sheet modelling of this dynamically sensitive sector of the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  13. Effects of sudden mixing in the solar core on solar neutrinos and ice ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, D.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Some numerical experiments with a solar model have been conducted in connection with the hypothesis regarding the effects of mixing in the solar core. Questions concerning a plausible mechanism by which such a mixing could be produced are explored. The variation of solar luminosity throughout the numerical experiments is shown. In connection with a great change in luminosity after a second mixing, it is suggested that the earth is presently undergoing an ice age.

  14. Abrupt onset and intensification of the Little Ice Age in Arctic Canada linked to explosive volcanism and sea-ice/ocean feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Refsnider, K. A.; Zhong, Y.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Lehman, S. J.; Southon, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    At high northern latitudes the most reliable monitors of summer temperature are glaciers and ice caps. Small ice caps are multi-decadal integrators of climate. Precise 14C dates on rooted vegetation exposed by recent recession of more than 70 different ice caps that have remained perpetually frozen to their beds since their inception date ice-cap inception at that site. Unlike valley glacier moraines that are not formed until long after the initial climate shift, entombed plants date the moment of a persistent summer cooling. The composite probability density function of the 138 calibrated 14C ages indicates that ice caps expanded in four discrete intervals within the past 2 ka, with the most abrupt ice-cap growth ~1250 AD following three centuries of relative warmth, and intensified ice expansion ~1450 AD, with maximum ice cover ~1850 AD. These intervals of sudden and sustained ice expansion coincide with the three most volcanically perturbed half centuries of the past millennium. Separating the impacts of solar and volcanic forcings in the late Holocene has been vexing because decades of low solar irradiance largely coincide with decades of frequent explosive volcanism. Transient simulations with a fully coupled climate model show that the main features of our proxy data can be matched by decadally paced explosive volcanism alone, perpetuated by feedbacks related to consequent sea-ice expansion and export into the northern North Atlantic. Exported sea ice cools and freshens surface waters there, leading to a reduction in the AMOC and consequently perpetuation of an expanded sea ice state. The coincidence of low decadal solar irradiance with decades of explosive volcanism suggests that volcanic impacts may have been amplified by solar variability, but scaling the proxies of past solar irradiance remains uncertain. The persistence in the Eastern Canadian Arctic of some ice caps that formed 5000 years ago and remained intact until melting in the past decade

  15. Carbonate verse silicate Sr isotope in lake sediments and its response to Little Ice Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of silicate (acid-insoluble, AI) and carbonate (acid-soluble, AS) of the lake sediments from the Daihai Lake, Inner Mongolia, since the last 500 years are measured respectively, indicating that chemical weathering of silicate minerals was in an early stage since the Little Ice Age within the Daihai watershed by combination with mineral constitute, Rb/Sr ratio and CaCO3 content in the sediments. During the Little Ice Age maximum, an evident peak in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of both silicate and carbonate in sediments suggests that a cold climate condition is unfavorable to dissolving radiogenic strontium from silicate minerals. Meanwhile, the variation of 87Sr/86Sr ratios of silicate and carbonate also reflects a projected warming climate favorable to intensifying chemical weathering after the Little Ice Age. Consequently, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of both silicate and carbonate in inland lake sediments can be used as an effective proxy of the past climate in single watershed.

  16. Modulation of ice ages via precession and dust-albedo feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Ellis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a simple and novel proposal for the modulation and rhythm of ice-ages and interglacials during the late Pleistocene. While the standard Milankovitch-precession theory fails to explain the long intervals between interglacials, these can be accounted for by a novel forcing and feedback system involving CO2, dust and albedo. During the glacial period, the high albedo of the northern ice sheets drives down global temperatures and CO2 concentrations, despite subsequent precessional forcing maxima. Over the following millennia more CO2 is sequestered in the oceans and atmospheric concentrations eventually reach a critical minima of about 200 ppm, which combined with arid conditions, causes a die-back of temperate and boreal forests and grasslands, especially at high altitude. The ensuing soil erosion generates dust storms, resulting in increased dust deposition and lower albedo on the northern ice sheets. As northern hemisphere insolation increases during the next Milankovitch cycle, the dust-laden ice-sheets absorb considerably more insolation and undergo rapid melting, which forces the climate into an interglacial period. The proposed mechanism is simple, robust, and comprehensive in its scope, and its key elements are well supported by empirical evidence.

  17. Modulation of ice ages via precession and dust-albedo feedbacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ralph Ellis; Michael Palmer

    2016-01-01

    We present here a simple and novel proposal for the modulation and rhythm of ice-ages and interglacials during the late Pleistocene. While the standard Milankovitch-precession theory fails to explain the long intervals between interglacials, these can be accounted for by a novel forcing and feedback system involving CO2, dust and albedo. During the glacial period, the high albedo of the northern ice sheets drives down global temperatures and CO2 concentrations, despite subsequent precessional forcing maxima. Over the following millennia more CO2 is sequestered in the oceans and atmospheric con-centrations eventually reach a critical minima of about 200 ppm, which combined with arid conditions, causes a die-back of temperate and boreal forests and grasslands, especially at high altitude. The ensuing soil erosion generates dust storms, resulting in increased dust deposition and lower albedo on the northern ice sheets. As northern hemisphere insolation increases during the next Milankovitch cycle, the dust-laden ice-sheets absorb considerably more insolation and undergo rapid melting, which forces the climate into an interglacial period. The proposed mechanism is simple, robust, and comprehensive in its scope, and its key elements are well supported by empirical evidence.

  18. Climate change threatens archaeologically significant ice patches: insights into their age, internal structure, mass balance and climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand Ødegård, Rune; Nesje, Atle; Isaksen, Ketil; Andreassen, Liss Marie; Eiken, Trond; Schwikowski, Margit; Uglietti, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous spectacular archaeological discoveries worldwide related to melting ice patches and the emerging field of glacial archaeology, governing processes related to ice patch development during the Holocene and their sensitivity to climate change are still largely unexplored. Here we present new results from an extensive 6-year (2009-2015) field experiment at the Juvfonne ice patch in Jotunheimen in central southern Norway. Our results show that the ice patch has existed continuously since the late Mesolithic period. Organic-rich layers and carbonaceous aerosols embedded in clear ice show ages spanning from modern at the surface to ca. 7600 cal years BP at the bottom. This is the oldest dating of ice in mainland Norway. The expanding ice patch covered moss mats appearing along the margin of Juvfonne about 2000 years ago. During the study period, the mass balance record showed a strong negative balance, and the annual balance is highly asymmetric over short distances. Snow accumulation is poorly correlated with estimated winter precipitation, and single storm events may contribute significantly to the total winter balance. Snow accumulation is approx. 20 % higher in the frontal area compared to the upper central part of the ice patch. There is sufficient meltwater to bring the permeable snowpack to an isothermal state within a few weeks in early summer. Below the seasonal snowpack, ice temperatures are between -2 and -4 °C. Juvfonne has clear ice stratification of isochronic origin.

  19. Duration of Greenland Stadial 22 and ice-gas Δage from counting of annual layers in Greenland NGRIP ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bigler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution measurements of chemical impurities and methane concentrations in Greenland ice core samples from the early glacial period allow the extension of annual-layer counted chronologies and the improvement of gas age-ice age difference (Δage essential to the synchronization of ice core records. We report high-resolution measurements of a 50 m section of the NorthGRIP ice core and corresponding annual layer thicknesses in order to constrain the duration of the Greenland Stadial 22 (GS-22 between Greenland Interstadials (GIs 21 and 22, for which inconsistent durations and ages have been reported from Greenland and Antarctic ice core records as well as European speleothems. Depending on the chronology used, GS-22 occurred between approximately 89 (end of GI-22 and 83 kyr b2k (onset of GI-21. From annual layer counting, we find that GS-22 lasted between 2696 and 3092 years and was followed by a GI-21 pre-cursor event lasting between 331 and 369 yr. Our layer-based counting agrees with the duration of stadial 22 as determined from the NALPS speleothem record (3250 ± 526 yr but not with that of the GICC05modelext chronology (2620 yr or an alternative chronology based on gas-marker synchronization to EPICA Dronning Maud Land ice core. These results show that GICC05modelext overestimates accumulation and/or underestimates thinning in this early part of the last glacial period. We also revise the possible ranges of NorthGRIP Δdepth (5.49 to 5.85 m and Δage (498 to 601 yr at the warming onset of GI-21 as well as the Δage range at the onset of the GI-21 precursor warming (523 to 654 yr, observing that temperature (represented by the δ15N proxy increases before CH4 concentration by no more than a few decades.

  20. 飞机除冰液在冰中的渗透性能影响因素分析%Research Aircraft Deicing Fluid Permeability of Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈元; 李志强; 张帆; 彭华乔; 于新华

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the ability of aircraft deicing fluid airworthiness certification, making a research and analysis of aircraft deicing fluid influence on the permeability of ice through temperature, freezing point, osmotic pressure and the molecular weight respectively, according to《AIR 6211 Ice Penetration Test Method for Runways and Taxiways Deicing/Anti-icing Chemicals》. The results show that the depth of aircraft deicing fluid on the penetration of ice decreases as the temperature is reduced. The permeability of Newtonian-fluid is better than non Newtonian-fluid at the same temperature. The permeability of aircraft deicing fluid has no direct relation to the freezing point and associated with osmotic pressure. Moreover, the higher pressure, the better permeability of ice.%为了提高飞机除冰液适航验证能力,根据《AIR 6211 Ice Penetration Test Method for Runways and Taxiways Dei-cing/Anti-icing Chemicals》标准试验方法,研究分析了温度、冰点、渗透压和分子大小对飞机除冰液渗透性能的影响。试验结果表明:随着温度的降低,飞机除冰液对冰的渗透性逐渐减小;在相同温度下,牛顿流体型除冰液的渗透性优于非牛顿流体型除冰液;飞机除冰液的冰点和渗透性无直接关系而与渗透压相关,且渗透压越大,对冰的渗透性越好。

  1. Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet: Preliminary 10Be Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Marcott, S. A.; Lunkka, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Caffee, M. W.; Carlson, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The response of ice sheets to a warming climate is not well understood. Because we are limited in our understanding of present dynamics, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a warming climate along with their contribution to sea-level rise. These reconstructions also serve as critical constraints for ice sheet modeling efforts. Here, we present a suite of new 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland, that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. Dates from southern Finland, beginning at the Salpausselka Younger Dryas moraine (11.5 × 0.7 ka, n=4), inland southern Finland near Jyvaskyla (11.5 × 0.5ka, n=2), and coastal Finland (~60km from Gulf of Bothnia) near Vimpeli (11.5 × 0.4ka, n=4) indicate a rapid retreat following the Younger Dryas for Southern Finland (~500km within uncertainty of ages). Preliminary dates also exist for Northern Finland, near Inari (10.8 × 0.5ka, n=4) and near Oulu (10.5 × 0.6 ka, n = 4) suggesting a later retreat in the north. Dates from southern Sweden, near Skovde (12.73 × 0.8ka, n=4) to Mora (10.41 × 0.6ka, n=5) suggest a slower retreat (over ~400km). Lastly, dates in Northwestern Sweden suggest a final termination of the SIS around 9.4 × 0.7ka (n = 3). Additional ages are now being processed at PRIME Lab, Purdue University, which will further strengthen our understanding of SIS retreat from all sampled sites. These new data will help to constrain the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, and establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, which will improve our understanding of ice-sheet response to a warming climate.

  2. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  3. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tao, E-mail: huangt@ahu.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Sun, Liguang, E-mail: slg@ustc.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yin, Xijie [Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540–2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540–1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition. - Highlights: • Emperor penguin colonized at Amanda Bay, East Antarctic as early as AD 1540. • Populations of emperor penguin at Amanda Bay increase during the little ice age. • Depleted N isotope ratios of Emperor penguins during the LIA were observed.

  4. Little Ice Age advance and retreat of Glaciar Jorge Montt, Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A.; Koppes, M.; Bravo, C.; Aravena, J. C.

    2012-03-01

    Glaciar Jorge Montt (48°20' S/73°30' W), one of the main tidewater glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Icefield (SPI), has experienced the greatest terminal retreat observed in Patagonia during the past century, with a recession of 19.5 km between 1898 and 2011. This retreat has revealed trees laying subglacially until 2003. These trees were dated using radiocarbon, yielding burial ages between 460 and 250 cal yrs BP. The presence of old growth forest during those dates indicates that Glaciar Jorge Montt was upvalley of its present position before the commonly recognized Little Ice Age (LIA) period in Patagonia. The post-LIA retreat was most likely triggered by climatically induced changes during the 20th century; however, Glaciar Jorge Montt has responded more dramatically than its neighbours. The retreat of Jorge Montt opened a 19.5 km long fjord since 1898, which reaches depths in excess of 390 m. The bathymetry is well correlated with glacier retreat rates, suggesting that dynamic responses of the glacier are at least partially connected to near buoyancy conditions at the ice front, resulting in high calving fluxes, accelerating thinning rates and rapid ice velocities.

  5. Enhancement of volcanism and geothermal heat flux by ice-age cycling: A stress modeling study of Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nathan T.; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    Ice-age cycling of the Greenland ice sheet likely contributed to locally elevated subglacial geothermal heat fluxes (GHFs), based on recent thermal modeling. Borehole and geophysical data indicate higher GHF in some areas than suggested by current knowledge of underlying geology, particularly at the head of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream. Changes in lithospheric loading during ice-sheet growth and decay cycles produce large and geologically rapid changes in the effective stress state beneath and near the ice sheet. Oscillations in melt fraction from cyclic loading through multiple ice-age cycles will enhance upward magma migration through the nonlinear increase of melt migration velocity with melt fraction. We simulate periodic ice-sheet loading scenarios along an east-west transect across central Greenland on an Elastic Lithosphere, Relaxed Asthenosphere Earth model. Under likely parameter ranges, deviatoric stresses in the elastic lithosphere across widespread regions are sufficiently high to meaningfully enhance dike emplacement and also allow vug-wave propagation in some scenarios. Stress patterns migrate laterally in response to ice-sheet dynamics, favoring multistage magma ascent. If melt occurs at depth, our modeling suggests that ice-age cycling could help it migrate upward to shallow depth or erupt, contributing to the high observed GHF. Furthermore, shallow magma emplacement might feed hydrothermal systems exploiting enhanced faulting or fracturing from ice-age cycling, adding to elevated GHF. The preglacial passage of the Iceland-Jan Mayen hot spot could have sourced such magmas. Direct observations of these lithospheric processes needed to further constrain our models are limited, highlighting the value of more targeted geophysical studies informing future modeling.

  6. Little Ice Age glaciers in Britain: Glacier–climate modelling in the Cairngorm Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Harrison; Ann V. Rowan; Neil F. Glasser; Jasper Knight; Mitchell A. Plummer; Stephanie C. Mills

    2014-02-01

    It is widely believed that the last glaciers in the British Isles disappeared at the end of the Younger Dryas stadial (12.9–11.7 cal. kyr BP). Here, we use a glacier–climate model driven by data from local weather stations to show for the first time that glaciers developed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the Cairngorm Mountains. Our model is forced from contemporary conditions by a realistic difference in mean annual air temperature of -1.5 degrees C and an increase in annual precipitation of 10%, and confirmed by sensitivity analyses. These results are supported by the presence of small boulder moraines well within Younger Dryas ice limits, and by a dating programme on a moraine in one cirque. As a result, we argue that the last glaciers in the Cairngorm Mountains (and perhaps elsewhere in upland Britain) existed in the LIA within the last few hundred years, rather than during the Younger Dryas.

  7. Holocene glacial history of the west Greenland Ice Sheet inferred from cosmogenic exposure ages and threshold lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, K. H.; Colding, Sune Oluf

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use a combination of 10Be exposure ages and threshold lakes to constrain the ice sheet history in Godthåbs- and Buksefjorden, west Greenland (63-64°N) during the Holocene. The 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages have been used to quantify both the ice retreat and thinning of the west ......) and this suggest that the ice sheet in this area may have been more retracted and probably more sensitive to climate change than other areas in south and west Greenland....

  8. An abrupt weakening of the subpolar gyre as trigger of Little Ice Age-type episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Chamarro, Eduardo; Zanchettin, Davide; Lohmann, Katja; Jungclaus, Johann H.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanism of a decadal-scale weakening shift in the strength of the subpolar gyre (SPG) that is found in one among three last millennium simulations with a state-of-the-art Earth system model. The SPG shift triggers multicentennial anomalies in the North Atlantic climate driven by long-lasting internal feedbacks relating anomalous oceanic and atmospheric circulation, sea ice extent, and upper-ocean salinity in the Labrador Sea. Yet changes throughout or after the shift are not associated with a persistent weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation or shifts in the North Atlantic Oscillation. The anomalous climate state of the North Atlantic simulated after the shift agrees well with climate reconstructions from within the area, which describe a transition between a stronger and weaker SPG during the relatively warm medieval climate and the cold Little Ice Age respectively. However, model and data differ in the timing of the onset. The simulated SPG shift is caused by a rapid increase in the freshwater export from the Arctic and associated freshening in the upper Labrador Sea. Such freshwater anomaly relates to prominent thickening of the Arctic sea ice, following the cluster of relatively small-magnitude volcanic eruptions by 1600 CE. Sensitivity experiments without volcanic forcing can nonetheless produce similar abrupt events; a necessary causal link between the volcanic cluster and the SPG shift can therefore be excluded. Instead, preconditioning by internal variability explains discrepancies in the timing between the simulated SPG shift and the reconstructed estimates for the Little Ice Age onset.

  9. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S. A.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Kjær, K. H.; Bevan, S.; Luckman, A.; Aschwanden, A.; Bjørk, A. A.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Box, J. E.; van den Broeke, M.; van Dam, T. M.; Fitzner, A.

    2014-08-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond such episodic events is required. Here, we extend the observational record of marginal thinning of Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers from 10 to more than 80 years. We show that, although the frontal portion of Helheim Glacier thinned by more than 100 m between 2003 and 2006, it thickened by more than 50 m during the previous two decades. In contrast, Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier underwent minor thinning of 40-50 m from 1981 to 1998 and major thinning of more than 100 m after 2003. Extending the record back to the end of the Little Ice Age (prior to 1930) shows no thinning of Helheim Glacier from its maximum extent during the Little Ice Age to 1981, while Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier underwent substantial thinning of 230 to 265 m. Comparison of sub-surface water temperature anomalies and variations in air temperature to records of thickness and velocity change suggest that both glaciers are highly sensitive to short-term atmospheric and ocean forcing, and respond very quickly to small fluctuations. On century timescales, however, multiple external parameters (e.g. outlet glacier shape) may dominate the mass change. These findings suggest that special care must be taken in the projection of future dynamic ice loss.

  10. Experimental determination of salt partition coefficients between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII: implication for the composition of the deep ocean and the geodynamics of large icy moons and water rich planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Hervé; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The potential habitability of extraterrestrial large aqueous reservoir in icy moons and exoplanets requires an input of nutrients and chemicals that may come from the rocky part of planetary body. Because of the presence of high pressure (HP) water ices (VI, VII, etc.) between the liquid ocean and the silicates, such interactions are considered to be limited in large icy moons, like Ganymede and Titan, and water rich exoplanets. In the case of salty-rich oceans, recent experimental and modeling works have shown that aqueous fluids can be stable at higher pressures [1, 2]. This can ultimately allow direct interaction with the rocky core of icy moons. This effect is nevertheless limited and for larger bodies such as water rich exoplanets with much higher pressures in their hydrosphere, HP ice should be present between the rocky core and a putative ocean. Salts are highly incompatible with low pressure ice Ih, but recent experimental work has shown that alkali metal and halogen salts are moderately incompatible with ice VII, that can incorporate up to several mol/kg of salts [3, 4, 5]. As far as we know, no similar study has been done on ice VI, a HP ice phase expected inside large icy moons. We present here the first experimental data on the partition coefficient of RbI salt between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII using in-situ synchrotron X-Ray single crystal diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence mapping (ESRF - ID-27 beam line [6]). Our experiment enable us to observe a density inversion between ice VI and the salty fluid, and to measure the values of salt partition coefficients between the aqueous fluid and ice VI (strongly incompatible) and ice VII (moderately incompatible). Using the volumes determined with X-Ray diffraction, we were able to measure the density of salty ice VI and ice VII and determine that salty ice VI is lighter than pure H2O ice VI. These results are very relevant for the study of water rich planetary bodies interior because the partition

  11. Deep Ocean Circulation Changes During the Transition to the Last Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, D. R.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    The transition between marine isotope stages (MIS) 5a and 4 appears in the stacked benthic foraminferal δ 18O SPECMAP record as a gradual increase in ice volume. In contrast, the transition occurs in the Greenland ice core δ 18O records with two well-developed interstadial events (I19 and I20), which are the first Dansgaard-Oescheger events of the last ice age. The MIS 5b/5a transition appears as a much more rapid warming in both the Greenland ice and benthic δ 18O records. Recent work (Lehmann et al. 2002, Chapman et al. 1999) indicates that climate variability in MIS 5 as indicated in the Greenland ice record was closely interconnected with iceberg discharges, surface temperature changes, and deep ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. In order to determine the response of deep ocean circulation to climate changes from late in MIS 5 to full glacial MIS 4, we have measured Nd isotope ratios from the Fe-Mn portion of core TNO57-21 from the Cape Basin in the South Atlantic. Nd isotopes, unlike nutrient water mass proxies, are not affected by biological fractionation, and reflect the strength of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) signal in the seawater above the core site. Results from cores TNO57-21 and RC11-83 (also from the Cape Basin) indicate that the NADW export to the Southern Ocean has varied on time scales reflecting glacial-interglacial cycles through MIS 4 (Rutberg et al. 2000) and during interstadial events through MIS 3 (Piotrowski et al. Fall AGU), and was stronger and weaker during warmer and colder Northern Hemisphere climate intervals, respectively. The extension of the Nd isotope record to MIS 5a and 5b indicates an increased NADW signal during MIS 5, therefore the long-term pattern of strong and weak NADW export during warm and cold periods persists beyond the last ice age. The Nd isotope pattern during MIS 4 through 5b generally corresponds to the benthic foraminferal δ 13C record from Cape Basin cores (Ninnemann et al. 1999), indicating

  12. Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Farge, Catherine; Williams, Krista H; England, John H

    2013-06-11

    Across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004. In Sverdrup Pass, central Ellesmere Island, rapid glacier retreat is exposing intact plant communities whose radiocarbon dates demonstrate entombment during the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD). The exhumed bryophyte assemblages have exceptional structural integrity (i.e., setae, stem structures, leaf hair points) and have remarkable species richness (60 of 144 extant taxa in Sverdrup Pass). Although the populations are often discolored (blackened), some have developed green stem apices or lateral branches suggesting in vivo regrowth. To test their biological viability, Little Ice Age populations emerging from the ice margin were collected for in vitro growth experiments. Our results include a unique successful regeneration of subglacial bryophytes following 400 y of ice entombment. This finding demonstrates the totipotent capacity of bryophytes, the ability of a cell to dedifferentiate into a meristematic state (analogous to stem cells) and develop a new plant. In polar ecosystems, regrowth of bryophyte tissue buried by ice for 400 y significantly expands our understanding of their role in recolonization of polar landscapes (past or present). Regeneration of subglacial bryophytes broadens the concept of Ice Age refugia, traditionally confined to survival of land plants to sites above and beyond glacier margins. Our results emphasize the unrecognized resilience of bryophytes, which are commonly overlooked vis-a-vis their contribution to the establishment, colonization, and maintenance of polar terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Little Ice Age glacial geomorphology and sedimentology of Portage Glacier, South-Central Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Córdova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of glacial landforms and deposits is important, as it isdifficult to observe processes under modern glaciers and ice-sheets. Thus landscapes and sediments that are the product of present glaciation can give insight into processes that occurred during Pleistocene times. This study investigates the genesis of little ice age glacial landforms present in Portage Glacier, South-Central Alaska. The present day moraine morphology and sedimentology in Portage Glacier valley reveals the presence of two types of till and moraines. The clast-rich sandy diamicton present on the 1852 moraine is interpreted to be a basal till indicating this feature is a pushmoraine representing an advance or a standstill position of Portage Glacier in 1852. The moderately sorted gray sandy boulder gravel present on the 1900 and 1922 moraines is interpreted to be an ice-marginal deposit (ablation till with a mixture of supraglacial and glaciofluvial sediments deposited by slumping and stream sortingprocesses. All of these features are interpreted to be ablation moraines representing glacier retreat and moraine building in 1900 and1922.

  14. Paraglacial dynamics in Little Ice Age glaciated environments in the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Marc; Serrano, Enrique; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Gómez-Ortiz, Antonio; Palacios, David

    2017-04-01

    Three Iberian mountain ranges encompassed glaciers during the Little Ice Age (LIA): the Pyrenees, Cantabrian Mountains and Sierra Nevada. The gradual warming trend initiated during the second half of the XIX century promoted the progressive shrinking of these glaciers, which completely melted during the first half of the 20th century in the Cantabrian Mountains and Sierra Nevada and reduced by 80% of their LIA extent in the Pyrenees. Currently, the formerly glaciated environments are located within the periglacial belt and still present to a major or lesser degree signs of paraglacial activity. LIA moraines are devoid of vegetation and composed of highly unstable sediments that are being intensely mobilized by slope processes. Inside the moraines, different landforms and processes generated following LIA glacial retreat have generated: (i) buried ice trapped within rock debris supplied from the cirque walls, which has also generated rock glaciers and protalus lobes; (ii) semi-permanent snow fields distributed above the ice-patches remnants of the LIA glaciers, and (iii) small periglacial features such as frost mounds, sorted circles and solifluction landforms generated by processes such as solifluction and cryoturbation. Present-day morphodynamics is mostly related to seasonal frost conditions, though patches of permafrost have formed in some areas in contact with the buried ice. This 'geomorphic permafrost' is undergoing a process of degradation since it is not balanced with present-day climate conditions. This is reflected in the occurrence of multiple collapses and subsidences of the debris cover where the frozen bodies sit. In the highest areas of the Pyrenees there is a permafrost belt next to the small glaciated environments in the highest massifs. Finally, we propose a model for paraglacial activity in Iberian mountain ranges and compare it to other mid-latitude mountain environments as well as to other past deglaciation stages.

  15. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust has the potential to modify global climate by influencing the radiative balance of the atmosphere and by supplying iron and other essential limiting micronutrients to the ocean. The scarcity of iron limits marine productivity and carbon uptake in one-quarter of the world ocean where the concentration of major nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) is perennially high. The Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems. Paleoceanographic records from the Subantarctic Atlantic have revealed a remarkable correlation between phytoplankton productivity and aeolian iron flux during glacial periods supporting the iron fertilization hypothesis. In addition, a recent study has shown that peak glacial times and millennial cold events were nearly universally associated not only with increases in dust flux and export production, but also with an increase in nutrient consumption (the last indicated by higher foraminifera-bound δ15N) (Martinez-Garcia et al. 2014). This combination of changes is uniquely consistent with ice age iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Atlantic. The strengthening of the biological pump associated with the observed increase in Subantarctic nutrient consumption during the high-dust intervals of the last two ice ages can explain up to ~40 ppm of the CO2 decrease that characterizes the transitions from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions. However, the impact of iron fertilization in other sectors of the Southern Ocean characterized by lower ice age dust fluxes than the Atlantic remains unclear. A series of recently published records from the Subantarctic Pacific indicate that dust deposition and marine export production were three times higher during glacial periods than during interglacials (Lamy et al. 2014). Here we present new measurements of foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes in a sediment core located in the

  16. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K M; McManus, J F; Anderson, R F; Ren, H; Sigman, D M; Winckler, G; Fleisher, M Q; Marcantonio, F; Ravelo, A C

    2016-01-28

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age--the Last Glacial Period (LGP)--but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the (232)Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, (231)Pa/(230)Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ(15)N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  17. Climate hazards, adaptation and "resilience" of societies (early Little Ice Age, west of France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athimon, Emmanuelle; Maanan, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years, climate hazards and adaptation have received more attention due to the current climate change. Climate historians have gathered strong evidence that the world's climate has evolved over the past millennium and one of the most significant changes took place during the Little Ice Age. Recently, a set of questions has emerged: what were the effects of the Little Ice Age on human's societies? How did humans adapt to these climate changes? How did they react to extreme weather-related events? Using examples of climate hazards from the West of France during the beginning of the Little Ice Age (xivth-xviith centuries) such as storms, flooding, drought, harsh winters, the poster aims at showing how the past societies can constitute a source of inspiration for present ones. Through schemas, this research exposes the system's rebound capacity, points out the importance of the historical depth in research on human's adaptation and resilience and shows the value of integrating a historical approach. It reveals that History contributes to the knowledge of the relationship between societies and climate hazards. Data on climate hazards and adaptation of societies stem from historical sources such as chronicles, diaries, books of accounts, records of cities repairs. To protect themselves and their goods, medieval and modern societies had developed specific skills, practices and strategies. From the xivth to the xviiith century, there is an increase of defense by dikes in the low Loire, as for example the construction of those amongst Longué and Ponts-de-Cé between the early xivth century and 1407. The French kingdom's authorities also tried increasingly to provide technical, material, logistical and fiscal support: for instance, during the winter 1564-1565, several bridges have been destroyed by a river flooding in Nantes. The King Charles IX then offered to people of Nantes part of the funds from taxes on the main activities such as the

  18. Implications of 36Cl exposure ages from Skye, northwest Scotland for the timing of ice stream deglaciation and deglacial ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Austin, William E. N.; Bates, Richard; Benn, Douglas I.; Scourse, James D.; Bourlès, Didier L.; Hibbert, Fiona D.

    2016-10-01

    Geochronological constraints on the deglaciation of former marine based ice streams provide information on the rates and modes by which marine based ice sheets have responded to external forcing factors such as climate change. This paper presents new 36Cl cosmic ray exposure dating from boulders located on two moraines (Glen Brittle and Loch Scavaig) in southern Skye, northwest Scotland. Ages from the Glen Brittle moraines constrain deglaciation of a major marine terminating ice stream, the Barra-Donegal Ice Stream that drained the former British-Irish Ice Sheet, depending on choice of production method and scaling model this occurred 19.9 ± 1.5-17.6 ± 1.3 ka ago. We compare this timing of deglaciation to existing geochronological data and changes in a variety of potential forcing factors constrained through proxy records and numerical models to determine what deglaciation age is most consistent with existing evidence. Another small section of moraine, the Scavaig moraine, is traced offshore through multibeam swath-bathymetry and interpreted as delimiting a later stillstand/readvance stage following ice stream deglaciation. Additional cosmic ray exposure dating from the onshore portion of this moraine indicate that it was deposited 16.3 ± 1.3-15.2 ± 0.9 ka ago. When calculated using the most up-to-date scaling scheme this time of deposition is, within uncertainty, the same as the timing of a widely identified readvance, the Wester Ross Readvance, observed elsewhere in northwest Scotland. This extends the area over which this readvance has potentially occurred, reinforcing the view that it was climatically forced.

  19. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K. M.; McManus, J. F.; Anderson, R. F.; Ren, H.; Sigman, D. M.; Winckler, G.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Marcantonio, F.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age—the Last Glacial Period (LGP)—but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the 232Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, 231Pa/230Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ15N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  20. Episodic Neoglacial Cryosphere Expansion Reconstructed from 14C Ages of Ice-Entombed Plants on Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Lehman, S.; Landvik, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Hemisphere cryosphere's response to the monotonic decline in summer insolation through the Holocene has been irregular expansion, interrupted by periods of retreat, culminating in the Little Ice Age, when most glaciers attained their maximum late Holocene dimensions. This non-linear response to near-linear forcing implies other factors modulate the radiative effects of the regular insolation decline. Understanding how the Earth system accomplishes this modulation is relevant to the development of reliable models for future climate change. Accurately dating the onset of persistent summer coolings across the Arctic is a first step toward developing this understanding. Here we report 52 precise radiocarbon dates on rooted plants emerging from beneath receding glaciers on Svalbard that define times when colder summers led to snowline depression and an expanded cryosphere. The earliest persistent depression of snowline documented by our dates occurred between 4.0 and 3.4 ka, but with little additional summer cooling until early in the first millennium AD. Episodes of subsequent summer cooling were centered on 240-340, 410-540 and 670-770 AD, followed by additional cooling between 1000 and 1230 AD, and between 1300 and 1470 AD. Cooling that occurred after 1470 AD, includes of the Little Ice Age when the Svalbard cryosphere reached its maximum Neoglacial dimensions. We suggest that in addition to insolation forcing, irregular reductions in the strength of the North Atlantic Current and expansions of Arctic Ocean sea ice were dominant factors that led to episodic snowline depression over Svalbard, but the extent to which these changes are linked to radiative forcing from volcanism or solar irradiance as opposed to unforced variability remains unclear. The widespread exposure of entombed plants dating from the first millennium AD suggests that Svalbard's average summer temperatures of the past century now exceed those of any century since at least 700 AD

  1. Atmospheric aging of dust ice nucleating particles - a combined laboratory and field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, Yvonne; Rodríguez, Sergio; García, M. Isabel; Linke, Claudia; Schnaiter, Martin; Zipori, Assaf; Crawford, Ian; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Sierau, Berko

    2016-04-01

    than the rather fresh dust at Izaña. This suggests that atmospheric aging and processing decreases the ice nucleation efficiency of Saharan dust during advection to Central Europe.

  2. Development of Non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme for a two-fluid, three-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Yoon, H. Y.; Bae, S. W

    2007-11-15

    A pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. In this code, the semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme has been adapted to a 'non-staggered' grid. Using several conceptual problems, the numerical scheme has been verified. The results of the verifications are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, two-phase mixture flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. The non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme, which has been developed in this study, will be a starting point of a new code development that adopts an unstructured finite volume method.

  3. Ice-nucleating particle emissions from photochemically aged diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Jathar, S. H.; Kodros, J. K.; Levin, E. J. T.; Galang, A. M.; Friedman, B.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Pierce, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Immersion-mode ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations from an off-road diesel engine were measured using a continuous-flow diffusion chamber at -30°C. Both petrodiesel and biodiesel were utilized, and the exhaust was aged up to 1.5 photochemically equivalent days using an oxidative flow reactor. We found that aged and unaged diesel exhaust of both fuels is not likely to contribute to atmospheric INP concentrations at mixed-phase cloud conditions. To explore this further, a new limit-of-detection parameterization for ice nucleation on diesel exhaust was developed. Using a global-chemical transport model, potential black carbon INP (INPBC) concentrations were determined using a current literature INPBC parameterization and the limit-of-detection parameterization. Model outputs indicate that the current literature parameterization likely overemphasizes INPBC concentrations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. These results highlight the need to integrate new INPBC parameterizations into global climate models as generalized INPBC parameterizations are not valid for diesel exhaust.

  4. The Asian monsoon over the past 640,000 years and ice age terminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Sinha, Ashish; Spötl, Christoph; Yi, Liang; Chen, Shitao; Kelly, Megan; Kathayat, Gayatri; Wang, Xianfeng; Li, Xianglei; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Ning, Youfeng; Zhang, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen isotope records from Chinese caves characterize changes in both the Asian monsoon and global climate. Here, using our new speleothem data, we extend the Chinese record to cover the full uranium/thorium dating range, that is, the past 640,000 years. The record’s length and temporal precision allow us to test the idea that insolation changes caused by the Earth’s precession drove the terminations of each of the last seven ice ages as well as the millennia-long intervals of reduced monsoon rainfall associated with each of the terminations. On the basis of our record’s timing, the terminations are separated by four or five precession cycles, supporting the idea that the ‘100,000-year’ ice age cycle is an average of discrete numbers of precession cycles. Furthermore, the suborbital component of monsoon rainfall variability exhibits power in both the precession and obliquity bands, and is nearly in anti-phase with summer boreal insolation. These observations indicate that insolation, in part, sets the pace of the occurrence of millennial-scale events, including those associated with terminations and ‘unfinished terminations’.

  5. A permafrost glacial hypothesis – Permafrost carbon might help explaining the Pleistocene ice ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Zech

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several ~100 ka glacial-interglacial cycles, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was closely coupled to global temperature, which indicates the importance of CO2 as a greenhouse gas. The reasons for changes in atmospheric CO2 have mainly been sought in the ocean, but remain elusive. Moreover, the mid-Pleistocene transition from the ‘41 ka world’ during the early Pleistocene before ~0.7 Ma to the ~100 ka ice age cycles is poorly understood. The classical Milankovitch theory of summer insolation forcing at high northern latitudes can not fully explain the Pleistocene ice age rhythm. Based on the recent findings that the amount of soil organic carbon stored in high-latitude permafrost regions has been greatly underestimated and the simple logic that permafrost regions and respective carbon pools were likely much larger during glacials than during interglacials, a ‘permafrost glacial hypothesis’ is proposed: (i Gradual sequestration of CO2 in permafrost soils during coolings and rapid release of CO2 and methane during terminations, respectively, provide important positive feedbacks for the climate. (ii Integrated annual insolation at the southern and thus most sensitive permafrost boundary may act as a trigger for global climate changes. (iii The mid-Pleistocene transition might be readily explained with permafrost extents reaching ~45°N during the long-term Pleistocene cooling, resulting in a transition from high-latitude obliquity (~41 ka to mid-latitude eccentricity (~100 ka forcing.

  6. Onset and ending of the late Palaeozoic ice age triggered by tectonically paced rock weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddéris, Yves; Donnadieu, Yannick; Carretier, Sébastien; Aretz, Markus; Dera, Guillaume; Macouin, Mélina; Regard, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    The onset of the late Palaeozoic ice age about 340 million years ago has been attributed to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentrations associated with expansion of land plants, as plants both enhance silicate rock weathering--which consumes CO2--and increase the storage of organic carbon on land. However, plant expansion and carbon uptake substantially predate glaciation. Here we use climate and carbon cycle simulations to investigate the potential effects of the uplift of the equatorial Hercynian mountains and the assembly of Pangaea on the late Palaeozoic carbon cycle. In our simulations, mountain uplift during the Late Carboniferous caused an increase in physical weathering that removed the thick soil cover that had inhibited silicate weathering. The resulting increase in chemical weathering was sufficient to cause atmospheric CO2 concentrations to fall below the levels required to initiate glaciation. During the Permian, the lowering of the mountains led to a re-establishment of thick soils, whilst the assembly of Pangaea promoted arid conditions in continental interiors that were unfavourable for silicate weathering. These changes allowed CO2 concentrations to rise to levels sufficient to terminate the glacial event. Based on our simulations, we suggest that tectonically influenced carbon cycle changes during the late Palaeozoic were sufficient to initiate and terminate the late Palaeozoic ice age.

  7. The Impact of the Little Ice Age on Coccolithophores in the Central Mediterranea Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Incarbona

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Little Ice Age (LIA is the last episode of a series of Holocene climatic anomalies. There is still little knowledge on the response of the marine environment to the pronounced cooling of the LIA and to the transition towards the 20th century global warming. Here we present decadal-scale coccolithophore data from four short cores recovered from the central Mediterranean Sea (northern Sicily Channel and Tyrrhenian Sea, which on the basis of 210Pb activity span the last 200–350 years. The lowermost part of the record of one of the cores from the Sicily Channel, Station 407, which extends down to 1650 AD, is characterized by drastic changes in productivity. Specifically, below 1850 AD, the decrease in abundance of F. profunda and the increase of placoliths, suggest increased productivity. The chronology of this change is related to the main phase of the Little Ice Age, which might have impacted the hydrography of the southern coast of Sicily and promoted vertical mixing in the water column. The comparison with climatic forcings points out the importance of stronger and prolonged northerly winds, together with decreased solar irradiance.

  8. Mount Logan Ice Core Evidence for Secular Changes in the Climate of the North Pacific Following the End of the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K.; Alverson, K.; Holdsworth, G.

    2003-12-01

    The relatively short length of most instrumental climate datasets restricts the study of variability and trends that exists in the climate system. This is particularly true regarding the atmosphere where high quality spatially dense data exists only since the late 1940s. With this data, the Pacific North America pattern (PNA) has been identified as one of the dominant modes of variability in the atmosphere that plays an important role in the climate of North America. This pattern consists of alternating regions of high and low geopotential height anomalies in the middle and upper troposphere arching from the tropical Pacific to North America. It is thought to be the result of a standing Rossby wave pattern forced by the upper-atmospheric convergence associated with the descending branch of the regional Hadley Circulation. We will describe the climate signal contained in a 301-year ice core record from a high elevation site on Mount Logan in the Yukon. This record has a statistically significant and accelerating positive trend in snow accumulation from the middle of the 19th century, the end of the Little Ice Age. As we will show, this record contains an expression of the Pacific North America (PNA) teleconnection as well as the regional Hadley and Walker circulations in the Pacific. We argue that the positive trend in snow accumulation in the ice core is a reflection of secular changes in the intensities of these circulations that has ongoing since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  9. Spatial pattern of mass loss processes across the Greenland Ice Sheet from the Little Ice Age to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, K.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Bjork, A. A.; Khan, S. A.; Funder, S.; Nuth, C.; Larsen, N. K.; Vinther, B.; Andresen, C. S.; Long, A. J.; Woodroffe, S.; Hansen, E. S.; Odgaard, B. V.; Olsen, J.; Bamber, J. L.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Box, J. E.; Willerslev, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet loses mass through surface meltwater runoff and discharge from marine terminating outlet glaciers. The spatial variability and magnitude of these processes have been studied and described in detail for the past decades. Here, we combine the mass loss between the LIA to 2010 with a SMB model extending back to ~1900 in order to investigate the spatial distribution of mass loss processes. We use high quality aerial stereo photogrammetric imagery recorded between 1978 and 1987 to map morphological features such as trim lines and end moraines marking the maximum ice extent of the LIA, which enables us to obtain vertical point-based differences associated with former ice extent. These point measurements are combined with contemporary ice surface differences derived using NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) from 2003-2010, NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from 2003-2009, NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, and ASTER (Silcast AST14DMO) co-registered to ICESat, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. The mass balance estimates of the GrIS since retreat from maximum LIA is combined with a SMB model for the period for three intervals, LIAmax (~1900) - 1978/87, 1978/87 - 2003, and 2003 - 2010. Across the GrIS the total mass loss if found to be spatially- and temporally variable. However, when assessing the mass loss due to SMB and mass loss due to dynamic ice loss, we find that that the ratios between these components are variable between the different sectors of the GrIS, e.g. in the southeast sector of the GrIS we find substantial mass loss, possibly driven by high precipitation rates but also the presence of a large number of marine terminating glaciers. Furthermore many areas currently undergoing changes correspond to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the 20th century. Consequently, comparing the 20th century thinning pattern to that of the last decade

  10. Duration of Greenland Stadial 22 and ice-gas Δage from counting of annual layers in Greenland NGRIP ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vallelonga

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The NorthGRIP ice core chronology GICC05modelext is composed of the annual-layer counted GICC05 chronology to 60 kyr before 2000 AD (b2k, and an ice flow model dating the deepest part of the ice core to 123 kyr b2k. Determination of annual strata in ice beyond 60 kyr b2k has been challenged by the thinning of annual layers to <1 cm and the appearance of microfolds in some early glacial strata. We report high-resolution measurements of a 50 m section of the NorthGRIP ice core and corresponding annual layer thicknesses, constraining the duration of the Greenland Stadial (GS-22 between Greenland Interstadials (GIs 21 and 22 which occurred between approximately 89 (end of GI-22 and 83 kyr b2k (onset of GI-21 depending on the chronology used. Multiple analytes (insoluble dust particles, electrolytic conductivity, ammonium and sodium were determined in annual layers of ice often thinner than 1 cm. From annual layer counting, we find that GS-22 lasted 2894 ± 198 yr and was followed by a GI-21 pre-cursor event lasting 350 ± 19 yr. Our layer-based counting agrees with the duration of GS-22 determined from the NALPS speleothem record (3250 ± 526 yr but not with that of the GICC05modelext chronology (2620 yr. These results show that GICC05modelext overestimates accumulation and/or underestimates thinning in this early part of the last glacial period. We also revise the NorthGRIP ice depth-gas depth (5.67 ± 0.18 m and ice age-gas age (550 ± 52 yr differences at the warming onset of GI-21, observing that δ15N increases before CH4 concentration by no more than a few decades.

  11. Dust Provenance and Radiometric U-Series Ages as Evidence for an Eemian Ice Sheet in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciego, S.; Bourdon, B.; Schwander, J.; Stocker, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry of air-transported mineral particles, dust, reflect the prior history of the source material as well as influence the chemistry of the settling locations (rivers, ice sheets and ultimately the oceans). When applied to ice sheets, the atmospheric circulation patterns gleaned from the chemical characteristics of the dust may provide some additional constraints on size and shape of paleo-ice sheets. Furthermore, the ice bound dust grains can be used to determine the age of the ice by using uranium series recoil as a radiometric dating method, provided there is sufficient information about the size and shape of the dust grains and the [U] concentration and isotopic (234U/238U) composition of the ice and dust. The Dye3 ice core is the southern-most deep ice core in Greenland, so should provide a minimum estimate of ice sheet size in the past: the existence of ice is evidence for an ice sheet at any given time. A series of samples from 200 m to 2030 m in depth were analyzed by MC-ICPMS and TIMS for U concentrations and 234U/238U as well as 176Hf/177Hf, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd. The radiogenic isotopic compositions of the insoluble dust found in the upper 1800 m falls within the range of previously measured Greenland dust samples: 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7108 - 0.7174, ɛNd = -9.7 - -13.6, and ɛHf = -2 - -5. However, the data trends toward significantly more unradiogenic Nd and Hf and radiogenic Sr values in the lower 100 m: 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7167 - 0.7200, ɛNd = -15.62 - -17.36, and ɛHf = -21 - -25; the deepest sample containing basal sediments having the most extreme values: 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7349 - 0.7785 ɛNd = -37.48 - -41.61, and ɛHf = -24.8 - -39.54. The calculated 234U/238U radiometric age for the deepest ice ranges from 90 to 110 ± 50 ka, in the same range as two possible age models for the Dye3 location, indicating the deepest ice is in the range of 40-60 ka or 85-120 ka. However, based on the radiogenic isotopes, while the dust in the

  12. Spatial pattern of mass loss processes across the Greenland Ice Sheet from the Little Ice Age to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjeldsen, K. K.

    The Greenland Ice Sheet loses mass through surface meltwater runoff and discharge from marine terminating outlet glaciers. The spatial variability and magnitude of these processes have been studied and described in detail for the past decades. Here, we combine the mass loss between the LIA to 2010...

  13. The episodic influx of tin-rich cosmic dust particles during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaViolette, Paul A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents evidence of the first detection of interstellar dust in ice age polar ice. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are reported for 15 elements found in dust filtered from eight samples of Camp Century Greenland ice dating from 40 to 78 kyrs BP. High concentrations of Sn, Sb, Au, Ag, Ir, and Ni were found to be present in three out of these eight samples. One compositionally anomalous dust sample from an ice core depth of 1230.5 m (age ∼49 kyrs BP, near the beginning of D/O stadial No. 13) was found to contain tin with an average weight percent of 49% as determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). This sample was also found to contain high concentrations of Pb with an average weight abundance of 8.4% and matching the Sn:Pb ratio observed in interstellar spectra. Dust particles in this sample generally have a platy morphology and range from submicron size up to a size as large as 120 μm, a particle consisting almost entirely of SnO2 and being the largest monomineralic extraterrestrial dust particle so far discovered. One porous aggregate tin-bearing particle was found to contain nanometer sized chondrules indicating an extraterrestrial origin. The extraterrestrial origin for the tin is also indicated by the presence of isotopic anomalies in the 114Sn, 115Sn and 117Sn isotopes. Follow up isotopic measurements of this tin-rich dust need to be performed to improve confidence in the anomalies reported here. High abundances of the low melting point elements Ag, Au, and Sb are also present in this tin-rich sample along with elevated abundances of the siderophiles Ir, Ni, Fe, and Co, the latter being present in chondritic proportions and indicating that about 9% of the dust has a C1 chondrite component. Measurements indicate that about 97% of this dust is of extraterrestrial origin with a 3% residual being composed of terrestrial windblown dust. EDS analysis of another tin-rich Camp Century ice core dust sample dating to ∼130 kyrs BP

  14. Fluid intelligence and brain functional organization in aging yoga and meditation practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tim; Taquet, Maxime; Dixit, Rohan; Hölzel, Britta K; de Montjoye, Yves-Alexandre; Brach, Narayan; Salat, David H; Dickerson, Bradford C; Gray, Jeremy R; Lazar, Sara W

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the normal age-related decline of neural structure, function, and cognitive performance. Preliminary evidence suggests that meditation may reduce decline in specific cognitive domains and in brain structure. Here we extended this research by investigating the relation between age and fluid intelligence and resting state brain functional network architecture using graph theory, in middle-aged yoga and meditation practitioners, and matched controls. Fluid intelligence declined slower in yoga practitioners and meditators combined than in controls. Resting state functional networks of yoga practitioners and meditators combined were more integrated and more resilient to damage than those of controls. Furthermore, mindfulness was positively correlated with fluid intelligence, resilience, and global network efficiency. These findings reveal the possibility to increase resilience and to slow the decline of fluid intelligence and brain functional architecture and suggest that mindfulness plays a mechanistic role in this preservation.

  15. Fluid intelligence and brain functional organization in aging yoga and meditation practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eGard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have documented the normal age-related decline of neural structure, function, and cognitive performance. Preliminary evidence suggests that meditation may reduce decline in specific cognitive domains and in brain structure. Here we extended this research by investigating the relation between age and fluid intelligence and resting state brain functional network architecture using graph theory, in middle-aged yoga and meditation practitioners, and matched controls. Fluid intelligence declined slower in yoga practitioners and meditators combined than in controls. Resting state functional networks of yoga practitioners and meditators combined were more integrated and more resilient to damage than those of controls. Furthermore, mindfulness was positively correlated with fluid intelligence, resilience, and global network efficiency. These findings reveal the possibility to increase resilience and to slow the decline of fluid intelligence and brain functional architecture and suggest that mindfulness plays a mechanistic role in this preservation.

  16. Humid Little Ice Age in arid central Asia documented by Bosten Lake,Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fahu; HUANG Xiaozhong; ZHANG Jiawu; J.A.Holmes; CHEN Jianhui

    2006-01-01

    Short sediment cores retrieved from Bosten Lake,the largest inland freshwater lake in China,were used to explore humidity and precipitation variations in arid central Asia during the past millennium.The chronology of the cores was established using 137Cs,210Pb and AMS 14C dating results.Multi-proxy high-resolution analysis,including pollen ratios of Artemisia and Chenopodiaceae (A/C),carbonate content and grain size,indicates that the climate during the past millennium can be divided into three stages: a dry climate between 1000-1500 AD,a humid climate during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (c.1500-1900 AD),and a warm dry period after 1900 AD.On centennial timescales,the climate change in northwestern China during the past 1000 years is characterized by oscillations between warm-dry and cold-humid climate conditions.All the proxies changed significantly and indicate increased precipitation during the LIA,including increased pollen A/C ratios and pollen concentrations,decreased carbonate content and increased grain size.The humid period during the LIA recorded by the Bosten Lake sediments is representative of arid central Asia and is supported by numerous records from other sites.During the LIA,the water runoff into the Keriya River and Tarim River in the Tarim Basin increased,while the ice accumulation in the Guliya ice core increased.Additionally,the lake levels of the Aral and Caspian Sea also rose,while tree-ring analysis indicates that precipitation increased.We hypothesize that both the lower temperature within China and the negative anomalies of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during this period may have contributed to the humid climate within this area during LIA.

  17. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance at the decadal scale. To improve the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond such episodic events is required. Here, we extend the observational record of marginal thinning of Helheim glacier (HG and Kangerdlugssuaq glacier (KG from 10 to more than 150 yr. We show that although the frontal portion of HG thinned by more than 100 m between 2003 and 2006, it thickened by more than 50 m during the previous two decades. In contrast, KG was stable from 1981 to 1998 and experienced major thinning only after 2003. Extending the record back to the end of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1850 shows no significant thinning of HG from 1850 to 1981, while KG underwent substantial thinning of ~265 m. Analyses of their sensitivity to sub-surface water temperature anomalies and variations in air temperature suggest that both HG and KG are highly sensitive to short-term atmospheric and ocean forcing, and respond very quickly to small fluctuations. At century time-scales, however, multiple external parameters (e.g. outlet shape dominate the mass change. These findings undermine attempts to use measurements over the last decade as initial conditions to project future dynamic ice loss.

  18. The effect of age on fluid intelligence is fully mediated by physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ingvar; Almkvist, Ove

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which the effect of age on cognitive ability is predicted by individual differences in physical health. The sample consisted of 118 volunteer subjects who were healthy and ranging in age from 26 to 91. The examinations included a clinical investigation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain neuroimaging, and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. The effect of age on fluid IQ with and without visual spatial praxis and on crystallized IQ was tested whether being fully-, partially- or non-mediated by physical health. Structural equation analyses showed that the best and most parsimonious fit to the data was provided by models that were fully mediated for fluid IQ without praxis, non-mediated for crystallized IQ and partially mediated for fluid IQ with praxis. The diseases of the circulatory and nervous systems were the major mediators. It was concluded from the pattern of findings that the effect of age on fluid intelligence is fully mediated by physical health, while crystallized intelligence is non-mediated and visual spatial praxis is partially mediated, influenced mainly by direct effects of age. Our findings imply that improving health by acting against the common age-related circulatory- and nervous system diseases and risk factors will oppose the decline in fluid intelligence with age.

  19. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding; Sun, Liguang; Yin, Xijie

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540-2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540-1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition.

  20. Mount Logan Ice Core Evidence For Changes In The Hadley And Walker Circulations Following The End Of The Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, G.; Moore, K.; Alverson, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Hadley and Walker circulations dominate the climate of the tropics and contribute to extra-tropical climate variability through the forcing of planetary waves that result in the long-range correlation of atmospheric circulation patterns known as teleconnections. Previous work showed that an annually resolved 301-year ice core record of annual snow accumulation from a high elevation site on Mount Logan in northwestern North America contains an expression of one such teleconnection, the Pacific North America (PNA) pattern. Here we show that this record contains a related signal associated with the regional Hadley and Walker circulations in the Pacific. We argue that the positive trend in snow accumulation in the ice core that started in the middle of the 19th century is a reflection of changes in the intensities of these circulations that has been ongoing since the end of the Little Ice Age. This change may also be associated with the observed jump in δ 18O that occurred in the ice core as well as in a number of widely spaced tropical coral records around the same time.

  1. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  2. Permafrost response to the post Little Ice Age climate variability in the Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan POPESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The geomorphological evidences along with the range of methods recently (since 2008 applied in the Romanian Carpathians indicate that most of the rock glaciers are relict or inactive in the present. Only a few cases of active or complex rock glaciers (active only across their upper parts are supposed to exist in the highest granitic massifs of Southern Carpathians (Retezat and Parâng, but contemporary inactivation trends seem to take place as indicated by growth of vegetation (especially Pinus mugo on their fronts. On the other hand, most of the inactive rock glaciers present distinct signs of activity in the recent past that followed the Little Ice Age colder period which in the Romanian Carpathians had its last maximum between 1820 and 1840 (Popa and Kern, 2008.

  3. The Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age in the Daihai Area,North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金章东; 王苏民

    2003-01-01

    Rb/Sr ratio,CaCO3 content,organic carbon ( Cog ) concentration,magnetic suscep-tibility and clay mineralogy of 4.0 m sediments samples recovered from Daihai Lake,northern China,are presented in the paper. Weathering and paleoclimatic change history during the last2300 years is reconstructed in terms of the variations of Rb/Sr ratios in the sediment sequence,including the Little Ice Age and Medieval Warm Period. Our results suggest that the evolution processes of weathering and paleoclimate can be rebuilt in terms of the variations of Rb/Sr ratios in the lake sediment sequence,in combination with magnetic susceptibility,Corg,CaCO3 contents and clay mineralogy.

  4. Pacemaking the ice ages by frequency modulation of Earth's orbital eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial

    1999-07-23

    Evidence from power spectra of deep-sea oxygen isotope time series suggests that the climate system of Earth responds nonlinearly to astronomical forcing by frequency modulating eccentricity-related variations in insolation. With the help of a simple model, it is shown that frequency modulation of the approximate 100,000-year eccentricity cycles by the 413,000-year component accounts for the variable duration of the ice ages, the multiple-peak character of the time series spectra, and the notorious absence of significant spectral amplitude at the 413,000-year period. The observed spectra are consistent with the classic Milankovitch theories of insolation, so that climate forcing by 100,000-year variations in orbital inclination that cause periodic dust accretion appear unnecessary.

  5. Rapid reorganization in ocean biogeochemistry off Peru towards the end of the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gutiérrez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate and ocean ecosystem variability has been well recognized during the twentieth century but it is unclear if modern ocean biogeochemistry is susceptible to the large, abrupt shifts that characterized the Late Quaternary. Time series from marine sediments off Peru show an abrupt centennial-scale biogeochemical regime shift in the early nineteenth century, of much greater magnitude and duration than present day multi-decadal variability. A rapid expansion of the subsurface nutrient-rich, oxygen-depleted waters resulted in higher biological productivity, including pelagic fish. The shift was likely driven by a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the South Pacific Subtropical High to their present day locations, coupled with a strengthening of Walker circulation, towards the end of the Little Ice Age. These findings reveal the potential for large reorganizations in tropical Pacific climate with immediate effects on ocean biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem structure.

  6. Little Ice Age wetting of interior Asian deserts and the rise of the Mongol Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Aaron E.; Putnam, David E.; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Cook, Edward R.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Clark, Elizabeth H.; Wang, Chunzeng; Chen, Feng; Denton, George H.; Boyle, Douglas P.; Bassett, Scott D.; Birkel, Sean D.; Martin-Fernandez, Javier; Hajdas, Irka; Southon, John; Garner, Christopher B.; Cheng, Hai; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2016-01-01

    The degree to which warming of the planet will alter Asia's water resources is an important question for food, energy, and economic security. Here we present geological evidence, underpinned by radiometric dating and dendrochronology, and bolstered by hydrological modeling, indicating that wetter-than-present conditions characterized the core of the inner Asian desert belt during the Little Ice Age, the last major Northern Hemispheric cold spell of the Holocene. These wetter conditions accompanied northern mid-latitude cooling, glacier expansion, a strengthened/southward-shifted boreal jet, and weakened south Asian monsoons. We suggest that southward migration of grasslands in response to these wetter conditions aided the spread of Mongol Empire steppe pastoralists across Asian drylands. Conversely, net drying over the 20th century has led to drought that is unprecedented for the past ∼830 years, and that could intensify with further heating of the Asian continent.

  7. Episodic Neoglacial snowline descent and glacier expansion on Svalbard reconstructed from the 14C ages of ice-entombed plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gifford H.; Landvik, Jon Y.; Lehman, Scott J.; Southon, John R.

    2017-01-01

    The response of the Northern Hemisphere cryosphere to the monotonic decline in summer insolation and variable radiative forcing during the Holocene has been one of irregular expansion culminating in the Little Ice Age, when most glaciers attained their maximum late Holocene dimensions. Although periods of intervening still-stand or ice-retreat can be reconstructed by direct dating of ice-recessional features, defining times of Neoglacial ice growth has been limited to indirect proxies preserved in distal archives. Here we report 45 precise radiocarbon dates on in situ plants emerging from beneath receding glaciers on Svalbard that directly date the onset of snowline descent and glacier expansion, entombing the plants. Persistent snowline lowering occurred between 4.0 and 3.4 ka, but with little additional persistent lowering until early in the first millennium AD. Populations of individual 14C calendar age results and their aggregate calendar age probabilities define discrete episodes of vegetation kill and snowline lowering 240-340 AD, 410-540 AD and 670-750 AD, each with a lower snowline than the preceding episode, followed by additional snowline lowering between 1000 and 1220 AD, and between 1300 and 1450 AD. Snowline changes after 1450 AD, including the maximum ice extent of the Little Ice Age are not resolved by our collections, although snowlines remained lower than their 1450 AD level until the onset of modern warming. A time-distance diagram derived from a 250-m-long transect of dated ice-killed plants documents ice-margin advances ∼750, ∼1100 and after ∼1500 AD, concordant with distributed vegetation kill ages seen in the aggregate data set, supporting our central thesis that vegetation kill ages provide direct evidence of snowline lowering and cryospheric expansion. The mid- to late-Holocene history of snowline lowering on Svalbard is similar to ELA reconstructions of Norwegian and Svalbard cirque glaciers, and consistent with a cryospheric response

  8. The deglaciaton of the Pyreenes: from the Oldest Dryas to the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; de Andrés, Nuria; López-Moreno, Juan I.; García-Ruiz, José M.

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the paper is to study the deglaciation process, including the retreat of the glaciers and the occurrence of short advances with the deposition of new, relatively recent tills in two head valleys of the central-southern Pyrenees: The Upper Gállego Valley, with the main peak Balaitus (42°46'0' N, 0° 15'0'W, 3151 m), and the Marbore Cirque, at the head of the Cinca Valley, on the north face of the Monte Perdido Peak (42º400' N; 0.5º0'W; 3355 m). The deglaciation process was studied through geomorphological mapping and 36Cl cosmogenic exposure ages obtained from morainic and rock glacier boulders and polished bedrocks. Even though the exact position of the front glacier during the global Last Glacial Maximum is not known, there is evidence that the different ice tongues retreated until headwater positions, causing the subdivision of the main glaciers into various individual glaciers. Two clear climate reversals within the general trend to deglaciation have been detected: First of all, the Oldest Dryas, coinciding with the Heinrich Event 1 (ca 17-15 ka) and, secondly, the Younger Dryas (ca 13-11.7 ka). Between both stadials, the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial (ca 15-13 ka) represented an intense glacial retreat up to the cirque headwalls. During the Bølling/Allerød Interstadial the retreat was very rapid, although the occurrence of a short readvance of small glaciers during the Older Dryas must not be ruled out. The Younger Dryas is represented by a new glacial push with the deposition of distinct types of tills. During these late glacier advances, small glaciers and rock glaciers developed close to the cirque headwalls, and coexisted under the same climatic conditions. After the Younger Dryas, new glacial advances has not been detected until the Little Ice Age, except in the Marbore Cirque, where glacial expansion occurred during the Mid and Late Holocene (5.1 ± 0.1 ka), represented by a large push moraine. A melting phase occurred at

  9. The formation of glacial lakes in Austria since the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckel, Johannes; Otto, Jan-Christoph; Prasicek, Günther

    2017-04-01

    The global temperature rise in the 20th and 21st centuries led to massive deglaciation and the formation of numerous glacial lakes. Glacier lake development and lifetime are controlled by the complex interplay of climate and geological boundary conditions, geomorphological process activity and glacier dynamics. New lakes in formerly glaciated alpine areas significantly contribute to changing geomorphologic, hydrologic and ecologic conditions at high altitudes. Here we present an inventory of lakes in the Austrian Alps. The inventory is a central part of the project FUTURELAKES that aims at understanding and modelling the development of glacier lakes in Austria. We intersect glacier lake locations with glacier inventory data to understand how deglaciation controls lake evolution. The timing of lake formation is reconstructed by comparing emerged lake area with vanished glacier area at five points in time from Little Ice Age (LIA) to 2014 - the longest time period covered by a glacier lake inventory. We discuss lake formation with respect to temperature records at high-alpine climate stations in the study area. The lake inventory contains 1389 mapped lakes with a minimum size of 1000 m2 covering an area of more than 17 km2. Lakes are classified by the damming mechanisms: (a) glacial debris dammed (49.5%), (b) bedrock dammed (49%), (c) glacier ice dammed (0.4%), and (d) debris dammed (1.1%). In Austria, 243 lakes above 1700 m have formed since LIA. Both the total number of glacial lakes and total lake area increased exponentially from LIA to 2014, while glacier area shrunk correspondingly. The number of new lakes per year grew from 0.6 (±0.1, LIA-1920) to 5.8 (2006-2014) and new lake area per year increased from 6,877 ± 513 m2 (LIA-1920) to 74,129 m2 (2006-2014). This development can be linked to rising air temperatures in the Austrian Alps which show an accelerated increase since the 1980s.

  10. Ice formation and development in aged, wintertime cumulus over the UK: observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, I.; Bower, K. N.; Choularton, T. W.; Dearden, C.; Crosier, J.; Westbrook, C.; Capes, G.; Coe, H.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Williams, P.; Trembath, J.; Cui, Z.; Blyth, A.

    2012-06-01

    In situ high resolution aircraft measurements of cloud microphysical properties were made in coordination with ground based remote sensing observations of a line of small cumulus clouds, using Radar and Lidar, as part of the Aerosol Properties, PRocesses And InfluenceS on the Earth's climate (APPRAISE) project. A narrow but extensive line (~100 km long) of shallow convective clouds over the southern UK was studied. Cloud top temperatures were observed to be higher than -8 °C, but the clouds were seen to consist of supercooled droplets and varying concentrations of ice particles. No ice particles were observed to be falling into the cloud tops from above. Current parameterisations of ice nuclei (IN) numbers predict too few particles will be active as ice nuclei to account for ice particle concentrations at the observed, near cloud top, temperatures (-7.5 °C). The role of mineral dust particles, consistent with concentrations observed near the surface, acting as high temperature IN is considered important in this case. It was found that very high concentrations of ice particles (up to 100 L-1) could be produced by secondary ice particle production providing the observed small amount of primary ice (about 0.01 L-1) was present to initiate it. This emphasises the need to understand primary ice formation in slightly supercooled clouds. It is shown using simple calculations that the Hallett-Mossop process (HM) is the likely source of the secondary ice. Model simulations of the case study were performed with the Aerosol Cloud and Precipitation Interactions Model (ACPIM). These parcel model investigations confirmed the HM process to be a very important mechanism for producing the observed high ice concentrations. A key step in generating the high concentrations was the process of collision and coalescence of rain drops, which once formed fell rapidly through the cloud, collecting ice particles which caused them to freeze and form instant large riming particles. The

  11. Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

    2014-12-01

    The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n = 14 325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [χ(2) (3) = 16.32, P less movement between competition levels compared to retained players. This study confirms a relationship between relative age and dropout from ice-hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon.

  12. Little Ice Age to modern climate transition of Meso-American climate derived from speleothems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A.; Miller, T.; Kushnir, Y.; Black, D. E.; Estrella, J.; Burnett, A.; Haug, G. H.; Breitenbach, S.; Beaufort, L.; Edwards, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a high-resolution (annual) reconstruction of hydrological variability from a speleothem located in a cave under the Guatemala/Belize (G/B) border. Our age model is highly constrained by annual layering in the speleothem and nine U/Th MC ICPMS dates. Our δ18O record from 1640 to 2005 A.D. shows two large, abrupt decreases in inferred precipitation rates that appear to coincide with historical, large volcanic eruptions, superimposed on a general drying trend. The first abrupt increase in aridity occurred synchronously with the Tambora eruption in 1815, followed by another sharp decrease in Meso-American precipitation coincident with the eruption of Krakatau in 1883. Both drying events extend for thirty to forty years after the initial eruption, in good agreement with the 19th century drying and the "volcanic dust veil index" from Lamb (1970). Preliminary analysis indicates that the Meso-Americas may be highly sensitive to volcanic forcing because they receive considerable climate input from both Atlantic (primary) and Pacific (secondary) influences. Past volcanic aerosol model loading patterns from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption produced global and in particular, North Atlatic cooling. This could have moved the Atlantic ITCZ southwards and caused drying in Meso-America. Wavelet analysis of the speleothem data also shows ENSO scale variability. Our results highlight the need for better understanding of the consequences of volcanic eruptions and their patterns of climate variability, in particular during the transition from the Little Ice Age to the modern industrial era.

  13. On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L; Palmer, Matthew S

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES...

  14. Laboratory-scale evaluation of a combined soil amendment for the enhanced biodegradation of propylene glycol-based aircraft de-icing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libisch, Balázs; French, Helen K; Hartnik, Thomas; Anton, Attila; Biró, Borbála

    2012-01-01

    A combined soil amendment was tested in microcosm experiments with an aim to enhance the aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol (PG)-based aircraft de-icing fluids during and following the infiltration of contaminated snowmelt. A key objective under field conditions is to increase degradation of organic pollutants in the surface soil where higher microbial activity and plant rhizosphere effects may contribute to a more efficient biodegradation of PG, compared to subsoil ground layers, where electron acceptors and nutrients are often depleted. Microcosm experiments were set up in Petri dishes using 50 g of soil mixed with appropriate additives. The samples contained an initial de-icing fluid concentration of 10,000 mg/kg soil. A combined amendment using calcium peroxide, activated carbon and 1 x Hoagland solution resulted in significantly higher degradation rates for PG both at 4 and 22 degrees C. Most probable numbers of bacteria capable of utilizing 10,000 mg/kg de-icing fluid as a sole carbon source were about two orders of magnitude higher in the amended soil samples compared to unamended controls at both temperatures. The elevated numbers of such bacteria in surface soil may be a source of cells transported to the subsoil by snowmelt infiltration. The near-surface application of amendments tested here may enhance the growth of plants and plant roots in the contaminated area, as well as microbes to be found at greater depth, and hence increase the degradation of a contaminant plume present in the ground.

  15. Ice formation and development in aged, wintertime cumulus over the UK : observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Crawford

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In-situ high resolution aircraft measurements of cloud microphysical properties were made in coordination with ground based remote sensing observations of Radar and Lidar as part of the Aerosol Properties, PRocesses And InfluenceS on the Earth's climate (APPRAISE project. A narrow but extensive line (~100 km long of shallow convective clouds over the southern UK was studied. Cloud top temperatures were observed to be higher than ~−8 °C, but the clouds were seen to consist of supercooled droplets and varying concentrations of ice particles. No ice particles were observed to be falling into the cloud tops from above. Current parameterisations of ice nuclei (IN numbers predict too few particles will be active as ice nuclei to account for ice particle concentrations at the observed near cloud top temperatures (~−7 °C. The role of biological particles, consistent with concentrations observed near the surface, acting as potential efficient high temperature IN is considered important in this case. It was found that very high concentrations of ice particles (up to 100 L−1 could be produced by powerful secondary ice particle production emphasising the importance of understanding primary ice formation in slightly supercooled clouds.

    Aircraft penetrations at −3.5 °C, showed peak ice crystal concentrations of up to 100 L−1 which together with the characteristic ice crystal habits observed (generally rimed ice particles and columns suggested secondary ice production had occurred. To investigate whether the Hallett-Mossop (HM secondary ice production process could account for these observations, ice splinter production rates were calculated. These calculated rates and observations could only be reconciled provided the constraint that only droplets >24 μm in diameter could lead to splinter production, was relaxed slightly by 2 μm.

    Model simulations of the case study were also performed with the WRF

  16. Simple energy balance model resolving the seasons and the continents - Application to the astronomical theory of the ice ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. R.; Short, D. A.; Mengel, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is undertaken of the properties of a one-level seasonal energy balance climate model having explicit, two-dimensional land-sea geography, where land and sea surfaces are strictly distinguished by the local thermal inertia employed and transport is governed by a smooth, latitude-dependent diffusion mechanism. Solutions of the seasonal cycle for the cases of both ice feedback exclusion and inclusion yield good agreements with real data, using minimal turning of the adjustable parameters. Discontinuous icecap growth is noted for both a solar constant that is lower by a few percent and a change of orbital elements to favor cool Northern Hemisphere summers. This discontinuous sensitivity is discussed in the context of the Milankovitch theory of the ice ages, and the associated branch structure is shown to be analogous to the 'small ice cap' instability of simpler models.

  17. Age differences in relationships between crystallized and fluid intelligences and problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, B; Sterns, H L

    1979-05-01

    One hundred and sixty-two subjects at three age levels were tested to examine the relationship between crystallized (Gc) and fluid (Gf) abilities and three problem solving tasks varying in the abstractness concreteness of their stimuli and emphasis on past experience. It was predicted that the difference in correlations between crystallized and fluid abilities and each of these tasks would increase with increased age. The hypotheses were partially supported in the young and elderly groups of subjects. On tasks using concrete stimuli, emphasizing past experience, where no cross-sectional decline was observed, Gc (relative to Gf) accounted for an increasing proportion of variance in performance with increased age. On tasks using abstract stimuli, de-emphasizing past experience, where significant cross-sectional declines were obtained, Gf (relative to Gc) correlated more highly with performance. Contrary to previous research, relationships between Gf and Bc supported a reintegration of abilities in old age.

  18. Rapid Access Ice Drill: A New Tool for Exploration of the Deep Antarctic Ice Sheets and Subglacial Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodge, J. W.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) will penetrate the Antarctic ice sheets in order to core through deep ice, the glacial bed, and into bedrock below. This new technology will provide a critical first look at the interface between major ice caps and their subglacial geology. Currently in construction, RAID is a mobile drilling system capable of making several long boreholes in a single field season in Antarctica. RAID is interdisciplinary and will allow access to polar paleoclimate records in ice >1 Ma, direct observation at the base of the ice sheets, and recovery of rock cores from the ice-covered East Antarctic craton. RAID uses a diamond rock-coring system as in mineral exploration. Threaded drill-pipe with hardened metal bits will cut through ice using reverse circulation of Estisol for pressure-compensation, maintenance of temperature, and removal of ice cuttings. Near the bottom of the ice sheet, a wireline bottom-hole assembly will enable diamond coring of ice, the glacial bed, and bedrock below. Once complete, boreholes will be kept open with fluid, capped, and made available for future down-hole measurement of thermal gradient, heat flow, ice chronology, and ice deformation. RAID will also sample for extremophile microorganisms. RAID is designed to penetrate up to 3,300 meters of ice and take sample cores in less than 200 hours. This rapid performance will allow completion of a borehole in about 10 days before moving to the next drilling site. RAID is unique because it can provide fast borehole access through thick ice; take short ice cores for paleoclimate study; sample the glacial bed to determine ice-flow conditions; take cores of subglacial bedrock for age dating and crustal history; and create boreholes for use as an observatory in the ice sheets. Together, the rapid drilling capability and mobility of the drilling system, along with ice-penetrating imaging methods, will provide a unique 3D picture of the interior Antarctic ice sheets.

  19. Global warming and ice ages: I. prospects for physics based modulation of global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Hyde, R.

    1996-08-15

    It has been suggested that large-scale climate changes, mostly due to atmospheric injection of greenhouse gases connected with fossil-fired energy production, should be forestalled by internationally-agreed reductions in, e.g., electricity generation. The potential economic impacts of such limitations are obviously large: greater than or equal to $10{sup 11}/year. We propose that for far smaller - less than 1% - the mean thermal effects of greenhouse gases may be obviated in any of several distinct ways, some of them novel. These suggestions are all based on scatterers that prevent a small fraction of solar radiation from reaching all or part of the Earth. We propose research directed to quite near-term realization of one or more of these inexpensive approaches to cancel the effects of the greenhouse gas injection. While the magnitude of the climatic impact of greenhouse gases is currently uncertain, the prospect of severe failure of the climate, for instance at the onset of the next Ice Age, is undeniable. The proposals in this paper may lead to quite practical methods to reduce or eliminate all climate failures.

  20. Ecological changes in Coyotes (Canis latrans in response to the ice age megafaunal extinctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Meachen

    Full Text Available Coyotes (Canis latrans are an important species in human-inhabited areas. They control pests and are the apex predators in many ecosystems. Because of their importance it is imperative to understand how environmental change will affect this species. The end of the Pleistocene Ice Age brought with it many ecological changes for coyotes and here we statistically determine the changes that occurred in coyotes, when these changes occurred, and what the ecological consequences were of these changes. We examined the mandibles of three coyote populations: Pleistocene Rancho La Brean (13-29 Ka, earliest Holocene Rancho La Brean (8-10 Ka, and Recent from North America, using 2D geometric morphometrics to determine the morphological differences among them. Our results show that these three populations were morphologically distinct. The Pleistocene coyotes had an overall robust mandible with an increased shearing arcade and a decreased grinding arcade, adapted for carnivory and killing larger prey; whereas the modern populations show a gracile morphology with a tendency toward omnivory or grinding. The earliest Holocene populations are intermediate in morphology and smallest in size. These findings indicate that a niche shift occurred in coyotes at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary - from a hunter of large prey to a small prey/more omnivorous animal. Species interactions between Canis were the most likely cause of this transition. This study shows that the Pleistocene extinction event affected species that did not go extinct as well as those that did.

  1. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age in Chesapeake Bay and the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Hayo, K.; Thunell, R.C.; Dwyer, G.S.; Saenger, C.; Willard, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new 2400-year paleoclimate reconstruction from Chesapeake Bay (CB) (eastern US) was compared to other paleoclimate records in the North Atlantic region to evaluate climate variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and Little Ice Age (LIA). Using Mg/Ca ratios from ostracodes and oxygen isotopes from benthic foraminifera as proxies for temperature and precipitation-driven estuarine hydrography, results show that warmest temperatures in CB reached 16-17. ??C between 600 and 950. CE (Common Era), centuries before the classic European Medieval Warm Period (950-1100. CE) and peak warming in the Nordic Seas (1000-1400. CE). A series of centennial warm/cool cycles began about 1000. CE with temperature minima of ~. 8 to 9. ??C about 1150, 1350, and 1650-1800. CE, and intervening warm periods (14-15. ??C) centered at 1200, 1400, 1500 and 1600. CE. Precipitation variability in the eastern US included multiple dry intervals from 600 to 1200. CE, which contrasts with wet medieval conditions in the Caribbean. The eastern US experienced a wet LIA between 1650 and 1800. CE when the Caribbean was relatively dry. Comparison of the CB record with other records shows that the MCA and LIA were characterized by regionally asynchronous warming and complex spatial patterns of precipitation, possibly related to ocean-atmosphere processes. ?? 2010.

  2. On the choice of ingredients for a theory of the Ice Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Baltensperger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    "With five parameters one can fit an elephant". This provocative statement expresses the fact that when a theory has several adjustable parameters, an agreement with empirical data can be of modest value. What about a theory which contains unobserved objects? This is the subject of this paper. It is motivated by a model of the Ice Ages of the Pleistocene, which postulates a hot planet in an extremely eccentric orbit. This object has many consequences. It is rather well defined by the requirements, that it must not be in conflict with laws of nature, nor with empirical data. It must have sufficient mass to produce a rapid geographic pole shift on Earth after a close flyby at the end of the Pleistocene, and also be small enough to disintegrate at this occasion and to evaporate during the Holocene. These requirements leave hardly any adaptable parameters. In this situation, the agreement with further data, in particular the reverse Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the Holocene, represents a significant support of th...

  3. Conference Summary: First International Conference on Global Warming and the Next Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Peter J.; Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The First International Conference on Global Warming and the Next Ice Age was convened in Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 19-24, 2001. The conference program began each day with a 30 minute live classical music performances of truly international quality before the beginning business. Ample time for panel discussions was also scheduled. The general public was invited to attend and participate in a special evening panel session on the last day of the conference. The unusual and somewhat provocative title of the conference was designed to attract diverse views on global climate change. This summary attempts to accurately reflect the tone and flavor of the lively discussions which resulted. Presentations ranged from factors forcing current climate to those in effect across the span of time from the Proterozoic "snowball Earth" epoch to 50,000 years in the future. Although, as should be expected, attendees at the conference arrived with opinions on some of the controversial issues regarding climate change, and no-one openly admitted to a 'conversion' from their initial point of view, the interdisciplinary nature of the formal presentations, poster discussions, panels, and abundant informal discourse helped to place the attendees' personal perspectives into a broader, more diversified context.

  4. A permafrost glacial hypothesis to explain atmospheric CO2 and the ice ages during the Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarozo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several 100 ka glacial-interglacial cycles, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was closely coupled to global temperature, which indicates the importance of CO2 as a greenhouse gas. The reasons for changes in atmospheric CO2 have mainly been sought in the ocean, yet proxy evidence does not support the notion of increased oceanic carbon storage during glacials. Here we present results from the first permafrost loess sequence in Siberia spanning two glacial cycles (~240 ka, which reveal that permafrost soils repeatedly sequestered huge amounts of terrestrial carbon during glacial periods. This can be explained with permafrost favouring more intensive waterlogging conditions and better preservation of soil organic matter. Terrestrial carbon stored in permafrost soils was released upon warming and provided a powerful feedback mechanism for the glacial terminations. We outline a "permafrost glacial hypothesis" building on integrated annual insolation forcing, which readily explains the observed succession of the ice ages during the Pleistocene, including the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  5. Global Warming and Ice Ages: I. Prospects For Physics Based Modulation of Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Hyde, R.

    1996-08-15

    It has been suggested that large-scale climate changes, mostly due to atmospheric injection of greenhouse gases connected with fossil-fired energy production, should be forestalled by internationally-agreed reductions in, e.g., electricity generation. The potential economic impacts of such limitations are obviously large: greater than or equal to $10{sup 11}/year. We propose that for far smaller - less than 1% - the mean thermal effects of greenhouse gases may be obviated in any of several distinct ways, some of them novel. These suggestions are all based on scatterers that prevent a small fraction of solar radiation from reaching all or part of the Earth. We propose research directed to quite near-term realization of one or more of these inexpensive approaches to cancel the effects of the greenhouse gas injection. While the magnitude of the climatic impact of greenhouse gases is currently uncertain, the prospect of severe failure of the climate, for instance at the onset of the next Ice Age, is undeniable. The proposals in this paper may lead to quite practical methods to reduce or eliminate all climate failures.

  6. Tracing the effects of the Little Ice Age in the tropical lowlands of eastern Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Ma del Socorro; Caballero, Margarita; Ortega, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Sosa, Susana

    2007-10-09

    The causes of late-Holocene centennial to millennial scale climatic variability and the impact that such variability had on tropical ecosystems are still poorly understood. Here, we present a high-resolution, multiproxy record from lowland eastern Mesoamerica, studied to reconstruct climate and vegetation history during the last 2,000 years, in particular to evaluate the response of tropical vegetation to the cooling event of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Our data provide evidence that the densest tropical forest cover and the deepest lake of the last two millennia were coeval with the LIA, with two deep lake phases that follow the Spörer and Maunder minima in solar activity. The high tropical pollen accumulation rates limit LIA's winter cooling to a maximum of 2 degrees C. Tropical vegetation expansion during the LIA is best explained by a reduction in the extent of the dry season as a consequence of increased meridional flow leading to higher winter precipitation. These results highlight the importance of seasonal responses to climatic variability, a factor that could be of relevance when evaluating the impact of recent climate change.

  7. Low atmospheric CO2 levels during the Little Ice Age due to cooling-induced terrestrial uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Allison, C. E.; Rayner, P. J.; Enting, I.; Mulvaney, R.; Steele, L. P.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Sturges, W. T.; Curran, M. A. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Low atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during the Little Ice Age has been used to derive the global carbon cycle sensitivity to temperature. Recent evidence confirms earlier indications that the low CO2 was caused by increased terrestrial carbon storage. It remains unknown whether the terrestrial biosphere responded to temperature variations, or there was vegetation re-growth on abandoned farmland. Here we present a global numerical simulation of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations in the pre-industrial period. Carbonyl sulfide concentration is linked to changes in gross primary production and shows a positive anomaly during the Little Ice Age. We show that a decrease in gross primary production and a larger decrease in ecosystem respiration is the most likely explanation for the decrease in atmospheric CO2 and increase in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations. Therefore, temperature change, not vegetation re-growth, was the main cause of the increased terrestrial carbon storage. We address the inconsistency between ice-core CO2 records from different sites measuring CO2 and δ13CO2 in ice from Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). Our interpretation allows us to derive the temperature sensitivity of pre-industrial CO2 fluxes for the terrestrial biosphere (γL = -10 to -90 Pg C K-1), implying a positive climate feedback and providing a benchmark to reduce model uncertainties.

  8. An ice rink refrigeration system based on CO{sub 2} as secondary fluid in copper tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahzad, Khuram [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholrn (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2006-06-15

    This report is a study of the use of copper tubes with CO{sub 2} as heat transfer fluid in ice rink applications. Copper tubes can be rolled rather easily up to the required length which decreases installation cost and simplifies the procedure. A test ice rink was built at IUC Ref Centre, Katrineholm with copper tubes. FEMLAB and EES are two softwares that were used for analysis. The comparison between 12.7 mm diameter copper tubes with and without plastic foil cover, 9.5 mm diameter copper tubes with and without plastic foil cover, 21.3 mm diameter steel pipes and 25 mm diameter plastic pipes is presented in the report. The reason to have plastic foil over copper tubes is to avoid the minor risk of chemical corrosion. Furthermore the foil serves as mechanical wear protection as well, which in this case could appear if rubbing would occur due to thermal expansion and contraction. It is found that 12.7 mm copper tube with plastic foil is good choice in terms of heat transfer. At rated heat flux of 100 W/m{sup 2} and with a pitch of 100 mm, it is 0.18 deg C better than 9.5 mm copper tube with plastic foil. This report includes the investigation which shows that there is no danger of movement of copper tubes inside the rink bed due to thermal expansion and contraction during operation. It also includes the comparison of average Friedel pressure drop model and average homogeneous pressure drop model with experimental results. Average Friedel pressure drop method gave good results. It predicted 20 to 25 % higher pressure drop at lower CR and about 60 % at higher CR than the experimental results for 120 meter long and 12.7 mm diameter copper tubes. 120 meter long copper tubes are good choice; as header can be placed on short side of the ice rink. It will reduce the header length and connections to half. FEMLAB modelling for conduction heat transfer gave good results and can be used as a tool for design and optimization. The optimization of the pitch of the copper tubes

  9. Ice Age Reboot: Thermohaline Circulation Crisis during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, L.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) marked a fundamental change in glacial-interglacial periodicity, when it increased from ~41- to 100-kyr cycles and developed higher amplitude climate variability. Because it took place without significant changes in the Milankovitch forcing, this fundamental change must reflect either non-linear responses of the climate system to these external forcings, or internal changes in the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system that led to longer periodicities and more intense glacial periods. We document using Nd isotopes a major disruption of the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) system during the MPT between MIS 25-21 at ~950-860 ka, which effectively marks the first 100-kyr cycle, including an exceptional weakening through critical interglacial MIS 23 at ~900 ka. The data are from ODP Sites 1088 (41°8.163'S, 13°33.77'E, 2082m) and 1090 (42°54.82'S, 8°53.98E', 3702m) in the SE Atlantic Subantarctic Zone, near the upper and lower boundaries of NADW and Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Given evidence for nearly stable NADW and North Pacific Water (NPW) ɛNd-values over the last 2 Ma, we interpret the ɛNd variations to reflect changes in the NADW:NPW mixing fractions. During the studied pre-MPT 41-kyr world (MIS 31-25, 1,100-950 ka), at both sites the differences in glacial and interglacial ɛNd-values are small, indicating strong glacial as well as interglacial export of NADW. A major weakening of NADW export occurred during MIS 24-22, including MIS 23, which is unique as the only known interglacial in which the THC did not strengthen, and thus can be considered as a 'trans-glacial' period. The recovery into the post-MPT 100-kyr world is characterized by continued weak glacial THC. We conclude that the MPT ocean circulation crisis 'rebooted' the pacing and intensity of ice ages and facilitated the coeval drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and high latitude ice sheet growth, generating the conditions that stabilized 100-kyr cycles.

  10. Genetic and environmental variation in lung function drives subsequent variation in aging of fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Deborah; Reynolds, Chandra A; Emery, Charles F; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2013-07-01

    Longitudinal studies document an association of pulmonary function with cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults. Previous analyses have identified a genetic contribution to the relationship between pulmonary function with fluid intelligence. The goal of the current analysis was to apply the biometric dual change score model to consider the possibility of temporal dynamics underlying the genetic covariance between aging trajectories for pulmonary function and fluid intelligence. Longitudinal data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging were available from 808 twins ranging in age from 50 to 88 years at the first wave. Participants completed up to six assessments covering a 19-year period. Measures at each assessment included spatial and speed factors and pulmonary function. Model-fitting indicated that genetic variance for FEV1 was a leading indicator of variation in age changes for spatial and speed factors. Thus, these data indicate a genetic component to the directional relationship from decreased pulmonary function to decreased function of fluid intelligence.

  11. Texture-modified food and fluids in dementia and residential aged care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Painter V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Painter,1 David G Le Couteur,1–3 Louise M Waite1–3 1Aged and Chronic Care Department, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia; 2Ageing and Alzheimer’s Institute, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia; 3Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, University of Sydney, Concord, NSW, Australia Introduction: Dysphagia is common in people living with dementia and associated with increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, malnutrition, and death. Treatment options are limited and the use of texture-modified food and fluids (TMF is a widespread clinical practice. This review aimed to evaluate the evidence for TMF in dementia.Methods: A literature search using terms “dysphagia,” “texture-modified food and fluids,” “dementia,” and “aged care” was performed by using three electronic databases from 1990 to March 2017. Studies were assessed for suitability, then reviewed with data extracted, and grouped by categories of outcome measures.Results: A total of 3,722 publications were identified, and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were heterogeneous in design and methodology. There were no publications examining dementia exclusively; however, many subjects with dementia were included in studies of residential aged care facilities. TMF reduced the risk of aspiration seen on videofluoroscopy but not clinical aspiration and pneumonia. TMF was associated with lower daily energy and fluid intake and variable adherence.Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence for people living with dementia and in residential care facilities that TMF improves clinical outcomes such as aspiration pneumonia, nutrition, hydration, morbidity, and mortality. Adverse effects including poorer energy and fluid intake were identified. Keywords: modified diet, dysphagia, aspiration, aged care, nursing homes, dehydration, nutrition

  12. Ice formation and development in aged, wintertime cumulus over the UK: observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Crawford

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ high resolution aircraft measurements of cloud microphysical properties were made in coordination with ground based remote sensing observations of a line of small cumulus clouds, using Radar and Lidar, as part of the Aerosol Properties, PRocesses And InfluenceS on the Earth's climate (APPRAISE project. A narrow but extensive line (~100 km long of shallow convective clouds over the southern UK was studied. Cloud top temperatures were observed to be higher than −8 °C, but the clouds were seen to consist of supercooled droplets and varying concentrations of ice particles. No ice particles were observed to be falling into the cloud tops from above. Current parameterisations of ice nuclei (IN numbers predict too few particles will be active as ice nuclei to account for ice particle concentrations at the observed, near cloud top, temperatures (−7.5 °C.

    The role of mineral dust particles, consistent with concentrations observed near the surface, acting as high temperature IN is considered important in this case. It was found that very high concentrations of ice particles (up to 100 L−1 could be produced by secondary ice particle production providing the observed small amount of primary ice (about 0.01 L−1 was present to initiate it. This emphasises the need to understand primary ice formation in slightly supercooled clouds. It is shown using simple calculations that the Hallett-Mossop process (HM is the likely source of the secondary ice.

    Model simulations of the case study were performed with the Aerosol Cloud and Precipitation Interactions Model (ACPIM. These parcel model investigations confirmed the HM process to be a very important mechanism for producing the observed high ice concentrations. A key step in generating the high concentrations was the process of collision and coalescence of rain drops, which once formed fell rapidly through the cloud, collecting ice particles which caused them

  13. Coupling between atmospheric CO2 and temperature during the onset of the Little Ice Age

    OpenAIRE

    Hoof, T.B. van

    2004-01-01

    Present day global warming is primarily caused by the greenhouse effect of the increased CO2 emissions since the onset of the industrial revolution. A coupling between temperature and the greenhouse gas CO2 has also been observed in several ice-core records on a glacial-interglacial timescale as well as on a millennial timescale during the glacials. In marked contrast, no significant ice-derived CO2 fluctuations occur on centennial time scales contemporaneously with well-documented cooling ev...

  14. Historical reconstruction of storms in the West of France in the early Little Ice Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athimon, Emmanuelle; Maanan, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    This research offers to : 1) identify, as accurately as possible, the storms and the coastal flooding in the early Little Ice Age, 2) expose their impacts on the environment and populations, 3) query the « resilience » and adaptation of medieval and modern coastal societies in the West of France by presenting their perceptions and reactions. The space-time frame of the study is located in France, from Brittany to Gascony, between the xivth and the xvith century. Sensitive and brittle, this area is regularly battered by violent winds. It also undergoes episodic sea flooding that can cause ruptures of balance. Hence, the historical reconstruction and analysis of storms and coastal flooding in a long period appear fundamental. A thorough knowledge of past meteo-marine hazards allows to recreate a link with the territory, particularly through the (re)construction of an effective memory of these phenomena. This process is essential however difficult because of many documentary gaps. They are due to historical contingencies such as wars, French Revolution, or archival disasters like the fire of the Chamber of Accounts in Paris in 1737. Many limits must also be taken into account and discussed as inaccurate dates, exaggerated or undervalued descriptions, strict spatial demarcation almost impossible to achieve for the xivth-xvith centuries. Furthermore, during this period, no death toll, material and economic balance was done after a climate disaster. Yet, many historical records - especially narrative sources, books of accounts or cities repairs - expose the impacts of storms and marine submersion on agriculture, environment, infrastructures, etc. For instance, a violent storm hit the coast on June 24th 1452. It washed away part of the roof of a castle on Noirmoutier island and knocked down the bell towers of two churches in Angers. Storms and sea flooding have affected activities, constructions and populations' lives. They have therefore forced societies to adapt

  15. Increasing subtropical North Pacific Ocean nitrogen fixation since the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Batista, Fabian C.; Schiff, John T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major part in the export of carbon and other nutrients to the deep ocean. Primary production in the NPSG has increased in recent decades despite a reduction in nutrient supply to surface waters. It is thought that this apparent paradox can be explained by a shift in plankton community structure from mostly eukaryotes to mostly nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. It remains uncertain, however, whether the plankton community domain shift can be linked to cyclical climate variability or a long-term global warming trend. Here we analyse records of bulk and amino-acid-specific 15N/14N isotopic ratios (δ15N) preserved in the skeletons of long-lived deep-sea proteinaceous corals collected from the Hawaiian archipelago; these isotopic records serve as a proxy for the source of nitrogen-supported export production through time. We find that the recent increase in nitrogen fixation is the continuation of a much larger, centennial-scale trend. After a millennium of relatively minor fluctuation, δ15N decreases between 1850 and the present. The total shift in δ15N of -2 per mil over this period is comparable to the total change in global mean sedimentary δ15N across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but it is happening an order of magnitude faster. We use a steady-state model and find that the isotopic mass balance between nitrate and nitrogen fixation implies a 17 to 27 per cent increase in nitrogen fixation over this time period. A comparison with independent records suggests that the increase in nitrogen fixation might be linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  16. The Little Ice Age: evidence from a sediment record in Gullmar Fjord, Swedish west coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Polovodova Asteman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the climatic and environmental changes during the last millennium in NE Europe based on a ca. 8-m long high-resolved and well-dated marine sediment record from the deepest basin of Gullmar Fjord (SW Sweden. According to the 210Pb- and 14C-datings, the record includes the period of the late Holocene characterised by anomalously cold summers and well known as the Little Ice Age (LIA. Using benthic foraminiferal stratigraphy, lithology, bulk sediment geochemistry and stable carbon isotopes we reconstruct various phases of this cold period, identify its timing in the study area and discuss the land-sea interactions occurring during that time. The onset of the LIA is indicated by an increase in cold-water foraminiferal species Adercotryma glomerata at ~ 1350 AD. The first phase of the LIA was characterised by a stormy but milder climate, which is indicated by a presence of Nonionella iridea. Maximum abundances of this species are likely to mirror a short and abrupt warming event at ~ 1600 AD. It is likely that due to land use changes in the second part of the LIA there was an increased input of terrestrial organic matter to the fjord, which is indicated by lighter δ13C values and an increase of detritivorous and omnivorous species as Textularia earlandi and Eggerelloides scaber. The climate deterioration during the climax of the LIA (1675–1704 AD, as suggested by the agglutinated species, caused some carbonate dissolution, variations in primary productivity and a decline of N. iridea dependant on fresh phytodetritus. It is also assumed that an increase of Hyalinea balthica could be indicative of climate warming trends at 1600–1743 and 1813–1940 AD.

  17. The Little Ice Age and its Spatial Variability across the Balkans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, C.; Peteet, D. M.; Boger, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using biological proxies (pollen, spores, and charcoal), geochemical signals through X-ray fluorescence, and AMS 14C based chronology, we present a correlation between two new high resolution Little Ice Age (LIA) records from the Central Balkans that are part of one of the least studied regions of Europe. The sediments extracted from a western sinkhole and central Serbian oxbow lake are analyzed at 8-10-cm intervals to capture the nature and magnitude of the LIA at a resolution of 20 years. During the 15th-19th CE, indigenous tree (e.g. Quercus, Acer, Pinus) and herbaceous (e.g. Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Artemisia) pollen from these records demonstrate fluctuations in woodland-grassland dynamics. While tree populations from Central Serbia remain comparatively stable (40-60%), the trees of western Serbia vacillate drastically between 15% and 50%. Similarly, central Serbian grasses show variations of ~18-36% whereas the western Serbian grass populations exhibit abrupt oscillations between high (55%) and low (19%) percentages. As a proxy for surface erosion and clastic input into the lakes, the 1-cm resolution potassium and titanium counts are in strong agreement with varying herbaceous taxa. These variations in ecological signals across the cores can account for local factors including altitude, terrain exposure, soils etc., however, the dynamic human component of the landscape is evident through crop pollen (e.g. Cerealia, Juglans) and microscopic charcoal highlighting the dominant role of people in ecological changes. Although the two sites show certain differences in charcoal concentration, extremely high charcoal indicates accelerated land clearance between the 15th and 17th CE. Until the beginning of 18th CE, the cultivars (e.g. Secale, Triticum) occur with very low percentages and then peak to suggest improved agriculture in the region. In the post-LIA era, the 20th CE exhibits increased arboreal percentages and declining grasslands in both the two Central

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF GLACIERS OF MOUNT ELBRUS AFTER THE LITTLE ICE AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Zolotarev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SummaryThe results of remote monitoring of the greatest inEuropemountain glaciation of Elbrus are covered for 120 years by instrumental survey (1887–2007 and lichenometric survey in 1986. The materials of stereoscopic digital photo survey of the whole glaciation with terrain resolution of2.5 metersproduced by space imaging system Cartosat-1 (IRS-P5 in 2007 were compared with the same year materials of phototheodolite survey of south glaciation slope (6 glaciers in total. Results of comparison showed that the data received from Cartosat-1 can be used for monitoring of glaciers with long enough interval of time between repeated surveys (from 10 years and more, and also is suitable for updating 1:25 000 topographic maps of mountain areas. The leading role of Dzhikiugankez plateau in changes was revealed. Over the last 50 years (1957–2007 the Dzhikiugankez share in change of the glaciation area as a whole has reached 45 %. The method of glacier dynamics research, based on digital technologies of image processing and assuming first of all visual deciphering of changes and in the second – measurement of parameters of changes is offered. The quantitative data of Elbrus glaciation reduction since the middle of the XIX century do not confirm the hypothesis of the global climate warming beginning just in the second half of XX century as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gases effect. Contrarily in 1970s, many Elbrus glaciers advanced. Elbrus glaciation area reduction is occurring practically evenly through time and is alternated with short-term periods of stationary state and advance. These facts suggest that global climate warming, which alternated with short-term cooling periods, began after the end of the Little Ice Age and was most likely due to natural rather than anthropogenic causes.

  19. Morphological changes in Alpine rivers following the end of the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Enrico; Scorpio, Vittoria; Fuller, Ian; McColl, Samuel; Comiti, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    This work investigates the channel changes of Alpine rivers from the end of the Little Ice Age (1850s) to the 1950s, with the aim to determine the possible role of climatic variations occurred in this period before the onset of anthropic pressures (i.e., dams, check-dams, bank protections, and gravel mining). The research was conducted on 17 river catchments of South Tyrol (northern Italy), glaciated and unglaciated. A multitemporal GIS analysis approach was adopted to assess the morphological changes (in terms of channel width and pattern) from three different sources: (i) Austrian cadastral map (1858), (ii) maps from the Italian Institute of Military Geography (1917-1925), and (iii) two aerial photo sets taken in 1945 and 1954. The analysed river network (a total of 480 km) was subdivided into 162 morphologically homogeneous reaches (76 confined, 81 partly confined, and 5 unconfined), with lengths ranging from 630 to 5500 m, slope from 0.3 to 24%, and drained area from 20 to 4000 km2. The statistical relationships among morphological changes and reach- and basin-scale factors were analysed by univariate and multivariate methods, and the relationships between width changes and 36 controlling factors were explored using Principal Component Analysis. The variability in width and morphological pattern changes were very pronounced between and within single rivers, highlighting the value of such a large data set. Overall, the analysed rivers varied their morphological pattern, mostly exhibiting a shift from multithread/transitional to single-thread patterns, but unchanged planform types were also common. Variations in channel width varied substantially among the analysed rivers, which featured narrowing (slightly prevailing) and widening (the least common) as well as many cases of very limited changes. Channel width variations appear statistically, although weakly, related to some morphometric variables; and significant differences emerge comparing glaciated vs

  20. Amino acid concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid: effects of aging, depression, and probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, P J; Evans, H E; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1980-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acid concentrations were measured in six Bipolar I, eight Bipolar II, eight Unipolar, and four other and control patients. All but four were also studied after administration of probenecid. Fourteen amino acids showed significant correlations of concentrations with age of subjects. Significant diagnostic group differences were found for five amino acids; only that of tyrosine persisted after taking subject's age into account. Following probenecid administration, there were statistically significant changes in CSF concentration of several amino acids, but these changes were small and likely indicative of diurnal changes.

  1. Cold distribution networks. Cold distribution by two-phase refrigerant fluid. Case of ice slurries; Reseaux de distribution de froid. Distribution de froid par fluide frigoporteur diphasique. Cas du coulis de glace stabilisee (2002 - 2004). Rapport final (1er juillet 2004). Programme energie. PRI 9.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), Centre de Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL), UMR 5008, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Mercier, P. [CEA Grenoble, Groupement pour la Recherche sur les Echangeurs Thermiques (GRETH), 38 (France); Royon, L. [Paris-1 Univ., Lab. de Biorheologie et d' Hydrodynamique Physico-Chimique, 75 (France); Dumas, J.P. [L' Ecole Nationale Superieure en Genie des Technologies Industrielles, Lab. de Thermique Energetique et Procedes, 64 - Pau (France); Guilpart, J. [URGPAN/CEMAGRE, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2004-07-01

    This PRI aims to participate to the development of alternate solutions for refrigerant fluids, for the cold transport and more specially a two phase refrigerant fluid: the stabilized ice slurry. The research program presented three main axis: design, realization and characterization of stabilized ice slurry, experimental studies of transport and transfer properties, study of online measurement process of the solid content. A simulation has been realized to evaluate the energy efficiency of this refrigerant use. (A.L.B.)

  2. Little ice age advance and retreat of Glaciar Jorge Montt, Chilean Patagonia, recorded in maps, air photographs and dendrochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rivera

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Glaciar Jorge Montt (48°20' S/73°30' W, one of the main tidewater glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Icefield (SPI, has experienced the fastest frontal retreat observed in Patagonia during the past century, with a recession of 19.5 km between 1898 and 2011. This record retreat uncovered trees overridden during the Little Ice Age (LIA advance of the glacier. Samples of these trees were dated using radiocarbon methods, yielding burial ages between 460 and 250 cal yr BP. The dendrochronology and maps indicate that Glaciar Jorge Montt was at its present position before the beginning of the LIA, in concert with several other glaciers in Southern Patagonia, and reached its maximum advance position between 1650 and 1750 AD. The post-LIA retreat is most likely triggered by climatically induced changes during the 20th century, however, Glaciar Jorge Montt has responded more dramatically than its neighbours. The retreat of Jorge Montt opened a new fjord 19.5 km long, and up to 391 m deep, with a varied bathymetry well correlated with glacier retreat rates, suggesting that dynamic responses of the glacier are at least partially connected to near buoyancy conditions at the ice front, resulting in high calving fluxes, accelerating thinning rates and rapid ice velocities.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Firn Close-Off Depth, Delta Age, and Depth-Integrated Porosity in the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, H.; Stevens, C. M.; Yoon, M.; Waddington, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice cores in dry snow zones can provide a unique record of Earth's past climate history and atmospheric composition for up to 800,000 years. However, in order to interpret ice-core data accurately, scientists must understand the entire firnification process. In addition, satellite-based measurements of ice-sheet elevation changes must be accompanied by estimates of the air content, or depth-integrated porosity of the firn, in order to infer rates of mass gain or loss. The firn physics group at University of Washington is developing an open source Community Firn Model to simulate firn densification and gas-transport processes. We have calculated the spatial distribution of depth and age of the firn at pore close-off, as well as the depth-integrated porosity, using gridded mean-annual temperature over Greenland over a 173 year period together with gridded snow accumulation-rate data (Box). Our results can contribute to a better understanding of past climate changes, and knowing the close-off depth and age will provide guidelines for future core sites for investigation of pre-industrial levels of trace gases. Knowing the depth-integrated porosity will allow more accurate mass-loss estimates, and to future sea-level predictions.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid production and dynamics in normal aging: a MRI phase-mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase mapping was used for non-invasive evaluation of the to-and-fro motion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, and to measure the supratentorial CSF production in vivo, in 13 healthy volunteers to determine whether normal aging affects...... these parameters. Eight young healthy volunteers (mean age 29.8 years) and five elderly healthy volunteers (mean age 69.0 years) were examined, all were normal on conventional MRI. Slightly higher aqueductal CSF peak flow velocities and peak volume flow in both the caudal and rostral directions were found...... in fact occurs at this relatively high rate. Our study further suggests that the differences found in human CSF production rates are caused by interindividual factors other than age....

  5. Radiocarbon ages of terrestrial gastropods extend duration of ice-free conditions at the Two Creeks forest bed, Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Jason A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of terrestrial gastropods that underlie the late Pleistocene Two Creeks forest bed (~ 13,800–13,500 cal yr BP) in eastern Wisconsin, USA provides evidence for a mixed tundra-taiga environment prior to formation of the taiga forest bed. Ten new AMS 14C analyses on terrestrial gastropod shells indicate the mixed tundra-taiga environment persisted from ~ 14,500 to 13,900 cal yr BP. The Twocreekan climatic substage, representing ice-free conditions on the shore of Lake Michigan, therefore began near the onset of peak warming conditions during the Bølling–Allerød interstadial and lasted ~ 1000 yr, nearly 600 yr longer than previously thought. These results provide important data for understanding the response of continental ice sheets to global climate forcing and demonstrate the potential of using terrestrial gastropod fossils for both environmental reconstruction and age control in late Quaternary sediments.

  6. Net ecosystem production in a Little Ice Age moraine: the role of plant functional traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varolo, E.; Zanotelli, D.; Tagliavini, M.; Zerbe, S.; Montagnani, L.

    2015-07-01

    Current glacier retreat allows vast mountain ranges available for vegetation establishment and growth. Little is known about the effective carbon (C) budget of these new ecosystems and how the presence of different vegetation communities, characterized by their specific physiology and life forms influences C fluxes. In this study, using a comparative analysis of the C fluxes of two contrasting vegetation types, we intend to evaluate if the different physiologies of the main species have an effect on Ecosystem Respiration (Reco), Gross Primary Production (GPP), annual cumulated Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), and long-term carbon accumulation in soil. The NEE of two plant communities present on a Little Ice Age moraine in the Matsch glacier forefield (Alps, Italy) was measured over two growing seasons. They are a typical C3 grassland, dominated by Festuca halleri All. and a community dominated by CAM rosettes Sempervivum montanum L. on rocky soils. Using transparent and opaque chambers, we extrapolated the ecophysiological responses to the main environmental drivers and performed the partition of NEE into Reco and GPP. Soil samples were collected from the same site to measure long-term C accumulation in the ecosystem. The two communities showed contrasting GPP but similar Reco patterns and as a result significantly different in NEE. The grassland acted mainly as a carbon sink with a total cumulated value of -46.4 ± 35.5 g C m-2 NEE while the plots dominated by the CAM rosettes acted as a source with 31.9 ± 22.4 g C m-2. In spite of the NEE being different in the two plant communities, soil analysis did not reveal significant differences in carbon accumulation. Grasslands showed 1.76 ± 0.12 kg C m-2, while CAM rosettes showed 2.06 ± 0.23 kg C m-2. This study demonstrates that carbon dynamics of two vegetation communities can be distinct even though the growing environment is similar. The physiological traits of the dominant species determine large differences in

  7. Net ecosystem production in a Little Ice Age moraine: the role of plant functional traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Varolo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current glacier retreat allows vast mountain ranges available for vegetation establishment and growth. Little is known about the effective carbon (C budget of these new ecosystems and how the presence of different vegetation communities, characterized by their specific physiology and life forms influences C fluxes. In this study, using a comparative analysis of the C fluxes of two contrasting vegetation types, we intend to evaluate if the different physiologies of the main species have an effect on Ecosystem Respiration (Reco, Gross Primary Production (GPP, annual cumulated Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE, and long-term carbon accumulation in soil. The NEE of two plant communities present on a Little Ice Age moraine in the Matsch glacier forefield (Alps, Italy was measured over two growing seasons. They are a typical C3 grassland, dominated by Festuca halleri All. and a community dominated by CAM rosettes Sempervivum montanum L. on rocky soils. Using transparent and opaque chambers, we extrapolated the ecophysiological responses to the main environmental drivers and performed the partition of NEE into Reco and GPP. Soil samples were collected from the same site to measure long-term C accumulation in the ecosystem. The two communities showed contrasting GPP but similar Reco patterns and as a result significantly different in NEE. The grassland acted mainly as a carbon sink with a total cumulated value of −46.4 ± 35.5 g C m−2 NEE while the plots dominated by the CAM rosettes acted as a source with 31.9 ± 22.4 g C m−2. In spite of the NEE being different in the two plant communities, soil analysis did not reveal significant differences in carbon accumulation. Grasslands showed 1.76 ± 0.12 kg C m−2, while CAM rosettes showed 2.06 ± 0.23 kg C m−2. This study demonstrates that carbon dynamics of two vegetation communities can be distinct even though the growing environment is similar. The physiological traits of the dominant species

  8. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the Eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analysed the pollen content of a 1100-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the Eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined to distinguish the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo. Results showed that between 900 AD and 1230 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with high T/P index linked to a high ENSO variability and a weak South American Summer Monsoon (SASM activity. Between 1230 and 1650 AD, a dry climate prevailed characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index related to lower ENSO variability with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed, first a wet phase between 1650 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1810 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulting in drying of the páramo. The Current Warm Period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity, the highest in the last millennium, and weaker SASM activity modifying the water stock of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively loosing its capacity for water storage and that the variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matters for Andean climate patterns although many teleconnection mechanisms are still poorly understood.

  9. The Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in the eastern Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-P. Ledru

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To better characterize the climate variability of the last millennium in the high Andes, we analyzed the pollen content of a 1150-yr-old sediment core collected in a bog located at 3800 m a.s.l. in the páramo in the eastern Cordillera in Ecuador. An upslope convective index based on the ratio between cloud transported pollen from the Andean forest to the bog (T and Poaceae pollen frequencies, related to the edaphic moisture of the páramo (P, was defined. This index was used to distinguish changes in the atmospheric moisture from the soil moisture content of the páramo and their associated patterns of interdecadal El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO variability and South American summer monsoon (SASM activity. Results show that between 850 and 1250 AD, the Medieval Climate Anomaly interval was warm and moist with a high transported pollen/Poaceae pollen (T/P index linked to high ENSO variability and weak SASM activity. Between 1250 and 1550 AD, a dry climate prevailed, characterized by an abrupt decrease in the T/P index and therefore no upslope cloud convection, related to lower ENSO variability and with significant impact on the floristic composition of the páramo. During the Little Ice Age, two phases were observed: first, a wet phase between 1550 and 1750 AD linked to low ENSO variability in the Pacific and warm south equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs favored the return of a wet páramo, and then a cold and dry phase between 1750 and 1800 AD associated with low ENSO variability and weak SASM activity resulted in drying of the páramo. The current warm period marks the beginning of a climate characterized by high convective activity – the highest in the last millennium – and weaker SASM activity modifying the water storage of the páramo. Our results show that the páramo is progressively losing its capacity for water storage and that the interdecadal variability of both tropical Pacific and Atlantic SSTs matter for

  10. A refined TALDICE-1a age scale from 55 to 112 ka before present for the Talos Dome ice core based on high-resolution methane measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schüpbach

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A precise synchronization of different climate records is indispensable for a correct dynamical interpretation of paleoclimatic data. A chronology for the TALDICE ice core from the Ross Sea sector of East Antarctica has recently been presented based on methane synchronization with Greenland and the EDC ice cores and δ18Oice synchronization with EDC in the bottom part (TALDICE-1. Using new high-resolution methane data obtained with a continuous flow analysis technique, we present a refined age scale for the age interval from 55–112 thousand years (ka before present, where TALDICE is synchronized with EDC. New and more precise tie points reduce the uncertainties of the age scale from up to 1900 yr in TALDICE-1 to below 1100 yr over most of the refined interval and shift the Talos Dome dating to significantly younger ages during the onset of Marine Isotope Stage 3. Thus, discussions of climate dynamics at sub-millennial time scales are now possible back to 110 ka, in particular during the inception of the last ice age. Calcium data of EDC and TALDICE are compared to show the impact of the refinement to the synchronization of the two ice cores not only for the gas but also for the ice age scale.

  11. Age-related changes in body fluid volumes in young spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Dreele, M.M. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The authors have measured total body water (TBW, by dessiccation), extracellular fluid volume (ECF, Na{sub 2}{sup 35}SO{sub 4} space), and plasma volume (PV, radioiodinated serum albumin space) in 5-sec-butyl-5-ethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid and sodium salt (Inactin)-anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats aged 12-60 days. Interstitial fluid volume (ISF) was calculated as ECF minus PV. Changes in TBW, ECF, and ISF were largely a function of age in both strains, which is typical of developing mammals. Further analysis revealed that although these volumes were significantly larger in SHR before 25 days of age, after 30 days no difference existed between the strains. Before 25 days of age, when SHR's TBW was expanded, no weight difference was seen between the strains. However, once TBW was normalized (after 30 days), WKY was significantly heavier than SHR. The ISF volume was preferentially enlarged in SHR, although PV was also periodically greater. ISF normalized at the time when blood pressure becomes significantly higher in SHR, when plasma aldosterone falls to WKY values in SHR and when renal function is approaching adult levels. Thus the return of ECF (ISF) to normal values may be a result of decreased aldosterone-dependent volume retention or to diuresis induced by increasing blood pressure in an animal whose renal function is close to maturity.

  12. Coupling between atmospheric CO2 and temperature during the onset of the Little Ice Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, T.B. van

    2004-01-01

    Present day global warming is primarily caused by the greenhouse effect of the increased CO2 emissions since the onset of the industrial revolution. A coupling between temperature and the greenhouse gas CO2 has also been observed in several ice-core records on a glacial-interglacial timescale as we

  13. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, S. A.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Kjaer, K. H.; Bevan, S.; Luckman, A.; Aschwanden, A.; Bjork, A. A.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Box, J. E.; van den Broeke, M.; van Dam, T. M.; Fitzner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve the

  14. Effect of ageing of K-feldspar on its ice nucleating efficiency in immersion, deposition and contact freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Bachmann, Felix; Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recently K-feldspar was identified as one of the most active atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) of mineral origin [1]. Seeking the explanation to this phenomena we have conducted extensive experimental investigation of the ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in three heterogeneous freezing modes. The immersion freezing of K-feldspar was investigated with the cold stage using arrays of nanoliter-size droplets containing aqueous suspension of polydisperse feldspar particles. For contact freezing, the charged droplets of supercooled water were suspended in the laminar flow of the DMA-selected feldspar-containing particles, allowing for determination of freezing probability on a single particle-droplet contact [2]. The nucleation and growth of ice via vapor deposition on the crystalline surfaces of macroscopic feldspar particles have been investigated in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) under humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The ice nucleation experiments were supplemented with measurements of effective surface area of feldspar particles and ion chromatography (IC) analysis of the leached framework cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+). In this contribution we focus on the role of surface chemistry influencing the IN efficiency of K-feldspar, in particular the connection between the degree of surface hydroxylation and its ability to induce local structural ordering in the interfacial layer in water molecules (as suggested by recent modeling efforts). We mimic the natural process of feldspar ageing by suspending it in water or weak aqueous solution of carbonic acid for different time periods, from minutes to months, and present its freezing efficiency as a function of time. Our immersion freezing experiments show that ageing have a nonlinear effect on the freezing behavior of feldspar within the investigated temperature range (-40°C to -10°C). On the other hand, deposition nucleation of ice observed in the ESEM reveals clear different pattern

  15. A refined TALDICE-1a age scale from 55 to 112 ka before present for the Talos Dome ice core based on high-resolution methane measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schüpbach

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A precise synchronization of different climate records is indispensable for a correct dynamical interpretation of paleoclimatic data. A chronology for the TALDICE ice core from the Ross Sea sector of East Antarctica has recently been presented based on methane synchronization with Greenland and the EDC ice cores and δ18Oice synchronization with EDC in the bottom part (TALDICE-1. By the use of new high-resolution methane data, obtained with a continuous flow analysis technique, we present a refined age scale for the age interval from 55–112 ka before present where TALDICE is synchronized with EDC. New and more precise tie points reduce the uncertainties of the age scale from up to 2000 yr in TALDICE-1 to below 1000 yr over most of the refined interval. Thus, discussions of climate dynamics at sub-millennial time scales are now possible back to 110 ka, in particular during the inception of the last ice age. Calcium data of EDC and TALDICE are compared to show the impact of the refinement to the synchronization of the two ice cores not only for the gas but also for the ice age scale.

  16. A volcanically triggered regime shift in the subpolar North Atlantic ocean as a possible origin of the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Schleussner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the climatological events of the last millennium, the Northern Hemisphere Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, succeeded by the Little Ice Age (LIA are of exceptional importance. The origin of these regional climate anomalies remains however a subject of debate and besides external influences like solar and volcanic activity, internal dynamics of the climate system might have also played a dominant role. Here, we present transient last millennium simulations of the fully-coupled model Climber 3α forced with stochastically reconstructed wind fields. Our results indicate that short-lived volcanic eruptions might have triggered a cascade of sea-ice – ocean feedbacks in the North Atlantic, ultimately leading to a persistent regime shift in the ocean circulation. We find that an increase in the Nordic Sea sea-ice extent on decadal timescales as a consequence of major volcanic eruptions leads to a spin-up of the subpolar gyre (SPG and a weakened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, eventually causing a persistent, basin-wide cooling. These results highlight the importance of regional climate feedbacks such as a regime shift in the subpolar gyre circulation for past and future climate.

  17. Oblique wave scattering by an undulating porous bottom in a two-layer ice-covered fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Srikumar

    2016-06-01

    The present study analyzes the reflection and transmission phenomenon of water-waves in a two-layer ice-covered system. The upper layer is covered by an ice-sheet, whereas the bottom of the lower layer is undulated and permeable. By using regular perturbation analysis and Fourier transform technique, the problem is solved and the first order reflection and transmission coefficients are determined. It is found that these coefficients depend on the shape as well as the permeability of the undulating bottom. Therefore, from the practical viewpoint, an undulating bottom topography is considered to determine all the aforesaid coefficients. The role of various system parameters, such as porosity, angle of incidence and ice parameters, are discussed to analyze the transformation of incident water wave energy from one layer to another layer. The outcomes are demonstrated in graphical forms.

  18. THE SAND WEDGE AND MIRABILITE OF THE LAST ICE AGE AND THEIR PALEOCLIMATIC SIGNIFICANCE IN HEXI CORRIDOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sand wedges in Hexi Corridor occur in the alluvial gravel stratum of bajada and high terraces. The 14C ages of eolian sand in sand wedges prove that they formed during the Last Ice Age, with the mean annual air temperature about 5.6℃. The common 14C and AMS 14C dating ages of terrestrial branch relicts in Huahai clay-mirabilite interlayer are ( 11 600 ±280) a B. P. and (1118 ±54) a B.P. respectively, proving that the mirabilite formed at the cold episode of the Last Glacial Maximum(LGM) and Younger Dryers(YD) in Huahai Lake. It is pointed out that the mean annual air temperature in Hexi Corridor during LGM was about - 3℃ - - 7℃ ,11℃ - 15℃ lower than that of present, and that during YD was about 0℃ - 2℃,6℃ - 8℃ lower than at present. This decreasing temperature values are generally coincident with those inferred by pollen, sand wedge and ice core in the northern China, and also with the research on temperature-falling amplitude of middle and high latitude on the Northern Hemisphere recently.

  19. Excitability, mixed-mode oscillations and transition to chaos in a stochastic ice ages model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Bashkirtseva, I. A.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by an important geophysical significance, we consider the influence of stochastic forcing on a simple three-dimensional climate model previously derived by Saltzman and Sutera. A nonlinear dynamical system governing three physical variables, the bulk ocean temperature, continental and marine ice masses, is analyzed in deterministic and stochastic cases. It is shown that the attractor of deterministic model is either a stable equilibrium or a limit cycle. We demonstrate that the process of continental ice melting occurs with a noise-dependent time delay as compared with marine ice melting. The paleoclimate cyclicity which is near 100 ky in a wide range of model parameters abruptly increases in the vicinity of a bifurcation point and depends on the noise intensity. In a zone of stable equilibria, the 3D climate model under consideration is extremely excitable. Even for a weak random noise, the stochastic trajectories demonstrate a transition from small- to large-amplitude stochastic oscillations (SLASO). In a zone of stable cycles, SLASO transitions are analyzed too. We show that such stochastic transitions play an important role in the formation of a mixed-mode paleoclimate scenario. This mixed-mode dynamics with the intermittency of large- and small-amplitude stochastic oscillations and coherence resonance are investigated via analysis of interspike intervals. A tendency of dynamic paleoclimate to abrupt and rapid glaciations and deglaciations as well as its transition from order to chaos with increasing noise are shown.

  20. Sr Isotopes at the Onset of the Ice Ages at the Northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Rita; Lazar, Boaz; Angiolini, Lucia; Crippa, Gaia; Stein, Mordechai

    2017-04-01

    Sr isotopes can be used to constrain the marine Sr budget. The temporal variations in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios (radiogenic Sr) have been reconstructed over the past few decades based on marine macro and micro fossils data (e.g. brachiopods and foraminifera). It is used to constrain the sources and amounts of strontium that dictate the temporal variations in oceanic Sr throughout the Phanerozoic. On the other hand, the study of processes controlling the composition stable Sr isotopes (δ88/86Sr) is very new and only limited research was conducted on this topic during the past few years. Up to date, no δ88/86Sr data are available for considerable parts of Earth's history and the contribution of the potential Sr sources to the oceans is poorly constrained. Here, we set to examine the behavior of radiogenic and stable Sr isotopes in the marine environment of the northern Apennines (Italy) during the time interval of the late Pliocene to early-Middle Pleistocene - upon the onset of ice ages in the northern latitudes. We collected fossil mollusks from outcrops of the Arda and Stirone Rivers that are rich in bivalves, brachiopods, foraminifera (that were used for establishing the chronostratigraphy of the sections) and other genera. Ecological and sedimentological analysis of the section suggest a normal marine environment of depth range of several tens of meters that existed on the southern flanks of the large Po embayment. In order to evaluate the potential of the fossil assemblages in the Arda and Stirone sections to serve as reliable recorders of the marine δ88/86Sr of seawater during the desired period, we examined mineralogical and chemical properties of the fossils (e.g. distribution of trace elements like Sr and Mg in the skeletons, microstructures like secondary fillings of punctate shells in brachiopod) and measured the 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Among the species analyzed, Aequipecten opercularis (bivalve) and Glycymeris inflata (bivalve) have aragonite skeletons that

  1. Age of the Pineo Ridge System: Implications for behavior of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in eastern Maine, U.S.A., during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brenda L.; Borns, Harold W.; Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Lowell, Thomas V.

    2017-08-01

    The Laurentide Ice Sheet was a major driver of global sea-level change during the last deglaciation and may have impacted both atmospheric and oceanic circulation. An understanding of past changes in the ice sheet is important for constraining its interaction with other components of the climate system. Here, we present the geologic context and chronology for ice-sheet fluctuations in eastern Maine, adjacent to the North Atlantic Ocean, thought to be a key player in the termination of the last ice age. Retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet through coastal Maine first produced a series of lobate grounding-line moraines, followed by deposition of the prominent Pineo Ridge System, which crosscut the earlier moraine set and which is characterized by extensive ice-contact deltas, closely spaced parallel moraines, and association with eskers. Our new 10Be surface exposure ages indicate that the Pineo Ridge System, which extends for more than 100 km in eastern Maine and Atlantic Canada, dates to ∼15.3 ka, ∼800 years older than recent estimates. Our data are in accord with inboard minimum-limiting radiocarbon ages of terrestrial materials, which indicate deglaciation as early as 15.3 ka, as well as of marine shells that are as old as 15.0 ka. Both the deglaciation that produced the lobate moraines and the short-lived readvance that led to the Pineo Ridge System occurred during Heinrich Stadial 1. Given that faunal and isotopic evidence indicates that the ocean remained cold during deglaciation of coastal Maine, we infer that ice recession was due to rising summer air temperatures that gave way briefly to cooling to allow minor readvance. Glacial deposits north of the Pineo Ridge System display evidence of ice stagnation and downwasting, suggesting rapid ice retreat following deposition of the delta-moraine complex, coincident with the onset of the Bølling.

  2. Preface: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23 27 July 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Amazonian-aged fluvial system and associated ice-related features in Terra Cimmeria, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Solmaz; Hauber, Ernst; Kleinhans, Maarten; Le Deit, Laetitia; Platz, Thomas; Fawdon, Peter; Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate throughout the Amazonian is widely believed to have been cold and hyper-arid, very similar to the current conditions. However, ubiquitous evidence of aqueous and glacial activity has been recently reported, including channels that can be tens to hundreds of kilometres long, alluvial and fluvial deposits, ice-rich mantles, and glacial and periglacial landforms. Here we study a ∼340 km-long fluvial system located in the Terra Cimmeria region, in the southern mid-latitudes of Mars. The fluvial system is composed of an upstream catchment system with narrow glaciofluvial valleys and remnants of ice-rich deposits. We observe depositional features including fan-shaped deposits, and erosional features such as scour marks and streamlined islands. At the downstream section of this fluvial system is an outflow channel named Kārūn Valles, which displays a unique braided alluvial fan and terminates on the floor of the Ariadnes Colles basin. Our observations point to surface runoff of ice/snow melt as the water source for this fluvial activity. According to our crater size-frequency distribution analysis the entire fluvial system formed during early to middle Amazonian, between ∼ 1.8-0.2+0.2 Ga to 510-40+40 Ma. Hydraulic modelling indicates that the Kārūn Valles and consequently the alluvial fan formation took place in geologically short-term event(s). We conclude that liquid water was present in Terra Cimmeria during the early to middle Amazonian, and that Mars during that time may have undergone several episodic glacial-related events.

  4. A link between an ice age era and a rapid polar shift

    CERN Document Server

    Wölfli, W

    2004-01-01

    The striking asymmetry of the ice cover during the Last Global Maximum suggests that the North Pole was in Greenland and then rapidly shifted to its present position in the Arctic See. A scenario which causes such a rapid geographic polar shift is physically possible. It involves an additional planet, which disappeared by evaporation within the Holocene. This is only possible within such a short period, if the planet was in an extremely eccentric orbit and hot. Then, since this produced an interplanetary gas cloud, the polar shift had to be preceded by a cold period with large global temperature variations during several million years.

  5. Brief survey of deicing/anti-icing fluid and techniques for aircraft%飞机除冰/防冰液及除冰技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌

    2012-01-01

    本文主要介绍了飞机除冰/防冰液的四种类型及主要技术要求,包括材料组成与理化性能、稳定性、使用性能、对飞机材料及机场跑道材料的影响、对生态环境的影响等,并简述了飞机液体防冰技术、机械除冰技术和热力防冰技术等几大类除冰技术的发展情况。%The four types and chief requirements of deicing/anti-icing fluid for aircraft were intrduced,including fluid composition and physical properties,stability,performance properties,effect on aircraft materials and runway concrete scaling resistance,environmental information,etc.The development of deicing techniques for aircraft which include fluid deicing,mechanical deicing and hot deicing were summarized.

  6. Age-specific characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Schmid Daners

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to quantify age-related differences in the characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. To this end, 3T phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging blood and CSF flow data of eleven young (24 ± 3 years and eleven elderly subjects (70 ± 5 years with a comparable sex-ratio were acquired. Flow waveforms and their frequency composition, transfer functions from blood to CSF flows and cross-correlations were analyzed. The magnitudes of the frequency components of CSF flow in the aqueduct differ significantly between the two age groups, as do the frequency components of the cervical spinal CSF and the arterial flows. The males' aqueductal CSF stroke volumes and average flow rates are significantly higher than those of the females. Transfer functions and cross-correlations between arterial blood and CSF flow reveal significant age-dependence of phase-shift between these, as do the waveforms of arterial blood, as well as cervical-spinal and aqueductal CSF flows. These findings accentuate the need for age- and sex-matched control groups for the evaluation of cerebral pathologies such as hydrocephalus.

  7. Aging and Strategic Retrieval in a Cued-Recall Test: The Role of Executive Functions and Fluid Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Bouazzaoui, Badiaa; Isingrini, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Cued-recall in episodic memory was investigated in relation to low and high cognitive support at retrieval, executive function level and fluid intelligence level in 81 healthy adults divided first into two age groups (young and elderly adults). The first analyses showed that age-related differences were greater when a low cognitive support was…

  8. Comparative Study of Probiotic Ice Cream and Probiotic Drink on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Levels in 6-12 Years Age Group Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahantesha, Taranatha; Reddy, K M Parveen; Kumar, N H Praveen; Nara, Asha; Ashwin, Devasya; Buddiga, Vinutna

    2015-09-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in the world. Probiotics are one the various preventive methods to reduce dental caries. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of probiotic ice cream and drink on salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in children of 6-12 years age group. A three phase study was carried out in children (n = 50) of 6-12 years age with zero decayed missing filled teeth (dmft)/DMFT. They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva samples were collected before the consumptions of probiotic ice cream and probiotic drink. Colony count obtained was recorded as baseline data. For both groups probiotic ice cream and drink was given randomly for 7 days and a washout period of 90 days were given and then the saliva samples were collected and colony counting was done. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's paired t-test and multiple comparisons by Tukey's honest significant difference test which showed, there is a significant reduction in salivary S. mutans level in both groups after 7 days period. However, after washout period only probiotic ice cream showed reduction whereas drink did not. Also, there was no significant difference between probiotic ice cream and drink. Probiotic organisms definitely have a role in reducing the salivary S. mutans level and ice cream would be a better choice than drink. However, the prolonged use of the agents and their effects on caries is still to be determined.

  9. Evaluating the Age of Buried Ice in Antarctica Using Ashfall Deposits: New Insights from Deposit Morphology, Grain Shape, and LA-ICP-MS Trace-Element Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A. R.; Marchant, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Dating of buried ice in the western Dry Valleys region relies on 40Ar/39Ar analysis of ashfall deposits within sublimation tills that rest directly on stagnant glacier ice. The oldest ice so dated is >8.1 Ma. The fundamental assumption is that dated ashes are in-situ and have not been transported from surface deposits elsewhere in the Dry Valleys region. Given that the surface of sublimation tills shows well-developed patterned ground, the presumption of ground stability and long-term preservation of in-situ ashfall is questioned. As a test of ground stability, we examined ash-deposit morphology, grain shape, and glass-shard trace-element geochemistry from several ashfall deposits used to provide limiting ages on buried ice and tills in the western Dry Valleys. Detailed field analyses show that ashfall that collects in sublimation tills over buried ice occurs in one of three morphologic settings: surface troughs that delineate sand-wedge polygons, void spaces in gravel-and-cobble lags that overlie active sand wedges, and 1 to 2-cm-wide thermal contraction cracks. Post-depositional sublimation of underlying ice may distort initial deposit morphology through uneven surface lowering. Microscopic analyses of concentrated ashfall deposits that lack detrital sand grains show highly angular glass shards that preserve delicate hair-like spires and thin bubble-wall vesicles. Grain edges are sharp with no chipped, fractured, or pitted surfaces. In contrast, ash deposits containing detrital sand grains show subangular to subrounded shard morphologies with concave fractures and pits on grain edges, all of which are suggestive of abrasion during transport. In such deposits, grains preserving delicate bubble walls and hair-like spires are conspicuously absent. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry shows that glass shards within each ashfall deposit have uniform trace-element geochemical signatures. If ashfall were eroded and transported after initial

  10. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.;

    2014-01-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve...... the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond such episodic events is required. Here, we extend the observational record of marginal thinning of Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers from 10 to more than 80 years. We show that, although the frontal portion...... of Helheim Glacier thinned by more than 100 m between 2003 and 2006, it thickened by more than 50 m during the previous two decades. In contrast, Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier underwent minor thinning of 40–50 m from 1981 to 1998 and major thinning of more than 100 m after 2003. Extending the record back...

  11. Greenhouse effect and ice ages: historical perspective; Effet de serre et glaciations, une perspective historique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, E. [College de France, Chaire d' Evolution du Climat et de l' Ocean, 75 - Paris (France); CEREGE (UMR 6635), 13 - Aix en Provence (France)

    2004-06-01

    This article provides a brief historical perspective on the first scientific research on the greenhouse effect and glaciations. While these two aspects of our climate can be investigated separately, naturalists, physicists and chemists during the 19. century were interested jointly in both issues, as well as the possible relationship between them. The contributions of famous pioneers are mentioned, ranging from scholars with encyclopedic knowledge such as Horace-Benedict de Saussure, to modern scientists like Svante Arrhenius, who was first to predict global warming as a consequence of using fossil fuels. Despite fragmentary observations, these pioneers had prophetic insights. Indeed, the main fundamental concepts used nowadays have been developed during the 19. century. However, we must wait until the second half of the 20. century to see a true revolution of investigative techniques in the Earth Sciences, enabling full access to previously unknown components of the climate system, such as deep oceans and the interior of the polar ice caps. (author)

  12. Changes in oxidative damage, inflammation and [NAD(H] with age in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Guest

    Full Text Available An extensive body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the degenerative changes of systemic tissues in aging. However a comparatively limited amount of data is available to verify whether these processes also contribute to normal aging within the brain. High levels of oxidative damage results in key cellular changes including a reduction in available nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+, an essential molecule required for a number of vital cellular processes including DNA repair, immune signaling and epigenetic processing. In this study we quantified changes in [NAD(H] and markers of inflammation and oxidative damage (F2-isoprostanes, 8-OHdG, total antioxidant capacity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of healthy humans across a wide age range (24-91 years. CSF was collected from consenting patients who required a spinal tap for the administration of anesthetic. CSF of participants aged >45 years was found to contain increased levels of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.04 and inflammation (IL-6 (p = 0.00 and decreased levels of both total antioxidant capacity (p = 0.00 and NAD(H (p = 0.05, compared to their younger counterparts. A positive association was also observed between plasma [NAD(H] and CSF NAD(H levels (p = 0.03. Further analysis of the data identified a relationship between alcohol intake and CSF [NAD(H] and markers of inflammation. The CSF of participants who consumed >1 standard drink of alcohol per day contained lower levels of NAD(H compared to those who consumed no alcohol (p0-1 (p1 (p<0.05 standard alcoholic drinks per day compared to those who did not drink alcohol. Taken together these data suggest a progressive age associated increase in oxidative damage, inflammation and reduced [NAD(H] in the brain which may be exacerbated by alcohol intake.

  13. A volcanically triggered regime shift in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean as a possible origin of the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Schleussner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the climatological events of the last millennium, the Northern Hemisphere Medieval Climate Anomaly succeeded by the Little Ice Age are of exceptional importance. The origin of these regional climate anomalies remains a subject of debate and besides external influences like solar and volcanic activity, internal dynamics of the climate system might have also played a dominant role. Here, we present transient last millennium simulations of the fully coupled model of intermediate complexity Climber 3α forced with stochastically reconstructed wind-stress fields. Our results indicate that short-lived volcanic eruptions might have triggered a cascade of sea ice–ocean feedbacks in the North Atlantic, ultimately leading to a persistent regime shift in the ocean circulation. We find that an increase in the Nordic Sea sea-ice extent on decadal timescales as a consequence of major volcanic eruptions in our model leads to a spin-up of the subpolar gyre and a weakened Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, eventually causing a persistent, basin-wide cooling. These results highlight the importance of regional climate feedbacks such as a regime shift in the subpolar gyre circulation for understanding the dynamics of past and future climate.

  14. Seasonally asymmetric transition of the Asian monsoon in response to ice age boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Hiroaki; Kuroki, Harumitsu; Kamae, Youichi [University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohba, Masamichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Abiko (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Modulation of a monsoon under glacial forcing is examined using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM) following the specifications established by Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 2 (PMIP2) to understand the air-sea-land interaction under different climate forcing. Several sensitivity experiments are performed in response to individual changes in the continental ice sheet, orbital parameters, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: 21 ka) to evaluate the driving mechanisms for the anomalous seasonal evolution of the monsoon. Comparison of the model results in the LGM with the pre-industrial (PI) simulation shows that the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal are characterized by enhancement of pre-monsoon convection despite a drop in the SST encompassing the globe, while the rainfall is considerably suppressed in the subsequent monsoon period. In the LGM winter relative to the PI, anomalies in the meridional temperature gradient (MTG) between the Asian continents minus the tropical oceans become positive and are consistent with the intensified pre-monsoon circulation. The enhanced MTG anomalies can be explained by a decrease in the condensation heating relevant to the suppressed tropical convection as well as positive insolation anomalies in the higher latitude, showing an opposing view to a warmer future climate. It is also evident that a latitudinal gradient in the SST across the equator plays an important role in the enhancement of pre-monsoon rainfall. As for the summer, the sensitivity experiments imply that two ice sheets over the northern hemisphere cools the air temperature over the Asian continent, which is consistent with the reduction of MTG involved in the attenuated monsoon. The surplus pre-monsoon convection causes a decrease in the SST through increased heat loss from the ocean surface; in other words, negative ocean feedback is also responsible for the subsequent weakening of summer

  15. Age of the Mt. Ortles ice cores, the Tyrolean Iceman and glaciation of the highest summit of South Tyrol since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Paolo; Barbante, Carlo; Bertagna, Giuliano; Bertó, Michele; Binder, Daniel; Carton, Alberto; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Cozzi, Giulio; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Davis, Mary; De Blasi, Fabrizio; Dinale, Roberto; Dragà, Gianfranco; Dreossi, Giuliano; Festi, Daniela; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Galos, Stephan P.; Ginot, Patrick; Heidenwolf, Petra; Jenk, Theo M.; Kehrwald, Natalie; Kenny, Donald; Magand, Olivier; Mair, Volkmar; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Lin, Ping Nan; Oeggl, Klaus; Piffer, Gianni; Rinaldi, Mirko; Schotterer, Ulrich; Schwikowski, Margit; Seppi, Roberto; Spolaor, Andrea; Stenni, Barbara; Tonidandel, David; Uglietti, Chiara; Zagorodnov, Victor; Zanoner, Thomas; Zennaro, Piero

    2016-11-01

    In 2011 four ice cores were extracted from the summit of Alto dell'Ortles (3859 m), the highest glacier of South Tyrol in the Italian Alps. This drilling site is located only 37 km southwest from where the Tyrolean Iceman, ˜ 5.3 kyrs old, was discovered emerging from the ablating ice field of Tisenjoch (3210 m, near the Italian-Austrian border) in 1991. The excellent preservation of this mummy suggested that the Tyrolean Iceman was continuously embedded in prehistoric ice and that additional ancient ice was likely preserved elsewhere in South Tyrol. Dating of the ice cores from Alto dell'Ortles based on 210Pb, tritium, beta activity and 14C determinations, combined with an empirical model (COPRA), provides evidence for a chronologically ordered ice stratigraphy from the modern glacier surface down to the bottom ice layers with an age of ˜ 7 kyrs, which confirms the hypothesis. Our results indicate that the drilling site has continuously been glaciated on frozen bedrock since ˜ 7 kyrs BP. Absence of older ice on the highest glacier of South Tyrol is consistent with the removal of basal ice from bedrock during the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum (6-9 kyrs BP), the warmest interval in the European Alps during the Holocene. Borehole inclinometric measurements of the current glacier flow combined with surface ground penetration radar (GPR) measurements indicate that, due to the sustained atmospheric warming since the 1980s, an acceleration of the glacier Alto dell'Ortles flow has just recently begun. Given the stratigraphic-chronological continuity of the Mt. Ortles cores over millennia, it can be argued that this behaviour has been unprecedented at this location since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum.

  16. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During peritoneal dialysis (PD, the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87 years; median time on PD 19 (3–100 months underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS, fraction of ultrasmall pores (αu, osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG, and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters. Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  17. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21-87) years; median time on PD 19 (3-100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters--rather than solute transport parameters--are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  18. An investigation into the use of color as a device to convey memes during the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter A.

    Color is used as a tool in visual communication to express ideas in a symbolic fashion. It can also be used as a guide to assist the viewer in the visual narrative. Artwork created in the period of time between 1300 to 1850 in northern and central Europe provides a comprehensive perspective in the use of color as symbol and color as an elucidative devise. This period of time is known as the Little Ice Age, the duration of which spans European history between the Medieval period and the Romantic era. The extreme climatic conditions of this era caused profound changes in society on many levels and influenced the use of color in paintings throughout this chapter in history. The new paradigm of the science of ideas, called memetics, provides a framework to analyze the expression of ideas through the use of color within this span of time.

  19. The onset of the Little Ice Age in Andalusia (southern Spain: detection and characterization from documentary sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Rodrigo

    Full Text Available In this work the onset of the "Little Ice Age" period in Andalusia (southern Spain is analysed from documentary data, focusing attention on the evolution of the climate during the 16th and 17th centuries. It is shown that changes in the rainfall regime have been more important than those in the temperature in studying the Andalusian climate change. Analysis of the total annual precipitation is carried out by codifying the documentary data and establishing an ordinal index. Several statistical methods are used to detect and characterize climate changes in the region. The results suggest a fluctuating evolution, without trends or abrupt changes, with a prevailing wet period from 1550 to 1650 AD. Cycles of ~17, 3.5 and 2.1 years are detected. Some possible causal mechanisms are suggested.

  20. Current long-term negative average annual energy balance of the earth leads to the new little ice age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussamatov Habibullo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The average annual decreasing rate of the total solar irradiance (TSI is increasing from the 22-nd to the 23-rd and 24-th cycles, because the Sun since the 1990 is in the phase decline of quasi-bicentennial variation. The portion of the solar energy absorbed by the Earth is decreasing. Decrease in the portion of TSI absorbed by the Earth since 1990 remains uncompensated by the Earth's radiation into space at the previous high level over a time interval determined by the thermal inertia of the Ocean. A long-term negative deviation of the Earth’s average annual energy balance from the equilibrium state is dictating corresponding variations in it’s the energy state. As a result, the Earth will have a negative average annual energy balance also in the future. This will lead to the beginning of the decreasing in the Earth's temperature and of the epoch of the Little Ice Age after the maximum phase of the 24-th solar cycle approximately since the end of 2014. The influence of the consecutive chain of the secondary feedback effects (the increase in the Bond albedo and the decrease in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to cooling will lead to an additional reduction of the absorbed solar energy and reduce the greenhouse effect. The start of the TSI’s Grand Minimum is anticipated in the solar cycle 27±1 in 2043±11 and the beginning of the phase of deep cooling of the 19th Little Ice Age for the past 7,500 years around 2060±11.

  1. Aging investigation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in low pH magnetic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria A G; Lima, Emilia C D; da Silva, Sebastião W; Melo, Tiago F O; Pimenta, Angela C M; Sinnecker, João P; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Garg, Vijayendra K; Oliveira, Aderbal C; Novak, Miguel A; Morais, Paulo C

    2007-09-11

    In this study, we report on how surface-passivated and nonpassivated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (8 nm diameter), suspended as ionic magnetic fluids and aged under low pH conditions, revealed different behavior as far as the time evolution of the iron/cobalt cation distribution, crystal quality, coercivity, and saturation magnetization are concerned. Different techniques were used to perform a detailed study regarding the chemical stability, structural stability, and surface and magnetic properties of the suspended nanoparticles as a function of the aging time. Properties of surface-passivated and nonpassivated nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectrometry, magnetic measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our data showed that the employed nanoparticle surface passivation process, besides the formation of an iron-rich surface layer, modifies the nanoparticle core as well, improving the crystal quality while modifying the Fe/Co cation distribution and the nanoparticle dissolution rate profile. Magnetic data showed that the saturation magnetization increases for surface-passivated nanoparticles in comparison to the nonpassivated ones, though coercivity decreases after passivation. These two observations were associated to changes in the cation distribution among the available tetrahedral and octahedral sites.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid norepinephrine and cognition in subjects across the adult age span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lucy Y; Murphy, Richard R; Hanscom, Brett; Li, Ge; Millard, Steven P; Petrie, Eric C; Galasko, Douglas R; Sikkema, Carl; Raskind, Murray A; Wilkinson, Charles W; Peskind, Elaine R

    2013-10-01

    Adequate central nervous system noradrenergic activity enhances cognition, but excessive noradrenergic activity may have adverse effects on cognition. Previous studies have also demonstrated that noradrenergic activity is higher in older than younger adults. We aimed to determine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) norepinephrine (NE) concentration and cognitive performance by using data from a CSF bank that includes samples from 258 cognitively normal participants aged 21-100 years. After adjusting for age, gender, education, and ethnicity, higher CSF NE levels (units of 100 pg/mL) are associated with poorer performance on tests of attention, processing speed, and executive function (Trail Making A: regression coefficient 1.5, standard error [SE] 0.77, p = 0.046; Trail Making B: regression coefficient 5.0, SE 2.2, p = 0.024; Stroop Word-Color Interference task: regression coefficient 6.1, SE 2.0, p = 0.003). Findings are consistent with the earlier literature relating excess noradrenergic activity with cognitive impairment.

  3. Little Ice Age climate reconstruction from ensemble reanalysis of Alpine glacier fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lüthi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mountain glaciers sample a combination of climate fields – temperature, precipitation and radiation – by accumulation and melting of ice. Flow dynamics acts as a transfer function that maps volume changes to a length response of the glacier terminus. Long histories of terminus positions have been assembled for several glaciers in the Alps. Here I analyze terminus position histories from an ensemble of seven glaciers in the Alps with a macroscopic model of glacier dynamics to derive a history of glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA for the time span 400–2010 C.E. The resulting climatic reconstruction depends only on records of glacier variations. The reconstructed ELA history is similar to recent reconstructions of Alpine summer temperature and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO index, but bears little resemblance to reconstructed precipitation variations. Most reconstructed low-ELA periods coincide with large explosive volcano eruptions, hinting at a direct effect of volcanic radiative cooling on mass balance. The glacier advances during the LIA, and the retreat after 1860, can thus be mainly attributed to temperature and volcanic radiative cooling.

  4. Molecular evidence of the survival of subterranean amphipods (Arthropoda) during Ice Age underneath glaciers in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornobis, Etienne; Pálsson, Snaebjörn; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2010-06-01

    A Two endemic groundwater arthropod crustacean species, Crangonyx islandicus and Crymostygius thingvallensis, were recently discovered on the mid-Atlantic volcanic island of Iceland. The extent of morphological differences from closest relatives, endemism, along with the geographic isolation of Iceland and its complete coverage by glaciers 21,000 years ago, suggests that these two species have survived glaciation periods in sub-glacial refugia. Here we provide strong support for this hypothesis by an analysis of mitochondrial genetic variation within Crangonyx islandicus. Our results show that the species is divided into several distinct monophyletic groups that are found along the volcanic zone in Iceland, which have been separated by 0.5 to around 5 million years. The genetic divergence between groups reflects geographic distances between sampling sites, indicating that divergence occurred after the colonization of Iceland. The genetic patterns, as well as the dependency of genetic variation on distances from the tectonic plate boundary and altitude, points to recent expansion from several refugia within Iceland. This presents the first genetic evidence of multicellular organisms as complex as crustacean amphipods which have survived glaciations beneath an ice sheet. This survival may be explained by geothermal heat linked to volcanic activities, which may have maintained favourable habitats in fissures along the tectonic plate boundary in Iceland during glaciations.

  5. Total-tau and phospho-tau(181Thr) in cerebrospinal fluid of neurologically intact population increase with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, J; Psujek, M; Bartosik-Psujek, H

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated molecule playing a crucial role in maintenance of neuronal integrity and in many neurodegenerative processes; its pathology has become a hallmark feature at the tissue level. The aim of the study was to estimate total tau and phospho-tau (Thr181) concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy population. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were taken from 129 subjects (age 18-77 years) without known neurologic or psychiatric condition. Both total-tau and phospho-tau levels showed significant correlation with age, which was more pronounced in older population.

  6. Constraining the equation of state of fluid H2O to 60 GPa using the melting curve of Ice VII and the formation of Mg(OH)2 in the MgO-H2O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M. R.; Fei, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The physical properties of fluid H2O are important geologically over a large range of pressure and temperature. Shock-wave data have served as the main resource for the derivations of many equations of state for fluid H2O. Direct measurements of the specific volume of water are required to test the validity of these models; however, direct measurements at elevated pressures and temperatures are difficult and, as a result, rare. The study presented here sought to determine the PVT properties of Ice VII along the melting curve at pressures > 20 GPa using the a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell with an external Mo-wire resistance heater. Small grains of MgO, gold and a relatively large volume of H2O were loaded in a sample chamber drilled in a pre-indented Re-gasket. The temperature of the experiment was determined by placing a thermocouple between the diamond anvil and Re-gasket, directly against the surface of the diamond. The experiments were conducted on beam line X17C at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source using the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXD) technique. The unit cells of Ice VII, MgO, and gold were monitored during the experiment with gold being used as an internal pressure calibrant. The methodology was to use the disappearance of the diffraction pattern of Ice VII with the production of brucite following the reaction of fluid H2O with MgO. Generally, experiments would follow the following sequence as temperature was increased: 1.) slight drop in pressure, 2.) the appearance of diffraction lines indicative of brucite, and 3.) total disappearance of Ice VII diffraction lines and noticeable drop in pressure (up to ~2 GPa at the highest pressures). The appearance of brucite would always proceed the disappearance of Ice VII diffraction lines. The data suggest that brucite formed as soon as fluid H2O became available whereas Ice VII melted over a small range over temperature (Free Energy difference between Ice VII and fluid H2O. Comparison

  7. Islands in the ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Kjær, Kurt H.; Haile, James Seymour

    2012-01-01

    Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in 'oceans' of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen's Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated ...

  8. Episodic expansion of Drangajökull, Vestfirðir, Iceland, over the last 3 ka culminating in its maximum dimension during the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harning, David J.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug; Miller, Gifford H.; Anderson, Leif

    2016-11-01

    Non-linear climate change is often linked to rapid changes in ocean circulation, especially around the North Atlantic. As the Polar Front fluctuated its latitudinal position during the Holocene, Iceland's climate was influenced by both the warm Atlantic currents and cool, sea ice-bearing Arctic currents. Drangajökull is Iceland's fifth largest ice cap. Climate proxies in lake sediment cores, dead vegetation emerging from beneath the ice cap, and moraine segments identified in a new DEM constrain the episodic expansion of the ice cap over the past 3 ka. Collectively, our data show that Drangajökull was advancing at ∼320 BCE, 180 CE, 560 CE, 950 CE and 1400 CE and in a state of recession at ∼450 CE, 1250 CE and after 1850 CE. The Late Holocene maximum extent of Drangajökull occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), occupying 262 km2, almost twice its area in 2011 CE and ∼20% larger than recent estimates of its LIA dimensions. Biological proxies from the sediment fill in a high- and low-elevation lake suggest limited vegetation and soil cover at high elevations proximal to the ice cap, whereas thick soil cover persisted until ∼750 CE at lower elevations near the coast. As Drangajökull expanded into the catchment of the high-elevation lake beginning at ∼950 CE, aquatic productivity diminished, following a trend of regional cooling supported by proxy records elsewhere in Iceland. Correlations between episodes of Drangajökull's advance and the documented occurrence of drift ice on the North Icelandic Shelf suggest export and local production of sea ice influenced the evolution of NW Iceland's Late Holocene climate.

  9. Ice Complex permafrost of MIS5 age in the Dmitry Laptev Strait coastal region (East Siberian Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Rudaya, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Vladislav; Maksimov, Fedor; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Andreev, Andrei A.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    Ice Complex deposits (locally known as the Buchchagy Ice Complex) are exposed at both coasts of the East Siberian Dmitry Laptev Strait and preserved below the Yedoma Ice Complex that formed during MIS3 and MIS2 (Marine Isotope Stage) and lateglacial-Holocene thermokarst deposits (MIS1). Radioisotope disequilibria (230Th/U) of peaty horizons date the Buchchagy Ice Complex deposition to 126 + 16/-13 kyr and 117 + 19/-14 kyr until 98 ± 5 kyr and 89 ± 5 kyr. The deposit is characterised by poorly-sorted medium-to-coarse silts with cryogenic structures of horizontal ice bands, lens-like, and lens-like reticulated segregation ice. Two peaty horizons within the Buchchagy Ice Complex and syngenetic ice wedges (2-4 m wide, up to 10 m high) are striking. The isotopic composition (δ18O, δD) of Buchchagy ice-wedge ice indicates winter conditions colder than during the MIS3 interstadial and warmer than during MIS2 stadial, and similar atmospheric winter moisture sources as during the MIS2 stadial. Buchchagy Ice Complex pollen spectra reveal tundra-steppe vegetation and harsher summer conditions than during the MIS3 interstadial and rather similar vegetation as during the MIS2 stadial. Short-term climatic variability during MIS5 is reflected in the record. Even though the regional chronostratigraphic relationship of the Buchchagy Ice Complex to the Last Interglacial remains unclear because numerical dating is widely lacking, the present study indicates permafrost (Ice Complex) formation during MIS5 sensu lato, and its preservation afterwards. Palaeoenvironmental insights into past climate and the periglacial landscape dynamics of arctic lowlands in eastern Siberia are deduced from the record.

  10. Aging and strategic retrieval in a cued-recall test: the role of executive functions and fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Bouazzaoui, Badiâa; Isingrini, Michel

    2007-06-01

    Cued-recall in episodic memory was investigated in relation to low and high cognitive support at retrieval, executive function level and fluid intelligence level in 81 healthy adults divided first into two age groups (young and elderly adults). The first analyses showed that age-related differences were greater when a low cognitive support was provided to recall the words. An individual index of loss of performance when the number of cues was decreased was then calculated. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that the executive functions measure (perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was a better candidate than the fluid intelligence measure (Cattell's culture fair test) to account for the age-related variance of the size of performance loss. These findings suggest that age differences in implementing strategic retrieval may be mainly due to a decline in executive functions.

  11. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose and lactate: age-specific reference values and implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina G Leen

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis is an important tool in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological disorders, but reference ranges for CSF glucose, CSF/plasma glucose ratio and CSF lactate based on studies with large numbers of CSF samples are not available. Our aim was to define age-specific reference values. In 1993 The Nijmegen Observational CSF Study was started. Results of all CSF samples that were analyzed between 1993 and 2008 at our laboratory were systematically collected and stored in our computerized database. After exclusion of CSF samples with an unknown or elevated erythrocyte count, an elevated leucocyte count, elevated concentrations of bilirubin, free hemoglobin, or total protein 9,036 CSF samples were further studied for CSF glucose (n = 8,871, CSF/plasma glucose ratio (n = 4,516 and CSF lactate values (n = 7,614. CSF glucose, CSF/plasma glucose ratio and CSF lactate were age-, but not sex dependent. Age-specific reference ranges were defined as 5-95(th percentile ranges. CSF glucose 5(th percentile values ranged from 1.8 to 2.9 mmol/L and 95(th percentile values from 3.8 to 5.6 mmol/L. CSF/plasma glucose ratio 5(th percentile values ranged from 0.41 to 0.53 and 95(th percentile values from 0.82 to 1.19. CSF lactate 5(th percentile values ranged from 0.88 to 1.41 mmol/L and 95(th percentile values from 2.00 to 2.71 mmol/L. Reference ranges for all three parameters were widest in neonates and narrowest in toddlers, with lower and upper limits increasing with age. These reference values allow a reliable interpretation of CSF results in everyday clinical practice. Furthermore, hypoglycemia was associated with an increased CSF/plasma glucose ratio, whereas hyperglycemia did not affect the CSF/plasma glucose ratio.

  13. A Method for En Face OCT Imaging of Subretinal Fluid in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the study is to report a method for en face imaging of subretinal fluid (SRF due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT. Methods. High density SDOCT imaging was performed at two visits in 4 subjects with neovascular AMD and one healthy subject. En face OCT images of a retinal layer anterior to the retinal pigment epithelium were generated. Validity, repeatability, and utility of the method were established. Results. En face OCT images generated by manual and automatic segmentation were nearly indistinguishable and displayed similar regions of SRF. En face OCT images displayed uniform intensities and similar retinal vascular patterns in a healthy subject, while the size and appearance of a hypopigmented fibrotic scar in an AMD subject were similar at 2 visits. In AMD subjects, dark regions on en face OCT images corresponded to reduced or absent light reflectance due to SRF. On en face OCT images, a decrease in SRF areas with treatment was demonstrated and this corresponded with a reduction in the central subfield retinal thickness. Conclusion. En face OCT imaging is a promising tool for visualization and monitoring of SRF area due to disease progression and treatment.

  14. A Method for En Face OCT Imaging of Subretinal Fluid in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Fatimah; Wanek, Justin; Zelkha, Ruth; Lim, Jennifer I; Chen, Judy; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study is to report a method for en face imaging of subretinal fluid (SRF) due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Methods. High density SDOCT imaging was performed at two visits in 4 subjects with neovascular AMD and one healthy subject. En face OCT images of a retinal layer anterior to the retinal pigment epithelium were generated. Validity, repeatability, and utility of the method were established. Results. En face OCT images generated by manual and automatic segmentation were nearly indistinguishable and displayed similar regions of SRF. En face OCT images displayed uniform intensities and similar retinal vascular patterns in a healthy subject, while the size and appearance of a hypopigmented fibrotic scar in an AMD subject were similar at 2 visits. In AMD subjects, dark regions on en face OCT images corresponded to reduced or absent light reflectance due to SRF. On en face OCT images, a decrease in SRF areas with treatment was demonstrated and this corresponded with a reduction in the central subfield retinal thickness. Conclusion. En face OCT imaging is a promising tool for visualization and monitoring of SRF area due to disease progression and treatment.

  15. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  16. Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age Impacts on Prehistoric Human Migrations in the Eastern North American Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, M.; Finkelstein, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern North American Arctic has a complex 5,000-year prehistory, during which many human population movements occurred over large distances. Archaeologists have interpreted these movements as resulting from many factors, however the effects of climate change are often hypothesized as primary drivers that can "push" human groups to leave some regions, or "pull" them to move to others. In this paper, we will examine climate change over the past millennium-and-a-half, and in particular at the two widespread, though variable, climate change events known as the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age. We synthesize the latest paleoclimatological information on the timing and magnitude of these periods across the eastern Arctic, and assess the degree to which they coincide with current understanding of major population movements. In particular, we assess climate's potential impact on 1) the expansion of Late Dorset Paleo-Inuit to the High Arctic; 2) the migration of Thule Inuit from Alaska to the eastern Arctic; and 3) the abandonment of northern regions and new settlement of southern regions by Inuit in the mid-second millennium AD.

  17. Paraglacial and postglacial debris flows on a Little Ice Age terminal moraine: Jamapa Glacier, Pico de Orizaba (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; Parrilla, Gemma; Zamorano, Jose J.

    1999-05-01

    The study area is located on the northern face of Pico de Orizaba (Mexico, 5700 m ASL), on the terminal moraine of Jamapa Glacier, which dates from the Little Ice Age. Large debris flows are recurrent on the proglacial ramp. The comparison of lichen colonies growing on the deposits of the flows reveals that two generations of flows are present: an old one and a very recent one that occurred between 1994 and 1995. Studies were made of the sedimentologic characteristics of the flows and ground temperatures were recorded to a depth of 70 cm on the floor of the channels. Comparison of the lichen-growth on the exposed surfaces of the deposits led to the relative dating of the older debris flow, which is associated with the beginning of the retreat of the glacier and the saturation of the terminal moraine deposits by meltwater. The more recent flow has less transport capacity and is identified with the formation of an impermeable layer of permafrost that covers the bottom of the channel of the old debris flow. The permafrost layer formed when snow accumulations on the bottom of the channel were covered by ash that fell from the slopes.

  18. Vegetation response to southern California drought during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and early Little Ice Age (AD 800–1600)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Linda E.; Hendy, Ingrid L.; Barron, John A.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution studies of pollen in laminated sediments deposited in Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) core SPR0901-02KC reflect decadal-scale fluctuations in precipitation spanning the interval from AD 800–1600. From AD 800–1090 during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) SBB sediments were dominated by xeric vegetation types (drought-resistant coastal sagebrush and chaparral) implying reduced precipitation in the southern California region. Drought-adapted vegetation abruptly decreased at AD 1090 and was rapidly replaced by mesic oak (Quercus) woodlands associated with an increased pollen flux into the basin. After a mesic interval lasting ∼100 years, pollen flux and the relative abundance of Quercus pollen dropped abruptly at AD 1200 when the rapid rise of chaparral suggests a significant drought similar to that of the MCA (∼AD 800–1090). This brief resurgence of drought-adapted vegetation between AD 1200–1270 marked the end of the MCA droughts. A gradual increase in mesic vegetation followed, characterizing cool hydroclimates of the Little Ice Age (LIA) in coastal southern California.

  19. Seasonal variability in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas W. D.; Hammarlund, Dan; Newton, Brandi W.; Sjolte, Jesper; Linderson, Hans; Sturm, Christophe; St. Amour, Natalie A.; Bailey, Joscelyn N.-L.; Nilsson, Anders L.

    2017-06-01

    Here we report new reconstructions of winter temperature and summer moisture during the past millennium in southeastern Sweden, based on stable-isotope data from a composite tree-ring sequence, that further enhances our knowledge and understanding of seasonal climate variability in the Northern Hemisphere over the past millennium. Key features of these new climate proxy records include evidence for distinctive fluctuations in winter temperature in SE Sweden, superimposed upon the general pattern of cooling between the so-called Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) of the early millennium and the Little Ice Age (LIA) of the late millennium, as well as evidence for sustained summer wetness during the MCA, followed by drier and less variable conditions during the LIA. We also explore these new records within a circumpolar spatial context by employing self-organizing map analysis of meteorological reanalysis data to identify potential modern analogues of mid-tropospheric synoptic circulation types in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics that can reconcile varying seasonal climate states during the MCA and LIA in SE Sweden with less variable conditions in southwestern Canada, as portrayed by paleoclimate records developed in the same manner in an earlier study.

  20. Interannual climate variability change during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age in PMIP3 last millennium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaiqing; Jiang, Dabang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we analyzed numerical experiments undertaken by 10 climate models participating in PMIP3 (Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase 3) to examine the changes in interannual temperature variability and coefficient of variation (CV) of interannual precipitation in the warm period of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the cold period of the Little Ice Age (LIA). With respect to the past millennium period, the MCA temperature variability decreases by 2.0% on average over the globe, and most of the decreases occur in low latitudes. In the LIA, temperature variability increases by a global average of 0.6%, which occurs primarily in the high latitudes of Eurasia and the western Pacific. For the CV of interannual precipitation, regional-scale changes are more significant than changes at the global scale, with a pattern of increased (decreased) CV in the midlatitudes of Eurasia and the northwestern Pacific in the MCA (LIA). The CV change ranges from -7.0% to 4.3% (from -6.3% to 5.4%), with a global average of -0.5% (-0.07%) in the MCA (LIA). Also, the variability changes are considerably larger in December-January-February with respect to both temperature and precipitation.

  1. Winter precipitation changes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age in arid Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Jens; Plessen, Birgit; Dudashvili, Alexey S.; Tjallingii, Rik; Wolff, Christian; Cheng, Hai

    2017-04-01

    The strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is considered to be the main driver of centennial to decadal climate changes over the European and western Asian continents throughout the last Millennium. Over Europe, the predominantly warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the following cold period of the Little Ice Age (LIA) have been associated with long-lasting positive and negative NAO modes, respectively. The climatic imprints of these NAO modes are especially pronounced in European winter seasons. However, little is known about the eastern extent of the NAO anomalies over the Eurasian continent. The speleothem records of Mount Keklik-Too (Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia) presented here reveal past climate variations during the last millennium. Present-day climate characteristics and seasonal changes of the cave environment suggest that winter and spring conditions govern the isotopic and Sr/ Ca variations of the stalagmite. The Keklik-Too records shows strong and simultaneous changes in these geochemical proxies that give evidence for severe variations in winter precipitation in the region over the last 900 years. Winter precipitation during the MCA was generally higher than during the LIA, which is in line with climatic changes linked to the strength of the NAO over Europe. Furthermore, several events of strongly reduced winter precipitation are observed during the LIA. These dry winter events can be related to phases of a strongly reduced strength of the NAO. These results reveal that winter precipitation over the central Eurasian continent is tightly linked to atmospheric NAO modes by the westerly wind systems.

  2. Phylogeographic analysis elucidates the influence of the ice ages on the disjunct distribution of relict dragonflies in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Büsse

    Full Text Available Unusual biogeographic patterns of closely related groups reflect events in the past, and molecular analyses can help to elucidate these events. While ample research on the origin of disjunct distributions of different organism groups in the Western Paleartic has been conducted, such studies are rare for Eastern Palearctic organisms. In this paper we present a phylogeographic analysis of the disjunct distribution pattern of the extant species of the strongly cool-adapted Epiophlebia dragonflies from Asia. We investigated sequences of the usually more conserved 18 S rDNA and 28 S rDNA genes and the more variable sequences of ITS1, ITS2 and CO2 of all three currently recognised Epiophlebia species and of a sample of other odonatan species. In all genes investigated the degrees of similarity between species of Epiophlebia are very high and resemble those otherwise found between different populations of the same species in Odonata. This indicates that substantial gene transfer between these populations occurred in the comparatively recent past. Our analyses imply a wide distribution of the ancestor of extant Epiophlebia in Southeast Asia during the last ice age, when suitable habitats were more common. During the following warming phase, its range contracted, resulting in the current disjunct distribution. Given the strong sensitivity of these species to climatic parameters, the current trend to increasing global temperatures will further reduce acceptable habitats and seriously threaten the existences of these last representatives of an ancient group of Odonata.

  3. Phylogeographic analysis elucidates the influence of the ice ages on the disjunct distribution of relict dragonflies in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsse, Sebastian; von Grumbkow, Philipp; Hummel, Susanne; Shah, Deep Narayan; Tachamo Shah, Ram Devi; Li, Jingke; Zhang, Xueping; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Wedmann, Sonja; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Unusual biogeographic patterns of closely related groups reflect events in the past, and molecular analyses can help to elucidate these events. While ample research on the origin of disjunct distributions of different organism groups in the Western Paleartic has been conducted, such studies are rare for Eastern Palearctic organisms. In this paper we present a phylogeographic analysis of the disjunct distribution pattern of the extant species of the strongly cool-adapted Epiophlebia dragonflies from Asia. We investigated sequences of the usually more conserved 18 S rDNA and 28 S rDNA genes and the more variable sequences of ITS1, ITS2 and CO2 of all three currently recognised Epiophlebia species and of a sample of other odonatan species. In all genes investigated the degrees of similarity between species of Epiophlebia are very high and resemble those otherwise found between different populations of the same species in Odonata. This indicates that substantial gene transfer between these populations occurred in the comparatively recent past. Our analyses imply a wide distribution of the ancestor of extant Epiophlebia in Southeast Asia during the last ice age, when suitable habitats were more common. During the following warming phase, its range contracted, resulting in the current disjunct distribution. Given the strong sensitivity of these species to climatic parameters, the current trend to increasing global temperatures will further reduce acceptable habitats and seriously threaten the existences of these last representatives of an ancient group of Odonata.

  4. The Maximum Ice Age Glaciation between the Karakorum Main Ridge (K2) and the Tarim Basin and its Influence on Global Energy Balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kuhle

    2005-01-01

    A modern research approach and working techniques in hitherto unexamined areas, produced the following results: 1). The tongues of decakilometre long Karakorum glaciers belong to temperate ice-streams with an annual meltwater output. The short Aghil glaciers on the contrary are continental, arid and cold. 2). The present-day oscillations of the Karakorum glaciers are related to their own mass, and are contrary to and independent of the actual climate. Only the short glaciers, with steep tongue fronts, show a present-day positive balance. 3). 14C- dated Late Glacial moraines indicate a 400~800 m thick valley glacier at the former confluence point of the K2-, Sarpo Laggo- and Skamri glaciers. 4). From the evidence of transfluence passes with roches moutonnées, striae and the limits of glacial polishing, as well as moraines and erratics, a High Glacial at least 1200 m thick ice-stream network between the Karakorums and the Kuen Lun north slopes was reconstructed. The Shaksgam and Yarkand valleys were occupied by glaciers coming from west Tibet. The lowest-lying moraines are to be found in the foreland down to 2000 m, indicating a depression of the High Glacial (LGM) snowline (ELA) by 1300 m.5). The approximately 10,000 measurements of the radiation balance at up to heights of 5500 m on K2indicate that with incoming energy near the solar constant the reflection from snow- covered ice is up to 70% greater than from rock and rock waste surfaces.6).These results confirm for the very dry western margins of Tibet an almost complete ice sheet cover in an area with subtropical energy balance, conforming with the Ice Age hypothesis of the author which is based upon the presence of a 2.4 million km2 Tibetan inland ice sheet. This inland ice developed for the first time when Tibet was uplifted over the snowline during the early Pleistocene. As the measured subtropical radiation balance shows, it was able to trigger the Quaternary Ice Ages.

  5. Using Ice Predictions to Guide Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    prevented the use of several airfields used for transporting personnel and equipment to the ice camp. The rapidly changing conditions of the ice ...of the ice cover. The age of the sea ice serves as an indicator of its physical properties including surface roughness, melt pond coverage, and...Sailors and members of the Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station clear ice from the hatch of the submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) during Ice

  6. Proteomic profiles reveal age-related changes in coelomic fluid of sea urchin species with different life spans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Sea urchins have a different life history from humans and traditional model organisms used to study the process of aging. Sea urchins grow indeterminately, reproduce throughout their life span and some species have been shown to exhibit negligible senescence with no increase in mortality rate at advanced ages. Despite these properties, different species of sea urchins are reported to have very different natural life spans providing a unique model to investigate cellular mechanisms underlying life span determination and negligible senescence. To gain insight into the biological changes that accompany aging in these animals, proteomic profiles were examined in coelomic fluid from young and old sea urchins of three species with different life spans: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate life span. The proteomic profiles of cell-free coelomic fluid were complex with many proteins exhibiting different forms and extensive post-translational modifications. Approximately 20% of the protein spots on 2-D gels showed more than two-fold change with age in each of the species. Changes that are consistent with age in all three species may prove to be useful biomarkers for age-determination for these commercially fished marine invertebrates and also may provide clues to mechanisms of negligible senescence. Among the proteins that change with age, the ectodomain of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) was significantly increased in the coelomic fluid of all three sea urchin species suggesting that the Wnt signaling pathway should be further investigated for its role in negligible senescence.

  7. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ice age, and iv) onset dates of melt and freezeup . 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from ice-albedo feedback to the observed decrease of...the impact on albedo evolution of ice concentration and melt and freezeup onset dates. This effort will expand on previous work by i) examining...radiation, ice concentration, ice type, and melt and freezeup onset dates on a 25 x 25 km equal area scalable grid. We have daily values of these parameters

  8. Multi-Centennial Record of North Atlantic Freshwater Variability since the Little Ice Age Archived in Coralline Algal Ba/Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P. T. W.; Halfar, J.; Adey, W.; Zack, T.

    2014-12-01

    Declining Arctic sea-ice cover in recent decades has driven large-scale freshwater transport into the North Atlantic, possibly influencing the strength of the Meridional Overturning Circulation and even global climate. However, due to the lack of long-term oceanographic observations, little is known about the natural freshwater variability of the Northwestern Atlantic. Crustose coralline algae Clathromorphum compactum are extremely long-lived shallow marine calcareous plants that are abundant along the subarctic eastern Canadian coastline. They are particularly well-suited as recorders of paleoclimate signals due to the formation of annual growth increments, allowing for the precise calendar dating and geochemical sampling of hard tissue. Here, we provide the first annually-resolved multi-centennial record of coralline algal Ba/Ca from Labrador, Canada, as a proxy for North Atlantic freshwater variability extending well into the Little Ice Age (LIA) (1665 AD). Barium-to-calcium ratios (Ba/Ca) from coralline algae have previously been used as an indicator of freshwater runoff. This is because barium-rich clay sediments are transported by terrestrial runoff into coastal waters, and barium is released from the clay minerals upon encountering more alkaline elements present in seawater. We observe higher algal barium concentrations during the LIA, followed by a steady decline to recent times. In addition, coralline algal Ba/Ca shows significant positive relationships to Hudson Strait runoff, as well as Canadian Arctic and North Atlantic sea-ice extent. This suggests that more riverine Ba is transported from the Hudson Strait into the Labrador Sea during periods of increased sea-ice cover. Multiyear sea-ice can block incoming solar radiation thereby diminishing the effects of nutrient scavenging by phytoplankton, resulting in a more conservative transport of Ba into northern Labrador. However as sea-ice continues to thin, more sunlight is able to penetrate through the

  9. Deriving hydrologic conditions in the southern Caucasus region during the Little Ice Age using different geomorphological and paleoenvironmental archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Benito, Dario Martin; Pederson, Neil; Faust, Dominik

    2016-04-01

    From the 15th century to ca. 1850 AD, the Little Ice Age (LIA), was one of the most prominent climatic fluctuations during the Holocene. It was characterized by negative temperature anomalies evidenced for many regions of the Northern Hemisphere (Mann 2002). During the LIA, many of these regions showed significant changes of their landscape dynamics such as glacier advances and an intensified hydrological cycle. Although glacier advances and reduced pine growth are reported from the Greater Caucasus for parts of the LIA (Solomina 2005), little is known about the hydrological conditions of the humid to semi-arid Lesser Caucasus and Transcaucasus region during the LIA. Existing pollen records are so strongly disturbed by anthropogenic activity during the last millenia that the LIA is not resolved in the only existing pollen-based precipitation reconstruction for the region (Connor & Kvavadze 2008). Here, we present data derived from different kinds of geomorphological archives from the southern Caucasus region (fluvial sediments, indicators for the timing of incision of recently dry valleys). These data demonstrate intensive geomorphic activity during the LIA obviously caused by a strongly intensified hydrological cycle. Given the rather low temporal resolution of these geomorphological archives, however, more highly-resolved palaeoenvironmental data are needed to better understand also minor climatic and hydrologic fluctuations around the LIA period. To this end, we intend to use a recently developed multispecies tree-ring network from living trees (Martin-Benito et al., in revision). This tree-ring network will be expanded both in space and time using subfossil wood material (stems) found embedded into fluvial LIA-terrace deposits and radiocarbon-dated to the end of the 15th century AD. By overlapping these samples with the living tree network, we will be able to better characterize sub-ordinate climatic and hydrologic fluctuations during the LIA period. References

  10. Episodes of aeolian sand movement on a large spit system (Skagen Odde, Denmark) and North Atlantic storminess during the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Hansen, Kristian W T;

    2015-01-01

    Late Holocene coastal dune successions in north-western Europe contain evidence of episodic aeolian sand movement in the recent past. If previous periods of increased sand movement can be dated sufficiently precisely and placed in a correct cultural and geomorphological context, they may add to o...... moderate storminess. These findings are important as they indicate three major periods of aeolian sand movement and storminess during the Little Ice Age...... recognized. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating indicates that aeolian sand movement took place in four phases: around AD 1460, between AD 1730 and 1780, around AD 1870, and since about AD 1935. The first phase of sand movement occurred during cooling in the first part of the Little Ice Age...... movement during the Little Ice Age also took place in periods of increased storminess, but during these events it appears that negative NAO values were coupled with positive AMO values. The final phase of sand movement is intimately linked to the modern formation of frontal dunes which takes place during...

  11. The landslide response of alpine basins to post-Little Ice Age glacial thinning and retreat in southwestern British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Kris; Bovis, Michael; Jakob, Matthias

    2004-02-01

    The role of post-Little Ice Age (LIA) Neoglacial retreat on landslide activity is investigated in 19 alpine basins along the upper Lillooet River Valley, British Columbia. We examine how Neoglacial scouring and glacial recession have modified hillslope form and slope stability, and construct a decision-making flowchart to identify landslide hazards associated with glacial retreat. This work is based on field mapping, GIS analysis, statistical associations between landslides and terrain attributes, and a comparison between Neoglaciated and non-Neoglaciated terrain within each basin. The bedrock landslide response to glacial retreat varies appreciably according to lithology and the extent of glacial scour below the LIA trimline. Valleys carved in weak Quaternary volcanics show significant erosional oversteepening and contain deep-seated slope movement features, active rock fall, rock slides, and rock avalanches near glacial trimlines. Basins in stronger granitic rock rarely show increased bedrock instability resulting from post-LIA retreat, except for shallow-seated rock slides along some trimlines and failures on previously unstable slopes. In surficial materials, landslides associated with post-LIA retreat originate in till or colluvium, as debris slides or debris avalanches, and are concentrated along lateral moraines or glacial trimlines. Significant spatial association was also observed between recent catastrophic failures, gravitational slope deformation, and slopes that were oversteepened then debuttressed by glacial erosion. Eight out of nine catastrophic rock slope failures occurred just above glacial trimlines and all occurred in areas with a previous history of deep-seated gravitational slope movement, implying that this type of deformation is a precursor to catastrophic detachment.

  12. Hydrological evidence for a North Atlantic oscillation during the Little Ice Age outside its range observed since 1850

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín-Puertas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An annual-resolved precipitation reconstruction for the last 800 yr in Southern Spain has been performed using stable carbon isotope (δ13C of Pinus nigra tree rings. The reconstruction exhibits high- to low-frequency variability and distinguishes a Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1350–1850 characterized by lower averaged rainfall than both in the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the LIA and in the 20th century. The driest conditions are recorded during the Maunder solar Minimum (mid 17th–early 18th centuries, in good agreement with the Spanish documentary archive. Similar linkage between solar activity (maximum/minimum and precipitation (increase/decrease is observed throughout the entire LIA. Additionally, the relationship between the hydrological pattern in the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco during the LIA suggests different spatial distribution of precipitation in the south-eastern sector of the North Atlantic region such as it is known currently. Whereas in the instrumental record the precipitation evolves similarly in both regions and opposite to the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO index, the coldest periods of the LIA shows a contrasting pattern with drier conditions in the South of Spain and wetter in Northern Africa. We suggest an extreme negative NAO conditions, accompanied by a southward excursion of the winter rainfall band beyond that observed in the last century, can explain this contrast. The sustained NAO conditions could have been triggered by solar minima and higher volcanic activity during the LIA.

  13. Palaeoclimate science: Pulsating ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieli, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    During the last ice age, huge numbers of icebergs were episodically discharged from an ice sheet that covered North America. Numerical modelling suggests that these events resulted from a conceptually simple feedback cycle. See Letter p.332

  14. THE AIRPORT DE-ICING OF AIRCRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert KONIECZKA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of the issues involved in de-icing several kinds of aircrafts before flight. The basic risks of an iced aircraft and the factors that can influence its intensity are stated. It discusses the methods for de-icing and protecting against ice formation on small aircrafts, helicopters, and large aircrafts. It also classifies the fluids and other methods used for these de-icing operations, and explains the characteristics and limitations of their use.

  15. Recent glacierization of the Tsambagarav ridge (North‑Western Mongolia and its changes since the Little Ice Age maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ganyushkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of glacierization of the Tsambagarav mountain ridge were determined on the basis of images obtained from satellites Corona, Landsat‑5, Spot‑4, Landsat‑8 together with results of field investigations. Inventories of glaciers located on the ridge had been prepared for three time periods: 1968, 2006, and 2015. Glacierization of the ridge during the Little Ice Age (LIA maximum was then reconstructed. In 2015, 67 glaciers formed the ridge glacierization with their total area 68.41 km2. Mean weighed altitude of the firn line averaged 3748 m. The flat‑top glaciers accounted for almost 40% of the glacierization area, and the glaciers composed 6 complexes. For the period of the LIA maximum, 73 glaciers had been reconstructed, their total area was 128.4 km2, and the calculated firn line altitude – 3583 м; these glaciers were combined into two complexes where the flat‑top glaciers predominated as well. By 1968, the area of the glacierization decreased by 36%, and the firn line altitude increased by 89 m. By 2006, area of glaciers decreased down to 71.32 km2, and the firn line altitude increased more by 60 m. Finally, in 2006–2015, area of the glacierization contracted additionally by 2.91 km2, and the firn line altitude still more increased by 16 m. Over the whole period from the LIA maximum, the flat‑top glaciers reduced the most. The general rate of contraction of glaciers tends to increase. Reconstructed rates of retreating of the valley glaciers of the Tsambagarav ridge are similar to estimates of other researchers made for the nearest centers of glacierization. Continuation of the current trend to a rise of summer temperature and a growth of precipitation should result in primary fast degradation of the flat‑top glaciers and reorganization of morphological structure of the glacierization.

  16. The Little Ice Age climate of New Zealand reconstructed from Southern Alps cirque glaciers: a synoptic type approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrey, Andrew; Fauchereau, Nicolas; Stanton, Craig; Chappell, Petra; Phipps, Steven; Mackintosh, Andrew; Renwick, James; Goodwin, Ian; Fowler, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA) austral summer temperature anomalies were derived from palaeoequilibrium line altitudes at 22 cirque glacier sites across the Southern Alps of New Zealand. Modern analog seasons with temperature anomalies akin to the LIA reconstructions were selected, and then applied in a sampling of high-resolution gridded New Zealand climate data and global reanalysis data to generate LIA climate composites at local, regional and hemispheric scales. The composite anomaly patterns assist in improving our understanding of atmospheric circulation contributions to the LIA climate state, allow an interrogation of synoptic type frequency changes for the LIA relative to present, and provide a hemispheric context of the past conditions in New Zealand. An LIA summer temperature anomaly of -0.56 °C (±0.29 °C) for the Southern Alps based on palaeo-equilibrium lines compares well with local tree-ring reconstructions of austral summer temperature. Reconstructed geopotential height at 1,000 hPa (z1000) suggests enhanced southwesterly flow across New Zealand occurred during the LIA to generate the terrestrial temperature anomalies. The mean atmospheric circulation pattern for summer resulted from a crucial reduction of the `HSE'-blocking synoptic type (highs over and to the west of NZ; largely settled conditions) and increases in both the `T'- and `SW'-trough synoptic types (lows passing over NZ; enhanced southerly and southwesterly flow) relative to normal. Associated land-based temperature and precipitation anomalies suggest both colder- and wetter-than-normal conditions were a pervasive component of the base climate state across New Zealand during the LIA, as were colder-than-normal Tasman Sea surface temperatures. Proxy temperature and circulation evidence were used to corroborate the spatially heterogeneous Southern Hemisphere composite z1000 and sea surface temperature patterns generated in this study. A comparison of the composites to climate mode archetypes

  17. Calcareous nannofossil assemblages from the Central Mediterranean Sea over the last four centuries: the impact of the little ice age

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    A. Incarbona

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present decadal-scale calcareous nannofossil data from four short cores (Station 272, 37° 17' N, 12° 48' E, 226 m depth; St 342, 36° 42' N, 13° 55' E, 858.2 m depth; St 407, 36° 23' N, 14° 27' E, 345.4 m depth; C90-1M, 40° 36' N, 14° 42' E, 103.4 m depth recovered in the central Mediterranean Sea (northern Sicily Channel and Tyrrhenian Sea, which, on the basis of 210Pb activity span the last 200–350 years. Assemblages are dominated by placoliths, mostly Emiliania huxleyi, while, at least in the Sicily Channel sediments, Florisphaera profunda was an important part of the coccolithophore community.

    The paleoenvironmental reconstruction, based on ecological preference of species and groups, suggests that the Tyrrhenian core C90-1M maintained higher productivity levels over recent centuries, with respect to the Sicily Channel sites, possibly because of more pronounced winter phytoplankton blooms, in agreement with modern primary productivity variations over the last ten years.

    The lowermost part of the record of one of the cores from the Sicily Channel, Station 407, which extends down to 1650 AD, is characterized by drastic changes in productivity. Specifically, below 1850 AD, the decrease in abundance of F. profunda and the increase of placoliths, suggest increased productivity. The chronology of this change is related to the main phase of the Little Ice Age, which might have impacted the hydrography of the southern coast of Sicily and promoted vertical mixing in the water column. The comparison with climatic forcings points out the importance of stronger and prolonged northerlies, together with decreased solar irradiance. The identification of the LIA in the northern Sicily Channel cover the Bond cycle BO that was missing in a previous study of Holocene climatic anomalies in the Sicily Channel.

    Finally, we suggest that major abundance changes in reworked nannofossil specimens

  18. Hydroclimatic changes in China and surroundings during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age: spatial patterns and possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Fahu; Feng, Song; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jianbao; Zhou, Aifeng

    2015-01-01

    Investigating hydroclimatic changes during key periods such as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 1000-1300 AD) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, 1400-1900 AD) is of fundamental importance for quantifying the responses of precipitation to greenhouse gas-induced warming on regional and global scales. This study synthesizes the most up-to-date and comprehensive proxy moisture/precipitation records during the past 1000 years in China and surroundings. The proxy data collected include 34 records from arid central Asia (ACA) and 37 records from monsoonal Asia. Our results demonstrate a pattern of generally coherent regional moisture variations during the MCA and LIA. In mid-latitude Asia north of 30°N, monsoonal northern China (North China and Northeast China) was generally wetter, while ACA (Northwest China and Central Asia) was generally drier during the MCA than in the LIA (a West-East mode). The boundary between wetter northern China and drier ACA was roughly consistent with the modern summer monsoon boundary. In monsoonal China to the east of 105°E, the northern part was generally wetter, while the southern part was generally drier during the MCA than in the LIA (a North-South mode), with a boundary roughly along the Huai River at about 34°N. These spatial patterns of moisture/precipitation variations are also identified by instrumental data during the past 50 years. In order to understand the possible mechanisms related to the moisture variations during the MCA and LIA, we investigate the major SST and atmospheric modes (e.g. the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)) which affect the moisture/precipitation variations in the study region using both the instrumental data and the reconstructed time series. It is found that the ENSO may play an important role in determining hydroclimatic variability over China and surroundings on a multi-centennial time-scale; and that the foregoing

  19. Hydroclimatic changes in Asia during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age: Basic facts and possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Chen, F.; Feng, S.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the hydroclimatic changes during key periods, such as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 900~1300 AD) and Little Ice Age (LIA, 1400~1900 AD) is one of the fundamental requirements for quantifying the responses of precipitation to greenhouse gas induced warming on regional and global scales. This study synthesized the most updated and comprehensive proxy moisture (or precipitation) records during the past 1000 years in Asia. The proxy data collected include 21 records from the arid central Asia and 25 records from monsoonal East and South Asia. Our results showed coherent regional moisture variations during the MCA and LIA in the study region. In the mid-latitude Asia (areas north 30N), the North China is generally wetter while the Northwest China and Central Asia are generally dryer during the MT than in the LIA. The boundary between the wetter North China and drier Northwest China is roughly close to the modern summer monsoon boundary. Additionally, the out-of-phase moisture variations during MCA and LIA are also evident between the North and South China with a boundary around the 30N. This pattern of moisture variations is also identified using instrumental data during the past 50 years. To understand the possible mechanisms related to the moisture variations during the MWP and LIA, the major SST and atmospheric modes (e.g. ENSO, AMO, PDO and NAO) that affecting the precipitation/moisture variations in Asia were analyzed. Comparing and contrasting the variations of ENSO and AMO during the past 1000 years suggested that the colder (warmer) SST in the eastern tropical Pacific and warmer (colder) SST in the North Atlantic during the MCA (LIA) have played important roles on the moisture variations in Asia during the MCA (LIA). Our interpretation is further supported by the simulations made by 5 global climate models. When forced by a colder eastern tropical Pacific, a warmer North Atlantic Ocean, or combination of a colder eastern tropical Pacific and a

  20. Current glaciation of the Chikhachev ridge (South-Eastern Altai and its dynamics after maximum of the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ganyushkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaciation of the Chikhachev ridge (South-Eastern Altai remains poorly known: field observations were not performed since the mid-twentieth century, available schemes and estimates of the glaciation and its scale made on the basis of remote sensing cover only a part of the glaciers, reconstructions of the Little Ice Age (LIA glaciations are absent. This research was based on interpretation of the satellite images: Landsat-4 (1989, Landsat-7 (2001, and Spot-5 (2011, as well as with the use of data of the field season of 2015. Characteristics of glaciations of the Chikhachev ridge as the whole and of its individual centers (Talduair massif, Mongun-Taiga-Minor massif, and southern part of the Chikhachev ridge were determined for the first time. Recent glaciation is represented by 7 glaciers with their total area of 1.12 km2 in the Talduair massif, by 5 glaciers with total area of 0.75 km2 in the Mongun-Taiga-Minor massif, and by 85 glaciers with total area of 29 km2 in the southern part of the Chikhachev ridge. Since the LIA maximum, areas of glaciers decreased by 61% in the Talduair massif, by 74% in the Mongun-Taiga-Minor massif, by 56% in the southern part of the Chikhachev ridge with simultaneous lifting of the firn line by 50 m, 65 m, and 70 m, respectively.The largest rates of the glacier contractions were determined for the period 1989–2011. Different mechanisms of the glacier retreats were shown by the example of the glacier complexes Burgastyn-Gol (one-sided retreat and disintegration and the Grigorjev glacier (gradual retreat of the tongue. Retreat of the Grigorjev glacier has been reconstructed for the period from the LIA maximum until 2015. Average rate of the retreat increased from 1,6 m/year in 1957–1989 up to 11,3 m/year in 2011–2015. The present-day scales of the glaciers and rates of their retreating do not significantly differ from estimations made by other researchers for the nearest centers of glaciation of the

  1. High-resolution sedimentary effects of post-Little Ice Age glacial recession in Hornsund (Svalbard) - insights from chirp and core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Aleksander; Szczuciński, Witold; Moskalik, Mateusz; Forwick, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    As a result of global warming from the end of the Little Ice Age a fast withdrawal and loss of mass of many glaciers have been observed. The retreat has been particularly rapid in case of tidewater glaciers of Spitsbergen, where in an effect a new bays were formed and serve as glaciomarine sediment accumulation areas. The new depocenters in emerging bays are characterized by high sediment accumulation rates. Analysis and quantitative assessment of the processes occurring in these bays can enhance a better understanding of the dynamics of glaciers recession and bio-geochemical processes occurring in the fjords. This is particularly important because the subpolar fjords may be important storage for organic carbon on a global scale (Smith at al. 2015). In order to obtain a detailed high-resolution record of sedimentation history in the post Little Ice Age bays, 30 gravity cores and 18 box cores were collected along with detail seism acoustic surveys (Chirp) during three cruises on board of R/V Helmar Hansen in 2007, 2014 and 2015. The sediment cores revealed two major types of sediments: subglacial till and overlying laminated glacimarine mud with abundant ice rafted debris. The sediment accumulation rate of the latter is estimated to be on average in order of 1 to 5 cm per year. The periods of increase ice rafting are likely related to surge events. The dense Chirp survey grid spatial changeability in the post-Little Ice Age sediment cover. The amount and lithology of sediments in different parts of the bays also helped to link glacier dynamics with sedimentary effect. Our results confirms that despite similarities in lithology there are significant differences in sediment accumulation rates, probably driven by changes in accommodation spaces and sediment delivery. The record is also affected by effects of glacier surges. However, analyses of historical data enhanced the interpretation of sedimentary record and provide hints to identify the specific processes and

  2. Temporal course of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and amyloid accumulation in the aging rat brain from three to thirty months

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    Chiu Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid accumulation in the brain parenchyma is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD and is seen in normal aging. Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics are also associated with normal aging and AD. This study analyzed CSF volume, production and turnover rate in relation to amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ accumulation in the aging rat brain. Methods Aging Fischer 344/Brown-Norway hybrid rats at 3, 12, 20, and 30 months were studied. CSF production was measured by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion with blue dextran in artificial CSF; CSF volume by MRI; and CSF turnover rate by dividing the CSF production rate by the volume of the CSF space. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in the cortex and hippocampus were measured by ELISA. Results There was a significant linear increase in total cranial CSF volume with age: 3-20 months (p p p p -1 to 12 months (11.30 day-1 and then a decrease to 20 months (10.23 day-1 and 30 months (6.62 day-1. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in brain increased from 3-30 months (p Conclusions In young rats there is no correlation between CSF turnover and Aβ brain concentrations. After 12 months, CSF turnover decreases as brain Aβ continues to accumulate. This decrease in CSF turnover rate may be one of several clearance pathway alterations that influence age-related accumulation of brain amyloid.

  3. Evaluation of the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells; Avaliacao do envelhecimento de fluidos de perfuracao polimericos para pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Mecanica, UAEM/CCT - UFCG], e-mail: kassie@dem.ufcg.edu.br; Leite, R.S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Graduacao Engenharia de Materiais; Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais, UAEMa/ CCT - UFCG

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells, from the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties in the temperatures 100 degree F ({approx} 38 degree C) and 150 degree F ({approx} 66 degree C). The results had been compared with a standard fluid used for the oil industry and had evidenced that the polymeric fluids had presented good thermal stability, presenting a small reduction in the rheological properties and better values of lubricity coefficient that a reference fluid. (author)

  4. Reconstruction of the Ice Age Glaciation in the Southern Slopes of Mt. Everest, Cho Oyu, Lhotse and Makalu (Himalaya) (Part 1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kuhle

    2006-01-01

    In the Khumbu- and Khumbakarna Himalaya an ice stream network and valley glacier system has been reconstructed for the last glacial 18 Ka BP, Stage o) with glaciogeomorphological and sedimentological methods. It was a part of the glacier system of the Himalaya and has communicated across transfluence passes with the neighbouring ice stream networks toward the W and E. The ice stream network has also received inflow from the N, from a Tibetan ice stream network, by the Kyetrak-Nangpa-Bote Koshi Drangka (Valley) in the W, by the W-Rongbuk glacier valley into the Ngozumpa Drangka (Valley), by the Central Rongbuk glacier valley into the Khumbu Drangka (Valley) and by the antecedent Arun Nadi transverse-valley in the E of the investigation area.The ice thickness of the valley glacier sections, the surface of which was situated above the snow-line,amounted to 1000~1450 m. The most extended parent valley glaciers have been measured approx. 70 km in length (Dudh Koshi glacier), 67 km (BarunArun glacier) and 80 km (Arun glacier). The tongue end of the Arun glacier has flowed down to c. 500 m and that of the Dudh Koshi glacier to c. 900 m asl. At heights of the catchment areas of 8481 (or 8475) m (Makalu), i.e., 8848 (or 8872) m (Mt. Everest,Sagarmatha, Chogolungma) this is a vertical distance of the Ice Age glaciation of c. 8000 m. The steep faces 6000~7000 m-high surfaces of the ice stream network were located 2000~5000 m above the ELA.Accordingly, their temperatures were so low, that their rock surfaces were free of flank ice and ice balconies. From the maximum past glacier extension up to the current glacier margins, 13 (altogether 14)glacier stages have been differentiated and in part 14C-dated. They were four glacier stages of the late glacial period, three of the neoglacial period and six of the historical period. By means of 130 medium-sized valley glaciers the corresponding ELA-depressions have been calculated in comparison with the current courses of the

  5. Photoemission study of metallic iron nanoparticles surface aging in biological fluids. Influence on biomolecules adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canivet, L.; Denayer, F.O. [Université de Lille 2, Droit et Santé, 42 rue P. Duez, 59000 Lille (France); Champion, Y.; Cenedese, P. [CNRS-ICMPE, 2 rue H. Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Dubot, P., E-mail: pdubot@icmpe.cnrs.fr [CNRS-ICMPE, 2 rue H. Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France)

    2014-07-01

    Iron nanoparticles (nFe) prepared by vaporization and cryogenic condensation process (10–100 nm) has been exposed to Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and the B-Ali cell growth fluids. These media can be used for cellular growth to study nFe penetration through cell membrane and its induced cytotoxicity. Surface chemistry of nFe exposed to such complex fluids has been characterized as the nanoparticles surface can be strongly changed by adsorption or corrosion processes before reaching intracellular medium. Particle size and surface chemistry have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS). Exposition of nFe particles to growth and differentiation media leads to the formation of an oxy-hydroxide layer containing chlorinated species. We found that the passivated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer of the bare nFe particles is rapidly transformed into a thicker oxy-hydroxide layer that has a greater ability to adsorb molecular ions or ionic biomolecules like proteins or DNA.

  6. 明朝灭亡与“小冰期”%The Demise of Ming Dynasty and the Little Ice Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易山明

    2015-01-01

    历史上每次气候变迁都会对人类历史进程产生一定影响。以明朝为例,身处“小冰期”鼎盛时期的晚明,气候的冷变使得灾害多发,对农牧业造成巨大冲击,而社会秩序、军事战争等都与“小冰期”这一气候大背景有着直接或间接地联系。因此,有必要从“小冰期”时期气候变迁这一角度来分析明朝灭亡的原因,以期对研究王朝更替与气候变迁之间的关系做出更加全面、合理地解读。%In the history, each climate change produces a certain influence on human historical development. Take the Ming Dy-nasty for an example. The late Ming is in the Little Ice Age heyday. The climate changes to be cold making the disaster-prone and producing tremendous impact on agriculture and animal husbandry. What’ s more, social order, military, war and other aspects have a direct or indirect contacts with the climatic background of Little Ice Age. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the reasons for the de-mise of the Ming Dynasty, from the perspective of the climate change in Little Ice Age period in order to make a more comprehensive and reasonable interpretation for the study of relationships between the switch of dynasties and climate changes.

  7. Age and origin of ice-rich Yedoma silts at Duvanny Yar, northeast Siberia: a record of Beringian environmental change since the last interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, J.; Edwards, M. E.; Murton, D.; Bateman, M.; Haile, J.

    2010-12-01

    Silty Yedoma deposits at the important Beringian site of Duvanny Yar (68o,37’ N; 159o08’ E) in northeast Siberia, have been interpreted before as both loess and nival deposits. The yedoma deposits form a stratigraphic unit more than 30 m thick that comprises sandy silts which are generally massive and rich in ground ice and organic material. The ground ice includes pore ice, segregated ice and wedge ice (both syngenetic and epigenetic), and much of it accumulated more or less coevally with deposition of the silt and upward growth of permafrost. Organic material includes pervasive rootlets of former steppe-tundra vegetation (e.g. grasses), vertebrate bones (e.g. mammoth, bison, horse), pollen, insect remains, and plant macrofossils. A number of cryoturbated organic horizons within the silts are interpreted as incipient palaeosols. The sedimentary properties of the silts (particle size and magnetic susceptibility) and the palaeocological characteristics of the contained organic material are both consistent with deposition of silts primarily as loess and loess-sand intergrades, sedimentologically similar to known aeolian deposits in northwest Europe (e.g. Pegwell Bay, UK). Deposition primarily by snow meltwater is unlikely because the nearest uplands where snow could have accumulated and hillslopes could have provided runoff sites are many kilometers distant. The remnants of the original landsurface—prior to thermokarst activity during the late-glacial and Holocene—indicate an essentially flat landscape during dust deposition. Radiocarbon dating of mainly in situ rootlets indicates a complete record of dust deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), potentially one of the best terrestrial records of LGM palaeoenvironments. Older radiocarbon dates suggest at least two periods of soil formation between the LGM and about 40,000 radiocarbon years BP (within Marine Isotope Stage 3). Optical dating is currently being undertaken to constrain the ages of older

  8. Characterization of Industrial Coolant Fluids and Continuous Ageing Monitoring by Wireless Node-Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachat, Alexandros El; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Markos, Christos; Sakellariou, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Aggelos; Katsikas, Serafim; Riziotis, Christos

    2017-03-11

    Environmentally robust chemical sensors for monitoring industrial processes or infrastructures are lately becoming important devices in industry. Low complexity and wireless enabled characteristics can offer the required flexibility for sensor deployment in adaptable sensing networks for continuous monitoring and management of industrial assets. Here are presented the design, development and operation of a class of low cost photonic sensors for monitoring the ageing process and the operational characteristics of coolant fluids used in an industrial heavy machinery infrastructure. The chemical, physical and spectroscopic characteristics of specific industrial-grade coolant fluids were analyzed along their entire life cycle range, and proper parameters for their efficient monitoring were identified. Based on multimode polymer or silica optical fibers, wide range (3-11) pH sensors were developed by employing sol-gel derived pH sensitive coatings. The performances of the developed sensors were characterized and compared, towards their coolants' ageing monitoring capability, proving their efficiency in such a demanding application scenario and harsh industrial environment. The operating characteristics of this type of sensors allowed their integration in an autonomous wireless sensing node, thus enabling the future use of the demonstrated platform in wireless sensor networks for a variety of industrial and environmental monitoring applications.

  9. Characterization of Industrial Coolant Fluids and Continuous Ageing Monitoring by Wireless Node—Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sachat, Alexandros; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Markos, Christos; Sakellariou, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Aggelos; Katsikas, Serafim; Riziotis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Environmentally robust chemical sensors for monitoring industrial processes or infrastructures are lately becoming important devices in industry. Low complexity and wireless enabled characteristics can offer the required flexibility for sensor deployment in adaptable sensing networks for continuous monitoring and management of industrial assets. Here are presented the design, development and operation of a class of low cost photonic sensors for monitoring the ageing process and the operational characteristics of coolant fluids used in an industrial heavy machinery infrastructure. The chemical, physical and spectroscopic characteristics of specific industrial-grade coolant fluids were analyzed along their entire life cycle range, and proper parameters for their efficient monitoring were identified. Based on multimode polymer or silica optical fibers, wide range (3–11) pH sensors were developed by employing sol-gel derived pH sensitive coatings. The performances of the developed sensors were characterized and compared, towards their coolants’ ageing monitoring capability, proving their efficiency in such a demanding application scenario and harsh industrial environment. The operating characteristics of this type of sensors allowed their integration in an autonomous wireless sensing node, thus enabling the future use of the demonstrated platform in wireless sensor networks for a variety of industrial and environmental monitoring applications. PMID:28287488

  10. Adaptation and rise: Little Ice Age challenges and social responses on the Trans-Tisza Region (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinke, Zsolt; Romhányi, Beatrix F.; Gábris, Gyula; Gyulai, Ferenc; Mravcsik, Zoltán; Pósa, Patricia; Ferenczi, László

    2016-04-01

    The studied 4.128 km2 Central European lowland region includes the Hortobágy landscape, a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of the most extensive protected natural grasslands of Europe. In the evolution of this semi-natural landscape human-nature interactions were characterised by gradual but extremely serious settlement abandonment during the 13th-17th centuries. The identification of the agents shaping this process has been widely discussed in the Hungarian landscape historiography. The statistical analysis of medieval archaeological sites indicating settlements showed that elevation means in the early period of the Little Ice Age (LIA) (mid-13th - mid-16th centuries) were significantly higher than in the Medieval Warm Epoch (MWE) (mid-10th - mid-13th centuries) (p≤0.01; n=549; α=0.05). This result supported our hypothesis that waterside settlements of the plain displaced vertically from the MWE to the LIA. Secondly, a GIS based zonal analysis suggested a strong spatial connection between the geomorphological zones (riparian, deep floodplain and sand plateau), the agro-ecological suitability zones (good-excellent, medium and low) and the population zones (with stable settlement pattern, deserted and uninhabited). E.g. the elevation means of archaeological sites in deserted zones proved significantly lower than those with stable settlement pattern (p≤0.01; n=381; α=0.05). Similarly, a statistical investigation of grain remains (narchaeologicalsite=79; ntaxon=751; nfindings=4.8 millions) of the Great Hungarian Plain (GHP) indicated that the early phase of the LIA saw the spreading of moorland plants and rye, the cereal most resistant to humidity and cool. When the relation of settlement patterns to soil conditions was analysed by ANOVA linear model, a significant spatial correlation appeared between the extension of the high and medium agro-ecological suitability zones and the number of settlements in each population zone of the five microregions (R2

  11. Effect of Probiotic Containing Ice-cream on Salivary Mutans Streptococci (SMS) Levels in Children of 6-12 Years of Age: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Study with Six-months Follow Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Devasya; Ke, Vijayaprasad; Taranath, Mahanthesh; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Nara, Asha; Sarpangala, Mythri

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the caries risk based on the salivary levels of streptococcus mutans in children of 6-12 years of age group before and after consuming probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5. A double blind, placebo controlled trial was carried out in 60 children aged between 6 to 12 years with zero decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva sample were collected before the consumption of ice-cream and Streptococcus mutans count was calculated and recorded as baseline data. For the next seven days both the groups were given ice creams marked as A and B. Saliva samples were collected after ice-cream consumption at the end of study period and also after a washout period of 30 days and again after six months. Samples were inoculated and colonies were counted. On statistical evaluation by students paired t-test, probiotic ice-cream brought significant reduction in the Streptococcus mutans count after seven days of ice-cream ingestion (pice-cream consumption. After six months of the study period in both the groups the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans was similar to the baseline. Probiotic ice-cream containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 can cause reduction in caries causative organism. The dosage of the probiotic organisms for the long term or synergetic effect on the oral health are still needed to be explored.

  12. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of glaciations in the Frankland Range, southwest Tasmania reveal a limited MIS-2 ice advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Kevin; Fink, David; McConnell, Anne

    2017-02-01

    New mapping of the glacial geomorphology coupled with 10Be and 26Al exposure age dating of moraines on the flanks of the Frankland Range in south west Tasmania indicate that glacier extent during MIS-2 was far smaller than during earlier glaciations with the ice cover being confined to only the uppermost cirques of the range. Moraines further down the range flanks, ∼50-150 m lower in altitude than the MIS-2 dated advance, indicate that glaciers were only slightly larger during earlier glaciations and, depending on the interpretation of their exposure ages, may range from MIS 7 to MIS 12. These older moraines are nested inside the maximum ice limits of an even more ancient and extensive glaciation, defined by degraded valley floor moraines and coalescing glacio-fluvial fans that remain undated but appear no younger than MIS 12. Patterns of glacial erosion and moraine deposition on the Frankland Range suggest that the more recent glaciations were increasingly influenced by the erosional morphology initiated by earlier glaciers. Microclimatic differences resulting from this earlier glacial topography were particularly influential determinants of glaciation during MIS 2. These results are consistent with emerging evidence from studies of other ranges in southwest Tasmania.

  13. Physiological and Growth Responses of C3 and C4 Plants to Reduced Temperature When Grown at Low CO2 of the Last Ice Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joy K. Ward; David A. Myers; Richard B. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    During the last Ice age, CO2 concentration ([CO2]) was 180-200 μmol/mol compared with the modern value of 380 μmol/mol,and global temperatures were ~8 ℃ cooler. Relatively little is known about the responses of C3 and C4 species to longterm exposure to glacial conditions. Here Abutilon theophrasti Medik. (C3) and Amaranthus retroflexus L. (C4) were grown at 200 μmol/mol CO2 with current (30/24 ℃) and glacial (22/16 ℃) temperatures for 22 d. Overall, the C4 species exhibited a large growth advantage over the C3 species at low [CO2]. However, this advantage was reduced at low temperature, where the C4 species produced 5× the total mass of the C3 species versus 14× at the high temperature.This difference was due to a reduction In C4 growth at low temperature, since the C3 species exhibited similar growth between temperatures. Physiological differences between temperatures were not detected for either species, although photorespirationlnet photosynthesis was reduced in the C3 species grown at low temperature, suggesting evidence of improved carbon balance at this treatment. This system suggests that C4 species had a growth advantage over C3 species during low [CO2] of the last ice age, although concurrent reductions in temperatures may have reduced this advantage.

  14. Fluidized bed ice slurry generator for enhanced secondary cooling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meewisse, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ice slurries are liquid solutions of a freezing point depressant in water, in which small ice crystals are present. Ice slurries are efficient secondary cooling fluids because they utilize the latent heat effect involved with the ice/water phase change. A high heat capacity is available at relativel

  15. Fluidized bed ice slurry generator for enhanced secondary cooling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meewisse, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ice slurries are liquid solutions of a freezing point depressant in water, in which small ice crystals are present. Ice slurries are efficient secondary cooling fluids because they utilize the latent heat effect involved with the ice/water phase change. A high heat capacity is available at

  16. Fluidized bed ice slurry generator for enhanced secondary cooling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meewisse, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ice slurries are liquid solutions of a freezing point depressant in water, in which small ice crystals are present. Ice slurries are efficient secondary cooling fluids because they utilize the latent heat effect involved with the ice/water phase change. A high heat capacity is available at relativel

  17. 极地冰层取心钻进超低温钻井液理论与试验研究%Theoretical and Experimental Research on the Ultra-low Temperature Drilling Fluids for the Polar Ice Coring Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩俊杰; 韩丽丽; 徐会文; 于达慧; 曹品鲁; Pavel・ Tatalay

    2013-01-01

      南极冰层取心钻进的关键之一是钻井液的耐温能力。根据南极冰层钻进的特点及对钻井液的特殊要求,在综合分析国内外冰层钻进钻井液应用经验的基础上,对有机硅、氟代烃、一元脂肪酸酯及二元脂肪酸酯进行了理论上的分析研究,测试了各自在不同温度条件下的粘度和密度,分析了粘度与密度变化的机理。确定出分子间相互作用中无氢键形成的物质的粘温系数最小,脂肪酸酯的粘温系数受到分子间氢键的数量影响最大,指出了介质密度的增加是由于体积收缩所致,与介质的分子结构与形态无关。所得到的结论对于极地冰层取心钻进钻井液的选择与确定具有重要的理论与实际意义。%  The low temperature resistance of drilling fluid is one of the keys for core drilling in Antarctica ice sheet.Ac-cording to the characteristics of ice core drilling and the special requirements for drilling fluids in Antarctic, based on the comprehensive analysis on the application experience of ice drilling fluids both in China and abroad, theoretical study was made on organosilicon, fluohydrocarbon, aliphatic monocarboxylic acid ester and aliphatic dibasic acid ester, their viscosity and density were tested under different temperatures and the mechanism of changes in viscosity and density were also ana-lyzed.The result indicates that the hydrogen bond strongly influences the viscosity temperature coefficient of the fatty acid ester, and the lowest viscosity temperature coefficient of drilling fluid could be obtained if there is no hydrogen bond forma-tion.Besides, the increase of the density mainly depends on the shrinking volume of the drilling fluid;the chemical struc-ture and morphology have nothing to do with the change of density.These results have theoretical and practical significance for the selection and optimization of the ultra-low temperature drilling fluid system for ice

  18. Age-Related Decrease in Heat Shock 70-kDa Protein 8 in Cerebrospinal Fluid is Associated with Increased Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Loeffler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-associated declines in protein homeostasis mechanisms (proteostasis are thought to contribute to age-related neurodegenerative disorders. The increased oxidative stress which occurs with aging can activate a key proteostatic process, chaperone-mediated autophagy. This study investigated age-related alteration in cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (HSPA8, a molecular chaperone involved in proteostatic mechanisms including chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its associations with indicators of oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG] and 8-isoprostane and total anti-oxidant capacity. We examined correlations between age, HSPA8, 8-OHdG, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity in CSF samples from 34 healthy subjects ranging from 20 to 75 years of age. Age was negatively associated with HSPA8 (rho = -0.47; p = .005. An age-related increase in oxidative stress was indicated by a positive association between age and 8-OHdG (rho = 0.61; p = .0001. HSPA8 was moderately negatively associated with 8-OHdG (rho = -0.58; p = .0004. Age and HSPA8 were weakly associated with 8-isoprostane and total antioxidant capacity (range of rho values: -0.15 to 0.16. Our findings in this exploratory study suggest that during healthy aging, cerebrospinal fluid HSPA8 may decrease, perhaps due in part to an increase in oxidative stress. Our results also suggest that 8-OHdG may be more sensitive than 8-isoprostane for measuring oxidative stress in cerebrospinal fluid. Further studies are indicated to determine if our findings can be replicated with a larger cohort, and if the age-related decrease in HSPA8 in cerebrospinal fluid is reflected by a similar change in the brain.

  19. No support for premature central nervous system aging in HIV-1 when measured by cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau (p-tau)

    OpenAIRE

    Krut, J. J.; Price, R W; Zetterberg, H; Fuchs, D.; Hagberg, L.; YILMAZ, A.; Cinque, P.; Nilsson, S; Gisslén, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of neurocognitive deficits are reported to be high in HIV-1 positive patients, even with suppressive antiretroviral treatment, and it has been suggested that HIV can cause accelerated aging of the brain. In this study we measured phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a potential marker for premature central nervous system (CNS) aging. P-tau increases with normal aging but is not affected by HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. METHODS: With ...

  20. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  1. Intense inflammation and nerve damage in early multiple sclerosis subsides at older age: a reflection by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khademi

    Full Text Available Inflammatory mediators have crucial roles in leukocyte recruitment and subsequent central nervous system (CNS neuroinflammation. The extent of neuronal injury and axonal loss are associated with the degree of CNS inflammation and determine physical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study was to explore possible associations between a panel of selected cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and robust clinical and demographic parameters in a large cohort of patients with MS and controls (n = 1066 using data-driven multivariate analysis. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 13 (CXCL13, osteopontin (OPN and neurofilament-light chain (NFL were measured by ELISA in 548 subjects comprising different MS subtypes (relapsing-remitting, secondary progressive and primary progressive, clinically isolated syndrome and persons with other neurological diseases with or without signs of inflammation/infection. Principal component analyses and orthogonal partial least squares methods were used for unsupervised and supervised interrogation of the data. Models were validated using data from a further 518 subjects in which one or more of the four selected markers were measured. There was a significant association between increased patient age and lower levels of CXCL13, MMP9 and NFL. CXCL13 levels correlated well with MMP9 in the younger age groups, but less so in older patients, and after approximately 54 years of age the levels of CXCL13 and MMP9 were consistently low. CXCL13 and MMP9 levels also correlated well with both NFL and OPN in younger patients. We demonstrate a strong effect of age on both inflammatory and neurodegenerative biomarkers in a large cohort of MS patients. The findings support an early use of adequate immunomodulatory disease modifying drugs, especially in younger patients, and may provide a biological explanation for the relative inefficacy of such treatments in older patients at later

  2. Intense inflammation and nerve damage in early multiple sclerosis subsides at older age: a reflection by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Mohsen; Dring, Ann M; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D; Wuolikainen, Anna; Al Nimer, Faiez; Harris, Robert A; Andersson, Magnus; Brundin, Lou; Piehl, Fredrik; Olsson, Tomas; Svenningsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have crucial roles in leukocyte recruitment and subsequent central nervous system (CNS) neuroinflammation. The extent of neuronal injury and axonal loss are associated with the degree of CNS inflammation and determine physical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to explore possible associations between a panel of selected cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and robust clinical and demographic parameters in a large cohort of patients with MS and controls (n = 1066) using data-driven multivariate analysis. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13 (CXCL13), osteopontin (OPN) and neurofilament-light chain (NFL) were measured by ELISA in 548 subjects comprising different MS subtypes (relapsing-remitting, secondary progressive and primary progressive), clinically isolated syndrome and persons with other neurological diseases with or without signs of inflammation/infection. Principal component analyses and orthogonal partial least squares methods were used for unsupervised and supervised interrogation of the data. Models were validated using data from a further 518 subjects in which one or more of the four selected markers were measured. There was a significant association between increased patient age and lower levels of CXCL13, MMP9 and NFL. CXCL13 levels correlated well with MMP9 in the younger age groups, but less so in older patients, and after approximately 54 years of age the levels of CXCL13 and MMP9 were consistently low. CXCL13 and MMP9 levels also correlated well with both NFL and OPN in younger patients. We demonstrate a strong effect of age on both inflammatory and neurodegenerative biomarkers in a large cohort of MS patients. The findings support an early use of adequate immunomodulatory disease modifying drugs, especially in younger patients, and may provide a biological explanation for the relative inefficacy of such treatments in older patients at later disease stages.

  3. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  4. Little Ice Age mapping as a tool for identifying hazard in the paraglacial environment: The case study of Trentino (Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoner, Thomas; Carton, Alberto; Seppi, Roberto; Carturan, Luca; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zumiani, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    The Little Ice Age (LIA) is a well-recognized climatic event during which the glaciers in the Alps advanced and reached their maximum Holocene extent. During their retreat following the LIA, the glaciers left large areas of loose or poorly consolidated glacial deposits in their forelands, which are subject to paraglacial reworking and may represent potential hazards for human infrastructures. In this study, we present a regional scale mapping of the LIA and post-LIA glacial deposits and a reconstruction of the maximum LIA extents of glaciers in the same area. This work is motivated by a local law requiring the classification of areas subject to natural hazards in Trentino (Italian Alps). Results highlight that glaciers shrunk by 63% from the LIA maximum, leaving 30 km2 of unconsolidated deposits, which are subject to geomorphic paraglacial processes. Potentially hazardous consequences can occur, in particular, during high-magnitude instantaneous events, causing debris and mud flows, mass wasting from debris-covered ice, and floods from small moraine-dammed lakes.

  5. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O2 and N2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  6. On the nature of the dirty ice at the bottom of the GISP2 ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael L.; Burgess, Edward; Alley, Richard B.; Barnett, Bruce; Clow, Gary D.

    2010-11-01

    We present data on the triple Ar isotope composition in trapped gas from clean, stratigraphically disturbed ice between 2800 and 3040 m depth in the GISP2 ice core, and from basal dirty ice from 3040 to 3053 m depth. We also present data for the abundance and isotopic composition of O 2 and N 2, and abundance of Ar, in the basal dirty ice. The Ar/N 2 ratio of dirty basal ice, the heavy isotope enrichment (reflecting gravitational fractionation), and the total gas content all indicate that the gases in basal dirty ice originate from the assimilation of clean ice of the overlying glacier, which comprises most of the ice in the dirty bottom layer. O 2 is partly to completely depleted in basal ice, reflecting active metabolism. The gravitationally corrected ratio of 40Ar/ 38Ar, which decreases with age in the global atmosphere, is compatible with an age of 100-250 ka for clean disturbed ice. In basal ice, 40Ar is present in excess due to injection of radiogenic 40Ar produced in the underlying continental crust. The weak depth gradient of 40Ar in the dirty basal ice, and the distribution of dirt, indicate mixing within the basal ice, while various published lines of evidence indicate mixing within the overlying clean, disturbed ice. Excess CH 4, which reaches thousands of ppm in basal dirty ice at GRIP, is virtually absent in overlying clean disturbed ice, demonstrating that mixing of dirty basal ice into the overlying clean ice, if it occurs at all, is very slow. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the mixing rate of clean ice into dirty ice is sufficient to maintain a steady thickness of dirty ice against thinning from the mean ice flow. The dirty ice appears to consist of two or more basal components in addition to clean glacial ice. A small amount of soil or permafrost, plus preglacial snow, lake or ground ice could explain the observations.

  7. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  8. Prevalence of HHV-6 in cerebrospinal fluid of children younger than 2 years of age with febrile convulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Febrile convulsion is a common disorder in children. Viral infections such as human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6 which results in roseola infantum may contribute to developing seizure. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HHV-6 by detecting DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of children with febrile convulsion and without any rash of roseola infantum.In this descriptive cross-sectional study, CSF of 100 children younger than 2 years of age with febrile convulsion was evaluated for detecting HHV-6 DNA by PCR. All of them were referred to emergency ward in Pediatric Medical Center from March 2010 to March 2011. General information, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and outcomes were collected in the questionnaires.One hundred children including 59 males and 41 females were evaluated. HHV-6 was detected from CSF in six patients (6% by PCR. Mean age was 8 months old. All children were younger than 12 months old. The most common primary manifestation was fever alone. None of them had rash. Majority of cases occurred in winter. All patients recovered without any encephalitis.These findings showed that primary infection with HHV-6 is frequently associated with febrile convulsion in infants which may be at risk for subsequent development of epilepsy.

  9. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  10. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  11. Small for gestational age and poor fluid intelligence in childhood predict externalizing behaviors among young adults born at extremely low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahat, Ayelet; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; Saigal, Saroj; Boyle, Michael H; Schmidt, Louis A

    2015-02-01

    Although infants born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; birth weight intelligence. As young adults, a subset of ELBW survivors free of major neurosensory impairments provided self-reports of personality characteristics related to psychopathology. Data from 66 participants indicated that, as predicted, the association between ELBW and externalizing behaviors was moderated by fluid intelligence. Specifically, ELBW individuals with poor fluid intelligence who were born small for gestational age (birth weight intelligence might be a cognitive mechanism contributing to the development of psychopathology among nonimpaired individuals who were born at ELBW and small for gestational age.

  12. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which

  13. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which res

  14. 飞机除冰/防冰液的流变特性研究%Rheological properties of aircraft deicing/anti-icing fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚博; 赵芯; 于新华; 张帆; 陈元

    2015-01-01

    The non-Newton aircraft deicing/anti-icing fIuid rheoIogicaI property through use of BrookfieId viscometer. By means of the aircraft deicing/anti-icing fIuid shear rate and shear stress measurement and data caIcuIation,found that under the condition of medium shear rate,the aircraft deicing/anti-icing fIuid conforms to the power Iaw. The shear rates tend to be zero and tend to infinity,the aircraft deicing/anti-ic-ing fIuid viscosity is cIose to a constant vaIue. The new rheoIogicaI equation can describe the rheoIogicaI properties of the aircraft deicing/anti-icing fIuid within the fuII scope of the shear rate.%使用BrookfieId粘度计对非牛顿流体型飞机除冰/防冰液的流变性进行了研究,通过对飞机除冰/防冰液剪切速率和剪切应力的测量和数据拟合,发现在中等剪切速率条件下,飞机除冰/防冰液符合幂律流体的流变特性;在剪切率趋近于0和趋近于无穷大时,飞机除冰/防冰液的粘度都是趋近于一个固定值,据此推导出新的流变方程,新流变方程能在整个剪切速率范围内很好的反应飞机除冰/防冰液的流变特性。

  15. Approaching sediment dynamics on Little Ice Age (LIA) lateral moraines in Upper Kaunertal valley, Austria using long-lived radionuclide 129I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamleitner, Sarah; Czarnowsky, Verena; Lachner, Johannes; Steier, Peter; Morche, David; Kraushaar, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Kaunertal, as many other valleys situated in the Eastern Alps, has recently undergone large deglaciation processes as a result of global warming, leaving behind large moraines exposed to geomorphic processes. Steep lateral moraines represent large and easily erodible sources of material within an Alpine sediment cascade. In order to quantify the amount of sediments provided by the moraines, methods of surface change detection such as aerial and terrestrial laser scanning or sfm (structure from motion) generated Digital Elevation Models (DEM) are being applied. However, morphological changes due to the melt out of persisted ice are overlain by processes of mass movement, slope wash, and fluvial erosion, and therefore often remain unnoticed. Yet melting alone could account for a volume reduction in the sediment matrix of up to 13%, the additional leaching of water to a further unknown amount. Hence, the hydrological situation on the lateral moraines needs to be clarified. Previous investigations of springs evolving from the LIA lateral moraine were showing light isotope signatures comparable to those of glacier ice, and resulted in first assumption about the presence of ice lenses within the moraines (Kraushaar et al. 2014). Stable isotope measurements applied by Czarnowsky et al. 2015 confirm former findings. However, fail to distinguish between recently developed ice and dead ice lenses originating from former glacial maxima. This study therefore aims to date evolving spring waters on lateral moraines of the Gepatschferner, sampled between May and October 2015, using the radioactive isotope iodine-129. The environmental abundance of this long-lived radionuclide has been, analogue to tritium, significantly altered due to human activity since Nuclear Age, and is therefore believed to provide feasible relative age estimations. Hence, measurements will allow the clarification of the hydrological situation on site and the specification of processes causing

  16. Climate variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age based on ostracod faunas and shell geochemistry from Biscayne Bay, Florida: Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas M.; Wingard, Georgiana L.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Swart, Peter K.; Willard, Debra A.; Albietz, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    An 800-year-long environmental history of Biscayne Bay, Florida, is reconstructed from ostracod faunal and shell geochemical (oxygen, carbon isotopes, Mg/Ca ratios) studies of sediment cores from three mudbanks in the central and southern parts of the bay. Using calibrations derived from analyses of modern Biscayne and Florida Bay ostracods, palaeosalinity oscillations associated with changes in precipitation were identified. These oscillations reflect multidecadal- and centennial-scale climate variability associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation during the late Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). Evidence suggests wetter regional climate during the MCA and drier conditions during the LIA. In addition, twentieth century anthropogenic modifications to Everglades hydrology influenced bay circulation and/or processes controlling carbon isotopic composition.

  17. 汽车自备防滑用融雪液喷洒装置的设计%Self-provided antiskid with de-icing fluid spraying device design in the car

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 王兴

    2014-01-01

    “汽车风窗玻璃洗电动涤器”进行适当技术改进,使其“一物两用”,在天气正常情况下用于风窗玻璃洗涤;在下雪天则可用于汽车轮胎辙面喷洒融雪液,防止汽车在雪地行驶途中刹车、起步或爬坡时轮胎瞬间滑移或滑转事故发生。%"Auto wind window washer" appropriate technology improvement, make its "dual-use" thing, the weather is usually used for wind window washing;Car tires quotes in the snow, it can be used for the surface spraying de-icing fluid, prevent the automobile braking, start, or climbing a hill in the snow driving tire slip or sliding accident.

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein-15 in follicle fluid combined with age may differentiate between successful and unsuccessful poor ovarian responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yan-Ting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The counselling of poor ovarian responders about the probability of pregnancy remains a puzzle for gynaecologists. The aim of this study was to optimise the management of poor responders by investigating the role of the oocyte-derived factor bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP-15 combined with chronological age in the prediction of the outcome of in-vitro fertilisation-embryo transfer (IVF-ET in poor responders. Methods A retrospective study conducted in a university hospital. A total of 207 poor ovarian responders who reached the ovum pick-up stage undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI with three or fewer follicles no less than 14 mm on the day of oocyte retrieval were recruited from July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. Another 215 coinstantaneous cycles with normal responses were selected as controls. The BMP-15 levels in the follicular fluid (FF of the 207 poor responders were analysed by western blot. Based on the FF BMP-15 level and age, poor responders were sub-divided into four groups. The main outcome measures were the FF BMP-15 level, implantation rate, pregnancy rate, and live birth rate. Results The implantation rate (24.2% vs. 15.3%, chemical pregnancy rate (40% vs. 23.7%, clinical pregnancy rate (36.5% vs. 20.4% and live birth rate (29.4% vs. 15.1% in the high BMP-15 group were significantly higher than those in the low BMP-15 group. Furthermore, poor responders aged less than or equal to 35 years with a higher FF BMP-15 level had the best implantation, pregnancy and live birth rates, which were comparable with those of normal responders. Conclusions Our study suggests a potential role of BMP-15 in the prediction of the IVF outcome. A high FF BMP-15 combined with an age less than or equal to 35 years may be used as a potential indicator for repeating IVF cycles in poor ovarian responders.

  19. El registro de la pequena edad de hielo en lagunas pampeanas The record of the Little Ice Age in the Pampean lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Laprida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se conoce como Pequeña Edad de Hielo (LIA al episodio acontecido entre el siglo 16 y mediados del siglo 19, durante el cual el clima en Europa se tornó frío y ocasionalmente tormentoso. En ciertas partes de Europa, las observaciones instrumentales lo abarcan parcialmente, pero para Sudamérica no se dispone de registros instrumentales contemporáneos a dicho evento. Con el objetivo de obtener nuevas evidencias para el período comprendido por la Pequeña Edad de Hielo en la llanura pampeana, se analizaron testigos cortos de la laguna de Chascomús y de la laguna del Monte los que, de acuerdo a dataciones AMS, abarcan los últimos 500 años. Ambos testigos constan de tres secuencias granodecrecientes. El análisis del registro de la laguna de Chascomús ha permitido reconocer un período benigno desde fines del siglo 15 hasta alrededor del 1700, cuando se evidencia una retracción de la laguna que inaugura un período seco. Este episodio habría continuado por casi 150 años y se revierte alrededor de 1850, momento a partir del cual los eventos de excesos hídricos comenzaron a dominar el escenario pampeano. La base del testigo de la laguna de Monte fue datada en 1441-1494 AD. Si bien el modelo de edades para este testigo aún no ha podido ser bien establecido, los eventos de Chascomús y Monte podrían ser correlacionables y expresar tendencias seculares regionales de la humedad.The Little Ice Age (LIA is a climate episode between the 16th and middle 19th centuries, characterized in Europe by colder temperatures and occasionally stormy weather. In certain areas of Europe, long instrumental observations record the Little Ice Age partially; however, in the pampean region meteorological data only started about one hundred years ago. The objective of this contribution is to provide new evidences about the Little Ice Age in the Pampean plain based on lake cores. Short cores of Chascomús and Monte lakes were analyzed and, according to AMS data

  20. A NEW STUDY ON QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU IN ICE AGES%冰期之青藏高原新研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周尚哲; 李吉均

    2001-01-01

    Many technologies have been used to date moraines in recentyears. The 36Cl dating of bottom of ice core of Guliya ice cap, western Kunlun and the ESR dating of moraine at Kunlun pass indicate that the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau had grown up into the Cryosphere at 0.7 Ma B.P.The recent work on moraine ESR dating shows that glaciation occurred at least at 0.46 Ma B.P. ( stage 12 of oxygen isotope of deep sea ) in the Qilian Mountains. The same situation was also shown in the Tianshan Mountains. Recent studies indicate again that Quaternary glaciations occurred just around the high mountains over the Plateau. The clear bounds and limited scales of multiple glaciations are incompatible with imagining a successive ice sheet on the Plateau. The very deeply weathered moraine with 2.42 of w(SiO2)/w(Al2O3) and 2.35 of w(SiO2)/w(R2O3) at the southern margin (3 850m) of Daocheng ice cap and the red crust in Litang Basin (4 100m) show that they are of considerable age and never suffered mopping-up operations of an ice sheet. The present and ice age snowlines of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau have been distributed with an ascendant trend (the difference is about 1 500m) from the surrounding margin to the hinterland Qiangtang, describing vividly its function of “The Dry Pole of Asia” suggested by some scientists early. The lakes mean that Qiangtang Plateau is an interior drainage area where the big rivers have not yet stretched in, showing an younger Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau rather than an ice covered Plateau!%冰碛测年技术近些年有很大进展。古里雅冰芯底部36Cl测年和昆仑山垭口老冰碛ESR测年已表明,青藏高原在昆仑黄河运动之后的70万年前就进入了当时的冰冻圈,与全球性的冰期旋回相耦合,发生了最早的冰川作用。最近的冰碛ESR测年表明,高原东北边缘的祁连山地区至少在40多万年前的氧同位素12阶段发生了冰川作用,天山高望峰冰碛测年显示了同样的结果

  1. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part I. Body fluid balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine men were subjected to four temperature exposures to detect changes in weight, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and relative volumes of plasma. The exposures were: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. All experiments were repeated and ended with recovery at room temperature. The greatest weight loss (mean +/- S.D.) (i.e. sweating) was observed in C, 544 +/- 207 g. The weight losses (mean +/- S.D.) in A and B were equal, 417 +/- 253 g and 437 +/- 221 g. The relative post-exposure plasma volumes decreased 7.2% in A, 8.0% in B, and 5.6% in C; the decrease in D (1.3%) was statistically not significant. Combinations of heat and cold or cool (A and B) reduced the plasma volumes more than mere heat (C), suggesting a disturbance of cutaneous circulation producing transient edema in the skin.

  2. Glacial-interglacial variability in Tropical Pangaean Precipitation during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age: simulations with the Community Climate System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Heavens

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA, the Earth's penultimate "icehouse climate", was a critical time in the history of biological and ecological evolution. Many questions remain about the connections between high-latitude glaciation in Gondwanaland and low-latitude precipitation variability in Pangaea. We have simulated the Earth's climate during Asselian-Sakmarian time (299–284 Ma with the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3, a coupled dynamic atmosphere-ocean-land-sea-ice model. Our simulations test the sensitivity of the model climate to direct and indirect effects of glaciation as well as variability in the Earth's orbit. Our focus is on precipitation variability in tropical (30° S–30° N Pangaea, where there has been the most interpretation of glacial-interglacial climate change during the LPIA. The results of these simulations suggest that glacials generally were drier than interglacials in tropical Pangaea, though exceptional areas may have been wetter, depending on location and the mode of glaciation. Lower sea level, an indirect effect of changes in glacial extent, appears to reduce tropical Pangaean precipitation more than the direct radiative/topographic effects of high-latitude glaciation. Glaciation of the Central Pangaean Mountains would have greatly reduced equatorial Pangaean precipitation, while perhaps enhancing precipitation at higher tropical latitudes and in equatorial rain shadows. Variability evident in strata with 5th order stratigraphic cycles may have resulted from precipitation changes owing to precession forcing of monsoon circulations and would have differed in character between greenhouse and icehouse climates.

  3. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to all...... the interesting conversations during the workshop, however, made me think that much of the concern with the Polar Regions in general, and the presence of ice in particular, reverberates around the question of how to accommodate various geographical presences and practices within the regulatory framework that we...

  4. Cultural Implications of Out-of-Phase Weather across northern Alaska after 500 CE: Regional Variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, O. K.; Alix, C. M.; Bigelow, N. H.; Hoffecker, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    From a global perspective, a diverse mélange of paleoclimate data reveal that Northwest Alaska is partially out of phase with northwest Europe, witnessing cooler periods during the Medieval Climate Anomaly ca. CE 1000 and warmer conditions in the 16th and 17th centuries. The search for climatic forcers in northern Alaska relies on integration of data drawn from tree-rings, lacustrine varves and moraines, diatoms, beach ridges and dunes. At Cape Espenberg, northern Seward Peninsula, a 1500-year reconstruction of settlement, landscape evolution and climatic variability employs >100 14C ages from accreting dunes with shell-laden storm beds, intercalated driftwood and superimposed soils, archaeological sites and marsh peats within swale ponds. Large storms occurred along the Chukchi Sea from Cape Espenberg and Deering (Kotzebue Sound) to Point Barrow prior to 1000 CE, and at decadal intervals during the Little Ice Age (LIA) from 1300 to 1700. Architecural driftwood logs from several excavated houses capped by sand dunes yield several 14C dated floating chronologies covering intervals from 700 to 1700, suggest the identification of cooler intervals 800 to 1000 and intermittently after 1300. Peat aggradation followed isolation from the sea from 500 onward, and was interrupted by two pulses of fresh water, one ca. 1300 and a second ca. 1800, with diatoms suggesting relative aridity during the LIA. The occupation history of Cape Espenberg generally follows dune growth, and may be inversely related to cooler temperatures.

  5. Architecture and structural evolution of an early Little Ice Age terminal moraine at the surge-type glacier Múlajökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benediktsson, Ívar &Oum; lrn; Schomacker, Anders; Johnson, Mark D.; Geiger, Alessa J.; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Gudmundsdóttir, Esther Ruth

    2015-09-01

    The internal architecture and structural evolution of the Arnarfellsmúlar terminal moraine at Múlajökull, a surge-type glacier in central Iceland, is described in order to demonstrate submarginal and proglacial glaciotectonic processes during glacier surging, as well as constraining the age of the maximum extent of the glacier. The moraine is 4-7 m high, 50-100 m wide, and composed of a highly deformed sequence of loess, peat, and tephra that is draped by till up to the crest. The internal architecture is dominated by steep, high-amplitude overturned folds and thrusts in the crest zone but open, low-amplitude folds on the distal slope. Section balancing suggests a basal detachment (décollement) depth of 1.4 m and a total horizontal shortening of around 59%. This implies that the glacier coupled to the foreland about 70 m up glacier from its terminal position to initiate the formation of the moraine. The structural evolution is polyphase in that the formation commenced with low-amplitude open folding of the foreland, followed by overfolding and piggyback thrusting. Radiocarbon dating and analysis of tephra layers, along with historical references, indicate that the most likely time of moraine formation was between A.D. 1717 and 1760, which suggests that Múlajökull had its Little Ice Age maximum and most extensive surge earlier than many other surge-type glaciers in Iceland.

  6. Dietary sodium intake is associated with total fluid and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in US children and adolescents aged 2-18 y: NHANES 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Carley A; Wright, Jacqueline D; Liu, Kiang; Nowson, Caryl A; Loria, Catherine M

    2013-07-01

    Increasing dietary sodium drives the thirst response. Because sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are frequently consumed by children, sodium intake may drive greater consumption of SSBs and contribute to obesity risk. We examined the association between dietary sodium, total fluid, and SSB consumption in a nationally representative sample of US children and adolescents aged 2-18 y. We analyzed cross-sectional data from NHANES 2005-2008. Dietary sodium, fluid, and SSB intakes were assessed with a 24-h dietary recall. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess associations between sodium, fluid, and SSBs adjusted for age, sex, race-ethnic group, body mass index (BMI), socioeconomic status (SES), and energy intake. Of 6400 participants, 51.3% (n = 3230) were males, and the average (±SEM) age was 10.1 ± 0.1 y. The average sodium intake was 3056 ± 48 mg/d (equivalent to 7.8 ± 0.1 g salt/d). Dietary sodium intake was positively associated with fluid consumption (r = 0.42, P consumption and predicted SSB consumption in consumers of SSBs. The high dietary sodium intake of US children and adolescents may contribute to a greater consumption of SSBs, identifying a possible link between dietary sodium intake and excess energy intake.

  7. Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  8. From the Holocene Thermal Maximum to the Little Ice Age: 11000 years of high resolution marine and terrestrial paleoclimate reconstruction using biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moossen, H. M.; Abell, R.; Quillmann, U.; Andrews, J. T.; Bendle, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Holocene climate change is of significantly smaller amplitude than the Pleistocene Glacial-Interglacial cycles, but climatic variations have affected humans over at least the last 4000 years. Studying Holocene climate variations is important to disentangle climate change caused by anthropogenic influences from natural climate change. Sedimentary records stemming from fjords afford the opportunity to study marine and terrestrial paleo-climatic changes and linking the two together. Typically high sediment accumulation rates of fjordic environments facilitate resolution of rapid climate change (RCC) events. The fjords of Northwest Iceland are ideal for studying Holocene climate change as they receive warm water from the Irminger current, but are also influenced by the east Greenland current which brings polar waters to the region (Jennings et al., 2011). In the Holocene, Nordic Seas and the Arctic have been sensitive to climate change. The 8.2 ka event, a cool interval, highlights the sensitivity of that region. Recent climate variations such as the Little Ice Age have been detected in sedimentary records around Iceland (Sicre et al., 2008). We reconstruct Holocene marine and terrestrial climate change producing high resolution (1sample/ 30 years) records from 10700 cal a BP to 300 cal a BP using biomarkers. Alkenones, terrestrial leaf wax components, GDGTs and C/N ratios from a sediment core (MD99-2266) from the mouth of the Ìsafjardardjúp fjord were studied. For more information on the core and evolution of the fjord during the Holocene consult Quillmann et al., (2010) The average chain length (ACL) of terrestrial n-alkanes indicates changes in aridity, and the alkenone unsaturation index represents changes in sea surface temperature. These independent records exhibit similar trends over the studied time period. Our alkenone derived SST record shows the Holocene Thermal Maximum, Holocene Neoglaciation as well as climate change associated with the Medieval Warm

  9. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  10. Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  11. Headwater valley response to climate and land use changes during the Little Ice Age in the Massif Central (Yzeron basin, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delile, Hugo; Schmitt, Laurent; Jacob-Rousseau, Nicolas; Grosprêtre, Loïc; Privolt, Grégoire; Preusser, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The geomorphological response of valley bottoms in eastern France to climatic fluctuations of the Little Ice Age (LIA) was investigated using sedimentological analysis together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating. Diachronic mapping of land use since the beginning of the nineteenth century was also carried out. Since A.D. 1500, the valley bottoms experienced three cycles of aggradation and subsequent incision, each characterized by paired periods of high and low detritic activity. While the impact of human activity on the aggradation of the alluvial plain is observed, the vertical dynamics of the valley bottom deposits seemingly were also linked to the hydroclimatic fluctuations during the LIA. The sensitivity to these fluctuations was increased by human activity at the scale of the basin. Variations of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and solar activity from the last five centuries correlate with wet and cold phases during which valley bottoms accumulated, and dry and warm phases during which the streams incised into the valley floors. This fluvial sensitivity to the meteorological conditions induced temporal variations in sedimentary supply originating from either direct input from remnants of periglacial alluvial sheets or local rocky outcrops and/or from indirect input from the erosion of alluvial and colluvial deposits. These two components, combined with the sheet runoff over the ploughlands, express the complex coupling between hillslopes and valley bottoms in the headwater catchments. This caused a cascade-shaped transit of the sediments characterized by alternating phases of storage and removal.

  12. A warm and wet Little Climatic Optimum and a cold and dry Little Ice Age in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, K.L.

    1992-05-01

    In the next century, increases in atmospheric trace gas concentration could warm the global average temperature beyond what it has ranged during the past century. Examination of larger-than-historic climatic changes that have occurred in the past in specific regions provides realistic context for evaluating such potential future changes. This paper has contrasted the climatic manifestation of the Little Climatic Optimum or Medieval Warm Period (AD 900--1300) with that of the Little Ice Age (AD 1300--1850) in the northern Colorado Plateau region of the southwestern USA. The zenith of the Anasazi occupation coincides with the former and their demise coincides with the latter, when conditions became too cold and especially dry (in the summer) to support upland dry farming. During the height of the Little Climatic Optimum the region was characterized by a relatively long growing season and greater winter and summer precipitation than that of today. This resulted in a relatively rapid development of a potential dry-farming belt that was twice as wide as the present and areas that cannot be dry farmed today were routinely farmed by the Anasazi. Such conditions would be beneficial to dry farmers in the Four Corners region if those conditions were repeated in the near future.

  13. Possible Evidence for Enhanced Seasonality During the Little Ice Age Indicated by Multiple Isotopes from Kepler Lake, South-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyo, A.; Yu, Z.; Bebout, G.

    2008-12-01

    We present multiple-proxy data from two short cores (85 cm and 101 cm) from Kepler Lake, an evaporation- insensitive, groundwater-fed marl lake in South-Central Alaska to reconstruct climate and environmental changes in the recent centuries. The proxies used include calcite C and O isotopes, organic matter (OM) C and N isotopes, and loss on ignition (LOI) analysis. Two cores can be visually correlated based upon LOI results. A 600 year chronology was established based on 3 calibrated AMS 14C dates of terrestrial macrofossils and 210Pb analysis. δ18OVPDB values of inorganic calcite range from - 17.0‰ to -15.7‰, with the highest values between 1470 and 1840 AD during the Little Ice Age (LIA). The relatively high δ18O values during the cold LIA contrast with the conventional temperature interpretation of O isotopes. Therefore, the isotopic shifts around the LIA were likely caused by a shift in atmospheric circulation. A weakening of the wintertime Aleutian Low pressure system residing over the Gulf of Alaska would result in enriched 18O in precipitation as well as a colder winter climate in SC Alaska. During the LIA period CaCO3 contents were elevated by ~15% to >80%. Calcite precipitation in freshwater lakes is primarily a function of summer temperature; we propose that the LIA in SC Alaska represents a period of colder winters and warmer summers. This interpretation is also supported by C isotopes, reflecting aquatic productivity. Both δ13C OM and δ13Ccalcite (relative to VPDB) exhibit relatively high values at 1600 to 1840 AD, after which δ13COM remains constant throughout the rest of the record and δ13Ccalcite declines after the LIA. The delayed increase in δ13C of OM and calcites at 1600 AD may reflect the differential responses of calcite precipitation and aquatic productivity. The negative shift of ~1‰ in δ18O in the 1840s has also been documented in ice cores from Mt. Logan and in marl lake sediments from the southern Yukon, suggesting a broad

  14. Archimedean Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Eloranta, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

  15. The impact of increased sedimentation rates associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet on gas hydrate stability and focused fluid flow at the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, Jens; Haflidason, Haflidi; Becker, Lukas; Petter Sejrup, Hans; Berndt, Christian; Planke, Sverre; Dahlgreen, Torbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Climatic changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) have affected the stability of gas hydrate systems on glaciated margins by sea-level changes, bottom water temperature changes, isostatic uplift or subsidence and variability in sedimentation rates. While subsidence and sea-level rise stabilize gas hydrate deposits, bottom water temperature warming, uplift and enhanced sedimentation have the opposite effect. The response of gas hydrate systems to post-glaciation warming is therefore a complex phenomenon and highly depends on the timing and magnitude of each of these processes. While the impact of bottom water warming on the dissociation of gas hydrates have been addressed in numerous studies, the potential of methane release due to basal gas hydrate dissociation during periods of warming has received less attention. Here, we present results from numerical simulations which show that rapid sedimentation associated with the decay of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet was capable of causing significant basal gas hydrate dissociation. The modeling is constrained by a high-resolution three-dimensional sedimentation rate reconstruction of the Nyegga pockmark field, offshore mid-Norway, obtained by integrating chrono-stratigraphic information derived from sediments cores and a seismo-stratigraphic framework. The model run covers the period between 28,000 and 15,000 calendar years before present and predict that the maximum sedimentation rate-related gas hydrate dissociation coincides temporally and spatially with enhanced focused fluid flow activity in the study area. Basal gas hydrate dissociation due to rapid sedimentation may have occurred as well in other glaciated continental margins after the LGM and may have caused the release of significant amounts of methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. The major post glaciation deposition centers are the location of some of the largest known submarine slide complexes. The release of free gas due to basal gas hydrate

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of age-related environmental impact of biogenic hydraulic fluids; Life Cycle Assessment der alterungsbedingten Umweltvertraeglichkeit biogener Hydraulik-Schmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressling, Jana

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic hydraulic fluids, based on synthetic esters (category: HEES), have an excellent environmental profile in the unused state, so that they are typically classified into water hazard class 1 or as ''not hazardous to water''. During storage at room temperature and tribological application, occurring chemical and toxicological changes take no account in the classification of lubricants until now. However, the ageing and oxidation stability gets increasing importance, since it determines the service life of lubricants in tribological systems in addition to the storage time. Since it always comes to direct and uncontrolled entries into the environment in case of accidents or hydraulic leaks, it is essential to assess whether there is an environmental hazard by waste oils. With an increased use of biogenic hydraulic fluids in environmentally sensitive areas, thus the need for an appropriate monitoring and assessment approach as part of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The aquatic and miniaturised test procedures applied in this work with the Water Soluble Fraction (WSF) concept, allows a simple and quick screening of age-related ecotoxic potential of lubricants by oxidative processes and tribological application. For detection of genotoxic potential the umu-test is a suitable indicator test to detect geno- and cytotoxic effects by oxidative reactions. The determination of biodegradability is essential for the assessment of the environmental impact of hydraulic fluids. The optimised biodegradability test system ''O2/CO2-Headspace Test'' has proved itself as a suitable procedure for the investigation of biogenic lubricants within the scope of a LCA and shows therefore a comparable method of the required test procedures for the assignment of ecolabels. In addition, the combination of biological test procedures and chemical analysis allows a comprehensive investigation of effects and causes of age-related changes of hydraulic

  17. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a large

  18. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a

  19. Ice sculpture in the Martian outflow channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Viking Orbiter and terrestrial satellite images are examined at similar resolution to compare features of the Martian outflow channels with features produced by the movement of ice on earth, and many resemblances are found. These include the anastomoses, sinuosities, and U-shaped cross profiles of valleys; hanging valleys; linear scour marks on valley walls; grooves and ridges on valley floors; and the streamlining of bedrock highs. Attention is given to the question whether ice could have moved in the Martian environment. It is envisaged that springs or small catastrophic outbursts discharged fluids from structural outlets or chaotic terrains. These fluids built icings that may have grown into substantial masses and eventually flowed like glaciers down preexisting valleys. An alternative is that the fluids formed rivers or floods that in turn formed ice jams and consolidated into icy masses in places where obstacles blocked their flow.

  20. A comparison of the climates of the Medieval Climate Anomaly, Little Ice Age, and Current Warm Period reconstructed using coral records from the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wenfeng; Liu, Xi; Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Zeng, Ti; Xie, Luhua; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-01-01

    For the global oceans, the characteristics of high-resolution climate changes during the last millennium remain uncertain because of the limited availability of proxy data. This study reconstructs climate conditions using annually resolved coral records from the South China Sea (SCS) to provide new insights into climate change over the last millennium. The results indicate that the climate of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, AD 900-1300) was similar to that of the Current Warm Period (CWP, AD 1850-present), which contradicts previous studies. The similar warmth levels for the MCA and CWP have also been recorded in the Makassar Strait of Indonesia, which suggests that the MCA was not warmer than the CWP in the western Pacific and that this may not have been a globally uniform change. Hydrological conditions were drier/saltier during the MCA and similar to those of the CWP. The drier/saltier MCA and CWP in the western Pacific may be associated with the reduced precipitation caused by variations in the Pacific Walker Circulation. As for the Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1550-1850), the results from this study, together with previous data from the Makassar Strait, indicate a cold and wet period compared with the CWP and the MCA in the western Pacific. The cold LIA period agrees with the timing of the Maunder sunspot minimum and is therefore associated with low solar activity. The fresher/wetter LIA in the western Pacific may have been caused by the synchronized retreat of both the East Asian Summer Monsoon and the Australian Monsoon.

  1. Was the Little Ice Age more or less El Niño-like than the Mediaeval Climate Anomaly? Evidence from hydrological and temperature proxy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, L. M. K.; Lambert, F. H.; Charman, D. J.

    2015-11-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), an ocean-atmosphere coupled oscillation over the equatorial Pacific, is the most important source of global climate variability on inter-annual time scales. It has substantial environmental and socio-economic consequences such as devastation of South American fish populations and increased forest fires in Indonesia. The instrumental ENSO record is too short for analysing long-term trends and variability, hence proxy data is used to extend the record. However, different proxy sources have produced varying reconstructions of ENSO, with some evidence for a temperature-precipitation divergence in ENSO trends over the past millennium, in particular during the Mediaeval Climate Anomaly (MCA; AD 800-1300) and the Little Ice Age (LIA; AD 1400-1850). This throws into question the stability of the modern ENSO system and its links to the global climate, which has implications for future projections. Here we use a new statistical approach using EOF-based weighting to create two new large-scale ENSO reconstructions derived independently from precipitation proxies and temperature proxies respectively. The method is developed and validated using pseudoproxy experiments that address the effects of proxy dating error, resolution and noise to improve uncertainty estimations. The precipitation ENSO reconstruction displays a significantly more El Niño-like state during the LIA than the MCA, while the temperature reconstruction shows no significant difference. The trends shown in the precipitation ENSO reconstruction are relatively robust to variations in the precipitation EOF pattern. However, the temperature reconstruction suffers significantly from a lack of high-quality, favourably located proxy records, which limits its ability to capture the large-scale ENSO signal. Further expansion of the palaeo-database and improvements to instrumental, satellite and model representations of ENSO are needed to fully resolve the discrepancies found

  2. Increasing dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau linked with the Little Ice Age and recent human activity since the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dejun; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Song, Lei; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas in inner Asia contribute lots of mineral dust in the northern hemisphere, but dust flux evolution in the past is poorly constrained. Based on particle sizes and elemental compositions of a sediment core from Lake Qinghai on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, dust fluxes during ∼1518-2011 A.D. were reconstructed based on 18-100 μm fractions of the lake sediment. The dust fluxes during the past ∼500 years ranged between 100 and 300 g/m2/yr, averaging 202 g/m2/yr, experiencing four stages: Stage 1 (∼1518-1590s), the flux was averaged 165 g/m2/yr, much lower than that in the Stage 2 (1590s-1730s, 254 g/m2/yr); similarly, an average flux of 169 g/m2/yr in the Stage 3 (1730s-1950s) was followed by an increased flux of 259 g/m2/yr in the Stage 4 (1950s-2011). During the first three stages the fluxes were dominated by natural dust activities in arid inner Asia, having a positive relation with wind intensity but a poor correlation with effective moisture (or precipitation) and temperature. The high dust flux in Stage 2 was due to relatively strong wind during the maximum Little Ice Age, whereas the remarkably high flux in 1950s-2011 was resulted from recent increasing human activities in northwestern China. The dust record not only documents past dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau but also reflects evolutions and mechanisms of dust activity/emission in inner Asia during the past ∼500 years.

  3. Evaluation of the flow of cerebrospinal fluid as well as gender and age characteristics in patients with communicating hydrocephalus, using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomyakova, Olga; Stankevich, Yu; Mesropyan, N; Shaybman, L; Tulupov, A

    2016-12-01

    To determine the difference in the velocity parameters of cerebrospinal fluid flow in patients with varying severity of communicating hydrocephalus compared to a group of healthy volunteers without hydrodynamic disorders. The study involved 35 subjects with communicating hydrocephalus (25 subjects with Evans index of 0.31; 10 subject with Evans index of 0.46) and 62 healthy volunteers. The mean, volume, and peak flow velocities were determined at the different intracranial levels. Also were made an assessment of gender and age differences. Analysis of the differences between the mean values showed the progressive inhibition of cerebrospinal fluid outflow from the cranial cavity [in moderate communicating hydrocephalus-at 1.5 times (p hydrocephalus at 2-2.5 times (p < 0.01)], depending on the severity of enlargement of the ventricular system and, most likely, related to inhibition of its reabsorption. These changes may explain the clinical symptoms of subjects and serve as diagnostic criteria. Also it was revealed a significant influence of the factor of age on speed characteristics of the cerebrospinal fluid flow (F = 5.3303, p = 0.0003, for mean velocity).

  4. Age and duration of the Mississippi Valley-type mineralizing fluid flow event in the Viburnum Trend, southeast Missouri, USA, determined from palaeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, David T. A.; Lewchuk, Michael T.; Leach, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is included in the Special Publication entitled 'Dating and duration of fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction', edited by J. Parnell. The Viburnum Trend is a world-class Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc ore deposit in platform carbonates of the Upper Cambrian Bonneterre Dolomite in the midcontinent of the USA. Palaeomagnetic methods have been used to analyse 233 specimens from early octahedral (nine sites) and late-stage cubic (13 sites) galena ore from four mines along the c. 70 km north-south length of the Trend. The characteristic remanence is carried by single to pseudo-single domain pyrrhotite and magnetite. This is the first MVT deposit in which pyrrhotite is shown to be a remanence carrier and present in galena crystals. The remanence directions define an Early Permian mean age of 273 ?? 10 Ma for the ore-stage mineralization, a maximum duration for the mineralization event of 12 Ma, and a time difference of 5 Ma between the early octahedral and late cubic galena ore stages. The Early Permian age for the ore is consistent with models of ore genesis that invoke fluid flow from the Ouachita orogen during Ouachitan orogenesis.

  5. Uranium-series dating of antarctic ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fireman, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is very interesting to date polar ice radiometrically. Bands of dust imbedded in ice are frequently observed in antarctic ice fields. This work focuses on dating ice samples with high dust contents by the uranium-series method. The author obtained uranium-series ages of 325 thousand (+/- 75) and 100 thousand (+/- 20) years for dusty ice samples from two sites in the main Allan Hills ice field. The dust-banded ice was collected from 50- to 100-centimeter depth at two sites, called Cul de Sac 100 and Cul de Sac 150. The particles in these samples were examined with an optical microscope and found to consist essentially (more than 95% of the particulates) of fine volcanic glass shards full of vesicles and microvesicles. Evidently the fine volcanic glass shards were deposited on snow, became incorporated in the ice, and moved with the ice to the Allan Hills sites. Ice samples with other types of particulates, such as terrestrial morraine, may also be amenable to uranium-series dating; however, it is difficult to date ice with less than 0.03 gram of fine particulates per kilogram of ice with their present technique. The uranium-series method can cover the age range from 10,000 to 600,000 years.

  6. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  7. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Bai Junqiang; Hua Jun; Wang Kun; Zhang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when enter-ing clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes:rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  8. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  9. LEVELS OF LL-37 ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE IN THE GINGIVAL CREVICULAR FLUID OF YOUNG AND MIDDLE-AGED SUBJECTS WITH OR WITHOUT GINGIVITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya TÜRKOĞLU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: LL-37 is an antimicrobial peptide which plays an important role in the innate immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the LL-37 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of middle-aged and young adults who have either gingivitis or healthy periodontal tissues. Materials and Methods: Forty middle-aged adults (20 healthy controls and 20 with gingivitis and 41 younger adults (20 healthy controls and 21 with gingivitis were included in the present study. Probing depth, clinical attachment level, plaque index, and papilla bleeding index were recorded. LL-37 levels in the GCF were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: No significant differences were observed in the GCF LL-37 levels between young healthy and middle-aged healthy subjects. Also, there were no significant differences in GCF LL-37 levels between young and middle-aged gingivitis subjects. However, gingivitis groups had significantly higher GCF LL-37 levels than healthy groups (p<0.001. Correlation analysis demonstrated no significant correlation between age and GCF LL-37 levels neither in healthy nor in gingivitis groups. Conclusion: The levels of LL-37 in GCF increase in the presence of gingival inflammation, however, this does not vary according to subjects being young or middle-aged.

  10. Structural integrity of the corpus callosum predicts long-term transfer of fluid intelligence-related training gains in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dominik; Fischer, Florian Udo; Fesenbeckh, Johanna; Yakushev, Igor; Lelieveld, Irene Maria; Scheurich, Armin; Schermuly, Ingrid; Zschutschke, Lisa; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Although cognitive training usually improves cognitive test performance, the capability to transfer these training gains into respective or functionally related cognitive domains varies significantly. Since most studies demonstrate rather limited transfer effects in older adults, aging might be an important factor in transfer capability differences. This study investigated the transfer capability of logical reasoning training gains to a measure of Fluid Intelligence (Gf) in relation to age, general intelligence, and brain structural integrity as measured by diffusion tensor imaging. In a group of 41 highly educated healthy elderly, 71% demonstrated successful transfer immediately after a 4-week training session (i.e. short-term transfer). In a subgroup of 22% of subjects transfer maintained over a 3-month follow-up period (i.e. long-term transfer). While short-term transfer was not related to structural integrity, long-term transfer was associated with increased structural integrity in corpus and genu of the corpus callosum. Since callosal structural integrity was also related to age (in the present and foregoing studies), previously observed associations between age and transfer might be moderated by the structural integrity. Surprisingly, age was not directly associated with transfer in this study which could be explained by the multi-dependency of the structural integrity (modulating factors beside age, e.g. genetics). In this highly educated sample, general intelligence was not related to transfer suggesting that high intelligence is not sufficient for transfer in normal aging. Further studies are needed to reveal the interaction of transfer, age, and structural integrity and delineate mechanisms of age-dependent transfer capabilities.

  11. Zonal assessment of environmental driven settlement abandonment in the Trans-Tisza region (Central Europe) during the early phase of the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinke, Zsolt; Ferenczi, László; F. Romhányi, Beatrix; Gyulai, Ferenc; Laszlovszky, József; Mravcsik, Zoltán; Pósa, Patricia; Gábris, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    This investigation focuses on the transformation of the settlement pattern of a lowland landscape as a social response to the hydrological challenges emerging in the late 13th century (c.) overture of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Results of the applied zonal analysis suggested a strong spatial connection between the geomorphological conditions, the agro-ecological suitability (good-excellent, medium and low) and the stability or instability of settlement patterns. The elevation means of archaeological sites in the deserted zones proved significantly lower than those in zones with permanent settlement pattern (Brunner-Munzel test p ≤ 0.01; n = 377). Additionally, the late medieval (14th-mid-16th centuries) site group was situated, on average, significantly higher than the high medieval (late 10th-13th centuries) site group within the permanent zones (Brunner-Munzel test p ≤ 0.01; n = 219). These outcomes statistically confirm that not only did low-lying inhabited areas shrink significantly, but they also displaced vertically in the first phase of the LIA. When analysing the relation of settlement pattern to soil conditions, the proportion of areas with good-excellent agro-ecological suitability proved 1.5-2 times higher in the permanent zones than in the deserted and uninhabited settlement suitability zones. Using the linear model, different regression coefficients appeared between the extension of the high and medium agro-ecological suitability zones and the number of high and late medieval settlements. The different coefficients in the studied two periods suggest that the issue of agroecological suitability in the High Middle Ages did not bear such importance as in the late Middle Ages. The findings of the paper may contribute to answering the question why the relatively dense settlement pattern of the deserted zones was abandoned almost completely by the end of the 13th c. in areas where flood proneness and weak agro-ecological suitability both meant a serious

  12. Historical Glacier Variations in Southern South America since the Little Ice Age: Examples from Lago Viedma (Southern Patagonia) and Mendoza (Central Andes), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, S. U.; Masiokas, M.; Pitte, P.; Berthier, E.; Guerrido, C.; Luckman, B. H.; Villalba, R.

    2013-12-01

    similar event is reported to have occurred in 1786 according to historical records. Finally we compare the observed glacier fluctuations of the two regions with other available glacier reconstructions to give an overview of glacier evolution in southern South America since the Little Ice Age.

  13. Dendroclimatic transfer functions revisited: Little Ice Age and Medieval Warm Period summer temperatures reconstructed using artificial neural networks and linear algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helama, S.; Holopainen, J.; Eronen, M. [Department of Geology, University of Helsinki, (Finland); Makarenko, N.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory; Karimova, L.M.; Kruglun, O.A. [Institute of Mathematics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Timonen, M. [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit (Finland); Merilaeinen, J. [SAIMA Unit of the Savonlinna Department of Teacher Education, University of Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-07-01

    Tree-rings tell of past climates. To do so, tree-ring chronologies comprising numerous climate-sensitive living-tree and subfossil time-series need to be 'transferred' into palaeoclimate estimates using transfer functions. The purpose of this study is to compare different types of transfer functions, especially linear and nonlinear algorithms. Accordingly, multiple linear regression (MLR), linear scaling (LSC) and artificial neural networks (ANN, nonlinear algorithm) were compared. Transfer functions were built using a regional tree-ring chronology and instrumental temperature observations from Lapland (northern Finland and Sweden). In addition, conventional MLR was compared with a hybrid model whereby climate was reconstructed separately for short- and long-period timescales prior to combining the bands of timescales into a single hybrid model. The fidelity of the different reconstructions was validated against instrumental climate data. The reconstructions by MLR and ANN showed reliable reconstruction capabilities over the instrumental period (AD 1802-1998). LCS failed to reach reasonable verification statistics and did not qualify as a reliable reconstruction: this was due mainly to exaggeration of the low-frequency climatic variance. Over this instrumental period, the reconstructed low-frequency amplitudes of climate variability were rather similar by MLR and ANN. Notably greater differences between the models were found over the actual reconstruction period (AD 802-1801). A marked temperature decline, as reconstructed by MLR, from the Medieval Warm Period (AD 931-1180) to the Little Ice Age (AD 1601-1850), was evident in all the models. This decline was approx. 0.5 C as reconstructed by MLR. Different ANN based palaeotemperatures showed simultaneous cooling of 0.2 to 0.5 C, depending on algorithm. The hybrid MLR did not seem to provide further benefit above conventional MLR in our sample. The robustness of the conventional MLR over the calibration

  14. Was the Little Ice Age more or less El Niño-like than the Medieval Climate Anomaly? Evidence from hydrological and temperature proxy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Lilo M. K.; Lambert, F. Hugo; Charman, Dan J.

    2017-03-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most important source of global climate variability on interannual timescales and has substantial environmental and socio-economic consequences. However, it is unclear how it interacts with large-scale climate states over longer (decadal to centennial) timescales. The instrumental ENSO record is too short for analysing long-term trends and variability and climate models are unable to accurately simulate past ENSO states. Proxy data are used to extend the record, but different proxy sources have produced dissimilar reconstructions of long-term ENSO-like climate change, with some evidence for a temperature-precipitation divergence in ENSO-like climate over the past millennium, in particular during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; AD ˜ 800-1300) and the Little Ice Age (LIA; AD ˜ 1400-1850). This throws into question the stability of the modern ENSO system and its links to the global climate, which has implications for future projections. Here we use a new statistical approach using weighting based on empirical orthogonal function (EOF) to create two new large-scale reconstructions of ENSO-like climate change derived independently from precipitation proxies and temperature proxies. The method is developed and validated using model-derived pseudo-proxy experiments that address the effects of proxy dating error, resolution, and noise to improve uncertainty estimations. We find no evidence that temperature and precipitation disagree over the ENSO-like state over the past millennium, but neither do they agree strongly. There is no statistically significant difference between the MCA and the LIA in either reconstruction. However, the temperature reconstruction suffers from a lack of high-quality proxy records located in ENSO-sensitive regions, which limits its ability to capture the large-scale ENSO signal. Further expansion of the palaeo-database and improvements to instrumental, satellite, and model representations of

  15. Impact of the Medieval Climate Anomaly, Little Ice Age, and Recent Warming on Hydrology and Carbon Accumulation in the James Bay Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, J. R.; Booth, R. K.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructing late-Holocene hydroclimatic variations can be useful to understand the sensitivity of peatland soil carbon (C) to climate change (Bunbury et al., 2012). We reconstructed water table depth (WTD), using testate amoebae, for a four-core north to south transect of the James Bay Lowland and Boreal Shield of Ontario, Canada, and compared WTD to long-term apparent rate of C accumulation (LARCA). The three southern sites indicate that WTD fluctuated relative to the mean, with a wetter Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and drier Little Ice Age (LIA) (Fig. 1). However, the most northern site recorded a wet LIA and dry MCA (Fig. 1). All four cores recorded drying coincident with modern warming (Fig. 1). Increased Medieval moisture detected in the three southern sites is consistent with a geographic pattern of precipitation anomalies associated with La Niña-like conditions, which cause drought in the American southwest and central plains regions coupled with increased moisture in the Pacific Northwest and north of the Great Lakes (Feng et al., 2008; Seager et al., 2008). Despite the hydroclimatic sensitivity of the region, we observed no consistent relationship between variations in WTD and LARCA from the same cores. At these particular sites, at least, C accumulation has not been sensitive to the range of climatic variability associated with the MCA, LIA and recent warming. Bunbury, J., Finkelstein, S. A., & Bollmann, J. (2012). Holocene hydro-climatic change and effects on carbon accumulation inferred from a peat bog in the Attawapiskat River watershed, Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Quaternary Research: 275-284. Feng, S., Oglesby, R. J., Rowe, C. M., Loope, D. B., & Hu, Q. (2008). Atlantic and Pacific SST influences on Medieval drought in North America simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984-2012), 113(D11). Seager, R., Burgman, R., Kushnir, Y., Clement, A., Cook, E., Naik, N., & Miller, J. (2008). Tropical

  16. Climatic variability and human impact during the last 2000 years in western Mesoamerica: evidences of late Classic and Little Ice Age drought events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez-Ramírez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from biological (diatoms and ostracodes and non-biological (Ti, Ca/Ti, total inorganic carbon, magnetic susceptibility proxy analyses from an 8.8 m long laminated, high resolution (~20 yr sample−1 sediment sequence from lake Santa María del Oro (SMO, in western Mexico. This lake is at a sensitive location between the dry climates of northern Mexico, under the influence of the north Pacific High Pressure Subtropical Cell and the moister climates of central Mexico, under the influence of the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the North American Monsoon (NAM. The sequence covers that last 2000 years and gives evidence of two periods of human impact in the lake, shown by increases in Achnanthidium minutissimum, the first related with the Shaft and Chamber Tombs Cultural Tradition from 100 BC to AD 300 and a second late Postclassic occupation from AD 1100 to 1300. Both periods correspond to relatively wet conditions. The sequence also gives evidence of three dry intervals with high carbonates, ostracodes and aerophilous Eolimna minima concentrations. The first, from AD 500 to 1000 (most intense from AD 600 to 800, correlates with the end of the Shaft and Chamber Tradition after ca. AD 600. This late Classic dry period is the most important climatic signal for the Mesoamerican region during the last 2000 years, as it has been recorded at several sites from Yucatan to the Pacific coast. In the Yucatan area this dry interval has been related with the demise of the Maya culture between AD 850 and 950. The last two dry events correspond with the onset and late Little Ice Age (1400 to 1550 and 1690 to 1770, and follow the Spörer and Maunder minima in solar radiation. The first of these intervals (1400–1550 shows the most intense signal over western Mexico, however this pattern changes at other sites. Dry/wet intervals in the SMO record are related with lower/higher intensity of the NAM over this region.

  17. ENSO Variability during the Little Ice Age from the Perspective of a Long Coral Record from the Western Pacific Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereid, K. A.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Shen, C.; Banner, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Little Ice Age (LIA, ~1400-1700 CE) is a period of cool temperatures generally best expressed in records from Northern Hemisphere high latitudes, but which is variably expressed in the tropics. In particular, the nature of short-term tropical variability, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is obscured by contradictory evidence. Although central Pacific corals and some South American sedimentary records indicate an increase in ENSO activity during the LIA, tree ring records from ENSO teleconnected regions are highly variable, and lake records from the Galápagos Islands and Ecuador show reduced ENSO activity in the LIA. However, the differing resolutions, physical means for recording ENSO events, and dynamical connections to the ENSO system complicate efforts to form a coherent interpretation of these conflicting proxy records. This study addresses the need for additional LIA proxy records that resolve individual ENSO events, record climate parameters directly impacted by ENSO, and are located in core ENSO-affected regions. We investigate the nature of ENSO during the LIA by generating high-resolution climate time series from corals from Misima Island, Papua New Guinea (10.6°S, 152.8°E). Misima Island is located at the southern edge of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), an important heat and moisture source for the climate system that is highly sensitive to ENSO events. Our monthly resolved fossil coral record of δ18O and Sr/Ca variations spans the interval from ~1414-1645 CE, which we compare with similar variations in a near modern coral record (~1915-1945 CE) from this location. The fossil Misima coral δ18O record, bandpass filtered to highlight ENSO frequencies, contains multidecadal variations in ENSO amplitude, consistent with what is observed in the modern instrumental record of ENSO variability. However, the standard deviation of the fossil δ18O record is significantly reduced relative to that observed in the modern Misima coral

  18. Enhancing calculation of thin sea ice growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Igor

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the present study is to develop, generate, and integrate into operational practice a new model of ice growth. The development of this Sea Ice Growth Model for Arctic (SIGMA), a description of the theoretical foundation, the model advantages and analysis of its results are considered in the paper. The enhanced model includes two principal modifications. Surface temperature of snow on ice is defined as internal model parameter maintaining rigorous consistency between processes of atmosphere-ice thermodynamic interaction and ice growth. The snow depth on ice is naturally defined as a function of a local snowfall rate and linearly depends on time rather than ice thickness. The model was initially outlined in the Visible Infrared Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Ice Characterization Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (Appel et al., 2005) that included two different approaches to retrieve sea ice age: reflectance analysis for daytime and derivation of ice thickness using energy balance for nighttime. Only the latter method is considered in this paper. The improved account for the influence of surface temperature and snow depth increases the reliability of ice thickness calculations and is used to develop an analytical Snow Depth/Ice Thickness Look up table suitable to the VIIRS observations as well as to other instruments. The applicability of SIGMA to retrieve ice thickness from the VIIRS satellite observations and the comparison of its results with the One-dimensional Thermodynamic Ice Model (OTIM) are also considered. The comparison of the two models demonstrating the difference between their assessments of heat fluxes and radical distinction between the influences of snow depth uncertainty on errors of ice thickness calculations is of great significance to further improve the retrieval of ice thickness from satellite observations.

  19. Ancient ice streams and their megalineated beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Nick; Ross, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Ice streams are corridors of fast-flowing (~ 800 m yr- 1) ice inset within otherwise sluggish-moving ice sheets. According to reported estimates, as much as 90% of the total discharge of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, for example, occurs through such corridors. Recognition of ice stream records in paleo-ice sheet research has profoundly changed the discipline of glacial geology. The key has been identification of the distinctive corrugated or 'megalineated' geomorphology of their beds, consisting of elongate ridges that are parallel to ice flow direction and often transitional to drumlins. Access to new satellite imagery has enabled mapping of megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) over large swaths of terrain and the recognition of regional-scale ice stream flow paths and origins. At the peak of the last ice age, just after 20,000 years ago, there were more than 100 ice streams within the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Only now are we beginning to fully appreciate the fundamental role that such streams (which have been called the 'arteries' of ice sheets) have had on glaciated landscapes, by moving enormous volumes of sediment and releasing armadas of floating ice to the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. There is also a growing awareness of the erosional role of ice streams in overdeepening of lakes, fiords and other troughs along coastlines. Much remains to be learnt and new discoveries surely await. The picture of past ice sheets, like the Laurentide and Fennoscandian Ice Sheets, that is emerging today is very different from that of 20 years ago.

  20. Cold-season patterns of reserve and soluble carbohydrates in sugar maple and ice-damaged trees of two age classes following drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Wong; K. L. Baggett; A. H. Rye

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of summer drought on the composition and profiles of cold-season reserve and soluble carbohydrates in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees (50-100 years old or ~200 years old) in which the crowns were nondamaged or damaged by the 1998 ice storm. The overall cold season reserve...

  1. Diversity of cultured bacteria from the perennial ice block of Scarisoara Ice Cave, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Iţcuş

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cave ice ecosystems represent a poorly investigated glacial environment. Diversity of cave ice bacteria and their distribution in perennial ice deposits of this underground glacial habitat could constitute a proxy for microbial response to climatic and environmental changes. Scarisoara Ice Cave (Romania hosts one of the oldest and largest cave ice blocks worldwide. Here we report on cultured microbial diversity of recent, 400, and 900 years-old perennial ice from this cave, representing the first characterization of a chronological distribution of cave-ice bacteria. Total cell density measured by SYBR Green I epifluorescence microscopy varied in the 2.4 x 104 – 2.9 x 105 cells mL-1 range. The abundance of cultured bacteria (5 x 102 – 8 x 104 CFU mL-1 representing 0.3-52% of the total cell number decreased exponentially with the ice age, and was higher in organic rich ice sediments. Cultivation at 4˚C and 15˚C using BIOLOG EcoPlates revealed a higher functional diversity of cold-active bacteria, dependent on the age, sediment content and physicochemical properties of the ice. The composition dissimilarity of ice microbiota across the ice block was confirmed by growth parameter variations when cultivated in different liquid media at low and high temperatures. PCR-DGGE and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments from the cultured ice samples led to the identification of 77 bacterial amplicons belonging to Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, showing variation in distribution across the ice layers. Several identified OTUs were homologous to those identified in other glacial and karst environments and showed partial conservation across the ice block. Moreover, our survey provided a glimpse on the cave-ice hosted bacteria as putative biomarkers for past climate and environmental changes.

  2. River Ice Data Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    edge in the field of ice engineering expands. For example, ice concentration and freezeup stage are not considered by the survey respondents to...im- pacts both freezeup and breakup jam formation Table 2. Ice parameters currently monitored, by Divisions (as of 1995). Ice parameters currently...V V V V Date of ice in V V V V Ice concentration V V V V Freezeup stage V V V V V Note: Southwestern Division does not currently monitor ice

  3. Systematic investigation of factors controlling supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of spiked and aged PCBs from edible tissues of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylor, Michael O; Harvey, Ellen; Hale, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Systematic investigation of factors controlling supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of spiked and naturally incurred (aged) PCBs from edible tissues of the Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) was undertaken. Effects of extraction pressure, temperature and time, CO2 flow rate and total volume, and collection temperature were assessed. Temperature dramatically impacted extraction efficiency, especially at lower pressures. Surprisingly, extraction of both spiked and aged PCBs was flow rate dependent, counter to prevailing views regarding the relative ease of SFE of spiked versus aged contaminants from environmental matrices. PCBs were optimally trapped on a 1:1 mixture of C18-modified and porous silica at 0°C and eluted with <2 mL isooctane at 90°C. A combined 10 min static/30 min dynamic extraction at 35.5 MPa and 150°C with a CO2 flow rate of 3 mL min(-1) yielded maximum (quantitative) recoveries of spiked and aged PCBs. Resulting solvent extracts required no cleanup and could be analyzed directly by halogen-selective GC with MS confirmation.

  4. [Diagnostic performance of T-SPOT.TB on peripheral blood in combination with adenosine deaminase on pleural fluid for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy within different age group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H Y; Zhang, D Q; Ye, J R; Su, S S; Xie, Y P; Chen, C S; Li, Y P

    2017-06-27

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of T cell enzyme-linked immuno-spot assay (T-SPOT) on peripheral blood in combination with adenosine deaminase (ADA) on pleural fluid for diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) pleurisy within different age groups. Methods: The data of patients with pleural effusion from the Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine of the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from April 2012 to November 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and the diagnoses of these patients were histopathologically confirmed through medical thoracoscopy. The cases who had confirmed diagnosis, in the same time, received peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB were enrolled. The performance of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB in combination with pleural fluid ADA on diagnosing TB pleurisy in the younger patients (16-59 years old) and elderly patients (≥60 years old) were analyzed respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were adopted for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 448 cases were finally enrolled, 341(76.1%) confirmed with TB pleurisy, 224 males, 117 females, (47±19) years old; and 107 (23.9%) classified as non-TB pleurisy, 65 males, 42 females, (61±14) years old. There were 285 cases who were classified as younger group, and the other 163 cases were classified as elderly group. The sensitivity and specificity of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB were 85.4% (204/239) and 71.7% (33/46) in the younger patients, 76.5% (78/102) and 59.0% (36/61) respectively in the elderly patients. The sensitivity of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB in the younger patients was significantly higher than that in the elderly patients (P=0.047). The sensitivity and specificity were 99.2% and 95.7% in combination with peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB and pleural fluid ADA respectively in the younger patients. The area under ROC curve (AUC) of T-SPOT.TB in the younger patients was 0.833, AUC of T-SPOT.TB combined with ADA was 0

  5. Preliminary modelling study of ice accretion on wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Yin, Chungen

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges associated with cold-climate wind energy is icing on wind turbines and a series of icing-induced problems such as production loss, blade fatigue and safety issues. Because of the difficulties with on-site measurements, simulations are often used to understand and predict...... icing events. In this paper, a new methodology for prediction of icing-induced production loss is proposed, from which the fundamentals of ice accretion on wind turbines can be better understood and the operational production losses can be more reliably predicted. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD......) modelling of ice accretion on wind turbines is also performed for different ice events, resulting in a reliable framework for CFD-based ice accretion modelling which is one of the key elements in the new methodology....

  6. The Founding and Evolution of Astronomical Theory of Ice Age%冰期天文理论的创立与演变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周尚哲

    2014-01-01

    冰期天文理论是运用地球轨道偏心率、地轴倾角和地转轴进动的3种参数的变化幅度与周期来解释上新世-第四纪期间冰期-间冰期交替变化的一种理论.该理论1842年由Adhemar提出,经过Croll发展到Milankovitch最终完成,经历了整100年的时间.上世纪60年代开始,深海、黄土、冰芯等大量的地质记录都揭示出3种周期变化,证实冰期天文理论的正确性,同时也对冰期天文理论带来了一些概念上的修正.但是, Berger 计算的天文曲线至少从6 Ma以来展示同一规律的变化,然而地质记录却显示清晰的分段响应模式:41 kyr的地轴倾角周期在5.3~1.4 Ma期间一直是记录曲线的主要特征;北半球冰川作用只是在2.7 Ma BP才开始大规模出现;0.8 Ma开始100 ka周期转变为主要周期,称之为中更新世转型( MPT).还有:11阶段和全新世是2个偏心率很低的时期,但记录中却是冰期-间冰期振幅最大的时期,即大的间冰期为何出现于低偏心时期;由间冰期进入冰期比由冰期进入间冰期时来得迅速,意味大冰盖建造需要很长的时间,而消融则比较迅速.这些都是冰期天文理论本身不能解释的问题,正在由地球响应系统的研究来探索答案.%The astronomical theory of ice age provides an update solution to Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles based on the long-term variations of three earth ’ s orbital parameters , eccentricity , obliquity and precession .This theory had been under modification over one hundred years since it was suggested by Adlhemar in 1842 , developed by Croll and finished by Milankovitch in 1941.Since 1960s, numerous geological records from sea , loess and ice core have been exhibiting the three different cycles of 100kyr, 41kyr and 21kyr, demonstrating the validity of the theory , and meanwhile , brought some revisions to the theory .However , there are still a lot of

  7. Wind turbine aerodynamic response under atmospheric icing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, M.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    -four hours of icing, with time varying wind speed and atmospheric icing conditions, was simulated on a rotor. Computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, was used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of the blade after icing. The results were also validated against wind tunnel measurements performed at LM......). However, the thrust of the iced rotor in below rated wind speed is smaller than the clean rotor up to 14%, but after rated wind speed, it is up to 40% bigger than the clean rotor. Finally, it is briefly indicated how the results of this paper can be used for condition monitoring and ice detection...

  8. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...

  9. Characterization of Industrial Coolant Fluids and Continuous Ageing Monitoring by Wireless Node-Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachat, Alexandros El; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Environmentally robust chemical sensors for monitoring industrial processes or infrastructures are lately becoming important devices in industry. Low complexity and wireless enabled characteristics can offer the required flexibility for sensor deployment in adaptable sensing networks for continuous...... of sensors allowed their integration in an autonomous wireless sensing node, thus enabling the future use of the demonstrated platform in wireless sensor networks for a variety of industrial and environmental monitoring applications.......-gel derived pH sensitive coatings. The performances of the developed sensors were characterized and compared, towards their coolants' ageing monitoring capability, proving their efficiency in such a demanding application scenario and harsh industrial environment. The operating characteristics of this type...

  10. Birth cohort differences in fluid cognition in old age: comparisons of trends in levels and change trajectories over 30 years in three population-based samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Peter; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Skoog, Ingmar; Gudmundsson, Pia; Johansson, Boo

    2015-03-01

    Later-born cohorts of older adults tend to outperform earlier born on fluid cognition (i.e., Flynn effect) when measured at the same chronological ages. We investigated cohort differences in level of performance and rate of change across three population-based samples born in 1901, 1906, and 1930, drawn from the Gerontological and Geriatric Population Studies in Gothenburg, Sweden (H70), and measured on tests of logical reasoning and spatial ability at ages 70, 75, and 79 years. Estimates from multiple-group latent growth curve models (LGCM) revealed, in line with previous studies, substantial differences in level of performance where later-born cohorts outperformed earlier born cohorts. Somewhat surprisingly, later-born cohorts showed, on average, a steeper decline than the earlier-born cohort. Gender and education only partially accounted for observed cohort trends. Men outperformed women in the 1906 and 1930 cohorts but no difference was found in the 1901 cohort. More years of education was associated with improved performance in all three cohorts. Our findings confirm the presence of birth cohort effects also in old age but indicate a faster rate of decline in later-born samples. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed.

  11. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  12. Rock glacier ice as a microbial habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentine, C. E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Montross, S. N.

    2010-12-01

    Rock glaciers are ubiquitous geomorphic features in alpine environments, recognizable by a talus mantle, steep-toe, lobate shape and that flow due to the inferred presence of internal ice. Rock glaciers consist of both ice and debris, and are abundant in mountain ranges such as the Rocky Mountains, the Andes and the European Alps. Rock glacier ice has not previously been considered as a microbial habitat. However, given recent research showing debris-rich basal layers in glaciers harbor viable microbes, the debris-rich ice in a rock glacier has potential as a microbial habitat. The glacier research has demonstrated increased cell numbers in the debris rich basal ice relative to the clean glacier ice, and the finely-ground debris is considered to be a source of nutrients for the microbes. In August 2009 3 m of surface talus was excavated from the Lone Peak rock glacier, one of ~ 380 in Southwest Montana, to expose the underlying rock glacier ice. The ice contained numerous large rocks making sampling difficult, but 25 cm thick blocks with layers of clean and amber (~ 0.01% debris) ice were sampled. The isotopic, microbiological, and geochemical composition of the clean and amber ice was analyzed. The isotopic data provides some relative age dating for the ice and the geochemical data information on nutrient availability. Differences were observed between the microbial communities in the clean and amber ice by both cell counts and culturing techniques suggesting that as in glacier ice the debris-rich (amber) ice is a more amenable habitat for microbes.

  13. Refrigerating fluids; Fluides frigorigenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-03-01

    Refrigerating fluids are experiencing a real revolution since few years. CFCs with their destructive effect on the ozone layer are now prohibited while HCFCs will be progressively eliminated and replaced by HFCs. However, HFCs can contribute to the increase of the greenhouse effect. The solutions proposed by thermal engineering professionals consist in the confinement of air-conditioning installations (elimination of recurrent leaks) and in the improvement of installations efficiency. HCFC fluids like the R 22 are still widely used in air-conditioning but they are supposed to be replaced by HFC fluids like the R 134a, the R 407C or the R 410A. This short paper gives a brief presentation of these fluids and of their chemical characteristics. (J.S.)

  14. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  15. Age-related changes in electrophysiological and neuropsychological indices of working memory, attention control, and fluid intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Brumback Peltz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Older adults exhibit great variability in their cognitive abilities, with some maintaining high levels of performance on executive control tasks and others showing significant deficits. Previous event-related potential (ERP work has shown that some of these performance differences are correlated with persistence of the novelty/frontal P3 in older adults elicited by task-relevant events, presumably reflecting variability in the capacity to suppress orienting to unexpected but no longer novel events. In recent ERP work in young adults, we showed that the operation-span task (OSPAN, a measure of attention control is predictive of the ability of individuals to keep track of stimulus sequencing and to maintain running mental representations of task stimuli, as indexed by the parietally-distributed P300 (or P3b. Both of these phenomena reflect aspects of frontal function (cognitive flexibility and attention control, respectively. To investigate these phenomena we sorted both younger and older adults into low- and high-working memory spans and low- and high-cognitive flexibility subgroups, and examined ERPs during an equal-probability choice reaction-time task. For both age groups (a participants with high OSPAN scores were better able to keep track of stimulus sequencing, as indicated by their smaller P3b to sequential changes; and (b participants with lower cognitive flexibility had larger P3a than their high-scoring counterparts. However, these two phenomena did not interact suggesting that they manifest dissociable control mechanisms. Further, the fact that both effects are already visible in younger adults suggests that at least some of the brain mechanisms underlying individual differences in cognitive aging may already operate early in life.

  16. Flow properties of ice cream mix prepared from palm oil: anhydrous milk fat blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnani, A I Wan; Aini, I Nor; Yazid, A M M; Dzulkifly, M H

    2007-05-15

    Ice cream mixes containing 33.4% total solids including 10% fat, 11.1% milk solid-non fat (MSNF), 12% sugar, 0.35% commercial blend of emulsifier/ stabiliser and water were produced. The blending of PO with AMF were conducted at three different ratios 30: 70, 50: 50 and 70: 30, respectively. The experimental ice cream mixes were compared with a control ice cream mix prepared from AMF. The flow properties were measured after ageing at 0, 1, 1.5, 2 and 24 h and determined using a controlled stress rheometer (Haake RS 100). The Power Law and Casson equation was employed to estimate the yield stress of an ice cream mixes. The regression coefficients (r) was represented well by the Casson model (r > 0.99) for all the samples, indicating goodness of fit. The profiles of the consistency coefficients (K(c)) were quite similar for all experimental samples, which could be attributed to the fact that all the samples exhibited similar viscoelastic behaviour. The flow behaviour index (n) of an ice cream mix prepared from PO and their blends with AMF were less then 1.0 (range 0.04-0.08) indicating that they were psuedoplastic fluid. The eta(o) at shear rate 20(-1) indicated higher degree of viscosity in AMF.

  17. Effect of 1 night of total sleep deprivation on cerebrospinal fluid β-amyloid 42 in healthy middle-aged men: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Sharon; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Besse, Kees; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Verbeek, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a relationship between poor sleep and the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. A previous study found an effect of sleep on β-amyloid (Aβ), which is a key protein in Alzheimer disease pathology. To determine the effect of 1 night of total sleep deprivation on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 protein levels in healthy middle-aged men. The Alzheimer, Wakefulness, and Amyloid Kinetics (AWAKE) study at the Radboud Alzheimer Center, a randomized clinical trial that took place between June 1, 2012, and October 1, 2012. Participants were cognitively normal middle-aged men (40-60 years of age) with normal sleep (n = 26) recruited from the local population. Participants were randomized to 1 night with unrestricted sleep (n = 13) or 1 night of total sleep deprivation (24 hours of wakefulness) (n = 13). Sleep was monitored using continuous polysomnographic recording from 3 pm until 10 am. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected using an intrathecal catheter at defined times to compare cerebral Aβ42 concentrations between evening and morning. A night of unrestricted sleep led to a 6% decrease in Aβ42 levels of 25.3 pg/mL (95% CI [0.94, 49.6], P = .04), whereas sleep deprivation counteracted this decrease. When accounting for the individual trajectories of Aβ42 over time, a difference of 75.8 pg/mL of Aβ42 was shown between the unrestricted sleep and sleep deprivation group (95% CI [3.4, 148.4], P = .04). The individual trajectories of evening and morning Aβ42 concentrations differed between the unrestricted sleep and sleep deprivation groups (P = .04) in contrast to stable Aβ40, tau, and total protein levels. Sleep deprivation, or prolonged wakefulness, interferes with a physiological morning decrease in Aβ42. We hypothesize that chronic sleep deprivation increases cerebral Aβ42 levels, which elevates the risk of Alzheimer disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01194713.

  18. Ice Crystal Icing Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2017-01-01

    Ice crystals found at high altitude near convective clouds are known to cause jet engine power-loss events. These events occur due to ice crystals entering a propulsion systems core flowpath and accreting ice resulting in events such as uncommanded loss of thrust (rollback), engine stall, surge, and damage due to ice shedding. As part of a community with a growing need to understand the underlying physics of ice crystal icing, NASA has been performing experimental efforts aimed at providing datasets that can be used to generate models to predict the ice accretion inside current and future engine designs. Fundamental icing physics studies on particle impacts, accretion on a single airfoil, and ice accretions observed during a rollback event inside a full-scale engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory are summarized. Low fidelity code development using the results from the engine tests which identify key parameters for ice accretion risk and the development of high fidelity codes are described. These activities have been conducted internal to NASA and through collaboration efforts with industry, academia, and other government agencies. The details of the research activities and progress made to date in addressing ice crystal icing research challenges are discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of mechanical breakup of river ice-cover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; HE Liang; CHEN Pang-pang; SUI Jueyi

    2013-01-01

    Ice jams and ice dams in rivers will cause significant rises of water levels.Under extreme conditions,the ice flooding during winter or early spring may occur.In this paper,by considering the fluid-solid coupling effect caused by the water and the ice cover,the mechanisms of the mechanical breakup of the river ice cover are studied.A formula is obtained for determining whether or not the mechanical breakup process would happen under the hydraulic pressure of the flow.Combined with the hydraulic model under the ice covered flow,a numerical model is built and the interaction between the discharge,the hydraulic pressure under the ice cover and the date for the mechanical breakup of the river ice cover is simulated.The simulated results of the dates for the mechanical breakup of the river ice cover agree very well with the field observations of the breakups of the river ice cover in the Hequ Reach of the Yellow River.Therefore,the numerical model might serve as a good preliminary step in studying the breakup of the river ice-cover,evidencing many important parameters that affect the ice-cover process.

  20. Facility for testing ice drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Delahunty, Chris; Goodge, John W.; Severinghaus, Jeffery P.

    2017-05-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) is designed for subsurface scientific investigations in Antarctica. Its objectives are to drill rapidly through ice, to core samples of the transition zone and bedrock, and to leave behind a borehole observatory. These objectives required the engineering and fabrication of an entirely new drilling system that included a modified mining-style coring rig, a unique fluid circulation system, a rod skid, a power unit, and a workshop with areas for the storage of supplies and consumables. An important milestone in fabrication of the RAID was the construction of a North American Test (NAT) facility where we were able to test drilling and fluid processing functions in an environment that is as close as possible to that expected in Antarctica. Our criteria for site selection was that the area should be cold during the winter months, be located in an area of low heat flow, and be at relatively high elevation. We selected a site for the facility near Bear Lake, Utah, USA. The general design of the NAT well (NAT-1) started with a 27.3 cm (10.75 in.) outer casing cemented in a 152 m deep hole. Within that casing, we hung a 14 cm (5.5 in.) casing string, and, within that casing, a column of ice was formed. The annulus between the 14 and 27.3 cm casings provided the path for circulation of a refrigerant. After in-depth study, we chose to use liquid CO2 to cool the hole. In order to minimize the likelihood of the casing splitting due to the volume increase associated with freezing water, the hole was first cooled and then ice was formed in increments from the bottom upward. First, ice cubes were placed in the inner liner and then water was added. Using this method, a column of ice was incrementally prepared for drilling tests. The drilling tests successfully demonstrated the functioning of the RAID system. Reproducing such a facility for testing of other ice drilling systems could be advantageous to other research programs in the future.

  1. Amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carefully. Removing a sample of the fluid through amniocentesis can provide information about the sex, health, and development of the fetus. Images Amniocentesis Amniotic fluid Polyhydramnios Amniotic fluid References Cunningham FG, ...

  2. What am I? Supercooled droplet or ice?

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, Carlo; Maitra, Tanmoy; Tiwari, Manish K; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show the trick played by a supercooled liquid water drop against a superhydrophobic surface. The water drop shows a double personality, impacting onto the surface the first time while still in the liquid state, and then re-impacting as a frozen ice crystal.

  3. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  4. Challenges in validating model results for first year ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Arne; Eastwood, Steinar; Xie, Jiping; Aaboe, Signe; Bertino, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of model results for the distribution of first year ice, a comparison with a product based on observations from satellite-borne instruments has been performed. Such a comparison is not straightforward due to the contrasting algorithms that are used in the model product and the remote sensing product. The implementation of the validation is discussed in light of the differences between this set of products, and validation results are presented. The model product is the daily updated 10-day forecast from the Arctic Monitoring and Forecasting Centre in CMEMS. The forecasts are produced with the assimilative ocean prediction system TOPAZ. Presently, observations of sea ice concentration and sea ice drift are introduced in the assimilation step, but data for sea ice thickness and ice age (or roughness) are not included. The model computes the age of the ice by recording and updating the time passed after ice formation as sea ice grows and deteriorates as it is advected inside the model domain. Ice that is younger than 365 days is classified as first year ice. The fraction of first-year ice is recorded as a tracer in each grid cell. The Ocean and Sea Ice Thematic Assembly Centre in CMEMS redistributes a daily product from the EUMETSAT OSI SAF of gridded sea ice conditions which include "ice type", a representation of the separation of regions between those infested by first year ice, and those infested by multi-year ice. The ice type is parameterized based on data for the gradient ratio GR(19,37) from SSMIS observations, and from the ASCAT backscatter parameter. This product also includes information on ambiguity in the processing of the remote sensing data, and the product's confidence level, which have a strong seasonal dependency.

  5. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  6. Development of CFD-based icing model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Martinez, Benjamin; Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    Operation of wind turbines in cold climate areas is challenged by icing-induced problems, such as loss of production, safety issues and blade fatique. Production losses are especially a big issue in Sweden, and due to difficulties with on-site measurements, simulations are often used to get...... an understanding and to predict icing events. In this paper a case study of modeling icing using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is proposed. The case study aims to form the basic of a general CFD model for icing on wind turbine blade sections....

  7. On underwater sound reflection from layered ice sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Hobæk, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    Reflection of sound from ice sheets floating on water is simulated using Thomson and Haskell's method of matrix propagation. The reflection coefficient is computed as a function of incidence angle and frequency for selected ice parameters of a uniform sheet and two layered ice sheets. At some incidence angles and frequencies the reflection coefficient has very low values. It is shown that this is related to generation of Lamb waves in the ice. The matrix propagation method also provides a dispersion equation for a plate loaded with fluid on one side and vacuum on the other. Finally the concept of beam displacement is briefly discussed.

  8. Arctic ice islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Large scale facies change in the middle Eocene South-Pyrenean foreland basin: The role of tectonics and prelude to Cenozoic ice-ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Damien; Castelltort, Sébastien; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Serra-Kiel, Josep; Filleaudeau, Pierre-Yves; Emmanuel, Laurent; Berthier, Benoît; Renard, Maurice

    2012-05-01

    The present study reports a sedimentological analysis of the Guara Limestone Formation deposited during the Lutetian in the Sierras Exteriores, in the South-Pyrenean foreland basin. We provide a detailed facies analysis of the carbonates to precise the paleoenvironmental context during their deposition. We show that those limestones are mainly composed of shallow-water foraminifers and were deposited in relative shallow-water environments (Jaca basin, this event correlates with a marked increase in subsidence rate. However, this deformation event is local and the carbonate systems in the Pyrenean foreland resisted to many deformation events during the whole basin history before. Paleobathymetric reconstructions in the Jaca basin, where shallow marine sections outcrop, suggest an increase of the amplitude of high-frequency sea-level cycles. This increase is contemporaneous with several climatic evidences, which suggest the appearance of early ice-sheets near the Lutetian-Bartonian boundary. The demise of carbonate producers seems, therefore, to be the result of a major environmental shift in the basin accompanying increased subsidence rates, switching from low nutrient oligotrophic conditions - favourable for shallow water benthic foraminifers - to eutrophic conditions due to the increase of erosion and terrigenous nutrient input associated with higher-frequency sea-level changes and river destabilization.

  10. New IceTracker Tool Depicts Forward and Backward Arctic Sea Ice Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Campbell, G.; Tremblay, B.; Newton, R.; Meier, W.

    2013-12-01

    The IceTracker allows researchers, educators and the public to depict the forward drift trajectories of sea ice, as well as back trajectories showing the path the ice took to the specified location. Users enter in the location and date of an ice parcel - or parcels -- of interest, then select a later or earlier date, depending on whether they want to see the forward or the backward trajectory. The database for the IceTracker contains ice motion vectors based upon a pattern recognition algorithm applied to images of sea ice derived from microwave satellite data. Ice motion vector plots are single day motion estimates. The available database starts November 1978 and runs to the present with ca. 1 month delay. IceTracker output includes both an image of the ice motion path as well as a data file that has quasi-daily date, latitude, longitude, estimated sea ice age, ice drift speed, mean air temperature, and water depth. One can overlay different days on the same plot in different colors for comparing different seasons. This presentation highlights research, education, and outreach applications of the tool. Research applications include estimating the origin and melt location of sediment and contaminants sampled on or in sea ice, assessing potential trajectories oil spilled in ice-infested waters, documenting seasonal and interannual variability in ice drift trajectories from specific locations, defining the typical origins of ice that tend to melt in an area of interest, such as a polynya, and assessing the deviation from drift of polar bear foraging. The IceTracker can also be used in the social sciences, for example recreating Nansen's historic 1893-1896 trans-Arctic drift with the Fram under modern conditions and considering the implications of alternative fates. Educational purposes include teaching students about ice dynamics and interannual variability by setting up team competitions to be the first to reach the North Pole or some other location. Applications

  11. Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctic Ice and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Antarctic ice and clouds, (56.5S, 152.0W), the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica is almost totally clear, showing stress cracks in the ice surface caused by wind and tidal drift. Clouds on the eastern edge of the picture are associated with an Antarctic cyclone. Winds stirred up these storms have been known to reach hurricane force.

  12. 冰区老龄平台整体时变可靠性分析与更新%Analyzing and updating on the global time-dependent reliability for ageing platforms in ice zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈团海; 陈国明; 林红

    2011-01-01

    建立了冰区老龄平台整体时变可靠性分析模型,并基于Bayes理论研究平台时变可靠性更新方法.根据现场实测冰力时程曲线,将冰载过程简化为具有随机强度和时间间隔的脉冲序列,利用泊松点过程描述冰载发生次数;采用平台极限状态时的基底剪力作为平台整体抗力指标,运用Weibull函数腐蚀模型预测平台抗力衰减;基于条件概率与载荷-强度干涉理论,建立冰区老龄平台整体时变可靠性微分方程,导出时变可靠性与失效率函数分析模型;给出基于Bayes理论对平台抗力衰减影响因子进行修正的方法,通过修正抗力衰减模型对老龄平台可靠性进行更新.分析渤海一冰区平台的时变可靠性,并利用检测数据进行可靠性更新.研究结果表明,随着服役时间的增加,平台可靠性迅速下降,失效率在初期缓慢增大,达到一定服役期后迅速上升.抗力衰减模型对平台可靠性与失效率的评估均有较大影响.随着更新次数的增加,平台抗力衰减函数概率分散性减小,可靠性与失效率准确度提高.%Since the number of ageing platforms increased rapidly and ageing effects would imperil the safety and service ability of structures, the present paper brought forward an analysis model for the global time-dependent reliability of ageing platforms in ice zones and investigated update ways of the time-variation reliability based on the Bayesian theory. The ice-load process was simplified to be a pulse sequence with random intensity and intervals and the occurrence number of ice loads was described by the Poisson point process according to probabilistic characteristics of load intervals. The base shear force in the ultimate limit state was taken as a whole resistant index for offshore platforms and a corrosion model with the Weibull function expression was employed to study the resistance degradation of platforms. Based on the conditional probability model and

  13. A Sub-Decadal Continental Margin Record of Little Ice Age-to-Modern Climate-Induced Changes in Sediment Delivery and Transport in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, J. M.; Viene, W.; Finney, B.; Stoner, J.; Evans, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Gulf of Alaska (GOA) margin is one of the few locations on Earth where orogenic processes, glacial climate, and continental margin sedimentation can be studied and quantitatively modeled in unison. Climatic changes control glacial dynamics, erosion, and sediment/meltwater fluxes to the ocean, and GOA margin strata appear to preserve a strong record of terrestrial climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation) as well as paleoceanographic signals on seasonal to tectonic time scales. In collaboration with the GOA-NEP GLOBEC program, gravity cores were collected at key sampling sites under the influence of the climatically sensitive Alaska Coastal Current (ACC). Chronologies for the past 400-y were established using Pb-210/Cs-137, coupled with paleo-and-environmental magnetism analyzed from u-channel samples at one-cm intervals. The sedimentary paleomagnetic record is correlated to the Sitka geomagnetic observatory record for the last century and extended using the Jackson et al. 400-yr global field model. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, C/N ratios and opal concentrations were analyzed to determine OM source and paleoproductivity. Proximal to large sediment sources, high (>1 cm/y) sediment accumulation rates vary over decadal times scales and appear to be directly tied to the amount of coastal precipitation and the corresponding strength of the ACC. Distal shelf cores have sedimentation rates that vary over longer time scales and are 2-3 x higher during glacial melting from LIA maxima. High-resolution grain size analyses and core logging of bulk density and environmental magnetic parameters including magnetic susceptibility vary at LIA, pentadecadal, and decadal time scales and are strongly correlated with variability in regional precipitation as seen in the nearby Mt. Logan ice core record. Preliminary results suggest that the amount of freshwater discharge and corresponding strength of the ACC was substantially higher during the LIA.

  14. Capabilities and performance of Elmer/Ice, a new-generation ice sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gagliardini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fourth IPCC Assessment Report concluded that ice sheet flow models, in their current state, were unable to provide accurate forecast for the increase of polar ice sheet discharge and the associated contribution to sea level rise. Since then, the glaciological community has undertaken a huge effort to develop and improve a new generation of ice flow models, and as a result a significant number of new ice sheet models have emerged. Among them is the parallel finite-element model Elmer/Ice, based on the open-source multi-physics code Elmer. It was one of the first full-Stokes models used to make projections for the evolution of the whole Greenland ice sheet for the coming two centuries. Originally developed to solve local ice flow problems of high mechanical and physical complexity, Elmer/Ice has today reached the maturity to solve larger-scale problems, earning the status of an ice sheet model. Here, we summarise almost 10 yr of development performed by different groups. Elmer/Ice solves the full-Stokes equations, for isotropic but also anisotropic ice rheology, resolves the grounding line dynamics as a contact problem, and contains various basal friction laws. Derived fields, like the age of the ice, the strain rate or stress, can also be computed. Elmer/Ice includes two recently proposed inverse methods to infer badly known parameters. Elmer is a highly parallelised code thanks to recent developments and the implementation of a block preconditioned solver for the Stokes system. In this paper, all these components are presented in detail, as well as the numerical performance of the Stokes solver and developments planned for the future.

  15. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif; Backman, Jan; Björk, Göran; Cronin, Thomas M; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Barrientos Macho, Natalia; Cherniykh, Denis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Björn; Flodén, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Örjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-18

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (∼ 140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  16. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif G.; Backman, Jan; Bjork, Goran; Cronin, Thomas M.; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Macho, Natalia Barrientos; Cherniykh, Dennis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Bjorn; Floden, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Orjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (~140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  17. The Paleozoic Dust Bowl: Dust Deposition in Tropical Western Pangaea (Midcontinent U.S.) at the Terminus of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreghan, G. S.; Heavens, N. G.; Benison, K. C.; Soreghan, M. J.; Mahowald, N. M.; Foster, T.; Zambito, J.; Sweet, A.; Kane, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric dust is well recognized and studied as both an archive and agent of climate change in Earth's relatively recent past. Archives of past dust include loess deposits and dust recovered from ocean- and ice-cores. Dust remains poorly known in Earth's past prior to the Cenozoic, but is increasingly recognized in the form of paleo-loess deposits, and (epeiric) marine strata that accumulated isolated from fluvio-deltaic influx. Here, we report on the growing recognition of voluminous dust deposits preserved in the Permian record of the U.S. Midcontinent (western tropical Pangaea). Fine-grained redbeds predominate in Permian strata throughout the U.S. Midcontinent, but notably in a swath extending from Oklahoma through South Dakota. These units consist predominantly of red mudstone and siltstone in commonly massive units, but sedimentary structures and bedding that signal aqueous processes (e.g. laminations, ripples) have led most to infer deltaic or tidal deposition. The absence of channel systems to deliver the sediment, as well as the predominantly massive and laterally continuous character and the uniform fine grain size signal wind transport, implying that these units record sustained dust deposition overprinted at times by sub-aqueous deposition in lakes, including ephemeral saline and acid lakes that led to evaporite cementation. Detrital zircon geochronology indicates that much of the dust originated in the relatively distant Appalachian-Ouachita orogenic systems, which formed part of the central Pangaean mountains (CPM), the collisional zone that sutured the supercontinent. Within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma, Permian redbeds record >2 km of predominantly dust deposition, some of the thickest dust deposits yet documented in Earth's record. Yet the tropical setting is remarkably non-uniformitarian, as much Quaternary loess occurs in mid- to high-latitude regions, commonly linked to glacial genesis. We are currently investigating with both data and

  18. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  19. Dead-ice environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Kötlujökull transports considerable amounts of supraglacial debris at its snout because of frontal oscillations with frequent ice advances followed by ice-margin stagnation. Kötlujökull provides suitable conditions of studying dead-ice melting and landscape formation in a debris-charged lowland...... glacier environment. The scientific challenges are to answer the key questions. What are the conditions for dead-ice formation? From which sources does the sediment cover originate? Which melting and reworking processes act in the ice-cored moraines? What is the rate of de-icing in the ice-cored moraines...... and conclusions on dead-ice melting and landscape formation from Kötlujökull. Processes and landform-sediment associations are linked to the current climate and glacier–volcano interaction....

  20. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  1. Forecast Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Forecast Icing Product (FIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The FIP algorithm uses...

  2. Current Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Current Icing Product (CIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The CIP algorithm combines...

  3. Ice Adhesion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Uses Evaluate and compare the relative performance of materials and surfcae coating based on their ability to aid in ice removal Test the effectiveness of de-icing...

  4. Elemental analysis of human amniotic fluid and placenta by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: child weight and maternal age dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Custódio, P. J.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2001-11-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate the possible influence of the mother's age in trace element concentrations in human amniotic fluid and placenta and whether these concentrations are correlated to the weight of the newborn infants. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyze 16 amniotic fluid samples, and the placenta samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The whole samples were collected during delivery from healthy mothers and healthy infants and full-term pregnancies. According to the age of the mother, three different groups were considered: 20-25, 25-30 and 30-40 years old. Only two mothers were aged more than 35 years. The weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg and three groups were also considered: 2.5-3, 3-3.5 and 3.5-4 kg. The organic matrix of the amniotic fluid samples was removed by treatment with HNO 3 followed by oxygen plasma ashing. Yttrium was used as the internal standard for TXRF analysis. Placenta samples were lyophilized and analyzed by EDXRF without any chemical treatment. Very low levels of Ni and Sr were found in the amniotic fluid samples, and were independent of the age of the mother and weight of the child. Cr, Mn, Se and Pb were at the level of the detection limit. Zn, considered one of the key elements in neonatal health, was not significantly different in the samples analyzed; however, it was weakly related to birth weigh. The concentrations obtained ranged from 0.11 to 0.92 mg/l and 30 to 65 μg/g in amniotic fluid and placenta, respectively. The only two elements which seemed to be significantly correlated with mother's age and newborn weight were Ca and Fe for both types of sample: Ca levels were increased in heavier children and older mothers; however, Fe increased with increasing maternal age, but decreased for heavier babies. The same conclusions were obtained for placenta and amniotic fluid samples. Cu is closely associated with Fe in its function in the organism

  5. Numerical investigation on super-cooled large droplet icing of fan rotor blade in jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Icing (or ice accretion) is a phenomenon in which super-cooled water droplets impinge and accrete on a body. It is well known that ice accretion on blades and vanes leads to performance degradation and has caused severe accidents. Although various anti-icing and deicing systems have been developed, such accidents still occur. Therefore, it is important to clarify the phenomenon of ice accretion on an aircraft and in a jet engine. However, flight tests for ice accretion are very expensive, and in the wind tunnel it is difficult to reproduce all climate conditions where ice accretion can occur. Therefore, it is expected that computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can estimate ice accretion in various climate conditions, will be a useful way to predict and understand the ice accretion phenomenon. On the other hand, although the icing caused by super-cooled large droplets (SLD) is very dangerous, the numerical method has not been established yet. This is why SLD icing is characterized by splash and bounce phenomena of droplets and they are very complex in nature. In the present study, we develop an ice accretion code considering the splash and bounce phenomena to predict SLD icing, and the code is applied to a fan rotor blade. The numerical results with and without the SLD icing model are compared. Through this study, the influence of the SLD icing model is numerically clarified.

  6. Superhydrophobic nanocomposite surface topography and ice adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexander; Yeong, Yong Han; Steele, Adam; Bayer, Ilker S; Loth, Eric

    2014-06-25

    A method to reduce the surface roughness of a spray-casted polyurethane/silica/fluoroacrylic superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating was demonstrated. By changing the main slurry carrier fluid, fluoropolymer medium, surface pretreatment, and spray parameters, we achieved arithmetic surface roughness values of 8.7, 2.7, and 1.6 μm on three test surfaces. The three surfaces displayed superhydrophobic performance with modest variations in skewness and kurtosis. The arithmetic roughness level of 1.6 μm is the smoothest superhydrophobic surface yet produced with these spray-based techniques. These three nanocomposite surfaces, along with a polished aluminum surface, were impacted with a supercooled water spray in icing conditions, and after ice accretion occurred, each was subjected to a pressurized tensile test to measure ice-adhesion. All three superhydrophobic surfaces showed lower ice adhesion than that of the polished aluminum surface. Interestingly, the intermediate roughness surface yielded the best performance, which suggests that high kurtosis and shorter autocorrelation lengths improve performance. The most ice-phobic nanocomposite showed a 60% reduction in ice-adhesion strength when compared to polished aluminum.

  7. The Arctic Ocean ice balance - A Kalman smoother estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. R.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology of Kalman filtering and smoothing is used to integrate a 7-year time series of buoy-derived ice motion fields and satellite passive microwave observations. The result is a record of the concentrations of open water, first-year ice, and multiyear ice that we believe is better than the estimates based on the microwave data alone. The Kalman procedure interprets the evolution of the ice cover in terms of advection, melt, growth, ridging, and aging of first-year into multiyear ice. Generally, the regions along the coasts of Alaska and Siberia and the area just north of Fram Strait are sources of first-year ice, with the rest of the Arctic Ocean acting as a sink for first-year ice via ridging and aging. All the Arctic Ocean except for the Beaufort and Chukchi seas is a source of multiyear ice, with the Chukchi being the only internal multiyear ice sink. Export through Fram Strait is a major ice sink, but we find only about two-thirds the export and greater interannual variation than found in previous studies. There is no discernible trend in the area of multiyear ice in the Arctic Ocean during the 7 years.

  8. Ice Cream Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Ice cream headaches By Mayo Clinic Staff Ice cream headaches are brief, stabbing headaches that can happen when you eat, drink or inhale something cold. Digging into an ice cream cone is a common trigger, but eating or ...

  9. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  10. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  11. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  12. Linking sulfate and phyllosilicate formation at Mawrth Vallis: Weathering in ancient low-latitude ice deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Michalski, J.

    2009-12-01

    A currently outstanding question in martian geology is the mechanism by which large and numerous deposits of sulfate-rich and phyllosilicate-rich sedimentary rocks were generated. Hypotheses proposed to explain the origin of layered, sulfate-rich sediments at Meridiani Planum include: a) alteration by acidic fluids in a shallow and intermittently wet groundwater/playa/sebkha system, b) alteration of volcanic ash-flows by acidic sulfur-rich gases, c) reworking of sulfate-rich material by impact base surge, and d) acidic weathering within massive low-latitude ice deposits. We favor the ice-weathering model because this scenario can best explain the geologic and geochemical observations made from orbit and the surface. In addition, this model is in accord with an emerging picture of Mars in which ice-related processes have driven many aspects of sedimentation through time. The ice weathering model may also be relevant for understanding the origin of phyllosilicate deposits located beneath the sulfate-rich deposits at Meridiani Planum as well as at Mawrth Vallis. The Mawrth Vallis phyllosilicate deposits have several special characteristics: they are laterally extensive - occurring within stratigraphic windows over >~2*106 km2, and the mineralogical stratigraphy is the same everywhere that they are observed (Al-phyllosilicates overlying Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates). These observations can only be explained by a process that operated on a large spatial scale, just as with the sulfate deposits at Meridiani. However, if there were in fact massive ice deposits at low latitudes as called for in the Meridiani ice-weathering model, basal melting of these deposits may have driven a large regional groundwater system. Groundwater derived from extensive basal melting would likely have been alkaline due to increased water-rock interaction and increased dilution of the acid present in the ice deposit. Thus, the mineralogical stratigraphy could be explained by this alkaline groundwater

  13. Reconstructing the temperature regime of the Weichselian ice sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmlund, P. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Geography

    1997-04-01

    Areas in Sweden are described, where the ice could have been at the pressure melting point during the last ice age. In order to calculate probable degrees of glacial erosion, estimates on the time of ice coverage and the temperature distribution in time are combined data on erosion rates from present day glaciers. An estimate of the extent of ice cover can be made using the proxy temperature record from the Greenland ice cores and a model of the ice sheet. Adding the estimations on climate and ice sheet shape outlined in this contribution, to erosion figures we may conclude that the crucial areas for glaciation erosion are within the mountains and where the present Baltic and the Gulf of Bothnia are situated. At these sites erosion rates of some tens of meters may have occurred. In inland northern Sweden and inland southern Sweden the potential for glacial erosion seems to be small. 14 refs.

  14. Towards a CFD Model for Prediction of Wind Turbine Power Losses due to Icing in Cold Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Sørensen, Henrik

    Icing induced power losses is an important issue when operating wind turbines in cold climate. This paper presents a concept of modelling ice accretion on wind turbines using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The modelling concept works towards unifying the processes of modelling ice accretion...... and the aerodynamic analysis of the iced object into one CFD-based icing model. Modelling of icing and obtaining ice shapes in combination with mesh update by surface boundary displacement was demonstrated in the paper. It has been done by expressing in-cloud icing in CFD by an Eulerian multiphase model, implementing...... an icing module into the CFD solution and finally by surface boundary displacement also included in the CFD solution. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT and user-defined functions. The naca profile, NACA64618, has been used to illustrate the functionality of the model. Running ice accretion...

  15. Arctic ice management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Smith, Nathan; Groppi, Christopher; Vargas, Perry; Jackson, Rebecca; Kalyaan, Anusha; Nguyen, Peter; Probst, Luke; Rubin, Mark E.; Singleton, Heather; Spacek, Alexander; Truitt, Amanda; Zaw, Pye Pye; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2017-01-01

    As the Earth's climate has changed, Arctic sea ice extent has decreased drastically. It is likely that the late-summer Arctic will be ice-free as soon as the 2030s. This loss of sea ice represents one of the most severe positive feedbacks in the climate system, as sunlight that would otherwise be reflected by sea ice is absorbed by open ocean. It is unlikely that CO2 levels and mean temperatures can be decreased in time to prevent this loss, so restoring sea ice artificially is an imperative. Here we investigate a means for enhancing Arctic sea ice production by using wind power during the Arctic winter to pump water to the surface, where it will freeze more rapidly. We show that where appropriate devices are employed, it is possible to increase ice thickness above natural levels, by about 1 m over the course of the winter. We examine the effects this has in the Arctic climate, concluding that deployment over 10% of the Arctic, especially where ice survival is marginal, could more than reverse current trends of ice loss in the Arctic, using existing industrial capacity. We propose that winter ice thickening by wind-powered pumps be considered and assessed as part of a multipronged strategy for restoring sea ice and arresting the strongest feedbacks in the climate system.

  16. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology.

  17. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  18. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    is not shut down for its protection. We also found that there is a a large spread across the various turbines within a wind park, in the amount of icing. This is currently not taken into account by our model. Evaluating and adding these small scale differences to the model will be undertaken as future work....... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine......In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...

  19. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  20. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  1. Icing Operations - De-Icing Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Procházka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ice, frost and snow on aircraft surfaces can drastically reduce the climb and maneuvering capabilities of an aircraft. The removal of such contamination prior to take off MUST be strictly adhered to in accordance with regulations and standards. The policy with respect to aircraft icing contamination should be “MAKE IT CLEAN AND KEEP IT CLEAN”. All personnel associated with the dispatch and/or operation of aircraft share the responsibility for ensuring that no aircraft is dispatched unless it is clear of ice, snow or frost.

  2. Palaeoclimatological and palaeolimnological records from fossil midges and tree-rings: the role of the North Atlantic Oscillation in eastern Finland through the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, Tomi P.; Helama, Samuli

    2010-08-01

    Hydrological changes and air temperature variability are reconstructed from the sediments of Lake Pieni-Kauro, eastern Finland during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and Little Ice Age (LIA) using transfer functions derived from midge (Insecta: Nematocera)-based calibration models. The reconstructions are compared with a regional tree-ring chronology and sediment physical properties are determined to track depositional changes. An objective of the study is to examine the long-term relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and climate (temperature, precipitation). Our results show that the MCA was characterized by warm and dry summer conditions, which were accompanied by changes in the sediment magnetic susceptibility values most likely representing major forest fires during the tree-ring indicated MCA megadrought. However, the midge-based stream flow reconstruction shows increased values during the MCA, thus implying enhanced spring floods after snowy winters. During the LIA, the tree-ring data indicate that a generally wetter climate prevailed during summers, but the stream flow reconstruction indicates less snowy winters. In the terms of long-term climatology, the present results show support to the concept that the NAO has a positive correlation between winter precipitation and annual temperature and a negative correlation between summer precipitation in eastern Finland. Thus, the results may serve as important background data for global change assessments.

  3. Land Ice: Greenland & Antarctic ice mass anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from NASA's Grace satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are losing mass. The continent of Antarctica (left chart) has been...

  4. Numerical calculation of air velocity and temperature in ice rinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellache, O.; Galanis, N. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada); Ouzzane, M.; Sunye, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Varennes, PQ (Canada). CANMET Energy Diversification Laboratory

    2002-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to predict the energy consumption at an ice rink. Ice rinks in Canada consume approximately 3500 GWh of electricity annually and generate about 300,000 tons of gases contributing to the greenhouse effect. This newly developed model also considers ice quality and comfort conditions in the arena. The typical 2D configuration includes refrigeration loads as well as heat transfer coefficients between the air and the ice. The effects of heat losses through the ice rink envelope are also determined. A comparison of prediction results from 4 different formulations confirms that there are important differences in air velocities near the walls and in the temperature gradient near the ice. The turbulent mixed convection model gives the best estimate of the refrigeration load. It was determined that a good ventilation should circulate air throughout the building to avoid stagnant areas. Air velocities must be low near the stands where the temperature should be around 20 degrees C. Air temperature near the ice should be low to preserve ice quality and to reduce the refrigeration load. The complexity of this geometry has been taken into account in a numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic and thermal fields in the ice rink. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Anti-Icing Formulas Prevent Train Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the winter of 2009, Washington, DC, workers faced the prospect of a difficult commute due to record-setting snowfalls. But thousands of the city's Metrorail riders found the public transportation system fully functional, thanks in part to a NASA technology invented years before. Just like trains, an airplane must be snow- and ice-free to ensure safe travel. Traditionally, fluids containing a compound called ethylene glycol have been used to inhibit ice on planes. In 1992, however, the US Air Force banned its purchase of this ingredient due to toxicity concerns. According to the Centers for Disease Control, exposure to large amounts of ethylene glycol through air or water can damage the kidneys, nervous system, lungs, and heart. Urine samples from airport deicing workers have contained traces of the substance. At the time of the Air Force s ban, Robert Lockyer was working at NASA s Ames Research Center in the Advanced Composites Model Development Branch, where he says "we decided to pick up the gauntlet and began researching existing fluid compositions and the processes used in deicing aircraft." Along with Lockyer, in 1997 Ames researchers Leonard Haslim and John Zuk devised a nontoxic, biodegradable, and cost effective substitute for ethylene glycol. When applied to a dry surface before a snow or ice event, the solution prevented ice from forming a bond with the surface. This made it easy to wipe away any accumulation.

  6. Ice Jams in Alaska. Ice Engineering. Number 16, February 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    An ice jam is an accumulation of ice in rivers that restricts flow and can cause destructive floods costly to riv- erine communities. Freezeup jams...and reliable data on past ice jam events. The CRREL Ice Jam Database is such a com- pilation of freezeup and breakup ice jam events in the United

  7. IceChrono1: a probabilistic model to compute a common and optimal chronology for several ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrenin, Frédéric; Bazin, Lucie; Capron, Emilie; Landais, Amaëlle; Lemieux-Dudon, Bénédicte; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Polar ice cores provide exceptional archives of past environmental conditions. The dating of ice cores and the estimation of the age scale uncertainty are essential to interpret the climate and environmental records that they contain. It is however a complex problem which involves different methods. Here, we present IceChrono1, a new probabilistic model integrating various sources of chronological information to produce a common and optimized chronology for several ice cores, as well as its uncertainty. IceChrono1 is based on the inversion of three quantities: the surface accumulation rate, the Lock-In Depth (LID) of air bubbles and the thinning function. The chronological information integrated into the model are: models of the sedimentation process (accumulation of snow, densification of snow into ice and air trapping, ice flow), ice and air dated horizons, ice and air depth intervals with known durations, Δdepth observations (depth shift between synchronous events recorded in the ice and in the air) and finally air and ice stratigraphic links in between ice cores. The optimization is formulated as a least squares problem, implying that all densities of probabilities are assumed to be Gaussian. It is numerically solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and a numerical evaluation of the model's Jacobian. IceChrono follows an approach similar to that of the Datice model which was recently used to produce the AICC2012 chronology for 4 Antarctic ice cores and 1 Greenland ice core. IceChrono1 provides improvements and simplifications with respect to Datice from the mathematical, numerical and programming point of views. The capabilities of IceChrono is demonstrated on a case study similar to the AICC2012 dating experiment. We find results similar to those of Datice, within a few centuries, which is a confirmation of both IceChrono and Datice codes. We also test new functionalities with respect to the original version of Datice: observations as ice intervals

  8. Abrupt climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Ice Age——Comparative study of the Guliya ice core with the Greenland GRIP ice core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚檀栋

    1999-01-01

    Based on a comparative study of the Gtdiya ice core with the Greenland GRIP ice core, the abrupt climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Ice Age have been examined. The major stadial-interstadial events and 7 warm events (BrΦrump, Odderade, Oerel, Glinde, Hengelo, Denekamp, BΦlling) are consistent in the two ice cores. However, there are some unique features in the Guliya ice core records. The transition from warm to cold periods in the Guliya ice core is faster than that in the Greenland GRIP ice core. The magnitude of the climatic changes in the Guliya ice core is also larger than that in the Greenland GRIP ice core. Another significant feature of the Guliya ice core records is that there is a series of cycles of about 200 a from 18 to 35 kaBP. 22 warm events and 20 cold events with a fluctuation magnitude of 7℃ have been distinguished. The warm and cold events with a fluctuation magnitude within 3℃ are as high as 100. It is speculated that the abrupt climatic changes in different

  9. Ice-Accretion Test Results for Three Large-Scale Swept-Wing Models in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Malone, Adam M.; Paul, Benard P., Jr.; Woodard, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    Icing simulation tools and computational fluid dynamics codes are reaching levels of maturity such that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing conditions with increasingly less reliance on natural-icing flight testing and icing-wind-tunnel testing. Sufficient high-quality data to evaluate the performance of these tools is not currently available. The objective of this work was to generate a database of ice-accretion geometry that can be used for development and validation of icing simulation tools as well as for aerodynamic testing. Three large-scale swept wing models were built and tested at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The models represented the Inboard (20% semispan), Midspan (64% semispan) and Outboard stations (83% semispan) of a wing based upon a 65% scale version of the Common Research Model (CRM). The IRT models utilized a hybrid design that maintained the full-scale leading-edge geometry with a truncated afterbody and flap. The models were instrumented with surface pressure taps in order to acquire sufficient aerodynamic data to verify the hybrid model design capability to simulate the full-scale wing section. A series of ice-accretion tests were conducted over a range of total temperatures from -23.8 deg C to -1.4 deg C with all other conditions held constant. The results showed the changing ice-accretion morphology from rime ice at the colder temperatures to highly 3-D scallop ice in the range of -11.2 deg C to -6.3 deg C. Warmer temperatures generated highly 3-D ice accretion with glaze ice characteristics. The results indicated that the general scallop ice morphology was similar for all three models. Icing results were documented for limited parametric variations in angle of attack, drop size and cloud liquid-water content (LWC). The effect of velocity on ice accretion was documented for the Midspan and Outboard models for a limited number of test cases. The data suggest that

  10. Ground-penetrating radar reveals ice thickness and undisturbed englacial layers at Kilimanjaro's Northern Ice Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohleber, Pascal; Sold, Leo; Hardy, Douglas R.; Schwikowski, Margit; Klenk, Patrick; Fischer, Andrea; Sirguey, Pascal; Cullen, Nicolas J.; Potocki, Mariusz; Hoffmann, Helene; Mayewski, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Although its Holocene glacier history is still subject to debate, the ongoing iconic decline of Kilimanjaro's largest remaining ice body, the Northern Ice Field (NIF), has been documented extensively based on surface and photogrammetric measurements. The study presented here adds, for the first time, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data at centre frequencies of 100 and 200 MHz to investigate bed topography, ice thickness and internal stratigraphy at NIF. The direct comparison of the GPR signal to the visible glacier stratigraphy at NIF's vertical walls is used to validate ice thickness and reveals that the major internal reflections seen by GPR can be associated with dust layers. Internal reflections can be traced consistently within our 200 MHz profiles, indicating an uninterrupted, spatially coherent internal layering within NIF's central flat area. We show that, at least for the upper 30 m, it is possible to follow isochrone layers between two former NIF ice core drilling sites and a sampling site on NIF's vertical wall. As a result, these isochrone layers provide constraints for future attempts at linking age-depth information obtained from multiple locations at NIF. The GPR profiles reveal an ice thickness ranging between (6.1 ± 0.5) and (53.5 ± 1.0) m. Combining these data with a very high resolution digital elevation model we spatially extrapolate ice thickness and give an estimate of the total ice volume remaining at NIF's southern portion as (12.0 ± 0.3) × 106 m3.

  11. The Relationship of the Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children to Sex, Race, and Fluid-Crystallized Intelligence on the KAIT at Ages 11 to 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan S.; McLean, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Four typologies assessed by the Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children (C. Meisgeier and M. Murphy, 1987) (Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, Judging-Perceiving) were related to sex, race/ethnic group, intelligence level, and fluid/crystallized IQ discrepancy for 263 adolescents. The Thinking/Feeling index…

  12. Concentration of anti-Mullerian hormone and inhibin-B in relation to steroids and age in follicular fluid from small antral human follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Rosendahl, M.; Byskov, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ovaries surgically removed for fertility preservation served as a source of follicle fluid from human small antral follicles. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to measure intrafollicular concentrations of anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH), inhibin-B, progesterone, androstenedione, tes...

  13. Amniotic fluid water dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M H; van den Wijngaard, J P H M; van Gemert, M J C; Ross, M G

    2007-01-01

    Water arrives in the mammalian gestation from the maternal circulation across the placenta. It then circulates between the fetal water compartments, including the fetal body compartments, the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is created by the flow of fluid from the fetal lung and bladder. A major pathway for amniotic fluid resorption is fetal swallowing; however in many cases the amounts of fluid produced and absorbed do not balance. A second resorption pathway, the intramembranous pathway (across the amnion to the fetal circulation), has been proposed to explain the maintenance of normal amniotic fluid volume. Amniotic fluid volume is thus a function both of the amount of water transferred to the gestation across the placental membrane, and the flux of water across the amnion. Membrane water flux is a function of the water permeability of the membrane; available data suggests that the amnion is the structure limiting intramembranous water flow. In the placenta, the syncytiotrophoblast is likely to be responsible for limiting water flow across the placenta. In human tissues, placental trophoblast membrane permeability increases with gestational age, suggesting a mechanism for the increased water flow necessary in late gestation. Membrane water flow can be driven by both hydrostatic and osmotic forces. Changes in both osmotic/oncotic and hydrostatic forces in the placenta my alter maternal-fetal water flow. A normal amniotic fluid volume is critical for normal fetal growth and development. The study of amniotic fluid volume regulation may yield important insights into the mechanisms used by the fetus to maintain water homeostasis. Knowledge of these mechanisms may allow novel treatments for amniotic fluid volume abnormalities with resultant improvement in clinical outcome.

  14. Fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Pijush K; Dowling, David R

    2011-01-01

    Fluid mechanics, the study of how fluids behave and interact under various forces and in various applied situations-whether in the liquid or gaseous state or both-is introduced and comprehensively covered in this widely adopted text. Revised and updated by Dr. David Dowling, Fluid Mechanics, 5e is suitable for both a first or second course in fluid mechanics at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. Along with more than 100 new figures, the text has been reorganized and consolidated to provide a better flow and more cohesion of topics.Changes made to the

  15. Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Fetterer, F.; Knowles, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M.; Arbetter, T.

    2004-12-01

    Of all the recent observed changes in the Arctic environment, the reduction of sea ice cover stands out most prominantly. Several independent analysis have established a trend in Arctic ice extent of -3% per decade from the late 1970s to the late 1990s, with a more pronounced trend in summer. The overall downward trend in ice cover is characterized by strong interannual variability, with a low September ice extent in one year typically followed by recovery the next September. Having two extreme minimum years, such as what was observed in 2002 and 2003 is unusual. 2004 marks the third year in a row of substantially below normal sea ice cover in the Arctic. Early summer 2004 appeared unusual in terms of ice extent, with May a record low for the satellite period (1979-present) and June also exhibiting below normal ice extent. August 2004 extent is below that of 2003 and large reductions in ice cover are observed once again off the coasts of Siberia and Alaska and the Greenland Sea. Neither the 2002 or 2003 anomaly appeared to be strongly linked to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) during the preceding winter. Similarly, the AO was negative during winter 2003/2004. In the previous AO framework of Rigor et al (2002), a positive winter AO implied preconditioning of the ice cover to extensive summer decay. In this hypothesis, the AO does not explain all aspects of the recent decline in Arctic ice cover, such as the extreme minima of 2002, 2003 and 2004. New analysis by Rigor and Wallace (2004) suggest that the very positive AO state from 1989-1995 can explain the recent sea ice minima in terms of changes in the Arctic surface wind field associated with the previous high AO state. However, it is also reasonable to expect that a general decrease in ice thickness accompanying warming would manifest itself as greater sensitivity of the ice pack to wind forcings and albedo feedbacks. The decrease in multiyear ice and attendant changes in ice thickness

  16. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  17. Evaluation of argon ages and integrity of fluid-inclusion compositions: Stepwise noble gas heating experiments on 1.87 Ga alunite from Tapajós Province, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.; Juliani, Caetano

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative analyses are reported for active (N2, CH4, CO, CO2, H2, O2, HF, HCl, H2S, SO2) and noble (He, Ar, Ne) gases released by crushing and step heating of magmatic-hydrothermal alunite from the Tapajós gold province in Brazil. This is the oldest known alunite (40Ar/39Ar age of 1.87 Ga), and because it has undergone minimal postdepositional thermal or tectonic strain, it is excellent material to test the retention of gas species in fluid inclusions and within the crystal structure over geological time. The gas compositions of a single sample, in combination with Ar age-spectrum data derived from stepwise heating of 10 related samples, have been used to constrain the limits of modification of primary gas compositions in fluid inclusions and the possible extent of the loss of radiogenic Ar. The observed variations in the isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar released by stepwise heating have been used to identify the residence sites and determine the diffusion coefficients of the gases in the mineral. The data suggest that the only modification to primary gas compositions after entrapment in fluid inclusions and formation of the mineral is due to radiogenic and nucleogenic processes which affect the noble gas isotopic compositions.

  18. Experimental investigation of ice slurry heat transfer in horizontal tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per; Palm, Bjoern; Melinder, Aake [Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Heat transfer of ice slurry flow based on ethanol-water mixture in a circular horizontal tube has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethanol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The heat transfer tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 22% depending on test performed. Measured heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry are found to be higher than those for single phase fluid, especially for laminar flow conditions and high ice mass fractions where the heat transfer is increased with a factor 2 in comparison to the single phase flow. In addition, experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry flow were compared to the analytical results, based on the correlation by Sieder and Tate for laminar single phase regime, by Dittus-Boelter for turbulent single phase regime and empirical correlation by Christensen and Kauffeld derived for laminar/turbulent ice slurry flow in circular horizontal tubes. It was found that the classical correlation proposed by Sieder and Tate for laminar forced convection in smooth straight circular ducts cannot be used for heat transfer prediction of ice slurry flow since it strongly underestimates measured values, while, for the turbulent flow regime the simple Dittus-Boelter relation predicts the heat transfer coefficient of ice slurry flow with high accuracy but only up to an ice mass fraction of 10% and Re{sub cf} > 2300 regardless of imposed heat flux. For higher ice mass fractions and regardless of the flow regime, the correlation proposed by Christensen and Kauffeld gives good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  19. Kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Paula

    Spin ice in magnetic pyrochlore oxides is a peculiar magnetic state. Like ordinary water ice, these materials are in apparent violation with the third law of thermodynamics, which dictates that the entropy of a system in thermal equilibrium vanishes as its temperature approaches absolute zero. In ice, a "zero-point" entropy is retained down to low temperatures thanks to a high number of low-energy positions of hydrogen ions associated with the Bernal-Fowler ice-rules. Spins in pyrochlore oxides Ho2Ti 2O7 and Dy2Ti2O7 exhibit a similar degeneracy of ground states and thus also have a sizable zero-point entropy. A recent discovery of excitations carrying magnetic charges in pyrochlore spin ice adds another interesting dimension to these magnets. This thesis is devoted to a theoretical study of a two-dimensional version of spin ice whose spins reside on kagome, a lattice of corner-sharing triangles. It covers two aspects of this frustrated classical spin system: the dynamics of artificial spin ice in a network of magnetic nanowires and the thermodynamics of crystalline spin ice. Magnetization dynamics in artificial spin ice is mediated by the emission, propagation and absorption of domain walls in magnetic nanowires. The dynamics shows signs of self-organized behavior such as avalanches. The theoretical model compares favorably to recent experiments. The thermodynamics of the microscopic version of spin ice on kagome is examined through analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The results show that, in addition to the high-temperature paramagnetic phase and the low-temperature phase with magnetic order, spin ice on kagome may have an intermediate phase with fluctuating spins and ordered magnetic charges. This work is concluded with a calculation of the entropy of kagome spin ice at zero temperature when one of the sublattices is pinned by an applied magnetic field and the system breaks up into independent spin chains, a case of dimensional reduction.

  20. An ice lithography instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  1. Characterization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings as deicing and anti-icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Akihito; Morita, Katsuaki; Konno, Akihisa; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    Anti-icing is necessary in various fields, such as aeronautics, roads, power lines, ships, and architectures. Deicing fluids, and sometimes hot water, work to prevent from icing. Due to environmental issue, deicing fluids are not always welcome to use. We study hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings for anti-icing. By coating these to a target surface, it prevents icing without damaging the environment. We present a characterization method of hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings for deicing and anti-icing. We provide a temperature-control room to create an icing condition, such as -10 to 0 degrees C. Under the controlled room, the contact angle measurement as well as the force measurement is employed. Total 15 coatings are characterized. Based on the tests of all coatings, we propose a combined coating from some characterized ones.

  2. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  3. What Lies Below a Martian Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version This image (top) taken by the Shallow Radar instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals the layers of ice, sand and dust that make up the north polar ice cap on Mars. It is the most detailed look to date at the insides of this ice cap. The colored map below the radar picture shows the topography of the corresponding Martian terrain (red and white represent higher ground, and green and yellow lower). The radar image reveals four never-before-seen thick layers of ice and dust separated by layers of nearly pure ice. According to scientists, these thick ice-free layers represent approximately one-million-year-long cycles of climate change on Mars caused by variations in the planet's tilted axis and its eccentric orbit around the sun. Adding up the entire stack of ice gives an estimated age for the north polar ice cap of about 4 million years a finding that agrees with previous theoretical estimates. The ice cap is about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) thick. The radar picture also shows that the boundary between the ice layers and the surface of Mars underneath is relatively flat (bottom white line on the right). This implies that the surface of Mars is not sagging, or bending, under the weight of the ice cap and this, in turn, suggests that the planet's lithosphere, a combination of the crust and the strong parts of the upper mantle, is thicker than previously thought. A thicker lithosphere on Mars means that temperatures increase more gradually with depth toward the interior. Temperatures warm enough for water to be liquid are therefore deeper than previously thought. Likewise, if liquid water does exist in aquifers below the surface of Mars, and if there are any organisms living in that water, they would have to be located deeper in the planet. The topography data are from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter, which was flown on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor mission. NPLD stands

  4. [Aging effect on mechanical properties in fluid resin. (Part 3) Affection of residual monomer on the surface morphology after tensile test by microscopic observation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, A

    1981-04-01

    Affection of residual monomer on the surface morphology after tensile test was observed by an scanning microscope. Evaporation or leaching of the monomer gave big influence on the morphology of pearls and matrix. The observation suggested that the residual monomer existed mainly in the matrix. When the residual monomer disappeared, the surface morphology did not change by tensile load. It is the most important point to get good denture with fluid resin that we could decrease the residual monomer as possible.

  5. Amery ice shelf DEM and its marine ice distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Amery Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf in East Antarctica. A new DEM was generated for this ice shelf, using kriging to interpolate the data from ICESat altimetry and the AIS-DEM. The ice thickness distribution map is converted from the new DEM, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The Amery Ice Shelf marine ice, up to 230 m thick, is concentrated in the northwest of the ice shelf. The volume of the marine ice is 2.38×103 km3 and accounts for about 5.6% of the shelf volume.

  6. Ice Tank Experiments Highlight Changes in Sea Ice Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy P.; DeCarolis, Giacomo; Ehlert, Iris; Notz, Dirk; Evers, Karl-Ulrich; Jochmann, Peter; Gerland, Sebastian; Nicolaus, Marcel; Hughes, Nick; Kern, Stefan; de la Rosa, Sara; Smedsrud, Lars; Sakai, Shigeki; Shen, Hayley; Wadhams, Peter

    2009-03-01

    With the current and likely continuing reduction of summer sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, the predominant mechanism of sea ice formation in the Arctic is likely to change in the future. Although substantial new ice formation occurred under preexisting ice in the past, the fraction of sea ice formation in open water likely will increase significantly. In open water, sea ice formation starts with the development of small ice crystals, called frazil ice, which are suspended in the water column [World Meteorological Organization, 1985]. Under quiescent conditions, these crystals accumulate at the surface to form an unbroken ice sheet known in its early stage as nilas. Under turbulent conditions, caused by wind and waves, frazil ice continues to grow and forms into a thick, soupy mixture called grease ice. Eventually the frazil ice will coalesce into small, rounded pieces known as pancake ice, which finally consolidate into an ice sheet with the return of calm conditions. This frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle is currently frequently observed in the Antarctic [Lange et al., 1989]. The cycle normally occurs in regions that have a significant stretch of open water, because this allows for the formation of larger waves and hence increased turbulence. Given the increase of such open water in the Arctic Ocean caused by retreating summer sea ice, the frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle may also become the dominant ice formation process during freezeup in the Arctic.

  7. Ice-on-ice impact experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Manabu; Iijima, Yu-Ichi; Arakawa, Masahiko; Okimura, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Akio; Maeno, Norikazu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1995-02-01

    Impact experiments, cratering and fragmentation, on water ice were performed in order to test the scaling laws previously constructed on rocks and sands for studying the collision process in the planetary history. The installation of a vertical gas gun in a cold room at -18°C (255 K) made it possible to use a projectile of water ice and to get the detailed mass distribution of ice fragments. Experimental results indicated the necessity for large modification of those scaling laws. Material dependence was investigated by using projectiles of ice, aluminum, and polycarbonate. Differences were observed in the morphology and efficiencies of cratering and in the energies required to initiate the fragmentation. Moreover, an abrupt increase of cratering efficiency, suggesting a change of excavation mechanism, was found at a critical diameter of spalled crater. The mass (size) distribution of small ice fragments obeyed a power law with an exponent significantly larger than that in rocks. The exponent was the same as that in Saturn's ring particles estimated from the data by the microwave occultation, which indicates a collisional disruption ring origin.

  8. Small Airframe Manufacturer's Icing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the icing effects, risk mitigation practices, and icing certifications for various Cessna small aircraft models. NASA's role in the development of simulation tools for icing certifications is also discussed.

  9. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  10. Fossil genes and microbes in the oldest ice on Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Bidle, Kay D.; Lee, Sanghoon; Marchant, David R.; Falkowski, Paul G

    2007-01-01

    Although the vast majority of ice that formed on the Antarctic continent over the past 34 million years has been lost to the oceans, pockets of ancient ice persist in the Dry Valleys of the Transantarctic Mountains. Here we report on the potential metabolic activity of microbes and the state of community DNA in ice derived from Mullins and upper Beacon Valleys. The minimum age of the former is 100 ka, whereas that of the latter is ≈8 Ma, making it the oldest known ice on Earth. In both sample...

  11. Performance Analysis of Organic Rankine-vapor Compression Ice Maker Utilizing Food Industry Waste Heat

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Hu; Yuanshu Cao; Weibin Ma

    2015-01-01

    To develop the organic Rankine-vapor compression ice maker driven by food industry exhaust gases and engine cooling water, an organic Rankine-vapor compression cycle system was employed for ice making and a thermodynamic model was developed and the effects of working fluid types, hot water temperature and condensation temperature on the system performance were analyzed and the ice making capacity from unit mass hot water and unit power waste heat were evaluated. The calculated results show th...

  12. High-resolution paleoclimatology of the Santa Barbara Basin during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and early Little Ice Age based on diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David B.; Hendy, Ingrid L.

    2015-01-01

    Diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages documented in a high-resolution time series spanning 800 to 1600 AD in varved sediment recovered in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC (34°16.845’ N, 120°02.332’ W, water depth 588 m) from the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) reveal that SBB surface water conditions during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the early part of the Little Ice Age (LIA) were not extreme by modern standards, mostly falling within one standard deviation of mean conditions during the pre anthropogenic interval of 1748 to 1900. No clear differences between the character of MCA and the early LIA conditions are apparent. During intervals of extreme droughts identified by terrigenous proxy scanning XRF analyses, diatom and silicoflagellate proxies for coastal upwelling typically exceed one standard deviation above mean values for 1748-1900, supporting the hypothesis that droughts in southern California are associated with cooler (or La Niña-like) sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Increased percentages of diatoms transported downslope generally coincide with intervals of increased siliciclastic flux to the SBB identified by scanning XRF analyses. Diatom assemblages suggest only two intervals of the MCA (at ~897 to 922 and ~1151 to 1167) when proxy SSTs exceeded one standard deviation above mean values for 1748 to 1900. Conversely, silicoflagellates imply extreme warm water events only at ~830 to 860 (early MCA) and ~1360 to 1370 (early LIA) that are not supported by the diatom data. Silicoflagellates appear to be more suitable for characterizing average climate during the 5 to 11 year-long sample intervals studied in the SPR0901-02KC core than diatoms, probably because diatom relative abundances may be dominated by seasonal blooms of a particular year.

  13. Climatically-driven rockfalls in high-alpine steep rockwalls: the North side of the Aiguilles de Chamonix (Mont Blanc massif) since the end of the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2010-05-01

    Rockfall is one of the main process that affect rockwalls, with related risks for people and infrastructures. Nevertheless, the process and its relation with the permafrost degradation remain insufficiently understood, partly due to the lack of data. By comparing old, recent and present photos, and using geomorphological field data, we propose an inventory of the main (volume > 500 m3) rockfalls that affected the North face of the Aiguilles de Chamonix since the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA, c. 1860 AD). We documented 42 rockfalls on this emblematic ridge of the Mont-Blanc massif, ranging in volume from 500 m3 to 65,000 m3 (total volume: 390,000 ± 60,000 m3). The affected rockwalls are mostly with N to NW aspect, ranging in elevation from 2615 m to 3500 m a.s.l.. This suggests that the area is likely characterised with permafrost, of which degradation could trigger a part of the surveyed rockfalls. We observe a very good correlation between rockfall frequency and the air temperature: periods of years with the highest temperatures between 1860 and 2009 AD experienced the highest frequency; 70 % of rockfalls occurred during the two last decades, characterized by an accelerated increase of the warming in the Alps. Warm summers in 1947, 1976, 1983, and 2003, experienced the highest rockfall frequency, which was maximal during the 2003 Summer heatwave. Average elevation of rockfall scars is 3130 m a.s.l., suggesting that the lower limit of permafrost was affected, where degradation is active. For the most part, triggering of the surveyed post-LIA rockfalls in the Aiguilles de Chamonix was probably controlled by the current permafrost degradation.

  14. Growth dynamics of tree-line and lake-shore Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. in the central Scandinavian Mountains during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the early Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W Linderholm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trees growing at their altitudinal or latitudinal distribution in Fennoscandia have been widely used to reconstruct warm season temperatures, and the region hosts some of the world’s longest tree-ring chronologies. These multi-millennial long chronologies have mainly been built from tree remains found in lakes (subfossil wood from lake-shore trees. We used a unique dataset of Scots pine tree-ring data collected from wood remains found on a mountain slope in the central Scandinavian Mountains, yielding a chronology spanning over much of the last 1200 years. This data was compared with a local subfossil wood chronology with the aim to 1 describe growth variability in two environments during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA and the early Little Ice Age (LIA, and 2 investigate differences in growth characteristics during these contrasting periods. It was shown that the local tree-line during both the MCA and early LIA was almost 150 m higher that at present. Based on living pines from the two environments, tree-line pine growth was strongly associated with mid-summer temperatures, while the lake-shore trees showed an additional response to summer precipitation. During the MCA, regarded to be a period of favourable climate in the region, the tree-ring data from both environments showed strong coherency and moderate growth variability. In the early LIA, the two chronologies were less coherent, with the tree-line chronology showing more variability, suggesting different growth responses in the two environments during this period of less favourable growing conditions. Our results indicate that tree-ring width chronologies mainly based on lake-shore trees may need to be re-evaluated.

  15. Ultrasonic techniques for fluids characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Povey, Malcolm J W

    1997-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of ultrasonic techniques for the characterization of fluids. Focusing on ultrasonic velocimetry, the author covers the basic topics and techniques necessaryfor successful ultrasound measurements on emulsions, dispersions, multiphase media, and viscoelastic/viscoplastic materials. Advanced techniques such as scattering, particle sizing, and automation are also presented. As a handbook for industrial and scientific use, Ultrasonic Techniques for Fluids Characterization is an indispensable guide to chemists and chemical engineers using ultrasound for research or process monitoring in the chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotechnology,and fuels industries. Key Features * Appeals to anyone using ultrasound to study fluids * Provides the first detailed description of the ultrasound profiling technique for dispersions * Describes new techniques for measuring phase transitions and nucleation, such as water/ice and oil/fat * Presents the l...

  16. Ice cores and SeaRISE: What we do (and don't) know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Ice core analyses are needed in SeaRISE to learn what the West Antarctic ice sheet and other marine ice sheets were like in the past, what climate changes led to their present states, and how they behave. The major results of interest to SeaRISE from previous ice core analyses in West Antarctic are that the end of the last ice age caused temperature and accumulation rate increases in inland regions, leading to ice sheet thickening followed by thinning to the present.

  17. Theory of ice-skating

    CERN Document Server

    Berre, Martine Le

    2015-01-01

    Almost frictionless skating on ice relies on a thin layer of melted water insulating mechanically the blade of the skate from ice. Using the basic equations of fluid mechanics and Stefan law, we derive a set of two coupled equations for the thickness of the film and the length of contact, a length scale which cannot be taken as its value at rest. The analytical study of these equations allows to define a small a-dimensional parameter depending on the longitudinal coordinate which can be neglected everywhere except close to the contact points at the front and the end of the blade, where a boundary layer solution is given. This solution provides without any calculation the order of magnitude of the film thickness, and its dependence with respect to external parameters like the velocity and mass of the skater and the radius of profile and bite angle of the blade, in good agreement with the numerical study. Moreover this solution also shows that a lubricating water layer of macroscopic thickness always exists for...

  18. Slush Fund: Modeling the Multiphase Physics of Oceanic Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    melting events will be discussed for terrestrial ice. The impact of fluid motion within the mushy layer on nutrient transport and habitability will be discussed. Results from the model's application to icy moon environments will be presented, highlighting ice shell composition, thickness, thermodynamics, and role in potential habitability.

  19. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. Sometimes ... clear or white shiny rock (called a crystal). Meth powder can be eaten or snorted up the ...

  20. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  1. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  2. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  3. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  4. Testing The Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The country’s fourth scientific expedition tothe North Pole starts OBSERVATION STATIONS:Members of China’s fourth Arctic expedition set up polar bear-proof "apple houses" on the ice surface of the Arctic Ocean on August 8 The Chinese ice breaker Xuelong

  5. Rheology of glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, K. C.; Alley, R. B.; Thomas, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new method for calculating the stress field in bounded ice shelves is used to compare strain rate and deviatoric stress on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The analysis shows that strain rate (per second) increases as the third power of deviatoric stress (in newtons/sq meter), with a constant of proportionality equal to 2.3 x 10 to the -25th.

  6. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...... of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...... reveals that the shear thickening fluid shows an instability in a shear flow for some regime and exhibits the shear thickening oscillation (i.e., the oscillatory shear flow alternating between the thickened and the relaxed states). The results of numerical simulations are presented for one- and two...

  7. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. Here we analyse genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000–7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3–...

  8. Did ice-age bovids spread tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce M.; Martin, Larry D.

    2006-11-01

    Pathognomonic metacarpal undermining is a skeletal pathology that has been associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovids. Postcranial artiodactyl, perissodactyl, and carnivore skeletons were examined in major university and museum collections of North America and Europe for evidence of this and other pathology potentially attributable to tuberculosis. Among nonproboscidean mammals from pre-Holocene North America, bone lesions indicative of tuberculosis were restricted to immigrant bovids from Eurasia. No bone lesions compatible with diagnosis of tuberculosis were found in large samples of other pre-Holocene (164 Oligocene, 397 Miocene, and 1,041 Plio Pleistocene) North American mammals, including 114 antilocaprids. Given the unchanged frequency of bovid tubercular disease during the Pleistocene, it appears that most did not die from the disease but actually reached an accommodation with it (as did the mastodon) (Rothschild and Laub 2006). Thus, they were sufficiently long-lived to assure greater spread of the disease. The relationships of the proboscidean examples need further study, but present evidence suggests a Holarctic spread of tuberculosis during the Pleistocene, with bovids acting as vectors. While the role of other animals in the transmission of tuberculosis could be considered, the unique accommodation achieved by bovids and mastodons makes them the likely “culprits” in its spread.

  9. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. Here we analyse genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000–7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3......–6% to around 2%, consistent with natural selection against Neanderthal variants in modern humans. Whereas there is no evidence of the earliest modern humans in Europe contributing to the genetic composition of present-day Europeans, all individuals between ~37,000 and ~14,000 years ago descended from a single...... ~19,000 years ago. During the major warming period after ~14,000 years ago, a genetic component related to present-day Near Easterners became widespread in Europe. These results document how population turnover and migration have been recurring themes of European prehistory....

  10. Rotating ice blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  11. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  12. Ice storm 1998 : lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, J. [Eastern Ontario Model Forest, Kemptville, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presented details of a partnership formed in response to the ice storm of 1998, which caused extensive damage to trees in woodlots and urban settings in eastern Ontario and western Quebec. The aim of the Ice Storm Forest Recovery Group was to assist in the recovery of eastern forests, collect information on the extent of the damage to trees as well as contribute to the development of assistance programs for woodlot owners and municipalities. In response to the group's request, an initial aerial survey was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources to map the extent of the damage in eastern Ontario, which was followed by a more scientific survey with the Canadian Forest Service through the development of a flying grid pattern to observe the status of trees, followed by extensive ground checks. Damage was variable, depending on tree species, stand age and composition, management practices, wind direction, topography and ice deposition patterns. A summary of the severity of damage indicated that conifers suffered less than hardwoods. Consultants were hired to prepare news releases and extension notes to the public in order to provide information for the caring of trees. Various educational workshops were held which attracted large numbers of landowners and homeowners. A literature review was undertaken to produce a summary of current published knowledge covering the effects of storms and ice damage to trees and forests. Science efforts were published in a series of papers, and financial assistance programs were then organized by governmental agencies. It was concluded that cooperation between all agencies, groups and levels of government is needed in order to coordinate effective emergency strategies. 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  13. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  15. Phase Relations and Properties of Salty ices VI and VII: Implications for Solar System Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I.; Manning, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ice VI and ice VII may be important in the interiors of Europa, Ganymede, Callisto and Titan. Oceans and interior pore waters in these bodies likely contain dissolved salts. To address the role of salt on ice VI and ice VII, we investigated phase equilibria in the system H2O -NaCl at 1 molal (5.5 wt%) NaCl in an externally heated diamond-anvil cell. Phase identifications were made by optical microscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy. Experiments were conducted at 22-150°C and up to 5 GPa by allowing the cell to thermally equilibrate at a given temperature and then varying pressure isothermally while observing phase changes. The liquidus curves of ice VI and ice VII in a 5.5 wt% NaCl solution were determined. Melting was observed from 22 to 80°C (ice VI) and from 35 to 150°C (ice VII). Both melting curves are steeper than the respective NaCl-free curves, indicating that the freezing-point depression at this bulk composition increases with pressure. The intersection of the two liquidus curves indicates that VI-VII-liquid triple point is shifted toward lower T and higher P relative to pure H2O. The 5.5 wt% NaCl bulk composition crystallizes into a single solid phase of NaCl-bearing ice VI or ice VII solid solution over the investigated T range (the subscript 'ss' indicates solid solution). Large single crystals of ice VIss or ice VIIss can also be grown by slow compression of the cell from near-liquidus conditions to the solidus. Raman spectra of these crystals clearly show zoning in these crystals. The zoning persists for days at 22°C, indicating relatively slow Na+ and Cl- diffusivity. The large depression of the freezing point in a 1 molal NaCl solution has important implications for the oceans and interiors of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Salty fluids may remain stable to much greater depth than expected. This would promote extensive hydrothermal metamorphism of the silicate interiors. If not limited to ice VI and VII, this behavior may suppress

  16. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-07

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history.

  17. Binary Ice Technology - Processes and Applications for Energy Management of Buildings (Binäistechnologie - Verfahren und Anwendungen in der Technischen Gebäudeausrüstung)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    Binary Ice has stunning properties. Such liquid ice can be pumped and stored in a simple way, the fluid is energy efficient, has excellent heat transfer properties and is very well suited for air conditioning and air dehumidification. Furthermore Binary Ice is non toxic. Smaller pipes, less pumping...

  18. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  19. Onset of convective instabilities in under-ice melt ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Sílvia C; Goyeau, Benoît; Gobin, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    The onset of double-diffusive natural convection in under-ice melt ponds is investigated through a linear stability analysis. The three-layer configuration is composed by a fluid layer (melt pond) overlying a saturated porous medium (ice matrix), which in turn overlies another fluid layer (under-ice melt pond). Water density inversion is taken into account by adopting a density profile with a quadratic temperature dependence and a linear concentration dependence. We show that the key parameter affecting stability is the depth of the ice matrix, while the depths of the upper and lower fluid layers play a marginal role. A Hopf bifurcation is observed in the whole range of parameters studied, and the size of the convection cells depends on ice permeability. The influence of the external temperature gradient is investigated by means of the definition of an extra thermal parameter accounting for the relative position of the density maximum. It is shown that convection is favored by larger temperature gradients, which occur during Arctic summer.

  20. Crystals and fabrics analysis of an Arctic thermal growth multi-year ice sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志军; 康建成; 张运良

    2002-01-01

    One of sea ice core samples was taken from Arctic by the First Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition Team in 1999. 20 vertical and 2 horizontal ice sections were cut out of the ice core sample 2.22 m in length, which covered the ice sheet from surface to bottom except losses for during sampling and section cutting. From the observation and analysis of the fabrics and crystals along the depth of the ice core sample, followings were found. Whole ice sheet consists of columnar, refrozen clastic pieces, granular, columnar, refrozen clastic pieces, granular, columnar and refrozen clastic pieces. This indicates that the ice core sample was 3-year old, and the ice sheet surface thawed and the melt water flowed into ice sheet during summer. Hence, the annual energy balance in Arctic can be determined by the ice sheet surface thawing in summer, and bottom growth in winter. The thickness of the ice sheet is kept constantly at a certain position based on the corresponding climate and ocean conditions; A new kind of hydrodynamic-effected ice crystal was found in the analysis and was defined as refrozen clastic pieces. The newly refrozen clastic pieces are explained as that they belong to the ocean dynamic broken ice pieces that come into contact with ice sheet due to buoyancy and move with the whole ice sheet. While these pieces moved to a colder zone, they were refrozen. Therefore, its structure is different from that of first-year ice and also can explain why there are typical Arctic sea ice micro-algae in the ice core sample. The age of the ice sheet is determined to be from 1997 winter to 1999 summer.

  1. Ice flow Modelling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Tangaa

    simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using ice sheet models offers the possibility of deriving reconstructions of past ice sheet topography, flow and extent, consistent with the dynamics of ice flow and the imposed climate forcing. The large-scale response of the ice sheet modelled by such approaches can...... core derived temperature and precipitation histories have a long history of being used in studies of the past evolution of the Greenland ice sheet, acting as climatic forcing of the ice sheet models. However, the conversion from the isotopic records to past temperatures remain challenging, owing...... to both uncertain processes and depositional histories. Using five different temperature reconstructions derived from isotope records of Greenlandic ice cores, the influence of the paleo records on the simulated ice sheet was investigated using a high-resolution, large-scale ice sheet model (PISM...

  2. Laboratory Studies of Sea-Ice-Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monty, J.; Meylan, M. H.; Babanin, A. V.; Toffoli, A.; Bennetts, L.

    2016-12-01

    A world-first facility for studying the Marginal Ice Zone has been constructed in the Michell Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Melbourne. A 14m long wave tank (0.75m wide, 0.6m deep) resides in a freezer, where air temperature can be controlled down to -15C. This permits the freezing of the water surface. Large stainless steel ice-making trays (up to 4 m long) are also available to create ice of desired thickness and microstructure, which can be lowered onto the water surface. A computer controlled wave generator is capable of creating waves of any desired form. The temperature of the water in the tank can also be controlled between 2 and 30C. The tank frame is constructed of marine-treated wood and the entire tank is glass and acrylic, permitting the use of corrosive fluids, such as salt water. Here we present the first laboratory experiments of break-up of a controlled thickness, fresh water ice sheet impacted by regular and JONSWAP spectrum surface waves. The geometry of the resultant ice-floes is measured with high-resolution, time-resolved imaging, providing the crucial data of floe size distribution. Initial observations show that, in the case of high steepness waves, the primary mechanisms of ice break-up at the ice edge are overwash and rafting, both of which put weight on the ice interior to the ice-water interface. This additional weight (and impact in the case of rafting) breaks more ice, which allows overwash and rafting deeper into the ice sheet, breaking more ice and so on. For lower steepness waves, overwash and rafting are still present but far less significant. Finally, results of vertical ice movement using laser height gauges will be presented showing the attenuation of waves into an ice sheet and through a pack of ice floes. These results are compared with field data and theory available (e.g. Squire & Moore, Nature, 1980 and Kohout et al., Nature, 2014).

  3. Thermophysical Properties of Aqueous Solutions Used as Secondary Working Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Melinder, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Secondary working fluids (secondary refrigerants, heat transfer fluids, antifreezes, brines) have long been used in various indirect re-frigeration and heat pump systems. Aqueous solutions (water solu-tions) have long been used as single phase (liquid only) secondary working fluids for cooling in supermarkets, ice rinks, heat recovery systems, heat pumps and other applications. However, aqueous solutions are increasingly used also for freezers in supermarkets and other applications in low tem...

  4. The seeding of ice algal blooms in Arctic pack ice: The multiyear ice seed repository hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lasse M.; Laney, Samuel R.; Duarte, Pedro; Kauko, Hanna M.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Mundy, Christopher J.; Rösel, Anja; Meyer, Amelie; Itkin, Polona; Cohen, Lana; Peeken, Ilka; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Róźańska-Pluta, Magdalena; Wiktor, Józef; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Hop, Haakon; Assmy, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    During the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition (N-ICE2015) from January to June 2015 the pack ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard was studied during four drifts between 83° and 80°N. This pack ice consisted of a mix of second year, first year, and young ice. The physical properties and ice algal community composition was investigated in the three different ice types during the winter-spring-summer transition. Our results indicate that algae remaining in sea ice that survived the summer melt season are subsequently trapped in the upper layers of the ice column during winter and may function as an algal seed repository. Once the connectivity in the entire ice column is established, as a result of temperature-driven increase in ice porosity during spring, algae in the upper parts of the ice are able to migrate toward the bottom and initiate the ice algal spring bloom. Furthermore, this algal repository might seed the bloom in younger ice formed in adjacent leads. This mechanism was studied in detail for the dominant ice diatom Nitzschia frigida. The proposed seeding mechanism may be compromised due to the disappearance of older ice in the anticipated regime shift toward a seasonally ice-free Arctic Ocean.

  5. The convective dynamics of a suspension of ice crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David; Wells, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    The formation of solid crystals from a liquid cooled beneath its freezing temperature occurs in a wide range of environmental and industrial situations, such as in the formation of so-called ``frazil ice'' in rivers and the polar oceans. Eddies in the fluid flow act to keep the crystals suspended, while the relative buoyancy of the crystals causes them to rise, eventually sedimenting to form a layer of ice, called grease ice in the oceans. Here, we consider the interaction between the fluid dynamics of a suspension of crystals and the thermodynamics of phase change governing the growth and melting of the crystals. The crystals grow when the local temperature lies below the freezing temperature and melt when it lies above. We explore simplified scenarios that illustrate the important features of this multiphase flow and the effect of this ``active suspension'' on heat transfer. This research is funded by the John Fell Oxford University Press (OUP) Research Fund.

  6. 趣话ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奉越

    2002-01-01

    在英语中,ice是一个很普通的词,它的基本含义是“冰,冰块”。如:The sportsman slipped on the ice and one of his legs was broken.(这个运动员在冰上滑倒了,一条腿摔断了。)它还可指“冰淇淋”,相当于ice cream。如.After having two ices I felt uncomfortable.

  7. Stripping with dry ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  8. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  9. Ice nucleation terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.